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Eric Byrd Trio Jazz in June 6 p.m. Mike Rodgers Music at Village Square Café 6 p.m. Fitness with Soul Body 10:30 a.m. Tom Principato Band Jazz in June 6 p.m. Open Mic Music at Village Square Café 6 p.m. Blue Sky Puppet Show 10:00 a.m. Lauren Weiner & Julie Riffle Music at Village Square Café 6 p.m. Farmer’s Market Fitness with Soul Body 10:30 a.m. David Bach Consort Jazz in June 6 p.m. Blue Sky Puppet Show 10:00 a.m. Powell-Younger Project Music at Village Square Café 6 p.m. Farmer’s Market Fitness with Soul Body 10:30 a.m. Tongue in Cheek Jazz in June 6 p.m. Summer Sidewalk Sale begins Open Mic Music at Village Square Café 6 p.m. Blue Sky Puppet Show 10:00 a.m.

12 Tuesday

Blue Sky Puppet Show 10:00 a.m.  Mark Weinberg Music at Village Square Café 6 p.m. Independence Day Farmer’s Market Fitness with Soul Body 10:30 a.m. Beale Street Puppet Show 10:00 a.m. Scott Fulton Music at Village Square Café 6 p.m. Farmer’s Market

13 Wednesday

Fitness with Soul Body 10:30 a.m.

14 Thursday

Open Mic Music at Village Square Café 6 p.m. Beale Street Puppet Show 10:00 a.m. Vagabond Motel Music at Village Square Café 6 p.m. Farmer’s Market Fitness with Soul Body 10:30 a.m. Beale Street Puppet Show 10:00 a.m. Con Brio Trio and Chang Cole Duo Music at Village Square Café 6 p.m. Farmer’s Market Fitness with Soul Body 10:30 a.m. Open Mic Music at Village Square Café 6 p.m. Beale Street Puppet Show 10:00 a.m. The Dharma Bums Music at Village Square Café 6 p.m.

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CONTENTS

28

Vol. 350 No. 8 | June 24, 2016 Candle lighting 8:20 p.m.

COVER STORY: Reform in the Crosshairs

Local News 15 Brief

16 Kidney Foundation Takes Fundraiser to New Heights

Cover and top contents photo: ©istockphoto.com/kenlh; High cost contents photo: ©istockphoto.com/VIPDesignUSA

18 Har Sinai Lifelong Learning Program Is a Hit

20 Orlando Shooting Brings UMD Students Out of the Closet

International News

22 In Every Issue 6 14 35 37 44

The Seen You Should Know Worth The Schlep The Jewish View Amazing Marketplace

Opinion 7 8 10 13

Opening Thoughts Editorials From This View Your Say …

BOOKMARKED: The High Cost of Studying Abroad

26 New Plans to Protracted Mideast Conflict Surface

Society

39 The Community Page 40 Milestones 41 Obituaries

Baltimore Jewish Times (ISSN-0005-450X) is published weekly by Mid-Atlantic Media, 11459 Cronhill Drive, Suite A, Owings Mills, MD 21117. For subscription prices please call 410-902-2300. Periodicals postage paid at Owings Mills, MD and additional mailing offices. Postmaster: Send address changes to Baltimore Jewish Times, 11459 Cronhill Drive, Suite A, Owings Mills, MD 21117.

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Seen e Seen

Compiled from JTA reports

Heartfelt Show of Kindness from ‘Heartbroken’ Adam Levine Maroon 5 singer Adam Levine has offered to pay for the funeral for slain singer Christina Grimmie. Grimmie’s brother, Marcus, announced on June 13 in a post on his Facebook page that Levine — Grimmie’s coach on the sixth season of “e Voice” — had offered to pay for the cost of the funeral and flying her body home from Orlando, Fla., where she was killed June 10 by a deranged fan while she was signing autographs following a concert. He also said a GoFundMe page set up to help defray the costs of the burial had reached $100,000. “I found out this morning that Adam Levine personally called my mother and said he will pay for the funeral and her plane flight, and I was blown away,” Marcus Grimmie wrote. “Now a friend just told me to look at the GoFundMe page and I see it is at 100K. Words cannot express ... literally, I have no words.” In a Twitter post Saturday, Levine, who is Jewish, said he and his wife were “absolutely devastated and heartbroken” at the news of Grimmie’s death.

Rockin’ Jew’s Song Behind ‘Stairway to Heaven’ Lawsuit

6

Baltimore Jewish Times June 24, 2016

Grimmie, who lived in the Southern New Jersey town of Marlton, finished in third place on “e Voice,” the NBC reality singing competition. She had released two albums and remained popular with fans.

Fox Reporter Fired aer Slurring Jews, Mexicans Randy Wolfe

you,’ never said, ‘Can we pay you some money for it?’ It’s kind of a sore point with me.” Wolfe arranged a rock version of the Jewish hymn “Hineh Mah Tovu Umanaim” complete with Hebrew words, guitar solos and tempo changes. e song was featured on Spirit’s second album, “e Family at Plays Together,” in 1968. To celebrate the New Year in 1997, Wolfe and his 12-year-old son, Quinn, went swimming off the coast of Molokai, Hawaii. ey were caught up in a tidal wave, but Wolfe managed to push his son to safety before drowning. He was 45.

A Fox Sports sideline reporter has been fired for making racist and anti-Semitic comments on a live Facebook broadcast. In the broadcast on June 9 on Barstool Sports’ Facebook Live, Emily Austen, 27, said Jewish people are stingy and expressed surprise that a Mexican immigrant was a high school valedictorian because “I didn’t even know Mexicans were that smart.” She also made a stereotypical remark about ChineseAmericans. Citing an unnamed source with the Tampa Bay Rays, who Austen covers, Business Insider reported last Friday that Austen had been fired for the comments and will not appear on any future game broadcasts. Austen’s broadcast on June 9 included a rant about Jewish customers at an establishment where she worked in Boca Raton, Fla. “e way I used to talk to the Jews in Boca. … I just didn’t care,” she said. “ey would complain about everything.”

Levine: WikimediaCommons; Wolfe: Frans Schellekens/Redferns/Getty Images

In 1968, a new British band called Led Zeppelin was opening for the American psychedelic rock group Spirit on a U.S. tour. e headliner was fronted by a Jewish 17-year-old named Randy Wolfe, aka Randy California. Nearly 50 years later, a lawsuit filed on behalf of Wolfe, who died in 1997, alleges that Led Zeppelin stole the famous riff used in “Stairway to Heaven” from Spirit’s song “Taurus.” e federal copyright trial began last week in Los Angeles, with Led Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page and singer Robert Plant appearing in court. “I’d say it was a rip-off,” Wolfe told Listener Magazine in 1997. “And those guys made millions of bucks on it and never said, ‘ank

Adam Levine


of C d

Joshua Runyan Editorial Director

| Opening oughts

A Real Concern

Could a massacre similar to thegunning down last week of 49 patrons of the Pulse nightclub in orlando, Fla., happen here in Baltimore? No matter how much we might wish for the better, the answer is frighteningly yes, God forbid. e fact is, the terrorism corollary of “Where there’s a will, there’s a way” means that so long as there are people willing to risk their life to claim that of another, we will never be able to eradicate the threat of violence from our society. But that’s not really what the debate over gun control playing out over the airwaves and on our social media accounts is really about. If it were, we would have long ago abandoned the idea that a prime duty of government is to provide for the safety of its citizens. Rational people on either side of the debate accept on the one hand that 100 percent safety is unachievable and on the other that any policy that reduces the risk of casualties from a mass shooting is inherently worthy of consideration. At the center of just such a conversation sits the state assault weapons ban authored in part by Attorney General Brian Frosh back when he was a member of the Maryland legislature. Facing an upcoming decision by a u.S. district Court, the ban, which survived an earlier legal challenge, was modeled on a federal ban that expired in 2004. While the National Rifle Association argues the Maryland law presents too great a restriction of Americans’ Second Amendment

rights to “keep and bear arms,” Frosh looks to data indicating that as soon as the federal ban expired, mass shootings precipitously increased. one of the best ways to keep militarystyle weapons such as the Sig Sauer MCX used in orlando out of the hands of terrorists, his allies argue, is to make their purchase illegal. As you’ll read in this week’s JT, the Jewish community, as it does on so many issues, has a nuanced view — meaning consensus beyond agreeing that people should be safe is hard to come by. Both the Baltimore Jewish Council and the Jewish Community Relations Council of Greater Washington are in favor of assault weapons bans, and many rabbis, including Beth Am Synagogue’s daniel Cotzin Burg, are as well. But Edward Friedman, the editorin-chief of the NRA’s monthly Shooting Illustrated, happens to be orthodox, and Rabbi Ariel Sadwin, director of Agudath Israel of Maryland, notes that there is merit to both sides in the gun control debate. ere are “definitely plenty of people in the community who feel strongly about the need for protection,” he says. “At the same time, the availability of an assault weapon … is a real concern.” Clearly, we need to do more to prevent attacks such as the one last week. Equally clear is the constitutional right to own a gun. What that weapon may be and exactly who may own it are hopefully questions we’ll be able to sensibly and civilly answer in the weeks and months ahead. JT jrunyan@midatlanticmedia.com

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Editorials

No Easy Answers in Orlando Bloodbath

Omar Mateen’s massacre of 49 patrons at a gay nightclub in Orlando, Fla., appears to have touched more pressure points than any of the other well-known mass shootings in the last two decades. ere is the hate crime of homophobia. Then there is Mateen’s pledge of allegiance to the so-called Islamic State in the heat of his attack, raising the specter of a MuslimAmerican’s “self-radicalization.” ere was his everyday violent and erratic behavior, suggesting that mental illness played a role. And there was his easy access to and use of a military-style weapon — unnecessary for ordinary self-defense, hunting or an aernoon on the shooting range. While each of the foregoing issues is a cause for serious concern, it is simplistic to argue, “e answer is gun control” or “If everyone in that bar was carrying a weapon, this never would have happened.” Moreover, this does not appear to be a case of overseas terrorism and the threat

of radical Islam. Mateen apparently got everything he needed right here at home, just like several other well-known domestic terrorists. Similarly, it’s just not right to blame the carnage on a diagnosis of mental illness and to say that the solution is to mandate treatment for the mentally ill — as the gun lobby does in its opposition to common-sense gun laws. at argument ignores the problem of military-style weapon availability and stigmatizes those who live with chronic psychological conditions. And it ignores the fact that the overwhelming number of people with mental illness don’t go around shooting people. e massacre at the Pulse nightclub has sobered a country drunk of the heady progress the LGBT community has made in terms of acceptance, inclusion and same-sex marriage. e Orlando tragedy reminds us that there remain many at the

fringes of society who see violence as an effective means of opposing social or cultural progress. Add to that the reported FBI statistics that LGBT people are more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other group — more than African-Americans and more than members of the Jewish community — and we know we have a problem. Still, we don’t yet know why Mateen did what he did, and it is dishonest to pretend we do. But if all we do in this complex case is blame it on “all of the above” and wash our hands, then there is no chance for the kind of dialogue that is necessary to put a tragedy like this into perspective. No matter where one comes out on the underlying questions regarding the “why” of Mateen’s actions, we are le with the perplexing and chilling question: What can a society do to prevent people with strong beliefs and haunting demons from taking lives because of them? JT

Economic Support for Terrorism? Does foreign aid to the Palestinian Authority contribute to terrorism? An independent study in the United Kingdom suggests that it indirectly does, pointing to the P.A.’s much criticized policy of paying the salaries of people on the government payroll while they are serving time for terrorism. e pro-Israel community has been making just such an accusation for years. e recent report by the Overseas Development Institute adds a crucial voice to the analysis. According to the study, the evaluation of a $224 million grant by the U.K.’s Department for International Development (DFID) to pay for the expansion of the Palestinian civil government workforce “suggests that people who know their families will still receive their salary and that they will have a job waiting for them aer time in jail have less reason to avoid committing a violent act.” One big caveat is that much of that 13-year period covered by the report does not 8

Baltimore Jewish Times June 24, 2016

include the five-year period of the DFID grant. Nonetheless, two members of Parliament criticized the aid. Sir Eric Pickles, a Conservative lawmaker, said: “British taxpayers will be shocked to learn that we are helping to fund an equal opportunity employment policy for convicted terrorists.” And MP Joan Ryan, who chairs Labour Friends of Israel, called for an independent inquiry to make sure tax revenue is spent on building peace rather than “ending up in the pockets of convicted terrorists.” e British government is now investigating the issue. But the prospect of an increase in international criticism of P.A. practices raises the question of what the international community can do. e ODI study noted that “in the absence of donor support, a prospective collapse of the Palestinian economy would create acute adjustment costs, with an associated risk of an escalation in violence.” Put a different way: You think it’s bad now? Imagine how

bad things would be without the P.A. at’s actually a serious issue. Even with all of its problems, the P.A. is an internationally sanctioned body that cooperates with Israel on security measures, and it is the Palestinian address that Israel deals with in negotiations large and small. But while those functions are important, they cannot excuse encouragement and sanctioning of terror. Rather, the international community should vigorously insist that President Mahmoud Abbas make good on his public promises to stop salary payments to terrorists. A peace breakthrough may not be in the cards at this time. But it should be possible to raise the economic consequence of committing an act of terror, and it is not unreasonable to demand that the P.A. do its part to help achieve that result. is is another instance where actions speak louder than words. JT


