Recycling Product News September 2021, Volume 29, Number 6

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SEPTEMBER 2021 recyclingproductnews.com

STRATEGIES FOR SCRAP SUCCESS

WEST COAST METAL RECYCLING IS CUTTING ITS OWN PATH ON THE ROAD TO GROWTH BY INVESTING IN ITS PEOPLE AND TOOLS

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COVER STORY STRATEGIES FOR SCRAP SUCCESS

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recyclingproductnews.com | SEPTEMBER 2021

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EQUIPMENT ROUNDUP: COMPACT MOBILE IMPACT CRUSHERS


September 2021 | Volume 29, Number 6

FEATURES

DEPARTMENTS & SECTIONS

16

Strategies for scrap success

8

From the Editor

24

Ontario end-of-life tire program is demonstrating success on the road to a circular economy

10

News Room

14 Spotlight

28

Transforming landfill-bound glass

32

Building the circular economy: insight from a fibre-based-packaging producer

38

Compact mobile impact crushing plants for asphalt recycling

42

A focus on effective leadership in sustainability through the solid waste lens

16

Cover Story

24

Tire Recycling

28

Glass Recycling

32

Paper Recycling

38

Equipment Roundup

42

Last Word

46

Advertiser Index

SEPTEMBER 2021 | recyclingproductnews.com

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SEPTEMBER 2021 | VOLUME 29 • NUMBER 6 SENIOR EDITOR Keith Barker kbarker@baumpub.com 604-291-9900 ext. 305 EDITOR IN CHIEF Kaitlyn Till ktill@baumpub.com 604-291-9900 ext. 330

ADVERTISING PRODUCTION MANAGER Tina Anderson production@baumpub.com 604-291-9900 ext. 222 DESIGN & PRODUCTION Morena Zanotto morena@baumpub.com 604-291-9900 ext. 325

DIGITAL EDITOR Slone Fox sfox@baumpub.com 604-291-9900 ext. 335 ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER/ VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES Sam Esmaili sam@baumpub.com 604-291-9900 ext. 110

PRESIDENT/PUBLISHER Ken Singer ksinger@baumpub.com 604-291-9900 ext. 226 VICE PRESIDENT/CONTROLLER Melvin Date Chong mdatechong@baumpub.com

FOUNDER Engelbert J. Baum

Published by: Baum Publications Ltd.

FROM THE COVER: WEST COAST METAL RECYCLING HOOK-LIFT TRUCKS IN LANGLEY, B.C. Terry McHale and his team employ clear strategies for success based on outstanding customer service and using the most efficient equipment and tools for the job.

124 - 2323 Boundary Road Vancouver, BC, Canada V5M 4V8 Tel: 604-291-9900 Toll Free: 1-888-286-3630 Fax: 604-291-1906 www.baumpub.com www.recyclingproductnews.com @RecyclingPN FOR ALL CIRCULATION INQUIRIES Phone: 1-855-329-1909 • Fax: 1-855-272-0972 e-mail: baumpublications@circlink.ca

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One year subscription rates for others: Canada $33.50 + 1.68 GST = $35.18; U.S.A. $40; other countries $63.50. Single copies $6.00 + 0.30 GST = $6.30; outside Canada $7.00. All prices are in ­Canadian funds. Recycling Product News accepts no responsibility or liability for reported claims made by manufacturers and/or distributors for products or services; the views and opinions ­expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of Baum Publications Ltd. We acknowledge the financial support of the Government of Canada. Copyright 2021 Baum Publications Ltd. No portion of this publication may be reproduced without permission of the publishers. Printed in Canada, on recycled paper, by Mitchell Press Ltd. ISSN 1715-7013. PUBLICATIONS MAIL AGREEMENT NO. 40069270.

WE’D LIKE TO HEAR FROM YOU Do you have a story, equipment or technology innovation, commentary or news that our readers in the recycling industry should know about? Drop us a line any time. Contact: Senior Editor Keith Barker at kbarker@baumpub.com or 604-291-9900 ext. 305

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FROM THE EDITOR

FROM THE EDITOR PLAYING THE WAITING GAME

P

profitability at the scrapyard, in the simplest terms, is about touching material as little as possible; producing quality, highly pure, upgraded material; and moving it quickly to market. Over the last year, it is the last part of this equation that poses the most challenges for scrap recyclers that rely on export. For all scrap recyclers, there is a general shortage of containers on the ground, as well as trucks, including the specialized quad-axle, steel-deck haul trucks required to move scrap metal to many North American markets. For those that export scrap overseas, the real issue, one that is affecting all exporters worldwide, is the actual lack of ships to take containers to international markets. According to scrap exporter Terry McHale, owner of Vancouver-based West Coast Metal Recycling, and the subject of our cover story this issue, “We can get containers. The problem is the ships, they’re all delayed.” What could be referred to as a “perfect storm” of factors for the current global shipping situation really started with a shift in global end markets away from China in 2018, and tense geopolitical tensions over the last several years, especially between China and the U.S. The storm builds when we then consider the economic implications of the global pandemic since March 2020, which has resulted in increased global demand for goods combined with labour shortages, including at ports and on ships. Add to all of this the serious global shipping delays and backlogs caused by the Ever Given debacle in the Suez Canal, which lasted from March to July 2021, and we now have the current situation in which container ships are extremely delayed, running over capacity and are very expensive and difficult to book in a timely or reliable way. For scrap metal exporters, with shipping lines and ports controlling which containers are moved, the truth is also that our industry’s material often takes a back seat to more lucrative freight as well as essential goods including perishables and medicine. When a container full of valuable scrap does get a spot, freight rates for shipping to ports in Asia, those that have moved in to fill the void left by China, including Taiwan, Vietnam, Malaysia, Korea, Japan and India, are extremely high. Based on industry numbers, those costs have approximately doubled on average since the start of the pandemic and are up 400 percent compared to 2019. This means that for scrapyards depending on foreign markets, even though market prices for ferrous and non-ferrous have been positive for most of the last year, times are relatively

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All scrap exporters are dealing with the exact same thing, so nobody has an advantage when it comes to shipping currently. I think we’re all on a level playing field. Terry McHale

tough. But, as West Coast Metal Recycling’s McHale also points out, “All scrap exporters are dealing with the exact same thing, so nobody has an advantage when it comes to shipping currently. I think we’re all on a level playing field.” There is no quick, easy solution for fixing the current delays and high costs in global shipping, which are expected to last at least through 2021. All recyclers can do is make their freight bookings as early as possible, or look to domestic end markets as an alternative to international ones. Of course, they can also renew focus on elements of the recycling business that can be controlled, and which can make a serious difference to the bottom line no matter what end markets are doing. Customer service, taking care of employees, improving maintenance and safety infrastructure, and investing in the latest technology and equipment to build efficiencies in processing all come to mind.

KEITH BARKER Senior Editor kbarker@baumpub.com recyclingproductnews.com


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NEWS ROOM

FIRST OF ITS KIND VESSEL COLLECTS, TREATS AND REPURPOSES FLOATING PLASTIC DEBRIS

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The SeaCleaners have developed the Manta, a first-of-its-kind processing ship designed to collect, treat and repurpose large volumes of floating plastic debris. The Manta extracts both floating macro-waste and smaller debris, from 10 mm upward and up to 1 m deep, from highly polluted waters, along coasts, in estuaries and in the mouths of large rivers. Depending on the density and closeness of the layers of waste, the Manta can collect between 1 to 3 tonnes of waste per hour, with the objective of collecting 5 to 10,000 tonnes per year. It can operate for up to 20 hours a day, 7 days a week, and uses onboard waste-to-energy technology to convert the collected plastics into fuel to power the ship. The Manta will also host other scientific missions on board, and when in port will hold educational and learning conferences for the general public.

GFL ACQUISITION OF TERRAPURE FOR $743.8 MILLION EXCLUDES BATTERY RECYCLING OPERATIONS GFL Environmental has closed the previously announced acquisition of the solid waste and environmental solutions business of Terrapure Environmental and its subsidiaries. For an aggregate purchase price of $743.8 million, the acquisition includes all Terrapure assets, excluding the company’s battery recycling business. “Terrapure brings a high-quality, complementary network of assets and customer base to our existing solid and liquid waste operations and expands our service offerings in several regional markets,” said Patrick Dovigi, founder and chief executive officer of GFL. “This strategically located network of assets and Terrapure’s strong operating margins are expected to be immediately accretive to free cash flow and provide opportunities for us to continue to pursue our growth strategy.” In March 2021, GFL Environmental entered into a definitive agreement to acquire the solid waste and environmental solutions business of Terrapure for C$927.5 million.

