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HANDBOOK Global Education Dialogues: The Asia Series Employability skills in Southeast Asia and the needs of the new economy: The challenge for higher education Partners: Ministry of Education and Training, Vietnam, and Aston University, UK August 9-10, 2012 InterContinental Asiana Saigon Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam


Background In the current global business environment, nations demand much more from their higher education systems. With rapid development comes the need for more productive workforces, so graduates entering employment possess the skills the world of work requires. This Global Education Dialogue aims to bring greater understanding of how higher education has adapted, and must adapt, to meet the needs of industry by producing better-prepared graduates. The forum will share research findings and examples of successful innovation and effective practice, and will provide delegates from industry, governments and higher education with opportunities to engage critically and creatively to address the issue. It is hoped that action plans for partnerships will result. Participants include national policymakers in Vietnam and the region, public and private higher education institutions, national research agencies and international higher education professionals from the region and the UK.

Programme overview Timing

Session

Chair

Day One – August 9 0830-0900

Registration of delegates

0900-0915

Welcome Dr Antony Stokes, UK Ambassador to Vietnam Associate Professor Dr Tran Quang Quy, Vice-Minister of Education and Training, Vietnam

Robin Rickard, Country Director, British Council Vietnam

0915-1100

Opening plenary/panel discussion:

Robin Rickard, Country Director, British Council Vietnam

Employability skills in East Asia and the needs of the new economy: The challenge for higher education Keynotes: • Skills for productivity and growth in East Asia Christian Bodewig, Senior Economist, Human Development Sector Co-ordinator, The World Bank • How the UK higher education sector has responded to economic change, and the skills that local and international students need Professor Alison Halsted, Pro-Vice-Chancellor Strategic Academic Developments, Aston University, UK • Vietnamese universities: rising to the challenge Madame Ton Nu Thi Ninh, Director of Tri Viet Centre for Social and Educational Research, former Vice-Chairwoman, National Assembly Committee for External Affairs, former Vietnamese Ambassador to Belgium and the European Union •

Skilled labour shortfalls in Indonesia, the Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam Dr Janet B. Ilieva, Senior Education Adviser, British Council

1


Hong Kong SAR, China 1100-1115

Coffee break

1115-1215

Round table: The relationship between employability skills and the stages of economic development Speakers: • Bill Glew, Director of MSc Professional Engineering, Aston University, UK • Paul Smith, Chairman of Harvey Nash Outsourcing, Member of the UK-ASEAN Business Council • Dr Libertad P. Garcia, OIC Director IV, Regional Office 8, The Philippines Commission on Higher Education

1215-1330

Lunch

1330-1445

Round table: National and institutional responses – case studies Speakers: • Dr Mutsuhiro Arinobu, Comptroller of The University of Tokyo • Professor Rupert Maclean, Director of Centre for Lifelong Learning Research and Development, Chair Professor of International Education, The Hong Kong Institute of Education (HKIEd) (On behalf of Professor Kai-ming Cheng) • Associate Professor Dr Le Quang Minh, Vice-President, Vietnam National University, Ho Chi Minh City • Dr Illah Sailah, Director of Academic Affairs, Directorate General of Higher Education, Ministry of Education and Culture Indonesia

1445-1500

Coffee break

1500-1610

Parallel working groups Group 1: The meaning of employability, and the key skills that graduates need Speakers: • Professor Rupert Maclean, Director of Centre for Lifelong Learning Research and Development, Chair Professor of International Education, The Hong Kong Institute of Education (HKIEd) • Le Tien Truong, Member of the Board of Directors, Standing Vice-President, Vietnam National Textile and Garment Group (VINATEX) • Rachel Chee, Regional Head of Education for ASEAN, Association of Chartered Certified Accountants (ACCA) Group 2: Models for collaboration between industry and education Speakers: • Dr Peter Hooper, Head of Research & Enterprise Services, Keele University, UK • Bill Glew, Director of MSc Professional Engineering, Aston University, UK

Dr Christopher Hill, Director of Graduate School, The University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus

Professor Carl Lygo, Group CEO & Principal, BPP University College, UK

Stewart Comfort, Director of International Partnerships, Aston University, UK

Dr Janet B. Ilieva, Senior Education Adviser, British Council Hong Kong SAR, China

2


Group 3: Employability of women: moving beyond the “sticky floor” Speakers: • Dr Libertad P. Garcia, OIC Director IV, Regional Office 8, The Philippines Commission on Higher Education • Madame Ton Nu Thi Ninh, Director of Tri Viet Centre for Social and Educational Research, former Vice-Chairwoman, National Assembly Committee for External Affairs, former Vietnamese Ambassador to Belgium and the European Union • Professor Alison Halsted, Pro-Vice-Chancellor Strategic Academic Developments, Aston University, UK 1610-1640

Plenary feedback and discussion •

Professor Rupert Maclean, Director of Centre for Lifelong Learning Research and Development, and Chair Professor of International Education, The Hong Kong Institute of Education (HKIEd) Madame Ton Nu Thi Ninh, Director of Tri Viet Centre for Social and Educational Research, former Vice-Chairwoman, National Assembly Committee for External Affairs, former Vietnamese Ambassador to Belgium and the European Union Bill Glew, Director of MSc Professional Engineering, Aston University, UK

1640-1700

Observations from Day One and closing comments

1900-2100

Welcome dinner

Katherine Forestier, Senior Education Consultant, British Council Hong Kong SAR, China

Robin Rickard, Country Director, British Council Vietnam

Robin Rickard, Country Director, British Council Vietnam

Day Two – August 10 0900-0915

Introduction to Day Two

Robin Rickard, Country Director, British Council Vietnam

0915-0945

Plenary: Putting higher education to work – skills for growth in East Asia

Robin Rickard, Country Director, British Council Vietnam

Speaker: Mai Thi Thanh, Senior Education Specialist, The World Bank 0945-1100

Round-table discussion: Strategic alliances to address local and international labour workforce demands Speakers: • Professor Dr Aung Tun Thet, Senior Advisor, United Nations Resident Coordinator’s office, Yangon, Myanmar • Dr Vo Tan Long, Country General Manager, IBM Vietnam • Associate Professor Dr Doan Quang Vinh, Vice-President, The University of Danang, Vietnam • Associate Professor Simon Barrie, Director Teaching and Learning, The University of Sydney

Professor Rupert Maclean, Director of Centre for Lifelong Learning Research and Development, Chair Professor of International Education, The Hong Kong

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•

Dr Christopher Hill, Director of Graduate School, Academic Director for the Postgraduate Certificate of Higher Education, The University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus

1100-1115

Coffee break

1115-1145

Action planning and summary of the event

1200-1400

Lunch

1400

Dialogue ends

Institute of Education (HKIEd)