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From is View | Lisa Armony

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Baltimore Jewish Times June 24, 2016

UC Irvine Actually Safe Space for Jews The Jewish sTudenTs at the university of California-irvine and our supporters took a strong stand this month, showing our campus community that we will not be intimidated or allow our vocal support for israel to be stifled. Last month, a pro-israel event sponsored by the uC irvine student organization, students supporting israel (ssi), with support from hillel, was targeted by anti-israel protestors on the uCi campus. A dozen students had gathered in a classroom to watch the Jerusalem u film, “Beneath the helmet.” e program was meant to inform young people how their contemporaries in israel prepare physically, mentally and emotionally for the awesome task of protecting their country. A screaming mob disrupted the screening, tried to force their way into the room and chased one student into hiding aer she had been caught outside when the protestors arrived. Our students and staff had to be protected by campus police. how ironic that at a sight intended for learning, anti-israel students tried to shut learning down. rough bullying masquerading as social justice, they sought to make a statement that engagement with israel will be met with harassment and intimidation. e incident made news. it scared some people. And it made people question whether pro-israel students can safely hold events on their own campus. ree weeks later, the campus and broader communities made

a statement of a different kind. More than 400 students, alumni and Jewish community members gathered for a rescreening of “Beneath the helmet” at the uCi student Center, on an evening that will be remembered as truly special. idF Cmdr. eden Adler, featured in the film, attended the event and shared his personal story with the audience. we were joined by colleagues and friends from many other organizations who partnered with us on this event, including Chabad of uCi, standwithus, hasbara Fellowships and the secure Community network of Jewish Federations of north America. while the first screening was met with hostility, the rescreening, nearly 40 times bigger, was peaceful and celebratory. Our messages that night were clear. e community and the university will not allow our students’ right to engage with israel on campus to be curtailed. Freedom of speech and assembly, and the rights to inquire and learn, are fundamental values of uCi that belong not to only some students, but to everyone. Most important, our students stated forthrightly that despite the egregious incident of May 18, they feel safe at uCi. ey implored audience members to send their children and grandchildren to uCi in order to grow and strengthen the community of students connected to israel. JT

Lisa Armony is executive director of Hillel Foundation of Orange County and director of the Rose Project of Jewish Federation & Family Services.


Sean Durns

| From is View

The Greatest Threat to Palestinian Arab Youth On May 19, e Hill, a Washington-based newspaper covering Congress, other governmental agencies and related activity, published a one-sided, anti-Israel op-ed entitled “Obama must act to protect Palestinian youth” by Brad Parker of Defense for Children International-Palestine. Parker claimed a special envoy for Palestinian children would “ensure that Palestinian children’s rights are not abused.” His commentary obscured the greatest threat to Palestinian arab youths: manipulative Palestinian leaders promoting anti-Jewish incitement. Parker claimed “recent violence” is due to “hopelessness” Palestinian youth feel over Israel’s “violent military occupation.” He omitted the fact that

the overwhelming majority of Palestinian-Israeli violence since September 2015 has consisted of arabs attacking Israelis, including children, with rocks, vehicles, knives and guns. Hamas, the U.S.-designated terrorist group ruling the Gaza Strip and whose charter calls for the destruction of Israel and genocide of Jews, disagrees with Parker’s assessment. Hamas leader Ismail Haniyeh said as much in a speech at a rally on Jan. 19: “is intifada is not the result of despair. is intifada is a jihad, a holy war fought by the Palestinian people against the Zionist occupation,” meaning Israel, which unilaterally withdrew from Gaza in 2005. Excusing Palestinian anti-

Jewish violence as the result of “despair” over the lack of a Palestinian state, Parker omitted that Palestinian leaders have consistently rejected U.S. and Israeli offers of a “two-state solution.” Instead, the P.a. and Hamas have continued anti-Jewish incitement — frequently encouraging children to perpetrate violent acts. Palestinian children’s TV shows teach “there is no Israel” and Jews are the “most evil among creations, wretched pigs.” In its March report entitled “Educating the next Generation,” the Mideast Freedom Forum, a German-based think tank, found that Palestinian school textbooks “consistently portray Jews in a strongly negative manner,” deny the existence of

Israel and are awash with antiSemitic stereotypes. In an article professing to advocate on behalf of Palestinian children, Parker failed to acknowledge the use of Palestinian children as human shields by groups like Hamas. If Parker wants to “ensure that Palestinian children’s rights are not abused” he should speak to Palestinian leaders. But it’s doubtful he would find a willing reception. It’s unfortunate that e Hill, forgoing fact-checking, chose to give Parker’s unsubstantiated screed a platform. JT

Sean Durns is a media assistant for the Washington D.C., office of CAMERA, the 65,000-member, Boston-based Committee for Accuracy in Middle East Reporting in America.

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Baltimore Jewish Times June 24, 2016


Your Say … Question Off Target Before the JT publishes a poll question it should do some research to see if the question is even relevant. Anyone who responded “yes” to the June 17 question, “Do you believe that either federal or state officials should ban the sale of assault weapons?” clearly is not versed on the facts of this issue. To begin with, assault weapons, most accurately defined as weapons with high-capacity magazines and the capability to fire multiple bullets with one pull of the trigger, have been banned for civilian use on the federal level for many decades with very few exceptions. That federal ban carries over to the state level as well. In October 2013, the state of Maryland passed the Firearms Safety Act of 2013 that also banned the sale of semiautomatic rifles if they were cosmetically similar to the already-banned assault rifles by having a folding stock or a flash suppressor. In addition, the sale and purchase of a magazine with a capacity of more than 10 rounds became illegal in Maryland. is law was successfully challenged in court, and the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit said that the ban on semiautomatic weapons and

high-capacity magazines should be subject to strict scrutiny, not intermediate scrutiny, because they “are in common use by lawabiding citizens.” The court acknowledged that the state has a right to limit the use of or ban citizen possession, sale or transfer of “dangerous and unusual” weapons (such as hand grenades), but the weapons and ammunition barred by the 2013 law did not fall under that provision. e fact is that there is no meaningful difference between a legally sold/purchased civilian AR-15 and a hunting rifle. In

fact, the AR-15 is chambered for a .223 caliber round whereas many hunting rifles are chambered for .30-30 or .308 caliber rounds, which are significantly more powerful. Banning assault weapons has already been done. Can we please find a real solution? Joshua Gurewitsch Pikesville

Of Modesty, Handshakes With regard to the comment if the JT’s June 17 editorial “Of Swiss Handshakes, Restricted Swimming,” comment that “many

observant Jews will decline a handshake from someone of the opposite sex out of modesty”: Modesty is an arbitrary, subjective criterion, lacking dispositive validity. Halachically, according to Rambam, only libidinal physical contact between the sexes is prohibited. Anecdote: When an Orthodox rabbi of my acquaintance was apprised that a colleague “does not shake hands,” his spot-on response was: “What then does he shake?” Issachar Friedmann Baltimore

POLL OF THE WEEK:

As talk about potential challengers to Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu heats up, do you believe a new prime minister would be more likely to conclude a peace deal with the Palestinian Authority? To vote, visit jewishtimes.com/polls

LAST WEEK’S QUESTION: Do you believe that either federal or state officials should ban the sale of assault weapons?

Letters Policy: Letters to the editor reflect the opinions of our readers. e JT will run only letters directly related to an article published in the print or online editions. Letter writers must currently reside in Maryland, be from Maryland or subscribe to the JT. Send letters to editor@jewishtimes.com. e JT will not publish letters sent via U.S. post.

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YOU SHOULD KNOW … Ben Sigelman

Why did you start B-more KIDSTRONG? Kids are losing a lot of their 14

motor skills [sitting around] playing video games and watching TV, and with the program I’m running, I’m trying to change the culture of what’s going on. I really wanted to institute a new program that’s not out there. All these schools in Baltimore County are starting to lose their gym programs, and even if they have them, they’re oen not teaching kids about physical education. What’s behind the B-more KIDSTRONG concept? I had great and talented coaches and mentors, especially my dad. And I wanted to give the knowledge they gave me to the kids out there. To pass on all that’s inspiring, motivating — all the developmental approaches they’ve given to me, like how to be a well-rounded good individual. How does physical activity accomplish this? With a soccer ball or anything, it’s about the effort you put into it, it’s about establishing goals. I’ll give [kids] a skill, but they can establish the goals — short term, like getting just through a class, and long term, like learning to juggle a soccer ball. ey’re going to be working as a team, and they’re going to be working with other people their entire lives. So it’s important for them to learn how to share, love and care for other people when they’re young. What are the classes like? A typical class is first they get

Baltimore Jewish Times June 24, 2016

to hang out with each other, socialize. From there we’ll start with a warm-up game, and then we’ll go over a skill or strength for the day. We’ll learn a new movement. But it’s about really learning the movement first, learning what your body is doing and why it’s doing it. en we do a workout — four minutes to 30 minutes, it’s always changing — and finish with a cool-down game or a stretch. ere are different ways of learning and I use tell-showtell-go. So it’s visual, auditory, kinesthetic, linguistic — I’m hitting every style of learning so that everybody has the same foundation to learn from.

Nobody is going to be le behind. Everybody is treated fairly. Why do you love about your work? I get to wake up every day with a smile on my face knowing that I’m giving these kids a bright future. I can be having the worst day, but when I go to work, the kids are coming at you wholeheartedly. ey don’t care what happened five minutes ago; they’re there in the moment. e best thing in the world is, honestly, what they give to me, and that’s happiness. I love watching them learn. at’s the best part. JT mgerr@midatlanticmedia.com

Photo provided

To Pikesville native Ben Sigelman, 25, a soccer ball isn’t just a piece of sports equipment to kick around on a field, it’s representative of the personal development — physical, intellectual and creative — that’s possible for a young person to attain and integrate into all areas of his or her life. Sigelman is deeply committed to passing on the knowledge and care he received from coaches and mentors to the young people he works with and show them why confidence, dedication and motivation cultivated through sports is so worthwhile. He gained experience as a counselor for five years at the McDonogh All Sports Camp and also at Lil’ Kickers soccer for kids. en, aer completing his associate’s degree in business administration about two-anda-half years ago, he started B-more KIDSTRONG — where his clients might range from 18 months to 18 years — teaching physical literacy. He offers his programs to schools as well and just finished up a session at Beth Tfiloh Dahan Community School’s elementary school. JT caught up with Sigelman in between classes at Bare Hills Racquet and Fitness Club in the Nevermore CrossFit box, where he teaches one-hour classes aer school (or aer camp during the summer) for kids.

Story and photo by Melissa Gerr


« Local Brief

Handcrafted Solid Hardwood Amish Made Furniture for every room in your home. Open Monday thru Saturday year-round. Visit our website to see our new collections. Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz (holding scissors) marks the opening of a new 1.2-mile section of Owings Mills Boulevard.

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County Opens Final Owings Mills Boulevard Extension Baltimore County officially opened the final extension of Owings Mills Boulevard on ursday, June 16, completing the long-awaited connection between Owings Mills and the Liberty Road corridor. In his speech at the ribboncutting ceremony, Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz said, “If you think about it, life is really about connections — your family, your friends, your faith community, your job. I like to think of this final phase of Owings Mills Boulevard as being like the LinkedIn of roads.” is new section of the roadway is 1.2 miles, connecting Winands Road to Liberty Road (Route 26) at Live Oak Road. e significance of this connection is not lost on the local community. By joining existing portions of Owings Mills Boulevard to Liberty Road, the full 3.8-mile road now serves as a direct connector from Reisterstown Road to Liberty Road. “In addition to the important economic benefits of linking these two business and residential

communities, this extension will help relieve traffic congestion on neighborhood streets and provide for future road capacity,” Kamenetz added. A $13 million construction project, Owings Mills Boulevard Phase II accounted for the parking needs of businesses and residents and further updated the local infrastructure with new landscaping, paving, stop lights, signs and roadside lamps. The new section of road itself includes four lanes, a raised median and paths for both pedestrians and bicyclists. Additionally, Phase II boasts a two-span, 250-foot-long bridge crossing Scotts Level Branch stream. “is is a very good time to live, work and drive in Owings Mills and Randallstown. It’s wonderful how every year these communities shine just a little brighter — attracting new people, new businesses and new enthusiasm,” Kamenetz said. e newly completed route is a part of Baltimore County’s $30 million investment in growing the Randallstown area since 2008. — Daniel Nozick

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Kidney Foundation Takes Fundraiser to New Heights

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n a world with constant warnings about bizarre health risks such as the Zika virus and Ebola, some of the most common and dangerous ailments can be overlooked. One such ailment is kidney disease, the ninth-leading cause of death in the United States. More people die from kidney disease than from breast cancer, prostate cancer or leukemia. Nearly 50 percent of Americans will develop kidney disease in their life, a statistic that is increasing as diabetes and high blood pressure become more prevalent health issues as well. e National Kidney Foundation of Maryland (NKF-MD) has been actively advocating kidney health since 1955, officially joining the National Kidney Foundation in 1964. According to its mission statement, the NKF-MD “is dedicated to preventing kidney and urinary tract diseases, improving the health and well-being of individuals and families affected by these diseases, and increasing the availability of all organs for transplantation.” On June 25, the National Kidney Foundation of Maryland will be putting on its seventh annual Rappel for Kidney Health event at the Hyatt Regency in Baltimore from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Unique to Baltimore, the event is an opportunity for members