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LARGEST SORTING PLANT IN LATIN AMERICA IS UP AND RUNNING IN MEXICO CITY The Azcapotzalco Transfer Station and Sorting Plant, the largest and most modern in Latin America, has opened its doors in Mexico City. The new Azcapotzalco facility was built in partnership with MRF equipment and technology supplier STADLER, is run by Pro Ambiente, a subsidiary of CEMEX, and is the country’s first government-owned automated plant for the separation and treatment of municipal solid waste. The 11,000-square-metre facility sorts paper, cardboard, multilayer packaging, PET and HDPE, plastic bags and film, aluminum cans, metallized bags, textiles, glass and other metals. The plant was commissioned in May 2021, with official start up on July 25 and is expected to generate over 400 jobs. It operates in conjunction with a transfer station, and will be capable of receiving up to 1,400 tonnes of waste per day.

NEW PURECYCLE FACILITY TO PRODUCE ULTRA-PURE RPP FROM WASTE POLYPROPYLENE PureCycle Technologies, Inc. has reached an agreement with The Augusta Economic Development Authority to build its first U.S. cluster facility to produce ultra-pure recycled polypropylene (rPP) from waste polypropylene (PP). The 200-acre location in Augusta Corporate Park will create over 80 manufacturing jobs with an initial $440 million investment to primarily fund three lines of 130mm pounds of capacity during Phase 1 of the project. Augusta-Richmond County was selected based on feed and product delivery supply chain efficiencies, community support, a skilled labour market and Georgia’s business-friendly environment. PureCycle uses licensed proprietary technology to recycle waste PP into ultra-pure recycled PP for applications spanning consumer goods, automotive, building and construction, and industrial uses. The company can process a wide range of waste PP with varying levels of contamination.

KADANT ACQUIRES BALEMASTER FOR $54 MILLION Kadant Inc. has completed its acquisition of Balemaster for $54 million in cash, subject to certain customary adjustments. Balemaster is a manufacturer of horizontal balers and related equipment used primarily for recycling packaging waste at corrugated box plants and large retail and distribution centres. The company’s revenue for the twelve months ended June 30, 2021, was approximately $22 million. Balemaster will become part of Kadant’s material handling reporting segment.

ONTARIO END-OFLIFE TIRE PROGRAM IS DEMONSTRATING SUCCESS ON THE ROAD TO A CIRCULAR ECONOMY The province’s recently established approach to end-of-life tire diversion could benefit the future of the entire scrap tire industry across Canada, reduce our carbon footprint and help with developing a more circular economy in North America, according to eTracks Tire Management System’s Steve Meldrum. For more on this story, turn to page 24.

SEPTEMBER 2021 | recyclingproductnews.com

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NEWS ROOM

LATEST WASTE CONNECTIONS ACQUISITIONS REFLECTS U.S. EXPANSION Waste Connections has acquired E.L. Harvey & Sons Inc., the largest family owned and operated solid waste services company in Massachusetts, with total annualized revenue of approximately $110 million, and a 110-year history dating back four generations. Harvey provides solid waste collection, recycling and transfer services to commercial, industrial, municipal and residential customers primarily in Central and Eastern Massachusetts and Southern New Hampshire. “The Harvey family has established one of the most respected companies in our industry, and we are honoured to welcome Harvey to the Waste Connections family,” said Worthing F. Jackman, Waste Connections’ president and chief executive officer. “Together with their continuing leadership team, we look forward to carrying on the Harvey name and further expanding its market position, as well as enhancing its strong culture of support for its employees, customers and communities.” Waste Connections also announced the closing of one of its two previously announced signed acquisitions, with approximately $50 million of annualized revenue from franchise operations in Northern California and Nevada. The company expects the other signed acquisition, a solid waste services provider with approximately $25 million of annualized revenue from franchise operations in Oregon, to close during the fourth quarter.

MORE NEWS www.recyclingproductnews.com

ISRI RECOGNIZED FOR COVID-19 RESOURCE HUB The Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries (ISRI) was recognized as a 2021 APEX Award Winner for its COVID-19 Resource Hub, which provides resources for members in the areas of safe operations, state and local policies, federal legislation, and recycling as part of essential critical infrastructure. Through their COVID-19 Resource Hub, ISRI provided real-time updates on government policies as well as the latest safe operations guidelines. These updates were provided in a variety of forms including podcasts, newsletters and videos, as well as member alerts. The Hub also included toolkits for recyclers to use with their employees to communicate safe operations, and the association also had a COVID-specific email address to triage pandemic related questions from members.

NORTHSTAR BRINGS INNOVATION TO ASPHALT SHINGLE RECYCLING Northstar Clean Technologies, a Delta, B.C.-based clean technology company focused on the recovery and repurposing of single-use asphalt shingles, recently raised $12.24 million and has been subsequently listed on the TSX Venture Exchange. Northstar’s Bitumen Extraction and Separation Technology (BEST) uses a proprietary process to separate the liquid asphalt, fibre and aggregate sands from discarded or defective asphalt roofing shingles destined for landfill. According to Northstar, asphalt shingles are the most popular roofing material in North America due to their low cost, low

RPRA 2021 REGISTRY FEES FOR MANAGING ONTARIO’S EPR PROGRAMS RANGE FROM $75 TO $7,500 PER YEAR The Resource Productivity and Recovery Authority (RPRA) has posted the final 2021 Registry fees for Blue Box materials and Hazardous and Special Products (HSP). These are fees that producers are required to pay to the Authority in 2021 to recover its operational costs, including costs related to building and operating the Registry, and compliance and enforcement activities. There are no fees for service providers or producer responsibility organizations (PROs) in 2021. Fees range from a $75 flat yearly fee for producers supplying less than 50,000 kg paper/packaging to a $7,500 yearly fee for producers and sellers of mercury-containing barometers, thermometers and thermostats.

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weight, and durability, representing over 80 percent of the roofs constructed in North America today, and landfill tipping fees have tripled on average. The company says an asphalt shingle roof typically has a 15-year lifespan, after which it gets torn off and replaced. Twelve million tons of asphalt shingles are sent to landfills annually in North America with only 1 million tons recycled back into road pavement. In a survey of 13 Vancouver, B.C.based roofing companies, it was confirmed that environmental concerns have spread to the frontlines of asphalt roofing industry and that tipping fees have tripled in the last 10 years.


EREF’S NEW STRATEGIC PLAN REFLECTS EXPANSION INTO SUSTAINABLE MATERIALS MANAGEMENT SPACE The Environmental Research & Education Foundation (EREF) has revealed a new five-year strategic plan and new vision and mission statements. Under this new direction, EREF will further branch out into the sustainability space, aiming to build relationships with and unite every aspect of the circular economy. The new mission is to advance scientific research and create educational pathways that enable innovation in sustainable waste management practices. This new plan and expansion into sustainable materials management comes at a time of increased corporate focus on social responsibility driven by consumer interest, increased regulatory focus on extended producer responsibility, and roadblocks to sustainability, such as technological limitations, greenwashing and limited consumer education. Sustainable

materials management requires cooperation from a number of parties, including manufacturers, brands, consumers and the waste industry, and EREF seeks to advance science, data availability and knowledge, as well as open dialogue across the circular economy. EREF says their current core programs will continue: Research Grants, Scholarships, Education and Data & Policy; however, the organization says it will incorporate more focus on sustainability and the circular economy and will be leveraged to inform conversations with new constituents. According to the organization, this new five-year plan brings a stronger focus on development and marketing/communications, and as EREF moves further into the sustainability space, this strategy will open doors to new stakeholders and audiences.

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SPOTLIGHT

SPOTLIGHT

INTRODUCTIONS & UPDATES

Automated side loader

Tracked horizontal grinder

Bandit Industries

COMPACT TRACKED HORIZONTAL GRINDER

Bandit Industries’ new Model 1425 Track is a highly productive, compact track-mounted horizontal grinder equipped with many of the same features as the tow-behind version. This grinder is offered with a variety of tooth and screen options and features a 7-foot-long x 24-inch-wide steel or rubber belt infeed conveyor and a stationary discharge with a stacking height of 7 feet. To further enhance the machine’s capabilities, an optional grinder head or chipper drum provides the ability to produce mulch or a dimensional chip using 14 cutter bodies, while the chipper drum features four chipper knives that will produce a chip ranging from ¼-inch up to 1-inch.

