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Coachella Valley and Morongo Basin

Publication: November 2019 Publisher Cindy Melland VP of Sales and Marketing Deb Geissler Advertising Manager Kimberly Brucks Marketing Specialist Judy Moore Bob Cloyd Brandi Larson Cynthia Chavez Candle Bosch Cindy Frontado

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Advertising Assistant Joyce Terceira Layout and Content Specialist Jose De La Cruz Graphic Designers Teri Aitken Mary Rider

Distribution All delivery inquiries should be directed to Ahkto Distribution at 760-459-4204 or distribution@ahkto.com 760-365-3315 or 760-820-2610 Titles registered and all contents copyright 2019 by the Hi-Desert Publishing Co. All rights reserved. A PRODUCT OF

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in this issue 4 Managing diabetes during the holiday season.

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The power of positivity: simple tips to change your life.

5 Reasons kids should play outside more.

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Choose physical therapy for safe pain management.

6 Self-care tips to improve your well-being.

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Questions to ask when planning for long-term care.

7 Be prepared: three tips to help you get the care you need.

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How to avoid holiday temptations.

8 Invest in your health: it’s all about a state of mind and body.

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Peanut-Powered Protein: nutritious ideas for flavor-filled family meals.

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Healthy Living

Managing Diabetes

During the holiday season

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he holiday season is synonymous with many things, including food. Family gatherings and holiday office parties wouldn’t be the same without great food. Food plays such a significant role during the holiday season that many people are worried about overindulging. Some celebrants can afford to overindulge, while others must resist temptation. Diabetics fall into the latter category, as the festive mood of the season does not mean people with diabetes can throw dietary caution to the wind. With the holiday season upon us, diabetics can heed the following tips from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to help them stay on a healthy track. Stick to your normal routine. While the holiday season can be unpredictable, the CDC advises diabetics stick to their normal routines as closely as possible. Because holiday guests cannot control food served to them at family gatherings or parties, the CDC recommends diabetics offer to bring a healthy, diabetic-friendly dish along to any parties. In addition, don’t skip meals during the day in anticipation of a large holiday meal. Doing so makes it hard to control blood sugar levels. Be extra careful with alcohol. Alcohol is served or readily available at many holiday gatherings, and many people overindulge because of the festive mood of the season. Overindulging in alcohol is dangerous for anyone, but diabetics must be especially mindful of their alcohol consumption. Alcohol can lower blood sugar and interact with diabetes medicines. Diabetics who want to enjoy a holiday libation should keep their alcohol consumption to a minimum. Eat slowly. Eating slowly can benefit anyone during the holiday season. Eating at a leisurely pace gives diners’ brains ample time to signal that their bodies are full. By eating quickly, diners may be eating more calories than they hoped to eat, and that can lead to uncomfortable feelings of fullness after a meal. Diabetics who can slow down their eating are less likely to overindulge in less healthy holiday foods that can affect their blood sugar levels. Remain active. The holiday season can be hectic, as adults often must juggle extraordinarily busy social schedules with the responsibilities of everyday life. Many people sacrifice time at the gym to ease the burden of hectic holiday schedules, but diabetics must resist that temptation. The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases notes that routine physical activity helps diabetics keep their blood glucose levels in their target range. Physical activity also helps the hormone insulin absorb glucose into all of the body’s cells for energy. That extra energy boost can help diabetics fend off holiday-related fatigue. Diabetics face a lot of temptation come the holiday season. But with the right plan of action in place, men and women with diabetes can enjoy a healthy holiday season.

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Wellness

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Reasons kids should play outside more

