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2016

GRADUATES XL LUKE Best wishes in all your future endeavors, we are so proud of the amazing person you have become! Love always, Bubbe and Zayde

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CONTENTS

Vol. 349 No. 9 | April 29, 2016 Candle lighting 7:41 p.m.

Local News

16 HoCo Preschool Counts the Omer and Clothing

18 Grandparents Seek Support in Relating to Interfaith Grandchildren 20 Suddenly Dark, My World At Last Has a Chance for Light 22 Drama Aside, Van Hollen Bests Edwards for Mikulski’s Seat

34

24 It’s Close, but Baltimore Voters Chose Pugh, Schleifer

COVER STORY: A Land Flowing With Milk, Honey and … Water

Cover: Dani Machlis/Ben-Gurion University of the Negev; Contents Cover: Ben-Gurion University of the Negev; Insider: ©iStockphoto.com/ClarkandCompany

National & International News 28 Mechoulam Talks Cannabis Research, Medical Uses

30 No Experience Necessary: Meet the Orthodox Lawyer Advising Trump on Israel

Arts & Life

41 In Every Issue 6 14 58 66 71

The Seen You Should Know Worth The Schlep The Jewish View Amazing Marketplace

Opinion 7 8 10 13

Opening Thoughts Editorials From This View Your Say …

Society

INSIDER: Focus on Seniors

67 The Community Page 68 Obituaries

60 Music to His Ears: Baltimorean Debuts at Carnegie Hall

62 Not a Gnome or a Wizard, Just a Guy Who Likes to Wave

64 ‘Seinfeld’ Star Jason Alexander Talks Judaism, Show Biz

Baltimore Jewish Times (ISSN-0005-450X) is published weekly by Mid-Atlantic Media, 11459 Cronhill Drive, Suite A, Owings Mills, MD 21117. For subscription prices please call 410-902-2300, option 3. Periodicals postage paid at Owings Mills, MD and additional mailing offices. Postmaster: Send address changes to Baltimore Jewish Times, 11459 Cronhill Drive, Suite A, Owings Mills, MD 21117.

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Seen e Seen

Compiled from JTA reports

Doris Roberts, ‘Everybody Loves Raymond’ star, dies at 90

Doris Roberts

Larry David back on ‘SNL’ as Bernie Sanders — with Julia Louis-Dreyfus Larry David was back on “Saturday Night Live” playing Bernie Sanders, this time answering an audience question from former “Seinfeld” co-star Julie Louis-Dreyfus in character as Elaine Benes. e skit, which again featured Kate McKinnon portraying Hillary Clinton, had the two Democratic presidential candidates in a mock debate from Brooklyn, N.Y., ahead of the state’s primary last week. Benes, chosen as a long-time New Yorker to ask the candidates a question, wonders how Sanders plans to break up the big banks. Sanders gives a vague, “Seinfeld”-esque reply. (David was a creator and executive producer of the 1990s megahit.) “Once I’m elected president, I’ll have a nice shvitz in the White House gym, then I’ll go to the big banks, I’ll sit them down, and yada yada yada, they’ll be broken up,” he says, using a 6

Baltimore Jewish Times April 29, 2016

Larry David and Julia Louis-Dreyfus

“Seinfeld” euphemism for being vague about details. Later, making a reference to “Seinfeld,” Benes asks Sanders about his plan to tax the super-rich at a higher rate and muses how the creator of a hugely successful sitcom would “lose a lot of money. You see what I’m saying?” “Yeah,” David as Sanders replies, pointing at his opponent. “You should vote for her.” David has played Sanders several times in guest appearances on “SNL.”

Ronit Elkabetz, three-time Israeli Oscar winner, dies at 51 Ronit Elkabetz, a three-time winner of Israel’s version of the Oscars, has died at 51. Elkabetz, who won Ophir Awards for her performances in “Sh’Chur,” “Late Marriage” and “e Band’s Visit,” died last week of cancer. “Late Marriage” (2001) was Elkabetz’s first film that was widely viewed outside of Israel, performing particularly well in the United States, Britain and France. She played a divorced Moroccan-Israeli single mother who has an affair with a man several years younger. Michal Aviad, who cast Elkabetz as the lead in her film “Invisible,” described the actress as “one of the wisest women I ever met.” “Her understanding of how people act and how their relationships are expressed — in a look, in a touch, in a sentence — was exceptional and full of sensitivity to the point that I was astonished each time anew to discover how much she knows about life,” Aviad told Ha’aretz. Since 2012, Elkabetz served as president of Achoti (My Sister), a Mizrahi feminist organization. She is survived by her husband, architect Avner Yashar, and their 4-year-old twin sons.

Roberts: Angela George; SNL: Screenshot from SNL

Doris Roberts, who won four Emmy Awards as the meddling mother, Marie Barone, on the popular sitcom “Everybody Loves Raymond,” died last week in her sleep. She was 90. Roberts, who was of Russian Jewish descent, “will be remembered for lighting up every room she walked into with an unparalleled combination of energy, humor, warmth and even a little bit of grit,” CBS, which broadcast “Raymond” from 1996 to 2005, said in a statement. She won the Emmys for best supporting actress and was nominated seven times portraying Marie, matriarch of a dysfunctional Italian family. Roberts won another Emmy for a guest appearance on “St. Elsewhere,” playing a homeless woman. In 2003, she was awarded a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. A St. Louis native who grew up in New York, Roberts was raised by her mother, Ann Meltzer, with the help of her family, aer Meltzer was deserted by her husband. Roberts took the last name of her stepfather, Chester Roberts.