McNeilus

Komatsu

This new Zero Radius Automated Side Loader features the largest hopper available of any side loader on the market and an extremely fast pack cycle, according to McNeilus. It offers an innovative radius operation, ideal for narrow streets and alleyways, and its arm reaches, rather than swings, to grab 30- to 110-gallon cans, with optional 12-foot extended reach. Other enhancements include McNeilus’ simplified CODE CAN-based controls that provide complete vehicle diagnostics, tailgate-mounted CNG power, load-sense hydraulics for fuel savings, and CartSeeker Curbside Automation technology that identifies and locates curbside waste carts and fully automates the operation of the truck’s robotic lift arm without joystick manipulation.

The new FH100-160-1 series of forklifts from Komatsu integrate components and technology from the company’s wheel loaders, bulldozers and excavators, making them ideal for high cycle and heavy-load applications, including recycling and waste management. A hydrostatic drive system allows these forklifts to shuttle continuously with virtually no wear on drive and brake components, and a highly efficient, electronically controlled hydrostatic transmission hydraulic pump and motor system increases operator control, minimizes power transmission loss, helps moderate fuel use and reduces environmental impact. Other key features include: sealed wet multiple-disc brakes that provide protection from dust, dirt and debris, Tier 4 Final engine and Komatsu’s Komtrax wireless tracking and reporting system.

AUTOMATED SIDE-LOADER INCLUDES INDUSTRY’S LARGEST HOPPER

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Heavy-duty forklift

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HEAVY-DUTY FORKLIFTS FOR HIGHCYCLE, HEAVY LOAD APPLICATIONS


Super screener

Hybrid material handler

SENNEBOGEN

NEW HYBRID MATERIAL HANDLER

SENNEBOGEN has introduced the 835 G material handler with a hybrid drive system that can be individually configured for demanding applications in scrap and other recycling applications, as well as port handling. This model includes a Maxcab cab offering maximum driver comfort and easy operation, reach up to 20 m, and a wide range of configuration options. The 835 G features easy maintenance, a 188 KW Stage V diesel engine and engine output supplemented by an energy recovery system known as Green Hybrid, which considerably increases overall system output when in use, providing additional working speed and increased handling performance with up to 30 percent lower fuel consumption. Units feature high load capacity, and a newly designed Maxcab cab can be hydraulically raised over 2.8 m.

West Salem Machinery

REDESIGNED SCREEN MOVES MATERIAL UP TO FOUR TIMES FASTER West Salem Machinery’s new Super Screener has been redesigned and manufactured for reduced maintenance, increased production and a longer operating life. New features include a 15 percent lighter basket and increased durability with oversized hangers. Material moves up to four times faster due to the steep slope and stainless steel pan bottom – ideal for wet materials like compost and bark mulch – and a relocated drive allows for an unobstructed flow of material. Optional features include wire mesh or perforated screens, a ball deck for increased material agitation to help prevent buildup and blinding, multiple material classifications, top covers, access platforms and infeed chutes.

SEPTEMBER 2021 | recyclingproductnews.com

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COVER STORY

STRATEGIES FOR

SCRAP SUCCESS


WEST COAST METAL RECYCLING IS CUTTING ITS OWN PATH ON THE ROAD TO GROWTH BY INVESTING IN ITS PEOPLE AND TOOLS BY KEITH BARKER, SENIOR EDITOR

Located on 3.5 acres in Langley, B.C., West Coast Metal Recycling processes about 3,000 tons of ferrous material monthly.


COVER STORY

F

or scrap metal recyclers, the challenges of doing business are wide-ranging. The industry depends on volatile and unpredictable end markets, both domestically and globally, and faces very tough, unique issues including metal theft and susceptibility to fire and other hazards for its workers. Over the last year, especially since the onset of the pandemic, new challenges have emerged in the scrap industry, including shortages with respect to labour, containers, haul trucks and especially ships to move containers to overseas markets. All of this results in tighter and tighter profit margins, which means that scrap recyclers have to look to elements of their business that they can control, such as customer service, taking care of employees and increasing efficiencies at every stage in the recycling process. West Coast Metal Recycling (WCMR), located on 3.5 acres in Langley, B.C., started in 1966 as R&P Metals, and is now an award-winning example of using these strategies to remain competitive in scrap recycling. According to co-owner Terry McHale, they have built their business up from a rented, 2,000-square-foot shop originally in a barn, with three people, to their current operation at 52,000 square feet and 30 employees. Earlier this year, WCMR was awarded a 2021 Canadian Business award for “Best Metal Recycling Facility – Metro Vancouver,” and as of this summer, is processing about 3,000 tons of ferrous material per month – almost double what they were processing only a few years ago.

Customers don’t call you when their bin is full. They call you when it’s overfull or when they were supposed to call yesterday. Terry McHale

“Our growth has been exponential over the last 20 years,” says McHale. “We had a vision, a plan of what we wanted to do, and we just stuck with it.” According to McHale, they are constantly adapting and changing in response to customer needs and industry trends, continuously exploring new options in equipment, technology and processing, as well as investing and implementing when there is a benefit to both the company and its customers. But while WCMR has seen positive growth over the last several years, and through their history, they are now approaching capacity based on the small space they have to work with. They would consider expanding their space, but Vancouver and its surrounding areas have some of the highest real estate costs in the world. He estimates that industrial land is probably between $4 and $5 million per acre, even in Langley City, a small urban centre outside of the larger City of Vancouver, so it is extremely prohibitive to simply go buy a bigger yard. So for WCMR, like many in the industry, to maintain growth and success the best option is to stand out through customer

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service, keep employees happy and be more efficient within the space they have – which means using both the right strategies and the right equipment.

STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS Customer service

McHale says their mission has always been to provide superior service to customers while maintaining safety and environmental standards. “Although we have always chosen to cut our own path, we also look to our industry both locally and internationally for ideas on advancement, equipment, technology and implementation, and at the same time take notice of things that do not work.” A lack of good customer service is one key element McHale has noticed at some other scrapyards. “Service your customers, they want to see your trucks right away,” he says. “My trucks are nice, new, they’re fancy looking. My drivers are uniformed, polite and experienced. Customers don’t call you when their bin is full. They call you when it’s overfull or when they were supposed to call yesterday.” He has also noticed there are some other really simple mistakes made by many in the scrap business with respect to customer service, including unreliable payment to customers and simply not answering the phone. According to McHale, the volume of material processed at WCMR has grown largely because of their attention to exceptional customer service. “I am picking up business constantly and I do not knock on doors – I don’t solicit customers.”

Efficiency in the yard

Efficient handling of material is vital at WCMR. “I’ve been to multiple yards, and I’ve seen machines handle the same piece of material four or five times,” says McHale. “That machine is burning fuel, depreciating and putting hours on.” They took this as a major lesson early on and translated it not just to their yard, but to their warehouse as well. “It speaks to how we set up our yard,” he says. “I constantly hear from people that come here, people that regularly go to other scrapyards, and buyers, that we are probably the cleanest, neatest, most organized yard they’ve ever seen. We have it set so that there’s one way in, one way out. As you go in, you either dump in pit one, two, three or four, and they’re all in order.” The WCMR yard is also not only 100 percent paved, but all of their material handlers operate on ½-inch steel plates. “What that does is it protects the integrity of my asphalt, my paving, to make sure that there’s no leakage into the ground,” explains McHale. “I own my ground and I have to protect it and make sure it doesn’t become contaminated. We designed our yard so it’s 100 percent contained.” Another benefit of having a 100 percent paved yard is avoiding a common complaint from mills about receiving scrap loads that are full of dirt. “That comes from steel sitting in dirt. When you get down to the bottom of the pile, of course, the dirt is stuck to the metal. You pick it up with your machine and it goes into the load. There’s no chance of dirt being in my load.”

Location, location, location

WCMR’s location in Langley is about 30 minutes east of Vancouver. They are also 30 minutes from multiple ports and very close to highways and the U.S. border. “My proximity to multiple highways means my trucks can be on any of them in probably 10 minutes at the most. And then


WCMR runs a fleet of three Peterbilt trucks, all with Ampliroll hook-lift set-ups.

that also is the same for when I’m exporting. Our trucks can be at the U.S. border in 15 minutes. When I’m loading ocean containers, it is the same thing. It’s a very central location.” He says their location is also ideal because they are situated between their primary sources of material. “I’m literally right in the middle of multiple industrial parks, and they are what’s producing the bulk of the scrap we’re dealing with.”

