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LETTER FROM BASIC BOSS, I remember two years ago I shared with some of my friends

scrutinized by big shots and without the need to validate

a daring concept of starting a print fashion magazine. They

our opinion. This is what we call BASIC freedom.

told me, “Why don’t you start with a digital one first and see how it goes?” It took me one and a half seconds to blink and say, “I will start the print one now.”

When people ask us, “What is BASIC, what is your identity?”, I quote my friend. She once said that BASIC started as a teenage girl with her flaws, with her cute

Literally six months later I was holding our first edition

smile while still wearing braces. She was curious to try

themed BASIC Instinct in my hands, with prominent TV star

on avant garde clothes, listen to non-mainstream music

Kat Graham on one cover, and ravishing male model and influencer Josh Mario John on the second cover. Did I have

and dig into the unknown realm of the eternal question, “Who am I?” And with time, with every issue, she was

experience in publishing or printing logistics? No. Did I have

transforming into a young beautiful woman - more

the Swarovski encrusted balls to go for it? YES!

elegant, more sophisticated, more daring and more provoking in her own way.

Here we are two years later with David Guetta – one of the most respected and famous DJs in the world–

We are evolving, and I am happy to say that every issue is

proudly leading our cover themed BASIC Present. Past.

quite different from the previous one. We have the freedom

Future. Two years later, we have a newsstand presence

to keep changing. For instance, the one you have in your

in more than 20 countries worldwide and devoted fans

hands right now has way more interviews and articles,

from Japan, France, Russia, Germany, Taiwan, and the

whereas the previous ones have been more visual. Here,

UK - to name a few. BASIC is becoming the New Voice

we’ve covered the Women’s March and Revolutions in

of Fashion.

Fashion; daring storytelling editorials like Ex Machina and provocative erotic poetry by Jessica Yatrofsky. We don’t

It almost feels as though our future was already

know where we’re going, but we know where we came from.

predetermined by a present way of thinking – by being in

We wouldn’t have been here in the present if we didn’t make

this state of mind where anything seemed possible, where

the right decisions in the past. And we will not have the

every dream or thought could become reality. And that is

future if we don’t make the right moves in the present.

how it should be. For everyone. Every single revolutionary invention started from a couple of simple things. A thought.

Today, while having my morning coffee, I thought that

And a dream. We dreamt it, and we made it. Even though

maybe starting a print fashion publication now, in the digital

occasionally it might feel like we are swimming in a fish

age of social madness, was almost the same as jumping

tank full of sharks, let me tell you – nothing feels more

from an airplane with no parachute. But I guess this was the

empowering and liberating than receiving fan mail and

way I found out that by risking it all, we may discover we

reading Instagram comments from creatives and readers

have wings to fly.

from all over the world on how pleasantly surprised they were when they read BASIC.

Basically yours, CEO & EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Being an independent print publication has its challenges, but it also gives us the power to report on what we feel

2

is right. We can do whatever we want - without being

Viktorija@basic-magazine.com | @viktorija_pashuta


FUTURE

LETTER FROM BASIC BOSS

3


CEO & EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

VIKTORIJA PASHUTA

viktorija@basic-magazine.com | @viktorija _ pashuta CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER MANAGING EDITOR ART DIRECTOR CONTRIBUTING ART DIRECTOR JUNIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER CONTRIBUTING FASHION STYLIST CONTRIBUTING FASHION EDITOR SENIOR WRITER ADVERTISING MANAGER COPY ADVISOR ADVERTISING ENQUIRIES

JACKSON CHONG jackson@basic-magazine.com AMANDA VANDENBERG amanda@basic-magazine.com | @amanda_mary_vandenberg BRIEONA CORNELIUS brieona@basic-magazine.com | @brieonacornelius ROBERTA HALL CANDICE LEE @canlee__ JESSE J COLLECTIONS @jessejcollections DAVID THOMAS LISA WAYNE lisa@basic-magazine.com LAUNY RHEM JOSHUA TOEJES info@basic-magazine.com

INTERNS

BRIANNA WREN, VIRGINIA BULLINGTON, EMMA IZEK

PUBLISHER INTERNATIONAL DISTRIBUTION

BASIC MEDIA COMPANY LLC Pineapple Media | www.pineapple-media.com Printed in the UK by Pure Print

FOLLOW BASIC ON

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SPECIAL THANK YOU

Jackson Chong Jordan Frazes at Atlantic Records Mona Liza Studios, New York Claudia Nakash Birgit C Muller

Egard Watches Manuel Albarran Jivomir Domoustchiev Kenny Moore EMC|BOWERY

Atelier d’image Jonathan Amaret Studios60 LA Casa Casuriana VERSACE VILLA

BASIC HEADQUARTERS

9465 Wilshire Blvd, Suite #300 Beverly Hills, CA 90212 USA

No part of this publication may be reproduced in whole or in part without permission from BASIC. The views expressed in BASIC Magazine are those of respective contributors, and are not necessarily shared by the magazine or its staff. The magazine welcomes new contributors but can assume no responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts, photographs or illustrations. All rights reserved by BASIC Media Company LLC

ISSN 2470-153X (print)

ISSN 2470-1521 (online)

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ILLUSTRATION BY AMBER VITTORIA @AMBER_VITTORIA

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COVER CREDITS

CONTRIBUTORS PHOTOGRAPHERS

Alessandro Trincone, Isabel Zapardiez, Qi Wang, Bowenero

Viktorija Pashuta, Marco Imperatore, Mikel Muruzabal, Haiyan

by Brandi Howe, Damir Begović, Gal Sadirova, Adelina Rusu,

Zhang, Louie Aguila, Darija Cikač, Gioconda & August

Olesya Serchenko, Alon Livné, Guildhaus, Leonard Wong, Peter

Photography, Tibi Clenci, Sara Lehtomaa, Alon Livné, JÖ, Rose

Popps, Jean Louis Sabah, Dsquared, @thetrendhaus, Marianna

Conway, KT Auleta, Florian Fizek, Dylan Perlot, Ed Emrich, Mika

Harutunian, Martha Fadel, Topshop London, Victoria’s Secret,

Ceron, Domenico Donadio, Celia D. Luna, Reinhardt Kenneth,

Cecilia Aragon, Kaimin, & Other Stories, H&M, C/MEO Collective,

Diana Gomez, PINCH Martin Tremblay, Djeneba Aduayom, Dmitry

Wonderbra, Wolford, Konus, A. Tiziano, Pskaufman, Bakline, Zara,

Fursov, Tony Perez, Edwin Ortega, Ivan Copelli, r3dglasses limited,

V22LA, St. Germaine, 22/7, Michael Stars, Morra Designs, Junker,

Sequoia Emmanuelle

Von Drenik, B James, Madame Baloge, Gudrun & Gudrun, Long Clothing, Converse, David Giampiccolo, Digby Jackson, Thomas

PRODUCERS

Hanisch, Lisa van Wersch, Happy Socks Hamburg, Steinrohner,

Jackson Chong

Stuart Weitzmann, Nina Athanasiou, ACBY - Samuel Acebey,

CREATIVE DIRECTION

Gianvito Rossi Milan, Kristina Lapickaja, Jessica Buurman, Tracy

Aureta, Brandi Howe, Dina Vibes, Dylan Perlo

Estrada, Trends X Fashion, Wow Couture, Charmaine Joie Couture, Nasty Gal, Edward Achour Paris, Delfrance, Racine Carrée, Thot

GRAPHIC DESIGNERS

Gioielli, Sharra Pagno, Redemption, Alberto Zambelli, Enrico

Brieona Cornelius, Candice Lee

Mazza, Oscar Tiye, Gedebe, Lucia Pi, Vladimiro Gioia, Momonì,

SET DESIGNERS

Ottaviani, Racine Carrée, Sebastian Milano, Damico, Francesco

Robert Emrich, Die Filmbauarbeiter, Claudia Brugnaletti

Scognamiglio, Compagnia Italiana, Class, Ugo Boss, Electric Human, Otaner King, The Creature Den, JITTRAKARN, Mel Melecio,

WRITERS Amanda Vandenberg, Emily Nimptsch, Elizabeth Hazard, Aiden Arata, Emma Izek, Yael Reed, Lisa Wayne, Jessica Yatrofsky, Jonathan Amaret

Moni & J, LALIQUE, Ken Samudio, Lucian Matis, COS, Carven, Manolo Blahnik. Carolee, Missoni, Joncas Bicolor, Miu Miu, Blue comme le ciel, Sonia Rykiel, Aldo, Chanel, Eres, Marie Saint Pierre, Coach, Holt Renfrew, Bar à Lunettes, TNT Montreal, Hermès,

STYLISTS

Winners Gold, Jesse J Collections, Ferrici, Hugo Boss, Louis

David Thomas, Olesya Serchenko, Jesse J, Valentina Schupke, Dina

Vuitton, Johnston & Murphy, Alfani, Rolex, Leciel Deisgn, Diana

Vibe, Sky Bulatovic, Carmen Incarnato, Phil Keophaphone, Florence

Couture, Hilary Beane, Jessica Elliot Jewelry, SHOKRA, David Han,

O. Durand, Kim Sheree Mason, Michelle Wu

De Blossom, Cadieux Paris, AMICLUBWEAR, Manuel Albarran,

DAVID GUETTA PHOTOGRAPHY VIKTORIJA PASHUTA PRODUCER JACKSON CHONG STYLING DAVID THOMAS @ THE WALL GROUP GROOMING CRISTINA ORLANDO VIDEO ANDREW LEIBMAN PHOTO ASSISTANT VICTOR TRASVINA & REMINGTON PERREGAUX LOCATION MONA LIZA STUDIOS, NY WWW.MONALIZA.STUDIO

WOW Couture, Charles & Ron

MAKEUP & NAIL ARTIST Cristina Orlando, Regina Lomas, Agnes Yun, Mynxii White, Camilla

ILLUSTRATORS & ARTISTS

Cantini, Meliina Savela, Noga Tamir, Hiroto Kuwahara, Donna Mee,

Jason Eebeyer, Jacqui Kenny (Street View Portraits), Carlos

Sil Bruinsma, Simone Kostian, Lee Grubbs, Magdalena Major, Einat

Quevedo, Petecia Le Fawnhawk, Emilia Elfe, Jorg Karg, Leonid

Dan, Jennifer Malasczcuk, Antonia Deffenu, Lupe Moreno, Jerry

Gurevich, Federico Canata, Ed Emrich, Astoria / Atelier d’image,

Avilla, Liv Madorma, Cynthia Christina, Aurora Galarza, Maria

David Han, Rebecca Coltori , Amber Vittoria

Barrios

VIDEO PRODUCTION

HAIR STYLISTS

Andrew Leibman, Paul Ayala

Edurne Senosiain, Preston Wada, Ritz Lam, Jim Tse, Jill Turnbulls, Joey George, Simone Kostian, Lee Grubbs, Sacha Schütte, Myesha Howze, Antonia Deffenu, Victor Mendoza, Samantha Annatone, Cynthia Christina, Atma Hari, Cantrell Mitchell Jr.

MODELS Shquiprim Bruti, Esther, TJ, Ashleigh Baugh, Korina Brečić, Byanca Cargnin, Kirsi Kujala, Carina Leps, Karl-Lennart Meri, Yu Ting, Mariana Vansuit, Deven Japngie, Kyli Zion, Lisa Åkesson Stryker, Katalina O., Dasha Stakanova, Eden, Lauren McKell, Sidney

RETOUCHING Federico De Luca (DIAZO), Domenico Donadio, Lepinch / Elpinch

EDITORIAL INTERNS, PHOTO, PRODUCTION, SET & STYLIST ASSISTANTS Victor Trasvina, Remington Perregaux, Neven Muretić, Hamid Kootval, Anna Everett, Bridget Ortega, Carley Skidmore, Hamed Denise Sodo, Federico Laudicina, Jerry Avilla, Yanick Fournier, Ian Santos, Isaiah Lucas

DESIGNERS Prada, Balmain, Givenchy, Gucci, Alexander McQueen, Vince, Armiri, Jivomir Domoustchiev, Saint Laurent, Manuel Albarran,

ART COVER

Mehravaran, Holger Brandt, Pacquo Winter, Seana Hadnagy,

SPECIAL THANKS Mona Liza Studios, Casa Casuriana, VERSACE VILLA, Studios60 LA

BASIC HEADQUARTERS 9465 Wilshire Blvd, Suite #300 Beverly Hills, CA 90212 USA No part of this publication may be reproduced in whole or in part without permission from BASIC. The views expressed in BASIC Magazine are those of respective contributors, and are not necessarily shared by the magazine or its staff. The magazine welcomes new contributors but can assume no responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts, photographs or illustrations. All rights reserved by BASIC Media Company LLC

ISSN 2470-153X (print)

WWW.BASIC-MAGAZINE.COM

PHOTOGRAPHY VIKTORIJA PASHUTA PRODUCER JACKSON CHONG STYLING JESSE J. COLLECTIONS MAKEUP AURORA GALARZA HAIR ATMA HARI PHOTO ASSISTANT IAN SANTOS MODEL LAUREN MCKELL @ INDUSTRY MODEL MGMT

ISSN 2470-1521 (online)


BASIC LOOKBOOKS 22 AGENDERMI ALESSANDRO TRINCONE S/S 18' 86 CHAPTER 03 GUILDHAUS S/S 18' 122 SLUT FROM THE FUTURE KAIMIN OFFICIAL S/S 18'

BASIC ACCESSORIES

18 LIFE ORNATE WORDS BY AMANDA VANDENBERG

BASIC FASHION 32 38 54 66 104 126 136 156

KISS ME DEADLY BY FLORIAN FITZEK SUBURBAN BY PINCH MARTIN TREMBLAY LASER FOCUSED BY DOMENICO DONADIO IDENTITY CRISES BY DYLAN PERLOT WHERE THE WILD STRINGS ARE BY MIKA CERON OH!RIGAMI BY MIKE MURUZABAL DREAMING OF DYSTOPIA BY ROSE CONWAY EX MACHINA. BY VIKTORIJA PASHUTA

BASIC BEAUTY 24 FANCY FOODS BY VIKTORIJA PASHUTA 152 CASA BLANCA BY VIKTORIJA PASHUTA

BASIC MOVEMENT

50 THERE IS ONLY ONE LA WOMENS MARCH BY DIANA GOMEZ

BASIC DESIGNERS 8 COMING TO LIGHT 7 DESIGNER FEATUER

BASIC PROJECT 148 CLOTHING MAKE OF LIGHT BY ED EMRICH

BASIC ARTIST 46 88 100 114 116 124 134 142

PINK PRIVACY BY JESSICA YATROFSKY THE ART OF DESTRUCTION BY FEDERICO CANNATA BORN WITH WINGS BY LEONID GUREVICH SUPERNOVA SAGA BY CARLOS QUEVEDO EMPRESS OF TIME BY EMILIA ELFE MECHANICAL GARDEN BY PIERRE GRENET THE CONSTRUCTED UNIVERSE BY JORG KARG DESERT DREAMING BY PETECIA LE FAWNHAWK

BASIC INTERVIEWS 72 92 62 120

THEN, NOW & NEXT WITH DAVID GUETTA BY AMANDA VANDENBERG BEHIND THE CURTAIN WITH CLAUDIA NAKASH BY LISA WAYNE JONATHAN AMARET - SCHOLAR & DESIGNER Q&A WITH JASON EBEYER

BASIC ARTICLE 80 REVOLUTIONS IN FASHION - BASIC ARTICLE

BASIC CASE STUDY 166 THE AGORAPHOBIC TRAVELER - JACQUI KENNY ILLUSTRATION BY AMBER VITTORIA @AMBER_VITTORIA

BASIC MUSIC ARTIST 168 WHAT A GIRL WANTS DOES - TANESHA FIELDS 146 AN UNSTOPPABLE FORCE - NIKITA DRAGUN

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C

O

M

TO —————————

ING L I G H

T

In Conversation with 7 Designers who are the next big thing.