Joshua Runyan Editor-in-Chief

| Opening oughts

Israel’s Water Pioneers

E nglish poEt samuel taylor Coleridge might be frequently maligned through each iteration of the “water, water everywhere, but not a drop to drink” quote — the slightly altered line from “e Rime of the Ancient Mariner” does not, unlike how its most invoked, refer to scarcity in the midst of abundance — but in a world still reeling from the headlines coming out of places like Flint, Mich., and right here in Baltimore, where officials at one school have admitted to trucking in bottled water for years because of lead contamination, the literal meaning of his words are proving prescient. like the ancient mariner who slays an albatross and finds himself amid a sea of water — alas, not in any drinkable form — much of “civilized” society is today grappling with an abundance of contaminants. potable water, however, is in short supply. into this reality comes the state of israel. As you’ll read in this week’s Jt, the Jewish state has emerged as a leader in turning that which was undrinkable into something bordering on potable. Much like its fabled history of making the desert bloom, israel is pioneering an industry of desalination plants and water purification technology, earning attention from the parched state of California, as well as her own Arab neighbors, in the process. i’ve remarked before in this column that with the news cycle being what it is, rare is

the chance to report on good news coming out of the Middle East. so when reporter Daniel schere returned from a trip there looking at israel’s attempts at renewing a tainted resource, we jumped at the chance. e country, as many a historian or local resident will tell you, has a unique history with water, owing in large part to its arid climate and near-constant state of warfare. Any town worth defending had to have ready and immediate access to a spring or a cistern, the remnants of which you can literally stumble upon during a walk through the countryside. (Many guidebooks contain a general warning that broken ankles from falling into an ancient water pit are quite common.) Many such systems still collect water today, but as Ben gurion University archaeology professor steve Rosen observes, “You don’t want to put your toe in, let alone drink.” at might be fine for an ancient society, but with “the startup nation” emerging as a global leader in information technology and bursting at the seams with a fast-growing population, israel’s only option has been to invent a new way to process and deliver water. While the transformation has been entirely necessary, it’s also inspiring. it begs the obvious question: if israel, beset by terrorism and other existential dangers, can meet the environmental challenge, why can’t the rest of us? JT

2016

GRADUATES

The Baltimore Jewish Times invites you to celebrate and honor all graduating Jewish students in our 2016 GRADUATES. This special section will appear in our May 20 issue. Every student can receive a free listing.

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Tov!

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e, om, D a duate d, Jake, Zach, Luke a r G 16 20 M

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Editorials

Blaming the ‘Liberal-Left’ recent analysis of changes in support of Israel: “Jewish support for Israel has weakened primarily because Jews are solidly on the liberal-le of the political spectrum (these days symbolized by Bernie Sanders), the side most critical of Israel,” he wrote. “From Israel’s point of view, the fact that American Jews are losing their ardor for Israel is a distinct loss. But it is made up for by American conservative support for the Jewish state.” In other words, according to Pipes, liberal support is down, conservative support is up. Jewish support is down, Christian support is up. Implicit in this argument is a conclusion that because liberal American Jews are not viscerally supportive of the Jewish state (a questionable assertion), their Judaism is lacking. But that is demonstrably not true. One can be a proud, committed and active Jew and still be critical of positions taken by the Israeli government. And one can be a strong, visceral supporter of Israel and be critical of various realities there. at’s not to say that we back J Street’s

International focus on the well-being of the residents of Gaza is cyclical. at concern reached a high point during the 2014 war between Israel and Hamas, when over the course of 50 days, Gazans were held hostage by their rulers. ose rulers sent rockets into Israel knowing that any Israeli response would lead to a high death count, yet confident that it would also lead to world outrage at Israel. e fighting le quite a mark on Gaza, damaging or destroying some 171,000 homes. Aer it ended, an international conference pledged some $3.5 billion in reconstruction aid over three years. But the World Bank reported last week that those pledges are being fulfilled more slowly than promised. Of donor countries, the United States was the most prompt. It has delivered the

entire $277 million it promised. By contrast, Qatar, which pledged $1 billion, has only delivered $152 million, or 15 percent of its promise. Saudi Arabia has delivered about 10 percent of the $500 million it promised. Turkey, a close ally of Hamas, has sent one third of its $200 million pledge. We’re obviously in the waning phase of the cycle of interest in the plight of those living in Gaza, and the cynicism of the wealthy Arab states who made bloated promises of assistance is chilling. Aer years of turning a blind eye to the actions of Hamas, which diverted international aid to build cross-border tunnels and stockpile weapons — actions that directly led to the 2014 war — Arab states declared that they would contribute to a rebuilding of the Gaza abandoned by Hamas. But it

The Pawns of Gaza

8

Baltimore Jewish Times April 29, 2016

Vice President Joe Biden

point of view or their full-throated denunciations of Israel. We absolutely do not. In fact, we believe that in the dangerous reality in which the Jewish state exists, the last thing Israel needs from its allies — whether in the U.S. government or in the American-Jewish community — is tough love. Nonetheless, as we near the end of Passover, a reminder of the time when we were given our identity as a people, attempts to exploit the divides in our community for political gain — a sin employed by both sides of the spectrum — must be called out as the cynical tools they are. Dividing the Jewish community into “friends of Israel” and “those for whom liberalism is a more important religion than Judaism” is not only wrong, it is dangerous. JT

appears that those promises were as hollow as the o-repeated canard that Israel bears responsibility for the Palestinians living under Hamas rule. Indeed, as Hamas rearms, retools and rebuilds under the watchful eye of its Arab sponsors — just last week came the news of a discovery by Israeli forces of perhaps the longest tunnel to date — there appears to be very little focus on the humanitarian needs that allegedly prompted the international commitments two years ago. Someone besides the World Bank needs to press the Gulf States and other boastful international pledgers to fulfill their humanitarian commitments and to stop treating the Palestinians in Gaza like pawns in a never-ending war of attrition against Israel. JT

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Vice President Joe Biden used his appearance at the recent J Street Gala to voice the Obama administration’s frustration with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu at was not news to anyone who has followed U.S.-Israeli relations during the Obama years. Nor is it a secret that the administration believes that “the present course Israel’s on is not one that’s likely to secure its existence as a Jewish, democratic state,” as Biden put it. But what the vice president said in the next breath is vital: “We have to make sure that [secure existence] happens.” And later in his remarks, he said: “We are Israel’s maybe not-only friend, but only absolutely certain friend.” Biden’s same message of warning and support was derided at the AIPAC Policy Conference in March. It was warmly received by the J Street audience, whose organization is pushing for an end to an Israeli presence in the West Bank. Many on the Jewish right demonize J Street as Israel haters and self-hating Jews. Right-wing commentator Daniel Pipes took a more nuanced approach in a


Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

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From is View | Sharon Weiss-Greenberg