Taking care of employees

According to McHale, the most challenging aspect in operating a scrapyard currently is labour. “It’s been a struggle trying to find people,” he says. “Where

you would have general labourers filling all the positions, they’re not there. So your skilled trades people, the pressure is being put on them to not only do their job, but to do these jobs that we can’t find people for.” He says also, as of recently, they have noticed a psychological issue with some of their operators. “The scrap never stops,” he says. “Operators work with a shear all day, cutting a pile of steel, just cutting and cutting all day. At the end of the day, you look at the pile, and it doesn’t look like you did anything.” With this in mind, WCMR is looking at ways to address this, considering options like job sharing and moving people around

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COVER STORY

to different positions in the yard. “We’re also looking at an afternoon shift starting, which means some guys will cut all night. And because there will be no trucks coming in at night, that’ll definitely provide some visible results.” With respect to their employees, McHale is continuously thinking about what is going to make the process better for their workers. “I have to keep my employees happy. If they’re not happy doing what they’re doing, that is going to be your biggest problem.”

THE RIGHT TOOLS FOR THE JOB

Using the right equipment and tools for the job is key to efficiency in any industry. The question for McHale is: how can he use the limited land that he has and make it more efficient? He says a large part of the answer to this question is investing in new and innovative equipment and technology. “I don’t have a lot of room, so I’ve got to be smart about what I put in,” he says.

Material handling

Most recently, WCMR bought three brand-new Labounty mobile hydraulic shears, and their fourth Liebherr material handler is scheduled to arrive from Germany by this winter. “We’re investing in more machinery, so that we have more capacity, and we can process material faster and get it out faster. It also takes the pressure off our maintenance program,” he says. McHale admits that he’s fairly exclusive on some equipment. “All my material handlers are Liebherr. I’ve got a really good partnership with them. My sales rep is really good to deal with

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and their service staff is excellent. When we have a problem, they understand. They get it. It’s not like they have a mechanic there in two or three days. They understand I need that machine to run 10 minutes ago, they get me parts quickly, and they get a mechanic out here sometimes the same day, depending on the time, or next day for sure.” WCMR also uses Likufix hydraulic-electric disconnect technology supplied by Liebherr. This technology allows operators to quickly change out hydraulic attachments, from shear to grapple, and it allows for quicker maintenance. “Our operators can 100 percent stay in the cab, drive over to an implement that’s lying on the ground, pick it up and lock it in place. There’s a little alarm in the cab that sounds until the pins are locked in place. It takes less than two minutes to switch an implement.” He notes that with respect to this technology, he cannot figure out why, as far as he knows, to this day, WCMR is the only company on the West Coast using Likufix. “It blows my mind that other people have not jumped onto this. Specifically, smaller yards. Why would you have a machine that’s designated for a grapple, and a machine that’s designated for a shear, when you can have one machine that does both? There’s a significant cost savings, and there’s space savings. I would never buy another machine without one.”

The loading system

WCMR also runs another serious timesaver – an Acculoader automatic container loading system, which they have been using for about three years. “It goes back to efficiency,” McHale says. “How do I move ma-


The scrap never stops. Operators work with a shear all day, cutting a pile of steel, just cutting and cutting all day. At the end of the day, you look at the pile, and it doesn’t look like you did anything. Terry McHale

high-speed Car Crushers & baler loggers

WCMR uses an Acculoader container loading system which allows them to load material for hauling in as little as 10 minutes.

terials faster? We were loading containers with a ramp and Bobcat for years. That would take us an hour and a half per container. When you’re loading 10 containers a week, no problem, but I’m loading 10 or up to 15 containers a day. Without our Acculoader there’s no way we could do it.” The Acculoader also allows for pre-loading material so it’s ready when trucks show up. “If I’m expecting containers on Monday, that truck is going to show up, we’re going to weigh them in, he’s going to drive to the back, back up to the Acculoader, and it can take less than five minutes to load the material in. He then goes back around to the scale to exit, and the second that Acculoader is empty, they start pre-loading it again. The Acculoader is money very well spent.”

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The hooklift advantage

WCMR runs a fleet of three trucks and has a handful of partnerships with companies that haul their bins to and from customers. Their three trucks are all Ampliroll hook-lift set-ups, rather than cable hoist, and all are on Peterbilt chassis. He explains that while cable hoists are the standard set-up for hauling

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COVER STORY

WCMR uses Liebherr material handlers fitted with Likufix hydraulic-electric disconnect technology, allowing operators to quickly change out hydraulic attachments, from shear to grapple.

containers in North America, they have found hook-lifts to be much more efficient. “When you have a cable hoist the driver has to get out of the cab, crawl underneath a bin, and hook the cable on manually, and then get back in the truck to pull it up,” says McHale. “Then they need to get out again to put chains on to secure the bin. “This is not efficient for the drivers. You have to be a contortionist to get under bins to hook on a cable hoist, and the hook weighs about 20 pounds, which when an operator is fully extended under a bin trying to hook it, it’s tough. With drivers in and out, there is a chance for injury, and if it’s pouring rain, they are in and out in the rain.” With hook-lifts, drivers control the container hook-up (or drop) from inside the truck, and don’t have to get out. “You pull the bin on the truck from inside the cab, and it automatically locks, and the driver doesn’t have to put chains on it. For us, the time savings, and the safety, is a big, big deal.”

Software and systems

With respect to their software systems, also paramount to their overall efficiency, WCMR uses ScrapIT for buying and CRO for dispatch. “ScrapIT has been around for a long time. I think we were actually the first company on the West Coast to implement it, but lots use it now. It’s been rock solid, and ScrapIT is very responsive if there’s an issue or if we need something changed.” For dispatch, they use CRO software, which they began using close to 10 years ago. “CRO software has all my bins uploaded, so when the driver goes to a job our software tells him what bin he’s supposed to be picking up, and keeps track of both it and the new bin being dropped.” They can go quickly online anytime and find out where any bin is deployed, and the system provides GPS coordinates for all trucks, and displays their location live online

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One of the keys to WCMR’s success in scrap recycling: having an extremely clean, well organized, 100 percent paved yard.

at all times, especially good for route planning. With CRO software, their drivers can also upload notes and send them back to dispatch. “It has been a really versatile system,” McHale says. “We’re probably closing in on 1,000 bins that we have out, and to keep track of all of them would be almost impossible without it. If I had to do an Excel spreadsheet, I don’t know what I would do.” For Terry McHale and his team at West Coast Metal Recycling, their intuitive software is one of many very important tools, which, combined with forward thinking business strategies, remain central for their continued growth and success. Especially when faced with limited options for physical expansion through land acquisition, this means continuing to invest heavily in their tools and people, increasing efficiencies at every stage, adapting to rapidly changing industry trends, and remaining hyper-focused on providing the very best customer service possible. RPN


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TIRE RECYCLING

Ontario end-oflife tire program is demonstrating success on the road to a circular economy BY STEVE MELDRUM

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ntario’s approach to end-of-life tire diversion could benefit the future of the entire scrap tire industry across Canada, reduce our carbon footprint and help with developing a more circular economy. Over the last two years, the provincial government has experimented with a new model that has shifted the formerly government-driven tire programs to an industry-owned framework. The Ontario model for tires is called Individual Producer Responsibility (IPR) which means financial responsibility and liability for end-of-life management of products lies with the individual companies or producers who introduce products into the marketplace, and there are specific targets to meet. IPR is different from EPR (extended producer responsibility) which involves shared financial responsibility for recycling costs among all producers and industry funding organizations. Ontario is the first province in Canada to embrace the IPR model with respect to used tire recovery. Under the IPR model, companies who sell tires into the Ontario marketplace take full responsibility for their end-of-life collection, management, recycling and, ultimately, for turning them into a valued resource. This is significant for the development of a circular economy as it places responsibility on tire manufacturers and automakers to manage all of the waste produced by their products.