Robin Rickard, Country Director, British Council Vietnam

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Programme in detail DAY ONE – August 9 0830-0900

Registration

0900-0915

Welcome

Dr Antony Stokes, UK Ambassador to Vietnam Associate Professor Dr Tran Quang Quy, Vice-Minister of Education and Training, Vietnam

0915-1100

Opening plenary/panel discussion: Employability skills in East Asia and the needs of the new economy: The challenge for higher education

This session investigates the extent to which the changing economic environments of East Asia and the UK are prompting universities to address more directly the needs of employers and the skills of graduates. Keynote: Speaker:

Skills for productivity and growth in East Asia Christian Bodewig, Senior Economist, Human Development Sector Co-ordinator The World Bank

Economic growth and development in East Asia will increasingly depend on the availability of a skilled workforce that can contribute to a transition towards higher value-added manufacturing and services. But what skills are demanded by East Asian employers? And which are in short supply? The presentation will review evidence on skills from East Asian countries and highlight implications for education and training systems. It will pay particular attention to Vietnam, with new evidence from the recent World Bank STEP skills measurement survey.

Keynote: Speaker:

How the UK has responded to economic change and the skills that local and international students should be equipped with Professor Alison Halsted, Pro-Vice-Chancellor Strategic Academic Developments Aston University, UK

The UK Government has recognised the importance of technical skills for economic growth and is encouraging greater numbers of people to become skilled at the higher technical levels, degree level and upwards. This keynote will start by identifying the challenge for engineering education in the UK. Drawing on the results of a Royal Academy of Engineering survey of major industrial employers, small businesses and university engineering departments, it will highlight the main messages from employers to educators and set out the required skills for future economic growth for all university students. The second part will focus on the experience at Aston University, where most students spend a year of their degree programme working in industry, and the benefits of this approach to the student and employer. Degree programmes that the university has developed with UK employers will also be discussed. The final part will introduce one of the latest UK Government initiatives aimed at producing technically literate young people who have business and enterprise skills through the creation of the university-led University Technical College (UTC), Aston University Engineering Academy for 14-19 years old.

Keynote: Speaker:

Vietnamese universities: rising to the challenge Madame Ton Nu Thi Ninh, Director of Tri Viet Centre for Social and Educational Research, former Vice-Chairwoman, National Assembly Committee for External Affairs, former Vietnamese Ambassador to Belgium and the European Union

Madame Ninh shares the challenges facing Vietnam’s universities in meeting the employability needs of its students and the country’s employers. Vietnamese higher education is developing from post-war and reunification realities, coping with the 5


legacies of war, isolation, and reconciling two different educational backgrounds. “Đổi Mới” – Vietnam’s Reform and Renewal – has since the late 1980s brought new opportunities and challenges, such as rising living standards, growing demand for higher education, new interaction with the market, the development of the private sector in education, and expanding regional and international exchange and co-operation. Now a Middle Income Country, Vietnam must grapple with balancing technical training needed for the workplace and nurturing cultural and thinking skills and responsiveness. It needs a university system that prepares graduates for employability in both the public and private sectors, as well as in domestic and international environments.

Keynote: Speaker:

Skilled labour shortfalls in Indonesia, the Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam Dr Janet B. Ilieva, Senior Education Adviser, British Council Hong Kong SAR, China

Dr Ilieva will introduce British Council-commissioned research that aims to identify shortfalls in skilled labour in the ASEAN economies of Indonesia, the Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam. At national level, it examines the current and future state of their economies, aiming to determine the industries that will drive economic growth and their respective demand for skills. In addition, the study aims to capture the growing demand from industries for employees with intercultural skills. It studies graduates’ perceptions of the intercultural skills they feel they are equipped with, on the one hand, and looks at the intercultural skills that international businesses need most, on the other. The research has been conducted with the Economist Intelligence Unit.

Chaired by

Robin Rickard, Country Director, British Council Vietnam

1100-1115

Coffee break

1115-1215

Round-table discussion: The relationship between employability skills and the stages of economic development

Speaker:

Bill Glew, Director of MSc Professional Engineering, Aston University, UK

New Economic Thinking Needs New Educational Thinking. After a basic consideration of the various structures of employability skills, this presentation will put forward an analysis of the multiple stages of economic development, their associated structure of employment needs, and how that structure has been served by traditional educational systems. The analysis will result in a model of the soft employability skills mix required by the various stages of economic development, and highlight the problems of mismatched workforce development associated with traditional educational systems. Finally, the use of industry-education partnerships will be discussed and how they can be used to overcome the challenges of producing an ever-changing best mix of employability skills.

Speaker:

Paul Smith, Chairman of Harvey Nash Outsourcing Member of the UK-ASEAN Business Council

Harvey Nash Graduate recruitment Paul Smith asks if "soft skills" should be a key subject ranked against mathematics, science and languages and part of the work ready programme to provoke innovation, quality and team work.

Respondent:

Dr Libertad P. Garcia, OIC Director IV, Regional Office 8 The Philippines Commission on Higher Education

Chaired by

Dr Christopher Hill, Director of Graduate School Academic Director for the Postgraduate Certificate of Higher Education The University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus

1215-1330

Lunch InterContinental Asiana Saigon, Corner Hai Ba Trung & Le Duan Blvd, District 1

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1330-1445

Round-table discussion: National and institutional responses – case studies

In this round table, case studies will be presented on system and institutional initiatives to improve the employability of graduates. By evaluating these, speakers and participants will seek to identify priorities and direction for future initiatives. Speaker:

Dr Mutsuhiro Arinobu, Comptroller of The University of Tokyo

What is expected from university graduates? Dr Arinobu reviews national initiatives in Japan to improve the employability of its graduates. The Japanese industrial sector has challenged universities in a recently published report “The development of core industrial personnel, and engineering education”, in which it expressed concern over the state of university education. Collaboration between industry and higher education is seen as increasingly important, while career guidance is now included in the standards for the establishment of universities, among other initiatives.

Speaker:

Professor Rupert Maclean, Director of Centre for Lifelong Learning Research and Development, Chair Professor of International Education, The Hong Kong Institute of Education (HKIEd) (On behalf of Professor Kai-ming Cheng)

Summary notes of Hong Kong case study Hong Kong started its comprehensive education reform 13 years ago, culminating in a new academic structure and the move to four-year undergraduate courses this September. The essence of the reform is to prepare young people for a changed society. In so doing, the secondary school curriculum has been changed from an array of subjects for university entrance, to “key learning areas”. Public examinations have been reduced to leave more room for genuine learning and skills development. Meanwhile, undergraduate education is being extended by one more year, which is basically meant for non-discipline-based learning. This includes other learning opportunities outside university and in other cultures. Underpinning the reform is (a) that changed society anticipates a changed education and (b) authentic learning has risen to the centre of the agenda. Professor Cheng was among the architects of the reform.

