Page 1

Senior Studies

Curriculum Guide 2017/18

Curriculum Guide Senior studies 2017/2018 Bangkok Patana School

1


Bangkok Patana School Guiding Statements Our Mission statement is to ensure that all students of different nationalities grow to their full potential as independent learners in a caring British International community.

The IB Mission Statement

The IB aims to develop inquiring, knowledgeable and caring young people who help to create a better and more peaceful world through intercultural unders and respect1.

The IB Learner Profile

According to the International Baccalaureate Organisation (IBO), “provides a long-term vision of education. It is a set of ideals that can inspire, motivate and focus the work of schools and teachers, uniting them in a common purpose2�

Essentially the key principle behind the IB Learner Profile is to encourage students, through all aspects of their lives, to become: Inquirers

Knowledgeable

Thinkers

Communicators

Principled

Open-minded

Caring

Informed risk takers

Balanced

Reflective

In their lives at school, we thus aim to promote these attributes to ensure that student do not become accomplished only in the curriculuar studies but are balanced individuals who are better prepared for life beyond school. KEY CONTACTS

NAME

EMAIL

Head of School

Mr Matthew G Mills

mami@patana.ac.th

Cross Campus Principal

Mr James Penstone

jape@patana.ac.th

Secondary Principal

Mr Michael Smith

mism@patana.ac.th

Ms Suzanne Lindley

suli@patana.ac.th

Ms Helen Thew

heth@patana.ac.th

Mr Andrew Roff

anro@patana.ac.th

Secondary Careers Coordinator

Mr Andrew Haughton

anha@patana.ac.th

Admission and Registation

Ms Rachel Jones

rajo@patana.ac.th

Secondary Assistant Principal, Curriculum and Assessment Secondary Assistant Principal, Student Welfare Senior Studies Curriculum and Assessment Leader (IB Coordinator)

1

From http://www.ibo.org/mission/ From http://www.ibo.org/programme/profile

2

Front cover artwork by Rachel Ho, 13C 2 Bangkok Patana School


Senior Studies

Curriculum Guide 2017/18

CONTENTS FOREWORD FROM THE HEAD OF SCHOOL .............................................................................. 4 INTRODUCTION FROM THE SECONDARY PRINCIPAL ................................................................ 5 THE SENIOR STUDIES PROGRAMME ......................................................................................... 6 THE INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE (IB) DIPLOMA PROGRAMME ....................................... 7 ACADEMIC SUBJECTS ........................................................................................... 7 THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE (TOK) ........................................................................... 7 THE EXTENDED ESSAY (EE) .................................................................................... 8 CREATIVITY, ACTIVITY AND SERVICE ...................................................................... 10 THE PATANA CERTIFICATE PLUS PROGRAMME ......................................................................... 12 WHAT NEXT AFTER BANGKOK PATANA SCHOOL ..................................................................... 13 THE PASTORAL PROGRAMME ................................................................................................... 15 CORE PHYSICAL EDUCATION ................................................................................................... 16 LEARNING SUPPORT ................................................................................................................ 17 EXTRA-CURRICULAR ACTIVITY PROGRAMME ............................................................................ 18

SUBJECT GUIDE GROUP 1 STUDIES IN LANGUAGES AND

GROUP 4 EXPERIMENTAL SCIENCES .. 42

LITERATURE .................................................... 19

BIOLOGY

LANGUAGE A: LITERATURE (ENGLISH)

CHEMISTRY

LANGUAGE A: LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE (ENGLISH)

COMPUTER SCIENCE

LANGUAGE A: LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

DESIGN TECHNOLOGY

(THAI AND OTHER LANGUAGE ) SCHOOL SUPPORTED SELF TAUGHT LANGUAGE A: LITERATURE

GROUP 2 LANGUAGE ACQUISITION .......... 28 LANGUAGE B AB INITIO LANGUAGES

ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS AND SOCIETIES PHYSICS

GROUP 5 MATHEMATICS ..................... 56 MATHEMATICS STUDIES MATHEMATICS STANDARD LEVEL MATHEMATICS HIGHER LEVEL

GROUP 6 ARTS ...................................... 61

GROUP 3 INDIVIDUALS AND SOCIETIES .... 32

MUSIC

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

THEATRE

ECONOMICS

VISUAL ARTS

GEOGRAPHY

ADDITIONAL SUBJECT........................... 69

HISTORY

FURTHER MATHEMATICS

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY IN A GLOBAL SOCIETY Bangkok Patana School

3


Foreword From The Head of School “We expect our students to acquire the skills and motivation to become independent learners who seek knowledge and fulfilment actively while also seeking to establish a balance in their lives. We want them to take risks, learn from their mistakes and question critically.”

B

angkok Patana School offers a broad and balanced British international education from Nursery to Year 13 when students complete their preparation for university entrance. This booklet is one of a series that summarises the curriculum for 2017/18 at the following stages: • Foundation and Key Stage1 (Nursery to Year 2) • Key Stage 2 (Year 3 to Year 6) • Key Stage 3 (Year 7 to Year 9) • Key Stage 4 (Years 10 and 11) • Senior Studies (Years 12 and 13) These summaries are important as they give parents and staff an overview of what we offer across the complete age range. This overview is also increasingly important to students as they too seek to understand the nature of what they are leaning, especially when they have to make choices about what they will study for (I)GCSE and the International Baccalaureate Diploma or Patana Certificate Plus programme. This booklet should be read after a careful review of our website, www.patana. ac.th and in conjunction with another of our publications, Student Achievement. Here you will find more background about what makes Bangkok Patana so special, as students of all ages grasp the opportunities of an extensive range of learning experiences offered both in the main curriculum and our extra-curricular programme. What our students achieve academically, which is of an extremely high standard, must therefore be set in the context of their incredible commitment to our sports programme, outdoor education, our cultural activities and service projects. We are the leading sports school in Thailand, the pioneer of the International Award for Young People, one of the key schools in South East Asia offering Model United Nations and a leading school for the arts. As they progress through the school, we expect our students to acquire the skills and motivation to become independent learners who seek knowledge and fulfilment actively while also seeking to establish a balance in their lives. We want them to take risks, learn from their mistakes and question critically. These are the skills that will prepare them for the next stage of their education, wherever it takes place, and get them ready for the challenge of the world of work in the 21st Century. We are very proud of the quality of teaching and learning that takes place at Bangkok Patana and we hope that this booklet and our other publications will help you understand more about what we set out to achieve here as we introduce increasingly challenging material to our students as they progress through the school. We would be delighted to help you in any way once you have read this booklet. Please do not hesitate to contact us through the admissions office, or via our Primary and Secondary school offices if you need any further information.

Matt G Mills Head of School

4 Bangkok Patana School


Senior Studies

Curriculum Guide 2017/18

Introduction From The Secondary Principal “Senior Studies students have to work hard to meet the rigours of this challenging programme. They must demonstrate the kind of personal qualities of tolerance, cooperation and determination to achieve their own full potential as independent learners that are integral to the mission of the school�

T

he Senior Studies Programme at Bangkok Patana School has as its academic backbone the demanding International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme. This course of study offers students the opportunity to study externally accredited examination courses that are accepted widely throughout the world as a high quality entrance qualification for universities and colleges of higher education. A small number of students may elect, or be advised not to take the full IB Diploma Programme. These students may instead opt for our Patana Certificates Plus programme. Students choose to study at least four individual IB subjects either at Standard or Higher Level, which focus on their specific strengths and may gain them entrance either directly to a degree course or to a foundation course at university. We offer extra support in terms of teacher guidance and, for example, more workshop or studio time where possible, to ensure these students have the best possible opportunity to be successful in their chosen subjects. Building on the firm educational foundations established in the earlier key stages at Bangkok Patana, the curriculum in Years 12 and 13 provides our Senior students with a challenging, relevant and varied course of study which recognises the demands that they will have to face in the mid-21st Century. All Senior Studies students have to work hard to meet the rigours of this challenging programme. They must demonstrate the kind of personal qualities of tolerance, co-operation and determination to achieve to their own full potential as independent learners that are integral to the mission of the school. Whatever the specific components of a student’s course of study, successful completion of it will lead to the Bangkok Patana Academic Diploma. The Senior Studies programme provides not only the valuable passport to tertiary education around the world, but also the opportunity to develop the skills, knowledge and personal attributes that will ensure success both at university and beyond.

Michael Smith Principal, Secondary School

Bangkok Patana School

5


The Senior Studies Programme Requirements At Bangkok Patana we believe that our Senior Studies Programme should be available to all students - our only requirement is that they should have the necessary motivation and enthusiasm to benefit from what we offer. We aim to see students grow in academic ability and maturity in order that they fulfil their potential. The ultimate goal of the Senior Studies Programme is for students to receive the Bangkok Patana School Academic Diploma and either the IB Diploma or IB courses. In order to attain the Bangkok Patana School Academic Diploma, students must satisfactorily fulfil all the requirements of the individual courses that they undertake and complete the relevant examinations in their chosen courses. • The Senior Studies Programme at Bangkok Patana is a demanding one and students need to be: • motivated - both academically and socially; • able to cope with the range of subjects; • adaptable and flexible in their approach to learning; • resourceful and independent; • effective at time-management. The progress that students are making and their suitability to the courses that they have undertaken are constantly monitored to ensure that they are deriving maximum benefit from their studies. Students are required to have an attendance record of at least 85% full school days (excluding medical and school sanctioned absences) over the two years in order to be eligible for graduation. Where students do not meet this requirement but have mitigating circumstances, graduation will be at the discretion of the Head of School.

International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme Individual courses can be studied at either Standard or Higher level. A student choosing three Higher Level and three Standard Level International Baccalaureate courses has the opportunity to gain a full IB Diploma. This follows a pattern which is uniform throughout IB schools worldwide and provides a diploma to meet university/college admission standards internationally. In the United States and Canada, achievement within an IB Higher Level course is considered a sound basis for awarding advanced placement credit at many major universities. Similarly in Europe and Australia, the IB Diploma is held in very high regard by major universities. Compiled data shows us that students who go on to pass the IB Diploma have usually achieved six C grades or better at IGCSE (or equivalent in another school system), and this is therefore our baseline for entry to the Diploma programme (students not achieving this baseline, will be offered the Patana Certificate Plus programme). In addition to which guidance for selecting Higher or Standard level courses is as follows: • Higher level subjects should only be undertaken by students who achieved a B grade or better in that subject at IGCSE, or in consultation and by agreement with the subject leader. • Standard level subjects should only be undertaken by students who achieved a C grade or better in that subject at IGCSE, or in consultation and by agreement with the subject leader. The International Baccalaureate Diploma programme is an educational challenge which provides scope for both academic achievement and worthwhile practical activities in outdoor pursuits and social service. It is international not only because it is accepted worldwide, but also because it is a cross-cultural programme followed by thousands of young adults who thereby gain increasing knowledge of, and respect for, the cultures of the world. To obtain an IB Diploma, students must study three subjects at Higher Level and three at Standard Level. They must also complete satisfactorily the Creativity, Activity and Service (CAS) programme, a 4,000 word Extended Essay and the Theory of Knowledge course. After the final examinations, students receive point scores for each of the subjects they have studied. They can also receive up to three bonus points for the Theory of Knowledge course and Extended Essay. This means they can score a maximum of 45 points. To successfully gain the IB Diploma they must score a minimum of 24 points in total and 12 points in their Higher Level subjects though there are other requirements stipulated by the IB which must also be met.

6 Bangkok Patana School


Senior Studies

Curriculum Guide 2017/18

Bilingual diploma A bilingual diploma will be awarded to a successful IB Diploma candidate who fulfils one or both of the following criteria: Completion of two languages selected from Group 1 with the award of a grade 3 or higher in both; Completion of one of the subjects from Group 3 or Group 4 in a language that is not the same as the candidate’s nominated Group 1 language. The candidate must attain a grade 3 or higher in both the Group 1 language and the subject from Group 3 or 4.

Class Sizes Bangkok Patana School has set a maximum class size for Senior Studies students of 18 for Registration and Tutorial, and 17 for all other classes except Biology, Chemistry, Design Technology, Physics and Environmental Systems and Societies where the maximum class size is 15.

Assessment Assessment of IB Diploma and Course subjects is based on a seven-point scale: 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

Excellent Very good Good Satisfactory Mediocre Poor Very poor

The IB Diploma consists of: • • • •

Six academic subjects The Theory of Knowledge The Extended Essay Creativity, Activity and Service (CAS)

1. Six Academic Subjects These are made up from 3 Standard and 3 Higher Level International Baccalaureate examination courses. These subjects are arranged into groups, and students study one from each. Group 1: English or Thai as a first language (other languages may be available subject to student demand and may incur extra costs) Group 2: A foreign or second language Group 3: Individuals and Society (Humanities or Trans-Disciplinary) Group 4: Experimental Sciences, Design Technology, Computer Science or Trans-Disciplinary Group 5: Mathematics Group 6: Arts and Electives (selected second Group 3 and 4 subjects) Details on specific subjects follow 2. Theory of Knowledge (TOK) • The Theory of Knowledge course encourages critical thinking about knowledge itself and is a compulsory part of the IB Diploma programme. The course itself aims to try to help young people make sense of the varied and rich information that they are receiving both from their teachers and from the world outside of the classroom. In order to do this we explore questions such as: • What counts as knowledge? • How does it grow? • What are its limits? • Who owns knowledge? • What is the value of knowledge? • What are the implications of having, or not having, knowledge? At the centre of the course is the student as knower. By the time they reach Senior Studies, students will have spent many years painstakingly accumulating a vast amount of knowledge, and TOK gives them an opportunity to step back from this relentless acquisition of new ideas, in order to consider what this knowledge really means and how it has been developed. Bangkok Patana School

7


International dimensions In many ways TOK is ideally placed to foster internationalism. In close harmony with the aims of the IB Learner Profile, TOK aims to encourage students to develop many of the attributes needed by a citizen of the world: self-awareness; a reflective, critical approach; interest in other people’s points of view; and a sense of responsibility.