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Participants in June 25’s Rappel for Kidney Health will rappel from the top of the 15-story Hyatt Regency roof down to the pool deck.

of the community to raise awareness and money for kidney health and get screened. Since its inception, the Rappel for Kidney Health event has raised more than $676,000. Rappel for Kidney Health will be providing entertainment throughout the day, including face-painting, a DJ, carnival games and various raffles. Additionally, the event will offer free screenings to promote kidney health, which entail blood pressure, sugar and creatinine readings. e biggest draw and fundraiser of

Baltimore Jewish Times June 24, 2016

the event is rappelling. Each year, participants form teams to raise money for kidney health. Each team tries to attain a goal of $1,000, which, when achieved, earns the team’s participants the right to rappel from the top of a building. is year, participants will be making their way from the 15-story roof of the Hyatt Regency to the deck of the pool below, where friends, family and guests will cheer on those making the descent. Every year, members of Baltimore’s Jewish community

participate in the event. One such denizen is Jordan Levine, who has been actively working to raise awareness for kidney health since having his personal life affected. “I hadn’t even given kidneys a second thought until my son was born with only one,” said Levine, a board member of NKF-MD. He was further influenced when his brother was in a serious car accident and experienced renal failure. Since then, both of Jordan’s relatives have stabilized and are in good

Screenshot of http://kidneymd.kintera.org/faf/home/

I

By Daniel Nozick


Screenshot of http://kidneymd.kintera.org/faf/home/

health. ese days, it is their turn to watch Jordan put himself in “danger.” However, Levine notes that the members of Over the Edge, the rappel company that helps put on this special event, “do a tremendous job of making you feel comfortable.” is is the second year that he will be rappelling. Between this year and last year, Levine’s team alone has raised nearly $4,000. Another Baltimore resident who will be participating is former District 11 delegate Jon Cardin, who found out about Rappel for Kidney Health through a family friend, Amy Greten. e catalyst for Greten’s involvement with Rappel comes from a family history of polycystic kidney disease, which necessitated her having a liver/kidney transplant.

A thrill-seeker himself, Cardin is attending Rappel for Kidney Health both to support Greten and to rappel himself if he raises enough funds. He recounts that by rappelling to support friends and family affected by kidney disease “not only did [Amy] raise a lot of money, but she overcame a fear of heights as well.” Cardin supports a variety of nonprofits, having participated in the Special Olympics’ Polar Bear Plunge 16 times in addition to fundraising and attending events for the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, the American Heart Association and the American Diabetes Association. To raise further money for kidney disease, this year’s Rappel for Kidney Health event will feature the second annual Toss Your Boss Challenge, in which

“I HADN’T EVEN GIVEN KIDNEYS A SECOND THOUGHT UNTIL MY SON WAS BORN WITH ONLY ONE.” — Jordan Levine

employees from local businesses raise money to send their bosses over the edge. NKF-MD officer Jenny Trostel assures that this year’s event is guaranteed to be “the coolest thing around.” JT

Mid-Atlantic Media editorial director Joshua Runyan rappels on Friday, June 24 as part of Toss Your Boss. dnozick@midatlanticmedia.com

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Har Sinai Lifelong Learning Program Is a Hit Local News »

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Baltimore Jewish Times June 24, 2016

new program offered at Har Sinai Congregation has attracted a loyal following among community members interested in continuing their education. e program is called SPICE, which stands for “Social Interaction, Personal Growth, Intellectual Development, Cultural Stimulation and Educational Enrichment,” and it targets older adults who are interested in taking courses on a variety of topics. e synagogue hosted three programs in its first semester, which ran from March through May. e eight-week “Great American Music: Broadway Musicals” explored music from Broadway, much of which was created by Jewish composers. e two sessions of “Famous Jews Who Changed the World” focused on the works of Albert Einstein and Sigmund Freud. e programs concluded with the four-week “Muslims, Christians and Jews: Perceptions and (Mis)Understandings,” a series of discussions facilitated by scholars from the Institute for Islamic, Christian and Jewish Studies. Joseph DeMattos, president of Har Sinai, called the program the “brainchild” of some very involved members who reached out to synagogue staff to get the program off the ground. “What really excites me as Har Sinai president about SPICE is that it was organic, that the idea originated with

members,” he said. Har Sinai’s Rabbi Emeritus Floyd Herman, a former Jewish Chautauqua lecturer at Loyola University and a teacher of multiple “lifelong learning” programs at local colleges, says the program helps address the lack of these programs in the suburban area around Har Sinai in Owings Mills. Herman, who led the “Famous Jews Who Changed the World Sessions,” said one of the strengths of the program has been finding facilitators with a record of success in these programs. “We want to grow it and continue. We have the facilities, we can find the people to do the teaching, and it’s a good use of our building, it’s a good use of our time, and it’s an opportunity for people to learn and also to see what Har Sinai is all about,” he said. Har Sinai administrators who helped run the courses said some courses had regular attendances of 30 to 40 people, and the largest attendance they saw was around 60 participants. Jo-Ellen Unger, Har Sinai’s director of congregational learning, said that the administration realized that apart from regular services and religious school, the fact that Har Sinai does not run a preschool or day school meant that the building sat empty for most of the week. “We thought how wonderful it would be, first of all to have

File Photo

By Adam Barry


Compassionate. Innovative. Trusted.

File Photo

Har Sinai’s members put the SPICE program in motion.

people in the building, to have energy and excitement in the building and to provide for our members and members of the larger community,” she said. Unger said the feedback from members was overwhelmingly positive, with each program building its own loyal following. Synagogue members have already been reaching out to get information about the courses that will be offered in the summer and fall, she said. Barry Berman, a Har Sinai member of 38 years, attended all three programs in SPICE’s first semester and was enamored with the program. “It was all memorable, the music program was incredible,” he said. Berman said the programs brought him into the synagogue at times he would usually be away; he felt a greater engagement with the Har Sinai community. “It’s been a great experience … you walk in, write your check, pay for lunch or you bring your lunch, and you’re good to go,” Berman said, citing the program’s low cost and accessibility and engaging facilitators. When asked if he

would be coming back to SPICE, he said “Absolutely, I have already signed up for the next program.” In July, Susan Weis-Bolen of Susan’s Kitchen Vegetarian Cooking School will lead three sessions on juicing, soup making and vegetarian cooking. In August, Har Sinai will host “Reel Judaism,” which will be four separate showings of films with Judaic themes. e fall semester begins in September with a series on the Supreme Court taught by Loyola University professor and Supreme Court Historical Society trustee Jim O’Hara. In October, a series on the upcoming presidential election will begin, hosted by political commentator Barry Rascovar. e last program in the fall, beginning in November, will be “Bible Stories You Never Learned in Sunday School,” a take on lesser-known stories of the Bible. JT For more information about the SPICE program, contact Jo-Ellen Unger at 410-654-9393 or junger@harsinai-md.org.

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Adam Barry is an intern at the Baltimore Jewish Times.

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Local News »

ORLANDO SHOOTING

BRINGS UMD STUDENTS OUT OF THE CLOSET By Eliana Block

Zev Shields

Isabella Kalish

Chaim Kalish was celebrating the Shavuot holiday when Omar Mateen shot and killed 49 patrons at Pulse, a gay nightclub in Orlando, Fla. It took the 24-year-old student at the University of Maryland at College Park only 15 minutes aer the holiday ended to post a defiant response on Facebook: “I have a very BIG announcement to make. It is not an easy one. … I am transgender. I go by the name Isabella Maxine with She/Her pronouns.” About an hour later, it was Zev Shields’ turn: “Aer the tragedy of this past week in Florida, I’ve decided to officially, publicly come out,” wrote the 20year-old Maryland student and a friend of Kalish. “I am a proud, stalwart, openly bisexual person. In an ideal world, none of this should be a secret, a source of fear or shame. However, due to the hatred of some, it isn’t this way.” 20

Baltimore Jewish Times June 24, 2016

Josh Bloch


“lengthy” email. “My stomach was trying to escape my body because I didn’t know how they would respond,” he recalled, repositioning his ponytail and sipping from a cup of cold-brewed coffee. “I got incredibly lucky to have the family that I have.” Shields said his parents were nervous about his grandparents finding out and about people from his hometown of Baltimore, a community that he noted “had changed a lot to be less tolerant of the middle ground.” Bloch, who grew up in the heavily Orthodox Kemp Mill neighborhood in Silver Spring, was nervous about being socially ostracized aer coming out.

“They think it’s peer pressure, that it’s a phase. But being a man was a phase. Being a man was peer pressure to me.”

— Isabella Kalish

“My biggest fear was that I would lose a lot of my friends. I didn’t see that happen — not at all,” he said. e junior aerospace engineering student thought he might be bisexual when he was in 12th grade aer private discussions with friends. “I’ve always felt the attraction [to guys and girls], but I thought it was a normal feeling for straight people to have,” Bloch said, his voice unable to hide the thrill of going public. Kalish said she still has work to do with her family. “My family is really not happy about things. ey’ve

always seen me as an impulsive person,” she said, eyeing her bright blue nail polish. “ey think it’s peer pressure, that it’s a phase. But being a man was a phase. Being a man was peer pressure to me.” Part of the “180,” Kalish said, is that until November 2015 she was “very Orthodox and a [politically] staunch conservative.” e turning point came aer a heated argument with a friend in which Kalish criticized the idea of a person’s preferred pronouns. Her hurt friend approached her aerward. “I think it was just the way he approached me and I started to think, ‘Why am I so opposed to this? Why am I so closed to this?’” Kalish said. “I was stuck in a religious structure I didn’t really like.” e visual arts major said she hasn’t found a way to merge her Jewish and trans identities. She gave up celebrating Shabbat and keeping kosher within two months of starting hormone therapy. Bloch identifies as modern Orthodox, Shields as a “lazy modern Orthodox.” ey said they’ve been overwhelmed by the support they’ve received since coming out and joining Hamsa, Maryland Hillel’s LGBTQ and Allies student group. “We are all about student Jewish journeys, and we’re 100 percent supportive for students to come together and have an outlet to meet other students who are LGBT and allies,” said Maiya Chard-Yaron, Maryland Hillel assistant director. Kalish still worries about the first time she walks into Hillel wearing a skirt but knows that eventually she’ll stop caring. JT

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Aer contacting his friend Shields for a final boost of courage, 19-year old Josh Bloch posted his announcement moments later: “In light of the events in Orlando on Saturday night, I’ve decided that it’s time for me to publicly come out of the closet. … I’m bisexual.” e three friends had been putting off coming out. But in a little more than an hour, they had chosen the same way to show their solidarity and outrage aer the mass shooting in Orlando. “e goal of the shooting was to make us afraid, and we’re showing it didn’t work,” Bloch said in an interview later in the week. “It should make me more scared,” Kalish said. “But if I stayed in the closet, the religious zealots or the terrorists win. But I’ve been walking around like this,” she said, pointing to her multicolored necklace, Billabong purse and deep V-neck top, “and I still have to be careful.” “Once [Kalish] came out, it was a lot easier to come out,” Shields said. “It felt more like standing in arms [everyone coming out at once] than a trend.” Why had they waited until then to come out? Each had a reason. “I pushed it off at the request of my parents,” Shields said, “because there is the side of my family that is a whole lot less supportive.” Shields, a 20-year-old Silver Spring, Md., resident, realized he was bisexual when he was 15. He waited until the fall of 2014, just before he started the Israel Experience at Bar-Ilan University, to tell his parents in what he described as a

Be heard.

Email your le ers to the editor.

Eliana Block is an area freelance writer.