Speaker:

Associate Professor Dr Le Quang Minh, Vice-President Vietnam National University, Ho Chi Minh City

Human Resources Development in Vietnam - Responses from Universities Associate Professor Minh presents an overview of the measures implemented by Vietnam National University (VNU) to improve the quality and employability of its graduates. These include a strategic plan that defines quality as adding value and being fit for purpose, with purpose including stronger links with industry and the business community. It has also adapted programme assessment and improvement frameworks from the AUN (ASEAN University Network), which include links with the world of work, from curriculum design to implementation. A new curriculum development tool for Engineering programmes, namely Conceive, Design, Implement, Operate (CDIO), which was developed by a group of American Universities and led by MIT, has been applied. Finally, the Student Service Department traces students for three years after graduation, with one aim being to evaluate whether programmes are meeting the needs of society and employers.

Speaker:

Dr Illah Sailah, Director of Academic Affairs, Directorate General of Higher Education Ministry of Education and Culture Indonesia

Indonesian Strategies on Increasing the Quality and Relevance of Graduates

Chaired by

Professor Carl Lygo, Group CEO & Principal, BPP University College, UK

1445-1500

Coffee break

7


1500-1610

Parallel working group: Ballroom 2 Group 1: The meaning of employability, and the key skills that graduates need

This workshop will examine in more detail what is meant by employability and the implications for education. It will attempt to define the skills graduates need, drawing on the views of industry representatives and academic leaders. Speaker:

Professor Rupert Maclean, Director of Centre for Lifelong Learning Research and Development, Chair Professor of International Education, The Hong Kong Institute of Education (HKIEd)

The Meaning of Employability and the Key Skills that Graduates Need With the massification of secondary and higher education there has been increasing pressure and need for education institutions, such as universities throughout the Asia Pacific region, to cater for larger numbers of students, who have a wider range of interests and abilities than previously. One outcome of this is that the emphasis is increasingly on preparing individuals for employment rather than on more traditional approaches of providing a largely academic education. This has resulted in the “vocationalisation of higher education”. This has been heavily criticised in some places as encouraging an approach to learning that is becoming increasingly “one-dimensional”, the focus being on economic productivity and human capital rather than on developing and exploring the potential and talents of learners. This presentation will examine arguments for and against the trend to vocationalise higher education. If vocationalisation isn’t the solution, how can institutions ensure their students are well prepared for whatever they do after graduation?

Speaker:

Le Tien Truong, Member of the Board of Directors, Standing Vice-President, Vietnam National Textile and Garment Group (VINATEX)

Human Resource Training to Implement Strategy of Improving Value Added in Vietnam Textile and Apprarel Products Le Tien Truong will focus on the human resource needs for improving the value-added qualities of Vietnam’s textile and apparel industries. As in many countries, these labour-intensive, light industries have played an important role in economic development and the shift in labour from agriculture to industry. However, in the process of globalisation, the industries have gone through significant adjustments. In this context, being the fifth-largest producer of apparel exports in the world, yet a newcomer in the global textile and apparel production supply chain, Vietnam is facing enormous challenges in establishing a stable position in the high-value segment of the industry. The challenges arise from many different areas such as technology, design and branding, and distribution, yet all converging on the central challenge of high-quality human resourcing. This presentation reviews the challenges and proposes ways to bridge the gap between supply and demand for the skills needed, and implications for higher education.

Speaker:

Rachel Chee, Regional Head of Education for ASEAN Association of Chartered Certified Accountants

Employability, Dynamics of the Profession, Benchmark for Accounting Education, Challenges for Accounting Educators, Potential Solutions Rachel Chee will reflect on the challenges for education and skills development posed by the high growth rates of many ASEAN countries, combined with the changing nature of work and the shift in some economies from manufacturing to knowledge-based services.

Chaired by

Stewart Comfort, Director of International Partnerships, Aston University, UK

1500-1610

Parallel working group: Cat Ba Room Group 2: Models for collaboration between industry and education

8


In this workshop, participants will hear of various approaches to working with industry that universities and the vocational education sector can adopt, and share their own models. Challenges faced will also be addressed. Speaker:

Dr Peter Hooper, Head of Research & Enterprise Services, Keele University, UK

Internships and Employability - Upskilling and reskilling to meet industry sector requirements Dr Peter Hooper will share Keele’s highly successful model for addressing employability in the environmental sector. Project Green was developed and delivered through a university-business in partnership. This involves accredited master level training leading to a certificate in Environmental Business and includes a one-month internship. Company awareness of the benefits of (and legal requirements behind) environmental good practice and of graduate-level skills has been enhanced by the programme. A significant proportion of interns progressed to longer term funded placements with their host employer, and many to full employment; others were assisted to establish their own businesses. The initiative has now been extended to other sectors.

Speaker:

Bill Glew, Director of MSc Professional Engineering, Aston University, UK

Work Based Learning Partnerships for Global Professional Engineers The opposite of embedding employability skills within the curriculum is to embed the curriculum within the world of work. By doing so, the development of employability skills will automatically become part of the curriculum. In 2008 the UK’s Engineering Council started working with a number of UK universities to develop such an approach. The objective was to widen accessibility to professional engineering registration by finding a better way of working with employers. It also had to increase the quality of the learning experience but without the risks which may accompany some other types of distance learning. By building on a long history of technically focused education and thinking innovatively about the way people learn from practical experience, it has been possible to produce a new approach to engineering education which integrates theory and practical application, but which still has the academic rigour of traditional classroom-based teaching. Successful implementation requires a new way of thinking about education.

Chaired by

Dr Janet B. Ilieva, Senior Education Adviser, British Council Hong Kong SAR, China

1500-1610

Parallel working group: Con Dao Room Group 3: Employability of women: moving beyond the “sticky floor”

How are women graduates faring in the Asian employment market and what can education do to ensure they have the skills to rise to senior positions? This workshop examines and addresses the issues. Speaker:

Dr Libertad P. Garcia, OIC Director IV, Regional Office 8 The Philippines Commission on Higher Education

Employability of Filipino women: moving beyond the “sticky floor” This paper will reflect on how education has made a difference to the employability of Filipina women, and where in occupational groups women dominate and excel. It will also consider the barriers and challenges they face, the employment mismatches, and how the government is trying to intervene.