Aims The aims of the TOK course are to: • Develop a fascination with the richness of knowledge as a human endeavour, and an understanding of the empowerment that follows from reflecting upon it; • Develop an awareness of how knowledge is constructed, critically examined, evaluated and renewed, by communities and individuals • Encourage students to reflect on their experiences as learners, in everyday life and in the Diploma Programme, and to make connections between academic disciplines and between thoughts, feelings and actions; • Encourage an interest in the diversity of ways of thinking and the ways of living of individuals and communities, and an awareness of personal and ideological assumptions, including the student’s own; • Encourage consideration of the responsibilities originating from the relationships between knowledge, the community and the individual as a citizen of the world.

Assessment Outline Part 1

Part 2

External Assessment 67%

Essay on a prescribed title (1,200- 1,600 words). The student must write one essay on a title chosen from a list of six titles prescribed by the IBO for each examination session.

10 marks

Internal Assessment 33%

The Presentation (approximately 10 minutes per student). The student must select a significant, real life situation of their own choosing and explore the TOK issues raised by that topic.

10 marks

The method of assessment used by the IBO is criterion-related. That is to say, the method of assessing the essay on the prescribed title and the presentation in Theory of Knowledge judges each in relation to identified assessment criteria and not in relation to the work of other candidates. 3. The Extended Essay (EE) The Extended Essay is a 40-hour, 4000-word independent academic essay on a topic of the student’s choice and must involve personal, independent research accompanied by appropriate supervisor guidance. All Senior Studies students must submit an Extended Essay. One of the main purposes of the essay is to train students in the methods of work and critical research that apply to its subject area. It is a very valuable component of the Senior Studies programme as it enables students to develop study skills which are central to academic work in higher education.

Choice of Subject The subject chosen for the Extended Essay does not have to be one that students are studying. However, if students are doing the IB Diploma, it is normally advisable to select one of their Higher or Standard subjects. This is useful for references and for interviews if it is the subject in which they wish to specialise at university or college. Students should choose a topic that they find interesting and which will give them opportunities to collect information or data for analysis and evaluation. • In recent years topics have included: • How can Rolls Royce improve its image of corporate responsibility? • Electronic music: mechanical or artistic? • The rise of business in Japan since the end of World War II • Can hot water freeze faster than cold water? • Influence of the father figure in the Poetry of Sylvia Plath.

8 Bangkok Patana School


Senior Studies

Curriculum Guide 2017/18

Supervision Each essay will be supervised by a teacher from within the school community who has some specialist knowledge of the topic to be studied. It is crucial that students take responsibility in liaising fully with the specialist teacher allocated. The supervisor’s role is to guide the student, prepare interim reports and make a final evaluation of the essay before external marking. It is recommended that the supervisor spends between three and five hours with each candidate.

Deadlines Students will formally begin working on the essay in January of Year 12. Internal deadlines are set to ensure that the Extended Essay is completed by November in Year 13. Failure to meet deadlines may result in failure of the IB Diploma or Patana Certificate Plus.

Length of Essay Students taking the IB Diploma must write between 3,500 and 4,000 words. This includes the introduction, the main text of the essay and a conclusion. The abstract and referencing are essential but are not part of the word count.

Choice of Topic within the Subject Students should avoid topics which are vague or general. Topics should have a narrow focus and deal with a question or issue which is possible to answer or resolve within the word limits. Many successful essays have titles in the form of a question. Predicted grades A-E are submitted to the IBO. Marking is external and completed against subject specific criteria clearly defined by the IBO.

The IB Diploma Bonus-Point Matrix For each of the six academic subjects studied, students can be awarded a maximum of seven points. However, further bonus points are available and these are awarded according to performance in the Theory of Knowledge and Extended Essay parts of the course. Performance in both is combined on the bonus point matrix below, based on the A-E grading system for each. Theory of Knowledge Grade

Extended Essay Grade

A

B

C

D

E

A

+3

+3

+2

+2

Failing Condition

B

+3

+2

+2

+1

Failing Condition

C

+2

+2

+1

0

Failing Condition

D

+2

+1

0

0

Failing Condition

E

Failing Condition

Failing Condition

Failing Condition

Failing Condition

Failing Condition

For example, a candidate who achieves grade B for Theory of Knowledge and grade C for Extended Essay will be awarded two further points. 4. Creativity, Activity and Service (CAS)

What Is CAS? “If you believe in something, you must not just think or talk or write, but must act.” Peterson (2003) CAS stands for creativity, activity and service. All students are engaged in CAS experiences and projects on a weekly basis for the duration of their Senior Studies programme. CAS aims to challenge and extend the individual by developing a spirit of discovery, self-reliance, as well as intra and interpersonal skills. CAS is a framework for experiential learning, designed to involve a student in exploring new roles. The emphasis is on learning by doing real tasks that have real consequences and then reflecting on these experiences over time. The CAS programme aims to develop students who: • enjoy and find significance in a range of CAS activities • purposefully reflect upon their experiences • identify goals, develop strategies and determine further actions for personal growth Bangkok Patana School

9


• explore new possibilities, embrace new challenges and adapt to new roles • actively participate in planned sustained and collaborative CAS projects • understand that they are members of local and global communities with responsibilities towards each other and the environment. For student development to occur, CAS should involve: • real, purposeful activities, with significant outcomes • personal challenges – tasks must extend the student and be achievable in scope • involvement in the planning and initiation of activities • reflection on outcomes and personal learning. • It is essential that CAS experiences do not replicate other parts of the students’ Diploma Programme work.

Creativity This aspect of CAS involves exploring creative ideas which lead to an original or interpretive product. It is interpreted is as imaginatively as possible to cover a wide range of arts and other activities outside the normal curriculum, which may include creative thinking in the design and carrying out of service projects and could involve dance, theatre, music and art. Students need to be engaged in group activities, and especially in new roles, wherever possible. Nevertheless, individual commitment to learning an art form is allowed, provided that it respects the requirements for all CAS activities and that goals are set and reflection on progress is made throughout. Examples of Creativity at Bangkok Patana School include: Model United Nations

Year Book and other Publications

Instrumental Music Activities

Core Magazine

Designing Websites

Organising the Senior Prom

Choir

Producing Videos

Mural Painting

Activity This aspect of CAS encompasses any kind of physical exertion which can contribute to a healthy lifestyle. Activity can include participation in expeditions, individual and team sports and any form of physical exertion, including those undertaken in the physical education curriculum. International Award Expeditions

Varsity Teams

Diving

Coaching Younger Students

Fun Run

PE activities

Service “Service is not simply an emotional impulse, it is a demonstration of attitudes and values.” Maria Piaggio Service involves interaction, such as the building of links with individuals or groups in the community. The community may be the school, the local area, or it may exist on national and international levels. At Bangkok Patana School we believe it is vital for our service projects to focus on the needs of the local community, so students are encouraged to get involved in at least one project involving engagement with the wider community in Bangkok. Service can take a number of forms; research, advocacy, indirect and direct action. However, the most meaningful CAS experience comes from direct action service in which time is spent with others to build relationships and develop the self-worth of both server and served. Examples include World Food Project

Smile Club

Habitat for Humanity

Amnesty International

Project Star

Wildlife Friends for Thailand

Teaching English at Pong Ploy School

Thong Bai Day Care Centre

Mercy Centre Club

Playing for change

SOS Club

Interact

10 Bangkok Patana School


Senior Studies

Curriculum Guide 2017/18

The CAS Project As part of their CAS programme students are required to be involved in at least one CAS Project. To do this the student needs to find a supervisor to oversee the project and seek approval from the CAS Coordinator. A CAS project involves collaboration between a group of students in at least one of the strands of creativity, activity and service. It must be of at least one month’s duration.

Reflections and the CAS Portfolio There are seven learning outcomes which need to be evident in the reflections in a student’s portfolio. As a result of the CAS programme as a whole there should be evidence that students have: • identified their own strengths and developed areas for growth; • undertaken new challenges, developing new skills in the process • planned and initiated activities; • developed skills in, and recognised the benefits of, working collaboratively; • shown commitment to and perseverance in their CAS experiences; • engaged with issues of global importance; • considered the ethical implications of their actions; Students record their reflections and other evidence, in the form of photographs, videos etc, in an online portfolio. Towards the end of a CAS experience, an evaluation form is completed containing comments from the supervisor and this is also added to the portfolio. A student’s CAS portfolio is an important point for Careers Advisors, Tutors and Teachers who will consult it when writing university references. Furthermore, the IB may wish to inspect the CAS records at the end of Year 13 before Diplomas are awarded. A Bangkok Patana High School Diploma will only be issued if a student completes a full CAS programme

Bangkok Patana School 11


The Patana Certificate Plus Programme An Alternative Senior Studies Programme Students who elect not to or are advised against taking the International Baccalaureate Diploma have the opportunity to select IB courses at Higher Level (2 maximum) and Standard Level (6 maximum), totalling no more than 6 courses, from each of the six subject areas as well as the opportunity to retake (I)GCSE subjects. The IB courses are identical to – and therefore every bit as rigorous as - those studied for the Diploma and will therefore develop a student’s growth. They provide the potential to enter onto foundation and sometimes undergraduate level university courses in countries such as the United States, Australia, United Kingdom and Canada (especially, in the case of the United States, if supported by SAT scores). Students taking the Patana Certificate Plus Programme will also have the opportunity to study for the International Computer Driving License and the Sports Leadership Award and will be eligible for up to four periods (2.5 hours) of Study Support per week provided by the Learning Support Faculty. All students involved in this Programme must successfully complete the CAS Programme and complete an internally assessed Extended Essay of at least 2000 words (a 4000-word version can be externally assessed if required).

12 Bangkok Patana School


Senior Studies

What

next after

Curriculum Guide 2017/18

Bangkok Patana School?

Careers Education and Guidance in the Senior Studies Programme On successful completion of the Senior Studies Programme the student is faced with a number of options. There are four key questions that need to be considered and answered: • What should I do now? • Where should I go? • When should I go? • How should I prepare? The careers education and guidance offered through the Tutorial Programme to students in Years 12 and 13 allows informed decisions to be made and the above questions to be answered. The process involves students, teachers and parents. The Careers Centre contains up-to-date information on various occupations and on university courses throughout the world. Staff are available to give guidance and support and each student will be offered an individual interview to set an action plan for the future. An additional counsellor now also works with students in Key Stage 3 and Key Stage 4 to prepare them for the level of support offered in Senior Studies. Building on the knowledge, skills and experience gained from Year 11 workshops and internships, all students receive a one-on-one sixty minute interview in Year 12 in order to discuss their plans for applications to universities or colleges. Students are again counselled in Year 13 to ensure their post-secondary plans are in progress. All students and parents are welcome to make individual appointments at any time. It is important for students and parents to have a plan for their post-secondary experience and the Careers Department is here to help. Some universities require students to take the SATs (Scholastic Aptitude Tests)/ ACTs (American College Testing) and/ or the TOEFL/IELTS English Language Proficiency tests (if the student’s first language is not English). It is advisable to start taking the tests in the later part of Year 12. The Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test (PSAT/ NMSQT) is available for students to take every October. There will be a cost implication for students registering for these tests. It should be understood that particular university courses may require other tests. For example, students interested in Medicine in the United Kingdom must take the BMAT or UKCAT tests and if they wish to pursue Law in the UK they will need to take the National Admissions test for Law (LNAT). Therefore it is in the interest of the student to contact the Careers Centre early. Students in Year 12 should also consider arranging a university summer programme which will give them important information about their skills and interests and also bolster their university application by making them a more attractive applicant. Organising a work experience internship will also be required for some courses such as medicine, law, veterinary sciences, dental and some engineering courses. Such work experience is a valuable learning experience for all students and as such is a recommended part of the post-secondary preparation; again, the careers department will be available to help. It is essential for students to contact their target institutions to build up a relationship and also garner answers about what entry requirements are needed along with ensuring the course and the institution are a good social and academic fit. Some 200+ colleges and universities from across the globe make their way to Bangkok Patana each year to meet informally with our students and discuss their campus, programmes, entrance requirements, etc. Students are made aware of each visit via the Daily Notices and via Naviance updates. We encourage students to keep a close eye on which colleges / universities / destinations are visiting and make every effort to come and meet with the various representatives. This evidence of ‘demonstrated interest’ in the institution and its offerings is valued by competitive admissions offices. Meeting an admissions/recruitment representative from a target university can provide the student with an invaluable contact to answer any specific queries they may have during the application and course acceptance process.

US Testing Many (although not all) U.S colleges require either the SAT, administered by the Collegeboard, or ACT, administered by ACT.org. They are each offered 5 or 6 times per year between September and June and are generally taken during Term 2 and/or 3 of Year 12 and/or Term 1 of Year 13. Some of the most competitive colleges require Subject Tests, which are also given by the Collegeboard.  It is a useful step for Year 12 students and families to review their calendars in the autumn and determine when it might be best to prepare for, and take, the SAT, subject tests or ACT.  The SAT has been redesigned beginning with the test administration in March of 2016. There are some meaningful changes to content and the scoring will range from 400 to 1600 points (instead of the old 2400-point maximum).  More information about the SAT and subject tests can be found at: http://www.collegeboard.com/testing/.  For more information about the ACT:  http://act.org/ Bangkok Patana School 13


There are many US colleges that are test optional and do not require the SAT or ACT. More information can be found at: www.Fairtest.org. Please note that if a student submits their SAT/ACT tests to a test-optional school then those test scores become part of the application decision.  We would advise that for test-optional schools, a student take the SAT or ACT test and if the scores are very high for that school, then submit them, but if the SAT or ACT test scores are below average for that school then do not submit them. Most students will be applying to schools that do require the SAT/ACT test scores.  These require preparation.  Bangkok Patana students tend to have little trouble with the SAT Subject tests and some research and practice tests will prepare them well.  Students can buy books that will provide a great deal of practice and tips.