SURVEY SAYS ONTARIANS NEED TIRE RECYCLING EDUCATION

Each year there are over 12 million new tires sold in Ontario. The eTracks Tire Management Systems was incorporated by the Tire and Rubber Association of Canada (TRAC) to meet the needs of its members and other obligated producers to responsibly manage and dispose of ELTs (End of Life Tires) in Ontario as required by the Ontario Resource Recovery and Circular Economy Act (RRCEA). In 2020, eTracks conducted a province-wide survey focused on public perceptions of tire recycling. While the province has taken great strides toward sustainability in the last two years, this survey revealed that not

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So far, the experimental IPR model in Ontario is working. The industry is performing positively, and tire producers are achieving both imagined and desired outcomes of the regulation. Steve Meldrum

enough Ontarians are actually aware of where end-of-life tires go or how they are disposed of. In fact, nearly half of Ontarians do not know whether scrap tires are recycled or thrown into landfills, and 14 percent (approximately 1.5 million adults) do not believe tires are recycled at all. According to the survey, while in reality producers are now responsible for recycling every single tire they sell in Ontario, only 32 percent of the population is aware of this fact. Another interesting result from the survey is that although 63 percent know that there are many products made from the scrap rubber collected from tires, their knowledge is mixed when asked what those products could be. While a majority (70 percent) know that scrap tires can be used to make playgrounds and sports fields, fewer are aware that they can also be used for construction materials, athletic mats, asphalt and livestock mats. Only 18 percent know that garden mulch can be made from scrap tires. Eighty-one percent of Ontarians also agree that purchasing recycled products helps to combat climate change, according to the survey, which is positive news for increasing the number of


Each year there are over 12 million new tires sold in Ontario.

byproducts made from end-of-life tires used in our day-to-day lives – in products ranging from playgrounds and sports fields to welcome mats and patio tiles. And although a majority of respondents (83 percent) agree that the recycling of old tires into new products helps to combat climate change, and 69 percent believe products made from recycled tires are of high quality, only 28 percent agreed that they have intentionally purchased a product made from recycled tires. This is a missed opportunity for Ontarians.

CHANGING PERCEPTIONS AND ELIMINATING MISINFORMATION

While the 2020 survey shows that knowledge of the tire recycling industry is mixed, there’s an opportunity to use these results as a tool to change perceptions and help eliminate misinformation. For example, under the new regulations, in order to fund jobs and services in the tire recycling industry, a small fee of approximately $4 per tire is added to the consumer’s cost when purchasing new car tires. This is generally broken out as a separate fee, but can be included in the price of the new tire. However, more than half of Ontarians (55 percent) do not know there’s a fee. Only one in four of Ontario residents are aware of the fee and its purpose, while another 20 percent know of the fee but do not know what it is for. When asked to choose between a variety of options as reasons for the fee, nearly half (46 percent) said they believe it is a government tax, and 14 percent presume the funds are collected to pay for landfill fees. Regardless, the majority of residents (78 percent) say they’re happy to pay a small fee when purchasing tires if it helps the environment. When a recycling fee is made completely transparent with the purchase of new tires, it is a great opportunity for people to see where their money is going and learn how it’s being used to benefit the environment. Understanding what the fee funds, and what products are created as a result, can help lead to better decisions that help to support the tire industry.

Globally, it is estimated that one billion tires reach the end of their useful life annually.

MOVING FORWARD ON TIRE RECYCLING Overall, according to the 2020 survey, Ontarians are quite positive toward recycling and the future of having a more circular economy. Most agree that it makes sense for tire producers to be responsible for recycling end-of-life tires and for giving them a second life by turning them into a sustainable resource. In turn, this wouldn’t just improve the future of the environment but the future of the economy, as 84 percent also agree that investing in green technologies would help create jobs in the province. So, what does a corporate-led IPR model mean for the industry and its participants, and will it be successful? So far, the experimental IPR model in Ontario is working. The industry is performing positively, and tire producers are achieving both imagined and desired outcomes of the regulation. They are taking responsibility for not just selling tires into Ontario but also managing them through to their end of life and converting them into source materials for other products and purposes. The hope is to apply this success to other materials – in addition to tires – as part of the overall model, not only in Ontario, but in other provinces as well, in the months and years ahead. The IPR experiment demonstrates that producers are able to show industry leadership, corporate responsibility and significant environmentally beneficial outcomes. Solutions to our waste problems will come not only from reducing how much goes to landfills and increasing how much we recycle, but through effective communication and regulations, and by continuing to create new and innovative uses for tires and all of our recycled materials.

STEVE MELDRUM is the CEO of eTracks Tire Management Systems.

SEPTEMBER 2021 | recyclingproductnews.com

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TIRE RECYCLING

MICROWAVE RENEWABLE TECHNOLOGIES

TIREHOG MICROWAVE-BASED SOLUTION CAN EFFECTIVELY RECYCLE 1,200 TIRES PER DAY

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icrowave Renewable Technologies (MRT) has introduced a practical and self-sustaining solution for recycling tires. The MRT TireHog is a 100 percent mobile machine that uses microwaves to recycle up to 1,200 tires per day. With the TireHog, microwaves break down tires in a continuous process along a conveyor belt, ultimately allowing for rapid reclamation of high-quality, economically valuable end products, including carbon black, oil and natural gas. “Our initial testing indicates one TireHog machine can produce 2.8 million pounds of carbon, 1.5 million pounds of oil and 1.3 million pounds of gas per year,” says Chris Gabrelcik, president and CEO of Lubrication Specialties, which owns MRT. “These estimates translate to a yearly value of $1.8 million in carbon black, $258,470 in crude oil and $102,495 in natural gas.” Byproducts created by the TireHog can be used for diesel fuel, asphalt and other applications, and can even be used to power the TireHog itself, making it fully self-sustaining. As a truly mobile solution, once tires are cleared from a site, the TireHog’s small, easy-to-transport design can be moved on a standard tractor trailer to the next area where tires have been collected for recycling. “Each model has the potential to help companies generate an estimated $2.15 million in annual revenue, dollars that originally would have sat in a landfill or been torched,” says Gabrelcik. He adds that this new approach addresses the many processing difficulties encountered with the more traditional pyrolysis method of recovering end-of-life tires, including low efficiency

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and fouled heat transfer. “Our microwave-based technology has an 80+ percent energy conversion, eliminating heat transfer issues. Where other solutions have produced low-quality carbon, the carbon captured by the TireHog is low in volatile organic compounds (VOCs), making it more suitable for reuse applications.”

TECHNOLOGY TO ADDRESS THE GLOBAL TIRE CRISIS

Discarded tires leak chemicals and heavy metals into the ground as they break down, and a single tire takes 50 to 80 years to decompose. Globally, it is estimated that one billion tires reach the end of their useful life annually. Currently, the most popular options for recycling tires are cutting, shredding, punching, or stamping them into tire chips, shreds, crumb rubber or various rubber products. According to Gabrelcik, recycling or repurposing currently accounts for only a small percentage of what happens to endof-life tires (ELTs) – most are dumped or incinerated, both of which have devastating impacts on the environment. Knowing that one TireHog machine can recycle at least 288,000 tires each year, Gabrelcik says their solution can make real headway in the global ELT problem. “With the right machines in use over the next few years all around the world, millions of tires have the potential to be eliminated from landfills, and millions of dollars could be funnelled into the local economies of communities most plagued by tire waste.”


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GLASS RECYCLING

TRANSFORMING LANDFILL-BOUND GLASS A PAIR OF DOOSAN LOADERS ARE KEY TO GLASSWRX EFFORTS TO PRODUCE PURE RECOVERED GLASS FOR CONSTRUCTION END MARKETS BY LAURA MILLER

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lassWRX, an advanced technology and materials science company, is working hard to change the fact that 85 percent of all U.S. post-consumer glass ultimately ends up in landfills. Launched in early 2020, the Beaufort, South Carolina-based company’s vision is a “world without waste.” They take post-consumer soda-lime glass from local landfills and run it through a kilning process to create an innovative media called engineered cellular magmatic (ECM), which has many industrial applications in resilient infrastructure. “You could say the starting point was foam glass technology, which has been around since the 1930s,” explains Brad Graham,

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national director of site implementation at GlassWRX. “But then our founders and scientists took it to a whole new level. While ECMs are nearly 100 percent glass, they act and react nothing like the glass people expect.” According to GlassWRX, ECMs can make better, far longer-lasting and more eco-friendly concretes, and can be used to create materials that are better at cleaning polluted air and treating water. ECMs are also restorative and regenerative by design and can clean contaminated sites, or even remediate decades of nutrient and chemical pollution from the earth.


Brad Graham of GlassWRX, in front of his new Doosan DL220-5 wheel loader.

Thanks to an on-site ECM lab and test kiln, GlassWRX can also adjust inputs, cellular size, temperature and surface chemistry to custom-engineer ECMs to a customer’s unique needs and specifications, whether that be in resilient construction, or for blue-green sustainable infrastructure. Engineering ECMs requires a steady supply of glass, so GlassWRX partners with surrounding county and municipal governments to divert post-consumer glass that is too small or the wrong colour for other recycling companies from landfills back to the factory. Their Beaufort facility currently receives two to three truckloads of soda lime glass per day, which are weighed and then dumped into piles. A production supervisor checks the glass for any contaminants before moving it into production. Currently, GlassWRX processes around 135 tons of glass per day across three production lines.