Speaker:

Madame Ton Nu Thi Ninh, Director of Tri Viet Centre for Social and Educational Research, former Vice-Chairwoman, National Assembly Committee for External Affairs, former Vietnamese Ambassador to Belgium and the European Union

Speaker:

Professor Alison Halsted, Pro-Vice-Chancellor Strategic Academic Developments Aston University, UK

Encouraging Women into Engineering Research in Europe. What initiatives work? 9


Professor Halsted will present on the issues women face when progressing in the male-dominated world of engineering, in higher education and industry. Statistics on women in professorial and other senior positions in the engineering sector reveal a low progression rate. Over the past decade there have been significant local, national and international initiatives to increase women’s participation. This presentation will focus on the Athena Swan initiative in UK universities. This provides a series of national awards to science and engineering departments gained through the analysis of the numbers of women in science and engineering and on positive action initiatives, such as mentoring and transparent recruitment, and promotion criteria.

Chaired by

Katherine Forestier, Senior Education Consultant, British Council Hong Kong SAR, China

1610-1640

Plenary feedback and discussion

Panelists:

Professor Rupert Maclean, Director of Centre for Lifelong Learning Research and Development, Chair Professor of International Education, The Hong Kong Institute of Education (HKIEd) Madame Ton Nu Thi Ninh, Director of Tri Viet Centre for Social and Educational Research, former Vice-Chairwoman, National Assembly Committee for External Affairs, former Vietnamese Ambassador to Belgium and the European Union Bill Glew, Director of MSc Professional Engineering, Aston University, UK

Chaired by

Robin Rickard, Country Director, British Council Vietnam

1640-1700

Observations from Day One and closing comments

Chaired by

Robin Rickard, Country Director, British Council Vietnam

1900-2100

Dinner reception Roof-top Restaurant, Rex Hotel, 141 Nguyen Hue, District 1

DAY TWO – August 10 0900-0915

Introduction to Day Two

Chaired by

Robin Rickard, Country Director, British Council Vietnam

0915-0945

Plenary: Putting Higher Education to Work – Skills and Research for Growth in East Asia

Main findings from the recent World Bank flagship report on Higher Education in East Asia Speaker

Mai Thi Thanh, Senior Education Specialist, The World Bank

Putting Higher Education to Work – Skills and Research for Growth in East Asia Video: Higher education in East Asia – Students and grads share views Well known for their economic success and dynamism, countries in the East Asia and Pacific region must tackle an increasingly complex set of challenges to continue on a path of sustainable development. Mai Thi Thanh considers the implications of a flagship World Bank report - Putting Higher Education to Work: Skills and Research for Growth in East Asia. It begins with a diagnosis of the state of higher education in the region and then focuses on the economic benefits as they relate to skills and research. It argues that the failure of higher education to deliver skills and research is a result of the fact that higher education institutions have been managed as disconnected individual institutions. In other words, it is failing as a result of widespread disconnects between institutions and the users and providers of skills and research. These disconnects are due to information, capacity, 10


and incentive constraints that have been poorly addressed. The study concludes with an analysis of three public policies that can have a profound effect on higher education outcomes by tackling the disconnects around the financing, management and stewardship of the sector. The book was written by Emanuela di Gropello, Prateek Tandon, and Shahid Yusuf.

Chaired by

Robin Rickard, Country Director, British Council Vietnam

0945-1100

Round-table discussion: Strategic alliances to address local and international labour workforce demands

This discussion builds on the previous day’s analysis of case studies, to explore the ways that education institutions, industry, and governments can work together to produce more highly skilled graduates. By referring to real examples, speakers will attempt to better understand what makes strategic alliances succeed. Speaker:

Professor Dr Aung Tun Thet, Senior Advisor United Nations Resident Coordinator’s Office, Yangon, Myanmar

Strategic Alliances to address the need of the “new” Myanmar Professor Dr Aung Tun Thet will reflect on the fundamental political, social and economic reforms being instituted since the elections of 2010, by the new government led by President U ThanSein. He will consider the implications for education and skills development and how international collaboration can contribute to capacity building.

Speaker:

Dr Vo Tan Long, Country General Manager, IBM Vietnam

A View from Industry Dr Vo Tan Long will consider how Vietnam needs to nurture multi-disciplinary professionals to meet the needs of the growing knowledge-based economy and companies such as IBM. IBM envisions the ideal 21st-century individual as a “T-shaped” persona – someone who possesses strong technical competency but also demonstrates deep industry-specific knowledge, business-process expertise and people skills. IBM has seen the need for universities in Vietnam to evolve from teaching concepts relevant to the manufacturing era to those relevant to the services economy. Over the past decade it has worked with universities worldwide to equip students with an integrated mix of business, technology and people skills in a new academic field it terms “Service Science, Management and Engineering” (SSME). The collaboration involved is regarded as vital to drive service innovation in Vietnam.

Speaker:

Associate Professor Dr Doan Quang Vinh, Vice-President The University of Danang, Vietnam

Developing strategic alliances: an essential solution for improving quality of education and research at the University of Danang This presentation will focus on the University of Danang, the largest university in central Vietnam. Its leadership understands the importance of working closing with industry partners and it has strategic collaborations with companies such as Intel Corporation, IBM, Truong Hai Auto, and Dung Quat Petrol Complex. To enhance the employability of graduates, it sees further scope for initiatives to improve communications and collaboration between industry and higher education, a greater role for alumni, and a role for supporting government measures.

Speaker:

Associate Professor Simon Barrie, Director of Teaching and Learning, The University of Sydney, Australia

Strategic Collaborations And Partnerships – With Society Higher education’s contribution to society includes equipping graduates as agents of social good and ensuring they are able to contribute to the economic prosperity of society through their work. This contribution requires a commitment to building appropriate participation by all sectors of society in higher education as well as fostering relevant graduate capabilities for both the world of work and 11


citizenship through appropriate teaching and learning strategies and curriculum. This contribution will touch on the need to consider participation by those often under-represented in higher education in Asia (and elsewhere) if we are to reap the rewards of the “knowledge economy� through increased employability. Drawing on national projects in Australia it will question the notion that the qualities employers seek are not those that also equip graduates as agents of social good, and highlight the need for universities to develop a deeper, more complex dialogue around employability and a more iterative relationship with industry and professional associations. Lastly it will explore the range of teaching, learning and assessment strategies with the potential to foster and assure, these graduate learning outcomes.