In preparation for the SAT, the Collegeboard offers the PSAT (or PRACTICE SAT) once per year, which is administered at Bangkok Patana. It is offered to students in October of Year 11 and again in Year 12. The PSAT is a practice test to help students become familiar with the test format and style. Colleges do not receive score results and there is no need for students to prepare in advance. A useful purpose for the PSAT is to establish a baseline for students to understand their strengths and weaknesses in order to focus their test prep later in Year 12. More information about the PSAT can be found at: http://www.collegeboard.com/student/testing/ psat/about.html Bangkok Patana School is a closed test centre for the SAT and PSAT, which means we offer all of these tests to our students but not to outsiders. Students register through Bangkok Patana for the PSAT but directly with the Collegeboard for the SAT. We are not a test centre for the ACT, so students need to register and take the test elsewhere.  We are happy to provide support and guidance for decisions related to these tests, but registration for them is the responsibility of the student. Individual guidance is available from our University Advising office. We look forward to working with you and your students on their future plans.

14 Bangkok Patana School


Senior Studies

Curriculum Guide 2017/18

The Pastoral Programme Students in Years 12 and 13 follow a Pastoral Programme - called Tutorial - delivered by the Head of Year, Tutors within the Year Team and specialised staff when required, during one 80-minute session each week. Five strands provide a backbone for the programmes: Careers education

Including university application procedures, writing a curriculum vitae, higher education choices and producing personal statements and essays.

Study skills and Target setting

Including personal organisation, time management, target setting, research skills, academic honesty and revision planning.

Citizenship and community

Including safeguarding, finance and preparing for independence.

Health education

Including cancer, drugs and substance misuse and the prevention of sexually transmitted infections.

Relationships

Including having healthy relationships.

Residential Visit (Year 12 only)

The focus of this week is team work, Theory of Knowledge and the Group 4 Project to give the students a sample of a typical university learning environment

Residential Visits Object The Residential Visits are an integral part of the Secondary School curriculum and therefore contribute to the fulfilment of the School’s Mission Statement. They provide our students with an opportunity to develop through experience. Year 12 students attend a Residential Visit which focuses on Theory of Knowledge (TOK) and the Group 4 Project. Although the Year 12 Residential Visit endeavours to establish the same objectives as Key Stage 3 and 4 Residentials, one of the main aims of the Year 12 visit is a week of Theory of Knowledge – a compulsory requirement of the IB Diploma. This enables the TOK team to spend extended periods of time presenting ideas, discussing in small groups and developing the presentation skills of the students in TOK. This is also an opportunity for students to have some social time together in what is a very demanding year. As with Residential Visits in every year, the emphasis is on: • independence and self-discipline; • self-confidence and self-esteem; • the development of sound relationships among students; • the development of sound relationships between students and staff; • flexibility and consideration for others; • initiative and problem solving skills; • leadership skills; • the ability to work with others in a team; • communication skills; • the ability to enjoy the environment without destroying it; • the opportunity to socialise and have fun.

Bangkok Patana School 15


Core Physical Education Aims The aims of the course are to: • enable students to see physical activity as a major feature in their lives related to leisure, employment and culture; • develop and maintain a habit of physical exercise and activity; • give students the opportunity to pursue sports and activities that they have previously enjoyed as well as giving them the opportunity to experience new activities as part of a broader curriculum; • develop leadership qualities through the provision of vocational activities as well as creating opportunities within other activities; • Offer a different style of lesson and activity against a broadly academic, classroom based curriculum. • Promoting long-life participation in physical activity by providing a variety of choices

Course Outline Students select activities from a variety of sports and leisure activities. They participate in a sport for a 6 week block before changing to an alternative sport. Within the year they can also select to do a leadership activity, for which they will receive externally accredited certification e.g. First Aid Qualifications. They may also elect to use their PE activity as part of their Creativity, Activity, Service (CAS) programme. We also offer opportunities to work in a local school or lead sessions with local school children.

Assessment Students are assessed throughout the duration of each activity and this informs the lessons that they receive. This is a non-examination subject, in which active participation, leadership and enjoyment is encouraged. Students opt for activities, and therefore are able to follow a personalised curriculum throughout the year. The assessment criteria is therefore one of effort, organisation and participation only. If students are using their PE activity as part of their CAS programme, then they are required to regularly reflect on their progress against the relevant intended learning outcomes, as they would do in any other of their CAS experiences.

Course Structure Students opt for activities using a google form choosing two six week blocks at a time. They may choose from sports/ leisure activities such as football, basketball, rugby, volleyball, tennis, badminton, fitness (body pump/aerobics), kayaking, climbing, futsal, parkour, softball, trampolining, ultimate frisbee, squash and table tennis. They are able to participate in leadership activities, first aid, swimming teachers’ award or pool lifesaving and will receive a certificate which is given by the awarding body for that course. We also provide opportunity for varsity level athletes in swimming, tennis and gymnastics to have an extra training session during this time from the specialist coaches. Students are taught in mixed groups and each student has one 80minute period of Physical Education per week.

16 Bangkok Patana School


Senior Studies

Curriculum Guide 2017/18

Learning Support In Learning Support (LS) we encourage each student to develop skills for life-long learning. The Learning Support Faculty offers additional support to Year 12 and 13 students who have chosen to take the Patana Certificate Plus Programme. This programme includes the following: 1. Self-study and mentoring – LS teachers act as learning mentors to guide students through the peaks and troughs of post-16 education; 2. Weekly meetings with students to track their progress and discuss any problems or celebrate any accomplishments; 3. Specialist support – specific subject support with particular areas of study. Where appropriate, a Student Profile is completed and examination concessions are applied for.

Bangkok Patana School 17


Extra-curricular Activity (ECA) Programme The school organises a comprehensive programme of Extra-curricular Activities for students which operates from Monday to Friday. The Secondary School sessions occur both at lunch-time and after school (2:45pm to 3:45/4:30pm) with programmes coordinated to ensure students have adequate access to school facilities. As students’ progress through the school the range of activities becomes more varied and provides students with opportunities to link their activities with other schools both locally and regionally. Sports, Model United Nations, Drama, Musical Ensembles, the Duke of Edinburgh’s International Award and community-based projects provide the opportunity for travel in Thailand and South East Asia. The ECA programme run across four blocks within a year, enrolment for the various activities is on-line via the Parents’ Gateway.

Student-led extra-curricular activities such as: STOP! Patana

Amnesty International

Habitat for Humanity

Community Service projects are supported and organised by Senior Studies students and include: Thongbai Day Care Centre

Mercy Centre

Project Star

Smile club

Green Tigers

Youth Club

Cookery

Pottery

Core Magazine

Textiles

Film Scripting

Music Composition

Computer Programming

Art and Craft Work

Creating a Digibook

Jazz Traditional Chinese and Thai Dancing

Hip Hop

Skills-based activities including:

A diverse range of dance styles: Ballet Tap

Contemporary

A range of recreational sports-related activities in addition to the competitive sports programme including: Squash

Golf

Climbing

Rugby

Futsal

Badminton

Basketball

Off-Road Cycling

Scuba Diving

Table tennis

Football

Flo House

Brazilian Jiu- Jitsu

Horse-riding

Sailing

18 Bangkok Patana School


Senior Studies

Curriculum Guide 2017/18

GROUP 1 STUDIES IN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE LANGUAGE A: LITERATURE (ENGLISH) LANGUAGE A: LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE (ENGLISH) LANGUAGE A: LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE (THAI AND OTHER LANGUAGES) SCHOOL SUPPORTED SELF TAUGHT LANGUAGE A: (STANDARD LEVEL ONLY)

Artwork by Aishwarya Bagaria, 12J Bangkok Patana School 19


Language A: Literature—Standard Level (SL) English

and

Higher Level (HL)

Aims The course aims to: • encourage a personal appreciation of literature and develop an understanding of the techniques involved in literary criticism; • introduce students to a range of literary works of different periods, genres, styles and contexts; • develop the ability of students to engage in close, detailed analysis of written text; • develop the students’ powers of expression, in both oral and written communication; • promote in students an enjoyment of, and lifelong interest in, literature.

Course Outline Standard and Higher Level

Part 1: Works in translation

Part 2: Detailed study

Part 3: Literary genres

Part 4: Options

Course Structure Standard and Higher Level

Part 4, Options: August - November of Year 12

Part 1, Works in Translation: November - April of Year 12

Part 2, Detailed Study: May Year 12 - November Year 13

Part 3, Literary Genres: November - April Year 13

Assessment - standard Level Assessment component External Assessment (3 hours) Paper 1: Guided literary analysis (1 hour 30 minutes) The paper consists of two passages: one prose and one poetry. Students choose one and write a guided literary analysis in response to two questions. (20 marks) Paper 2: Essay (1 hour and 30 minutes): Part 2: Literary genres The paper consists of three questions for each literary genre. In response to one question students write an essay based on at least two works studied in Part 3. (25 marks) Written Assignment: Part 1: Works in translation Students submit a reflective statement and literary essay on one work studied in part 1. (25 marks) The reflective statement must be 300-400 words in length. The essay must be 1200-1500 words in length.

20 Bangkok Patana School

Weighting 70% 20%   25%     25%


Senior Studies

Curriculum Guide 2017/18

Internal Assessment This component is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course. Individual Oral Commentary (10 minutes) Part 2: Detailed study Students present a formal oral commentary and answer subsequent questions on an extract from a work studied in Part 2. (30 marks) Individual Oral Presentation (10-15 minutes) Part 4: Options The presentation is based on works studied in Part 4. It is internally assessed and externally moderated through the Part 2 internal assessment task. (30 marks)

30%   15%

15%

Assessment - Higher Level Assessment component

Weighting

External Assessment (3 hours) Paper 1: Literary Commentary (2 hours) The paper consists of two passages: one prose and one poetry. Students choose one and write a literary commentary. (20 marks) Paper 2: Essay (2 hours) Part 1: Literary genres The paper consists of three questions for each literary genre. In response to one question students write an essay based on at least two works studied in Part 3. (25 marks) Written Assignment Part 1: Works in translation Students submit a reflective statement and literary essay on one work studied in part 1. (25 marks) The reflective statement must be 300-400 words in length. The essay must be 1200-1500 words in length. Internal Assessment This component is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course. Individual Oral Commentary and Discussion (20 minutes) Part 2: Detailed study Formal oral commentary on poetry studied in Part 2 with subsequent questions (10 minutes) followed by a discussion based on one of the other two Part 2 works (10minutes) (30makrs) Individual Oral Presentation (10-15 minutes) Part 4: Options The presentation is based on works studied in Part 4. It is internally assessed and externally moderated through the Part 2 internal assessment task. (30 marks)

70% 20% 25%    

25%

30% 15%  15%

Who this course is for Higher English (Literature) If you wish to study English IB at Higher Level then you must opt for pure Literature. Higher English is advisable for students who enjoy studying prose, poetry and plays and are excited by the opportunity to read literature independently and explore ideas in depth in class. If you do not enjoy reading then you will find this course very difficult. Higher English is particularly useful for students who wish to go on to study and/or work in areas such as law, journalism, advertising, public relations, politics and the media. Standard English (Literature) If you wish to study IB English at Standard Level then you have the choice of a pure Literature course or the option of combining Literature with Language (for this option see English A: Language and Literature) Standard English Literature is similar to Higher in that you focus on novels, poetry and plays. This option is best suited to students who wish to specialise in Literature to Standard Level and have an innate enjoyment of reading. Bangkok Patana School 21


Language A: Language

and

Literature—Standard Level (SL) English

Aims The course aims to: encourage a personal appreciation of language and literature and develop an understanding of the techniques involved in language analysis and literary criticism; • introduce students to a range of literary works of different periods, genres, styles and contexts; • develop in students an understanding of how language, culture and context determine the ways in which meaning is constructed in texts; • encourage students to think crucially about the different interaction between text, audience and purpose • develop the ability of students to engage in close, detailed analysis of written text; • develop the students’ powers of expression, in both oral and written communication; • promote in students an enjoyment of, and lifelong interest in, language and literature.

Course Outline and structure- Standard Level Standard Level English Language and Literature Part 1: Language in a cultural context. August - December Year 13 Part 2: Language and mass communication. August - April Year 12 Part 3: Literature - text in context. December - May, Year 13 Part 4: Literature - critical study. August - June, Year 12

22 Bangkok Patana School


Senior Studies

Curriculum Guide 2017/18

Assessment - Standard Level Assessment component External assessment (3 hours) Paper 1: Textual analysis (1 hour 30 minutes) The paper consists of two unseen texts. Students write an analysis on one of these texts. (20 marks) Paper 2: Essay (1 hour 30 minutes) In response to one of the six questions, students write an essay based on both the literary texts studied in part 3. (25 marks) Written task Students produce at least three written tasks based on material studied in the course. Students submit one written task for external assessment. (20 marks) This task must be 800-1000 words in length plus a rationale of 200-300 words. Internal Assessment This component is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course. Individual Oral Commentary Students comment on an extract on a literary text studied in Part 4 of the course. (30 marks) Students are given two guiding questions. Further Oral Activity Students complete at least two further oral activities, one based on Part1 and one based on Part 2 of the course. The mark of one further oral activity is submitted for final assessment. (30 marks)

Weighting 70% 25%

25%

20%

30%

15%

15%

Who this course is for If you wish to study English IB at Standard Level and would like to combine Language and Literature, rather than specialising in 100% Literature, then this is the best option for you. Half (50%) of this course involves the study of English Language. This can cover as wide a range as political speeches from 17th century England to an advertising campaign in 21st century USA. Half (50%) of this course involves the study of English Literature. This will cover novels, poetry and plays. This course is equally rigorous as the Language A: Literature course and is given equal status by universities; however, it does require less independent reading of fiction so if you are not a ‘natural reader’ then this may be the better option for you. If your passion is reading high quality fiction then a pure Literature course at Standard or Higher Level may better suit your needs (please see Language A: Literature).