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hether it’s dance lessons, computer projects, art class or yoga, kids these days are busy bees. And while such activities are enriching and fun, experts say that many kids aren’t spending enough time doing something much simpler and every bit as important as structured programming: playing outdoors. “Finding time for the kids to play outside can be such a challenge for parents,” says Keri Wilmot, a pediatric occupational therapist and an expert contributor to TheGeniusofPlay.org. “As a parent I worry about ‘stranger danger’ or whether my kids will be able to navigate social issues on their own. Without spontaneity, playtime has lost some of it’s fun.” Outdoor play is necessary for healthy child development, according to The Genius of Play. The initiative, whose mission is to raise awareness about the importance of play and help parents make play a critical part of raising their kids, is sharing five benefits of unstructured outdoor playtime: Physical Development Research has shown that physically active kids tend to be leaner and healthier, while an inactive childhood can lead to a sedentary (and likely unhealthy) lifestyle in adulthood. Furthermore, physical play builds gross and fine motor skills necessary for success in school and beyond. Hanging from the monkey bars, for instance, helps kids develop the hand muscles needed to grip a pencil. Risk-Taking Through outdoor play, children are given the opportunity to step outside their comfort zones and try new things. While taking risks won’t always lead to success on the first try, moments like a first bike ride without training wheels, or the first trip down the big slide in the playground, are critical for building the confidence and resilience needed to pursue a future career, start a business, or handle life’s many challenges. Social Skills Childhood games played outdoors can help build social skills and teach kids to follow directions. From games as simple as tag, to those with more complicated rules, like “Kick the Can,” “Capture the Flag,” and sports like soccer and basketball, communication, teamwork and other important social skills are developed during outdoor play. Problem Solving Children’s imaginations are often stimulated by the world around them. Being outside widens their horizons and can encourage kids to tap into their creativity in order to come up with solutions to challenges, such as learning how to build a sandcastle or figuring out how to climb up a jungle gym. Reducing Stress So much outdoor play involves physical activity, thrilling moments and a sense of freedom, all of which can boost endorphins, helping to lower stress levels and reduce anxiety and depression. Interestingly, simply touching dirt when creating mud pies or digging for worms can be beneficial. According to a Bristol University study, certain types of “friendly” bacteria in soil have been found to activate the group of neurons that produce serotonin, which contributes to a feeling of well-being and happiness. So, don’t be afraid to let your kids get a bit dirty out there! For more play ideas, expert advice and other play resources, visit TheGeniusOfPlay.org.

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Mental Health

Self-care tips to improve your well-being

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etween hectic schedules, evergrowing to-do lists and caring for others, it can be easy to put self-care on the backburner. Committing to a healthy diet, getting adequate sleep, reducing stress, exercising regularly and unplugging from your devices can help keep you healthy, both mentally and physically. Consider these self-care ideas from the sleep experts at Mattress Firm to help bolster your well-being. Nourish Yourself While eating well may seem like an obvious self-care tip, it’s not always easy to change your eating habits or replace fast food and sweet indulgences with healthier options. However, properly nourishing your body with the right foods, like fish, leafy green vegetables and berries, can help you maintain a healthy weight, reduce your risk for diseases such as diabetes, improve your memory and reduce inflammation, among other short- and long-term benefits. Get a Good Night’s Rest Getting a proper night’s sleep - most experts recommend 7-9 hours for the average adult - can have a posi-

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tive impact on how you feel both mentally and physically. Having both the proper routine - limiting caffeine and sugar intake before bed and reducing distractions such as TV or smartphones - and the right mattress can be key to ensuring your bedroom is the sleep oasis you need for quality rest. If you need help when it comes to selecting a mattress, the experts at a retailer like Mattress Firm can help you find the right mattress based on your sleep position or aches and pains from a wide selection of mattress sizes, features and accessories that won’t break the bank. Practice Relaxation Techniques Whether you have a few spare minutes or an entire afternoon of free time, finding a quiet place to relax and practice meditation or yoga can help you reduce stress and anxiety, become more self-aware and create a sense of calmness during even the busiest of days. Try setting up a secluded area in your home (or office) where you can concentrate on your practice and really listen to yourself.

Unplug and Unwind With 24/7 access to the internet, social media and television, it can be easy to create bad habits associated with the always-connected, smartphone-obsessed world. However, screens - and the blue light they emit - have been proven to negatively impact sleep and mental performance. Setting aside some time - aim for a couple hours in succession each day to unplug from your devices and their distractions can lead to better sleep, productivity, emotional wellness and creativity. Make Sure to Move While it’s important to take care of yourself mentally, taking care of your body can be just as important to provide peace of mind. Finding time each day to get in at least 30 minutes of aerobic exercise, whether it’s a full-blown workout, a walk around the neighborhood with your dog or a bike ride to a favorite destination, can boost your mood, reduce stress and anxiety, and help keep your waistline trim. Find a regimen that works for you, be it multiple short active periods or one long gym session, and make it part of your daily routine for an easy way to boost both your physical and mental well-being. Find more tips and ideas to take care of yourself at MattressFirm.com/blog.