A PAIR OF LOADERS FOR PURITY OF OUTPUT

To start their production process, GlassWRX is using a Doosan DL220-5 wheel loader to load glass into a crushing machine, which cleans it with pneumatic air pressure and crushes it into pieces three-eighths of an inch or smaller. A magnetic block and trommel screen then remove any unwanted metal debris

A quick coupler on GlassWRX’ wheel loaders allows operators to quickly switch between attachments without leaving the cab.

and residue. Next, a dryer ensures that the glass is dry enough to move to the ball mill, which uses 12,000 pounds of steel balls to grind the glass into a fine powder. The powder moves along a pneumatic conveyance system to a screener that ensures the glass particles are the right size. GlassWRX then blends the approved particles into a proprietary mixture before moving the blend through a kiln process, where the mixture is heated and combined with a foaming agent to help it rise from a 1-inch layer to a 4-inch layer, similar to baking a cake. The finished product is an ECM. To avoid any cross-contamination of raw material with the finished product, a second DL220-5 wheel loader moves the finished ECMs from the kiln to shipping preparation and storage. “The reason we have two loaders is that even though our customers are fully aware that our product is made from glass, if they see a fleck of green, blue, clear or brown in the final product, they are going to call us because they can see glass in it,” explains Graham. “Using the same machine to handle the finished product that also handles the raw feed stock would cause that contamination.” A quick coupler on GlassWRX’ wheel loaders allow operators to quickly switch between attachments without leaving the cab of the machine. When ECM is ready to ship, the GlassWRX crew pairs a DL220-5 with a light-material bucket to load mateSEPTEMBER 2021 | recyclingproductnews.com

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GLASS RECYCLING

GlassWRX uses two Doosan wheel loaders, one at the initial loading stage and one at the finished product stage.

GlassWRX takes postconsumer soda-lime glass from local landfills and runs it through a kilning process to create an innovative media called engineered cellular magmatic (ECM), which has many industrial applications in resilient infrastructure.

rial into 8-foot-high, open-top containers on trailers. For ECM stored on pallets, a wheel loader outfitted with a pallet fork acts as a forklift to fill the trucks. “ECM is 15 pounds per cubic foot – incredibly light material,” Graham says. “To give you a comparison, marshmallows are 21 pounds per cubic foot. So, I ordered the biggest bucket I could get for the wheel loaders because material weight is not an issue.”

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“We’ve given ourselves extra capacity for what we can use the machines for,” he continues. “We switch to the forks and use it as a forklift and then turn it right back into a loader. Each time we switch attachments using the quick coupler, it’s probably a 30-minute savings compared to changing them manually.”

TAILORED TO GLASS RECYCLING

When selecting their wheel loaders for this application, GlassWRX looked for reliable parts availability, which Doosan provides via distribution centre in nearby Suwanee, Georgia. Operator comfort was another key factor in their decision. Their DL220-5 wheel loaders feature an air-ride seat and easy ability to adjust controls, specifically to enhance operator comfort. “You can operate one of these machines for several hours and not have your back aching or your knees hurting, or all the other things that occur if the machine is not very comfortable,” says Graham. Responsive controls were also important for GlassWRX, to provide the operator with more precision when loading glass into the crusher and stacking ECM into transport trucks. “It’s almost like operating a video game joystick,” he continues. “It’s very easy for the operator to fall in tune with operating the machine and getting it to do what you want.” He adds that the GlassWRX facility is a busy complex, and they definitely appreciate the standard rear-view camera that enhances the operator’s visibility.


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GlassWRX processes approximately 135 tons of soda lime glass per day across three production lines.

“Without that camera, you’d probably risk injury to property and person, especially on a site like this where there are people around all the time,” Graham says. “I can minimize the risk of property damage and see when there are people behind the machine. I think it’s probably the best safety feature on the machine.” In addition, easy access points and simple maintenance checks keep their loaders’ daily maintenance routines efficient, according to Graham, so he can focus most of his time on the glass recycling work. He points to easily visible lubrication points and fluid ports as two of the biggest maintenance benefits. To further boost the efficiency of their wheel loader maintenance, GlassWRX uses DoosanCONNECT telematics. This diagnostic tool allows their crew to digitally monitor the health, location and productivity of their wheel loaders and receive alerts about maintenance notifications. The company also has plans to integrate DoosanCONNECT telematics into their larger facility monitoring system. “Our entire facility is designed for us to monitor everything that’s going on through the computer, and track maintenance events,” Graham says. “Being able to hook these machines into that same system is one of the things I thought about when purchasing. So far, these machines are just perfect for how we’re using them.”

LAURA MILLER is a strategic communications specialist based out of Des Moines, Iowa. This article was submitted by Doosan Infracore North America, LLC.

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PAPER RECYCLING

BUILDING THE CIRCULAR ECONOMY: INSIGHT FROM A FIBRE-BASEDPACKAGING PRODUCER BY KEITH BARKER, SENIOR EDITOR

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or a truly circular economy to work for consumer packaging, or any category of product, every link in the supply chain needs to play its role, from producers to retailers, consumers to recyclers. For fibre-based packaging providers, one of the big challenges involves navigating a complete redesign of packaging so that it can be made from recovered materials and is also easily recyclable once discarded by consumers. Recyclers are required to adapt as well, by building adequate infrastructure and technology that can both handle the wide range of constantly changing incoming material, and producing the highly pure end-product needed to make new goods and packaging. All of this needs to be supported with

It has never been more important for companies to manage their impact on the environment. We want to show brands the beauty of the circular economy and allow them to explicitly understand what their packaging choices mean for that model. Stefano Rossi Packaging CEO, DS Smith

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buy-in from consumers, to first help optimally sort used materials at the source, and then to sustain demand for recycled content products, as well as both support and sound policy from government and regulators so that there is a level playing field with clear and consistent guidelines for all involved. DS Smith, a manufacturer of fibre-based packaging headquartered in the U.K., runs mills, packaging plants and recycling facilities around the world and is a prime example of a producer that is well ahead of the curve on making real progress toward creating a completely circular economy for its products. In Europe, DS Smith has a longstanding history as an innovator in sustainable packaging, with upward of 14 paper mills, multiple fibre recycling plants, and over 200 packaging manufacturing and related facilities. On the innovation front, just over the last year the company has been exploring the use of seaweed fibres as an alternative to paper, and as an alternative to the plastic barrier coatings used in food-grade packaging. In another project, work is being done to turn waste formerly destined for landfill, produced by a DS Smith mill,


DS Smith’s first dedicated fibre recycling facility in North America, in Reading, Pennsylvania, where they process 5.5- to 6-million tons of OCC per year.

into enhanced input for soil conditioning and remediation in the agriculture industry. In 2017, to expand their North American footprint, DS Smith bought the production and mill assets of Interstate Resources, an Atlanta-based paperboard and packaging products manufacturer. According to their Director of Recycling for North America, Toby Earnest (formerly with Interstate Resources), “They saw the growth potential and synergy that could happen in North America, and us as a good entrance into the market. Interstate had a 100 percent recycled fibre mill in Reading, Pennsylvania, and a virgin fibre mill in Riceboro, Georgia, which makes linerboard, as well as packaging facilities located on the East Coast.”

A CIRCULAR ECONOMY TRIFECTA

In the spring of 2020, DS Smith officially opened their first dedicated fibre recycling facility in North America, in Reading, where they now process 5.5- to 6-million tons of OCC (Old Corrugated Cardboard) per year.

Since coming on board at DS Smith in 2017, Earnest has come to realize that recycling is at the heart of everything they do. “DS Smith is unique in packaging, as we are now a net recycler,” he explains. “We recycle more than we actually produce in our mills.” “We built our recycling division from scratch once DS Smith came along. At our new, dedicated recycling facility we are at about 80 percent capacity, and can now provide about a half a million tons of recycled material, mostly OCC, to both the domestic market and our own mills yearly.” With the addition of their Reading recycling facility, the company is now operating what they call a “circular economy trifecta,” due to its location adjacent to their paper mill and within a few miles of their packaging manufacturing facility. “To be that close is very special,” he comments. “I don’t know of any others, in all of the travels that I’ve had, even with the DS Smith mills in Europe, that are anything like it. It cuts way down on logistics costs – we just move material across the parking lot.” SEPTEMBER 2021 | recyclingproductnews.com

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PAPER RECYCLING

DS Smith can provide about half a million tons of highly pure recycled fibre yearly, mostly OCC, to both their own mills and domestic markets.