Bangkok Patana School 23


Language A: Language and

and

Literature—Standard Level (SL)

Higher Level (HL)

Thai, and other languages Aims The course aims to: • introduce students to a range of texts from different periods, styles and genres; • develop in students the ability to engage in close, detailed analysis of individual texts and make relevant connections; • develop the students’ powers of expression, both in oral and written communication; • encourage students to recognize the importance of the contexts in which texts are written and received; • encourage, through the study of texts, an appreciation of the different perspectives of people from other cultures, and how these perspectives construct meaning; • encourage students to appreciate the formal, stylistic and aesthetic qualities of texts; • promote in students an enjoyment of, and lifelong interest in, language and literature; • develop in students an understanding of how language, culture and context determine the ways in which meaning is constructed in texts; • encourage students to think critically about the different interactions between text, audience and purpose.

Course Outline Language A: Language and Literature offers a particular focus on developing an understanding of the constructed nature of meanings generated by language. Two parts of the course relate to the study of language and two to the study of literature. This course gives students the opportunity to engage in the rigorous analysis of literary and non-literary texts. The Language A: Language and Literature course develops skills of textual analysis. A study of the formal structures of a text is combined with an exploration of the way in which the use of formal elements, and our understanding of their meaning, is affected by reading practices that are culturally defined. Standard Level

Higher Level

Part 1: Language in cultural context

Texts are chosen from a variety of sources, genres and media.

Part 2: Language and mass communication

Texts are chosen from a variety of sources, genres and media.

Part 3: Literature—texts and contexts

Two texts, one of which is a text in translation from the Prescribed Literature Translation (PLT) list and one, written in the language A studied, from the Prescribed List of Authors (PLA ) for the language studied, or chosen freely.

Three texts, one of which is a text in translation chosen from the PLT list and one from the PLA for the language studied. The other may be chosen freely.

Part 4: Literature—critical study

Two texts, both of which are chosen from the PLA for the language studied.

Three texts, all of which are chosen from the PLA for the language studied.

24 Bangkok Patana School


Senior Studies

Curriculum Guide 2017/18

Assessment Outline External Assessment Standard Level Paper 1: Textual analysis (1 hour 30 minutes) The paper consists of two unseen texts. Students write an analysis of one of these texts. (20 marks) Paper 2: Essay (1 hour 30 minutes) In response to one of six questions students write an essay based on both the literary texts studied in part 3. The questions are the same at HL but the assessment criteria are different. (25 marks) Written tasks Students produce at least three written tasks based on material studied in the course. Students submit one written task for external assessment. This task must be 800–1,000 words in length plus a rationale of 200–300 words. (20 marks)

Higher Level Paper 1: Comparative textual analysis (2 hours) The paper consists of two pairs of unseen texts. Students write a comparative analysis of one pair of texts. (20 marks) Paper 2: Essay (2 hours) In response to one of six questions students write an essay based on at least two of the literary texts studied in part 3. The questions are the same at SL but the assessment criteria are different. (25 marks)

Written tasks Students produce at least four written tasks based on material studied in the course. Students submit two of these tasks for external assessment. One of the tasks submitted must be a critical response to one of the prescribed questions for the HL additional study. Each task must be 800–1,000 words in length plus a rationale of 200–300 words. (20 marks for each task)

Weighting 25%

25%

20%

Internal Assessment This component is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course. Standard Level

Higher level

Weighting

Individual oral commentary Students comment on an extract from a literary text studied in part 4 of the course. Students are given two guiding questions. (30 marks)

Individual oral commentary Students comment on an extract from a literary text studied in part 4 of the course. Students are given two guiding questions. (30 marks)

15%

Further oral activity Students complete at least two further oral activities, one based on part 1 and one based on part 2 of the course. The mark of one further oral activity is submitted for final assessment. (30 marks)

Further oral activity Students complete at least two further oral activities, one based on part 1 and one based on part 2 of the course. The mark of one further oral activity is submitted for final assessment. (30 marks)

15%

Course Structure In the Thai Department, the course is offered in Standard Level (SL) and Higher Level (HL) for students currently studying Thai and for whom Thai is native or near-native. Students wishing to take the course should aim for mastering their communication. For students studying Language A: language and literature in their Home Language (Dutch or French) the course may be offered in Standard Level and Higher Level. Students opting for this course should be native or near-native speakers. SL requires the total of 150 teaching hours while HL requires 240. The time allocation for their teaching is two double periods per week for SL students and three double periods per week for HL students. HL students will usually be taught together with SL students for four periods every week. HL students should enjoy exercising their language proficiency. Materials used in class will cover a range of topics, both literary and non-literary. Bangkok Patana School 25


School Supported Self Taught Language A: Literature (Standard Level

only)

Language A: literature is a literature course that may be studied in as many as eighty languages. School Supported Self Taught Language A provides an opportunity for students to continue to develop oral and written skills in their mother tongue while studying in a different language of instruction. The course is built on the assumption that literature is concerned with our conceptions, interpretations and experiences of the world. The study of literature can therefore be seen as an exploration of the way it represents the complex pursuits, anxieties, joys and fears to which human beings are exposed in the daily business of living. It enables an exploration of one of the more enduring fields of human creativity, and provides opportunities for encouraging independent, original, critical and clear thinking. It also promotes respect for the imagination and a perceptive approach to the understanding and interpretation of literary works. Through the study of a wide range of literature, the Language A: literature course encourages students to appreciate the artistry of literature and to develop an ability to reflect critically on their reading. Works are studied in their literary and cultural contexts, through close study of individual texts and passages, and by considering a range of critical approaches.

Aims • encourage a personal appreciation of literature and develop an understanding of the techniques involved in literary criticism • develop the students’ powers of expression, both in oral and written communication, and provide the opportunity of practising and developing the skills involved in writing and speaking in a variety of styles and situations • introduce students to a range of literary works of different periods, genres, styles and contexts • broaden the students’ perspective through the study of works from other cultures and languages • introduce students to ways of approaching and studying literature, leading to the development of an understanding and appreciation of the relationships between different works • develop the ability to engage in close, detailed analysis of written text • promote in students an enjoyment of, and lifelong interest in, literature

Course Outline Part 1 Works in Translation Part 2 Detailed Study Part 3 Literary Genres Part 4 Options

26 Bangkok Patana School


Senior Studies

Curriculum Guide 2017/18

Assessment Standard Level

Component

Description

Time

Weighting

Works in Translation

One essay 2 works studied

Final draft completed by June of Year 12

25%

Options

Individual Oral Presentation (Alternative Oral Examination) Students make a presentation based on two works studied in part 4- 3 works studied

Completed March of Year 13

15%

Detailed Study

Individual Oral Commentary (Alternative Oral Examination) Students present a formal oral commentary on an extract from a work studied in part 2 – 2 works studied

Completed March of Year 13

15%

Literary Genres

Essay written in exam conditions - 3 texts studied

1 hour 30 minutes completed at end of Year 13

25%

Written Commentary

Commentary on poetry or prose written in exam conditions - unseen texts

1 hour 30 minutes completed at end of Year 13

20%

10 Works studied in total All assessment tasks for self-taught students are externally assessed.

Course Structure Year 12 covers the following sections: Part 1 – Works in Translation Part 4 - Options Year 13 covers the following sections: Part 2 - Detailed Study Part 3 – Literary Genres

Who This Course Is For Students choosing to study School Supported Self Taught Language A should be bilingual and have read widely in their Language A. This is a Group 1 course and is suitable for students experienced in using a language in an academic context. This is not a language acquisition course and students should be highly competent in the target language. Students may have studied their Language A independently and gained a qualification in the language A, for example IGCSE, DELF, MYP. This course will be beneficial for bilingual students who are considering studying at a university in the country of their Language A choice. Students who study Language A and either English A or English B will be eligible to gain the Bilingual IB Diploma.

Bangkok Patana School 27


GROUP 2 LANGUAGE ACQUISITION LANGUAGE B AB INITIO LANGUAGES

Artwork by Katrina Boardman, 12M 28 Bangkok Patana School


Senior Studies

Language B - Higher Level (HL)

and

Curriculum Guide 2017/18

Standard Level (SL)

Aims The courses aim to • provide students with the linguistic skills necessary for further study in the language; • promote an understanding of the countries where the language is spoken; • explore the culture(s) connected to the language; • enable students to cope with the language demands of day-to-day transactional and social contacts. The skills to be developed through the study of various themes are: text handling; written production; listening; interaction; oral proficiency.

Course Outline The core, which is common to both SL and HL, consists of three topics and is a required area of study: • Social Relationships • Communication and Media • Global Issues In addition, teachers select two options from a choice of five: • Health • Customs and Traditions • Leisure • Cultural Diversity • Science and Technology At Higher Level, in addition to the core and options above, two works of literature are studied. Students are required to read two works of literature originally written in the target language.

Assessment Standard Level (SL) Higher Level (HL) Paper 1 (text handling)

SL:Questions on 4 written texts from the core HL: Questions on five texts

1 hour 30 minutes

25%

Paper 2 (writing)

SL: One writing task from a choice of five from the options HL: One writing task from a choice of five One written response to a stimulus text based on the core

1 hour 30 minutes

25%

Written Assignment

SL: Inter-textual reading, on sources researched by the student. Researched and produced by the student independently HL: Creative response to one of the literary texts studied

Oral

SL/HL: Individual Oral (based on the options) Interactive oral (based on the core)

20%

10 minutes

20% 10%

Bangkok Patana School 29


Course Structure Courses will be offered in French, German, Japanese, Mandarin and Spanish, subject to demand and availability. English Language B is also available for students who study a non-English Language A course in Group 1 and this combination leads to the award of a ‘Bilingual Diploma’. The Higher Level course is only suitable for those students who have clearly recognisable skills in the language and who can already use and manipulate the language to a high standard. The Standard Level course is normally taken by students who have a good grade at (I)GCSE or its equivalent. The syllabi at Higher and Standard Level are similar in content although study in the former will be more intensive and proficiency levels achieved should thus be much higher. Materials used in class will cover a range of topics, both literary and non-literary. Higher Level students and Standard Level students with share a combined class for four periods every week and Higher Level students will then have an additional two periods taught separately.

Who This Course Is For Language B is an additional language-learning course designed for students with previous learning of that language, preferably at (I)GCSE level. This course is ideal for students who found success at (I)GCSE and are already able to read, write, speak and listen in the target language. Language B may be studied at either SL or HL. The main focus of the course is on language acquisition and development of language skills. These language skills will be developed through the study and use of a range of written and spoken material. Such material will extend from everyday oral exchanges to literary texts (in the case of HL), and should be related to the culture(s) concerned. Language B is not designed as a course for students who are home language speakers of that language, but for those who have learnt the language as an MFL.

30 Bangkok Patana School


Senior Studies

Curriculum Guide 2017/18

Ab Initio Languages - Standard Level (SL) Aims The courses aim to: • furnish students with a solid grounding in the language, focusing on the key skills of reading, speaking, listening and writing; • provide students with the skills required for everyday communication; • provide the students with an insight into the culture of the countries where the target language is spoken.

Course Outline Topics to be covered:

Individual and Society

Leisure and Work

Urban and Rural Environment

Daily routines, Education Food and Drink Personal details, appearance and character Physical health Relationships Shopping

Employment Entertainment Holidays Media Transport Technology Sport

Environment Global issues Neighbourhood Physical geography Town and services Weather

Assessment

4 Internal Assessment Interactive skills

Individual oral (25 marks) Three-part oral internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB towards the end of the course. • Part 1: Presentation of a visual stimulus (from a choice of two) by the student • Part 2: Follow-up questions on the visual stimulus • Part 3: General conversation including at least two questions on the written assignment

10 minutes (plus 15 minutes preparation)

25%

Course Structure Courses can be offered in French, German, Spanish, Mandarin and Japanese. Students will be exposed to written and spoken language and will carry out tasks in listening, reading, speaking and writing. The tasks will be topic based and practical in nature, the emphasis being on the ability to communicate effectively in the target language. While this course is solely aimed at beginners, the achievement of a good grade will demand a considerable amount of hard work on the part of the student as the level expected at the end of Year 13 is well in advance of that required for (I)GCSE.

Bangkok Patana School 31


GROUP 3 INDIVIDUALS AND SOCIETIES BUSINESS MANAGEMENT ECONOMICS GEOGRAPHY HISTORY INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY IN A GLOBAL SOCIETY Artwork by Saloni Kothari, 12S 32 Bangkok Patana School


Senior Studies

Business Management - Higher Level (HL)

and

Curriculum Guide 2017/18

Standard Level (SL)

Aims The IB Business Management programme aims to: • give students an understanding of business principles, practices and skills; • develop knowledge and understanding of business terminology, concepts and principles • develop competencies in problem-solving by identifying the problem, selecting and interpreting data, applying appropriate tools and recommending solutions by evaluating their quantitative and qualitative implications.

Course Outline The IB Business Management course integrates six underlying concepts (change, culture, ethics, globalisation, innovation and strategy) with the business management tools, techniques and theories used to make business decisions as well as integrating case studies and examples to allow students to relate their knowledge to the real world.