‘Traditional’ Women Not Immune to Rape

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Rabbi Steven PRuzanSky, the spiritual leader of Congregation bnai yeshurun in teaneck, n..J., is no stranger to controversy. His statements have been condemned by the Orthodox union, the Rabbinical Council of america and the antiDefamation League. as a former judge on the beth Din of america, he has held some of the most prominent positions in modern Orthodoxy. Pruzansky recently authored a blog post asserting that in many cases, women who report being raped on college campuses are leveling false allegations because they felt spurned by their romantic partners or were intoxicated at the time. “if indeed there was a ‘rape culture’ on american campuses,” writes Pruzansky, “no intelligent woman would want to attend college. e fact that more women attend college today than men itself belies the accusation.” Pruzansky failed to acknowledge that one in five women will report being assaulted during their time on a college campus. Rape and sexual assault are happening. While Pruzansky might want to pretend his words only apply to those engaged in the “hookup culture” or that those who adhere to “traditional morality” are immune from assault, Orthodox women might disagree. Sarah Robinson, a Stern College alumna and a student in yeshiva university’s graduate program in advanced talmudic studies, boldly spoke out on the issue in e Observer, Stern’s newspaper.

“Our campus culture [at yeshiva university] does not support victims of sexual violence,” she said. “it is immature and ignorant to think that consent doesn’t apply to students who are “shomer negiah” (someone who refrains from physical contact with members of the opposite sex.). Marital rape happens all the time. ere are so many women who want to say no but don’t know how.” Robinson added: “Rape can happen to anybody. Generally, rape occurs between two known parties. Shomer negiah doesn’t protect against rape.” as Passover approaches, we are ready to say dayenu, enough. On June 26, Pruzansky’s synagogue will host a daylong conference of Jewish educators with participants from more than 30 Orthodox yeshivas, day schools, publishers, youth groups and synagogues. e Jewish Orthodox Feminist alliance is asking those attending to make clear that their sponsorship and participation is contingent on Pruzansky not speaking at the conference. We are asking people to reach out to partnering organizations with which they are affiliated. Pruzansky’s insensitivity and failure to understand the violent and vicious nature of rape, confusing it with unsatisfying sex and “unrequited love,” indicates he should not be in a position to preach about values we want to pass on to our children. JT Sharon Weiss-Greenberg is executive director of the Jewish Orthodox Feminist Alliance.


Steven B. Nasatir

| From is View

How a United Community Can Still Work Miracles

Passover is a time for family, for tradition and for festive celebration. it’s also a time to fix a paradox. While we read the haggadah earlier this week, we reflected on our past travails and miraculous redemption as a Jewish people. But if we look only at the past we risk overlooking the incredible ways in which the cycle of Jewish history continues today. a poignant reminder of this was the clandestine final rescue and immigration to israel, or aliyah, of 19 Yemenite Jews completed on march 20. is wasn’t the first or the last time, given the dangerous era we live in, when unified, collective action through a strong

and effective federation system meant the difference between life and death for Jews in peril. in this case it was the Jewish agency for israel — an organization funded and governed by almost 300 Jewish community federations worldwide in partnership with the government of israel — that took the lead, with help from israeli intelligence and the U.s. state Department. our liturgy says of the exodus, which we celebrate at Passover, that God rescued the Jewish people “with a strong hand and an outstretched arm.” When it comes to rescuing Jews from jihadist terror and muslim sectarian war in Yemen, from discrimination

in ethiopia or from a gathering storm of anti-Jewish violence in europe, we know it is our duty to lend our own strong hands and outstretched arms. ank God we have the strength, unity and Jewish independence needed to take our fate into our own hands to the extent that we can. e rescue of the Yemenite Jews is one case in point. Which brings me to another Passover paradox: What is the meaning of the “wicked son” — the person who stands aloof from the story, separating himself from the collective — in this time of fraying Jewish unity? to me, today’s wicked sons are the men and women who,

knowingly or not, dismantle the very unity that enables the noble work of Jewish rescue to continue. if there is one lesson we need to learn from the recent Yemeni rescue, it’s the need to preserve that most at-risk Jewish value and asset: communal unity. in the final moments of Passover, let’s remember that the work of redemption is not complete and that the work requires not only divine grace but also our own strong hands and outstretched arms. JT

Dr. Steven B. Nasatir is president of the Jewish United Fund/Jewish Federation of Metropolitan Chicago and an associate member of the Jewish Agency’s Board of Governors.

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Your Say … Voter Registration, Clarified I would first like to commend the JT’s Marc Shapiro for capturing our accomplishments during the contentious 90-day legislative session in “Looking Back on the Maryland General Assembly” (April 22). I would like to clarify what was written on the Universal Voter Registration Act. As originally introduced, the bill would have automatically registered all eligible voters in Maryland. is version of the bill was defeated on the Senate floor. A similar bill (HB 1007) passed the House of Delegates but was subsequently

reworked on the Senate side. Sen. Steve Waugh, a Republican colleague, and I spent countless hours modifying the bill in the final days of session. e significantly amended bill, known as the Freedom to Vote Act, will make it much easier and more accessible to register to vote. It increases the number of government agencies that will be able to register voters and establishes an “optin” rather than an “opt-out” system. e revised bill passed the Senate unanimously. With such bipartisan support, it is very likely that Gov. Larry Hogan will sign the bill. ank you for covering the

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YOU SHOULD KNOW … Abby Bennett

How did you get involved at Creative City Public Charter School? In the first year of the [MICA] community arts program, students complete a teaching residency at a local school or organization. I was placed at Creative City. For a year I served as the artist-in-residence at the school, which included teaching aer-school art classes, helping build new elements for the school’s outdoor classroom and garden, organizing family and school

14

support for the outdoor classroom and teaching in the school’s Seed to Table program. How did you get involved with Seed to Table? During my second year at MICA, I decided to continue working with Creative City for my year-long thesis project. I collaborated with chef Jennifer Crisp, who teaches the Seed to Table program at the school, to write and produce a cookbook and gardening guide. All of the recipes in the cookbook use ingredients that the students grew in their school garden. e students illustrated the recipes and created other content for the cookbook. e project helped garner more excitement among the students about the great work they’re doing in the Seed to Table program and will allow other children and their families to try the recipes and grow food for themselves. We’ve been selling the book as a fundraiser for the school to create more opportunities for experiential learning through gardening and cooking. How does all of this tie into your studies at MICA? e MFA in community arts prepares its students to use the arts as a tool for community development, healing, working with youth, teaching and more. rough my work with Creative City, I’ve used my