Their facilities being so close together also allows corrugated packaging to be produced and recycled in what Earnest calls a 14-day cycle, a two-week box-to-box process for corrugated cardboard, which also allows units to be recycled up to 10 times. With respect to their focus on OCC, because it is a global commodity and due to extremely high demand for cardboard packaging, especially since the start of the pandemic with the significant increases in e-commerce from companies such as Amazon, there is a lot of pressure on the market, both domestically and internationally. “If you look at the market globally as a whole, packaging demand is up almost 9 percent year over year, which is amazing,” says Earnest. “That number is closer to 15 percent if you look at North America alone. This is putting a lot of pressure on the OCC market which is causing the pricing to go up. We have to recover these higher input cost increases as well, because a lot of our mills are 100 percent recycled material mills. Whether it be here or in Europe, we are all under that pressure when it comes to high demand for packaging.”

Toby Earnest, DS Smith’s director of recycling, North America

If you look at the market globally as a whole, packaging demand is up almost 9 percent year over year, which is amazing. That number is closer to 15 percent if you look at North America alone. Toby Earnest Director of Recycling for North America, DS Smith

A UNITED EFFORT FOR CIRCULARITY

Sustainability is at the heart of the circular economy business model that DS Smith wants to promote and strives to be a part of. “DS Smith has always wanted to be a part of the solution, not the problem,” says Earnest. “In order to do that, we get out there and work with all businesses, whether it be packaging customers, or other customers, to talk about and implement recycling and sustainability. We work on improving their efficiencies, whether it’s through supply chain optimization, reducing distances between supply parameters, or looking at total recycled content.” He says that for their packaging production plants, the circular economy starts with designing out all the items that aren’t recyclable or which are hard to recycle. “If you design material for recycling up front, it makes it easier for everybody throughout that whole supply chain,” he continues. “Through our circular design principles, we try to accomplish that. We have over 700 designers within our company that are trained in circular design principles and

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promoting the circular economy. They’re taught to design out the waste and the plastics in our packaging, and we are aiming for 100 percent recyclable packaging by 2023. “We substantiate our recyclability and recyclable content claims through industry certification. All of our facilities, from the mills through to packaging and recycling facilities, are Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) and/or Sustainable Forestry Initiative (SFI) certified. They’re all chain of custody certified, and re-certification happens on an annual basis, so we are audited once a year.” Similar responsibility also falls on the end users of the packaging products they provide, the retailers using packaging, which need to make sustainability claims as well. “They have to prove that their package is part of that chain of custody. All the different steps in the process, whether it be mills, the packaging manufacturers, recycling or our retail customers, they need to be certified in the process and require audits.”


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PAPER RECYCLING

DS Smith, which runs mills, packaging plants and recycling facilities around the world, is a prime example of a producer that is well ahead of the curve on making real progress toward creating a completely circular economy for its products.

With respect to the way packaging is currently made, the biggest mistake they see in the industry is at the very start of the design process. “You order a cellphone, and the size of the box is not right size for the packaging,” says Earnest. “That’s the biggest design flaw you see out there, is not designing packaging to fit the content. When we talk about the circular economy being reduce, reuse, recycle, that’s the reduce portion. We need to optimize the fibre usage that we have, and not put more fibre than needed into packaging.”

CHANGING THE GAME WITH CIRCULAR DESIGN METRICS

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DS Smith launched its Circular Design Principles for packaging in collaboration with the Ellen MacArthur Foundation in 2020. The principles used were developed to help both DS Smith and other companies design out waste and pollution, keep products and materials in use, and regenerate natural systems. Within the last year the company has trained its packaging designers to apply these circular design principles in the design process, and this past summer, introduced the industry’s first widely available circular design metrics. This tool uses eight different indicators to provide a clear indication of the circularity performance of any packaging, quantify it, and help identify areas with potential for improvement. It provides unique insight into how companies’ packaging choices can reduce their impact on the environment, and through a collaborative process, DS Smith and its customers will be able to compare the environmental performance of various solutions. According to Earnest’s colleague Stefano Rossi, packaging CEO at DS Smith, “It has never been more important for companies to manage their impact on the environment. We want to show brands the beauty of the circular economy and allow them to explicitly understand what their packaging choices mean for that model. Our new Circular Design Metrics is a game changer in driving environmental performance in packaging. We’re excited to use


our expertise to help companies, large and small, on their journey to become circular-ready.” Joe Iles, circular design lead for the Ellen MacArthur Foundation, also commented on this latest tool for advancing the circular economy: “The design stage has a huge influence on how products, including packaging, are produced, used and what happens to them after use. DS Smith’s Circular Design Metrics are a key milestone to help drive change toward a circular economy. As a strategic partner, DS Smith has the ability to make change happen faster by mobilizing its large design community and influencing its customers, many of which are global brands. And what’s more, the company will also inspire many other businesses and designers worldwide.” Earnest adds that with the addition of their circular design metrics it will be possible to rate the impact of every design decision, and help customers create the most circular packaging solutions ever. “That goes for everything in that package,” he explains. “Whether it’s supply chain optimization, recyclability, the carbon footprint associated with a product, or the recycled and renewable content of material used, we have various factors that evaluate a package before it goes out to our customer, and our circular design metrics give it a quantifiable score. It’s another tool in our toolbox that we use and to make sure that we’re driving hard for the circular economy and that sustainability model.” Those that manufacture the packaging used in the global economy have a key role to play in developing a circular economy. The circular economy metrics initiative is the latest tool that demonstrates DS Smith’s leadership in this movement, and ongoing commitment to put sustainability first as a global producer of fibre-based packaging. RPN

DS Smith is a net recycler, meaning the company recycles more than is produced by their mills.

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EQUIPMENT ROUNDUP: IMPACT CRUSHERS

COMPACT IMPACT CRUSHING PLANTS FOR ASPHALT RECYCLING BY KEITH BARKER, SENIOR EDITOR Rubble Master’s RM 90GO! compact impact crusher is ideal for asphalt recycling.

A

sphalt is one of the most recycled materials by volume in North America, and in most cases is easily size-reduced and processed to quality, accurately sized reusable material for RAP (reclaimed asphalt pavement) and other high-value products for construction applications. Road and highway reconstruction yields extremely large amounts of peeled and milled asphalt every year, and today’s roadbuilding engineers are allowing the use of more and more recycled asphalt into their mixes for new roads. Although asphalt is a relatively soft material, compared to other crushable material such as concrete, it is highly abrasive and, especially in warmer conditions, can be difficult to crush. Impact crushing plants, also known as impactors, generally range in size from as small as 29,000 pounds up to 110,000 pounds (approximately 13,000 kg to 50,000 kg), and they are widely considered to be the preferred tool for recycling asphalt because of their mobility, high performance and lower operating costs.

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Mobile jaw crushing plants, by comparison, are more expensive to own and operate and are known to struggle with processing asphalt – especially in warmer temperatures as material can get gummed up between jaw ties. Compact tracked impactors are easy to transport, are quick to set up, and are available with built-in screens, magnets and conveyors; with their smaller overall footprint and weight, they fit well on worksites at the side of roads and highways, or in urban C&D applications. Mobile impactors are also available with diesel, electric and hybrid drive systems, can be used as a first- and second-stage crusher in one unit, are known for producing high-quality material to very exact size with a cubical shape, and some can move and crush simultaneously. Following is an overview of four of the latest compact mobile impact crushing plants, ideal for asphalt recycling, from industry manufacturers Rubble Master, EvoQuip, Keestrack and McCloskey.


RUBBLE MASTER RM 90GO!

Rubble Master’s RM 90GO! compact mobile impact crusher is engineered to provide a good mix between performance, mobility, safety and ease of use, and while ideal for asphalt recycling, can easily switch between different materials, specs and job sites with a range of hammers. The RM 90GO! uses an 860 x 650 mm (34- x 25-inch) crusher inlet opening, a 4-foot x 8-foot screen-box, a wide core radiator that improves airflow and reduces dust buildup, and a return conveyor that can swing out 90 degrees for stockpiling additional oversize product. With capacity up to 200 tph and capability to produce spec material in a single pass, these compact crushers also weigh only 62,500 pounds for easy transport (on the same trailer used for excavators) with set-up time on the job as low as 15 minutes. According to Rubble Master’s Rene Wagner, when it comes to asphalt recycling, the material is easy to crush, but also quite abrasive. “Using suitable hammers with higher chrome content in your impact crusher is essential when processing large amounts of asphalt,” he says. “Rubble Master offers

different hammers for various applications. Using the wrong hammers leads to premature wear, and your cost per produced ton goes up.” He says another consideration in asphalt recycling is fines in the feed material. “If you process large amounts of asphalt millings, a mobile scalping screen improves your output and reduces operating costs.” An additional challenge in crushing asphalt continuously is asphalt dust, as fines stick to hot radiators and reduce efficiency. On all Rubble Master crushers, a wide core radiator is used to address this issue, by providing improved airflow and reduced asphalt buildup, and full accessibility from the ground. “If you can’t keep your radiator clean, operators will waste hours working on the crusher, soaking the radiator with chemicals, and face changing your radiator after a while. Rubble Master uses a diesel-electric-drive system and is not dependent on cooling hydraulics so that there are fewer cleaning and performance hassles while crushing asphalt.”