Standard Level The Standard Level (SL) syllabus consists of five core topics, plus a secondary research based business commentary:

• Business organisation and environment

• Marketing

• Human resources

• Operations management

• Finance and accounts

Higher Level The Higher Level (HL) syllabus consists of the same five core topics but with additional content plus a primary research based project: • Business organisation and environment

• Marketing

• Human resources

• Operations management

• Finance and accounts

Assessment Standard Level Component

Description

Time

Weighting

Paper 1

Questions based on pre-seen case study

1 hour 15 minutes

30%

Paper 2

Structured questions (quantitative, qualitative and concept focused essay)

1hour 45 minutes

45%

Internal Assessment

Written commentary

N/A

25%

Bangkok Patana School 33


Higher Level Component

Description

Time

Weighting

Paper 1

Questions based on pre-seen case study

2 hour 15 minutes

35%

Paper 2

Structured questions (quantitative, qualitative and concept focused essay)

2 hour 15 minutes

40%

Internal Assessment

Business Report

N/A

25%

Course Structure All students cover the five core topics which have common content and learning outcomes. In addition to the core, HL students are expected to complete extension areas of study in all five topics adding both depth and breadth to the course. Students can be taught in HL or SL or mixed groups. Outside expertise is made use of whenever possible and students are expected to link their research projects to real business issues.

Who This Course is For The demands of the Standard Level course are as rigorous as those of the Higher level course, however the content is reduced. Students doing this course need to have an interest in the business environment and do not need to have done Business Studies at IGCSE. There is not a high amount of mathematical content and so having a good ability in Mathematics is not essential but students should be aware there will be some basic numeracy questions.

34 Bangkok Patana School


Senior Studies

Economics - Higher Level (HL)

and

Curriculum Guide 2017/18

Standard Level (SL)

Aims The aims of the course are to: • provide students with a core knowledge of economics; • encourage students to think critically about economics; • promote an awareness and understanding of internationalism in economics; • encourage students’ development as independent learners; • enable students to distinguish between positive and normative economics; • enable students to recognise their own tendencies for bias.

Course Outline Higher and Standard Level candidates all study the following topics, with various sections of the course specific to HL Economics. 1.Microeconomics (includes some content specific to HL) 2.Macroeconomics 3.International economics (includes some content specific to HL) 4.Development economics Assessment

Standard Level Component

Description

Time

Weighting

Paper 1

Extended response essay question

1 hour 30 minutes

40%

Paper 2

Data response questions

1 hour 30 minutes

40%

Internal assessment

Portfolio of three commentaries

N/A

20%

Component

Description

Time

Weighting

Paper 1

Extended response essay question

1 hour 30 minutes

30%

Paper 2

Data response questions

1 hour 30 minutes

30%

Paper 3

Quantitative methods questions

1 hour

20%

Internal assessment

Portfolio of three commentaries

N/A

20%

Higher Level

Course Structure Economics may be run as a mixed group of Higher and Standard Level students.

Who this course is for Students should be interested in government policies and how they affect consumers and businesses within a country’s economy. The Higher level course has a Mathematical component, but the ability demands are equivalent to that of IGCSE Mathematics, such as linear equations. The content of the standard level course is quite reduced and has no mathematical component. Students of Economics may tend to go into politics, international relations, banking and the general business environment.

Bangkok Patana School 35


Geography - Higher Level (HL)

and

Standard Level (SL)

Aims The aims of the geography course at SL and HL are to enable students to: • Develop an understanding of the dynamic interrelationships between people, places, spaces and the environment at different scales • Develop a critical awareness and consider complexity thinking in the context of the nexus of geographic issues, including: • acquiring an in-depth understanding of how geographic issues, or wicked problems, have been shaped by powerful human and physical processes • synthesizing diverse geographic knowledge in order to form viewpoints about how these issues could be resolved • Understand and evaluate the need for planning and sustainable development through the management of resources at varying scales.

Course Outline All students (SL and HL) study the following: Part 1: Optional Themes Standard Level SL and HL students study the following optional themes: 1.Freshwater – drainage basins 2.Food and health Higher Level In addition to the above Higher Level (HL) students study and additional optional theme: 3.Ocean and coastal margins OR Geophysical hazards Standard and higher Level Part 2: SL and HL Core – Geographic perspectives – global change 1.Populations distribution – changing population 2.Global climate – vulnerability and resilience 3.Global resource consumption and security Higher Level Part 2: HL only Geographic perspectives – global interactions Power, places and networks Human development and diversity Global risks and reliance

36 Bangkok Patana School


Senior Studies

Assessment

Curriculum Guide 2017/18

Standard Level Component

Description

Time

Weighting

Paper 1

Optional Themes

1 hour 30 minutes

35%

Paper 2

Geographic perspectives

1 hour 30 minutes

40%

Fieldwork

Internal assessment

20 hours

25%

Component

Description

Time

Weighting

Paper 1

Optional themes

2 hours 15 minutes

35%

Paper 2

Geographic perspectives

1 hours 30 minutes

25%

Paper 3

Higher extension

1 hour

20%

Fieldwork

Internal assessment

20 hours

20%

Higher Level

Course Structure Geography is taught in mixed ability classes. Fieldwork takes place in Chiang Mai (changing river variables and globalisation). Additional costs will be incurred for this mandatory section of the course.

Who this course is for Geography is such a diverse subject that studying the IB course will be applicable to students that have an interest in areas of Human, Physical, Economic and Development Geography, and enjoy exploring the various inter-relationships between the different components. Studying Geography can provide an individual with a holistic understanding of our planet and its systems. Those who study Geography are better prepared to understand topics impacting our planet such as climate change, global warming, desertification, El Nino, water resource issues, among others. With their understanding of political geography, those who study Geography are well-positioned to comprehend and explain global political issues that occur between countries, cultures, cities and their hinterlands, and between regions within countries. Ideally students will have studied Geography at IGCSE level in order to get a grounding for the IB course, but this is not essential to succeed and pre-course reading materials will be provided. Geography certainly suits all types of learners but particularly visual people who like to solve problems, research solutions and utilize technology. Studying Geography can help to prepare for a wide range of careers which include Urban Planning, GIS specialist, Cartographer, Climatologist, Volcanologist, Transport Management, Environmental Management, Emergency Management, Demography and Marketing to name but a few.

More Information More Information can be found at https://community.patana.ac.th/humanities-1/geography

Bangkok Patana School 37


History - Higher Level (HL) and Standard Level (SL) Aims The course aims to: • develop an understanding of, and continuing interest in, the past • encourage students to engage with multiple perspectives and to appreciate the complex nature of historical concepts, issues, events and developments • promote international-mindedness through the study of history from more than one region of the world • develop an understanding of history as a discipline and to develop historical consciousness including a sense of chronology and context, and an understanding of different historical perspectives • develop key historical skill, including engaging effectively with sources • increase students’ understanding of themselves and of contemporary society by encouraging reflection on the past

Course Outline The 20th century Standard Level • The Move to Global War-Japanese Expansionism 1931-41 and German/Italian Expansion 1933-40 • Authoritarian States: Hitler’s Germany, Ho Chi Minh’s Vietnam, • Causes and effects of 20th century wars: First and Second World Wars, Russian Civil War, Vietnam War, Castro’s revolutionary guerrilla war • The Cold War (Early Period-1945-50)

Higher Level (in addition to SL content) • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Topic 12: China and Korea (1910–1950) Rise of national identity in China Nationalist rule of China Rise of communism in China Impact of Japanese invasion of China Impact of Japanese rule of Korea Taiwan and Republic of China (ROC) 14: The People’s Republic of China (1949–2005) Consolidation of the communist state (1949– 1961) under Mao Zedong Transition to socialism Social developments; women’s rights; health; education Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution Foreign policy and foreign affairs 1949–1976 Power struggle following the death of Mao Zedong China under Deng Xiaoping (1976–1997) 15: Cold War conflicts in Asia Malaya: Emergency (1948–1960): Korea: Korean War (1950–1953) Vietnam Cambodia Afghanistan

In addition, all students will complete an Historical Investigation which is a research assignment of 2,200 words on a topic from the syllabus, chosen by the student.

38 Bangkok Patana School


Senior Studies

Curriculum Guide 2017/18

Assessment Standard Level Component

Description

Time

Weighting

Paper 1

Analysing sources on ‘The Move to Global War’-Japanese Expansionism 1931-41 and German/Italian Expansion 1933-40

1 hour

30%

Paper 2

Two essays on 20th century wars and single-party states, early Cold War

1 hour 30 minutes

45%

Historical Investigation

Internal Assessment on a topic of the student’s choice

N/A

25%

Higher Level Component

Description

Time

Weighting

Paper 1

Analysing sources on ‘The Move to Global War’-Japanese Expansionism 1931-41 and German/Italian Expansion 1933-40

1 hour

20%

Paper 2

Two essays on 20th century wars and single-party states, early Cold War

1 hour 30 minutes

25%

Paper 3

Three essays on the topics Japan, China, Korea

2 hours 30 minutes

35%

Internal Assessment on a topic of the student’s choice

Approximately 20 hours (mostly homework)

20%

Historical Investigation

Course Structure Higher and Standard students are taught together for Papers 1 and 2. All students cover The World Wars, Move to Global War, Early Cold War and leaders of Authoritarian states. In addition, HL students look at China, Korea and Cold War conflicts in Asia history. HL and SL students will be taught together for two double lessons while the HL topics will be taught to HL students for one double lesson per week.

Who this course is for Higher and Standard Level History is for students who have an interest in history and why the world is the way it is today. Students will be involved in discussion, debates and role plays so active participation is expected. History prepares students well for university life as it is a subject with a strong emphasis on argument and analysis. These are crucial for so many university courses but also for jobs and careers beyond university. It helps to have studied it for IGCSE, but it is not necessary.

Bangkok Patana School 39


Information Technology

in a

Global Society (ITGS) -

Higher Level (HL) and Standard Level (SL) Aims The course aims to: • enable the student to evaluate social and ethical considerations arising from the widespread use of IT by individuals, families, communities, organisations and societies at the local and global level; • develop the student’s understanding of the capabilities of current and emerging IT systems and to evaluate their impact on a range of stakeholders; • enable students to apply their knowledge of existing IT systems to various scenarios and to make informed judgments about the effects of IT developments on them; • encourage students to use their knowledge of IT systems and practical IT skills to justify IT solutions for a specified client or end-user. Course Outline Social and ethical significance

Reliability and integrity, security, privacy and anonymity, intellectual property, authenticity, the digital divide and equality of access, surveillance, globalisation and cultural diversity, policies, standards and protocols, people and machines, digital citizenship.

Application to specified scenarios

Business and employment, education and training, environment, health, home and leisure, politics and government.

IT systems

Hardware, software, networks, internet, personal and public communications, multimedia/ digital media, databases, spreadsheets, modelling and simulations, introduction to project management. HL extension: IT systems in organisations, robotics, artificial intelligence and expert systems, information systems specific to the annually issued case study.

Assessment Standard Level Component

Description

Time

Weighting

1

Answer two of four structured questions

1 hour 30 minutes

40%

2

Written response to one unseen article

1 hour 15 minutes

30%

3

Internal Assessment

30 hours

30%

Component

Description

Time

Weighting

1

Answer three of seven structured questions

2 hours 15 minutes

35%

2

Written response to one unseen article

1 hour 15 minutes

20%

3

Four questions based on a pre-seen case study

1 hour 15 minutes

25%

4

Internal Assessment

30 hours

20%

Higher Level

40 Bangkok Patana School


Senior Studies

Curriculum Guide 2017/18

Internal Assessment: Standard Level and Higher Level The development of an original IT product for a specified client. Students must produce: • a cover page using prescribed format; • an original IT product; • documentation supporting the product (word limit 2,000 words); • Screencast

Course Structure An integrated approach is used when teaching ITGS. Social and ethical significance, application to specified scenarios and IT Systems are all interconnected. The parts of the syllabus are woven together so that, by the end of the course, students are able to appreciate the links between all the parts of the syllabus. During the first year students undertake an intensive programme of learning and refreshing their ICT application skills in order to prepare them for their Internal Assessment (project). The project is completed in the first year. In the second year we focus on structuring answers to exam questions and answering questions based on technology news articles. The HL students also examine the case study.

Who this course is for There is no specific degree subject linked to ITGS that a student may continue to study at university. However, ITGS would be useful for any ICT, humanities or society/social based further study. An ITGS student needs to be very interested in all fields of technology and be willing to read and present technology related news articles that have associated social or ethical issues. ITGS students need a good eye for detail when it comes to completing coursework since there are many processes and criteria that need to be carefully followed. A good level of English language ability is required in order to undertake the background reading and to structure exam paper answers. ITGS should not be viewed as an easy IB option.

More Information More information can be found at: http://itgsopedia.wikispaces.com/

Bangkok Patana School 41


GROUP 4 EXPERIMENTAL SCIENCES BIOLOGY CHEMISTRY COMPUTER SCIENCE DESIGN TECHNOLOGY ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS AND SOCIETIES PHYSICS Artwork by Jasmina Millard, 12B 42 Bangkok Patana School


Senior Studies

Biology - Standard Level (SL)

and

Curriculum Guide 2017/18

Higher Level (HL)

Aims The aim of the course is to develop an understanding of life processes. In doing so students will: • Appreciate scientific study and creativity within a global context through stimulating and challenging opportunities; • Acquire a body of knowledge, methods and techniques that characterize science and technology; • Apply and use a body of knowledge, methods and techniques that characterize science and technology; • Develop an ability to analyse, evaluate and synthesize scientific information; • Develop a critical awareness of the need for, and the value of, effective collaboration and communication during scientific activities; • Develop experimental and investigative scientific skills including the use of current technologies; • Develop and apply 21st century communication skills in the study of science; • Become critically aware, as global citizens, of the ethical implications of using science and technology; • Develop an appreciation of the possibilities and limitations of science and technology; • Develop an understanding of the relationships between scientific disciplines and their influence on other areas of knowledge.