BOWENERO

DESIGN BOWENERO BY BRANDI HOWE @BOWENERO @BRANDIHOWE PHOTOGRAPHY LOUIE AGUILA @LOUIEAGUILA CREATIVE DIRECTION AURETA @AURETA & BRANDI HOWE MAKEUP MYNXII WHITE @MYNXIIWHITE HAIR PRESTON WADA @PRESTINWADA MODELS TJ @RENEGADES_ & ASHLEIGH BAUGH @ASLAYY


What piece is most emblematic of your current collection and why? The piece most emblematic would have to be my first design, the Quadra. The Quadra top gave me inspiration for the rest of the collection by not only being reversible, but also having the option to wear “frontwards” or “backwards”. This

Dream client? And why? Dream client would have to be Cher; now or then. Her style has made such a statement over the years and Bowenero is a definite statement.

is where the name “Quadra” came from, because it could be worn four different ways. The entire collection is reversible.

What will clothes be like in the future? In the very near future, Bowenero will launch

collaborations

with

different

artists and fashion brands, as well as playing with different materials other

Tell us about a piece that has been

designs,

designed in your dreams but still isn’t

choose?

a reality.

“Eye of the Tiger” by Survivor

A

piece/collection

designed

in

what

song

would

you

my

dreams but I have not yet cracked the

What historical or vintage clothing

code to is swimwear. This will for sure be

trend do you wish would make a come

a reality one day, it’s just been some trial

back?

and error.

Historical clothing trend I wish would

than leather.

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PRESENT

comeback would have to be chain mail If there were a soundtrack to your

from the Medieval Times. It was an essential; Bowenero modern day chain mail, also an essential.

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10

BASIC DESIGNERS - PRESENT


02

PRESENT

DESIGN GAL SADIROVA @GALSADIROVA PHOTOGRAPHY GIOCONDA & AUGUST @GIOCONDAANDAUGUST MAKEUP CAMILLA CANTINI @CAMILLACANTINIMUA MODEL BYANCA CARGNIN VILL

What piece is most emblematic of your current collection and why? Crowns

transparent

headpieces

inspired by the symbol, and an integral part of the Hopi people’s ceremonies. Always unique, and made especially for the wearer.

What will clothes be like in the future? A wave of no gender differences is obviously coming. Although, I hope that in any case, both will keep their own dignity and identity. Chaotic, individual, diverse,

dynamic,

showing

bravery

and strength. At the same time, still comfortable and emphasizing nature, character, and meaning of life of every one of us.

Dream client? And why? A client that is able to see and appreciate the way of making and is able to find the real core of the creation. He or she will always feel something and have a relation to the work.

Tell us about a piece that has been designed in your dreams but still isn’t a reality. Wedding

dress.

I

usually

design

strong and geometrical shapes and silhouettes... but inside, I’m a romantic.

If there were a soundtrack to your designs,

what

song

would

you

choose? “Water” by Oliver Shanti gives me a lot of power and inspiration to get into the depths, but the acapella cover of “1944” by Jerry Heil underlines the soul.

What historical or vintage clothing trend do you wish would make a come back? Colorful wet-look vinyl raincoats.

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03 ADELINA RUSU

What piece is most emblematic of your current collection and why?

The most emblematic piece would be a long, black velvet hoodie embellished with

Swarovski crystals beads – it’s that kind of piece where you can’t take your eyes off of it.

What will clothes be like in the future? From my perspective, people are most looking for comfort and quality nowadays, so I guess, clothes will have to be comfortable, of a great quality, very well

DESIGN ADELINA RUSU @ADELINARUSUOFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHY & CREATIVE DIRECTION TIBI CLENCI @TIBICLENCI STYLING AMIR DOBOS MAKEUP GENNY MATEA HAIR ADONIS ENACHE MODEL DIANA DUMITRU (ALLURE MANAGEMENT) PRODUCTION ALLURE PRODUCTION

made, with simple yet bold lines and excellent finishing touches.

Dream client? And why? When a designer has a true love and passion for what they’re doing, each client or type of body becomes a new challenge. A designer wants to make every one of their clients look at their best no matter what. Everyone can be a dream client.

Tell us about a piece that has been designed in your dreams but still isn’t a reality. I usually do my best so that everything I imagine becomes real. Everything I imagine or dream about becomes a sketch, a sketch becomes a pattern, and without even noticing I have in my hands the exact piece of clothing that I imagined. My dreams have this magical force of becoming reality.

If there were a soundtrack to your designs, what song would you choose? “Summertime” by Ella Fitzgerald

What historical or vintage clothing trend do you wish would make a come back? Nowadays, you can wear everything. Vintage trends are not so ‘’vintage’’ anymore with so many options available on the market. I personally don’t have any desired vintage trend I wish would come back.

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BASIC DESIGNERS - PRESENT


04 PRESENT

DAMIR BEGOVIC What piece is most emblematic of your current collection and why? The most representative piece of my current collection is a red, oversized coat. It binds together most of the inspiration in one item of clothing. The red color symbolizes the blood of the butcher’s apron and the monstrous habit of carnivorous plants eating insects. Sequins on volumized sleeves represent seeds and their capability of growth.

What will clothes be like in the future? My hope for futuristic clothing is that every person in the world has the right to wear whatever he or she wants, that this freedom brings new visions and creativity in people’s minds, creating new cuts and forms in general.

Dream client? And why? The dream client is someone who is willing to let go, who trusts my vision, and its not afraid to take risks. There are a few of them on my wishlist, but the top three are Nicole Kidman, Cate Blanchett, and Rihanna.

Tell us about a piece that has been designed in your dreams but still isn’t a reality. My dreams are sometimes so crazy and fast, so most of the times

I forget what I have

dreamt about. But the one I remember the most is a piece entirely made of glass, and my hope is that one day it will come to life.

If there were a soundtrack to your designs, what song would you choose? Sounds are closer to my design aesthetic, so my chosen song would be without words, only instrumental. The Vivaldi’s “Four Seasons” is a bit like the mood of my inspirations, so definitely some classical masterpiece.

What historical or vintage clothing trend do you wish would make a come back? Crinolines. I really like the dramatic shapes and sizes of skirts. Of course, my modern version would be a bit different, but isn’t it so many girl’s dream to be a princess? As designers, we should be able to give them that joy. DESIGN DAMIR BEGOVIĆ @DAMIRBEGOVIC13 PHOTOGRAPHY DARIJA CIKAĆ @DARIJACIKAC PHOTOGRAPHY ASSISTANT NEVEN MURETIĆ MODEL KORINA BREČIĆ @SAPIOSEUXAL_FRVR @TALIAMODEL_OFFICIAL

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QI WANG

05 What piece is most emblematic of

DESIGN & STYLING QI WANG @QIWANGGGG PHOTOGRAPHY HAIYAN ZHANG @HEDYYYYYYYYYY

your current collection and why?

The woven stripe dress. I think it’s

representative because it looks random and woven casually but I actually spend much time testing the width of stripes to achieve the best visual effect, which is much harder to do than it is sounds. Since this collection is zero-waste, I need to calculate how many stripes can be cut per yard of wool and how to weave them in a way to achieve the effect of an optical illusion while using all the wool. I also enjoy the process of creating by combining modern techniques (lasercut) with traditional methods (weaving).

What will clothes be like in the future? I think it will be more custom made, more tech-intense and more multi-functional. For example, a coat that can change its colors based on the outer environment, like humidity or temperature. A shirt that can modify its structure to a skirt. Or to think outside of the box, maybe the categories of clothing will be eliminated. There will be no names like jeans, sweaters, or coats etc. There will be one piece of clothing that can modify into any forms.

Tell us about a piece that has been designed in your dreams but still isn’t a reality. There isn’t a specific piece I’ve dreamt of, but I had a dream once of a time when everyone possesses a telepathic dressing capsule. It’s like a small tube that can be opened by pressing a button and whatever you want to wear will just pop out.

Dream client? And why? A woman/girl who is independent and freethinking. She has her own style/own way of styling.

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BASIC DESIGNERS - PRESENT


PRESENT

What historical or vintage clothing trend do you wish would make a come back? From the top of my mind, I think rococo. It’s sentimental and kind of sassy but I love the pastel palette, the graceful and the romantic spirit. I feel delighted just by looking at the art and fashion of that time.

If there were a soundtrack to your designs, what song would you choose? “Luv Letter” by DJ Okawari

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6

DESIGN & STYLING OLESYA SERCHENKO, NO.RR 312 STUDIO @NO.RR312 PHOTOGRAPHY SARA LEHTOMAA @SARALEHTOMAA MAKEUP MELIINA SAVELA @MELIINASAVELA @STUDIOMELIINASAVELA MODEL KIRSI KUJALA @BRANDMGMT

OLESYA SERCHENKO

What will clothes be like in the future?

Dream client? And why?

I don’t think we can expect a revolution

Tilda

in fashion in the future. I guess the

Her cold and elegant beauty is so

tendency of simple and functional

extraterrestrial. She is chic, but not flashy,

clothes will continue. It will probably

a bit aristocratic. Whatever she wears, she

be more about new materials like

looks powerful and self-confident

Swinton

is

my

ideal

woman.

“smart fabrics” and technologies of their production. Sustainable and eco

Tell us about a piece that has been

fashion will be preferable.

designed in your dreams but still isn’t a reality.

What piece is most emblematic of

It’s not about only one piece, but an entire

your current collection and why?

collection I saw it once in my dream.

The dark blue short dress. It’s dramatic

Leather and knitted dresses combined

and expresses the full concept of the

with tight over-the-knee boots. The

collection.

inspiration for the collection came from the Elizabeth virgin queen époque.

If there were a soundtrack to your designs, what song would you choose? “Requiem for a Dream” composed by Clint Mansell.

What historical or vintage clothing trend do you wish would make a come back? A-line skirt of 40’s fashion. I adore this age of fashion.

.

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BASIC DESIGNERS - PRESENT


PRESENT

Tell us about a piece that has been designed in your dreams but still isn’t a reality. Dreams are bound to come true – so you’ll just have to wait and see, won’t you? ;)

If there were a soundtrack to your designs, what song would you choose? “Cherry” by Lana Del Rey – a tale of a helpless romantic caught

LIVINE WHITE

between her raw desires and reality. Simply timeless.

What

DESIGN & PHOTOGRAPHY ALON LIVNÉ @LIVNEWHITE

historical

or

vintage

7 clothing trend do you wish

MAKEUP NOGA TAMIR

would make a come back?

Bridal gowns with plain yet strong silhouettes, clean draping fabrics

and a touch of minimalistic details. Can’t get better than that.

What piece is most emblematic of your

What will clothes be like in the future?

Dream client? And why?

current collection and why?

Bridal gowns will always be inspired by

A woman who is independent, not afraid

The “Isabella” gown is definitely one of the

vintage weddings and romantic appeals,

to be different, fashion-forward, and knows

most stand-out pieces of the collection. I

but I think street-style and art are slowly

just what she wants. It’s simply the woman I

think its mix of modern-sophistication and

becoming greater and greater inspirations,

envision when designing my gowns.

details along with the classic, clean-cut

and the bridal fashion world will eventually be

silhouette form an almost timelessly romantic

a combination of the two.

piece.

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BASIC ACCESSORIES


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PRESENT

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ALESSANDRO TRINCONE S/S 18’ CAMPAIGN

Agendermi Stripped of its gender identity, Agendermi is born. Masculine, tailored pieces sprinkled with feminine detail, Alessandro Trincone’s Spring/Summer 2018 collection is a unisex canvas intertwined with texture and artistic expression. Inspired by the ability to be free of thoughts of others, the Italian designer creates Agendermi with everyone in mind. Created equally for men and women, the intent of Agendermi is to inspire people to authenticate themselves. A production to encourage people to write their own narratives and not be masked by societal norms. Simply, Agendermi is the freedom to be.

WORDS BY YAEL REED W.

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BASIC LOOKBOOK - PRESENT


PRESENT

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PHOTOGRAPHY & STYLING VIKTORIJA PASHUTA SET DESIGN VIKTORIA PASHUTA & BRIEONA CORNELIUS ART DIRECTON BRIEONA CORNELIUS MAKEUP LUPE MORENO HAIR VICTOR MENDOZA NAILS JERRY AVILA HAIR ASSISTANT JERRY AVILA

SPONSORED BY CASABLANCA

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BASIC BEAUTY - PRESENT


Bo

ujee Po p e s l i c

Earrings Ken Samudio @ Accoutrements LA


Boujee Bur ge r 26

BASIC BEAUTY - PRESENT


Earrings Ken Samudio @ Accoutrements LA

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BASIC BEAUTY - PRESENT

Image right- Earrings Ken Samudio @ Accoutrements LA


Bo

u je e Ic e C r

m

ea


Bo

ujee Do

n

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BASIC BEAUTY - FUTURE

s t u


31 Image left & right- Earrings Ken Samudio @ Accoutrements LA


Image left & rightEarrings & Other Stories Top H&M

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BASIC EDITORIAL - PRESENT


PRESENT

PHOTOGRAPHY FLORIAN FITZEK @FLOCIRCUS STYLING VALENTINA SCHUPKE @V.F.M.S MAKEUP & HAIR SIMONE KOSTIAN @SIMONEKOSTIAN | USING MAC COSMETICS & MR. SMITH MODEL MARIANA VANSUIT @MARIANAVASUIT MODEL AGENCY MGM MODELS @MGM.MODELS

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iss Me Deadly, Casablanca, Some Like It Hot. Mood dripping, suspense filling, fatalist, flirtatious, grandiose beyond measure. The golden age of cinema served monochromatic mirages that seeped into the collective unconsciousness. For a moment in time, the population dreamt in black and white.