Healthy Living

Be prepared Three tips to help you get the care you need

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hen a health issue comes up, it might be hard to know what to do, especially if you or someone you love isn’t feeling well. Your first impulse might be to go straight to the emergency room. However, with the potential for longer wait times, at times unnecessary tests and treatments, plus the possible added exposure to germs, the ER may not be the best option. Additionally, visiting the emergency room for non-emergency health concerns may result in barriers to building a long-term relationship with a primary care physician (PCP). A PCP can provide preventative care, treat minor illnesses and injuries, connect you to specialists and fully understand your medical history for improved health outcomes. Urgent care centers may also be a more appropriate and convenient way for you to get non-emergency medical care, if your primary care physician’s office is closed or unable to help with a same-day appointment. It may be best to ask yourself: “Is it serious?” If there’s a heath issue you can’t control - like catching your breath or bleeding that won’t stop - it’s a good idea to go to the emergency room. Be sure to call 911 if you need immediate help and

are unable to drive yourself. Tell a friend or family member your situation as it can be helpful to have someone check up on you later. If you’re unsure of where to go, remember that it’s usually a good idea to go to the emergency room if: You have major burns, cuts or breaks. You can’t stop bleeding or catch your breath. You lose consciousness or vision. You suffer a bite with venom. You have a back or neck injury. Whether it’s going to the ER, urgent care or seeing your primary care physician, to help you get the right care before a possible health issue arises, it’s best to be prepared. Here are three tips to keep in mind: Get help to make your choice Your insurance card may have a nurse line number that you can call. You can also try calling the num-

ber for your primary care doctor, who may connect you to a nurse line. Talking to a nurse might help you decide whether to go to an emergency room, urgent care clinic, your primary care physician or a virtual visit. Plan your visit If you have access to a care coordinator or customer service representative for your plan, they might be able to help you figure out when an urgent care clinic or your primary care physician is available. They may even be able to schedule an appointment for you. Bring the essentials Always have your photo ID and insurance card with you, along with a list of the medications you take. A mobile phone can also be helpful to jot down questions you might have - and don’t forget to bring a charger, too. Find out more about where to go for care, including a quiz to help you decide and references you can download, at www.uhc.com/ knowwheretogoforcare.

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Wellness • Teach kids to eat when they’re hungry, not when they’re bored, sad, or angry. Respect their ability to know when they feel full. • Breakfast helps jump start the day. It provides fuel for an active lifestyle and gives you and your child the energy to think faster and more clearly. • Play “Put the Fork Down” at meals. Put your forks down between bites and take turns sharing your day. • Balance. Balance what you eat to meet your need for nutrition and enjoyment. • Variety. Enjoy all foods from important food groups (fruits, vegetables, lean sources of protein, low-fat dairy, and whole grains). • Moderation. Focus on feeling comfortable instead of being too full after you eat. Use moderation when choosing less nutritious foods.

Invest in your

health

it’s all about a state of mind and body

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t’s important to take care of both your mind and body. It will pay off in many ways, including:

• Allowing you to take charge of your life and feel good about the choices you make. • Gaining energy and feeling more fit. • Improving your physical health. • Gaining a positive outlook and finding more enjoyment in your life. • Being a role model for your family and friends. Any lifestyle change is a “work in progress.” Lasting changes take time. So, begin by setting small goals that are easy to add to your daily life and that you control. Wellness and fitness involve being aware and making healthy choices about diet, exercise, and staying positive. This is the most important investment

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you can make in your life. Strive for the best health you can have in all areas of your life by making mindful, healthy choices.

Path to improved wellness Whether your meal preparation is for yourself or your family, focus on making smart, healthy meals. Tips for success include: • Make an effort to have more home-cooked meals. This can help encourage healthy eating. Also, it promotes more family time. • Let your kids help plan what to eat. Kids love to help make meals and snacks. • Keep healthy snacks on hand to help kids make good choices. Have more fresh fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. Have fewer chips and sweets.

A food and activity journal can help you understand your eating patterns. Also, it can help you find ways to make simple, healthy changes. Ask your family doctor about how to get started. When unhealthy food choices lead to weight gain, some people turn to popular diets to achieve quick weight loss. Diets usually tell you what you should or should not eat. Instead, focus on understanding why you eat in the first place. Are you eating because you are hungry, bored, sad, or angry? Is there something else causing your urge to eat? Also, don’t restrict your foods. Try to balance between good and bad choices. Make good choices more often and limit the bad foods to small portions once in awhile. For lasting dietary changes, there are some simple keys to eating healthy. Start by asking yourself if you are hungry. Hunger signals your body when it needs to be nourished. Let hunger tell you when you need to eat and how much to eat.