Course Outline The syllabus for the Diploma Programme Biology course is divided into three parts: the Core, the Additional Higher Level (AHL) material and the Options. A syllabus overview is provided below. Core

AHL

1.Cell biology 2.Molecular biology 3.Genetics 4.Ecology 5.Evolution and biodiversity 6.Human physiology

7.Cell biology 8.Molecular biology 9.Genetics 10.Ecology 11.Evolution and biodiversity 12.Human physiology

Options SL – students are required to study one option

Options HL – students are required to study one option

A. B. C. D.

A. Neurobiology and behaviour B. Biotechnology and bioinformatics C. Ecology and conservation D. Human physiology

Neurobiology and behaviour Biotechnology and bioinformatics Ecology and conservation Human physiology

Assessment Standard Level Component

Description

Time

Weighting

Paper 1

30 multiple-choice questions

45 minutes

20%

Paper 2

Data-based question, short answer response and extended response question

1 hour 15 minutes

40%

Paper 3

Data-based question, short answer response and extended response question

1 hour

20%

10 hours

20%

Internal Assessment

Individual Investigation (6-12 pages)

Bangkok Patana School 43


Higher Level students Component

Description

Time

Weighting

Paper 1

40 multiple-choice questions

1 hour

20%

Paper 2

Data-based question, short answer response and extended response question

2 hours 15 minutes

36%

Paper 3

Data-based question, short answer response and extended response question

1 hour 15 minutes

24%

Internal Assessment

Individual Investigation (6-12 pages)

10 hours

20%

Course Structure The teaching of Biology as an experimental science requires that all students participate in a field trip in January of Year 12. The trip take place in Khao Yai national park where we stay in a field station or resort just outside the entrance to the park. The trip lasts three days and three nights and takes place during term time. During the trip students are taught a variety of field/Ecology techniques. There will also be an opportunity during the trip for student to carry out a personal investigation of an aspect of forest ecology. Parents will be informed of the final arrangement for fieldtrip during term 1 of Year 12. All students are required to complete the practical scheme of work, 60 hours for HL and 40 hours for SL students. All students must complete the Group 4, collaborative Science project.

Who this course is for Students of Higher Level Biology may continue to study Biological sciences or medical sciences at university (and in many cases Higher Level Biology is an entry requirement for these courses). A good level of English and Mathematics is required, usually illustrated by a high grade at IGCSE. Students of Standard Level Biology typically have a broader range subjects in mind for Higher Education and often take the subject for the sake of interest and enquiry. The demands of the Standard Level course are as rigorous as those of the Higher Level course, however the content is reduced. Students who intend to study medicine are strongly advised to combine Higher Level Biology with Higher Level Chemistry. To ensure success in Biology at IB the following are expected: Higher Level Grade B and above for IGCSE Biology or grade AB and above for IGCSE Double Award Science (or by consultation and agreement with Head of Subject and IB Coordinator). Typically this will be supported by high grades for both IGCSE English and Mathematics. Standard Level Grade C and above for IGCSE Biology or grade BC and above for IGCSE Double Award Science (or by consultation and agreement with Head of Subject and IB Coordinator).

44 Bangkok Patana School


Senior Studies

Chemistry - Higher Level (HL)

and

Curriculum Guide 2017/18

Standard Level (SL)

Aims To study Chemistry is to study the composition and properties of substances and the nature of the reactions by which they can be produced or converted into other substances. The IB Chemistry course aims to help students understand: • the world around them; • how to make better materials; • how to get the energy we need; • how to protect the environment.

Course Outline The syllabus for IB Chemistry is divided into three parts: • Core • Additional Higher Level (AHL) • Options There are 11 topics studies in the Core theory syllabus and, at Higher Level, these are extended in the AHL material. The 11 topics are: SL and AHL Topics

Options (one option is studied at both SL and AHL)

Quantitative chemistry Atomic structure Periodicity Bonding Energetics Kinetics Equilibrium Acids and bases Oxidation and reduction Organic Chemistry Measurement and data processing

Materials Energy Medicinal Chemistry Biochemistry

Assessment External assessment consists of three written papers at both Standard and Higher Level as well as Internal Assessment (IA) of practical skills. Details are summarised below:

Standard Level Component

Description

Time

Weighting

Paper 1

30 multiple-choice questions on the Core material

45 minutes

20%

Paper 2

Tests core and AHL material. Short answer and extended answer questions

1 hour 15 minutes

40%

Paper 3

Tests core material and the SL option topic. Section A has one data based question and several short answer questions on experimental work. Section B has short answer and extended response questions on the selected option topic.

1 hour

20%

Internal Assessment

See next page

Approximately 10 hours

20% Bangkok Patana School 45


Higher Level Component

Description

Time

Weighting

Paper 1

40 multiple-choice questions (approximately 20 Core and 20 AHL questions)

1 hour

20%

Paper 2

Tests core and AHL material. Short answer and extended answer questions.

2 hours 15 minutes

36%

Paper 3

Tests core material, AHL material and the option topic. Section A has one data based question and several short answer questions on experimental work. Section B has short answer and extended response questions on the selected option topic.

1 hour 15 minutes

24%

Internal Assessment

See below

Approximately hours

20%

10

Course Structure Assessment has two components; internal assessment and external assessment. Topics are covered with each one starting with Core and then progressing onto AHL material. The Options are generally covered in Year 13. Internal Assessment involves one extended laboratory investigation designed by the student. Students should expect to carry out both short and long term investigations in addition to the Group 4 project.

Who this course is for Students of Higher Level Chemistry may continue to study pure chemistry or chemical engineering or else a discipline in the biological field where a good background in chemistry is deemed essential such as medicine, dentistry, veterinary science, biochemistry, pharmacology, pharmacy, microbiology etc. In many cases Higher Level Chemistry may be an entry requirement for these courses. A competent but not necessarily excellent level of Mathematics is required, usually illustrated by a good grade at IGCSE. Students of Standard Level Chemistry typically have a broader range of subjects in mind for Further Education and take the subject for the sake of interest and enquiry or as an extra science course to supplement their study of Physics and Mathematics in their ambition for an engineering course. The demands of the Standard Level course are less rigorous than those of the Higher Level course and the content is very much reduced. To ensure success in Chemistry at IB the following is expected: Higher Level Grade B and above for IGCSE Chemistry or grade AB and above for IGCSE Double Award Science (or by consultation and agreement with Head of Subject and IB Coordinator) Standard Level Grade C and above for IGCSE Chemistry or grade BC and above for IGCSE Double Award Science Typically this will be supported by high grades for both IGCSE English and Mathematics

More information More information can be found at: http://community.patana.ac.th/science/chemistry/ib-chemistry-

46 Bangkok Patana School


Senior Studies

Computer Science - Higher Level (HL)

and

Curriculum Guide 2017/18

Standard Level (SL)

Aims The course aims to:

• provide opportunities for study and creativity within a global context that will stimulate and challenge students developing the skills necessary for independent and lifelong learning • provide a body of knowledge, methods and techniques that characterize computer science • enable students to apply and use a body of knowledge, methods and techniques that characterize computer science • demonstrate initiative in applying thinking skills critically to identify and resolve complex problems • engender an awareness of the need for, and the value of, effective collaboration and communication in resolving complex problems • develop logical and critical thinking as well as experimental, investigative and problem-solving skills • develop and apply the students’ information and communication technology skills in the study of computer science to communicate information confidently and effectively • raise awareness of the moral, ethical, social, economic and environmental implications of using science and technology • develop an appreciation of the possibilities and limitations associated with continued developments in IT systems and computer science • encourage an understanding of the relationships between scientific disciplines and the overarching nature of the scientific method.

Course Outline Common core (HL and SL students) • Topic 1: System fundamentals • Topic 2: Computer organization • Topic 3: Networks • Topic 4: Computational thinking, problem-solving and programming Additional HL material (HL students only) • Topic 5: Abstract data structures • Topic 6: Resource management • Topic 7: Control • Case study (issued annually) Option (HL and SL students) The class will follow one of the options listed: • Option A: Databases • Option B: Modelling and simulation • Option C: Web science • Option D: Object-oriented programming (OOP) Internal assessment (HL and SL students) • Development of a product and associated documentation based on one of the options studied • Group 4 Project

Bangkok Patana School 47


Assessment Standard Level Component

Description

Time

Weighting

1

Several compulsory short-answer questions and three compulsory structured questions

1 hour 30 minutes

45%

2

Students answer all questions linked to the option studied

1 hour

25%

3

Internal Assessment

30 hours

30%

Description

Time

1

Several compulsory short-answer questions and five compulsory structured questions

2 hours 10 minutes

40%

2

Compulsory common questions linked to option studied

1 hour 20 minutes

20%

3

Four compulsory questions based on a preseen case study

1 hour

20%

4

Internal Assessment

30 hours

20%

Higher Level Component

Weighting

Course Structure In the first year the core topics 1, 2, 4 and an option unit are taught and for HL the additional topics 5 and 6. The internal assessment is begun in term 3 of the first year for both SL and HL students. In addition the HL students research the case study. In the second year the internal assessment is completed, the remaining topics are covered and HL students undertake more work related to the case study. Time has been allocated during term 2 for thorough review and revision. Students will undertake practical programming exercises using the Java programming language. Topic 4 is considered and examined throughout the course duration. Option D, Object-oriented programming (OOP), is usually the option selected for this course. Students undertake a programming project and study more OOP to answer questions in this category.

Who this course is for Students of Computing usually continue to study Computer Engineering or Computer Science at University. A good grade, ‘A’ or ‘A*’, for IGCSE Computer Science is the norm for students who select this subject. However, any student who can demonstrate a love for programming, from having undertaking their own personal and independent programming study and experimentation, would be considered. You must have undertaken some form of programming prior to this course. Students who take this course are passionate about computers, how they work, how to build them and how to program them at an advanced level.

More information More information can be found at: http://csopedia.wikispaces.com/

48 Bangkok Patana School


Senior Studies

Design Technology - Higher Level (HL)

and

Curriculum Guide 2017/18

Standard Level (SL)

Aims The course aims to develop in students: • a sense of curiosity as they acquire the skills necessary for independent and lifelong learning and action through inquiry into the technological world around them; • an ability to explore concepts, ideas and issues with personal, local and global significance to acquire indepth knowledge and understanding of design and technology; • initiative in applying thinking skills critically and creatively to identify and resolve complex social and technological problems through reasoned ethical decision-making; • an ability to understand and express ideas confidently and creatively using a variety of communication techniques through collaboration with others; • a propensity to act with integrity and honesty, and take responsibility for their own actions in designing technological solutions to problems; • an understanding and appreciation of cultures in terms of global technological development, seeking and evaluating a range of perspectives; • a willingness to approach unfamiliar situations in an informed manner and explore new roles, ideas and strategies so they can articulate and defend their proposals with confidence; • an understanding of the contribution of design and technology to the promotion of intellectual, physical and emotional balance and the achievement of personal and social well-being; • empathy, compassion and respect for the needs and feelings of others in order to make a positive difference to the lives of others and to the environment; • skills that enable them to reflect on the impacts of design and technology on society and the environment in order to develop their own learning and enhanced solutions to technological problems.

Course Outline Core Topics (Both SL and HL students complete the core topics) 1. Human factors 2. Resource management and sustainable production 3. Modelling 4. Raw materials to final product 5. Innovation and Design 6. Classic Design

Additional Higher Level Topics 7. User-centred design 8. Sustainability 9. Innovation and Markets 10. Commercial Production

Assessment Standard Level Component

Description

Paper 1 (SL/HL)

Multiple choice

Overall % 30

Duration 1 hour

Bangkok Patana School 49


Paper 2 (SL/HL)

Section A: Database questions and short answer Section B : extended response

30

1 hour 30 minutes

Internal Assessment

A student-centred design project that encompasses the IB Design Cycle.

40

40 hours

Higher Level Component

Description

Overall %

Duration

Paper 1 As SL

Multiple choice

20

1 hour

Paper 2 As SL

Section A: Database questions and short answer Section B : extended response

20

1 hour 30 minutes

Paper 3

Structured long and short response based on AHL material.

20

1 hour 30 minutes

Internal Assessment

A student-centred design project that encompasses the IB Design Cycle.

40

60 hours

Course Structure Both the IB Higher and Standard Level Design Technology courses follow on from, and further develop, the IGCSE Design and Technology syllabus. They include some student-centred practical/design project work as well as an increased amount of theoretical studies. Higher and Standard Level students are taught the common core together in mixed ability groups. Throughout the course, the students will have the opportunity to experience the full range of production and engineering processes the Design Technology Faculty has to offer.

Who this course is for Design Technology is a unique course in group 4 as a departure from a traditional science course, especially for students who are unsure about studying an experimental science. The course focuses on materials, processes, and roles of designs and designers. Students are encouraged to actively explore concepts, ideas and issues. Apply thinking skills creatively and critically and develop an understanding of how designers work and communicate. By embracing global technological development students develop an awareness of the role of design and technology in society. This includes an understanding of how designers must consider material, political, social, and economic factors which affect peoples’ priorities when designing a product. Students will be taught how to evaluate existing products and analyse situations so that they can suggest appropriate improvements. Additionally, Design Technology maintains a strong emphasis on giving students the experience of designers and as such a central part of the course is the design project where they will use the design cycle to produce an object of their own design. Design and Technology is a demanding course at both Standard and Higher Level. There is a large theoretical study content to the course and students must be prepared to read at home and sit topic tests in class. Students interested in a DT IB option will be given the opportunity of a “Taster Lesson� and discussion with teachers in Year11to ensure full understanding of the course content. To guarantee a place on the course and smooth transition it is essential students show interest at this stage.