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Image left & rightTop C/MEO Collective Earrings & Other Stories

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Image left & rightBra Wonderbra Leggings Wolford

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PRESENT Image leftSkirt Danny Reinke @clycommunication Earrings H&M

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PHOTOGRAPHY STYLING MAKEUP & HAIR POST PRODUCTION ASSISTANT MODEL GRAPHIC DESIGN

PINCH MARTIN TREMBLAY @LEPINCH FLORENCE O. DURAND @FLORENCEODURAND @JUDYINC CYNTHIA CHRISTINA @CYNTHIACHRISTINAMUA @JUDYINC LEPINCH / ELPINCH YANICK FOURNIER EDEN @SPECSMODELS CANDICE LEE @CANLEE__


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Belted neoprene jacket Marie Saint Pierre Embroidered wool sweater Coach Silver midi skirt Marie Saint Pierre Embellished mule Prada Sunglasses Bar Ă Lunettes


Long tailored wool coat Carven Pink blazer Vintage Heels with back strap Manolo Blahnik Earrings, linear drop Carolee

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Printed silk jersey Kaftan Bathing suit Ecru Turquoise strappy sandals Chanel Black swim cap Eres

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Tweed jacket & dress Sonia Rykiel Metallic boots Aldo Ring Bleu comme le ciel

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Wool coat Black collar Lace dress Miu Miu Holt Renfrew

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Image above Blazer & trousers Lucian Matis Shirt with scallop collar COS Image left Colour block bathing suit Missoni Red wool trousers Joncas Bicolor Suede platform sandals Miu Miu Earrings Bleu comme le ciel Sunglasses Vintage Image right Green silk dress Pierre Balmain Pink metallic boots Winners Gold

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Jessica Yatrofsky's

PINK PRIVACY

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BASICPOETRY INTERVIEW - PRESENT BASIC - PRESENT


FUTURE J E S S I CA YAT R O F S K Y | P I N K P R I VACY

An artist, photographer, and filmmaker,

from my collective, the NY Fem Factory,

creative spirit. I am inspired by so many

Yatrofsky is no stranger to letting her

which strives to be a platform that supports

creative fields and disciplines. Everything

creativity crossover to other mediums.

collaborative works across multiple artistic

influences

Celebrated for her photographic projects

disciplines. We have a series of events

photography, film making, writing. When

“I Heart Boy” and “I Heart Girl,” her work

that take on different forms depending on

inspiration is just coming at you – you can’t

has a beautiful, young eroticism that

the city we visit. For example, in

explores expectations of beauty and

2017 I was doing the tour for Pink

gender. In Yatrofsky’s debut poetry book,

Privacy and when I’d do live sets

Pink Privacy, her stream of consciousness

for the poems, I would invite other

bubbles forth, giving a bold voice to

women to be a part of it – other

fragmented thoughts that feel brazen

writers to read and share their

for being written, let alone spoken aloud.

work. Then I’d have a musician,

She is a champion of circumventing

or

presumption.

experimental. I would also hold

Yatrofsky spoke with BASIC about her

I

would

do

the

other

my

painting,

something

panel discussions, which I’ve

poetic writing process, from where her

been doing for a few years

inspiration is divined, and the dialogue

called “Gender, Beauty, and the

from which a new community has sprung.

Camera.” We did a performance

Since this was your first foray into

was highly experimental – we

through Art Basel Miami that writing poetry, how long did it take you

took spoken word, music, and

to put Pink Privacy together?

performance combined with VR and sculpture. We then got all

For years in my adulthood, I was culling

these amazing, powerful women

material – but I never took the time to write

in completely different disciplines

it down. When I was traveling a few years

to work together on something

ago, I began jotting down phrases and

collaborative,

quips and things that would ultimately end

experimental. A lot of these Q&A’s

immersive,

and

up on Twitter. I refer to my process as being

turn into some of the richest

divinely guided, because I had this burst

dialogue I’ve had in years. So now

of creative output and I could not stop

we want to expand on that with

writing. It was a 72-hour period of writing

the podcast. Words are powerful

nonstop – writing on my magic board in the

– and because they have power,

shower, writing on napkins, on my iPhone,

I want to follow that up with

everywhere that I could get these words

an action. The NY Fem Factory

down. The pace in which material came to

podcast will be so that people

me – I have no way to describe what that

who can’t go to our events can

feels like, and also no idea where it came

still have access to this dialogue.

from, and that’s why I refer to it as being divinely guided.

As

someone

who

became

known first and primarily as What sort of environment are you hoping

a photographer, did you feel

to foster? What’s amazing is how with

any pushback to becoming a

Pink Privacy you’re putting into words

writer?

these things we’re not supposed to say as women. We’re supposed to blush or

A very elitist perspective that I did not agree

shy away, and these are the exact things

with while I was in art school was that you

you are taking claim of.

have to stay in your lane and just stick to what you’re doing – if you’re a painter, you’re

Exactly. And I am actually in the midst of

a painter, and just stick to and do that, keep

launching a podcast this month to address

doing that, hammering away at just that. I

these ideas and more. The genesis came

don’t feel that this is very productive to your

*To order your own copy of Pink Privacy or to learn more about Jessica Yatrofsky’s podcast, visit http://www.jessicayatrofsky.com @jyatrofsky

25 47


COBRA PRINCESS STATUS UPDATE er Hung r me f o ike str

FLORIST BLUE

tar, nec

You went there and so did I A standard occurrence Rare but frequently on mind, in heart Bodily flew Bye Us both Soonly -stick s u cker Lic k

ey bee dreaming About other me n Hon n . Hu yum

I'm a city bitch, walk with me and get to the point, quickly. I have lots to say that's more currently reflective and relevant to your place, in my lane Keep up to my pace-y Lace string panty, hog tie me when you have the time if you can hang Get in there, baby.

it.

SHOW PONY

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think a lot of people are limited because they

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we need to remember to not be closed

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open mind is so powerful, and as creatives

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to be limited by these social constructions

ojis,

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movies, I’m going to love his music –and I

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the thought place of, if I love Vincent Gallo’s

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rs

BASIC POETRY - PRESENT

and I f*cking love it – Shia LaBeouf doing

Tig ass. that tap ble ou

e

do ta

fou

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performance art? Yes, please. I come from

come into the art world from other fields

nd

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ding, every pictur

Stream it live, living hide me, blue sheet coastal. On and off, sure

down. Art school hates on people trying to

PA P E R P R E S S P L AY

lm

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48

sc licking Sen

whatever – and they totally shut themselves

rs keep Deeply creepy e, finde s clicking Sen L ipe m ll fours Tip . Sw h a c t a n w e O r r and ge box my in and ag M into D , y b a ain b P ic me up IRL Birdie

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think, ‘I’m not a photographer,’ or a painter, or

Ball wreck me close to home Concrete jungle, dreamy California dreaming steaming on your watermelon juices.

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CREAM WAVE

ro

F i n g ers.

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have to capture it and record it, even if you

rs. Fin ge

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turn it down! It’s a gift, a divine gift, and you

like! ike

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son, deo views, no commenting Tell me in per

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world. Because you may not always have it. I

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Pony up, you can't at all, talk. You, never listen too pleased by your voice Vixen in your head and concrete in your heart Smile for the microphone fake

WHEN INSPIRATION IS JUST COMING AT YOU – YOU CAN’T TURN IT DOWN! IT’S A GIFT, A DIVINE GIFT, AND YOU HAVE TO CAPTURE IT AND RECORD IT, EVEN IF YOU DON’T HAVE THE INTENTION OF SHARING IT WITH THE WORLD.

Bend me baby and tape me shut Door chain me to the ceiling and levitate Vampire status, chat me and glamour, I forget Forge me over and wax on Reaching, maximized But keep me hidden Bury yourself, Faces close on top.


J E S S I CA YAT R O F S K Y | P I N K P R I VACY

PRESENT

KALEIDOSCOPE COLLIDE See you Soon Seeing me between beats Waving Crash Duplicate, return to tourmaline skies Rotating Symmetrical pinks In future

BE HERE NOW You are Sun beamy bird-escape Run away, this a'way Gemini brother bae Shaded Held Flown, flowing Bird and the honey b Purest potential lover Present Gifted God-sent to each other

L A P T O P L O V E LY BARE ESSENTIALS Honey, man bunny Not happening Douchebaggery Dark eye circle, Cycles. cough syrups and pain killers 'Round writer bellies Laughing at you Looking at things from my Lady habitat Perspective Not welcome Consumer complainy, Feed Back, new jack shitty Always in need Compliments necessary No more time in my New York minute Meter run low

Sit with me Please it, M'lady Typing non-stop Streamage

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Thousands of women, femmes, and allies came together again to celebrate one year of resistance. The inaugural Women’s March was held on January 21, 2017 with a worldwide participation of over five million in over eighty countries. The policy platform of the March includes addressing reproductive rights, workers’ rights, immigration reform, religious discrimination, LGBTQ rights, and gender and racial inequalities. The Anniversary March held in Los Angeles, in partnership with marches held around the world, set out to remind everyone that once the spirit of resistance is awakened, it will be relentless in the pursuit of equality.

THERE IS ONLY ONE

LOS ANGELES The future is

FEMALE 50

BASIC MOVEMENT - PRESENT

Women’s

March 2018


PRESENT

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PRESENT

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PHOTOGRAPHY & RETOUCHING DOMENICO DONADIO @DOMENICODONADIOPHOTOGRAPHER STYLING CARMEN INCORNATO @CARMENT.INCARNATO MAKEUP & HAIR ANTONIA DEFFENU @ANTONIADEFFENU MODELS KATALINA O. @KATALINAORLOVO FASHION MODEL MANGAEMENT @FASHIONMODEL.IT | DASHA STAKANOVA @DARIA | THE LAB MODELS @THELABMODELS MAKEUP & HAIR ASSISTANT DENISE SODO @DENISE_SODO ASSISTANT FEDERICO LAUDICINA @FEDERICO.LAUDICINA LOCATION MILAN, ITALY

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BASIC FASHION - PRESENT


PRESENT

LeftBlazer & coulotte Vladimiro Gioia Shirt Enrico Mazza Brooch & ring Thot Gioielli Clutch Damico Tights Wolford

RightDress Lucia Pi Earrings Sharra Pagano

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LeftBlazer & coulotte Vladimiro Gioia Shirt Enrico Mazza Brooch & ring Thot Gioielli Clutch Damico Tights Wolford Shoes Racine Carrée

RightDress Lucia Pi Tights Wolford Earrings Sharra Pagano

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LeftT-shirt Edward Achour Paris Skirt Delfrance Tights Wolford Shoes Racine

RightNecklace & bracelets Thot Gioielli Ring Sharra Pagano

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LeftDress Alberto Zambelli Panties Momoni Tiara Sharra Pagano Ring Thot Gioielli

RightDress Lucia Pi Necklace Sharra Pagano Bag Gedebe

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LeftDress Alberto Zambelli Panties Momoni Tiara Sharra Pagano Ring Thot Gioielli Bag Ottaviani Décolleté Racine Carrée

RightDress Lucia Pi Necklace Sharra Pagano Bag Gedebe Slingback Sebastian Milano

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LeftDress Lucia Pi Leather jacket Francesco Scognamiglio Earrings Sharra Pagano Tights Wolford Sandals Oscar Tiye

RightBolero Compagnia Italiana Shirt & pants Class Tights Wolford Décolleté Racine Carrée

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LeftDress Lucia Pi Bracelets Thot Gioielli Earrings Sharra Pagano

RightDress Lucia Pi Tights Wolford Tiara Sharra Pagano Ring Thot Gioielli

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Floral blazer Zara Man Dress shirt Alfani c/o Trendhaus showroom Slacks Zara Man Necklace c/o Trendhaus showroom

JONATHAN AMARET – SCHOLAR & DESIGNER Jonathan Amaret has accomplished a lot in an impressively short amount of time: teenage NASA scholar, entrepreneur, acclaimed author – and now luxury jewelry designer. BASIC Magazine sat down with Amaret to learn a bit more about his wide variety of interests and how they all seemingly connect to a much bigger picture.

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Doing an internship with NASA set you up on a course that seems to have affected the rest of your life. Can you tell us a little more about the experience?

older man tells me that we did. I asked how he knew, and he just said, “Because I’m John Glenn.” Couldn’t really argue with that.

I didn’t know what I was getting myself into, and my mom was actually the one who pushed me to do it – which is so funny in hindsight, because it was a life changing experience and I initially didn’t want to participate. I got to see and study things that no other civilian got to, and be mentored by some of the top scientists and astronauts there. You know, I actually went at it with John Glenn. I was talking about conspiracy theories and how we didn’t land on the moon, and pretty sternly, this

You left an airway space program in Texas to move out to Los Angeles and pursue a degree in film, television and media studies. You eventually became an author. How do you think your science background affects your writing, and what can you tell us about the book and its possible sequel?

BASIC INTERVIEW - PRESENT

The science background pushed me towards exploring how energy and the mind work at a grander level. It’s a journey of


PRESENT

White suite Zara Man Dress shirt Jesse J Collections Jewelry Talent's own

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Zipper front shirt Jesse J Collections Watch Rolex Jewelry Talent's own

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BASIC INTERVIEW - PRESENT


PRESENT

I HAD BEEN DESIGNING ON A SMALL SCALE, BUT WHEN FRIENDS POINTED OUT HOW MANY PEOPLE WERE INTERESTED, I DECIDED I NEEDED A TEAM TO MAKE IT EVEN BIGGER. DOING A JEWELRY LINE WAS AN OPPORTUNITY FOR MY SCIENCE AND MY CREATIVE BACKGROUNDS TO COME TOGETHER.

discovery, and it helps with focus and cognitive understanding. You can’t wait for the outside world to incentivize you – incentive needs to come from within yourself. My first book, Rominus, was described by Bryan Singer (director of the X-Men franchise) as the most sophisticated vampire story ever written. It’s a coming of age story about 21-year-old Julian Angelis, who’s destined to become a ruler. Rominus is highly autobiographical in some ways, because the power of an author comes from writing what he knows. It was very popular, so I’m taking my time to research, write, and make the sequel just as good. I want them to be related, but be able to stand independently of one another. Hopefully the sequel will be released sometime in 2019. Your upcoming self-titled jewelry collection, Amaret, has deep references to history as well as your writing – how so, and what got you into designing? The novel actually covers 20,000 years of human and art history, and the jewelry collection pulls from and references this history. I’m inspired by French and English royal courts, as well as the great masters like Rembrandt and Monet. The jewelry also alludes to mythology and technology referenced in the book, such as a piece of Moldavite wrapped in a futuristic looking gold bezel that is inspired by the Mecca Stone in the story of Rominus. I had been designing on a small scale, but when friends pointed out how many people were interested, I decided I needed a team to make it even bigger. Doing a jewelry line was an opportunity for my science and my creative backgrounds to come together. Every time I design a piece, it becomes – how do I feel about it as an artist? And how do I think about it as a scholar? There’s always a philosophy to be had.

PHOTOGRAPHY DJENEBA ADUAYOM PRODUCER JACKSON CHONG STYLING KIM SHEREE MASON

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I

dentity is divisible. It starts with the division of the “I” of consciousness and the “Me” of personal ipseity. One is intrinsic and one is constructed. The one constructed is composed of an infinite number of external impressions, pushing and pulling this one body into a homogeneity of averages, a survey of becoming ourselves through others. Identity mirrors the image collectively shaped in society. Chuck Palahniuk once said that, “Nothing of me is original. I am the combined effort of everyone I’ve ever known.” But if everyone is a stranger, how illusionary can you be? It’s enough to give anyone a complex.