Speaker:

Dr Christopher Hill, Director of Graduate School Academic Director for the Postgraduate Certificate of Higher Education The University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus

Capacity Building in SE Asia Providing students with the opportunity to acquire transferable skills through short courses makes graduates more employable and better able to adapt to the rapid changes in our increasingly globalised world. It is also prudent to supply suitable training for lecturers so they can provide improved teaching and supervision related to employability skills. Sustainability of projects of this nature depends largely upon the manner in which they can be contextualised, embedded and fully understood by the local community. There is a balance to be struck between so-called global solutions and national needs. Strategic alliances are instrumental, not only in the creation, development and sustainability of such ideas but also in ensuring that development is in line with national direction, aims and goals. This talk explores recent capacity building projects in Thailand, Malaysia and Kurdistan, discusses the lessons for future development and highlights the necessity to support academics and institutions to deliver locally led, cascading programmes that embed learning and training. Development of this model will help local higher education institutions increase independence and develop internal capacity, while the pedagogic element will enhance the student learning experience.

Chaired by

Professor Rupert Maclean, Director of Centre for Lifelong Learning Research and Development, Chair Professor of International Education, The Hong Kong Institute of Education (HKIEd)

1100-1115

Coffee break

1115-1145

Action planning and summary of the event

This session will summarise key conclusions and recommended actions for positive change in this complex area. Delegates will be offered the opportunity to present proposals for British Council seed funding for partnership projects that address skills gaps. Chaired by

1200-1400 1400

Robin Rickard, Country Director, British Council Vietnam

Networking lunch InterContinental Asiana Saigon, Corner Hai Ba Trung & Le Duan Blvd, District 1

Dialogue ends

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Speaker Biographies Dr Mutsuhiro Arinobu

Comptroller of The University of Tokyo Dr Mutsuhiro Arinobu started his career in 1976 in the Research and Development Centre of Tokyo Shibaura Electric Company (Toshiba Corporation), where he worked in various fields, including the strategic planning of R&D, and research into semiconductor crystal growth. In 1992, he moved to the Technology Planning and Coordination Division. He subsequently served in turn as the General Manager of Systems and Software Research Laboratories, the General Manager of the Technology Planning Division, the Corporate Vice-President and Director of the Research and Development Centre, and General Manager of the Corporate Audit Division. Since 2008, he has served as an advisor to Toshiba Corporation. In this role, he has undertaken various activities such as research and development, management of technology, and audit. In 2010, he joined the University of Tokyo as a comptroller, but maintains his relationships with industry. Dr Arinobu was the President of the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers, the Vice-President of the Japanese Society of Engineering Education, and the Vice-President of the Japan Society for Science Policy and Research Management, and is a member of the Central Council for Education. He is also vice-chairman of the Business University Forum of Japan, executive officer of the Council of Competitiveness-Nippon, and Vice-President of the Japan Accreditation Board for Engineering Education.

Associate Professor Simon Barrie

Director of Teaching and Learning The University of Sydney, Australia Simon Barrie is the Director of Teaching and Learning at The University of Sydney. He is a member of the University’s education portfolio and is responsible for leading the collaborative planning for and implementation of the university’s teaching and curriculum strategy. He leads the Institute for Teaching and Learning, and works with the heads of the Learning Centre and the Maths Learning Centre. He has strategic oversight of the university’s three teaching and learning units. Associate Professor Barrie’s research explores the nature of student learning experiences and learning outcomes in universities, the academic experience of teaching, and the academic development processes associated with efforts to improve university teaching and learning. In particular, his recent research has focused on the development and assurance of graduate learning outcomes and the quality assurance of university teaching and learning. Associate Professor Barrie’s work on graduate learning outcomes has informed policy and curriculum development at several universities in Australia and the UK. He is an international advisor and reference group member for several large-scale projects on graduate learning outcomes and assessment in Europe and Australia, and he leads national research projects in Australia on teaching quality assurance and on graduate attributes.

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Christian Bodewig

Senior Economist, Human Development Sector Coordinator, The World Bank Christian Bodewig is a senior economist in the Human Development Sector Unit in the East Asia and the Pacific department of the World Bank. He is based in Hanoi, Vietnam, where he coordinates the bank’s programme in education, health and social protection. Mr Bodewig is leading the team preparing the forthcoming Vietnam Development Report 2013 on skills. He is a co-author of the World Bank study Skills, not just Diplomas – Managing Education for Results in Eastern Europe and Central Asia, and has advised on education and social sector reforms in the new member states of the European Union. He holds a master’s degree from the London School of Economics and Political Science.

Rachel Chee

Regional Head of Education for ASEAN Association of Chartered Certified Accountants Rachel Chee is the Regional Head of Education for ASEAN of the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants. She oversees all education matters, ranging from reviewing education framework, evaluating competency framework and engaging with stakeholders, to establishing support for quality training with the aim of upholding the quality and standard of the ACCA qualification. Ms Chee has more than 10 years’ experience in an international accounting firm specialising in audit and corporate exercises for plantation and property development industry. She was seconded to the technical and training department of the same firm and was one of the pioneer members of the firm’s technical team, providing support for partners and conducting training for clients and professional staff as well as overseeing risk management policies of the firm. Ms Chee joined the Malaysian Institute of Accountants as Technical Director in 2007. In that role she represented the institute with regulators, government agencies, academia and accountants on business and technical matters as well as policy issues affecting the accountancy profession. She was appointed as the Technical Adviser to participate in the International Federation of Accountants’ Developing Nation Committee and Small-and Medium size Practitioners’ Committee. Ms Chee is a fellow member of ACCA and a member of the Malaysian Institute of Accountants.

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Stewart Comfort

Director of International Partnerships Aston University, UK Stewart Comfort is currently a part-time consultant, as Director of International Partnerships, at Aston University. He is also a tutor for Aston Business School students on their professional placement year. Until retiring from full-time work last year, Mr Comfort held a number of senior posts at Aston, most recently as Director of Marketing. His responsibilities included marketing and communications, international and UK recruitment and the university’s careers and employability service. He was also a member of the university’s senior management team. Mr Comfort has more than 20 years’ experience of marketing, student recruitment, and careers and employability in higher education and has represented Aston University at numerous conferences in the UK and abroad. Stewart was responsible for Aston’s employability strategy from 1996 until last year and has presented papers on graduate employability at a number of conferences, including the recent QS Apple Conferences.

Katherine Forestier

Senior Education Consultant British Council Hong Kong SAR, China Katherine Forestier joined the British Council in 2006 after a career as an education journalist and editor. Her responsibilities include coordinating the Global Education Dialogues: The Asia Series and is developing the British Council's work related to women in higher education in partnership with leading academics in the UK. She has also focused extensively on building the market intelligence and research portfolio related to Hong Kong, and on promoting best practice in transnational education. Previously, Ms Forestier was Education Editor of the South China Morning Post and a contributor to TES and THE, among other publications. She is now pursuing her interest in comparative education, education policy, reform and gender issues, studying for an EdD with the University of Bristol. Ms Forestier, originally from the UK, has lived in Hong Kong for more than 25 years.