True hunger signals • hunger pangs, gnawing, growling, or rumbling in your stomach • weakness or loss of energy • slight headache or trouble concentrating • irritability

False hunger signals • thirst • cravings • emotions • external cues (like mealtimes or social events) Learn to listen to your hunger signals so you can determine when and how much foor to eat. Make mindful decisions about eating by paying attention to how you feel. And don’t use diet “rules” to restrict what, when and how much you eat. Instead, learn to trust your body to tell you when it needs food. If you are truly hungry, ask yourself what it is that you want, what your body needs, what you have available (so you can make a healthy choice), and how much food you need. continues on page 11


Healthy Living

The power of positivity Simple tips to change your life

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ork demands paired with family demands make modern life extremely busy. Meetings, deadlines, housework and much more all vie for your time. What’s the secret to keeping on top of it all? Research shows the power of positivity can work wonders in managing stress, staying productive and boosting happiness. Four out of five people agree positive thinking can help improve their lives and start the morning off on a positive note, according to a recent survey of American workers to gain insight into the impact of positivity in the workplace conducted by The Original Donut Shop Coffee. The good news is that a resounding 88% of Americans consider themselves positive people, but they think there is room for improvement. In fact, 69% wish they could be even more positive! “Positive individuals are three times more creative, 31% more productive and 23% less fatigued,” says Amy Blankson, CEO of Fearless Positivity and author of “The Future of Happiness.” “No matter where your baseline for

happiness is today, you can always increase your overall happiness level.” Blankson offers some insight into simple ways you can inject positivity into your day: Set intentions early Take a moment to shift your focus in the morning. What do you want to get out of your day? It’s so easy to fall prey to the tyranny of urgency. Hold the emails, texts, calls and messages and spend just 2 minutes grounding yourself in a positive practice like meditating or journaling. You’ll set yourself up for greater happiness in the long run. Get creative If you feel like you don’t have the time or discipline to keep a gratitude journal, try looking for a “gratitude trigger.” For instance, every time you stop at a red light, say one thing you are grateful for. Think to the future Try saying “future-forward gratitudes” in the morning. These are the things you are excited about for the day ahead, such as a meeting, lunch or special project.

This practice helps prime you for positivity during the day and gives you an anchor point for reflection at the end of the day. Connect remotely While more people are working from home, 45% of them consider themselves a positive person versus 75% of people who work in the office, according to the survey. One way to stay connected and spread positivity with coworkers when you’re not in the office is by taking a few minutes each day to text, email or call a coworker to thank them for something they did. Move beyond off days Don’t get hung up when you have a negative day. The most important part of creating a new habit is having the courage to restart when you have an off day. Happiness is not a state of mind; it’s a mindset that develops over time. The best way to elevate your mindset is by training your brain to look for positive information in the world around you that you might have missed. Pay it forward Individuals who pay it forward through praise and recognition express that they have greater feelings of happiness, satisfaction and relatedness. However, even more importantly, both givers and receivers inspire others to want to give, which creates a powerful network effect.

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Wellness

Choose Physical Therapy for safe pain management

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ovement is crucial to a person’s health, quality of life and independence. For some people, pain makes movement a challenge. Pain is one of the most common reasons people seek health care. A physical therapist (PT) can help people move better and safely and manage their pain.

Who are physical therapists?

PTs are movement experts who improve quality of life through prescribed exercise, hands-on care and patient education. PTs treat people of all ages and abilities and empower them to actively take part in their own care. Physical therapist assistants (PTAs) work with patients under the direction of a PT and teach and demonstrate exercises that help improve mobility, strength and coordination. To ensure the best possible care, PTs often work with other members of a patient’s health care team. After performing an evaluation, PTs create personalized plans of care that can help you: • Improve mobility and function • Manage pain and chronic conditions • Avoid surgery • Reduce the use of opioids and other prescription drugs • Recover from injury • Prevent future injury and chronic disease

Here are three tips to manage pain:

Work with your PT to understand your pain. PTs play a valuable role in the patient education process, including setting realistic expectations for recovery with or without opioids. This allows you to take a proactive approach to pain management. Keep moving. An active lifestyle that is appropriate for your condition can help manage symptoms and decrease or eliminate pain. The body was built to move, and doing so regularly can help improve quality of life. PTs prescribe exercise specific to your condition, needs and goals. If you experience an injury or develop the onset of pain, seeing a PT early on can help address and manage your symptoms.

When and where do you see a physical therapist?