PHOTOGRAPHY DYLAN PERLOT @DYLANPERLOT CREATIVE DIRECTION DINA VIBES & DYLAN PERLOT STYLING DINA VIBES @DINAVIBES_ GROOMING LEE GRUBBS @BEAUTYBYLEEG MODEL DEVEN JAPNGIE @DEVENJAPNGIE | @NEXT MODELS LA

WORDS BY AMANDA VANDENBERG

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WORDS BY AMANDA VANDENBERG


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Coat David Giampiccolo Gloves Long Clothing Shorts Digby Jackson Sneakers Converse Rosary V22LA

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Hat Zara Leather Jacket V22LA Shirt Konus Pants V22LA Boots Pskaufman

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Leather Bracelet Gauntlet with Slave Ring V22LA Gauntlet Seven Sins V22LA

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Hat Zara Leather Jacket V22LA Shirt Konus Pants V22LA Boots Pskaufman Jewelry V22LA

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Neckerchief Von Drenik Leather Jacket B James Belt V22LA Jeans A.Tiziano

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BASIC COVER STORY - FUTURE


Shirt Saint Laurent, Shoulder piece & glasses Manuel Albarran

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P

icture yourself during springtime in Miami: clad in neon, packed downtown, heartbeat syncing in the humidity, letting the music wash over you. Or maybe you’re 130 miles east of Los Angeles, seeking refuge from the desert dust storms at the far edge of the grounds, tented laser lights cutting clear through the arenaceous air. Maybe you’ve had it happen during a stag weekend in Ibiza, or a girls’ trip to Vegas – the nights that taste like the intoxication of youth and leave you half dead but, somehow, also more alive. Or maybe you’ve stood in Belgium with the masses, watching flags from over 70 different nations wave in thousands of arms silhouetted against a mythologically proportioned stageline at one of the most immersive and internationally attended music events on earth No matter what corner of the world you’ve moved your body, brushed up against and befriended strangers, or had your entire outlook of the world shifted in a hazy flash, there’s a chance that part of that experience was a direct influence of David Guetta. There’s been a lot written about the particular magic of festivals, and for many, none of it would have been made corporeal without the emergence of electronic from the underground and up into the more widely accessible realm of popular music – a migration for which Guetta is a metaphorical figurehead. As someone who has consistently been evolving, adapting, and reacting to his environment for over three decades, no one would say that he hasn’t hustled for his success. But what is so thrilling about this trajectory is how filled it is with seemingly fated moments. It started with the way Guetta was signed – after playing his new record for Thomas (Bangalter) of Daft Punk, a call was placed immediately to the president of Virgin in France. The first time he was working on a new album, Kelly Rowland complimented the record he was playing in a club. Upon learning it was his own, she asked to try something out on

it, and together they created ‘When Love Takes Over,’ now a major crossover hit. The very same week, Will.i.am requested something produced similar to ‘Love is Gone,’ and ‘I Gotta Feeling’ was born. While performing with Rowland in London, Akon passed Guetta on his way to the stage and requested they work together. That same night, they created ‘Sexy Bitch.’ Nearly a decade later, the predestined falling-into-place of songs is still strongly a theme. After releasing ‘2U’ featuring Justin Bieber last year, Guetta’s newest single ‘Dirty Sexy Money’ gives us another peak into the direction the next album is being taken. Put together with longtime collaborator Afrojack, it was during a writing camp that Charlie XCX came up with the hook, and as Guetta describes it, “It was like a party in the studio. Everyone was dancing, and it was just a great, great time.” When the record was nearing release, Guetta ran into French Montana while performing at a festival, who wanted to set in motion a collaboration. Guetta handed over ‘Dirty Sexy Money’ and offered to let French Montana cut a verse. What he wasn’t expecting was for it to come back not even two days later with the perfect fit. If we go down the road of the foreordained, it could be proposed that music was ready for crossovers like these, and Guetta’s collaborative pairings may have a big something to do with the mainstream success of EDM today. Indeed, even those who wouldn’t directly count themselves as fans of Guetta’s music probably couldn’t say the same about at least one of his dozens of collaborators. And even if you haven’t danced directly for a Guetta megahit, if you’ve ever been to a concert or festival and knew the DJ’s name, that shift is a trend more than partially thanks to him as well. Guetta has worked hard to make sure DJs are counted as artists, and he’s gone from having his booth tucked in a corner, virtually unknown in a Paris nightclub, to having his face on billboards and his name listed as the headliner. Overall, Guetta truly seems to trust in a process, surrendering himself to the way that music can change with the times. “I avoid repeating myself too much. It

LocationMona Liza Studios, NY www.monaliza. studio

keeps it exciting.”

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BASIC COVER STORY - FUTURE

Avoiding repetition is key when you’ve been working this hard, for this long. When asked when his seventh studio


FUTURE

Shirt Alexander Mcqueen, Armor piece Jivomir Domoustchiev

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album – arriving later this year via What A Music/ Beat/ Atlantic/ Parlophone – will be released, he muses that hopefully it will be before summer he has to finish it first, hopefully between his new tour and Las Vegas residency at the Wynn. But in the meantime, BASIC sat down to get to know Guetta a little more personally, the man behind the booth that has strung together an entire generation’s formative dance moments. You’ve the sic

been

dance scene

decades,

in mufor

and

you’ve seen it in so many diff e r e n t ways do you

directions. In what think

your

own

My scene and my music have both evolved, and are reflective of one another. Meaning, I’ve been doing this for many, many years. When I started to play house music, it was at the end of the 80s and it was a very underground movement. There was no such thing as a famous DJ, really. You may be famous, but out of reputation in your club, in your town, maybe in your country. Of course, it’s completely different now. I started making songs that were crossing over on the radio. First in Europe with records like ‘Love Don’t Let Me Go,’ which was my first UK #1. Later, I had records crossing over in the US BASIC COVER STORY - PRESENT

You

often

headline

festivals

filled

with

up to hundreds of thousands of people from all

walks

of

life.

How

do

you

think

mu-

sic brings these people together, or what speaks to its universality?

Emotional music brings people together the most. I grew up in France, and though I couldn’t understand the words, I always listened to American or English music. And even though I couldn’t understand the words, I was touched. I would connect with the music. This shows that it’s about melodies and emotions even more than words. It’s funny, because I started to focus on the words really late in my career. I still have an approach that is different from most American producers. They’re so focused on lyrics, whereas I try not to be solely impressed by them. I try to pretend like I don’t understand the words and be touched by just the melody and the chord progression. It's because I’m still thinking globally. I want my music to touch everyone, even those that don’t understand English. It’s incredible to see how music is the universal language, and how it can touch people in so many different countries even when they don’t understand the words.

music

has also evolved?

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(‘I Got a Feeling’ and ‘Sexy Bitch’). What was once called undergrounded had crossed over and become the new format of pop music. So it’s an evolution of my music, but also the genre in general. I started with traditional, soulful types of vocals. I wanted to do something different, so I added in electro house beats using urban artists and melodies. That kind of created a style that was new. And then later, I started using indie pop artists (like Sia, who is one of my favorite artists to collaborate with) – and it was a new style, a new wave of music again. Then there was the EDM wave with records like ‘BAD.’ I think it’s a very interesting moment right now – there’s not one thing in dance music that is completely killing it. Really, it’s a moment where people are ready for anything – which is very interesting as an artist, because it gives us the opportunity to experiment. That means it’s possible to win, and it’s possible to lose, but I think all the producers are pushing to find a new sound. It’s stressful, but it’s also giving us freedom.

You always keep things changing –

where do

you typically find your inspiration?

My inspiration is a balance between my life as a DJ (when it comes to sounds and the reactions of the people) and just my life - period. It’s really that combination. I was using a phrase in one of my first records – “dancing and crying” – and that is what I’m trying to do: make people dance and have that energy, but at the same time, connect to some deeper emotion. Do you have performance?

a

favorite

festival

or


PRESENT

My favorite festivals would have to be Ultra and Tomorrowland. But thinking about this year, one of my favorite shows was...yesterday – New Year’s Eve. I had such an amazing time. We did a warehouse party in New York City. I hadn’t done this in forever, and it felt like I was back in the 90s. It was really unbelievable, because it was so rough. Most of the time, I’m playing concerts and festivals with amazing production, super spectacular shows. Or when I play clubs, like when I play the Wynn in Vegas, or I play Ibiza, all of those are extremely professional, you know? And very digitally perfect. And to get back to that rave life for New Year’s Eve was just so amazing. You’ve traveled the world, you’re laden with accolades. Do you have any remaining items on your bucket list?

If I’m totally honest, if I’m thinking about what I haven’t had in my life, it wouldn’t be these incredible things. What I haven’t had is a normal life. To have more time with my friends with my family...do normal things. Maybe that’s not what you want to hear, but I’ve always been deep into my work, my music, traveling all the time, never having any time for myself. That’s been my life until today. If I’m thinking about things that have been missing in my life and I want in the future, it’s probably not selling more millions of albums or doing a show on the moon. I was reading this letter written by Steve Jobs when he was about to die. He’s realizing that the most important moments of his life were the moments spent

T-shirt Vince, Zip-up hoodie Amiri, Jeans Amiri

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M

enough. he aybe he should haveMaybe spent more asn’t should have spent more time with time with loved ones and less time loved onesto and less time onIttrying on trying overachieve. was to overachieve. It was interesting, interesting, and I was touched and I was touched by the letter. I by the letter. I think about trying think about trying to find more of to find moretoofstay a balance, stay a balance, excitedtoabout excited about I do, and–stay what I do, and what stay creative but creative also have a life . also have-- abut life. What

was

the

last

thing

that made you laugh?

I did Christmas with a lot of friends, and one has a kid (4 or 5 years old). When it was time to open the gifts, I was looking at this little boy and he was screaming. He was so happy, it was unbelievable. It made me laugh a lot, and it was so beautiful to see. As a kid, everything new is always so exciting, and it gives you so much happiness. This was the first year that he could understand the concept of Christmas and the gifts and he could actually open the gifts himself. And of course the question is – how can I always stay like this? How can we always be screaming and laughing when we open the gifts of life? This is probably the secret to happiness. You’re

surprising

not attached to many things. But I need my computer because it’s a lot of work to set it up. What

memory

do

you

find

yourself revisiting when you’re daydreaming?

To be honest, I tend to daydream more about the future. Sometimes I think of the past, but I’m always more oriented towards dreaming of what I could do. That’s more my way of daydreaming than thinking about moments of my life, or something like this – I am not melancholic. I’m not thinking, ‘Oh, it was better then.’ You know, you hear so many people who say it was so much better before. I’m totally not like this! I’m a resident DJ in Ibiza and I’ve been playing Ibiza now for twenty years – and for twenty years at the end of the summer everybody says, [sigh] ‘It was so much better before. I think these are the last years of Ibiza.’ And it’s been TWENTY YEARS. I’ve heard this at the end of every single summer. And every year it’s the destination to party and everyone comes back. So I really don’t get it.

philo-

sophical.And quite poignant.

Is there anything everyone should try once in their life?

[laughs] Thank you. What would you make sure to save in a fire?

My computer. Because I make music with it. Apart from this, I’m

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Everyone should try once in their life to be in love. So many people are compromising. We should not compromise. It’s so amazing to be in love.


PAST

Shirt Prada Shawl jacket Balmain Coat Balmain Dress pants Givenchy Shoes Gucci Cane Alexander Mcqueen

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Revolutions in fashion have always been a reaction to and informative of the political and social climate of the day. Tracing fashion’s evolution, this is true of every period in history, it holds true today, and it will inevitably hold true in the times ahead, those incapable of being fathomed currently. It can be easy to write off fashion as frivolity or as excess, but every trend, design, or personal style is reflective of a choice, a reaction to the world, and a culmina-

tion of history up to that very moment. Revolutions in fashion occur because they are reflective of the revolutionaries themselves.

ION

I first noticed her on one I first noticed her on one particularly frosty winter morning.

I was a soph- Her story was tragic, yet here she was omore in col- exquisitely frozen in time, her satin lege. Instead blue dress so tangible and lifelike, I of going home could easily imagine the way that exto Florida for pensive and rare fabric felt to the touch. spring break, ingly aware of my modernity, I stayed with a friend in New especially in moments spent York City and together we viswrestling with my bulky coat, ited the Metropolitan Museum tangled hair, and scarf. I beof Art. As we were wandering gan to think about just how around other 19th century much has changed for women paintings, my eyes were drawn since the painting of that porto Jean Auguste Dominique trait, and what is still left to Ingres’s haunting portrait of accomplish. Joséphine-Éléonore-MarieReflecting upon annals Pauline de Galard de Brassac of history such as these, a de Béarn, Princesse de Broglie clear connection between (1851-3). some of the 20th century’s most iconic fashion trends and the prevailing socio-political attitudes of the day begins to emerge. Upon several minutes of looking into the soul of that painting, I started to

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This was the artist's final commission, and the glamorous, intriguing woman staring back at me had died of tuberculosis soon after the painting’s completion, leaving behind a heartbroken husband and five sons. Her story was tragic, yet here she was exquisitely frozen in time, her satin blue dress so tangible and lifelike, I could easily imagine the way that expensive and rare fabric felt to the touch. Making a connection across space and time, I found myself picturing what this woman’s life must have been like. And as she kept appearing in my thoughts, I became increas-

BASIC ARTICLE - PAST

understand that the most enviable ensembles of each decade were not random or frivolous, but an expression of society’s most vital values and goals. I first traced this link back to the Edwardian era (1901-1910), realizing the overly complicated crinoline skirts and restrictive corsets of the Victorian age were slowly giving way to more natural and simple silhouettes. With these shifting styles, women were thankfully free to move and breathe more easily than ever before. This loosening of societal norms was not simply a fashion choice, but reflected the rising status of women during this time. The women’s suffrage movement was gaining ground and the blossoming arts and culture scenes in Europe ushered in an age of modern, progressive thinking. Prior to this movement, John Singer-Sargent portraits depicted women like presents wrapped up in tulle, while just a few short years later, Pablo Picasso’s primal, deconstructed nudes in Des Demoiselles d’ Avignon (1907) took the world by storm. For the first time in modern history, women were depicted

in a raw, unembellished manner. In addition to this sorely needed cultural shift, countless women began serving their countries as nurses, factory workers, and ambulance drivers during the horrors of World War I. Through this international crisis, women were able to support their countries and prove themselves as trusted, capable workers and leaders. Although obviously overdue, this recognition of women for their talents, bravery, and strength was a massive step towards equality. Trying to imagine myself living in this era, I know that I would been honored to march with the suffragettes and aid my country any way I could