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Baltimore Jewish Times June 24, 2016

WITH THE COST of college tuition rising faster than the rate of inflation, Shlomo Lifshitz says he knows the solution: study abroad. Specifically, study using the services of Lifshitz’s Lirom Global Education, founded to encourage study in Israel. “More and more people cannot afford to pay the cost of tuition, which I think is ridiculous,” says Lifshitz, a longtime education and tourism marketer. “As a result, people are graduating with $100,000 in student loans, and what do you become — a line cook at Burger King or a waiter at Cheesecake Factory.” Lifshitz says Americans should study in Israel, which his company can facilitate “at much cheaper rates than most

U.S. universities.” “Israeli university presidents don’t go home with a paycheck of over a million dollars like in the States,” Lifshitz says when asked if tuition costs are cheaper in Israel. Before founding Lirom, Lifshitz ran Oranim Educational Initiatives, which sent tens of thousands of young people to Israel on guided tours and assisted with Taglit Birthright. Lirom offers academic gapyear programs, some of which offer 10 credits toward a bachelor’s degree, as well as summer programs in such areas as conflict resolution, archaeology, first-responder training and marine biology. Some 304,000 U.S. students studied abroad during the 201314 academic year, according to


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data by NAFSA: e Association of International Educators. e number represented just under 1.5 percent of all U.S. students enrolled at U.S. institutions of higher education. According to data from the Institute of International Education, six of the 10 top academic destinations are in Western Europe. “Will studying abroad save you money does not have a simple answer,” said Mark Shay, CEO of Abroad101, which provides a study abroad program evaluation tool to over 200 universities. “When people ask me this type of question, I generally say that in any consumer decision, you get what you pay for. In the United States, you can save money by going to

community college, but you lose out on all the benefits of a well-endowed university. When it comes to full degrees abroad, you can save a great deal in tuition by earning a bachelor’s or master’s degree overseas, and in many cases American students can get a federal student loan. In the you-getwhat-you-pay-for scenario, the value of that degree in the marketplace should be factored into that equation.” Abroad101 helps schools collect and share program information with prospective students through a creation of reports. “A student can enroll directly in a foreign university and take courses with the local students and in most cases save a great deal on tuition and

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even transfer that credit back to their home university,” said Shay. “Without the oversight of a provider, the vastly different teaching styles, living conditions and social norms may be hard to navigate, and that transcript may not be accepted, which is why many people elect to study abroad through third parties who take on the duty of care for that student. “Direct exchanges, coordinated through your home university, are a great way to bridge that unknown,” Shay continued. “You live in standard international student housing overseas and pay your home school tuition and will be assured the basic duty of care by your home university.” Based in Berkeley, Calif., Go Overseas, a study abroad provider, seeks to empower “more meaningful time overseas” for students. It includes a

“IN ANY CONSUMER DECISION, YOU GET WHAT YOU PAY FOR.” — Mark Shay, CEO of Abroad101

ratings and reviews system. e provider is a “millennialminded community [that] believes in creating a better world through travel and encouraging everyone they know to go on programs that include meaningful cultural exchange.” Prospective candidates are also offered volunteering and teaching options in various countries. Phoenix-based CEA Study

Abroad offers education programs for U.S. students looking to earn college credit from fully accredited programs to 13 countries. Its stated mission is to work closely with study abroad offices and international program departments across the United States and Canada. One of Lirom’s programs is offered through Israel’s

College of Law and Business, which costs about $48,000. e first year is in English with the second and third years being half-Hebrew and halfEnglish. In the fourth year, students may choose to take a four-month course and sit for the New York or California state bar exams, earning a bachelor of law degree from Israel, Lifshitz says. Or a student could finish his or her last semester at Chicago’s Kent College of Law or the Fordham University School of Law and earn a master of law degree. “And it’s affordable,” Lifshitz says. “ese bachelor’s degrees did not cause your parents to go bankrupt, and you did not cause yourself heavy, heavy loans.” JT jfeldschreiber@midatlanticmedia.com

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New PlaNs for Protracted Mideast coNflict surface By Justin Katz

Susie Gelman

Ilan Goldenberg

Michael Koplow

Nearly 50 years aer Israel gained control of the West Bank in the Six Day War, a nonpartisan movement of former Israeli senior security officials has joined with two American organizations to warn against the continuing presence of Israeli forces on land that Palestinians claim for a future state. “e status quo is an illusion, because the situation is getting worse every day,” said Susie Gelman, chair of the board of the Israel Policy Forum, quoting Amnon Reshef, founder of Commanders for Israel’s Security. Israel Policy Forum, which promotes a two-state solution to the Israel-Palestinian conflict, is advancing two plans developed by Reshef’s CIS and the Center for a New American Security, a Washington, D.C.-based think tank that aims to address the concerns of both Israelis and Palestinians. “Israelis need security, Palestinians need hope. ere are steps that can be taken now that can provide both,” said Gelman. (Gelman is a member of the ownership group of Mid-Atlantic Media, which publishes the Baltimore Jewish Times.) e CIS plan, called Security First, offers actions Israel can take in the short term to ensure its security in the absence of negotiations with the Palestinians. It recommends that Israel complete its security barrier around the West Bank and stop construction of Jewish settlements outside the barrier. e CNAS plan, Advancing the Dialogue: A Security System for the Two-State Solution, focuses on how Israel can withdraw from the West Bank without repeating

Gelman and Koplow: Israel Policy Forum; Goldenberg: Center for a New American Security; Map: ©iStockphoto.com/pop_jop

International News »


Gelman and Koplow: Israel Policy Forum; Goldenberg: Center for a New American Security; Map: ©iStockphoto.com/pop_jop

the mistakes it made in its unilateral withdrawal from Gaza in 2005. “Too oen you hear from Israelis that if [they] walk out of the West Bank, it’ll just become Gaza. at’s sort of the shutdown [of the debate],” said Ilan Goldenberg, director of the Middle East security program at CNAS. “We’re saying it doesn’t have to be that way.” Goldenberg’s plan includes elements that the Gaza pullout lacked: a regional and border security system, an internal Palestinian security system and a drawn-out Israeli redeployment. e redeployment would be monitored by a panel including American, Israeli and Palestinian representatives. He added that while Palestinians will not accept Israel taking unilateral action, a secondary deal can exist in which the United States would diplomatically support certain unilateral Israeli moves. However, the plan’s goal is to create enough layers of security that unilateral action would never become necessary. Michael Koplow, policy director for IPF, emphasized the plans do not require a change in Israel’s government nor do they attempt to back any opposition political leaders. “e current government has said it supports two states, and we take the prime minster at his word on that,” said Koplow. “We think that the CIS and CNAS plans can be implemented with any government, le or right.” But the dynamics between governments do matter, Goldenberg said. He believes Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas both support the idea of

a two-state solution, but their versions of what it looks like don’t necessarily overlap enough to see it through. “More than anything, you’re asking two risk-averse politicians who don’t trust or like each other to take this huge career and life risk, and they’re just not going to do it together,” said Goldenberg. “e dynamics do need to change.”

“We think that the plans can be implemented with any government, left or right.”

— Michael Koplow, Israel Policy Forum

at, coupled with the strained relationship between Netanyahu and President Barack Obama, only adds to the challenge. e unfavorable political realities, Gelman said, have caused some to question why Israel Policy Forum is promoting the two-state solution. “I think anyone who cares about Israel has to do everything possible to preserve Israel’s future as a Jewish, democratic and secure state,” said Gelman. “If you accept the premise that the two-state solution is the only solution, then we all have to do everything we can, despite the current political realities, to offer a different way forward.” JT jkatz@midatlanticmedia.com

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27


Cover Story »

REF RM IN THE CROSSHAIRS

F

aith leaders, policymakers and experts in the

greater Baltimore and Washington regions are refusing to stay silent more than one week aer the largest mass shooting in recent history. Whether or not Congress passes legislation this week restricting known terrorists from purchasing guns, the prevailing view among most Jews is that some form of restriction on gun purchases is in order when it comes to preventing tragedies such as the June 12 massacre in an Orlando, Fla., nightclub that le 50 dead, including the gunman. Maryland currently has a state assault weapons ban in effect, but it is undergoing its second legal challenge

28

Baltimore Jewish Times June 24, 2016

in district court. Meanwhile, the Orlando attack has led many to call for the reinstatement of the 1994 Federal Assault Weapons Ban that prevented the manufacture and sale of semiautomatic weapons for civilian use. e ban expired in 2004, and while there have been attempts to reinstate it, none have been successful. e Jewish Community Relations Council of Greater Washington in 2011 put out a policy statement calling for the reinstatement of this law following a rise in the number of mass shootings, said executive director Ron Halber. “ere was no reason why the man who committed that act of terror in Orlando should have been able to get his hands on [an assault weapon]” he said, referring to

Libit: Marc Shapiro

By Daniel Schere and Marc Shapiro

Main illustration: ©istockphoto.com/Andrey_Kuzmin; Flag background: ©istockphoto.com/govsum; Top illustration: ©istockphoto.com/Jamie Farvant

Gun violence spurs call for state, federal action


“Now is not the time to roll back any reasonable gun restrictions that are already in place.”

Libit: Marc Shapiro

— BJC executive director Howard Libit

killer Omar Mateen’s purchase of the Sig Sauer MCX assault weapon two weeks prior to the shooting (Mateen also used a handgun that he had purchased at the time). “ere is no reason at all that people on the terrorist list should have access to weaponry. at’s just illogical. I don’t know how anybody can defend that position.” Halber said he detects frustration among members of the public who are desperate for action in the wake of the Orlando shooting and the many tragedies that preceded it. He emphasized that the JCRC is not calling for an outright ban on firearms for the use of protection or hunting, but the elimination of “military-grade” weapons from the public’s possession is a rational step. Like the JCRC, the Baltimore Jewish Council also supports banning semiautomatic weapons. Executive director Howard Libit said the BJC has a history of supporting gun control legislation, including during the 2013 legislative session when the organization supported several new laws that were

proposed aer the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in Newtown, Conn., that took the lives of 20 children. “We certainly think that now is not the time to roll back any of the reasonable gun restrictions that are already in place in Maryland. at would be going the wrong direction,” he said. “And we’re paying close attention to what’s happening in Congress right now and certainly salute the efforts that a number of senators have made, including ours, to try and push for some greater federal steps.” In addition to the Jewish advocacy arenas of both cities, rabbis are also speaking out. e rabbinic community as a whole has not taken one formal position on gun control, and it may be because, as Agudath Israel of Maryland director Rabbi Ariel Sadwin said, assault weapons haven’t been widely discussed in terms of Halachah. “To say there is a position within the community here and even broader, Agudath Israel of America, I don’t

believe they’ve had too many statements on gun control because it’s not like we are against all guns,” he said. Sadwin said like with many hot-button issues, the Orthodox community oen can see merit to both sides in the gun control debate. “[ere are] definitely plenty of people in the community who feel strongly about the need for protection especially in a period of time that the Jewish community has seen continued safety issues, and

there are definitely people in the community who feel there should be added protections and stuff like that,” he said. “So it’s hard to go and take a position, as some in politics will say, to completely overhaul gun control. At the same time, the availability of an assault weapon, the likes of which can go carry out a disaster like happened in Orlando, is a real concern.” But Rabbi Daniel Cotzin Burg of Beth Am Synagogue, who serves on the board of jewishtimes.com

29


“[There are] definitely plenty of people in the community who feel strongly about the need for protection.”

30

and gun ownership in this country that when something tragic like this terrorist attack in Orlando occurs, we’re so conditioned as Americans to say, ‘Well, that has nothing to do with guns.’ But, of course, it has everything to do with guns,” Cotzin said. “Tel Aviv just had a shooting — a terrorist attack — a week and a half ago, and what was surprising about that attack was it was done with guns. Most of the terrorist attacks in Israel have been done with knives because in Israel it’s hard to get guns.” When Adas Israel Congregation Associate Rabbi Aaron Alexander arrived in Washington last year, one of his mandates was to better engage the congregation’s social action committee. He did so by first asking congregants what issues were most important to them, one of which was gun control. “When the consequences are life or death we have an obligation to fight as hard as we can for policies that preserve life and dignity,” he said. “We’re going to have a voice, and our voice is not just going

Baltimore Jewish Times June 24, 2016

to be to scream or yell or pray. Our voice is going to be to change tragedies that happen in this country every day.” Alexander is not yet sure what Adas Israel’s on-the-ground efforts will be, but he has experience in community organizing from a previous role in Los Angeles, where he served on the clergy caucus of LA Voice PICO — an interfaith advocacy group. “We’re in the midst of training our leadership to be effective organizers,” he said. “ere are a lot of people out in the world who want to do something and we have learned that groups are effective when they are part of something bigger.” Alexander said it was “shocking” that Congress took

no action related to gun legislation aer the Sandy Hook shootings. He called last week’s 15-hour filibuster by Senate Democrats on gun control a “God-inspired act.” “Sometimes, we get so bogged down in the intricacies of the Second Amendment, we’re no longer able to see beyond the forest to the bigger picture.” Alexander acknowledged that the Torah does provide a case for owning a gun by spelling out a right to self-defense, but he said in today’s world the most wellintentioned gun owners can cause devastating side effects simply by being enablers. “If you think about domestic violence and suicide, a gun in the home raises the possibility

Frosh: Dayna Smith

Jews United for Justice, believes Halachah can be interpreted to be against assault weapons. “Halachah exists to guide us in how we’re to live our lives as Jews and how societies should be ordered,” he said. “We are to do just about everything we can in order to preserve life and save lives, so weapons that exist whose purpose is solely to take lives — that we know in the hands of civilians are much more likely to take innocent lives than they are to protect innocent lives — I think Halachah would frown on assault weapons in nonmilitary personal hands.” He said that the United States’ obsession with gun ownership, as well as increasing xenophobic, racist, homophobic and misogynistic rhetoric, is a “dangerous and deadly cocktail.” “One of the great tragedies of the current perspective that some Americans have on gun ownership is that instead of using, in moderation, weapons that are designed for sport, for hunting or even perhaps for protection, we have so fetishized weapon ownership

Sadwin: Justin Tsucalas

— Rabbi Ariel Sadwin, director, Agudath Israel of Maryland


“The reason we banned [assault weapons] in Maryland is because they’re totally unnecessary or ill-suited for anything other than the police the military. The idea that you need to be able to fire off 15 shots really fast for hunting is crazy. It’s not necessary. It’s not sportsmanlike.”