Pain management is just one reason to work with a PT. They can also help you prevent future injury or chronic conditions. You do not need a physician’s referral to make an appointment with a PT for an evaluation. PTs can specialize in a variety of areas, including geriatrics, neurology, oncology, orthopedics, pediatrics, sports and women’s health. They provide treatments in: • Hospitals, outpatient clinics or offices • Inpatient rehabilitation facilities • Skilled nursing, extended care or subacute facilities • Schools, education or research centers • Fitness centers and sports training facilities • Hospice settings • Your workplace • Your home For more information and to find a PT near you, visit ChoosePT.com.

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Wellness continued from page 8

Caring for your physical health through exercise

Being active also is important to a healthy lifestyle. And it’s important in preventing serious problems like heart disease and diabetes. However, before you increase your activity level, talk to your doctor. Your weight is determined by the balance between the energy you take in (what you eat and drink) and the energy you use (physical activity). Every step counts. Studies have shown that every step you take helps you manage your weight and improve your overall health. You may want to track your steps with a step counter (pedometer) or an activity tracker. This can encourage you to increase your daily activity. The more steps you take per day, the better. Experts recommend walking at least 10,000 steps per day. Other tips for achieving an active lifestyle include: • Limit screen time (TV, computer and video games). Suggest or consider other options like reading, board games, and playing outside. • Enjoy the outdoors. Go to the park, ride bikes, swim, or enjoy a walk around the neighborhood. • Participate in (or encourage your children to participate) in sports. This is a great way to build coordination, skills, and confidence. • Plant a garden. • Wash your car. • Walk to the mailbox. • Walk over to a neighbor’s house to visit. • Turn off the TV and dance to music. • Walk or bike to work, school, or in the community. • Stretch at your desk. • Take the stairs. • Use lunchtimes to take a walk. • Get up and move around your office. • Take “active” vacations. • Go hiking or biking.

Caring for your physical health through a positive attitude

Staying positive and motivated can help you live a healthy life. Also, it makes it easier to make healthy food decisions and to stay active. Tips for staying positive include: • Choose to do something you enjoy. Many people prefer walking. You can walk outdoors, at home on a treadmill, alone, or with friends and family. • Make it fun. Listen to music or books on tape while you walk or jog. Watch TV or a video while you exercise. • Keep it interesting. Try different activities like tennis, swimming, dancing, biking, team sports, or yoga.

• Write it down. Schedule time to be active just as you would for any other important appointment. • Give yourself credit. Set short-term goals and plan rewards for yourself all along the way. • Be flexible. Life will sometimes get in the way of your plans. Stay flexible and get back on track right away. • Spend time with friends. Limit your exposure to friends who are negative. • Get away from the office, school, or everyday life with day trips, mini vacations, or full vacations. • Read an inspirational book. • Volunteer. Helping others can improve your emotional outlook. If you are a parent, help your family develop good emotional health. Parents are the most important role models. As parents, you set examples by being active, eating healthy, and living a balanced lifestyle. The following family tips can help: • Commit to making healthy choices and involve your kids. Ask them what your family can do to make healthy changes in your lives. • Take time out to have fun and connect with each other. Playtime for all ages is part of a healthy life. • Have a positive attitude. Show your kids how great it feels to lead a healthy lifestyle.

Things to consider

Don’t let stress get you down. We all feel stressed at times. How you react to stress will determine its effect on you. Take steps to prevent stress when you can and manage it when you can’t.

Take care of you. It is important to be mindful of the choices you make for your personal health and well being. Nothing is more important than taking care of you. Set aside time every day for you. Be active, enjoy hobbies, and share time with your family and friends.

Additionally • Strive for balance in both your personal and work life. • Make time for important relationships in your life. • Ask for help whenever you need support from others. • Find ways to relieve stress, like physical activity and relaxation techniques. • Be open-minded to try something new, like a hobby or activity. • Don’t let special events and holiday sabotage your healthy lifestyle. Remember to get back on track with a healthy diet if you splurge at Christmas or a wedding. Use the hotel gym if you travel. And enjoy the opportunity to meet new people when you can.

Questions to ask your doctor

• Is there an easy way to get back on track with diet after a holiday or vacation? • Making healthy food choices when you travel internationally is difficult. Do you have tips? • Can I reverse chronic diseases by committing to a healthy lifestyle? • What if lifestyle changes don’t improve my mood and emotional wellness? Article provided by familydoctor.org.