Baltimore Jewish Times April 29, 2016

own experience with art to help enhance others’ experiences. I’ve also learned how to collaborate with other communities in order to create positive change. I feel that my studies at MICA have given me a strong understanding of the intricacies of working in a community setting, along with a foundation for doing social justice work and for helping raise up the unique voices of communities we work with. What is your motivation to do this work? Art has always been an important part of my life, and I have always loved working with other people, especially youth. It is a joy for me to be able to use my interest in art to help others become more confident, to make new discoveries and

to feel more connected to their communities. One obstacle when working with communities is that I come in as an outsider, oen with a very different background than the people I’m working with. is means that I have to be very intentional about developing authentic relationships with the community members, and sometimes this can take time. I have to be deliberate and be patient, and most importantly, I have to be a good listener, making sure that I am valuing the community’s needs and wants. It is slow and sometimes challenging work, but it is also some of the most rewarding work I have ever done. JT

jkatz@midatlanticmedia.com

Provided

A

bby Bennett, 25, may be a native of St. Louis, but through her studies at the Maryland Institute College of Art, she has been connecting with Baltimore’s younger residents while earning her Master of Fine Arts in community arts. Bennett will graduate from MICA this May and had her hand in many projects, including one at Creative City Public Charter School, a new, progressive charter elementary school in Park Heights. Bennett helped illustrate and produce a cookbook based on the school’s Seed to Table program. Seed to Table focuses on teaching students every step of growing, nurturing and harvesting the food they see at supermarkets. e JT connected with Bennett to learn more about her hands-on involvement in creative projects.

By Justin Katz


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HoCo Preschool Counts the Omer and Clothing Local News »

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Baltimore Jewish Times April 29, 2016

With Passover in full swing, so begins the tradition of counting the Omer, the ritual of counting each of the 49 days between the 16th of Nisan and Shavuot. But that’s not the only thing students at the Bet Yeladim preschool in Columbia will be counting this year. “All teachers and staff have each been assigned a day of the Omer at which time they will bring in an item of clothing they are willing to donate to a local charity,” said Jodi Fishman,

executive director at Bet Yeladim. “At the same time, all of our families have been invited to select one item of clothing a day for each of the 49 days of the Omer that they are also willing to donate.” e clothing will be hung in Bet Yeladim’s hallways until June 10, the day before Erev Shavuot. GreenDrop, a charitable organization selected by the Military Order of the Purple Heart and the National Federation of the Blind to raise

Provided

From left: Marcie Cissel, Barbara Frederick and Jodi Fishman.

N E I G HB O R HO OD


Provided

funds through the generation and collection of donated clothing and household items, will visit the school to pick up the clothing. î ˘e idea for the project came from teacher Marcie Cissell and one of her colleagues, who saw this as an opportune time to celebrate the Jewish tradition while also completing a tikkun olam project. When they pitched the idea to Fishman, she “brought it to the next levelâ€? by including not just the children, but their families as well. “Because of [the visual aspect] happening in the hallway, it’s going to prompt a lot of questions and discussions, not only for children and teachers, but everyone who comes into the school,â€? said Fishman. “It’s a great opportunity to educate our families as well about the Omer.â€? Cissell added, “Anytime we can bring the families together with the sta, it makes it more meaningful for the children.â€? Because the project will involve teachers, sta, students and their families, the range of clothes donated will span all ages and sizes, as families decide who will donate a piece of clothing on any given day. Aside from the visual aspect that collecting and counting clothes provides, Fishman emphasized that the school focuses on ensuring that students see the impact their giving makes. Barbara Frederick is associate director of Bet Yeladim and has been with the school for 35 years. She said the concept of tzedakah has evolved as the school has developed. “When I first started with this school, we had our decorated container for the children

to contribute to and teachers could talk about [tzedakah], but it was very abstract,â€? said Frederick. “Teachers felt they needed to have something concreteâ€? to better explain the concept of tzedakah. î ˘e school has organized other hands-on experiences such as going to the supermarket to purchase food items with the money raised from tzedakah. Aî‚?erward, the students walked to the Howard County Food

“Anytime we can bring the families together with the sta, it makes it more meaningful for the children.â€? — Marcie Cissell, teacher at Bet Yeladim preschool

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Bank to weigh and donate the items. Cissell said this experience weighed heavily on one particular boy who asked others to bring food items to his next birthday party so he could make another donation to the food bank. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think making these connections between home and school is so important, and this is such a great way of visually doing that for the children,â&#x20AC;? said Fishman. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Not only at school do we pay attention to the needs of others, but as a family, we do that too.â&#x20AC;? JT jkatz@midatlanticmedia.com

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C

Grandparents Seek Support in Relating to Interfaith Grandchildren Local News »

By Justin Katz

18

interfaith marriage, she moved to Howard County because of its reputation for religious and ethnic diversity. She and Norden both emphasized that their children marrying outside their faith isn’t the issue; the issue is how to maintain a relationship with their grandchildren without bumping up against sensitive boundaries concerning faith. “I was looking for ideas and information or helpful suggestions on how to deal with the [grandchildren] and their parents without stepping on toes or intruding where we don’t belong,” said Davis. “[As far as] religious education, it is up to the parents unless you’re invited in as a grandparent.” All members of the group have slightly different situations, which Davis said she found interesting. Norden lives in Clarksville

Baltimore Jewish Times April 29, 2016

and has attended Temple Isaiah for more than 35 years. She has three sons, all of whom have made different choices: one who married a Jewish woman and is practicing; one who married a non-Jewish woman and is practicing a different religion; and one who

Davis has two grandchildren, 4 years old and 5 months old, and both are being raised Catholic. “e relationship between our grandchildren and us is more important and deeper than whatever religion is being taught in the home,” said Davis. “My husband and I have always said we would never let anything come between us and our kids.” Many of the members have very young grandchildren; therefore, another consensus formed by the group was to look for people who had teenage grandchildren as a way to understand what is to come. “e Grandparents Circle was very comforting because it is nice to know others out there have the same questions,” said Davis. “I’m sure as we go forward, there’ll be stumbles along the way, but