Frosh: Dayna Smith

— Maryland Attorney General Brian Frosh

that someone will do harm to themselves or others,” he said. “If the gun is not in the home, there is a much better chance someone will survive either their lowest moment of depression or someone close to them.” It is not directly from the Torah that the argument for gun ownership comes, but rather the history of persecution that Jews have faced, explained Edward Friedman, editor-in-chief of the NRA’s monthly magazine Shooting Illustrated. “Part of what made me a believer in the Second Amendment was what the Jewish

people have gone through and the fact that we were, until the creation of the State of Israel, actually until the creation of the United States, never able to protect ourselves,” he told Washington Jewish Week last year. “In the U.S. it is individually, and in Israel it’s more collectively … there are people out there who spew violent hatred toward Jews and all too oen put that into action.” e right to owning a handgun in the home has been upheld several times by the Supreme Court, including in the 2008 decision District of Columbia v. Heller, in which the court

determined 5-4 that banning the registration of handguns or requiring the use of trigger locks to store them in the home violated the Second Amendment. e late justice Antonin Scalia wrote the majority opinion. Nathan Lewin, a Washington attorney who has worked on a number of Supreme Court cases and knew Scalia, said he thinks there are limits on the latitude that the Heller decision gives gun owners. “Beyond [handguns] I think courts have construed that as meaning that the legislature has the authority to go and regulate other forms of purchases, other forms of guns and ammunition,” he said. Lewin said he thinks measures such as background checks and an assault weapons ban would be permitted under

the Constitution. While these measures may stand the test of the law, there may not be the political will to enact them, Lewin said, while noting the influence of the National Rifle Association on the political sphere. “Although I’m not generally sympathetic to a lot of things the Obama Administration supports, I think legislation in this area is desirable,” he said, while noting that he thinks the larger issue is “Islamic terrorism.” Maryland is currently fighting its own legal battle to uphold an assault weapons ban that took effect on Oct. 1, 2013. e law, which was based on the Federal Assault Weapons Ban, outlawed 45 different weapons including the AR-15, which is similar to the weapon Mateen used. Gun owners who purchased the banned jewishtimes.com

31


“This is a no-brainer ... You have somebody on a terror watch list, they shouldn’t have firearms.”

32

Attorney General Brian Frosh said he thinks the ban will withstand this latest court challenge aer other circuit courts upheld similar laws in the states of New York and Connecticut. “It’s not that difficult,” he said. “ere are clear definitions as to what an assault weapon is in the law. If somebody brings us a case where you’ve got an AR-15 that’s sold in a store who’s not buying it for police purposes or military purposes, it’s a violation. … e reason we banned them in Maryland is because they’re totally unnecessary or ill-suited for anything other than the police, the military. e idea

Baltimore Jewish Times June 24, 2016

of the original policy and said he does not see how the Second Amendment would include assault rifles since they are not used for hunting and there is “no rational basis” for their use. He regrets not including a mental health component at the time, which, he said, is “very hard to legislate.” “You want to people to seek mental health counseling and so forth without limits, but at the same time you want to keep guns out of the hands of people who have the capacity to do harm. So how you define that prohibition is very challenging but important to do,” he said. Zirkin also co-sponsored a bill last year that would have barred gun sales from suspected terrorists — something he thinks is seriously lacking at the federal level. “You look at Washington and their failure to do even the most simple of things is embarrassing,” he said. “is is a no-brainer of an issue in my opinion. You have somebody

Rosenberg: file photo

weapons prior to this date were permitted to keep them. ere is no estimate as to how many people this includes. e ban faced its first legal challenge from the pro-gun community in 2014 and was upheld by U.S. District Court Judge Catherine C. Blake. But in February, they appealed the decision to the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, which ruled by a 2-1 vote among three judges that the case should be reheard in the same lower court under the “strict scrutiny” standard, meaning that the ban must “further a compelling governmental interest” in order for it to trump the Second Amendment.

that you need to be able to fire off 15 shots really fast for hunting is crazy. It’s not necessary. It’s not sportsmanlike.” Frosh said anyone carrying a banned weapon into Maryland from another state is subject to the same penalties as someone who obtained one illegally in state, which include a $5,000 fine and a prison sentence of three years or less for the first offense. e penalties increase for subsequent offenses and for criminals who use the illegally obtained weapon in carrying out the act. Frosh said the country at large remains in danger due to the lack of a renewal of the federal ban, and that has to do with politicians being “more responsive to the NRA than to the citizens.” “I think that in Maryland we’ve made ourselves safer by having an assault weapons ban, but until our neighbors do the same, everybody’s in peril,” he said. State Sen. Bobby Zirkin (DDistrict 11) was a co-sponsor

Zirkin: file photo

— State Sen. Bobby Zirkin


on a terror watch list, they shouldn’t have firearms.” e bill did not pass Maryland last year, but he expects it to come up again in the 2017 General Assembly session. Adding to the problem, Zirkin said, is the lack of communication from the FBI to state and local police about who is on the watch list. He said it is “self-evident” that all police officers should have access to the list. “I believe we will pass a bill, but again, unless the federal government does it, it doesn’t protect us,” he said. “It’s nothing more than a statement from the state.” However, Del. Sandy Rosenberg (D-District 41) believes passing a bill in Maryland would be more than a statement. “It has the potential to make a difference in Maryland because it would make it more difficult for someone who is on that list who is a suspected terrorist to purchase a gun in this state,” he said. “Passing the law here could create momentum to do so in other states and hopefully eventually to do

so at the federal level, where it would be most effective. And that’s the role that states oen play.” He also thinks the state’s assault weapons ban will stand. “Justice Scalia’s opinion makes it clear when he said — when he struck down the D.C. law — that the Second Amendment right is not an absolute right,” Rosenberg said. “at’s the case with all the other Bill of Rights protections. ese are not absolute rights. When we worked on this bill, as the legislature considered the bill, we were very aware of that — that we can impose reasonable restrictions — and I hope and think that the bill will be ultimately upheld by the courts.” Montgomery County Sheriff Darren Popkin said he too thinks the ban is in the public’s interest. Popkin, an Olney resident who attends Washington Hebrew Congregation and has served in law enforcement for more than 30 years, said the community he is in charge of is generally very safe. But over the years it has seen its share of gun violence, including a

series of shootings near Westfield Montgomery Mall earlier this year. Popkin’s tactical team was also called into action during the sniper attacks of 2002 that le 17 people dead including six in Montgomery County. “For anybody to think that an active shooter situation could not happen in our backyard is being naive,” he said.

Popkin said at the very least, there should be some additional background review of gun purchasers. “No fly, no buy,” he said. “If you are being looked at as a person for potential violence, there should be some restriction for purchasing a firearm.” JT dschere@midatlanticmedia.com mshapiro@midatlanticmedia.com

Rosenberg: file photo

“We can impose reasonable restrictions. I think [Maryland’s] bill will be ultimately upheld.” — Del. Sandy Rosenberg

jewishtimes.com

33


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Baltimore Jewish Times June 24, 2016

STRONG


Worth The Schlep The World of a Sofer

The Jewish Museum of Maryland hosts a lecture and workshop with the All American Synagogue that teaches participants the basic steps of creating a Torah scroll, inspecting a Torah, mezuzah and Tefillin and how to write in a Torah font. 1 p.m. 15 Lloyd St., Baltimore. Visit jewishmuseummd.org.

Monday 27

Interview Role-Playing

Jewish Community Services hosts a workshop in which participants build interview skills through roleplaying. For clients only. 5 p.m. JCS Park Heights Office, 5750 Park Heights Ave., Baltimore. Register by calling 410-466-9200.

Tuesday 28

Harborview Mishpacha Meet-Up

The Associated: Jewish Community

Federation of Baltimore hosts a get-together for Jewish friends and neighbors with two-minute FedTalks on downtown Associated programs. $10. 7:30 p.m. The Harborview Towers Club Room, 100 Harborview Drive, Baltimore. Visit associated.org/downtown.

Wednesday 29 JPW Happy Hour

The Associated’s Jewish Professional Women group hosts a happy hour for career-minded women to network, socialize and learn from one another. 5:30 p.m. Hyatt Place Baltimore Inner Harbor, 511 S. Central Ave. Visit associated.org.

Thursday 30

Family Farm Camp

Pearlstone hosts a long weekend retreat that includes farming, learning on Jewish and environmental topics and a Shabbat celebration. Runs through July 4. 5425 Mount

Gilead Road, Reisterstown. Visit bit.ly/1ZLOzcH.

Friday 1

PJ Shabbat

Baltimore Hebrew Congregation hosts a service for families with newborns to pre-kindergartenaged children, featuring music, a story and tzedakah. 6:30 p.m. 7401 Park Heights Ave., Baltimore. Visit baltimorehebrew.org.

Saturday 2

DIY Torah Study

Beth Am Synagogue hosts DIY Torah study. Free. 8:45 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. 2501 Eutaw Place, Baltimore. Visit bethambaltimore.org.

Sunday 3

Star-Spangled Spectacular

The BSO performs Tchaikovsky’s “1812 Overture” and Sousa’s “Stars and Stripes Forever” with dazzling fireworks. Gates open at 5 p.m. Performance at 8 p.m. $9-$18. Oregon Ridge Park, 13401 Beaver Dam Road, Cockeysville. Visit bit.ly/28JcHrm.

Monday 4

Fourth Pier Party at the Aquarium

The National Aquarium hosts an Independence Day celebration on Pier 3 featuring kids’ activities, music, a great view of Baltimore’s fireworks and food and drinks. 6:30 p.m. 501 E. Pratt St., Baltimore. Call 410-659-4230.

Wednesday 6 >> Watermelon Wednesdays

Beth El Congregation hosts children’s activities and watermelon at Patterson Park. Free. 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. 27 S. Patterson Ave., Baltimore. Visit bethelbalto.com.

Tuesday 5

Summer Nights on Park Heights

Clergy and educators from Baltimore Hebrew Congregation host current event discussions in BHC’s courtyard with snacks and cocktails. 6:30 p.m. 7401 Park Heights Ave., Baltimore. Visit baltimorehebrew.org.

Thursday 7

Rosh Chodesh Storytime

The Macks Center for Jewish Education hosts story time for kids ages 3 to 6. Includes a kosher, nut-free snack. 10 a.m. 5708 Park Heights Ave., Baltimore. Visit cjebaltimore.org.

Friday 8

Beach Shabbat

Baltimore Hebrew Congregation clergy lead a free Shabbat service in Bethany Beach. Services begin at 7 p.m. Come early and bring dinner or purchase food from Rosenfeld’s Jewish Deli. South Inlet Day Area, Delaware Seashore State Park, 27099 Coastal Highway. Visit baltimorehebrew.org.

Saturday 9 Tot Shabbat

Beth El Congregation hosts an interactive service for kids up to 5 years old and their families featuring song, prayer, puppets and Torah stories. 11:15 a.m. Visit bethelbalto.com.

To see a full calendar of events or to submit yours, visit jewishtimes.com homepage (submit calendar button on right) or send information to mshapiro@midatlanticmedia.com. Include a summary of the event and date, time, cost, address and a contact for additional information. Must submit at least two weeks prior to event date, not all events will appear in the print edition due to space availability. jewishtimes.com

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Sunday 26

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Baltimore Jewish Times June 24, 2016


Rabbi Tzvi Hersh Weinreb

| e Jewish View

A Second Chance

Parshat Beha’alotcha

I was In a total fog during my first year in high school. I entered a strange school, much larger than the one I had attended previously, and was not given the benefit of any orientation to the new environment. I struggled academically and socially. But I knew one thing: I liked to write, and I sought to learn how to do so. I learned that there was a special track in the English department for those who were interested in writing. I was turned down, but I persisted and made it my business to arrange for an interview with Joe Brown, the instructor for the journalism class. I will never forget Mr. Brown because he was impressed by my perseverance and gave me a second chance, explaining that many freshmen oen become overwhelmed by the novelty of their new environment and don’t always excel to their full potential. To this day, every time I put a pencil to paper or fingers to a computer keyboard, I think of Joe Brown. Parshat Beha’alotcha, we read of a group of people who, like me, were unable to fulfill their responsibilities the first time around. In their case, it was the mitzvah of bringing the Passover offering on the 14th day of the month of nisan, which they failed to do. For them, it was not the strangeness of a new school that prevented them from doing the mitzvah properly. Rather it was because “they were unclean, having

come into contact with a dead body, so that they could not keep the Passover on that day” (num. 9:6). “Unclean though we are by reason of a corpse, why must we be debarred from presenting the Lord’s offering at its set time with the rest of the Israelites?” (num. 9:7) ey persisted and insisted upon having the same benefits of the rest of the people. e Lord gave them a second chance. He told Moses that, forevermore in the history of the Jewish people, when individuals are faced with circumstances that prevent them from bringing the Passover offering in its proper time, “they shall offer it in the second month.” God, in His infinite mercy, gave a second chance, a kind of a do-over session, to a group of people who could have easily given up, but who did not want to be le out and therefore persevered in their search for a spiritual privilege. ere is so much to be learned from this story. although we cannot play God, we can certainly emulate Him and give others a second chance. we need not strictly enforce all of our rules but can recognize that there are circumstances in the lives of men that prevent them from doing the right thing the first time around and who therefore require a little "slack.” JT

Rabbi Tzvi Hersh Weinreb is executive vice president emeritus of the Orthodox Union.

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Baltimore Jewish Times June 24, 2016

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The Community Page FELLOWSHIP: Jews United for Justice’s Baltimore Jeremiah Fellows include (from left) Amanda Kushner, Sara Zisow-McClean, Lizzy Solovey, Gregory Friedman, Micah Brosbe, Rachel Kassman, Sam Novey, Gabriel Pickus, Lisa Firnberg, Gracie Greenberg, Elad Firnberg, Adina Potter Yoe and Ellen Brown. The participants took part in an eight-month program in which they learned about Baltimore through the lens of Judaism and justice; studied Jewish texts, traditions and history; and developed organizing and activism skills.