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Healthy Living

Questions to ask when planning for long-term care

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ou may not want to consider a time when you might not be able to fully take care of yourself, but the reality is there is almost a 70% chance someone turning 65 today will need some type of long-term care service and support in his or her lifetime, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Even if you’ve worked hard to save for retirement and create the financial security you want in the future, the need for long-term care could throw a wrench into even the most well-thoughtout plans and impact you and your loved ones’ finances. Consider these questions as you begin the long-term care planning process. What is long-term care? Different from traditional medical care that treats illnesses and injuries, long-term care includes services designed to help you maintain your quality of life and perform everyday activities even if age, illness, injury or a severe cognitive impairment make it a challenge to take care of yourself for an extended period of time. Longterm care services help with common daily functions including dressing, bathing and eating, and even skilled nursing services such as giving medication.

When should you start thinking about long-term care planning? Because you never know when a need for care may arise, planning for care when you are younger and healthier can provide additional options as you’re more likely to qualify for coverage. Plus, cost is based on your age when you apply, so waiting can end up costing you more. Some people are beginning to plan as early as in their 40s.

Where is care provided? Long-term care can be provided in a variety of settings, including at home, in an assisted-living facility or in a nursing home depending on the amount and type of care needed. In fact, some insurance plans cover care on a part-time basis by a family member or home health worker. Planning ahead can allow for more control over how and where you receive care.

How much does long-term care cost? Long-term care costs vary depending on where you live, the type of care provided and the setting. Home-care services average $24-$135 per hour, according to the New York Life Cost of Care Survey, while private rooms in nursing homes can cost more than $100,000 a year. Long-term care is generally not covered by health insurance, and government programs like Medicare or Medicaid have limitations, which often isn’t discovered until care is needed. However, New York Life offers longterm care options to AARP members and provides specially trained agents who can provide guidance. The agents can work with you and your family to create a customized plan based on your financial goals, helping protect your assets should you ever require long-term care.

How much coverage do you need? The amount of coverage you need typically varies based on several considerations including budget, age, the type of care expected and how much of your assets and income you may be willing to use to offset the care costs. You don’t have to cover your entire risk - choosing a modest amount of coverage can still provide benefits and help protect other assets. While planning for long-term care can seem daunting, you can find more benefits and information to make the process easier at aarp.org/benefits.

Let’s Go Hiking Nine places to stretch your legs Joshua Tree National Park Characterized by its huge rock formations and immense Joshua tree forest, the national park lies where the Mojave Desert meets the low Colorado Desert. Hike through the trails that weave through the Hidden Valley, travel to Keys View and look out over the Coachella Valley or bring your rock climbing equipment and scale some of the most interesting geological formations in the California desert. nps.gov/jotr South Lykken Trail 4.4 miles with an elevation of just over 1,000 feet. This is considered strenuous and the north end of the trail starts at the west end of Mesquite Road, just south of downtown Palm Springs off South Palm Canyon Drive. There is no parking at the trailhead, but street parking is available. The hike is pretty strenuous for the first mile or so and then it levels off and one gets a great view of the Indian Canyons golf courses and South Palm Canyon communities. It is a beautiful hike and ends along South Palm Canyon Drive towards Indian Canyon. You will need to have vehicles at both ends. Museum Trail 2 miles round trip with an elevation change of around 1,000 feet. This hike is quite strenuous because of the rapid incline. The trailhead is just behind the museum off Palm Canyon Drive in Downtown Palm Springs. Turn around at the picnic tables. Clara Burgess Trail 4.4 miles round trip with an elevation of 1,339 feet. The trail is the only

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route to the summit of Murray Hill, a prominent conical peak just south of Palm Springs. It is best seen when heading south on Gene Autry Trail and, although it is only a couple miles to the peak, it is strenuous with a steep incline. Bump and Grind Trail 3 mile loop with an elevation rise of 523 feet. This trail is probably the most popular trail in the desert and frequented by exercisers who start behind Desert Crossings shopping center on Painters Path in Palm Desert. Randall Henderson Trail 2.4 mile loop with a gently rising elevation change of 423 feet. This easy trail offers a good introduction to desert hiking for the novice. It starts and ends at the National Monument Visitor Center in Palm Desert on Highway 74. Check the Visitor Center for guided hikes during the winter season. Amboy Crater Formed of ash and cinders, the 250-foot-high Amboy Crater rises from one of the youngest volcanic fields in the United States. A hiking trail winds to the rim with rest stations along the way. If you make it to the top, you’ll see the breach where lava poured out over 24 square miles, creating a landscape of dried lava lakes, collapsed lava tubes and sinks, spatter cones and massive flows of basalt. This can be a dangerous