PAST

in the war effort. I’m also certain that I would have felt the same sense of euphoria and relief that spread across the United States and Europe once the Great War ended. It was a time of peace and prosperity, where the stock market and the hemlines soared, waistlines dropped, and corsets vanished completely. In America, women secured the right to vote in 1920, and this decade’s signature flowy outfits further underscored this idea of physical and societal mobility. Women began embracing traditionally male behavior and fashion in this period, with many chopping their hair short, wearing bras to flatten their chests, as well as drinking and smoking in public. The 1920s were undoubtedly a triumph for womankind. After nearly a hundred years of marching, protesting, and speaking out against injustice, women had earned the right to bask in the glory of this achievement and celebrate what seemed to be end of both the war in Europe and the war for women’s rights. In the United States, the frivolity of the Roaring Twenties came to an abrupt halt with the Crash of ‘29, but this was only the beginning of harder times. The country’s metaphorical hangover continued for the next fifteen years with the Great Depression and World War II. Fashion in this era was meant to be affordable and durable above all else. The weary eyes and simple, frayed outfit of Dorothea Lange’s Migrant Mother (1936) gave the widespread poverty and suffering of the depression a human face. Trying to picture the hardships she must have faced in this decade has always left me at a loss for words. Once World War II began, women joined the workforce en masse, taking the place of their husbands while they fought overseas. After the introduction of "Rosie the Riveter" through government advertis-

ing, countless women tied up their hair in bandanas, sported their utility outfits, and got to work once more. Just as in the First World War, I would have gladly done my part and I applaud the women who did so. As a woman who exists in today’s shift towards greater gender equality, I would have despised the traditional gender roles that snapped right back into place after the war’s surviving soldiers came home and reclaimed their jobs. Once again, women were expected to live lives of domesticity and the popular fashions of this decade reflected this sense of conformity. With the end of rationing and the advent of consumerism, feminine frocks returned with a vengeance. Full skirts, girdles, and cinched waists reminiscent of the Belle Époque were back in style, signaling a return to conservative social values. With immense social pressure (and, honestly, sexist advertising) telling women that their roles in society were limited to housewives and mothers, the 1950s proved to be a disastrous decade for women’s rights, as illustrated in a recent trip to see my grandmother. I was helping her clean out her closet, and out from the room’s forgotten corners came a string of colorful, form-fitting dresses and full, hooped skirts from this exact decade. She allowed me to try on several pieces. Although absolutely gorgeous and flattering, the outfits were incredibly restrictive and uncomfortable. Mirroring that rigidity, the conversation later turned to her reflections on this period as she felt she had been pushed by her parents to give up her career as a nurse, get married, and have a family. Although she adored her husband and children, she wished she had been given more options in life. I wished that for her as well. Thankfully, by the 1960s, the pendulum of fashion and societal beliefs was beginning to swing the other way. In a massive rejection of the traditionalism set in place during the previous decade, young people on both sides of the Atlantic began experimenting with radically different lifestyles and fashion choices. In London, the Mod look was everywhere. Vivid hues, geometric shapes, go-go boots, and the mini skirt rode a wave of popularity. Individualism and self-expres-

sion were welcomed, as was unisex clothing. Denim and leather jackets became staples in every young person’s closet. And fashion was not the only way this generation expressed themselves. New age philosophy, rock n’ roll, and mind-altering drugs were experiments of the age. On the other side of the pond, the hippie counterculture movement, which started in San Francisco’s Haight-Ashbury district and New York City’s Greenwich Village, spread like wildfire throughout the country in reaction to the Vietnam War. As pacifists and nature-lovers, the hippies typically donned

handmade and reused clothing. Their signature bell-bottom jeans and tie-dye shirts notified the establishment and older generations that this younger legion would refuse to tow the line and simply accept the status quo regarding gender roles and equality. With second wave feminism happening roughly around the same time, many women were also rejecting the bras, girdles, make-up, and hair removal practices of their mothers and grandmothers, signaling a new, widespread push towards justice and accepting women in their natural state. This acceptance was sorely needed, as was this period of upheaval. It shocked the system and helped many recognize that the human soul needed to be unshackled from toxic gender roles. Over the past one hundred years, fashion trends have made it clear that the

road to women’s liberation has been full of twists and turns with countless battles won and lost. Throughout this entire period, the pendulum of fashion swung back and forth to match the progressive and traditional mentality of the times. It is endlessly heartbreaking to think about the women throughout this century who arduously and ferociously fought and marched for equality. Briefly seeing spurts of progress followed by the almost immedi-

ot noitcaer a ,eciohc a fo evit pu yrotsih fo noitanimluc a d .tnemom yrev taht ot

ate reinstatement of outdated beliefs, these inspiring women never gave up hope. With each new decade and generation, the fight for freedom and justice began anew. Never arbitrary, meaning-

less, or superficial, these ever-shifting aesthetics acted as a barometer measuring this progress towards women’s equality. Through these decades of hardship, prosperity, social enlightenment, and acquiescence, women’s fashion always swung between these two extremes, revealing that although fashion doesn’t directly repeat, it does rhyme.

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shouldn’t everyone get to wear dreadlocks?” – instead of focusing on why is it as a society that what’s fashionable for one race is “thuggish” for another. This is the conversation that needs to happen. And while there have been some serious missteps on the runways (a sacred Native American headdress has no place in a lingerie show), society has become a common denominator, collectively raising eyebrows and bringing into open waters educational conversation about what is appropriate. It becomes tiresome to list the seemingly endless ways the despotism of appropriation exhaustively harms, especially when challengers claim oversensitivity and move on. And I get it – the feeling that there is something capable of causing offense no matter which way you step can be exhausting. If in doubt, take the time to learn, listen, and be mindful of the emotional labor of those attempting to edify. No human being is a costume. And while this drags on often as a political opinion, the simple humanist approach of treating others with basic dignity and respect is an easy benchmark, and the growing willingness to do so reflects the better mindfulness blooming currently. Next, a challenge to ubiquitous “normalcy.” A challenge to gender constructs and assigned expectations. Growing up, so many of us were subjected to what boys should wear versus what girls

Sometimes, it can be hard to keep up with fashion forecasting. There are trends for the New Year – what was prerequisite in 2017 is irrelevant in 2018. It becomes further segmented by season, with runway events following the cataclysmic winter and spring like druids ceremonializing the equinox. However, when focus is withdrawn from these minute shifts, the perspective on the overarching mise en scène exposes something far greater. There’s a rumbling. The climate and the times are changing, and as it was reflected by fashion throughout previous decades, it is having an effect on the fashion of today. Conscious, conscientious, and stylized choices are making thundering statements on culture, identity, and progress. The tumultuous clashing tide between assuredness and uncertainty is the melding point where the greatest changes are seen. Regardless of which side of the spectrum you fall, the dividedness in politics has trickled down, making opinions seem more segregated than in recent history and splitting communities asunder. But after time, divides that seemed unconquerable start to look more like opportunities to reach across, connect, and move forward together with the common realization that the future is not something out of our control, but an existent that can be shaped with dedicated effort. Changes in fashion have arrived, first and foremost, due to challenge. First, a challenge to the exploitation of other’s cultures. Cultural exchange is a vital part of society, and borrowing is not inherently bad. A problem only occurs when appreciation becomes fetishization, or when cultures are reduced to a stereotype. (“Golden Geisha,” “Pocahottie,” and “Dia De Los Beauty” type Halloween costumes flatten vibrant and complex populations into these exact stereotypes.) Further, borrowing becomes appropriation when it reinforces historically exploitative relationships, reinforces systems of oppression, or makes “trendy” for one race what has caused direct discrimination for another. It’s hard to get excited about dreadlocks suddenly becoming high fashion for Marc Jacobs runway models when African American friends still have difficulty finding employers who will accept the protective hairstyle. People too often get caught up on the trend itself – “Why

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should wear, what games and what activities we could or could not participate in, the expectation that girls should be sweet and delicate at all times, but the rowdiness of our male counterparts was exhaustingly and equivocally excused as “boys will be boys.” These absurd standard separations have eased, with retailers like Target leading the way in national ads depicting children’s toys as entirely gender neutral. Meanwhile, the divide between what is “acceptable” for a man to wear and for a woman to wear has been blurred, and the greater breakdown of gender as a societal construct is underway. This results in not only a resurgence of some embracing androgyny, but cis men and cis women feeling renewably comfortable in interests typically on hold by the other gender. Clothes for women have taken into account practicality the same way men’s clothing has for decades, the very catalyst that spurred women to appropriate

men’s styles to begin with. Cosmetics companies have started marketing to an entire demographic that had been left behind, even going so far last year as to introduce the first male Cover Girl. (This unfortunately wasn’t a home run victory – James Charles later was scrutinized for extremely tasteless statements about Africa as disease ridden.) Freud’s assertion that biology is the key determinant in gender identity was once a hegemonic idea. While not dead judging by the way gender norms govern the lives of men and women around the globe, what once was law now, thankfully, feels antiquated. A growing consensus has starting to accept that sex and gender are not perfectly binary – so then why should clothes be? Runways have been muddying gender lines for years. Iconoclast labels such as Comme des Garcons and Alexander McQueen have brought pageantry and theater to a design so heightened it is neither male nor female. Rad Hourani and Prada have introduced collections that are entirely unisex. The ascetic practice of Rick Owens yields such alternative versions of exquisite beauty that stereotypes of the sexes have no place here, either. This especially rings true for the Owen’s 2014 Spring ready-to-wear show, which substituted traditional models for strong, bellicose, full of grit women of color from African American colleges, who instead of strutting took to stepping, a hybrid of step dancing, cheerleading, and military drill. There was no need for these women to be seen as precious, girlish, or anything other than invincible. On runways like these, the rules that govern what men and women typically wear feel rather arbitrary. Perhaps it is because the parameters keep changing – blue for girls, pink for boys, heels for men. Putting out images of female masculinity, male femininity, queerness, and trans-men and trans-women help familiarize a society with a new normal


PRESENT

and become aspirational for young individuals searching screens for someone more like them. Last, a challenge to the expectations of beauty and women in contemporary society. There is emphasis on the burgeoning ceasing of presumptions, the revolt against societal dictations, and a challenge to the male gaze. There is increased support amongst women to take charge of their own personas. Part of the contemporary women’s movement involves a sense of inclusivity that has reached record heights. There is a diversification in what is upheld as beautiful, with more inclusion for skin tones, bodies of all sizes, and “imperfections.” Aerie published lingerie ads sans tweaking models in Photoshop. Lorde chastised press for smoothing over her real, broken-out skin. Designers like Christian Siriano are making way for plus size models on the runway as more than a transparent trope. Meanwhile, a model in a hijab recently walked the Yeezy New York show. Kendrick Lamar became an ally for women everywhere when lyrics for “Humble” championed, “I wanna see some stretch marks.” These singular, separate instances all feel like victories as narrow ideals of beauty have given way to promising representation. Embracing a dynamic range of bodies, styles, and choices has activated brands that were, up until very recently, much more regimented. This has manifested as the age of the crossover – a period where brands, retailers, celebrities, and personalities combine name recognition and intersecting goals to achieve a variety of results. Designers creating exclusive collections for national chains (Phillip Lim for Target or Balmain for H&M) widen the realm of affordability, making clothing available at a price point more manageable for widespread consumption. Unusual pairings, such as Louis Vuitton and Supreme for a Fall-Winter men’s collection,

cast a wider net than any could individually, appealing to new demographics. The coupling caused quite a stir and pulled double duty, moving what was traditionally considered streetwear into the echelon of luxury fashion, and connecting a classic luxury brand with a more urban, casual, and contemporary look. When Rihanna launched her Fenty makeup line, it created a product for skin tones that had felt underrepresented while also shining a light on makeup lines who had failed to represent. Last year during Milan fashion week, Dolce & Gabbana pulled off one of the greatest runway experiments in recent memory, inviting mother and daughter clients, influencers, movie stars, tennis players, YouTubers, and even royal family members to walk the runway in lieu of exclusively models. The move was instantly iconic, bringing back down to earth the couture that seems so inaccessible for “real” bodies. And by choosing a group with such a diverse base, it gained manifold support. These pairings feel as though plucked from an alternate reality, dream mashups that even just a handful of years ago would have seemed out of the realm of possibility. Fashion has shown an eagerness to adapt quickly to the pulse of a moment and, in turn, encourages a divergence in the expression of individualistic taste. Though wonderful to have the support of figureheads and fashion authority, in actuality, the defense of inclusivity occurs most often in public forums. Not long ago,

is beaten down, but both exalted and celebrated in their freedom of volition. In a climate where self-sovereignty comes under attack and victims are asked, “Well, what were you wearing?”, droves will meet the challenge to their liberties and their choice. A fierce defense of whatever a woman wears and however she chooses to present herself is for herself alone, and no matter what she chooses, it is never an invitation. It is reasonable to admit that the work has only just begun. It is justifiable to feel that often the damage of antagonists recapitulates the triumphs. The importance is the challenge, and that it continues. It becomes exigent that complacency never becomes commonplace, that society strives to reside on the right side of history, and that as individuals and as a community, we remain ready to revolutionize.

I T BE COM TH AT COM BECOM

I remember when the comments sections were vehement cesspools of venom, where if someone posted a body that was misaligned with the purveying view of beauty, they were torn to pieces. Today, comment sections have become a deluge of support, validation, and defense against inevitable trolls. What’s most incredible is the range of defense: whether a woman wears no makeup or a full face, whether she dresses conservatively or bares all – whatever the extreme, neither

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Fashion is ever-changing: evolving, reshaping, and redefining what is deemed current and fresh. The future of fashion is imaginable through the lenses of movement and innovation. Normative style will be a thing of the past, allowing for the trend of individuality to prevail. This evolution will be intentional. A cognizant transformation, it will hold an important connection to rapid social change. The future of fashion holds the opportunity for the bridge between social change and art to be crossed. Displaying social change through everyday clothing holds an increasingly influential impact. The too easy escape from current controversies will no longer be an option. “You are what you wear” will become everyone’s new truth, fostering the first step to advancement-awareness. The production of fashion will be held to a greater standard than ever before. With the increased awareness in social issues and a thirst for development, there will be focus on creating sustainable merchandise. By utilizing recycled materials to create clothing, there is an opportunity to produce less pollutant causing waste. Future forms of technology also have the ability to manufacture the garments in ways that are less harmful to the environment. BASIC Magazine alumna, designer Ewa Polkowska, is already ahead of the game, utilizing the production of a unique milk fiber – fabric actually made from milk – to design clothing that is entirely sustainable. The process of establishing these forms of technology begins with the desire for change. By redefining the expectations in fashion, the future of the industry and society will benefit and prosper. The involvement of the designer will be redefined, remaining necessary, but translated in an ultramodern way. The vision and construction will be collective. The goal be-

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comes understanding and relating to the consumer in a different way. By rejecting the construct of the specific roles and blurring the categories of designer and consumer, a joint union will be initiated. Stemming further from the standards of clothing production, the future will hold innovative ways of constructing garments that fit perfectly to each person and body. This will include at-home 3D printing clothing mechanisms. By creating a machine to produce garments that are specific to each individual’s body type, it will revolutionize the personalization of clothing. By having the ability to create these products from home, the consumer is fully involved in the process of choosing the specifications of their outfits. The machines will have the ability to download designs from top designers and recreate and tweak each item in order to suit the individual style of each person. Fashion will no longer involve masking identities and agreeing to a single style and direction. The future will focus on individuality and self-expression through the use of bold fabrics and manipulated mediums. Fashion will create a space for each voice and a new found form of communication. Clothing will be illuminated with solar-powered light and designed with daring colors, expressing

individual emotion and granting the benefit of portable power. Movement paired with color and light create an image of artistry that is exclusive to each individual body. No two bodies are alike. This will be unequivocally clear in the future of fashion. The industry will become a platform for positive progress towards celebrating figure and welcoming diversity. Individuals that once solely supported one form of creativity will now understand the appeal of others. This crossover allows for creative collaborations that were vacant in the past and are underrepresented in the present. The transformation displayed within the realm of fashion will create a ripple effect in society, initiating a unifying revolution.

The crusade of fashion will create a sense of improvement that we as humans strive for. The action of self-expression is one of the most powerful statements to be made as an individual. With the deconstruction of normative fashion becoming the new standard, fashion will show us yet again that it has the ability to advance society and create strides in the future. You may notice the consistent use of will over perhaps, potentially, or maybe. Because there will be change. And where there is will, there’s a way.


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CHAPTER 03

GUILDHAUS To hear Guildhaus recount its origin story is akin to sitting round a small fire lit in the woods, listening to the opening lines of an Estonian fairytale. “When needles are left to rest on pincushions, scissors are daydreaming, and only plants quietly breathe the wondering light…” They are referencing their atelier, a space that radiates Guild’s core values of quality, sustainability, and skilled craft above mass-production. It’s earthy and it’s mystic and it delves down directly to the land underfoot. There is both turbulence and tenderness, with echoes of fashions from the last millennia reinvented and repeated from the basal layers to the crown. The collection is heavy, terra firma, and everything runs back to the land.