EvoQuip’s Cobra 230 compact crushing plant is designed for ease of use and optimal flow

EVOQUIP COBRA 230

EvoQuip’s Cobra 230 is designed for rapid set-up time and features an intuitive control system to enable operators to be crushing asphalt and other material minutes after unloading the machine from a truck. Operators can adjust settings easily without the need for any tools, using a standard, user friendly hydraulic assist, and these tracked plants also feature excellent rotor access for cleanup and inspection. According to EvoQuip product experts, “In asphalt applications it is so important to open and clean the machine every day. The Cobra 230’s hinged radiator makes it easy to clean and maintain, and the user has the ability to quickly detach the complete afterscreen system including the oversize conveyor,

providing increased mobility by either running the machine in standard mode or transporting it separately.” The Cobra 230 uses an extremely fuel-efficient and high-performing direct-drive system which, along with two independent hydraulic controlled aprons, allows operators to optimize both material throughput and accuracy of size-reduction, while ensuring lower energy costs. Additionally, to help ensure an optimal material flow of asphalt and other materials through the crushing process, the Cobra 230 is designed so that as material moves from the feeder through the impactor onto the product belt, each section becomes wider, enabling unrestricted flow. SEPTEMBER 2021 | recyclingproductnews.com

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EQUIPMENT ROUNDUP: IMPACT CRUSHERS

Keestrack’s R3e impact crusher is hybrid-electric powered.

McCloskey’s I4C impactor provides the power and productivity of a larger machine in a compact footprint.

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KEESTRACK R3E

The electric-diesel hybrid R3e impact crusher from Keestrack is engineered to achieve low emissions and low costs per ton, including running costs decreased by up to 70 percent when connected to a main grid electrical system. The R3e provides capacity up to 250 tons per hour in a range of applications, including asphalt and C&D recycling, and is designed for ease of transport at under 30 tons, significantly reduced noise levels over previous models, and zero emissions capability due to its unique electric-diesel hybrid drive system. Other key features include a large crushing chamber; integrated, automatic dust suppression; an anti-vibration system; as well as Keestrack-er telematics using GPS for real-time access to load parameters and machine operation via tablet, laptop or smartphone.

MCCLOSKEY 14C

The latest in McCloskey’s impactor lineup, the 14C heavy-duty compact crusher is suited particularly to harsh applications, including asphalt recycling and C&D. These impactors can be used as a primary or secondary unit, and are designed for high mobility, performance and expanded versatility, with fast set-up time and capability to work in tight spaces. Built to the same standards as McCloskey’s full-size crushers, the 14C has been designed with a deeper chamber, creating greater tramp release space, an aggressive blow bar and apron design, 4-bar variable speed rotor, and three crush zones with an optional fourth strike. According to McCloskey’s application engineering team, “The I4C has been designed to be one of the highest production compact crushers for asphalt recycling and has a number of features built in to deliver high performance and results. In addition to the fourth apron that produces fine gradations, and easy to replace/swap out ceramic blow bars for high wear life and efficient sizing in abrasive applications, a large 12 x 5 onboard screen processes oversized material back into the crushing chamber until the desired size is achieved. The I4C also combines a class-leading powerful impact chamber with the efficiency of fines screening, resulting in a high-performance mobile tracked crusher for asphalt and a range of applications.”

According to North American Keestrack distributor Frontline Machinery, the one or two most important features of Keestrack’s R3e compact impact crusher that will benefit operators in asphalt recycling applications specifically, are its robust rotor with optimum blow bar placement, and its integrated pre- and after-screens. The R3’s rotor weighs in at 3,200 kg (without bearings), the largest in its class according to Frontline and, with weight

distributed toward the outside, provides a highly efficient crush with increased energy and inertia while improving throughput. Even in some of the hardest of applications, such as asphalt, the rotor will run smooth with less risk of parts breakage while maintaining high velocity. In addition, optimal placement of the blow bars on the R3e rotor allows for high contact and utilization, while the shape of the rotors allows for smooth entry of the material with less wear on the rotor body.

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LAST WORD

LAST WORD A FOCUS ON EFFECTIVE LEADERSHIP IN SUSTAINABILITY THROUGH THE SOLID WASTE LENS BY DAVID BIDERMAN

L

eadership. Sustainability. Recovering from the pandemic. These are some of the central educational themes of the Solid Waste Association of North America’s (SWANA) WASTECON conference and trade show scheduled for November 1– 4 in Orlando, Florida. SWANA is transitioning WASTECON into an executive leadership summit that looks at how to be an effective leader and manager through the solid waste lens.

The annual SWANA Safety Summit will take place at WASTECON, with six sessions that will provide resources, tips and connections to help improve safety performance in solid waste and recycling. David Biderman

Because we know many industry decision makers are interested in networking with their peers after nearly two years in development, SWANA has designed a new program schedule to maximize opportunities for attendees to interact with each other and with exhibitors. We will not be holding the dozens of technical sessions that we typically have at WASTECON. Instead, the schedule includes about a dozen high-level keynote speakers over the course of the four-day event. This year’s speakers will include familiar names such as Patrick Dovigi, GFL’s CEO, and Tara Hemmer, Waste Management’s senior vice president and chief sustainability officer (our Lawrence Lecturer), as well as prominent government

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representatives, including EPA Deputy Assistant Administrator Carlton Whitehouse, a global expert on environmental justice. It also features new faces and challenging topics, such as Rueben Stokes, who will discuss diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) initiatives. And we’ll welcome popular returning speakers such as Rebecca Ryan, an acclaimed futurist who spoke at WASTECON 2019 in Phoenix, as well as Ron Gonen, CEO of Closed Loop Partners, who recently released his first book, The Waste-Free World. WASTECON will also have a busy exhibit hall filled with vendors interested in speaking with visitors about the latest technological advances and new products in solid waste management and recycling, with mask wearing, social distancing and good hygiene encouraged throughout. Some of the vendors will be hosting short sessions at their booths, as SWANA diversifies the way in which learning takes place, and there will be a multitude of networking opportunities to catch up with old friends and make new ones. Of course, it wouldn’t be a SWANA conference without a big focus on safety. The annual SWANA Safety Summit will take place at WASTECON 2021, with six sessions that will provide resources, tips and connections to help improve safety performance in solid waste and recycling. OSHA’s Regional Administrator for the southeast United States, Michelle Gonzalez, will address Safety Summit attendees. When I spoke at a SWANA regional conference in Virginia in mid-August, it was terrific getting together again with members, catching up and marveling at what we have all been through over the past 18 months. One thing we all agreed on is that the solid waste and recycling industry has proven during the pandemic how essential we are as a public service. I am very proud of the hard-working men and women who collect, process and dispose of waste and recycling in the United States and Canada.

DAVID BIDERMAN is executive director and CEO, Solid Waste Association of North America.


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ADVERTISER INDEX Acculoader..................................................................23 American Baler........................................................36 Bandit Industries.....................................................13 BKT Tires....................................................................... 41 BM&M Screening Solutions........................... 43 Buffalo Turbine....................................................... 45 Bunting Magnetics................................................31 CDE Global.................................................................... 3 CP Group......................................................................37

EQUIPMENT ROUNDUP: MATERIAL HANDLERS & ATTACHMENTS

Gensco Equipment.............................................. 43 Industrial Magnetics, Inc.................................. 45 Industrial Netting.................................................. 45 Kensal Carbide........................................................ 47 LeFort America........................................................ 19 NOVA Products (A Peninsula Plastics Ltd. Company)...................................... 46 OverBuilt Inc...............................................................21 PMR Inc........................................................................... 2 R.M. Johnson Co......................................................27 SANY America, Inc................................................... 7 Scott Equipment Co.............................................35 SENNEBOGEN........................................................48 Stellar Industries, Inc...........................................35

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