Dr Libertad P. Garcia

OIC Director IV of The Philippines Commission on Higher Education (CHED) Regional Office 8 Libertad P. Garcia is currently the OIC Director IV of Commission on Higher Education (CHED) Regional Office 8. She earned her postdoctoral degree in total quality management in higher education from Centro Escolar University and holds a PhD in educational management from De La Salle University Manila. Dr Garcia has held posts in CHED as the OIC Director IV (Office of Quality Management) in 2009-2010, as Chief of the Research Division (Office of Policy, Planning, Research and Information) from 1996-present, and as Financial Analyst V – Higher Education Development Fund (HEDF) in 1995-1996. She is involved with the Technical Advisory Group (TAG) Philippine National Health Research System and works closely with members of the Department of Science and Technology – Philippine Council for Health 15


Research and Development; Department of Health, University of the Philippines; Ateneo De Manila University; Pfizer Philippines, and Commission on Higher Education. She is also an accredited mediator of the Commission on Higher Education and is a member of the following professional organisations: Philippine KOIKA Fellows’ Association, Philippine Academy of Research Managers (PHILARM), Conflict Resolution Association, Philippine Academy of Management (PAoM), UPOU Alumni Association, DLSU Alumni Association. Dr Garcia has conducted and has spoken at several training seminarworkshops about quality assurance in open and distance education, the development of globally competitive graduates, meeting standards of quality in higher education, quality management, research capacity & productivity, and enhancing competencies in writing publishable research articles.

Bill Glew

Director of MSc Professional Engineering Aston University, UK Bill Glew is Director of MSc Professional Engineering at Aston University. He has spent the past five years collaborating with the UK’s Engineering Council to develop a new educational approach for the continuing education of professional engineers, which uses work-based learning techniques to integrate academic learning with the development of practical engineering competence. The approach was successfully launched in the UK in 2008, where it has now been adopted by a number of universities. Since early 2010 Aston University has been running two pilot programmes, in Indonesia and Angola, which have demonstrated its international potential. As part of Aston University’s international partnerships strategy, Mr Glew has been talking to employers and universities worldwide, looking for opportunities to run and share the delivery of future international programmes. To support this work he has given numerous presentations at international conferences and is particularly keen to initiate new activities in Southeast Asia, where the demand for world-class engineers is continually increasing. Mr Glew had significant practical experience as a professional engineer and with senior manufacturing management before becoming an academic and this has played a major part in his design of an educational approach that is now successfully bridging the traditional divide between industry and education.

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Professor Alison Halstead

Pro-Vice-Chancellor Strategic Academic Developments Aston University, UK Professor Alison Halstead has a physics degree and materials engineering PhD from Imperial College. She started her career in industry with Tube Investments before moving back to higher education. She has held academic posts at Brunel University, Coventry University, the Open University, and University of Wolverhampton, before taking up her current post as the Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Strategic Academic Developments at Aston University. In 2005 she received a National Teaching Fellowship for her innovative curriculum development and in 2008 she became one of the first Senior Fellows of the Higher Education Academy. At Aston Professor Halstead is responsible for learning and teaching innovation, the quality of the academic learning experience, the professional development of academic staff and widening participation. She is leading the development of the Aston University Engineering Academy, one of the first University Technical Colleges in the UK, and has recently been seconded half time to the Baker Dearing Trust, as the Director for University Engagement, to promote UTCs. Professor Halstead is Trustee and Board Member of the Open College Network West Midlands, the Aston University Engineering Academy Board Trust and the Birmingham Children’s University. She is a Board Member of EU Skills.

Dr Christopher Hill

Director of Graduate School, Academic Director for the Postgraduate Certificate of Higher Education The University of Nottingham, Malaysia Campus Christopher Hill is involved with the international development of the Graduate School at the University of Nottingham and works closely with colleagues in the UK and China to provide training and strategic direction in this regard. He gained his PhD from the University of Nottingham and has worked at the University of Nottingham’s Malaysia campus developing and establishing the Graduate School since 2008. He has international experience working in education in China, Germany, Ghana, Iraq, Malaysia, Spain, Tanzania, Thailand, UK, USA and Vietnam. Dr Hill is the Academic Director for the Postgraduate Certificate of Higher Education at the University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus and coordinates staff professional development training across the campus. He recently completed a two-year British Council DelPHE funded project developing and building research and supervisor capacity in the Kurdistan region of Iraq and is currently working with the British Council and Research Council in Thailand to develop an equivalent project for 10 Thai universities. Dr Hill’s research interests include transnational education and its impact in Southeast Asia, the development of international education and the student experience in the global arena. He has published and presented in the field of international education and politics and organised and delivered conferences, workshops, training and lectures around the world and was most recently awarded a 2012 U21 Teaching and Learning Network Fellowship to research internationalisation and global citizenship.

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Dr Peter Hooper

Head of Research & Enterprise Services Keele University, UK Peter Hooper is Head of Research & Enterprise Services at the University of Keele, leading a unit which unites 20 staff spanning business engagement, technology transfer and research support. Priorities include employer engagement, student enterprise and employability. Dr Hooper’s role includes policy development, particularly to do with knowledge transfer between the university and external partners. The nature of the job means he interacts with all sections of the university, dealing with researchers and educationalists from all subjects as well as working with the Medical School, the University Hospital of North Staffordshire and Keele’s Science & Business Park. He also works with a wide variety of external partners in various sectors; locally, nationally and internationally. Prior to joining Keele in late 2007, Dr Hooper held a number of senior posts at the University of Southampton, including Director of Research Support, Marketing and Technology Transfer. He started his career, after completing a PhD in marine geology, in marketing, and played commercial roles in the IT and publishing sectors before moving into business development as deputy managing director of UCL initiatives. He has acted as a non-executive director or board member for a range of bodies, including an environmental technology spin-out, a regional marketing company plus national and international collaborations. Dr Hooper has spoken at a number of national and international conferences on technology transfer, knowledge exchange and employability.

Dr Janet B. Ilieva

Senior Education Adviser British Council Hong Kong SAR, China Dr Janet B. Ilieva is a Senior Education Adviser with the British Council, Hong Kong, where her area of expertise includes policy analysis of global education systems and trends in international student mobility. More recently, she has been studying the wider impact of internationalisation on higher education research and teaching. She has been with the British Council for the past eight years. Dr Ilieva is a member of the advisory group for Project Atlas (global student mobility think tank based with the Institute for International Education, US) and the Association for Studies in International Education. She holds a PhD in economics from the Manchester Metropolitan University (UK). Previously, she lectured in economics at the University of Veliko Turnovo (Bulgaria) and the University of Applied Sciences in Ludwigsburg (Germany) and Research Methods at the University of Calabria (Italy).