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area. Don’t venture out in the heat, bring a gallon of water per person per day, hike with a partner and always let someone know where you’re going and when you expect to be back. Crater Road eight miles off National Trails Highway. blm.gov/visit/ amboy-crater Eisenhower Peak Loop 6 mile loop with an elevation gain of 700 feet. This trail is considered moderate and is part of the Living Desert preserve (admission fee required) in Palm Desert. The trail begins at the Eastern edge of the Living Desert and takes hikers toward Eisenhower Peak. The trail is a good representation of desert terrain and makes a perfect beginning to a Living Desert tour. Giant Rock The largest freestanding boulder in the Mojave Desert, Giant Rock covers 5,800 square feet of ground and stands seven stories high off the ground at its highest point. Native Americans once considered it sacred, and in the 1930s German immigrant Frank Critzer dug a space under the rock to live in. One of Critzer’s friends later said he was contacted by aliens there. Today, the rock is a popular tourist destination and a photo opportunity for visitors from across the globe. Past Belfield Boulevard in Landers


Weight Loss Blunders

How to avoid holiday temptations

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he holiday season means delicious food and parties galore. If you’ve been dedicated to maintaining a healthy lifestyle, there’s no reason to throw away all your hard work. You just need to make adjustments to your routine so you can enjoy the season guilt-free. According to Courtney McCormick, dietitian at Nutrisystem, these are the five biggest holiday temptations and how to manage them. Temptation #1 Parties: To avoid temptation at holiday gatherings, never walk into one hungry. No amount of willpower will stop you from rushing the dessert table if you arrive on an empty stomach. Before you go, have a good, balanced meal that includes protein, veggies and plenty of water. Even if you do treat yourself to a Christmas cookie once there, you’ve done some substantial damage control. Temptation #2 Skipping Workouts: Exercise frequency drops off dramatically once weather gets cold and messy, according to a Gallup poll. If you don’t have a gym membership, investing in a few key pieces of exercise equipment -- bands, kettle bells -- can help

you supplement indoor workouts and maintain an active lifestyle in cold weather. “I always aim for at least 30 minutes of exercise a day. If I’m having a hard day, I break it up into 10-minute increments -- in the morning, afternoon and at night. It makes it much more manageable,” says Marie Osmond, entertainer and Nutrisystem ambassador. Temptation #3 Office Treats: As if your own holiday party indulgences weren’t bad enough, you also have to deal with other people’s leftover treats in your workplace breakroom. To avoid temptation, make sure your meal prep is on point every week and includes snacks to keep you full throughout the day. It’s much easier to politely decline those brownies when you’ve filled up on almonds or light popcorn. Temptation #4 Holiday Traditions: Turkey with all the trimmings. Gingerbread houses with the kids. Hot chocolate on Christmas Eve. As much as we look forward to these traditions, they can take a toll on a healthy lifestyle. This year, try focusing less on food and more on shared experiences. Trade the

annual cookie bake-off for a day of crafting or ice skating; skip your calorie-laden dessert and become the life of the party by bringing board games to play after dinner. Temptation #5 Liquid Calories: Eggnog, mulled wine, or a festive holiday martini are delicious ways to celebrate the season, but they add up quickly. Alcohol has almost the same number of calories per gram as fat, and a typical hot chocolate with whipped cream from a coffee shop is around 400 calories. If you’re going to indulge, do so in moderation. Peppermint tea is a festive, tasty alternative as well. For more great tips and tricks on how to stay healthy and happy all season long, visit leaf. nutrisystem.com.

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Recipes

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itting down for a homemade meal may feel harder to come by these days, but recipes that are both nutritious and flavorful can help bring your loved ones together at the family table. From morning to night, these breakfast, dinner, side and dessert recipes from the Georgia Peanut Commission provide power-packed solutions loaded with protein to help your family take on a full schedule while coming together for memorable meals and moments. Find more recipe ideas for meals throughout the day at gapeanuts.com.

Peanut Power Bowl

Recipe courtesy of Parker Wallace of Parker’s Plate on behalf of the Georgia Peanut Commission Prep time: 15 minutes Servings: 2 Peanut Dressing: 1 cup creamy peanut butter 3/4 cup full-fat coconut milk, plus additional, if desired lime juice Bowl: 1 cup cooked farro or quinoa 1/2 cup chopped cabbage 1 cup shredded carrots 1 avocado, sliced 1 cup spiralized zucchini or butternut squash 1/2 cup pomegranate arils 1 cup mandarin pieces 1/2 cup roasted peanuts chopped cilantro, for garnish green onions, for garnish To make Peanut Dressing: In bowl, whisk peanut butter, coconut milk and lime juice until smooth. Add coconut milk, if necessary, to achieve desired consistency. To make bowl: Layer farro or quinoa then top with cabbage, carrots, avocado, zucchini or squash, pomegranate arils, mandarin pieces, peanuts and Peanut Dressing. Garnish with cilantro and green onions.