WORDS BY AMANDA VANDENBERG PHOTOGRAPHY JÖ MODELS CARINA LEPS & KARL LENNART MERI

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FED ERI C O CAN NATA THE ART OF DESTRUCTION

"Ro ma n tisism, wa s the perio d o f reva l u atio n o f the sphere o f sen timen t, pa ssio n a n d irratio n a l ity" With his passionately and violently crumpled reimaginings of some of the most iconic "Romantic paintings of the early nineteenth century, Sicilian fashion and art photographer Federico Cannata embellishes, recontextualizes, and modernizes several of the most prominent art historical motifs and notions of the age, including the rise of individuality and the triumph of emotionality over reason in his current "Suggestions" series, consisting of large-scale prints of instantly recognizable Jean-AugusteDominique Ingres and Jacques-Louis David paintings. These prints are crushed, crinkled, and finally photographed, adding a brutally weathered look to these timeless masterpieces. In his artist statement for the collection, Cannata expounds on this choice to dissect this artistic movement, revealing, "Romanticism, an artistic current born at the beginning of the eighteenth century, was the period of revaluation of the sphere of sentiment, passion and irrationality, in other words: of the individual heroic gesture as an affirmation of self and of his will." This highly inventive photo series include It was Romantic (2017)- brilliantly rendered homage to David’s celebrated Napoleon Crossing the Alps (1801). This dynamic and idealized equestrian portrait of the then-First Consul and soon-to-be Emperor leading this troops to a swift victory against Austrian forces celebrates the individual and marks the seeming reemergence of France after the long and bloody revolution years.

WORDS BY EMILY NIMPTSCH ART FEDERICO CANNATA

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Commissioned by King Charles II of Spain, this painting depicts a calm and self-assured leader on a fiery Arabian Stallion, his ungloved hand pointing to the summit and a symbolic new leaf for the battered young nation. The crumpled texture here adds a wrinkle to this problematic narrative, as Napoleon turned out not to be as progressive as the country had hoped. This undulating composition echoes the struggle for just rule and the rough terrain of the Alps. Here we see this age-old mountain range as well as this historical moment represented as ephemeral and paperthin. According to Cannata, this effect is intentional, providing us feelings of decadence and break-up... appearing as wind-town newspaper pages wandering through the streets, or as a letter that is thrown into the rubbish by a resentful writer, or as the walls of torn houses that proudly show signs of passing time. While David’s Napoleon Crossing the Alps deals in militaristic and national patriotism and warfare, another Romantic image updated by Cannata in this series is Ingres’s Portrait of Mademoiselle Caroline Rivière (1806), a delicate, exquisite painting exploring the innocence of youth with a passion and reverence for life. As the daughter of Napoleon’s esteemed Councilor of the State, Philibert Rivière, Caroline was just 15 years old when this emerging Romantic artist painted her portrait. Ingres chose to depict Caroline in a blooming pastoral setting wearing a pristine white gown, alluding to her jejunity and maidenhood. The artist also portrayed this aristocratic young woman with his signature anatomical inaccuracies, such as an elongated neck, adding a sense of maturity, elegance, and glamour. She was also sickly, tragically dying that same year. Cannata’s crushed image makes this scene emotionally three-dimensional

Image Caption

David’s celebrated Napoleon Crossing the Alps (2017)

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Image Caption

Portrait of Mademoiselle Caroline Rivière (2017)

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" Ca nnat a partially d e s t roy s the se t re a s u re d re lics in o rd e r t o m ak e his ow n w a y " by featuring Caroline’s ethereal eyes shining through the merciless folds of time. He also reveals the tenuous nature of life here, as well as the search for immortality through art. Additionally, this Sicilian artist explores Romanticism through the lens of sensual passion and desire in this series with his photographic take on Ingres’s The Valpincon Bather (1808). The French Neoclassical and Romantic painter was so taken with this elegant female nude that he used this contorted, curvaceous form again in his famed harem scene, The Turkish Bath (1863). Seen from behind in both paintings, this idealized figure is both erotic and exotic, making this painting an early Ingres masterpiece. Cannata subverts this representation of physical perfection by deforming and abstracting the image, bringing it into the modern age. With his clever and poignant adaptations of traditional paintings, this visionary multimedia artist refreshes these enduring, adored works. As an iconoclast, Cannata partially destroys these treasured relics in order to make his own way, just like a young Robert Rauschenberg did in 1953 when he famously erased a priceless Willem de Kooning drawing. Although the then-up-andcoming American graphic artist greatly admired the Dutch abstract expressionist, oftentimes creators must dismantle the work of their predecessors in order to be successful.

Image Caption

The Valpincon Bather (2017)

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Interview by Lisa Wayne ile attending the British Colonial School in Hong Kong, Claudia Nakash had an epiphany. Realizing her destination was not that of the charmed socialite, she set out on a path to change the art world.

A bold venture. But with her parent’s encouragement, she traveled the world to learn and absorb as much knowledge as possible, discovering the desires and preferences of different cultures and how they each uniquely related to art. Living in the Middle East, Europe, and the United States, Nakash has made a name for herself amongst the elite and the up-and-coming, the art critics and the historians alike. She now offers her business card with a delicate bow and humbly asks to be of service - a gesture that perhaps Westerners are unfamiliar with, but will quickly realize as genuine interest, even kindness. You are immediately at ease. Petite, pretty, her heart shaped face in elegant repose, today Nakash is an influencer in the grand style of the global art dealer. Just back from Art Basel and our divine shoot at the Versace Mansion (the splendid backdrop for this feature), Nakash is excited to talk about her all-consuming passion: art.

Women loved Gianni Versace. They said his clothing made them feel ultra-feminine, ultra-chic. What is your connection to this extraordinary man? Members of my family acquired the Versace Mansion in 2013 with the thought of preserving the beautiful architectural heritage of the legendary fashion designer. It was his sanctuary for many years and his personal style is felt throughout the home and the grounds. It is the magical place of one who lived and breathed art every day of his life. Would you share with our BASIC readers some of the recent works of art you helped facilitate between collectors? It would be my pleasure to discuss them - but I cannot reveal the names of the people I work with or even the paintings themselves. All is very hush-hush in the art world when it comes to who owns what.

There are very important and valuable pieces of extraordinary art that move about and find new homes in new collections, and the majority of the owners of these large, private collections prefer to remain completely invisible. I will mention, though, that some of the artists that I have had the pleasure to be intimately involved with are Picasso, Kusama, Dali, Basquiat, Richter, Warhol, Condo, and Van Gogh - to name a few. Do people often ask you what is ‘good’ art or ‘bad’ art? Or is there such a thing? It is hard to say… Good art is the art that touches your heart. Maybe you like color, or maybe you like black and white, but it is where you fall in love, and that is good art. If you had to make one, what would be your prediction for 2018 on the next big trend in contemporary art? My current prediction is that paintings under $15,000 by emerging artists are a good place to invest. They are less risky in this political and economic climate. I like Kaws very much and some other new ‘primitive’ artists as well. Paintings over a million are in a wait-and-see pattern right now. You’re working with a laboratory in Luxembourg. Can you tell us a little more about that project? I am working with a small group of experts. We are all dedicated to the preservation and authentication of historical pieces. This lab will make available hyperspectral fingerprinting among other methods for collectors to be able to verify the origin and even the DNA of their works. This will help eliminate a lot of the risk associated with buying and investing in, say, the Old Masters, as documentation is so limited in many cases.

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Photography Viktorija Pashuta Styling Jesse J | www.jessejcollections.com Makeup Donna Mee Hair Jill Turnbulls Photography Assistant Hamid Kootval Styling Assistant Anna Everett Makeup Assistant Bridget Ortega Video Paul Ayala

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Bodysuit Victoria's Secret Cape wings Cecilia Aragon @thetrendhaus

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I would like to make art more popular in my homeland like music is, or films or sports. I would like to have it be more integrated into the broad culture, not just exclusive for only a few to enjoy

Owning historical paintings is a privilege not given to many, along with it comes great responsibility to care for them and keep them safe. How do you help your clients handle this? I strive to make my clients comfortable with the whole process. I have surrounded myself with some of the key business advisors in this industry. One of them is lawyer Don Burris, who is involved in many of my transactions. He actually recently recovered an iconic Gustave Klimt painting stolen by the Nazis from Maria Altman’s family. I also count on advice from my friend Xavier Jover, formerly the department head of two major auction houses, who guides me in certain purchases. Most of my other colleagues prefer to remain anonymous, but become known to my clients as we go through the process, which is sometimes nerve wracking but always very, very exciting. We learn as we go, as each piece comes with its own set of challenges and rewards. You have an incredible story about Michelangelo’s graffiti. Yes, that is a funny story, but it is true… I was honored recently by a dear friend with an invitation

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to visit a secret cave beneath the Sistine Chapel only discovered in 1975. It was here that Michelangelo hid for four months during a coup d’état against the Medici family in 1530. It is a very small, hidden chamber and he covered the walls with his sketches! These were all done in charcoal and would later prove to be studies for his David. Even in hiding and in fear for his life, his work evokes such a depth of feeling. This space is not on view for the public, as your very breath can alter the delicate climate that preserves the 56 drawings. In closing, would you share with us some of your dreams for the future? I would like to make art more popular in my homeland like music is, or films or sports. I would like to have it be more integrated into the broad culture, not just exclusive for only a few to enjoy. I see having more public art in outdoor areas, murals, shopping malls, cafes and greenspaces. Also, supporting art education in schools. When you understand a subject, you are more likely to embrace it, protect it, and put it there for future generations.


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All is very hush-hush in the art world when it comes to who owns what.

Dress Silvana Tedesco |@silvanatesciciuture Available @nowshowroom

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Born with wings WORDS BY ELIZABETH HAZARD Frida Kahlo and Madonna: two luminaries who expressed themselves boldly through their art. Boundary pushers, who never followed the conventional standards of beauty, appear here in the illustrations and stylings of Leonid Gurevich. The two icons meld into one. With the face of Madonna reimagined through the self-portraiture of Kahlo, the power of two artistic women is emboldened, showcasing the relevance reflected in the work of the two. Flowers intertwine with patterns and other hints of nature in the clothing, hinting at how greatly florals played an integral role in the iconic painter's work. In 1999, during the time of her "Ray of Light" album launch, Madonna very clearly mirrored the image of Kahlo as she appeared in a floral headpiece, much like the one shown in many of Kahlo's works of art, in a photo shoot promoting her "Nothing Really Matters" album, shot by Patrick Demarchelier for Harper's Bazaar. The similarities between the two are striking. In the words of Kahlo, "Nothing is absolute. Everything changes, everything moves, everything revolves, everything flies and goes away." Madonna mirrors those very sentiments in the chorus of "Nothing Really Matters." They both seemed to know that nothing is definite and that every state of being is impressionable. Passion, however is here to stay, and it's evident through the artwork of both. The Mexican painter, celebrated for her bold depiction of the female experience and form through her iconic brushstroke, mirrors the talents of the 80s-pop-star-turned-cultural icon. In a 1980 interview with Vanity Fair, Madonna spoke about her Kahlo painting titled My Birth, which depicts the birth of an adult Kahlo, to a mother whose upper body is covered in a sheet. She said, “If somebody doesn’t like this painting, then I know they can’t be my friend.” Madonna's one painting by Kahlo that she held so dear was in fact created during a time when Kahlo was in Detroit, the birthplace of the singer. Two women of talent and earth-bounding expression and impact through their work. Passionate, creative, mystifying, and unique, these two artistic icons have shaped and continue to shape the creative realm of the past, the present, and the future.

M A D O N N A R E I M AG I N E D A S F R I DA KA H LO I L L U S T RAT I O N S A N D S TY L I N G B Y LEONID GUREVICH |@LEONIDGUREVICH

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“I am my own experiment. I am my own work of art.” --Madonna

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a Surrealist, but I wasn't. I neve painted dreams. painted my own reality."—Frida Kahlo

Coat and dress Mary Katrantzou Earrings Versace Headpiece Anya Caliendo

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Studded Jacket, Top, Necklace Moschino Bodysuit Jeremy Scott Headpiece, Stockings, Shoes Versace Top, Belt, Undies (cactus) Andreas Kronthaler Earrings Marni Hats on skulls Amya Caliendo

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Only when I’m dancing can I feel this free. – Madonna

Feet, what do I need you for when I have wings to fly? Dress Versace Top Louis Vuitton Floral bolero Alexis Mabille

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PHOTOGRAPHY & CONCEPT MIKA CERON STYLING SKY BULATOVIC POST-PRODUCTION FEDERICO DE LUCA | DIAZO MAKEUP EINAT DAN HAIR SACHA SCHUTTE | LES ARTIST SET CONSTRUCTION DIE FILMBAUARBEITER PROP CRAFT CLAUDIA BRUGNALETTI MODEL LISÃ… KESSON STRYKER | MODELWERK PHOTOGRAPHY ASSISTANTS HAMED MEHRAVARAN, HOLGER BRANDT MAKEUP ASSISTANT PACQUO WINTER

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Body & headpiece ACBY - Samuel Aceby Shoes Gianvito Rossi Milan

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Image left & rightFull look Steinrohner Shoes Stuart Weitzmann Cuffs Nina Athanasiou

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Dress coat Thomas Hanisch Socks Happy Socks Hamburg Necklace Zara

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Full look Thomas Hanisch Shoes Kristina Lapickaja

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C A R LO S Q U E V E D O Carlosquevedoart.com

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C A R LO S Q U E V E D O Carlosquevedoart.com

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COLLAGE BY EMILIA ELFE @EMILIAELFE

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From where do y ou cu l l y o u r a rt i s t i c inspirati on? I ge t m y inspiration fr o m wh a t I am sur r ou nded by, along wi th th em es a n d ide as I can't explore i n th e p h ysi cal wo r l d . Wit hin m y work, I ten d to l ea n to wa r d s th e abst r a ct and surreal as wel l a s sci -fi e r ot ic a. I m ix ideas of s exu a l i ty a n d b ea u ty w it h t hem es and refer en ces to p o p u la r c ult ur e, fashion, and BD S M. How woul d y ou and o t h e rs d e scri b e y o u r w ork ? One c o m m on them e w h i ch I h ea r th r o wn ar ound a lot regardin g m y wo r k wo u l d b e ' inc lusive.’ I've design ed m y m ai n m o d el s to look r a cially androgyn o u s . T h i s i s so m et hing which a lot of m y a u d i en ce a p p r eci at e s and feels they ca n r el a te wi th , wh i ch i s a r e ally cool feeling. As a n ar ti st, yo u wa n t t o be able to connect wi th yo u r a u d i en ce, and I' m very fortunate th a t s o m a n y p eo p le c an do that with m y w o r k . Wha t is y our artistic p ro ce s s ? I don' t really have a s et p r o ces s wh en i t c ome s to creating ne w wo r k . S o m eti m es I'l l sk e t c h out an idea and b u i l d fr o m th er e, ot he r tim es I'll have an i d ea i n m y h ea d a n d I' ll j ust start playing wi th i t i n s i d e th e 3 D sof t w are. Most of the tim e, m y o r i g i n a l i d ea i sn 't t he f in al piece I produ ce. T h e i d ea u su a l l y gr ow s and evolves as I'm wo r k i n g o n i t.

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// SLUT FROM THE FUTURE '18 S/S CAMPAIGN

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PIERRE GRENET ASTORIA ARTISTIC DIRECTOR

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My images are a mix of the real world and some sort of dream world. I’m not the kind of photographer to have a camera in his pocket at all times. I do, however, have a sketchbook. Reality is not really where I begin. I prefer to start from scratch, thinking that anything is possible. I love to watch artisans working: jewelers, dressmakers, carpenters. Detailed handmade work, the quest for the perfect gesture. The thought of someone being able to give life to a simple piece of material. If you've ever thought of the fact that a Stradivarius is just a piece of wood at the beginning, you'll see where I'm coming from. The simple notion is incredible. My job isn’t the same as it was twenty years ago, and it is ever-evolving with new technologies. Today, I spend more time on my computer than I do with my camera. In this age of image ubiquity, I wonder if it's still possible to create. I often wonder what talent really is, what it means today. At these times I recall the guy who is able to give life to a piece of wood. Most of the bug parts are made using CGI. A lot of people feel unsettled by these new technologies. They believe it’s not

— My images are a mix of the real world and some sort of dream world.