50 Bangkok Patana School


Senior Studies

Curriculum Guide 2017/18

Ideally students will have studied Design and Technology at IGCSE level in order to get grounding for the IB course, but this is not essential to succeed. However there will be an expectation that non-IGCSE DT students complete a two day practical orientation after the completion of their IGCSE exams and pre-course reading materials will also be provided. Design Technology certainly suits all types of learners but particularly creative people who like to solve problems and those who have an active interest in design. The world of Design, Engineering and Industry is vast. There are a multitude of college courses as there are careers. Below are just a few options available: • Product design • Industrial design • Interior design • Web design • Graphic design • Transport design • Engineering • Architecture • Furniture design

Bangkok Patana School 51


Environmental Systems

and

Societies - Standard Level (SL)

A Trans-disciplinary Subject: Trans-disciplinary subjects are located in more than one option group and satisfy the requirements of both Groups 3 (Humanities) and 4 (Experimental Sciences).

Aims The course aims that the students: acquire the knowledge and understandings of environmental systems at a variety of scales • apply the knowledge, methodologies and skills to analyse environmental systems and issues at a variety of scales • appreciate the dynamic interconnectedness between environmental systems and societies • value the combination of personal, local and global perspectives in making informed decisions and taking responsible actions on environmental issues • be critically aware that resources are finite, and that these could be inequitably distributed and exploited, and that management of these inequities is the key to sustainability • develop awareness of the diversity of environmental value systems • develop critical awareness that environmental problems are caused and solved by decisions made by individuals and societies that are based on different areas of knowledge • engage with the controversies that surround a variety of environmental issues • create innovative solutions to environmental issues by engaging actively in local and global contexts.

Course Outline Students are required to spend 120 hours studying the material specified in the course and a further 30 hours on practical/investigative work. Topic 1— Foundations of environmental systems and societies Topic 2—Ecosystems and ecology Topic 3—Biodiversity and conservation Topic 4—Water and aquatic food production systems and societies Topic 5—Soil systems and terrestrial food production systems and societies Topic 6—Atmospheric systems and societies Topic 7—Climate change and energy production Topic 8—Human systems and resource use There are two required field trips during the course. The first one will be to a Mangrove Ecosystem in Chantaburi, and will take place in Term 2 of Year 12. The aim of this field trip is to gain first-hand experience in studying Topics 2 and 3, and to provide students with the opportunity to gather data for their internal assessment projects. The second field trip will take place in Term 1 of Year 13, and will be a single day trip on the Chao Phraya River, to study water pollution. There will be a fee associated with both trips.

52 Bangkok Patana School


Senior Studies

Curriculum Guide 2017/18

Assessment External The external assessment consists of two written papers and is worth 75% of the final assessment. Component Paper 1

Description Case Study - Resource book and structured questions

Duration

Weighting

1 hour

25%%

Paper 2

Section A (25 marks) is made up of short-answer and data-based questions Section  B (40 marks) requires students to answer two structured essay questions from a choice of four. Each question is worth 20 marks

2 hours

50%

Internal Assessment

See below

10 hours

25%

Internal Internal assessment accounts for 25% of the final assessment. It enables students to demonstrate the application of their skills and knowledge, and to pursue their personal interests, without the time limitations and other constraints that are associated with written examinations. The task involves the completion of an individual investigation of an ESS research question that has been designed and implemented by the student. The investigation is submitted as a written report that is between 1500 to 2250 words. The task and report will consist of: • Identifying an ESS issue and focusing on one of its specific aspects • developing methodologies to generate data that are analysed to produce knowledge and understanding of this focused aspect • applying the outcomes of the focused investigation to provide understanding or solutions in the broader ESS context. This report is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IBO. The performance in IA is judged against six assessment criteria – Identifying the Context; Planning; Results, Analysis and Conclusion; Discussion and evaluation; Applications and Communication

Course Structure Through studying Environmental Systems and Societies (ESS) students will be provided with a coherent perspective of the interrelationships between environmental systems and societies ; one that enables them to adopt an informed personal response to the wide range of pressing environmental issues that they will inevitably come to face. The teaching approach is such that students are allowed to evaluate the scientific, ethical and socio-political aspects of issues. Awareness of local and global environmental concerns and an understanding of the scientific method would be good preparation for this course.

Who this course is for To ensure success in Environmental Systems and Societies at IB the following are expected: Grade C and above for IGCSE Geography OR Grade C and above for Biology or grade BC and above for IGCSE Double Award Science Awareness and an interest in local and global environmental concerns would also be good preparation for this course.

Bangkok Patana School 53


Physics - Higher Level (HL)

and

Standard Level (SL)

Aims The course encourages students to: • explain the behaviour of the Universe, from the smallest quark to the largest galactic structures; • study the theories and methodology that have been successful in creating our present understanding of the physical universe; • appreciate the importance of experimentation in this acquisition of knowledge and to be competent in its application; • understand how our knowledge of Physics is applied to develop technology.

Course Outline Both the Higher and Standard Level courses consist of a subject-specific core (SSC) with additional option topics. The Higher level course has additional material (AHL). Practical work occupies about 25% of the course study time. Subject Specific Core (SSC) Standard level study these only

Additional Higher Level (AHL) Higher level study these in addition to the standard level material

Measurement and uncertainties Mechanics Thermal concepts Waves Electricity and magnetism Circular motion and gravitation Atomic, nuclear and particle physics Energy production

Wave phenomena Fields (gravitational and electric) Electromagnetic induction Quantum and nuclear physics

Options (one of these )

Options (one of these)

Relativity Engineering physics Imaging Astrophysics

Relativity Engineering physics Imaging Astrophysics

The practical aspect of the course consists of an introduction to experimental techniques and error analysis, followed by a series of experiments of varying complexity designed to prepare the students for a ten-hour Internal Assessment. Including this assessment students must complete a minimum of 40 hours of practical work for Standard Level and 60 hours for Higher Level.

Assessment Standard Level Component

Description

Time

1

Multiple choice questions

45 minutes

20%

2

Short answer and extended-response questions on core material

1 hour 15 minutes

40%

3

One data based question and short-answer questions on experimental work plus short-answer and extended-response questions from the option chosen

1 hour

20%

54 Bangkok Patana School

Weighting


Senior Studies Internal Assessment

Curriculum Guide 2017/18

An individual piece of work based on data collected or measurements generated 

10 hours

20%

Component

Description

Time

Weighting

1

Multiple Choice

1 hour

20%

2

Short answer and extended-response questions on the core and AHL material

2 hours 15 minutes

36%

3

One data based question and short-answer questions on experimental work plus short-answer and extended-response questions from the option chosen

1 hour 15 minutes

24%

Internal Assessment

An individual piece of work based on data collected or measurements generated    

10 hours

20%

Higher Level

Course Structure Students will progress through the above content in a manner that brings concepts together and allows them to access ideas in a structured way in preparation for the three written papers. They will be internally assessed on their practical work through a ten hour investigation where they will design, carry out and evaluate a practical task. Throughout the course they will be exposed to examples of the Nature of Science pertaining to Physics along with the International Mindedness of Physics and links with Theory of Knowledge. There will also be a ten-hour Group 4 Project in which students from other Group 4 subjects work together. The IB Learner Profile will be central to their development throughout. During Year 12 there is a mandatory field trip to Dreamworld to investigate forces and motion; students will be required to pay for their entry.

Who this course is for Students of Higher Level Physics may continue to study Engineering or Physical Science at University (and in many cases Higher Level Physics is an entry requirement for these courses). A good level of Mathematics is required, usually illustrated by a high grade at IGCSE. Students of Standard Level Physics typically have a broader range subjects in mind for Further Education and take the subject for the sake of interest and enquiry. The demands of the Standard Level course are as rigorous as those of the Higher Level course, however the content is reduced. To ensure success in Physics at IB the following are expected: Higher Level Physics Grade B and above for IGCSE Physics or grade AB and above for IGCSE Double Award Science (or by consultation and agreement with Head of Subject and IB Coordinator) Standard Level Physics Grade C and above for IGCSE Physics or grade BC and above for IGCSE Double Award Science (or by consultation and agreement with Head of Subject and IB Coordinator) Typically this will be supported by high grades for both IGCSE English and Mathematics

Bangkok Patana School 55


GROUP 5 MATHEMATICS MATHEMATICAL STUDIES MATHEMATICS STANDARD LEVEL MATHEMATICS HIGHER LEVEL

Artwork by Beccy Waite, 12A 56 Bangkok Patana School


Senior Studies

Curriculum Guide 2017/18

Mathematical Studies - Standard Level (SL) Aims Students are encouraged to: • develop logical, critical and creative thinking; • develop an understanding of the principles and nature of the subject; • develop patience and persistence in problem solving; • transfer skills to alternative situations and to future developments; • communicate clearly and confidently in a variety of contexts.

Course Outline Topics covered are: • introduction to the graphical display calculator • number and algebra • sets, logic and probability • functions • geometry and trigonometry • statistics • introductory differential calculus • financial mathematics.

Assessment Component

Description

Time

Weighting

Paper 1

Graphic display calculator (GDC) required This paper consists of 15 compulsory short-response questions.

1 hour 30 minutes

40%

Paper 2

Graphic display calculator (GDC) required This paper consists of 5 compulsory extended-response questions.

1 hour 30 minutes

40%

Internal Assessment

The project is an individual piece of work involving the collection of information or the generation of measurements, and the analysis and evaluation of the information or measurements.

N/A

20%

Who this course is for Students will typically take this course if they will not need Mathematics for their University courses. However, the course is still demanding and some preparation is needed to ensure a sound base before starting the course.

More information More information can be found at: http://community.patana.ac.th/mathematics/ib-maths/studies-level

Bangkok Patana School 57


Mathematics - Standard Level (SL) Aims Students are encouraged to: • develop logical, critical and creative thinking; • develop an understanding of the principles and nature of the subject; • develop patience and persistence in problem solving; • transfer skills to alternative situations and to future developments; • communicate clearly and confidently in a variety of contexts.

Course Outline Topics covered: • algebra • functions and equations • binomial theory • exponents and logarithms • circular functions and trigonometry • vectors • statistics • probability • calculus

Assessment Component

Description

Time

Weighting

Paper 1

No Calculator allowed Section A – Compulsory short-response questions based on the whole syllabus (20%) Section B – Compulsory extended-response questions based on the whole syllabus (20%)

1 hour 30 minutes

40%

Paper 2

Graphic display calculator (GDC) required Section A – Compulsory short-response questions based on the whole syllabus (20%) Section B – Compulsory extended-response questions based on the whole syllabus (20%)

1 hour 30 minutes

40%

Internal assessment

Exploration – Students explore a mathematical theme, which is an area of personal interest. The level of mathematics has to be commensurate with the level of course being followed.

N/A

20%

Who this course is for Students of Standard Level Mathematics typically have a broad range subjects in mind for Further Education and take the subject to prepare for courses like Sciences, Economics or Architecture. The demands of the Standard Level course are as rigorous as those of the Higher-level course, however the content is reduced. A good grade (A*, A or B) at IGCSE Mathematics is expected as well as successfully completing the transition material (indicated by a high grade in its assessment in the second week of Year 12).

More information More information can be found at: http://community.patana.ac.th/mathematics/ib-maths/standard-level

58 Bangkok Patana School


Senior Studies

Curriculum Guide 2017/18

Mathematics - Higher Level (HL) Aims Students are encouraged to: • develop logical, critical and creative thinking; • develop an understanding of the principles and nature of the subject; • develop patience and persistence in problem solving; • transfer skills to alternative situations and to future developments; • communicate clearly and confidently in a variety of contexts.

Course Outline Topics Covered: • algebra • functions and equations • binomial theory • exponents and logarithms • circular functions and trigonometry • vectors • statistics • probability • calculus In addition, students opt for one option from: • statistics and probability • sets, relations and groups • series and differential equations • discrete mathematics

Assessment Component

Description

Time

Weighting

Paper 1

No calculator allowed Section A - short-response questions (15%) Section B - extended-response questions (15%)

2 hours

30%

Paper 2

Graphic display calculator (GDC) required Section A - short-response questions (15%) Section B - extended-response questions (15%)

2 hours

30%

Paper 3

Graphic display calculator (GDC) required This is the paper based on the option that the students/teachers have chosen to study. In recent years, students have sat the paper on Statistics and Probability which complements the Core content. This paper consists of a small number of compulsory extended-response questions based on the option chosen. Where possible, the first part of each question will be on core material leading to the option topic.

1 hour

20%

Internal assessment

Exploration – Students explore a mathematical theme, which is an area of personal interest. The level of mathematics has to be commensurate with the level of course being followed.

N/A

20%

Bangkok Patana School 59


Who this course is for Students with some prior exposure to the material is required which is usually illustrated by a high grade at AS in Year 11 having previously achieved a high grade in IGCSE Mathematics. All students should successfully complete the summer transition material (indicated by a high grade in its assessment in the second week of Year 12) and achieve a high grade (should be expecting an A*) at IGCSE Mathematics. We recommend this course predominantly for those who enjoy Mathematics and are likely to study a related course such as Mathematics, Engineering, or Physics at University (in many cases Higher Level Mathematics is an entry requirement for these courses).

More information More information can be found at: http://community.patana.ac.th/mathematics/ib-maths/higher-level

60 Bangkok Patana School


Senior Studies

Curriculum Guide 2017/18

GROUP 6 THE ARTS MUSIC THEATRE VISUAL ARTS

Artwork by Aiesha Penwaden, 13C Bangkok Patana School 61


Music - Standard Level (SL)

and

Higher Level (HL)

Aims The aims of the course at both Standard and Higher Levels are to: • enjoy lifelong engagement with the arts; • give students the opportunity to explore and enjoy the diversity of music throughout the world; • encourage students to develop perceptual and critical thinking skills through a breadth of musical experiences, where they will learn to recognise, speculate, analyse, identify, discriminate and hypothesise in relation to music; • enable students to develop creatively their knowledge, abilities and understanding through performance and composition; • assist students to develop their potential as musicians both personally and collaboratively, in whatever capacity, to the full.