Snapshot: Courtesy of the Jewish Museum of Maryland, 1994.53.79.28; Fellowship: Bruria Hammer Photography; Pool Party: Rachel Millman; Quarry: Marc Shapiro

Out&About

POOL PARTY: The Goldfish Swim School opened its newest location in Owings Mills on Cronridge Drive. Reisterstown-Owings Mills-Glyndon Chamber of Commerce board chair Bob Frank (second from left) welcomed the swim school on Wednesday, June 15. From left: owner Michael Solarz, Frank, vice president of operations Sean Flanigan and general manager Zachary Healy.

ROCK AT THE QUARRY: The Brisket Brothers performed its mix of “home-cooked, well-seasoned blues, jazz, rock oldies and klezmer” at the Baltimore Jewish American Festival at Quarry Lake on June 19. The band includes frontman and guitarist the “Rockin’ Rabbi” Avraham Rosenblum and conga player Arnie Clapman.

|Snapshots| Guests chat after the groundbreaking ceremonies for the Beth Israel chapel wing, circa 1984. Can you identify anyone in this photo? Contact Joanna Church, 410-732-6400, ext. 226 or jchurch@jewishmuseummd.org. To see more of the Jewish Museum’s extensive collection and find out who has been identified in past photos, visit jewishmuseummd.org/tag/once-upon- a-time-2/. jewishtimes.com

39


Society » Births

Zisow

Erin (née Iwanicki) and Bradley Zisow are thrilled to announce the birth of their son, Ari Louis, on May 25, 2016. Ari is named in loving memory of his maternal great-grandfather, Angelo Piazza, his paternal great-grandfather, Louis Setren, and his paternal great-granduncle, Michael Mechlovics. Ari’s Hebrew name is Eliyahu Mechel. Proud bubbie, zaydie, Nonna and PopPop, are Marcie and David Zisow and Gail Piazza and Jim Iwanicki. Send submissions of births, engagements, weddings and anniversaries via email to mshapiro@midatlanticmedia.com or mail to Marc Shapiro, BJT, 11459 Cronhill Drive, Suite A, Owings Mills, MD 21117. Please send a stamped, self-addressed envelope for returning photos. Items will be selected and edited at the discretion of the editors.

SHARE YOUR GOOD NEWS where all your friends can see! Bar/Bat Mitzvahs, Births, Engagements, Weddings

Submit milestones to mgerr@jewishtimes.com or jewishtimes.com/milestones 40

Baltimore Jewish Times June 24, 2016

Society Notes

Reisterstown.com Launched e Reisterstown Improvement Association recently launched Reisterstown.com, an online destination for all that is happening in Reisterstown. is new website includes a guide to Reisterstown’s best restaurants and a shopping directory to advertise for local businesses. e community resources section and services directory profiles the area’s church and community groups, charities, elected officials and other organizations. Reisterstown.com functions as an app on mobile phones and tablets, and can add events to mobile calendars, provide instant directions and the latest community news and information.

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ADLER — On June 7, 2016, Lucille Adler (née Danenburg); devoted wife of Ira Adler; beloved mother of Roy Adler, Bradley Adler and Robin Greenspan; cherished sister of the late Saul Danenburg; adored daughter of the late David and Dena Danenburg; loving grandmother of Jeffrey and Sean Greenspan. Interment at Beth Jacob Anshe Veshear Cemetery, Rosedale. Please omit flowers. Contributions in her memory may be sent to the American Heart Association, P.O. Box 5216, Glen Allen, VA 23058-5216. CAPLAN — On June 16, 2016, Tillie Caplan (née Hochman); devoted wife of the late Stanley L. Caplan; dear mother of Caren (Keith) Pozanek; beloved sister of the late Frieda (Bernard) Potts and Irvin (Evelyn) Hochman; cherished daughter of the late Rose and Joseph Hochman; adored grandmother of Joshua Pozanek and Casey Pozanek; also survived by many loving nieces and nephews. Interment Arlington Cemetery, Chizuk Amuno Congregation North Rogers Avenue. Please omit flowers. Contributions in her memory may be sent to Mildred Mindell Cancer Foundation, 40 Stirrup Court, Baltimore, MD 21208. ENGEL — On June 11, 2016, Stanley Alvin Engel, beloved husband of Rona L. Engel (née Ricklin); devoted father of Cheryl (Jeffrey) Gramling, Alan (Mindy) Lipsey and Steven (Stacey) Engel; dear brother of Sheila Margolis and the late Paul Engel; devoted brother-in-law of Stephen Margolis and Lorraine Engel; adored son of the late Robert

and Ida Engel; dear son-in-law of the late Selma and Henry Ricklin; loving grandfather of Hannah, Benjamin and Daniel Gramling, Matthew, Joshua and Emily Lipsey, Cole, Sophia and Connor Engel; also survived by many loving nieces and nephews. Interment at Maryland Veterans Cemetery, Garrison Forest Road. Please omit flowers. Contributions in his memory may be sent to the Foundation Fighting Blindness, 7168 Columbia Gateway Drive, Suite 100, Columbia, MD 21046. FEDDER — On June 17, 2016, Elayne Fedder (née Gottesman); loving mother of Steven (Janet) Fedder, Lisa Fedder (Christopher Baer), and Richard Fedder (Robbie Lieberman); devoted sister of the late Jerry Gottesman; adored grandmother of William, Anna and John Fedder, Katherine Lieder and Jeannie Lieder, and Matthew, Daniel and Emily Baer; cherished daughter of the late Louis and Frances Gottesman; loving companion of Aaron Eldridge. Interment at Kesher Zion Cemetery, Reading, Pa. Please omit flowers. Contributions in her memory may be sent to the Jewish Community Center of Greater Baltimore, 5700 Park Heights Ave., Baltimore, MD 21215 or Jewish Home Assisted Living, 685 Westwood Ave., River Vale, NJ 07675. FLEISCHMANN — On June 16, 2016, Mark Fleischmann; beloved husband of the late Gail Fleischmann (née Feiges); loving father of Marlene Eichner, Ira Eichner, Milton Eichner and Harry Eichner; adored grandfather of Solomon (Rebecca)

Eichner; devoted son of the late Jacob and Dorothy Voloshen. Interment Oheb Shalom Memorial Park, Berrymans Lane. Please omit flowers. FOREMAN — On June 15, 2016, Olga Foreman (née Buchwald), 94, beloved wife of 72 years of Eugene “Buddy” Foreman; loving mother of Barbara (Arnold) Sindler, Alan (Randi) Foreman, Edward (Sally) Foreman and Brian (Isabelle) Foreman; cherished daughter of the late Eugene and Bertha Buchwald; beloved grandmother of Amy (Jack) Childers, Jodi (Tim) Gilmore, Alexander (Madalyn) Foreman, Adam (Anne) Foreman, Kevin Foreman, Steven Foreman, Jonathan Foreman, Abby Foreman and Jake Foreman; loving greatgrandmother of Noah Childers, Autumn Gilmore and Sydney Gilmore; Please omit flowers. Contributions in her memory may be sent to Baltimore Hebrew Congregation, 7401 Park Heights Ave., Baltimore, MD 21208 or the Cancer Institute at Saint Joseph Medical Center, c/o Patrica Bosse, 7601 Osler Drive, Towson, MD 21204. GOLBERG — On June 13, 2016, Kenneth Golberg; beloved husband of the late Marcie Arleen Golberg (née Hoffman); devoted father of Risa and Gary Langbaum, Larry and Molli Golberg, Arnold and Dorathy Golberg, Marc and Leslie Golberg, Claude and the late Phyllis Golberg Johnpoll, David and Robin Golberg and Amy and Richard Berg; loving grandfather of Lauren and Mark Tobias, Rachel and Shaun Elhai, Daniel Golberg, Debra Golberg, Sheri and Daniel Swope, William and Michelle Gol-

berg, Emily Golberg and her fiance Evan Meyer, Jennifer Johnpoll and Michael Fisher, Michael Johnpoll, Sara Johnpoll, Sandy Golberg, Samantha and David Pace, Alexander and Natalie Berg, Courtney Berg and the late Erin Johnpoll; loving great-grandfather of Jacob Tobias, Cameron Swope, Mackenzie Golberg, Dorian Johnpoll, Malachai Johnpoll and Eshiva Johnpoll; devoted brother of Ruth and Bernard Leibowitz and Marvin and Libby Golberg. Interment at Beth Jacob Cemetery, Finksburg, Md. Please omit flowers. Contributions in his memory may be sent to the Beth Jacob Congregation Scholarship Fund at Beth Tfiloh Congregation, 3300 Old Court Road, Baltimore, MD 21208. GOLDBLOOM — On June 8, 2016, Esther Molly Goldbloom (née Seidman); devoted wife of the late Aaron Goldbloom; beloved mother of Marie (Jay) Janney; cherished sister of the late Phyllis Smith; adored grandmother of Leana Janney; beloved daughter of the late Morris and Lena Seidman. Interment was private. Please omit flowers. Contributions in her memory may be sent to Love on a Leash Dog Rescue, P.O. Box 8471, Elkridge, MD 21075. KLITZNER — On June 15, 2016, Irving B. Klitzner; beloved husband of Evelyn Elaine Klitzner (née Forshlager); cherished father of Sandra (Kenneth) Kantor and Sam Klitzner; devoted brother of the late Frank Klitzner, Viola Oppenheim and Irene Merenbloom; loving grandfather of Fran Aden and Andrew Kantor; jewishtimes.com

41


adoring great-grandfather of Chase and Mackenzie Aden. Interment at Shaarei Tfiloh Cemetery, 5800 Windsor Mill Road. Please omit flowers. Contributions in his memory may be sent to the charity of your choice.

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LEVIN — On June 10, 2016, Sharon D. Levin (née Gurewitz); devoted wife of Sylvan Levin; loving mother of Lloyd R. (Shelley) Levin, Michael A. (Courtney) Levin and Justin K. (Dianna) Levin; adored sister of the late Sandra Liebowitz; cherished daughter of Jack Gurewitz and the late Norma Gurey; adored grandmother of Ben Levin, Maddyn Levin and Dillon Levin. Interment at Oheb Shalom Memorial Park, Berrymans Lane. Please omit flowers. Contributions in her memory may be sent to the Alzheimer’s Association, 1850 York Road, Suite D, Timonium, MD 21093. LIPSETTS — On June 12, 2016, Ruth Ann Keyser Lipsetts: beloved wife of the late Irvin S. Keyser and Nathan Lipetts; devoted mother of Fred Jerry Keyser, Steven Marc Keyser and Lynn S. Keyser; dear step mother of Eric Lipsetts and Dr. Robert Kravetz; devoted sister of the late Robert Kaufman; loving daughter of the late Frank and Helen Kaufman; adored grandmother of Eric Keyser, Rachel Lipsetts, Katheryn, Liz, Nathan, Alan and Andrew; also survived by six loving great-grandchildren; caring friend of Jane Kravetz; also survived by loving nieces, nephews and dear friends. Interment at Baltimore

Baltimore Jewish Times June 24, 2016

Hebrew Cemetery, Berrymans Lane. Please omit flowers. MARKSAMER — On June 16, 2016, Muriel Marksamer (née Jackel); beloved wife of the late Bernard Marksamer; devoted mother of Joan Marksamer and Stephen (Pat) Marksamer; dear daughter of the late Sol and Fanny Jackel; loving grandmother of Justin (Milana) Marksamer and Rebecca (Michael) Obrock; cherished greatgrandmother of Brady and Mira Marksamer. Interment at Beth El Cemetery, Washington Township, N.J. Please omit flowers. MATZ — On June 8, 2016, Shirley H. Matz (née Goldstone); beloved wife of the late Lester Matz; devoted mother of Richard (Alina) Matz, Stuart Matz, Harry Matz and Jonathan (Fran) Matz; dear sister of the late Anita Roth; loving daughter of the late Maurice and Mollie Goldstone; cherished grandmother of Alexander, Ethan, Mollie, Arlo, Carly and Ella Matz. Interment at Arlington Cemetery, Chizuk Amuno Congregation, North Rogers Avenue. Please omit flowers. Contributions in her memory may be sent to Chizuk Amuno Congregation, 8100 Stevenson Road, Baltimore, MD 21208. MILNER — On June 18, 2016, Boris Milner; beloved husband of the late Mire Milner (née Plyatskovskaya); devoted father of Ida Milner (Gennady Sherman); cherished grandfather of Leo Sherman. Interment at Arlington Cemetery, Chizuk Amuno Congregation,

North Rogers Ave. MYERS — On June 12, 2016, Bernice Myers (née Isaacson); beloved wife of the late Robert Myers; devoted mother of Fred R. Myers and the late Aleen Gergely; dear motherin-law of Faye Ginsburg; loving sister of Shirley Garland and the late Ruth Gordon; adored daughter of the late Samuel and Sarah Isaacson; cherished grandmother of Kim Olin, Sean (Robin) Olin and Samantha Myers; dear great-grandmother of Brooke and Brett Olin. Interment at Bnai Israel Cemetery, 3701 Southern Ave. Please omit flowers. Contributions in her memory may be sent to the Familial Dysautonomia, Dysautonomia Foundation Inc., 315 W. 39th St., Suite 701, New York, NY 10018. ROTHBLOOM — On June 16, 2016, Marvin Edward Rothbloom; beloved husband of the late Adelle Rothbloom; loving brother of Charlotte Stein and the late Norman Rothbloom; devoted father of Stephen Rothbloom, Howard Rothbloom and Richard Rothbloom. Interment at Arlington Memorial Park in Sandy Springs, Ga. SANDERS — On June 12, 2016, Ronald A. Sanders; beloved husband of the late Merle Sanders (née Freedman); cherished father of Phyllis Sanders, Dr. Steven (Cindy) Sanders and Alan Sanders; dear brother of Robert Sanders; adored grandfather of Nathan, Alex, Zachary, Gabriel and Colin Sanders. Interment at Har Sinai Cemetery, Garrison Forest Road.