— an art and that it’s even more pointless for photography. Maybe so, but I can’t stop thinking that photography wasn’t considered as an art form in the beginning, either. One of the first photographers I admired was Jean-Loup Sieff. This is what he answered when a journalist asked him if he thought photography was an art - ‘I don’t

know if photography is an art, but I know some photographers who are artists.’ I believe that CGI is not an enemy of photography; it’s just another way of creating. The traditional camera is definitely not the only way to create a picture today. I still consider

myself a photographer, even if I use CGI in my creative process. The rules are the same: a good picture is at first a good idea, good cropping, and a good lighting set - no matter if you use a traditional camera or a virtual camera with a computer to make it. I have just one goal: to push the limits of my creativity. By mixing photography and CGI, everything becomes possible, and the only limit is my imagination. Even if the viewer knows these bugs aren’t real and alive, it seems possible for them to be so. Creativity definitely follows no rules. What leads you in your life? Your reason or your imagination? Look for your piece of wood. www.astoria-atelier.fr

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PHOTOGRAPHY MIKEL MURUZABAL @MIKELMURUZABAL DESIGN ISABEL ZAPARDIEZ @ISABELZAPARDIEZ 2017 HAUTE COUTURE BRIDAL COLLECTION

MAKEUP REGINA LOMAS @REGINALOMAS_MAKEUP HAIR EDURNE SENOSIAIN @EDURNESENOSIAIN MODEL ESTHER RODRIGUEZ @ESTHERODFER | @UNOMODELS GRAPHIC DESIGN CANDICE LEE @CANLEE__

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Origami combines repeated, simple and then increasingly complex folds to unveil intricate designs, perhaps most emblematic of which is the paper crane.

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In Japanese culture, one thousand painstakingly made paper cranes are traditionally given as a wedding gift, their legend holding that when hung...

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...they grant one thousand years of happiness and prosperity. What a perfect pairing for this bridal collection taking flight.

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Shiny Ruin b y Jorg K arg. Germany

WORDS BY AMANDA VANDENBERG

Digit al collage, 2017

The C o n st r u c te d Un i ve r s e

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Jorg Karg is a German photographic artist working in the realm of digital collage. Karg’s exploration of the medium acts as a way to build a language, with the cutting and additive nature expanding its boundaries. Using complementary source material, the disparately drawn fragments that have happened elsewhere take on the shape of a harmonious whole. There is a musical, feverish quality to the making of the work, as though Karg needs to exaggerate elements to unveil their meaning. The results are minimalist dreamscapes that follow formal rules of color, shape, and style. We come face to face with monochromatic tones, soft curves rather than edges, a clean romanticism given color by scenesetting titles. Karg says he likes to approach his work as though through the eyes of the old masters, wondering what they would have made if they had the opportunity to use cameras and modern editing software. Most enrapturing about Karg’s assemblages is the permeability between figure and object. The precise accuracy with which parts are twisted and overlaid makes the original divergent fractions indecipherable from one another. This is especially true in "Weight on Their Shoulders," where

arms, wings, and architecture twist together, like an inter-dimensional contortionist preening in the evening. Within "Shiny Ruin," limbs of indistinct origin are in full focus while the facial details have fallen vague. "Strange Fruits" is Karg’s most surrealist work, with a figure comfortably perched on a high-contrast banana. Though harboring an intuitiveness, the universe Jorg Karg has constructed is always one step ahead of comprehension. www. jorgkarg.com

" K a r g s ay s h e l i ke s to a p p ro a ch h i s wo rk a s t h o u g h t h ro u g h t h e eye s o f t h e o l d m a ste r s , wo n d e r i n g w h a t t h ey wo u l d h ave m a d e i f t h ey h a d t h e o p p o r t u n i t y to u s e c a m e r a s a n d m o d e r n e d i t i n g s o f t wa re . " 135


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PHOTOGRAPHY ROSE CONWAY | WWW.ROSECONWAY.COM DESIGNER LEONARD WONG MAKEUP HIROTO KUWAHARA HAIR RITZ LAM & JIM TSE Z MODEL YU TING @ S T Y L E I N T E R N AT I O N A L M A N A G E M E N T L I M I T E D S H O E S P E T E R P O P P S

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PETECIA LE FAWNHAWK @LEFAWNHAWK

As an artist, Petecia Le Fawnhawk is inextricably connected to the arid desert landscape. Feeding off an antediluvian energy, she pieces together photomontages that capture the gleaming, pulsing, kinetic magnetism of this region of extremes. A hypnagogic collection of mirages, the imagery is high contrast, brimming with paired shadows and infinite dunes. The magic here is if you were to recant the atmosphere, these scenes could be satellite projections of exoplanet exploration, or culled from THE MAGIC HERE IS IF YOU WERE TO REanother lucid dream. CANT THE ATMOSPHERE, THESE SCENES Her tableaus showcasing the figure COULD BE SATELLITE PROJECTIONS OF interacting with towering sculptural works have their origin in Le FawnEXOPLANET EXPLORATION, OR CULLED hawk’s interest in monumental land FROM ANOTHER LUCID DREAM. art. Knowing her own large-scale, sitedependent work was faroff in the making, she made do with the resources at hand. Collaborating with sculptors she admired (Spencer Hansen for Blamo Toys and wooden geometric works by Aleph Geddis),

Le Fawnhawk began taking their small works into the desert, shooting them, shooting herself, and then in post scaling them up to create surreal, otherworldly images. Thusly, she creates monumental art that lives in a digital world. Le Fawnhawk is in the habit of intuitively engaging with her desert environment, bringing objects occurring on a micro level to a larger-than-life degree, not only in photography, but in detailed drawings as well. Georgia O’Keeffe had a similar way of inhabiting her desert ecosystem, enduring the stinging sun and biting cold to be close to the topography that inspired her. And it’s her words about painting flowers so large to make people actually stop and appreciate them that Le Fawnhawk has taken to heart – “When I’d go hiking, there would be this specific bone or stone or whatnot that would beg for me to pick it up and take it home. I wanted to explore that attraction and thought, ‘maybe if I make these large scale, then maybe other people would find the same connection to these objects as I have.’”

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Truthfully, it becomes easy to connect to the coyote skull, twisted juniper, and dried saguaro that she brings to life. It is this manipulation of scale that achieves a visceral, emotional effect. In this same vein, Le Fawnhawk eventually wants to try her hand at her own land mass sculptures. She has visions of taking an old, European stone chapel and placing it in a hot spring in the Mexican desert. Inspired by the vertical steel towers of Richard Serra, “East-West/West-East” in the Qatar desert, she has been playing with the imagery of a vertical, dry lake. Though she’s not yet certain how logistically to keep it from crumbling, what entices her is the concept THOUGH SHE’S NOT YET CERTAIN HOW of changing the perspective of everyday LOGISTICALLY TO KEEP IT FROM CRUMBLING, landscape within the material itself. Ultimately, Le Fawnhawk is setting out to WHAT ENTICES HER IS THE CONCEPT OF recontextualize singular elements within CHANGING THE PERSPECTIVE OF EVERYDAY the desert. In working through this process, LANDSCAPE. she lays claim to its natural phenomena before setting it free to be seen in a grander, supernatural light. Soon renting a house in Joshua Tree, she’ll be setting out to create her largest work yet - a 5 x 7 ft. drawing of a stone that, in reality, fits in the palm of the hand. Categorizing herself as “an intuitive sojourner, explorer, inventor, creative scientist,” Le Fawnhawk presents a desert filled with a high-noon aubade, cultivating visions into material forms.

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PHOTOGRAPHY REINHARDT KENNETH @REINHARDTKENNETH #THEPHOTOGRAPHICSENSE STYLING PHIL KEOPHAPHONE @FRESH_PHILLY MAKEUP LIV MADORMA @LIVMADORMA HAIR SAMANTHA ANNATONE @SAMATONEE

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She’s the siren on that fire engine that has everyone pulling over to watch and listen.

INTERVIEW BY YAEL REED W.

Vivacious and bold, digital influencer and beauty guru Nikita Dragun is a force of nature. With well over 1 million Instagram followers (@nikita_dragun), 170,000 Twitter followers (@nikita_dragun) and 860,000 YouTube subscribers, Nikita struts in her own truth as an openly transgender savant. She delivers video tutorials on go-to beauty tips, tricks and trends, but Nikita is also dedicated to utilizing her platform to advocate for the LGBTQ community. She exposes the essence of her authenticity by steadily chronicling her gender transformation for viewers on her YouTube channel. Since launching her YouTube channel in 2013, Nikita has written her narrative as a trans woman. Sharing anecdotal content on her experience with plastic surgery, coming out to her parents, and legally officiating the change of her gender and name has undoubtedly contributed to the success of her brand and journey. Fresh off the plane from Sundance Film Festival and currently promoting her new wig collection Bellami Hair, we quickly caught up with The Mother of Draguns for a dose of her vibrant personality.

What’s been your career highlight? When I landed a huge campaign with Uber that featured my parents and recognized me as a pioneer for Trans Youth! It was because of a request from my father that led the execs at Uber to donate $75,000 to the LA LGBT Center as part of the campaign. It's one my favorite non-profits, so I was so happy to be able to do that. Thanks, Papa Dragun!

A few rapid fire questions… what was your first concert? Lady Gaga, The Monster Ball Tour

Who inspires you? I’m inspired by badass females. They’re usually fictional characters with superpowers, but lately there has been some real life women kicking butt that have been so inspiring. Thank you to all the strong women out there paving the way for all of us.

Carb of choice? Are boys a carb?

What was your craziest interaction with a fan? One time this girl was so excited to see me she jumped on me and snatched my wig off my head. I didn’t know whether to laugh or fight.

Go to lip color? Red! But one that’s kiss proof ;) Who's makeup would you love to do? Donald Trump needs a better foundation. Just saying.

Favorite trend: fake freckles Least Favorite trend: eating Tide pods If you weren't YouTubing, what would you be doing? I would be a cartoon illustrator for a female anime series or a badass female superhero comic book writer.

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Beginning his career as a cityscape photographer with an impeccable eye for architecture and design, celebrated New York City-based projection artist Ed Emrich was inspired by the latest collection of Italian fashion juggernaut Gucci in the creation of a highly experimental and groundbreaking new photo series. Instead of simply photographing the model wearing the renowned design house’s glamorous and exuberant ensembles, Emrich digitally projected them onto the model’s body. Gucci’s latest brightly colored, avant-garde separates are displayed in a manner that mirrors the clothing’s originality. Upon first glance, the projection looks subtle, realistic. It is almost believable that the pictured model is clad in these eye-catching outfits, including a studded leather and floral romper and a neon hot pink t-shirt emblazoned with the design of a UFO emanating rainbow light. Emrich’s work aims to be aesthetically pleasing while challenging expectations

through his compelling, unorthodox use of the human body The artist often adorns his models’ skin with the iconic masterpieces of Picasso, Dali, Warhol, and Monet, as well as intricate geometric designs, and Gucci and Chanel outfits. This marriage of the corporeal with timeless and sublime works of art allows the viewer to see and understand these paintings, patterns, and garments in a completely new way. These designs and compositions have a human core. Emrich embraces this figurative element in his work by using, as he describes it, “the body as the canvas and light as the paintbrush.” However, these nude forms are not simply the background for the artist’s light works, but an integral part of them. This inclusion of a living, breathing human being in Emrich’s projections literally breathes new life into these enduring works and media, showcasing the human body as the masterpiece that it is.

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PHOTOGRAPHER ED EMRICH @ED.EMRICH.ART | WWW.EDEMRICH.COM MODEL KYLI ZION @KYZION TECHNICAL ADVISOR ROBERT EMRICH PHOTOGRAPHY ED EMRICH @ED.EMRICH.ART | WWW.EDEMRICH.COM TECHNICAL ADVISOR ROBERT EMRICH MAKEUP MAGADALENA MAKEUP ARTIST MAGDALENA MAJOR @MAGDALENA.MAJOR PRODUCTION ASSISTANT SKIDMORE @CARLEYSKIDMORE MAJOR @MAGDALENA.MAJOR MODEL KYLI ZION @KYZION PRODUCTION ASSISTANT CARLEYCARLEY SKIDMORE @CARLEYSKIDMORE

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PHOTOGRAPHY VIKTORIJA PASHUTA PRODUCER JACKSON CHONG STYLING JESSE J. COLLECTIONS MAKEUP AURORA GALARZA HAIR ATMA HARI MODEL LAUREN MCKELL @ INDUSTRY MODEL MGMT PHOTO ASSISTANT IAN SANTOS SPONSORED BY CASABLANCA

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Image leftDress by Dania Dahleh X CREATE Consultancy Jewelry Charlie Lapson

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Hat Sarmy's Studio Scarf Vintage Chanel Top Vintage Alexander McQueen Top Vintage Alexander McQueen Gloves Gloves Custom Jesse J. Collections Custom Jesse J. Collections Scarf Vintage Chanel

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Hat Sarmy's Studio


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Pearls Vintage Chanel Pearls Vintage Chanel Fur Vintage Prada Fur Vintage Prada

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Helmet Manuel Albarran Corset SHOKRA @Shokrala Bodysuit WOW Couture @wowcouture_usa Shoes AMICLUBWEAR @amiclubwear

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FUTURE Helmet David Han @davidhansculpture Jumpsuit Diana Couture @dianamputri Coat Jivomir Domoustchiev @jivomir.domoustchiev Ring Stylist’s Own Shoes De Blossom @deblossomshoes

PHOTOGRAPHY & CREATIVE DIRECTION VIKTORIJA PASHUTA PRODUCER JACKSON CHONG ART DIRECTION BRIEONA CORNELIUS METALLIC SCULPTURES DESIGNED BY DAVID HAN STYLIST MICHELLE WU MAKEUP MARIA BARRIOS HAIR CANTRELL MITCHELL JR MODEL SIDNEY | NOMAD LA PHOTO ASSISTANT ISAIAH LUCAS SPECIAL LIGHTING MICHAEL VINCENT STUDIOS | MVA.LA LOCATION STUDIOS60 LA DRAGON LIZARD BAMBA SPONSORED BY DBA AMARET SHOWROOMS: THE ARCHIVES & SHOWROOM @THEARCHSHOW | MAISON PRIVÉE PR @MAISONPRIVEEPR_LA RED LIGHT PR @REDLIGHTPR | STYLE BARRE @THESTYLEBARRE 157


U

or as long as the human race

ntamed, to the has existed, banished magic had steered

outermost reaches of their home world, exoskeleEra of the 20th century, an advanced tons composed of liquid metal form of magic evolved that took roamed the wild dust storms of mankind out of the darkness and into Holnla, a small planet outside the the light. star It was called Their technology. Earth’s system. name Before long, people began to rely was Talthi. Once peaceful, the solely whattransformed they could see, touch, Talthionhad into the and measure until one their day, magic was dangerous beings outward appearance made them out to be. forgotten and that part of humanness Travelers who closeand to that allowed us veered to feel, too dream, the desert wasteland were believe eventually vanished withoften it. attacked, brought within inches of Three hundred years passed death. This was all the evidence since that day and the world that the high council needed to advanced greatly with heavenly cities justify their decree, “Beware the floating in the air; where artificial Talthi!” There was no one who intelligence automatons replaced could reinand them in... until she the human workforce. Even pets had came along. been She substituted withelegance, sophisticated was pure idolrobotic avatars or so-called ACEPs ized for her angelic prowess. She was a human female, orphaned (Animal Cybertronic Enhancement at a youngthat age after explosion Programs) eitheranserved as wiped out her familyor when domestic companions as partshe of was barely able to run. The human law enforcement. Unlike real pets, female grew up and learned many each move that an ACEP beast made things, particularly of enemies. the way of life. Yet in the New

was precise and predetermined predictable. Nothing in this seemingly

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perfect society was left to chance

the Talthi wereand banished, or When emotional impulse, for thata

part of her withered. Now a young woman, she vowed to take down the high council. of death. She understood the hatred And yet, beneath the original and pain of the Talthi. Her mind and cities Earth lived a faction of rebels soulofburned for their mistreatment, believed to still practice magic despite and one night she ventured out theinloss of their leader, a high priestess search of the banished metal who had secretly lived as a prominent beasts. Something guided her to their hunting grounds. When the member of society. This was before Talthi uponliving her, aclaws exshe was came discovered double tended and unhinged, she life, and she wasjaws executed. She was stood her ground. Anyone else survived by a daughter, Mina, to whom would have been turned inward to she left a powerful talisman for her to fear. She was with them, banished discover her magical roots so she may to the outermost reaches of her one day lead a rebellion and put an home world. And there, together, end to the Agewait. of Machines once and they would There they would forprepare. all. Untamed. reason, books, art, animals, plants and magic were outlawed with the penalty

WORDS BYBY JONATHAN AMARET WORDS JAMES ARNETT


UNTAMED.