Peanut-Powered Protein Nutritious ideas for flavor-filled family meals Thai Chicken Lettuce Wraps with Peanut Sauce

Recipe courtesy of Parker Wallace of Parker’s Plate on behalf of the Georgia Peanut Commission Prep time: 30 minutes Cook time: 15 minutes Servings: 4 Peanut Sauce: • 1/2 cup creamy peanut butter • 2 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce • 1 tablespoon rice vinegar • 2 tablespoons brown sugar • 3 teaspoons chili garlic sauce • 1/2 lime, juice only • 2-3 garlic cloves, pressed or grated • 2 tablespoons fresh ginger • 1 teaspoon fish sauce • 1/2 cup full-fat coconut milk • 4 tablespoons warm water, plus additional, if necessary

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Lettuce Wraps: • 2 heads Boston or butter lettuce • 1 pound cooked chicken • 1 red bell pepper, thinly sliced • 4 green onion, sliced • 3 carrots, shredded and grated • 1/2 cucumber, sliced into matchsticks • 1 bunch fresh basil • 1 bunch fresh mint • 1/4 cup crushed peanuts • sliced limes, for garnish To make Peanut Sauce: In small saucepan over low heat, combine peanut butter, soy sauce, rice vinegar, brown sugar, garlic sauce, lime juice, garlic, ginger, fish sauce, milk and water. Add more water for thinner sauce, if desired. To make Lettuce Wraps: Fill lettuce leaves with chicken and Peanut Sauce; top with bell pepper, onion, carrots, cucumber, basil and mint. Sprinkle crushed peanuts on top and garnish with lime slices.


Recipes Peanut Butter Breakfast Bread Pudding with Maple Peanut Sauce

Recipe courtesy of the Georgia Peanut Commission Prep time: 20 minutes Cook time: 35-40 minutes Servings: 4 • Butter • 2/3 cup creamy peanut butter, divided • 2 eggs • 1/2 cup granulated sugar • 2/3 cup milk • 1 1/2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract • 1/2 teaspoon salt • 4 cups cubed brioche or challah bread, cut into 3/4-inch cubes • 2/3 cup pure maple syrup • 1/3 cup crushed peanuts • powdered sugar, for garnish

Heat oven to 350 F. Butter four 4-ounce ramekins. In bowl, mix 1/3 cup peanut butter, eggs, sugar, milk, vanilla and salt. Toss bread cubes in mixture until thoroughly coated. Divide evenly among prepared dishes. Bake until custard is set in middle and tops are golden, about 35-40 minutes. If tops of bread brown too quickly, cover ramekins loosely with aluminum foil. In small saucepan over low heat, combine remaining peanut butter and maple syrup until thoroughly warmed. To serve, drizzle ramekins with maple-peanut sauce and garnish with chopped peanuts and powdered sugar. Substitution: Whole wheat rolls may be used in place of brioche or challah bread.

Peanut Butter Squares Recipe courtesy of Southern Peanut Growers Prep time: 20 minutes Cook time: 20 minutes Yield: 24 squares • Nonstick cooking spray • 1 package peanut butter cookie mix • 3 tablespoons vegetable oil • 1 tablespoon water • 1 egg • 3 cups miniature marshmallows • 2/3 cup light corn syrup 2 tablespoons butter 2 teaspoons vanilla 1 bag (10 ounces) peanut butter chips 2 cups crispy rice cereal 2 cups salted roasted peanuts Heat oven to 350 F. Spray 13-by-9-inch pan with nonstick cooking spray. In large bowl, stir cookie mix, oil, water and egg until soft dough forms. Press dough into prepared pan. Bake 15-20 minutes, or until set. Sprinkle marshmallows over crust. Bake 1-2 minutes until marshmallows begin to puff. Remove from oven. In 4-quart saucepan over low heat, heat corn syrup, butter, vanilla and peanut butter chips, stirring constantly until chips are melted and smooth. Remove from heat. Stir in cereal and peanuts; spoon mixture evenly over marshmallow layer. Refrigerate 30 minutes, or until firm. Cut into bars and serve.

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