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Dr Vo Tan Long

Country General Manager IBM Vietnam Dr Vo Tan Long was appointed Country General Manager, IBM Vietnam, in November 2008. He oversees IBM’s operations in Vietnam, including sales and distribution, marketing, finance, procurement and corporate support functions. Dr Long began his career with IBM in early 1997 as a product specialist before becoming sales leader in charge of the company’s enterprise server business. Since then, he has held a number of managerial positions with IBM Vietnam. Before taking up his current role, Dr Long served as IBM Vietnam’s Deputy General Manager, responsible for the general business sector. He was instrumental in shaping IBM’s small and medium business strategy, creating lasting relationships with clients by developing an indepth understanding of their requirements. Prior to working with IBM, Dr Long had a few years of experience in technical sales, marketing and management in Ukraine and Russia. He holds a PhD degree in physics and mathematics from the SaintPetersburg State Electrical Engineering University in Russia.

Professor Carl Lygo

Group CEO & Principal, BPP University College, UK Carl Lygo is Chief Executive Officer of BPP, a wholly owned subsidiary of the world’s leading private higher education business Apollo Global Inc., where he has oversight of BPP’s 22 city UK-based learning centre footprint, and its presence throughout 11 countries in Europe. As Principal of the UK’s first and currently only for profit degree awarding body, BPP University College, Professor Lygo led BPP to gain degree awarding powers in 2007 and University status in 2010. Professor Lygo is a qualified Barrister who also has experience of working within the UK publicly maintained University sector.

Professor Rupert Maclean

Director of Centre for Lifelong Learning Research and Development Chair Professor of International Education, The Hong Kong Institute of Education Professor Rupert Maclean is Chair Professor of International Education, UNESCO Chair in TVET and Lifelong Learning and Director of the Centre for Lifelong Learning Research and Development, the Hong Kong Institute of Education (HKIEd). Before joining HKIEd, Professor Maclean worked for almost two decades with UNESCO in Yangon, Bangkok, Paris and Bonn. He has mainly been involved with providing support to developing countries to help strengthen and upgrade their systems of schooling to cope with change, and to promote successful innovative and best practices, with particular reference to education for the world of work (TVET). He is co-editor, with David Wilson, of the six-volume International Handbook on Education for the Changing World of Work: Bridging 19


Academic and Vocational Learning, published by Springer in 2009 and co-editor with Felix Rauner of the Handbook of TVET Research (Springer, 2008). Professor Maclean was appointed an Officer of the Order of Australia (AO) in the Queen’s Birthday Honours List for Australia announced on June 13 last year. The award was for distinguished service of a high degree to humanity at large through his work as an international academic and professional, working to improve education in developing countries. He is specifically recognised “for distinguished service to technical and vocational education, particularly through the UNESCO”. The Order of Australia is the pre-eminent means by which Australia recognises the outstanding and meritorious service of its citizens.

Associate Professor Dr Le Quang Minh

Vice-President Vietnam National University, Ho Chi Minh City Associate Professor Dr Le Quang Minh worked in Can Tho University as the Dean of the College of Technology, Vice-Rector in charge of international relations, and then Rector until his term ended in December 2006. He was a member of Vietnam National Assembly for two terms from 1997 to 2007, and a member of the National Council of Education from 2002 to 2007. He then joined Vietnam National University – Ho Chi Minh City (VNU-HCM), where he served as Senior Advisor to the President. Since 2008, he has been Vice-President in charge of International Relations and Research of VNU-HCM. He obtained his first degree, a BSc in agronomy, at Can Tho University; his MSc in water resources management in 1985, and PhD in 1996 with Wageningen University, The Netherlands.

Madame Ton Nu Thi Ninh

Director of Tri Viet Centre for Social and Educational Research, former Vice-Chairwoman, National Assembly Committee for External Affairs, former Vietnamese Ambassador to Belgium and the European Union Madame Ninh served her country as a diplomat for more than two decades, specialising in multilateral institutions (United Nations, NonAligned Movement, Francophonie, and ASEAN) and global issues (international peace and security, development, environment, governance, and human rights). She was the chief architect of key international efforts on behalf of Vietnam, such as the holding of the Summit of FrenchSpeaking Countries in 1997 in Hanoi. From 2000 to 2003 she was Ambassador and Head of Mission to the

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European Union in Brussels, then, until 2007, Vice-Chair of Vietnam’s 11 National Assembly’s Foreign Affairs Committee, with a special focus on North America and Western Europe. In her capacity as a diplomat, an elected official and, today, a social entrepreneur regularly invited to address international gatherings inside and outside Vietnam, Madame Ninh has consistently worked to build bridges of understanding and cooperation between Vietnam and the world. She is currently a member of the Asia-Pacific Leadership Network for Nuclear Non-Proliferation and Disarmament, the Honorary Advisers’ Council of the Asia-New Zealand 20


Foundation and the Advisory Committee of Asia Society’s Women Leaders of New Asia. Madame Ninh's present role, as Director of the Tri Viet Centre for Social and Educational Research – a knowledge and ideas exchange to help develop social awareness around critical issues – draws upon her European education, her first calling as an academic at the Sorbonne in Paris, her rich international experience and her lifelong commitment to Vietnam. Madame Ninh is the recipient of the French Legion d’Honneur (Commandeur), the Belgian Order of Leopold II, and the Vietnamese Medal of Labour – First Class.

Robin Rickard

Country Director British Council Vietnam Robin Rickard has been Country Director of the British Council Vietnam since August 2009. He manages 160 staff, providing British Council services across Vietnam – a priority country for the British Council (BC) both globally and within East Asia – and acts as the regional strategic lead for Equality and Diversity, and Child Protection. Mr Rickard joined the BC in 1999, serving as Deputy Director, Poland, from 1999 to 2004, and as Deputy Director China and Director Beijing from 2004 to 2009. He studied geography at Durham University, where he gained a BA (Honours) degree in 1979 and followed that with an MA in education and society from Sussex University in 1985. He is a qualified secondary school teacher and is the holder of a professional qualification in management from Middlesex University. Before joining the British Council, Mr Rickard worked for nearly 20 years in the education and public sectors. His teaching experience in the UK includes both mainstream and special education in day and residential schools. In the public sector, he worked in local government in the fields of social inclusion and education. Immediately prior to joining the British Council, he held the posts of Deputy Director of Education & Community Development for the London Borough of Barnet. For many years Mr Rickard has worked as an elected volunteer board member of various local, national and international non-governmental organisations. From 1990 until 1993 he was the elected Chairperson of the UK branch of Amnesty International. Subsequently, he was elected to the International Executive Committee of Amnesty and served as the elected Vice-Chairperson of the global movement until 1999. In 1990 he founded a charity for people with communication difficulties in England.