“Judaism is important to us, but my husband and I both feel that we wouldn’t want to jeopardize our relationship with our children.” — Jackie Norden, Grandparents Circle participant

married a non-Jewish woman but still embraces Judaism. is diversity among her own family made getting involved with the group an easy decision.

my husband and I just take the kids’ leads. If we have questions, they’re happy to answer, but we just follow their lead.” JT jkatz@midatlanticmedia.com

istockphoto.com/Aleksandr Ermolaev

Columbia was founded with the intention to host a religiously diverse community, and Howard County as a whole has embraced that. is makes the first meeting of the Grandparents Circle at Temple Isaiah nothing if not appropriate. e program is hosted nationally by Big Tent Judaism, an organization that pushes the Jewish community to be more welcoming to those who are underserved or le out and “is geared toward Jewish grandparents whose adult children have intermarried,” according to Rachel Petroff Kessler, family educator at Temple Isaiah. “Our feeling is that nothing is more important to us than the love of our children,” said Jackie Norden, who along with her husband, Roger, hosted the first meeting. “Judaism is important to us, but my husband and I both feel that we wouldn’t want to jeopardize our relationship with our children.” e group’s first meeting took place earlier this month, attracting about 15 people, and while it was initially only a one-off idea to discuss the issue, there was a consensus among members to continue meeting in the fall. Barbara Davis, who lives in Ellicott City and has been a member at Temple Isaiah for more than three decades, attended the first meeting with her husband, Larry. She said that while many in her parents’ generation were intolerant of


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SUDDENLY DARK, My World

Local News »

At Last Has a Chance for Light By Robin Blum

In the dark

, I stumbled to my car. Sitting in the driver’s seat, I stroked the velvet steering-wheel cover. “We had some good times, didn’t we, Crikey?” I say. I felt like it was the end of my independence and tried not to imagine — six months into my blindness — the scenario the next day, when a stranger would hand me cash and drive Crikey away forever. Instead, I get up on unsteady feet and start re-creating my life at age 58. Within the span of six days in August 2014, an unknown trauma caused a lack of oxygen to my optic nerves, leaving me blind. e result, according to top neuro-ophthalmologists at the Johns Hopkins Wilmer Eye Institute, is a rare, irreversible condition called non-arteritic ischemic optic neuropathy, or NAION. ere’s a better chance of being struck by lightning three times. In my right eye, I can see through a pinhole-sized area, with black-and-white vision and darkness encircling it like the screen of a broken ’60s TV. Everything is so — I can tell it’s a tree but can’t see a single leaf. rough my other eye, sight is only possible in the lelower peripheral. A dark mass covers the pupil, but I can 20

distinguish colors. Between the two, my sight is 20/400 — legally blind, with 85 percent loss of clarity. You wouldn’t know by looking at me, my eyes are still green, from the outside in. I wince at sunlight like a newborn vampire. With no depth perception, I grab at air instead of a glass and bruise myself on open cabinets. I’ve attached baby guards to furniture and wrapped Day-Glo tape around knives. My family and friends question whether I will come home to Pikesville, where I graduated from Milford Mill High School in 1974, but I want to stay in my own home in Washington, D.C., as independent as possible. But one day walking to the store — thankfully I live in the safe Capitol Hill neighborhood with shops nearby — I slam into a metal pole. Blood pours from my nose (luckily, unbroken). I know it’s black and blue, but, disturbingly, I can’t see my face in the mirror. As I lie in bed in a fetal position recovering from the store outing, tears fall onto my cat’s so fur, and the realization sinks in that I wouldn’t be able to attend High Holiday services at Moses Montefiore Congregation, the synagogue where my father, Monte Blum, was a founding member 50 years ago.

Baltimore Jewish Times April 29, 2016

Suddenly blinded at age 58, Robin Blum (left) will undergo experimental surgery in hopes to revive her eyesight. Her mother, Helene, provides encouragement.

Later, I’m referred to Columbia Lighthouse for the Blind, which sends a teacher for my first white-cane mobility training. As we walk, I feel stares — and can see people part like the Red Sea at my approach. When did I become a freak? Re-creating a life continues. A friend buys markers and index cards; notes go up on

the fridge like giant Post-its. She sits on the floor with garbage bags, surrounded by years of paperwork that she condenses into one box. (Don’t care what she throws out — can’t see it!) With my iPhone, I learn to photograph cooking directions and menus. My magnifying eyeglasses enlarge type and I can read four letters at a time. I’m


able to, sort of, watch movies on my iPad, and with TV shows I stand inches from the screen. Every morning, I call the Newsline to read/hear newspaper stories. Aer 25 years in the newspaper business, I dearly miss reading it with my morning coffee. Audiobooks are my salvation. At my local pool I swim endless laps to calm the panic attacks I now endure. I’ve found kindness others will never see. Teenagers offer me their seat on the Metro. Strangers reach out protectively — they’re unconditionally kind. I feel their discomfort but know the satisfaction: Not long ago, I was one of them. Assisting a disabled person made me feel good too.

A Lighthouse class introduces me to low-vision appliances: a liquid level detector and contrasting colored cutting boards. Instructors take me to a treacherous traffic intersection, and on my tail like border collies, they teach me to cross safely with my newly enhanced hearing. I miss eye contact. I miss beauty, I miss ugly, and I miss the differentiation between the two. It would be amazing to see the pink tutu on the little girl next door or a tu of lavender. Instead, two years later, I continue to re-create myself, now at age 60. Maybe there’ll be a cure for NAION in my lifetime. What if there was one? What if you

were me and there was an operation that gives a fighting chance to see again? If you could leave this dark organization that you never joined, wouldn’t you take that small chance? On May 17, my brother, Murray Blum, and I, fly to Florida where I will undergo a revolutionary stem-cell transplant, not FDA-approved and not covered by insurance. Dr. Jeffrey Weiss and his team will remove healthy stem cells from my hip bone marrow and inject them into my optic nerves. e stem cells will, hopefully, regenerate new, live nerves. On my Facebook page (Robin Blum), please open the link to read and watch an

exciting video, featuring a “formerly” blind woman from Baltimore who successfully underwent the surgery. I have also been writing a blog since this began that’s linked to Facebook and on Tumblr titled ”legallyblindblonde.” I’m keeping my expectations low but my hopes high. Resigning myself to the fact that I may never enjoy viewing the gentle brushstrokes of Degas’ ballet dancers again would be hard. But as my mom, Helene Blum, said, “You’ve seen them — remember them.” JT

Robin Blum can be reached at Blum50@comcast.net.