Course Outline Standard Level Students at the Standard Level study the compulsory Musical perception and analysis component, plus either performance or creating. This course may suit the student who prefers to focus on one aspect out of performance and creating (composition) rather than both. Assessment Component

Description

External/Internal

Listening Exam 30%

Section A Set work questions Section B Unprepared extract questions Western Art Music World Music Jazz/Rock/Pop

External

Musical Links Investigation 20%

A written media script of 2,000 words investigating the musical links between two different musical cultures

External

Performance 50% Solo Performance OR Group Performance

Solo – A recording selected from pieces performed during public performances. 15 minutes. Group – A recording selected from pieces presented during two or more public performances. 20-30 minutes. Must provide a rehearsal and performance log.

Internal and moderated by IBO

Two contrasting pieces of coursework, both of which can be free compositions, or can include options such as music technology, arranging, improvising and stylistic techniques Each composition is normally 3-6 minutes long, and is accompanied by a reflective statement

Internal and moderated by IBO

OR Creating 50%

62 Bangkok Patana School


Senior Studies

Curriculum Guide 2017/18

Higher Level Students at the Higher Level study the compulsory Musical perception and analysis component, plus both Solo performance and Creating. Assessment Component

Description

External/Internal

Listening Exam 30%

Section A Set work questions Section B Unprepared extract questions Western Art Music World Music Jazz/Rock/Pop

External

Musical Links Investigation 20%

A written media script of 2,000 words investigating the musical links between two different musical cultures

External

Performance 25% Solo Performance

Solo – A recording selected from pieces performed during public performances. 20 minutes.

Internal and moderated by IBO

Creating 25%

Three contrasting pieces of coursework, all of which can be free compositions, or can include options such as music technology, arranging, improvising and stylistic techniques Each composition is normally 3-6 minutes long, and is accompanied by a reflective statement

Internal and moderated by IBO

Course Structure All students pursue studies in musical perception and analysis, developing their knowledge and recognition of musical repertoire, aural and theoretical skills, understanding of musical concepts and use of terminology, critical thinking skills and ability to compare and contrast different music. Students listen to and appraise a wide variety of western art music, Jazz/Rock/Pop and world music and develop understanding of the technical, structural, musical and contextual basis of music, as well as the ability to reach informed views. There are also two set works to be studied in detail. For the 2017, 2018, 2019 examination years they are Johann Sebastian Bach’s Brandenburg Concerto, No. 2 in F Major (BWV 1047) and Zoltán Kodály’s Dances of Galánta. Students complete a student led Musical Links Investigation, in which they analyse and compare and contrast two pieces of music from two different musical cultures. Students undertaking the creating option will be instructed in some compositional techniques, and will also have the opportunity to work on free compositions with appropriate guidance. In addition to attending class lessons, we strongly recommend that students doing the performing option should arrange individual music lessons on their selected instrument or voice.

Who this course is for Standard Level This is for the student who has a genuine interest in music and has an open mind to various styles of music across time and place. They also may prefer to focus on either performing or creating. It allows the student to develop their skills in their chosen area and work towards a portfolio of work. The Listening and perception elements of the course are the same but result in a shortened exam time. Higher Level This is for the student who has a genuine interest in music and has an open mind to various styles of music across time and place. They will also have an interest in both performing and creating. IGCSE Music is not a pre-requisite, but this or an equivalent previous music course would be useful. If IB Diploma Music is a subject you are considering, please discuss this with a member of the music department.

Bangkok Patana School 63


Theatre - Higher Level (HL)

and

Standard Level (HL)

Aims The Arts aims of the course are to enable students to: 1. Enjoy lifelong engagement with the Arts; 2. Become informed, reflective and critical practitioners in the Arts; 3. Understand the dynamic and changing nature of the Arts; 4. Explore and value the diversity of the arts across time, place and cultures; 5. Express ideas with confidence and competence; 6. Develop perceptual and analytical skills. In addition, the aims of the Theatre course at SL and HL are to enable students to: 7. Explore theatre in a variety of contexts and understand how these contexts inform practice (Theatre in Context) 8. Understand and engage in the processes of transforming ideas into action (Theatre Processes); 9. Develop and apply theatre production presentation and performance skills, working both independently and collaboratively (Presenting Theatre). For HL only: 10. Understand and appreciate the relationship between theory and practice (Theatre in Context; Theatre Processes, Presenting Theatre).

Course Outline Core Areas The theatre syllabus at SL and HL consists of three equal, interrelated areas:

0Mapping the course Students are required to investigate the core syllabus areas from the perspectives of creator, designer, director, performer and spectator through the following activities: • creating theatre based on theatre theory (HL only) • working with play texts • examining world theatre traditions and performance practices • collaboratively creating original theatre.

64 Bangkok Patana School


Senior Studies

Curriculum Guide 2017/18

These activities link with the core syllabus areas as follows: THEATRE IN CONTEXT

THEATRE PROCESSES

PRESENTING THEATRE

HL only

Creating theatre based on theatre theory

At HL, students research and examine the various contexts of at least one theatre theorist.

At HL, students practically explore at least one theatre theorist collaboratively and engage with the process of creating a piece of theatre based on their theory.

At HL, students create, present and evaluate at least one theatre piece based on an aspect(s) of a theatre theorist’s work they have explored.

SL and HL

Working with play texts

Students research and examine the various contexts of at least one published play text and reflect on live theatre moments they have experienced as spectators.

Students take part in the practical exploration of at least two contrasting published play texts and engage with the process of transforming a play text into action.

Students direct at least one scene or section from one published play text which is presented to others.

SL and HL

Examining world theatre traditions

Students research and examine the various contexts of at least one world theatre tradition.

Students practically examine the performance conventions of at least one world theatre tradition and apply this to the staging of a moment of theatre.

Students present a moment of theatre to others which demonstrates the performance convention(s) of at least one world theatre tradition.

SL and HL

Collaboratively creating original theatre

Students reflect on their own personal approaches, interests and skills in theatre. They research and examine at least one starting point and the approaches employed by one appropriate professional theatre company, and consider how this might influence their own personal approaches.

Students respond to at least one starting point and engage with the process of transforming it collaboratively into an original piece of theatre.

Students participate in at least one production of a collaboratively created piece of original theatre, created from a starting point, which is presented to others.

Assessment Task Outline – SL and HL Students are assessed on the following range of tasks: Assessment Tasks

Higher Level

Standard Level %

External Assessment

Task 1: Solo theatre piece (HL only) Students at HL research a theatre theorist they have not previously studied, identify an aspect(s) of their theory and create and present a solo theatre piece (4–8 minutes) based on this aspect(s) of theory.

N/A

Higher Level % 35%

Task 2: Director’s notebook (SL and HL) Students at SL and HL choose a published play text they have not previously studied and develop ideas regarding how it could be staged for an audience.

35%

20%

Bangkok Patana School 65


Internal Assessment (These components are internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IBO)

Task 3: Research presentation (SL and HL) Students at SL and HL plan and deliver an individual presentation (15 minutes maximum) to their peers in which they outline and physically demonstrate their research into a convention of a theatre tradition they have not previously studied.

30%

20%

Task 4: Collaborative project (SL and HL) Students at SL and HL collaboratively create and present an original piece of theatre (lasting 13–15 minutes) for and to a specified target audience, created from a starting point of their choice.

35%

25%

Course Structure The Theatre course at both Higher Level and Standard Level requires no previous experience in drama or theatre. It provides a relevant learning opportunity for a diverse range of students as it lays an appropriate foundation for further study in theatre, performing arts and other subjects. In addition, by instilling discipline and refining communication and group work skills, it offers a valuable course of study for students who may wish to pursue a career of further education studies in areas unconnected to the theatre.

Who this course is for Students of IB Theatre are open minded, creative, collaborative and curious. The course is for anyone interested in theatre as a whole and students will develop key skills such as leadership, collaboration, presentation and independent research. Students may continue to an arts based or theatre orientated course at University, however, the majority of our students pursue subjects such as Law, Business and Marketing, or in fact any subject where team work, project development and presentation skills are a key component.

66 Bangkok Patana School


Senior Studies

Visual Arts - Higher Level (HL)

and

Curriculum Guide 2017/18

Standard Level (SL)

Aims The course aims to enable students to: • enjoy lifelong engagement with the arts • become informed, reflective and critical practitioners in the arts • understand the dynamic and charging nature of the arts • explore and value the diversity of the arts across time, place and cultures • express ideas with confidence and competence • develop perceptual and analytical skills In addition, the aims of the Visual Arts course at Standard and Higher Level are to enable students to: • make artwork that is influenced by personal and cultural contexts • become informed and critical observes and makers of visual cultural and media • develop skills, techniques and processes in order to communicate concepts and ideas

Course Outline The visual arts course encourages students to challenge their own creative and cultural expectations and boundaries. It is a thought provoking course in which students develop analytical skills in problem- solving and divergent thinking, while working towards technical proficiency and confidence as art makers. The visual arts core syllabus at SL and HL consists of three equal, interrelated areas: visual arts in context, visual arts methods and communicating visual arts. These core areas interlink and are fully covered by completing set theme based project work. Students are required to understand the relationship between these areas and how each area informs and impacts on their visual work.

Assessment Standard Level Component

Description

Work Submitted

Weighting

1

Comparative Study

10-15 screens

20%

2

Process Portfolio

9-18 screens

40%

3

Exhibition

4-7 artworks

40%

Higher Level (240 hours) Component

Description

Work Submitted

Weighting

1

Comparative Study

13-20 screens

20%

2

Process Portfolio

13-25 screens

40%

3

Exhibition

8-11 artworks

40%

The difference in expectations at Higher Level and Standard Level is provided above in the required work submission section. All work is moderated by an external assessor. The process portfolio is assessed by the teacher. Assessment consists of an evaluation of the body of work as a whole in the form of an exhibition.

Bangkok Patana School 67


Course Structure Comparative Study  Students are required to analyse and compare artworks, objects or artifacts by different artists. This independent critical and contextual investigation should explore artworks, objects and artifacts from differing cultural contexts. Throughout the course, students will have investigated a range of artists, styles, images and objects from a range of cultural contexts, through an integrated approach to exploring the three syllabus areas: visual arts in context, visual arts methods and communicating visual arts. Students select artworks, objects and artifacts for comparison from differing cultural contexts that may have been produced across any of the art-making forms and that hold individual resonance for the student and have relevance to their own art-making practice. Process Portfolio Students at SL and HL submit carefully selected materials which demonstrate their experimentation, exploration, manipulation and refinement of a variety of visual arts activities during the two-year course. The work, which may be extracted from their visual arts journal and other sketch books, notebooks, folios and so on, should have led to the creation of both resolved and unresolved works. The selected process portfolio work should show evidence of their technical accomplishments during the visual arts course and an understanding of the use of materials, ideas and practices appropriate to visual communication. Exhibition Students at SL and HL submit for assessment a selection of resolved artworks for their exhibition. The selected pieces should show evidence of their technical accomplishment during the visual arts course and an understanding of the use of materials, ideas and practices to realize their intentions. Students also evidence the decision-making process which underpins the selection of this connected and cohesive body of work for an audience in the form of a curatorial rationale.  

Who this course is for Students of Higher Level Visual Arts often go on to study in related fields such as Architecture, Fine Art, Arts Administration, Photography, Graphic Design, Events Planning and Product design, where a portfolio is often requested as part of the application process. IGCSE art is not a pre-requisite to IB studies but it is a helpful background to further studies.

68 Bangkok Patana School


Senior Studies

Curriculum Guide 2017/18

ADDITIONAL SUBJECT Artwork by Sam Leather, 12K Bangkok Patana School 69


Further Mathematics - Higher Level (HL) An Additional Subject Aims Students are encouraged to: • develop logical, critical and creative thinking; • develop an understanding of the principles and nature of the subject; • employ and refine their powers of abstraction and generalisation; • develop patience and persistence in problem solving; • communicate clearly and confidently in a variety of contexts.

Course Outline One of topic 2 will be studied as part of the Mathematics HL course: • Topic 1 – Geometry • Topic 2 – Linear Algebra • Topic 3 – Statistics and probability • Topic 4 – Sets, relations and groups • Topic 5 – Series and differential equations • Topic 6 – Discrete mathematics

Assessment Paper

Description

Time

Weighting

1

This paper consists of short- to medium-response questions based on the whole syllabus.

2 hours 30 minutes

50%

2

This paper consists of medium- to long-response questions based on the whole syllabus.

2 hours 30 minutes

50%

There is no internal assessment for this course.

Course Structure All students following this course must also take Mathematics Higher Level and existing Bangkok Patana students should have followed AS Level Mathematics with at least an A* or A. Students new to Bangkok Patana may sit an induction test or present similar qualifications. This course is taken as a seventh IB course and will run only if there is sufficient demand. It should also be noted that this is an additional subject to the six mandatory ones which form the IB Diploma; points scored in this subject do not therefore count for the Diploma, though a certificate for this will be awarded. Due to the heavy workload placed upon students opting for this course, careful monitoring occurs to ensure students’ other subjects do not suffer. Similarly, students may be guided off the course should it be felt it is impinging too heavily on other subjects.

Who this course is for Students of Further Mathematics should display both a strong interest in the subject and ability in problem solving skills. Students normally continue to study Mathematics, Engineering, or Physical Sciences at University. Some prior exposure to the material is required which is usually illustrated by a high grade at AS Mathematics. Students should have also scored well in the UK Mathematics Challenges and other Mathematics competitions.

70 Bangkok Patana School


Senior Studies

Curriculum Guide 2017/18

Bangkok Patana School 71


Bangkok Patana School 643 Lasalle Road (Sukhumvit 105) Bangna, Bangkok 10260 Thailand

72 Bangkok Patana School

Tel: +66(0) 27785 2200 Fax: 27785 2399 Email: admissions@patana.ac.th www.patana.ac.th

Senior Studies Curriculum Guide  

An overview of the Senior Studies curriculum at Bangkok Patana School

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you