SCHWARTZMAN — On June 11, 2016, Florence Schwartzman (née Kipness); cherished wife of the late Stanley Schwartzman; devoted mother of Barbara (Benjamin) Green and Robert (Debbie) Schwartzman; adored grandmother of Adam Green, Susan Green (Greg Skipper), Andrew (Jessica) Schwartzman and Jesse Schwartzman. Interment at Baltimore Hebrew Cemetery, Berrymans Lane. Please omit flowers. Contributions in her memory may be sent to the Green Family Religious Services Fund, Beth El Congregation, 8101 Park Heights Ave., Baltimore, MD 21208 or the Foundation For Women’s Cancer, 230 W. Monroe St., Suite 710, Chicago, IL 606064902. SHUGAR — On June 9, 2016, Donald Nelson Shugar; beloved uncle of Michael (Amy) Shugar; dear great-uncle of Erin Shugar; devoted brother of the late Harold (Anne) Shugar; cherished son of the late Morris and Edith Shugar; loving friend of the Kapinos and Moran families, along with many other dear friends and family. Interment at Baltimore Hebrew Cemetery, Berrymans Lane. Please omit flowers. Contributions in his memory may be sent to the Alzheimer’s Association, 1850 York Road, Suite D, Timonium, MD 21093. VINE — On June 16, 2016, Shirley Vine (née Gambel); devoted wife of Bernard Vine; adored sister of the late Alexander Gambel and Frank Gambel; cherished daughter of the late Rose and Isaac Gambel; also survived by many loving nieces, nephews, great-nieces and great-nephews

and many dear friends. Interment at Beth El Memorial Park, Randallstown. Please omit flowers. Contributions in her memory may be sent to Maryland SPCA, 3300 Falls Road, Baltimore, MD 21211 or American Heart Association, P.O. Box 5216, Glen Allen, VA 23058-5216. WYMAN — On June 14, 2016, M. Richard Wyman; beloved husband of Judith Wyman (née Wertheimer) and the late Marjorie Wyman (née Weinstock); devoted father of Jean Wyman (James Carter) and Frank (Deborah) Wyman; cherished step-father of Jonathan Garfunkel and Jill (Stephen) Dessau; dear brother of the late Alice (Laurence) Abrams; loving son of the late Henry and Carrie Wyman; adored grandfather of six. Also survived by many nieces and nephews. Interment was private. Please omit flowers. Contributions in his memory may be sent to KIPP, Attn: Mark Procopio, 4701 Greenspring Ave., Baltimore, MD 21209. YUFEST — On June 8, 2016, Khana Yufest (née Reznichenko); beloved wife of the late Grigoriy Yufest; cherished mother of Igor and Roman (Yelena) Yufest; dear daughter of the late Kreina and Boris Reznichenko. Interment at Baltimore Hebrew Cemetery, Berrymans Lane. Please omit flowers.

The Baltimore Jewish Times updates obituaries regularly on its website, jewishtimes.com/obituaries. To submit an obituary, contact Daniel Nozick at dnozick@midatlanticmedia.com or 410-902-2316.

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410-977-9165

www.SparklyCleanPressure washing.com

WE BUY COMPLETE ESTATES! REAL ESTATE INCLUDED!

FREE ESTIMATES CAL L YA AK O V O R AN ATO L IY TO D AY! 41 0- 484 -8 35 0

$

Commercial & Residential We bring our own Water Fully Insured Hot Water Pressure Washing Roof Cleaning

MARC BALOTIN

INTERIOR & EXTERIOR SERVICES Clean, neat, guaranteed. 35 years experience.

malks71@aol.com Malka Matyas

CALL 46

• Appliances • Sheds • Light Moving

FREE Estimates!

Baltimore Jewish Times June 24, 2016

FREE ESTIMATES • 410-356-4722 • BERT KATZ

GROUNDSCAPE INC.

WE’RE A

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ABOUT JEWISH BALTIMORE.

For all all your your lawn lawn and For and landscaping landscapingneeds. needs. Spring cleanup,mulching mulching&&planting planting etc. etc. Fall cleanup, MHIC# 126283 MHIC# 126283

Call today! 410-415-LAWN

410-902-2326

Follow us @jewishtimes

TO PLACE YOU R AD


EMPLOYMENT

SERVICE DIRECTORY BALTIMORE CITY

Department of Transportation

COMMUNITY MEETING For Fallstaff, Glen, Cheswolde, Cross Country, Mt. Washington

The Baltimore City Department of Transportation will hold a community meeting to discuss a comprehensive traffic study completed for the Northwest Communities of: Fallstaff, Glen, Cheswolde, Cross Country, and Mt. Washington. Please share this flyer with your neighbors and constituencies.

July 12th, 2016

6:30 PM to 8:00 PM

Jewish Community Center 5700 Park Heights Avenue Baltimore, MD 21215

The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. Please contact Ms. Kohl Fallin, Northwest Liaison at kohl.fallin@baltimorecity.gov or 443.984.4094/4095 if you have special needs. If the meeting is postponed, a revised invitation will be shared with your community association and leaders.

WE’RE A

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ABOUT JEWISH BALTIMORE.

SALES REP – NY METRO AREA

A very unique Israeli medical start-up company, seeks to recruit exceptional individuals to the position of Sales Representative employee based in NY metro area. Job Duties Include: •• Provide demonstrations of the device to groups of potential users •• Actively generate leads in their own area •• Provide initial training on the use of the device to first-time users at the user's home •• Write and submit detailed reports Requirements: •• Experience in sales of a technical nature to individuals, college degree a distinct advantage •• Minimum 2 years’ experience in outside sales •• Must be able to work independently and manage time well •• Strong verbal and written communication skills and attention to detail are essential for success •• Good computer skills, including Microsoft Office suite •• Superior customer service and telephone etiquette •• Event planning experience including logistics and communications a plus •• US citizenship, valid driver’s license, and access to a vehicle as needed

Please email resume & salary requirements to: rami.ben-yehuda@orcam.com

Congregation Or Chadash in Damascus, MD seeks a dynamic and engaging Cantorial Soloist for Shabbat and holiday services. Must be able to lead approximately 48 weeks a year, meet regularly with the Rabbi, and coordinate with other musical leaders. Guitar preferred.

Contact Deanna Alpaugh at 301-482-1025 or chadashadmin@gmail.com

Elementary Classroom Teachers 2016-2017 School Year Talmudical Academy of Baltimore is seeking qualified Elementary General Studies teachers. Be part of a school with: • A stimulating educational environment • Warm atmosphere • Engaging staff and students • Strong administrative support Candidates will need:

SHARE WHERE EVEN

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Word travels fast these days – don’t let your unwired loved ones feel left out! T

Follow us @jewishtimes

P/T Cantorial Soloist:

To share your good news in the new JT, call 410-902-2326.

• Excellent classroom management skills • Minimum of a Bachelor’s Degree • Experience in education • Knowledge of center based learning with differentiated instruction is preferred Qualified candidates please email resume to elemoffice@talmudicalacademy.org.

EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT OFFICE MANAGER

Baltimore’s Center for Jewish Education seeks an excellent candidate to fill the position of Executive Assistant/Office manager. This is a full-time (1.0FTE) position.

The Executive Assistant/Office Manager is responsible for providing administrative support for the Chief Executive Officer as well as for supervising the support team and providing general office management. Certain confidential, sensitive projects and information are handled by the Executive Assistant, including communication with officers and board members, donors and executives of other organizations. The Executive Assistant will also work on special projects in conjunction with the Management Team, as needed.

We are seeking an independent, motivated worker who enjoys interacting with people and possesses an excellent sense of organization. Experience in personnel supervision, proficiency in Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint and other productivity software is necessary. Database management experience (e.g. CRM) is desirable. The successful candidate will also have basic knowledge of Hebrew, Jewish holidays and customs, and Jewish community organization.

Salary and Benefits Commensurate with Experience. Submit cover letter and resume to Leah Margolis at: lmargolis@cjebaltimore.org www.cjebaltimore.org EOE

CALL

410-902-2326

TO PLACE YOU R AD jewishtimes.com

47


MARKETPLACE ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES

ELDER CARE

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Baltimore Jewish Times June 24, 2016

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TRANSPORTATION

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ADVE RTI S E I N MAR KETPLACE for only $20.00*

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Deadline is Monday at noon.

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Get print and online exposure when you advertise in Marketplace!

WANTED TO BUY  V V V0RGHUQ)XU QLWXUH $UW /LJKWLQJ HWF :WJMZ\" ! 

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J EWISHTI M ES.COM

*$20.00 minimum charge for 10 words or less. Additional charges apply for more than 10 words.

WINDOW TREATMENTS *-;<8:1+-;WVK][\WUJTQVL[]X PWT[\MZaLZIXMZQM[1V[\ITTI\QWVZM XIQZ[LZIXMZaKTMIVQVO8P" 

Call 410-902-2326

REAL ESTATE FOR RENT ITâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S amazing WHAT PEOPLE ARE LOOKING FOR

Now Overlook at Woodholme formerly known as The Excalibur

Call today for information!! â&#x20AC;¢

Newly renovated apartments featuring new cabinets, granite countertops, wood floor and stainless steel appliances.

â&#x20AC;¢

Rooftop amenities (Pool, outdoor kitchen and fireplace with outdoor sitting area)

T

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24 Hour Key Fob Building Entry/ Gated Community Parking

Selling? Buyers are flocking to the JTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Amazing Marketplace.

â&#x20AC;¢

24 hour fitness gym

â&#x20AC;¢

1, 2 and 3 bedrooms

â&#x20AC;¢

9 foot ceilings and scenic views

â&#x20AC;¢

Pet Friendly

â&#x20AC;¢

Elevators

â&#x20AC;¢

Lease terms are 2-12 months

Visit our website www.overlookatwoodholm.com

To advertise, call 410-902-2326.

CALL

410-902-2326

Overlook At Woodholme 9050 Iron Horse Lane, Pikesville, MD 21208 410.484.6000 Office 410.484.8200 Fax overlookatwoodholmeleasing@laramarapts.com

TO PLACE YOU R AD jewishtimes.com

49


REAL ESTATE

BRAND NEW LISTINGS 2504 LARRYVALE ROAD

G!

2901 FALLSTAFF ROAD, UNIT 504

TIN

IS WL

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FABULOUS 4 LEVEL SPLIT! 5 BEDROOMS, 2FULL BATHS & 2 HALF BATHS! BEAUTIFULLY UPDATED KOSHER KITCHEN! ELEGANT LIVING ROOM W/ CATHEDRAL CEILINGS! SEPERATE LARGE DINING ROOM! HUGE FAMILY ROOM, OFFICE, AND ENORMOUS PLAYROOM FOR ALL AGE GROUPS! LARGE DECK! FP! & SO MUCH MORE! WHY RENT WHEN YOU CAN OWN FOR UNDER $60,000! LOVELY TOP FLOOR 1 BEDROOM AND BATH CONDO, PLUS SOLARIUM! REASONABLE CONDO FEE AND TAXES TOO!

KATZNELSON BROTH TEAM OF LONG AND FOSTER REAL ESTATE OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY, JUNE 26, 12-2pm.

13 AUTUMN WINDS CT GREENSPRING VALLEY

This beautifully updated 4 BR, 2.5 Bath contemporary at the end of a quiet cul-de-sac boasts upgrades galore: NEW HVAC, ROOF, electrical, Chef's Kitchen w/ granite counters & ss applcs, renovated baths, washer/dryer, fabulous Screened Porch & more! Situated on an incredible lot, partially fenced with deck for enjoying the outdoors.

Offered at $420,000

REBECCA PERLOW - C. 410.916.2888 JASON PERLOW - C. 410.456-3370

O. 410.583.0400

Make Sure You Have Representation! EVA KATZNELSON, GRI

JASON BROTH

(443) 386-5384 (C)

(443) 250-2100 (C)

REALTORS WHO LIVE CLIENT REPRESENTATION

(410) 377-2270 (O)

Team Rosoff

DO YOU KNOW THE JEWISH TIMES READER? *The average net worth of the Jewish Time’s reader is over $1.2 million? *Have an average home market value of $255,400? *40% are millionaires? *Our subscribers will create $315 million worth of residential real estate listings in the next 12 months?