2016 Yom HaShoah Holocaust Commemoration

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21


Drama Aside, Van Hollen Bests Edwards for Mikulski’s Seat Local News »

In a race that differed more in style and symbolism than political positions — and in a race that many predicted would be decided by a razor-thin margin — voters in the Maryland Democratic primary le no doubt who they want to fill the Senate seat of soon-toretire Barbara Mikulski. Rep. Chris Van Hollen, who will square off against Baltimore County Del. Kathy Szeliga in November’s general election, surprisingly earned 53 percent of the vote, to Rep. Donna Edwards’ 39 percent. Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump won their parties’ presidential primaries in Maryland. In the contest between the two liberal Senate candidates, Van Hollen was cast as the establishment deal-maker and Edwards as the outside activist who would bring the experiences of a single African-American mother into the all-white, mostly male Senate. Edwards struck a defiant tone in her concession speech, telling her boisterous supporters at the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local Union 26 in Lanham, “Democracy is not about money, it’s about the American people. We can do better as a country. We can do better as a state.” Her message to the Democratic Party: “You cannot show up Election Day and call that post-racial inclusion.” In his victory speech at the Bethesda Marriott, Van Hollen 22

Rep. Donna Edwards concedes the race to Rep. Chris Van Hollen.

reminded his supporters of what the Democrats are capable of doing. “In the first two years of [Barack] Obama’s presidency, we did great things,” he said. “It’s easy to forget those days, but the economy was sinking by a lot. We were losing 700,000 jobs every month in this country. And President Obama and the Democratic Congress passed the economic recovery bill.” He praised the passing of the Affordable Care Act and said that as a senator, he would work toward ending gun violence and reducing mass incarceration. “We have 5 percent of the world’s population but 25 percent of the prison population. at is not right in America. We’re going to change that,” he said. On Trump’s Maryland victory, Van Hollen said the billionaire is trying to “pit people against

Baltimore Jewish Times April 29, 2016

each other based on religion or ethnicity or race. at is not who we are in the United States of America.” During a last-minute campaign stop at the Leisure World retirement community in Silver Spring, Van Hollen reflected on the intensity of the race but expressed optimism at his chances. “ere’s a lot of drama, and that’s why it’s important to talk to voters to the very end. I’m a big believer that you battle for every vote,” he said. “I think the word is getting out, and we’ve got momentum. But you can’t stop until you run across the finish line.” In the yearlong race, Van Hollen, 57, was considered the “establishment” candidate and Edwards, also 57, the champion of minorities and lowincome Marylanders. The organized Jewish community came out strongly for Van

Hollen, believing that he was the more successful legislator and that Edwards was insufficiently pro-Israel. Edwards was one of a handful of members of Congress who did not sign a letter asking Obama to veto any action by the United Nations deemed “biased against Israel.” Van Hollen signed the letter. Edwards also faced criticism early in her time in the House, in 2009, when she voted against condemning the U.N.’s Goldstone Report, which accused members of the Israel Defense Forces of human rights violations during the Gaza War. Van Hollen voted to denounce the report, which was later disputed by its lead author. At the Van Hollen campaign party early Tuesday night, Charles Heller of Rockville was waiting for the results. He said his biggest priorities are health care, gun control and fiscal responsibility. Van Hollen is the “best person with the best track record,” he said. “I have no confidence in Edwards because she has no track record and she’s made accusations that Van Hollen is supporting the NRA, which is not true.” Allison Wohl of Bethesda said she hopes Van Hollen will fill the void as a champion of disability rights in the Senate le by the retirement of Tom Harkin (D-Iowa). “All things equal, I would

Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call

By Daniel Schere, Jared Feldschreiber and David Holzel


A FREE EDUCATIONAL SERIES ON

have loved to see a woman take this seat, but things aren’t equal, and Van Hollen deserves a seat. He’s been an amazing congressman, and he’s a better legislator. He’ll represent Maryland better,” she said. At the Edwards party, volunteer Jeff Kaloc was waiting to hear the results. “If elected, she’s going to be tough, really take charge and be a voice for the American people, the working-class Americans,” said Kaloc, an Edwards volunteer. “I have a personal connection [with Edwards] because I also grew up in a single mother household. at, in itself, is a struggle. As an average citizen, it’s phenomenal. For a candidate like her, it’s just extraordinary.” e race had become so heated that it even attracted the attention of Israeli entertainment mogul Haim Saban, who contributed $100,000 to Van Hollen’s super PAC, according to online publication e Intercept. Edwards received $2 million from super PAC Women Vote! — a part of Emily’s List that contributes to the campaigns of pro-choice Democratic women. “Fundamentally, we shouldn’t be electing people because of gender,” said state Sen. Cheryl Kagan (D-District 17), who has known Van Hollen since their time together in the Maryland General Assembly. “I didn’t ask people to vote for me because I [am] a woman. I thought I could be most effective and a lot more consistent in my advocacy than my opponents.” Tuesday also marked the end of one of the most expensive House races in the country, the

bid to succeed Van Hollen in District 8. Democratic candidate David Trone spent $12 million of his own money on the race. But the contest was won by state Sen. Jamie Raskin (D-District 20), beating out a slate of challengers including former TV reporter and Marriott executive Kathleen Matthews. Matthews and Raskin were out campaigning at Leisure World Tuesday morning. Raskin, one of two Jews in the race, said he felt positive about the turnout and his campaign but was also a “nervous wreck.” He said he thinks that despite the amount of money being spent on the race, it is experience that matters most to voters. “What I love about democracy is the wisdom of crowds, and people understand that public office is something that you earn,” he said. “It’s not something that you buy, and I think we’re going to see a massive rejection of money politics and a vindication of grassroots progressive politics.” Matthews said she was proud of her campaign’s grassroots fundraising efforts from approximately 10,000 women, which she said mostly gave small donations of under $100. “I’ve been in this race for 11 months, and from the very beginning I wanted to run a broad-based grassroots campaign,” she said. “For me that meant doing about 100 meet and greets.” “It meant knocking on more than 150,000 doors,” she added, “with 25 candidate forums that were hosted by a huge range of grassroots groups, ethnic groups and religious groups.” JT dschere@midatlanticmedia.com jfeldschreiber@midatlanticmedia.com dholzel@midatlanticmedia.com

Healthy Living, Caring for Our Loved Ones and Planning for the Future TUESDAY, MAY 3 • 7 – 8:30 P.M. THE GREATEST GIFT: DISCUSSING AND PLANNING FOR FUTURE FINANCIAL, MEDICAL AND END-OF-LIFE MATTERS WITH LOVED ONES Weinberg Park Heights JCC • 5700 Park Heights Ave.