FUTURE

HELMET DAVIDHan HAN Helmet David @DAVIDHANSCULPTURE @davidhansculpture JUMPSUIT JumpsuitDIANA Diana COUTURE Couture @DIANAMPUTRI @dianamputri COAT JIVOMIR Coat Jivomir DOMOUSTCHIEV Domoustchiev @JIVOMIR.DOMOUSTCHIEV @jivomir.domoustchiev RING OWN RingSTYLIST’S Stylist’s Own SHOE De DE Blossom BLOSSOM Shoes @DEBLOSSOMSHOES @deblossomshoes

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Head piece LecielDESIGN Design HEAD PIECE LECIEL @leciel.design @LECIEL.DESIGN Bodysuit Diana Couture BODYSUIT DIANA COUTURE @dianamputri @DIANAMPUTRI Choker HilaryBEANE Beane CHOKER HILARY @hilarybeanejewelry @HILARYBEANEJEWELRY Jessica Elliot Jewelry RINGS Rings JESSICA ELLIOT JEWELRY @jessicaelliotjewelry @JESSICAELLIOTJEWELRY

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Head/Hair piece Design HEAD/HAIR PIECELeciel LECIEL DESIGN @leciel.design @LECIEL.DESIGN Bodysuit Diana Couture BODYSUIT DIANA COUTURE @dianamputri @DIANAM Necklace CadieuxCADIEUX Paris PUTRI NECKLACE PARIS @cadieux_official @CADIEUX_OFFICIAL Bracelet Stylist’s OwnOWN BRACELET STYLIST’S Shoes AMICLUBWEAR SHOES AMICLUBWEAR @amiclubwear @AMICLUBWEAR

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HELMET MANUEL ALBARRAN Helmet Manuel Albarran @MANUELALBARRANOFICIAL @manuelalbarranoficial CORSET Corset SHOKRA SHOKRA @SHOKRALA @Shokrala BODYSUIT WOW COUTURE Bodysuit WOW Couture @WOWCOUTURE_USA @wowcouture_usa SHOES Shoes AMICLUBWEAR AMICLUBWEAR @AMICLUBWEAR @amiclubwear

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FUTURE Helmet Manuel Albarran HELMET MANUEL ALBARRAN @manuelalbarranoficial @MANUELALBARRANOFICIAL Coat Jivomir Domoustchiev COAT JIVOMIR DOMOUSTCHIEV @jivomir.domoustchiev @JIVOMIR.DOMOUSTCHIEV Bodysuit WOW BODYSUIT WOWCouture COUTURE @wowcouture_usa @WOWCOUTURE_USA Ring Cadieux RING CADIEUXParis PARIS @cadieux_official @CADIEUX_OFFICIAL Belt Charles & Ron BELT CHARLES & RON @charlesandron @CHARLESANDRON Shoes De Collection SHOES BY Blossom DE BLOSSOM COLLECTION @deblossomshoes @DEBLOSSOMSHOES

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O N

G O O G L E

S T R E E T

V I E W

WORDS BY AMANDA VANDENBERG

Jacqui Kenny (@streetview.portraits) has photographed the sun-bleached architecture of Tunisia, the brightly patterned women of Senegal, and the camel crossings in the United Arab Emirates. She has caught a young couple kissing in Chile, children splashing in a plastic pool on the streets of Peru, a lone man in a wheelchair in Mexico, and the anthropomorphized shadows movements of Arizona. To capture these photos, London-based Kenny has never used a camera, and she has never left her home.

Kenny lives with agoraphobia, an anxiety condition that, contrary to a common misconception, is not about a fear of open spaces, but an anxiety of being placed in situations and environments that provide no easy route of escape. Traveling is often an ordeal, and when we spoke, she was visiting family in New Zealand for what would be a several week sojourn to really make worth the stress of the voyage. It was when the production company she had founded ten years earlier shuttered its doors that Kenny began to search for a creative reprieve from thinking about “what’s next?” She started exploring the world on Google Street View, and it became a way of visiting remote locations she may never have the chance to encounter otherwise. A casual hobby rapidly evolved into a visual devouring of remote, international neighborhoods, and Kenny began to take screenshots when she happened upon a particularly arresting image. She began to seek out distinct qualities in her landscapes – small towns full of negative space, horizons free of cars and clutter, colorful frameworks standing alone. Clicking through the world like this was freeing, and as the passion grew, she described it as “not just escape, but a way for me to start discovering a style that I didn’t even know I had.” The style Kenny has developed is distinctive, and though the imagery was captured automatically by the camera atop the Google Street View van, the vignettes she posts on Instagram under the moniker ‘Agoraphobic Traveller’ clearly show her hand, much like the individualized brush strokes of paintings lend to their authentication. Her more than 90K followers can expect recurring motifs – isolated and colorful dwellings in stark, architectural contrast to blue skies, the intricate shade patterns cast by a late afternoon sun, a quiet moment overseen of one or a few individuals, their faces softly blurred by Google’s privacy protection, and a lambent, corporeal haze that consociates even the most distant corners of the terrain. Kenny mentions that, “Street View is this parallel universe. It’s like I’m creating a whole new world.” Indeed, there is a delicate strangeness to the images. It’s almost as though you’re seeing them through the wrong end of a telescope, happening in the present, but from a distant time all the same. They feel rare and quiet and reverberate something you cannot quite put your finer on, but certainly speaks to the universality of the human condition. When sifting through the endless possibilities, it’s an identifiable feeling when an image correctly clicks. Since beginning the project, Kenny has amassed an assortment of over 27,000 photos, clarifying that she can sort through hundreds before landing on one she actually likes. There are times on her passing car, a flare, or not quite the right composition. Last year, Kenny was granted permission from Google to sell a series of limited edition prints, with £10 from each sale going towards the Brain and Behavior Research Foundation, a global nonprofit organization focused on improving the understanding, prevention, and treatment of mental illnesses. Photos here are from that collection, and numbered prints are available for purchase through her website, www.theagoraphobictraveller.com. Though it may seem contradictory, the project that arose in direct response to her agoraphobia may turn out to be a form of liberation, with excitement mounting for potential exhibitions in Barcelona, Berlin, and San Francisco. She has daydreams about bringing her images to life, filming scenes in the places she has screenshot – meaning traveling to the locations she has visited only through her computer. In the future (with Google’s go-ahead), she would love to publish a book. More conceptually, Kenny is thinking about handing the project over to artificially intelligent search engines, ones that would be trained over months to pick out imagery Kenny would pick herself. She muses, “Would it create emotional content with no human involvement whatsoever?” Kenny is still a bit in awe of the way things have come together. When her work landed on the front page of National Geographic she thought, “How is that possible? I didn’t travel and I didn’t use a camera – aren’t those the two prerequisites?” But clearly, she is showing us all a special version of the world – one that more and more people are eager to glimpse.

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WWW.THEAGORAPHOBICTRAVELLER.COM

virtual strolls when she needs to taper her expectations, that something can seem beautiful from far away but then ruined by a


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anesha Fields doesn’t want you to define her. The honey blonde songstress’ doe eyes and MariahCarey-esque button nose belie the decidedly adult singing voice she lends to her danceable R&B – and the contradictions don’t stop there. The mogulin-the-making’s LinkedIn is a professional potpourri (entrepreneur, model, mother) and while her music may find her center stage, Tanesha’s committed to staying complicated – in the best ways, of course. The artist took a breather to sit down with BASIC and discuss how she does it all. Tell me about your creative journey-- when did you realize that you were an artist? I’ve been singing since I was five years old. I used to sing to my dolls, I used to do a lot of dancing. I’ve always loved singing and modeling, just the arts in general. It’s kind of like I was born and knew exactly what I wanted to do. You know, when you’re a child, you don’t really think that what you want to do is so different from what everyone else wants to do. So initially, I thought

“You want to make your family happy, you want to go to school, you want to do all those things, but i just felt alive while performing.” 168

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Image leftJacket Trends X Fashion Jewelry Marianna Harutunian Boots @Thetrendhaus Image rightBodysuit Wow Couture Cape Charmaine Joie Couture Boots Nasty Gal

INTERVIEW BY AIDEN ARATA PHOTOGRAPHY VIKTORIJA PASHUTA STYLING JESSE J | WWW.JESSEJCOLLECTIONS.COM MAKEUP JENNIFER MALASZCZUK HAIR MYESHA HOWZE STYLING ASSISTANT SEANA HADNAGY PLAYMAKER ENTERTAINMENT FOR BOOKINGS/ BUSINESS INQUIRES CONTACT: LAUNEY RHEM- LAUNY@UEMINC.NET

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everybody could sing, and everybody could do those things. And I started acting in high school. I never saw it as a job, I just saw it as something that I loved. When was the point when performing became a job for you? I mean, I still don’t think I see it that way [laughs], but since it’s taken over my life, I guess I should probably grow up and realize that it is. When you’re in high school your family wants what’s best for you, so you go to school and you do what you’re taught to do – these people end up in category A, these people end up in category B, so if you don’t want to be in the C category – where you have a failed life – you pick A or B. I went to school and tried to do what everyone else was doing, but I kept daydreaming about doing the things that I loved to do. Each time I tried to do what everyone else was doing, I always found myself back in the same atmosphere doing the things I love. So I started doing them while I was in school, and they actually took over. I dropped out of school and started going to different auditions, and I found myself getting lost in that. It was kind of hard because you want to make your family happy, you want to go to school, you want to do all those things, but I just felt alive while performing. It’s like a breath of fresh air for me; it’s my oxygen. Can you talk about a few of the challenges you’ve faced? Feeling like I had to choose one direction in my life in terms of how to be successful – that was probably one of the hardest things. That was one of the first challenges that I had. And let me tell you, I repeated this over and over, it’s a self-inflicted type of thing, until I realized that I was in my own way. Do you think that being a mother to a daughter has affected the way that you see the world? I feel like it’s not only my duty to myself, but my job as a woman, as a mother, to show my child that she has options in life. It does affect me, because I know it affects her. Once you become a mother, you realize you’re responsible for this life. And they’re looking up to you, to them you’re like a superhero and you’re everything. No matter what you do, you’re perfect to them. I know where I stand in terms of if I’ve fulfilled myself: the true factor is if she sees me happy. Showing her that I’m happy, that’s what I’m teaching her. She wants to be everything, too. Let’s talk about your music a little more. Who are some of your influences? Growing up, I used to obsessively listen to Mariah Carey. She’s been a big influence. I love oldies, jazz – Billie Holiday, Etta James. I love

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Lauryn Hill, a lot of hip hop, particularly underground. And the Red Hot Chili Peppers, which people don’t always expect from me. I’m a big fan of live music. My music is definitely pop, but there’s jazz influence there, and reggae influence. I don’t limit myself at all. The thing is, I’m never going to be stuck in just one category. When you’re singing, who are you performing for? To be honest, when I’m in the studio recording, I’m so present that it’s almost like I just feel this energy. It feels like I’m singing to the world. I don’t think of one person in particular. I feel like I’m singing and I’m sharing myself with the world. But if everyone wanted to come hear me sing, I would be okay with it! [Laughs] It wouldn’t bother me one bit. But don’t expect

“Feeling like I had to choose one direction in my life in terms of how to be successful – that was probably one of the hardest things.” me to answer any questions, don’t expect me to pay attention to you, because I’m going to be in a zone that you can’t get into. How do you juggle your entrepreneurial and artistic talents on a day-to-day level? What’s a typical day like for you? No two days are ever the same. That’s the fun side of it, though there’s always a ton of planning involved. And then a little spontaneity – that’s what keeps me sane. I always leave a little room in my day for that. My day usually starts around 6:30 in the morning, typically with a workout. I take some time to meditate and stretch, so I like to envision what my day’s going to be like before I make any moves or calls or even jump on my phone. And then my day begins.

fill that hour with going to lunch with somebody and trying to create new deals; or meet up with a friend, walk my dog, something calming. And then I go into music mode. A lot of times, the middle of the day is when I’ll be inspired to write. I never know when I’m gonna write, it just happens. Whenever it happens, it happens, and I stop whatever I’m doing and write. Or I might be singing and recording on my phone. It’s very random, once it hits mid-day, you never know what’s going to happen. I might be in LA, or Vegas, or on a plane. So I don’t have the same routine every day. My days are pretty full most of the time, between managing my home and my career. But the cool part of that is that I’m in full control. I’m able to design my life the way I want it to be, and that’s beautiful. There’s no way to get a schedule out of me. I get up really early and I tend to stay up really late, so I don’t require much sleep, but I heard this new thing called the sleep diet, and I want to try it. That fits into how you’re always self-improving. That’s my learning part! I’m self-improving by going on the sleep diet. I’m always reinventing myself, I feel like that’s important too, because we’re not supposed to stay the same forever. What’s next for you? What do you want from 2018? That’s easy. I don’t really use the word “want” – when I do things, that’s what I’m doing. So what I see for 2018 is, of course I’m going to be modeling, doing some acting projects, some traveling, but most importantly, I’m going to be dropping my album this year, which is definitely one of my top priorities. I’m actually finishing up my album right now. Of course there’s going to be unexpected things, maybe some type of product lines, something entrepreneurial that crosses the bridge between my two passions. What can you tell us about the sound of your forthcoming album? There’s going to be a little bit of Euro influence in there, along with some live sounds, and of course there’s going to be some dance. I love to dance, there will be a dance track for sure. And also a few surprises. I’m just going to leave it at that. I don’t want you to know everything. I have been wanting to do this my whole entire life and I’m finally here. I have the right team around me. I’m in my true element right now. 2018 is my year. Itunes/Amazon/Spotify

My day can consist of taking my daughter to school, making lunch, all that mom stuff, and then it shifts right over into business. So I’ll shift over into whatever business situation I’m in at that time, and then I’ll go and take a break, and

"HOT FIRE" BY TANESHA FIELDS @officialtanesha


Shirt @Thetrendhaus Pants @Thetrendhaus Coat Vintage Tracy Estrada Shoes Prada Jewelry Marianna Harutunian

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