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Dr Illah Sailah

Director of Academic Affairs Directorate General of Higher Education Ministry of Education and Culture Indonesia Illah Sailah has been Director of Academic Affairs at the Directorate General of Higher Education (DGHE), Ministry of National Education, since February 2009. This has involved arranging study programmes, formulating competence-based curricula, soft skills development, and leadership training. Dr Sailah is also a lecturer in the Department of Agro-industrial Technology and the Master’s Programme of Management and Business at Bogor Agricultural University. She completed her PhD with University of Queensland (Australia) in the field of chemical engineering.

Paul Smith

Chairman of Harvey Nash Outsourcing Member of the UK-ASEAN Business Council Paul Smith is Non-Executive Chairman of Harvey Nash plc Outsourcing, Non-Executive Chairman of Nashtech Software, was a management board member of FPT Software, serves on the board of management with Roehampton University, is a board member and Vietnam trade specialist of the UK ASEAN Business Council chaired by Lord Davis, and an ExMinister of State for Trade and Investment. With extensive experience in the outsourcing market in Europe USA and Asia Pacific, Mr Smith has worked in Asia for 12 years, building a substantial software business employing 1,500 Vietnamese staff. He is a significant contributor to the Vietnam ICT services sector and was honoured by the Vietnamese government VINASA in 2007 and 2009 for his achievements. Mr Smith, an entrepreneur, has created and sold four technology businesses in the UK and the USA, has chaired a number of ICT missions to Vietnam, introducing more than 280 British businesses to the country, and has chaired trade missions on behalf of the London Chamber of Commerce to promote trade between Vietnam and the UK. He will be taking another mission of 30 delegates to Vietnam in November 2012. Mr Smith is a member of the Chartered Institute of Marketing, Fellow Chartered Institute of Directors, and has a BA in business and a Dip AD in fine art.

Dr Antony Stokes

British Ambassador to Vietnam Dr Antony Stokes LVO took up his appointment as British Ambassador to Vietnam in November 2010. Prior to that he was Head of Mission in Riga (2009-2010). As Head of the South Asia Group (2005-2008), Dr Stokes was responsible for relations with India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Bhutan and the Maldives. In Seoul (2000-2004) he dealt with the United Kingdom’s relations with the Republic of Korea and the DPRK, and in Bangkok (1996-1999) was accredited to Thailand and to the Lao PDR. Dr Stokes has covered a number of security issues at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO), including European security policy. He has represented the FCO on the Higher Command and Staff Course at the 22


Joint Services Command and Staff College, and HM The Queen awarded him the honour of LVO in 1996. Before joining the FCO in 1994 he worked in private sector management roles. He has a PhD from University College London and an MA in electrical sciences from Queens’ College, Cambridge.

Mai Thi Thanh

Senior Education Specialist The World Bank Mai Thi Thanh is a senior education specialist of the World Bank in Vietnam. She holds a Masters degree in Financial Economics from the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. Her portfolio at the World Bank covers lending programmes and technical assistance in basic education and higher education. Her areas of expertise include education sector financing, teacher policies, student assessment, institutional and social analysis.

Professor Dr Aung Tun Thet

Senior Advisor, United Nations Resident Coordinator’s Office, Yangon, Myanmar Professor Dr Aung Tun Thet is a senior international and national public servant with recognised expertise in social issues, capacity development, leadership and management and development economics. Currently he is a member of the Pyithu Hluttaw (Parliament) Commission on Legal and Special Cases, member of the Ministry of Finance Think-Tank and member of the Presidential National Economic and Social Advisory Council. He is also serving as the Senior Advisor at the United Nations Resident Coordinator’s Office. He is teaching postgraduate courses as a visiting professor at the Institute of Economics and University of Public Health. He served for many years with UNICEF in New York, Dhaka and Bangkok and at the United Nations System Staff College in Turin, Italy. He was the Director-General at the Department of Planning and Statistics, Ministry of Health. He received his PhD in management sciences at the University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology, and was the Alexander von Humboldt Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Marburg in Germany.

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Le Tien Truong

Member of Board of Directors, Standing Vice-President Vietnam National Textile and Garment Group (VINATEX) Le Tien Truong has been the First Vice-President and Member of the Board of Vietnam National Textile & Garment Group (VINATEX) since 2007. Prior to that, he worked for Coats Phong Phu, an UK joint venture in Vietnam, where he held several key country and regional positions: Director of Northern Region (2000) and Human Resources Director for Coats Asia Pacific (2002). Mr Truong graduated from Hanoi University of Technology as a mechanical engineer and subsequently earned his MBA in human resource management from Asia Institute of Technology in 1997. He has studied in the UK, France and at Harvard Kennedy School in the USA and has extensive background in differing human resource areas, such as developing salary scales based on job value systems, balancing score cards in the textiles & garment industry, the psychology of managing staff in the textiles & garment industry and training needs assessment in the T&G industry. Mr Truong’s interests include human resources development, organisational design and IT application in human resources.

Associate Professor Dr Doan Quang Vinh

Vice-President The University of Danang, Vietnam Prior to his appointment as vice president of the University of Danang in Vietnam, Associate Professor Vinh served as vice rector of Danang University of Technology (DUT) from 2010 to 2012. He was dean of DUT’s Electrical Engineering Faculty, 2005-2010, and vice director of UD’s Department of Academic affairs, 1997-2004 while also maintaining his teaching and research roles with the Electrical Engineering Faculty. Associate Professor Vinh gained his electrical engineer degree from the Institute of Technology, Pilsner City, Czech Republic, in 1985 and completed his PhD in automation at the University of West Bohemia in the Czech Republic in 1996. His main research projects include digital control of an introduction machine, current inverter, DC motor digital control, and work with battery chargers. He gained the title of Associate Professor in 2004. He has been awarded Certificates of Merit by the Chairman of Danang City People’s Committee and by the Minister of Education and Training. Beyond work, he enjoys table tennis, listening to music, and being with people.

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Contact us Dung Vu Assistant Director British Council Vietnam T +84 4 37281928 Dung.Vu@britishcouncil.org.vn Giang Nguyen Higher Education Manager British Council Vietnam T +84 4 37281926 Giang.Nguyen@britishcouncil.org.vn Katherine Forestier Senior Education Consultant, and Coordinator, Global Education Dialogues: The Asia Series British Council Hong Kong SAR, China T +852 29822602 Katherine.Forestier@britishcouncil.org.hk

Find out more about this and other Global Education Dialogues at www.britishcouncil.org/ged GED.Support@britishcouncil.org.hk

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Global Education Dialogue Handbook  

The handbook provides the Dialogue's background, detailed programme and speaker's profiles and presentations.