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jewishtimes.com

23


It’s Close, But Baltimore Voters Chose Pugh, Schleifer Local News »

By Marc Shapiro and Justin Katz

Isaac “Yitzy” Schleifer

I

n two hotly contested primaries, Baltimore City voters ultimately threw their support behind state Sen. Catherine Pugh for mayor and Isaac “Yitzy” Schleifer for District 5 councilman. In a mayoral race with a large pool of candidates, Pugh narrowly defeated former Baltimore mayor Sheila Dixon, who garnered much support, but ultimately fell short. Many Pugh supporters and experts pointed to Dixon’s misdemeanor conviction — and resignation — for using gi cards intended for the needy in 2010 as a major reason Pugh overtook her. “I’ve always seen the glass as half-full as opposed to halfempty,” Pugh told supporters in a victory speech. “A great mayor understands where you are so you can move the city forward.” As of press time, Pugh won with 45,360 votes, which was less than half of the votes cast in the Democratic mayoral primary at

24

36.8 percent, to Dixon’s 42,484 votes, which accounted for 34.5 percent. While Pugh will face Republican nominee Alan Walden, a former WBAL news anchor, and third-party candidates, she is expected to be the city’s next mayor. Democrats outnumber Republicans 10-to-1 in Baltimore. In the District 5 race, Isaac “Yitzy” Schleifer won in somewhat of an upset in a pool of seven candidates. Betsy Gardner, the neighborhood liaison for the 5th and 6th City Council districts and the citywide Jewish community liaison, was endorsed by sitting District 5 Councilwoman Rochelle “Rikki” Spector, who is stepping down aer nearly 40 years in office, and had the support of Baltimore City Council President Bernard C. “Jack” Young, who won his primary. ere are no Republican or third-party candidates in the District 5 race. Another Jewish council candidate, Zeke Cohen,

Baltimore Jewish Times April 29, 2016

won the Democratic primary in the city’s 1st District. Schleifer, 27, a small business owner who is involved in a number of Jewish and community organizations, said he is committed to transparency and hopes to use Spector’s remaining time in office to further familiarize himself with his future constituents and the issues in the district. “I think we’re going to bring new leadership to Baltimore and a lot of new ideas,” Schleifer said. “I know we can not only do better for the district, but for the city as a whole.” Schleifer, who is vice president of the Cheswolde Neighborhood Association and Northwest community liaison for Baltimore City State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby, won with 3,363 votes (33 percent) to Gardner’s 2,968 (29.1 percent) as of press time. He campaigned on public safety, technologically updating the city and ensuring city services are dispersed evenly throughout

Baltimore. “I think when people looked at this race entirely, they saw me as a candidate of the future, somebody who understands the challenges and develops unique strategies to overcome those challenges,” Schleifer said. “Whereas, when they looked at the other candidates, they felt it was same old, same old.” While he had a quiet evening with some friends at his home, just aer midnight when numbers from all the precincts were reported, his house quickly filled up with people coming by to celebrate. He considers the win quite the achievement, considering that having an election during Passover would pose challenges; he was aware that some people simply weren’t able to vote early during Passover preparation or on Tuesday since they were out of town. Gardner’s election night party attendees were hopeful and excited for most of the evening. She and a group of

Pugh: Lloyd Fox/TNS/Newscom; Schleifer: FeeBee Photography

Baltimore mayoral candidate Catherine Pugh on election night, with her staff and supporters, including Rep. Elijah Cummings (left), at the Baltimore Harbor Hotel on Tuesday, April 26, 2016.


Pugh: Lloyd Fox/TNS/Newscom; Schleifer: FeeBee Photography

supporters even danced to “Play at Funky Music” as a band played. e party wound down right around midnight, just before the last precinct results came in. “I feel like I got a late start, and if I would have had more time to put a campaign together in an earlier time frame, I think I would have been more successful in my [run],” Gardner said. She announced in February just ahead of the deadline to file, whereas Schleifer announced in August. She plans to speak to the City Council president about her future options but will remain a servant of the city. “I’ve been working for the citizens of Baltimore, not just the 5th District, for the last 14 years, and that won’t change,” Gardner said. Spector suspects Gardner may be right in that she could have used more time but said she’s proud of the campaign Gardner ran and what she’s done for the district. “ere is always life aer election day, and what’s important is that we do our best to make the transition as smooth as possible,” Spector said, noting she plans to work with Schleifer in her remaining time in office. “ere’s work to be done for the constituents and our city.” Earlier in the day when Baltimore was heading to the polls, Northwestern High School near Park Heights Avenue was crowded with campaign volunteers, at times even outnumbering voters. Amanda Schuster, a volunteer for Schleifer’s campaign, said that despite some backedup car traffic, she had seen a significant Jewish voting pres-