JUST LISTED IN 21136 Beautiful custom built Colonial with sensational outdoor park like oasis. $525,000

*70% of our readers are in Baltimore County/City? T

We have the dedicated audience that need to buy or sell property Call Dawn Lewis, Real Estate Specialist 410-902-2325 or dlewis@midatlanticmedia.com 50

Baltimore Jewish Times June 24, 2016

DOLLY ROSOFF Office 410-583-0400 • Cell 443-255-9810 Direct 443-632-0796


LONG & FOSTER

GREY ROCK, OPEN SUN 1-2:30 6/26, 119 OLD HOUSE CT. Wonderful 3-4 bedroom two level end TH w/2.5 baths.

Greenspring Valley – Lutherville

FIRST FLOOR MBR; Spacious eat in kit w/granite; large sep DR; LR leads to custom deck facing open area; upper lev w/2-3 BR’s, Full Bath + comfortable loft/den. Attached garage. Don't miss this one!!

6207 WESTERN RUN DR.

WESTERN RUN - MAJOR PRICE REDUCTION

NEW PRICE. ARBORWOOD. Outstanding 4 BR, brick front colonial featuring MAIN LEVEL MASTER BR w/luxury bath;eat-in kit leads to spacious fam rm w/fpl; many recent updates; 2 car garage. Beautiful private rear yard facing trees.

11 year old home with huge kitchen with 2 dishwashers and 2 sinks. Large breakfast area. 2 car integral garage. Washer/dryer on 2nd floor. Large master bedroom suite with walk-in closet, whirlpool and separate shower. Lower level has 2 bedrooms, full bath, and den/office space. Cul de sac with walking path to main street.

NEWLY LISTED! VELVET HILLS SO. Outstanding col on beautiful picturesque corner lot; 4 BR's + 2 full&2 half baths; fam rm w/fpl off spacious eat-in kit leading to deck & private rear yard; large lr/dr; fully finished low lev w/walk-out; 2 car garage.

IMPERIAL 2Br, 2 Ba condo on 2nd floor with sunken living room, eat in kitchen with breakfast nook, and separate dining room. Heat and a/c recently replaced. Assigned parking. Estate sale , as-is, priced to sell only $35,000.

GREENE TREE. Exceptional townhouse w/ 3 BR& 2 full & 2 1/2 baths ;updated eat-in kitchen w/granite &SS appliances; hardwood flrs thruout; updated HVAC; finished lower level clubroom;garage; gated community w/pool & tennis ct. NEW PRICE. STEVENSON VILLAGE TOWNHOUSE. Rarely available beautiful 2 level townhouse; 3 bedrooms+21/2 baths; updated eat-in kitchen w/sl drs to front patio;spacious DR & LR w/hardwood floors & sl drs to private rear patio; peaceful view from deck off Master Bedroom; near all conveniences; shows great!!

JEANNE WACHTER GRI, CRS, ABR Office 410-235-4100 • Cell 410-978-1183 View all listings at cbmove.com/jeanne.wachter

IT’S amazing WHAT PEOPLE ARE LOOKING FOR

SHARON ZUCKERBROD, ABR Accredited Buyer Representative Member Real Estate Million Dollar Association LONG and FOSTER Real Estate, Inc. Greenspring Valley / Lutherville sharon.zuckerbrod@lnf.com Cell: 410-599-5303 Office: 410-583-5700 www.sharonzuckerbrod.lnf.com

TI

W NE

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NG 410-583-5700

COBBLESTONE

Beautiful 3 bedroom & 3.5 baths Rancher with 2 car garage, SS appliances.

$2

99

T

Selling? Buyers are flocking to the JT’s Amazing Marketplace.

,9

00

MARRIOTSVILLE

Completely renovated 4 bedrooms Split Level on 3/4 acres corner lot with 1 car garage. Under 300k !

To advertise, call 410-902-2326.

Otterbein - 2 bedrooms 2 baths next to Inner Harbor, secure parking. $1,600/month

Gi li

For Rent

Greenspring Quarry - 2 Bedrooms 2 Baths+ garage. $2,200/month

G

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SMC PRO, I, eGR

410-258-0277

www.GGhomes4sale.com

Fluent in HEBREW GERMAN, and FRENCH! Lifetime Member of the Real Estate MILLION DOLLAR Assn. LTD

jewishtimes.com

51


Harriett HarriettWasserman, Wasserman,, CRS CRS 4 410 410-458-5300 10-458-5 458 5300 5300 410-458-5300

CAVES VALLEY | $999,900 Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

BROOKLANDVILLE | $829,000 Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

BAUBLITZ | $734,900 Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

CLIFTON COURT | $699,900 Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300 NE

W

TIN

G

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CAVESWOOD | $525,000, Terry Reamer 443-570-7672

ANTON NORTH | $1,050,000 Marni Sacks 410-375-9700 Nancy Sacks 443-418-6300

THE RISTEAU | $600,000 Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

WORTHINGTON PARK | $579,900 Marni Sacks 410-375-9700

BRIAN DANIEL | $599,900 Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300 CT

TRA

ON

C DER

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CT

TRA

ON

LIS

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REISTERSTOWN | $749,000 Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

ER ND

LAKE FOREST | $699,900 Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

ACT

NTR

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LONG MEADOW ESTATES | $429,000 VELVET HILL AMENDED | $312,500 Karen Glaser 410-456-2477 Nancy Sacks 443-418-6300

Nancy Sacks 443-418-6300

52

CT

TRA

ON

C DER

Terry Reamer 443-570-7672

Randi Sopher 410-299-7222

Della Morton-Smith

410-458-1863

Baltimore Jewish Times June 24, 2016

David Pensak 410-908-2787

Monye Weiner 410-382-2889

SUBURBIA | $265,000 Marni Sacks 410-375-9700

Gladys Santiago 443-813-3671

Toni Sherman 240-778-4401

410-484-7253 410-458-5300

Sharron Greene 703-867-3561

MCDONOGH PARK | $264,900 Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

Len Bernhardt

410-207-2467

Karen Glaser 410-456-2477

©2015 BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently owned and operated franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.® Equal Housing Opportunity.

Marni Sacks 410-375-9700


9 REDMILE CT, REISTERSTOWN

722 WARREN RD, COCKEYSVILLE

$439,000

8815 JOSHUA CT, PIKESVILLE

$424,900

72 BENSMILL CT, REISTERSTOWN

100 WALGROVE RD, REISTERSTOWN

$329,900 208 PARKHOLME CIR, REISTERSTOWN

1806 COURTYARD CIR #B,

PIKESVILLE

$272,500 7121 PARK HEIGHTS AVE, #408, BALTIMORE

Y NDA E SU OUS1-3PM H N OPE 6/26

NEW LISTING

$259,000

NEW PRICE!

$255,000

$239,900

$121,900

UNDER CONTRACT

7937 LONG MEADOW RD - $499,900 4001 OLD COURT RD - $378,000 5 VICTORIA CT #24 - $277,000 4815 OLD COURT RD - $175,000 6 FOURWOOD CT #6A - $149,900 10 STONEHENGE CIR #5 - $149,900 7 SLADE AVE #716 - $69,999

Call Patti Spigel 410-241-9797

Cindi Topolski, GRI 443-838-2061

Diane Stoler 410-440-1138 jewishtimes.com

53


410-530-2400

Historic 4000’ colonial in desirable Baltimore County location on 3 acres. Original home built pre civil war, main home addition turn of the century. Please call for details and more information.

801 Nicodemus Rd 21136

Do you love older homes?

3 finished levels plus basement, gas heat, central air, porch, large fenced yard. Good parking 410-530-2400

Hampden Stone Hill 718 Pacific St 21211 $324,944

410-530-2400

410-530-2400

GE ARA

RG 2 CA

1022 Windsor Rd 21208 - $229,944

3-4 bedroom brick single family home with 2 car garage, central air, fireplace, large lot. Minutes to Metro NG ISTI L NEW

7 Green Heather Court, 21208 - $699,944

HOMES NEEDED

MOVE IN CONDITION W/GARAGE.

410-530-2400

CALL MARGARET ROME

THINKING OF SELLING YOUR HOME?

• HOME W/GARAGE UNDER $350K. • NEED A HEATHER RIDGE CONDO.

• NEEDUSNINDGELRE$F2A5M0,I0LY00H.OMES

• T&RCAHDAITRIOANCTAELRHIONM2E12W08ITOHRC2H1A20R9M

Exceptional bright stone and cedar art lovers Deck House on a very private wooded lot. Custom gourmet luscious kitchen with granite and custom wood cabinets. Versatile 5-6 bedrooms, wood ceilings, luxury baths, gigantic dining room, sunroom, home office,2 fireplaces and a lovely in ground pool. This home is like living in a glass tree house. Superb for entertaining. If you love contemporary...this one is it!! 410-530-2400

THINKING OF SELLING YOUR HOME? CALL MARGARET ROME

I HAVE QUALIFIED BUYERS!!!

First floor bedrooms, 2 car garage, gourmet kitchen, wood floors, gas fireplace, sunroom, balcony and huge lower level

8605 SNOWREATH RD #8605 PIKESVILLE, MD 21208 $324,944

LY AMI LE F O! SINGCOND

Circa farmhouse built in 1812. 5 bedrooms 4 with attached baths. 10’ ceilings! Sitting at the top of 34 magnificent acres in the rolling hills of Monkton. Awesome views floor to ceiling windows and charming wrap around porch. Walk in pantry laundry has green house window. Modern kitchen with island and heated floors. Private river cottage with water access and spectacular views, great for kayaking, fishing and hiking! 410-530-2400

1560 Blue Mount Rd 21111 - $849,944

CRES S 34 AEPLACE R 5 FI

- Unit #105 40 foot patio. - Unit #400 has a balcony and views of the pool and French Gardens. - Unit #304 has an open floor plan with granite kitchen beautiful park views.

The Risteau luxury condominium in Baltimore County with pool, tennis, garage parking and concierge. Three Units to choose from.

The Risteau, 2331 Old Court Rd 21208 #400 -#304 -#105

,3 EAU BLE! RIST AILA THE OS AV D CON

NG

ISTI

the right way

Rome

Margaret Rome author of Real Estate

410-922-6680

Hosted by Margaret Rome 12 noon Sunday on Talk Radio AM680/WCBM

ALL ABOUT REAL ESTATE

Let’s Talk

CALL IN

37 Sherwood Rd. 21030 - $549,944 5-6 BR, 3 BA w/parking for 10 cars. Added loft apt. Central air. 410-530-2400

G KIN PAR RS AGE CA GARFOR 10

Largest Clubhouse Condo Second floor with elevator access, has two master bedrooms ,two baths, eat in kitchen with bright window. Full size side by side washer and dryer. Sliders from bright living room to covered balcony. Dressing room double vanity and huge walk in closet. Doorman to greet you in secure lobby. 410-530-2400

6711 Park Heights Ave #102

L NEW

w w w. H o m e R o m e .c o m | w w w. 4 1 0 - 5 3 0 - 2 4 0 0 . c o m

SELL YOUR HOME WITH MARGARET ROME

G TIN LIS

Y NDA N SU 0 PM OPE 0 - 3:3 2:3

NEW

E HOM ENT ESTM

INV

3810 Greenmount Ave Guilford

$329,944 3 apartments(all rented) Great investment property. For Information please call 410-530-2400. LE STY HS G IN BAT HIN 1/2 RYT S 2 EVE ROOM D 3 BE

Park Towers East Penthouse 21215 Unit 901 - $269,944 Grand living in a 2700 ‘ spacious Penthouse condo with skylights, garage parking and a gourmet granite kitchen. 410-530-2400

www.HomeRome.com • mrome@HomeRome.com

www.410-530-2400.com Broker-Owner • Home Rome Realty Master Certified Negotiations Expert

Baltimore Jewish Times June 24, 2016

54


Awarded Top 1% of Real Estate Professionals in North America

Glick*Seidel A Higher Standard in Real Estate Services

Carole Glick, Linda Seidel & Kristina Johnson

410-583-5700

410.409.8110 • 410.375.6532 • 410.404.4104 G

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THE ENCLAVE $775,000

G

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VALLEY HEIGHTS $589,000 G

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CAVES VALLEY $475,000

REISTERSTOWN $479,900

LIS

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ANTON WOODS $1,150,000

TIN

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GREENSPRING VALLEY $1,150,000

EW

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CEDARCROFT $299,900

GARDENS AT MCDONOGH $134,900

D

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STEVENSON $399,900 D

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CUSTOM DESIGN & BUILD W/JPAUL BUILDERS

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STEVENSON COMMONS $475,000

PALADIA WAY $1,200,000

BONITA $349,900

WORTHINGTON HILLSIDE $625,000

DU

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HOLLINGTON CONDO W/GARAGE $149,900

SLADE VILLAGE $149,900

“GREEN FRIENDLY CONSTRUCTION”

WE ARE SELLING!! CT

CT

CT

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WORTHINGTON PARK ESTATES $675,000

WORTHINGTON GLEN $395,000

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VALLEY HILLS $329,900

WORTHINGTON PARK $589,000

carole.glick@longandfoster.com | linda.seidel@longandfoster.com | kristina.johnson@longandfoster.com

www.glickseidelteam.com | Greenspring Valley/Lutherville jewishtimes.com

55


Annapolis, MD | 410.990.1700 purplecherry.com

56

Baltimore Jewish Times June 24, 2016

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