ence come through. Dr. Michael Carter spent his day outside the school campaigning to incoming voters on behalf of Derrick Lennon. He said that at about noon on Tuesday, roughly 278 people had come through that polling place so far. He added he was against the change from electronic ballots back to paper ballots, calling it antiquated. “I think we’re moving backwards, not forwards. I thought it was very cumbersome to do it that way,” Carter said. “It was easier to go click my buttons, and it was done.” Daniel Gordon, who voted at the school, agreed with Carter that the paper ballots were a step back. He said his votes were cast keeping in mind “that we need to have a caring government that is going to take care of its people.” One voter, who identified herself only as Leah, came out to vote with her husband and said she voted for Donald Trump because “I don’t like the establishment and all their dirty tricks.” When it came to paper or electronic ballots, she said, “As long as they’re honest, I don’t care.” At Fallstaff Elementary School, campaign volunteers were also out in full force and so were voters, including Alvin Young. A native of Jamaica who moved to Baltimore 20 years ago, Young said he is a proud American citizen and was eager to demonstrate his knowledge of the American history that he studied so diligently to become a citizen. “I voted for Shelia Dixon, I’m not hiding it, I will tell anybody that I voted for Sheila Dixon. I

want to bring her back in the system,” Young said. Aer election results started pouring in, at Pugh’s party, held in the ballroom of the Baltimore Harbor Hotel on West Fayette Street, the atmosphere was one of excitement, confidence and anticipation. Supporters watched the state senator take an early lead of 3,000 votes when the first precincts began reporting. at lead was maintained for the majority of the night as she beat out Dixon with a difference of only 5 percent of the vote, overtaking her other competitors by much larger margins. “We’ve done some great things in our neighborhoods, but together we are going to build some great neighborhoods throughout the city,” Pugh told the crowd of hundreds. Before Pugh — who was affectionately called “Cathy” by most of the crowd — spoke, familiar faces of Maryland’s Democratic delegation made brief remarks. “ank you, Baltimore. ank you for bringing us the mayor that we deserve, the mayor that we’ve been waiting for,” said Del. Jill P. Carter, who represents the 41st District in Baltimore City. “I’m so thankful that we finally can have a mayor that can move us into the future — forwards, not backwards.” Rep. Elijah Cummings, who represents Maryland’s 7th Congressional District, spoke next and was introduced as a longtime and unapologetic supporter of Pugh. “We’ve been through a lot, but now we are in the process of transformation,” he said. “[Pugh] knows every neighborhood is

important, and I know she’ll put her fingerprints on every one of them.” When Pugh took the microphone, she was flanked by a group of volunteers, campaign staff and fellow politicians, including Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz, and the crowd erupted when she came in. She began her speech thanking everyone who made her victory possible, saying that many people “did not give this campaign a chance” and noting she didn’t have a campaign manager until Feb. 1. She also thanked volunteers who helped raise money, as “this was one of the most expensive campaigns I’ve ever run,” she said. “We are going to work together because I understand the importance of growing business in the city and [the fact that] small business is the backbone of our economy,” Pugh said. She briefly talked about her own history from working as a banker to being a business owner and working under former Baltimore mayor William Donald Schaefer, emphasizing that everything she’s done in her career “has prepared me for this moment.” At one point during her speech, a supporter yelled, “You’ll be the greatest mayor ever,” to which she interrupted herself to respond, “You know that’s right.” On the GOP side, Walden made the Republican polls a one-man show, as he took roughly 40 percent of the vote while his contenders all came in under 20 percent each. JT

mshapiro@midatlanticmedia.com jkatz@midatlanticmedia.com

jewishtimes.com

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Mechoulam Talks Cannabis Research, Medical Uses National News »

Story and photo by Marc Shapiro

Israeli researcher Raphael Mechoulam spoke about medical cannabis in Baltimore on April 14.

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Baltimore Jewish Times April 29, 2016

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began by asking, “Why is this plant different from other plants?” ahead of the Passover holiday, pointing out that while most medicines come from plants, medicines derived from cannabis have been slow to develop due to the War on Drugs.

Dr. Dan Morhaim, a District 11 delegate and longtime proponent of medical cannabis,

Mechoulam kicked off his talk by telling the story of how materials for his early


B A LT L T I M O R E H E B R E W C O N G R E G AT AT I O N

ppresents r es ents an intima intimate te evenin eveningg w with ith experiments were acquired — that is he obtained 5 kilograms of Lebanese hashish from a contact at Israeli police. While he didn’t go to prison, he did have to apologize to the Minister of Health. In 1963, Mechoulam discovered CBD, or cannabidiol, which has shown promise in a variety of medical applications. In 1964, he discovered THC, or tetrahydrocannabinol, the main psychoactive component in THC. “One thing was missing, and it is how do these compounds act?” Mechoulam said. About two decades later, Mechoulam mapped out the brain’s endocannabinoid system, which is involved in appetite, pain-sensation,mood and memory and is affected by the compounds in cannabis. Mechoulam discussed what his research has shown over the years — promise in using cannabis to treat the side effects of chemotherapy; to improve sleep and decrease nightmares in soldiers with post-traumatic stress disorder; to treat inflammation in Crohn’s disease; to reduce anxiety; and to help control Type 1 diabetes and epilepsy. He spoke about his frustration with the slow movement of research in the United States, especially the slow development of CBD medicines, which have shown to drastically reduce frequency of seizures in pediatric epilepsy. “Even today, I’m not very happy with what’s going on,” he said. “I believe we should have pure cannabidiol investigated.” JT mshapiro@midatlanticmedia.com

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NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY: Meet the Orthodox Lawyer Advising Trump on Israel National News »

Photo and story by Uriel Heilman/JTA

NEW YORK — If Donald Trump wins the White House, he’ll probably be the first president whose top adviser on Israel used to do guard duty at a Jewish settlement in the West Bank armed with an M-16 assault weapon. The adviser, Jason Dov Greenblatt, currently works for Trump as a real estate attorney. Trump identified Greenblatt last week as one of two Jewish lawyers who would be his top Israel advisers; the other is bankruptcy expert David M. Friedman of the Kasowitz law firm. “I do rely on him as a consultant on Israel,” Trump said of Greenblatt at an April 14 meeting with Jewish reporters. “He’s a person who truly loves Israel. I love to get advice from people who know Israel, and especially from people who truly love Israel.” Greenblatt, 49, has an unusual resumé for a prospective presidential adviser on Middle East affairs. An Orthodox Jewish father of six from Teaneck, N.J., who wears his yarmulke at work, Greenblatt has worked for Trump for the last 19 years dealing exclusively with real estate and company matters. His titles are executive vice president and chief legal officer. He has self-published three travel books, one about a family trip to Israel, and runs a blog about family travel, Realfamilytrips.com. 30

Asked about his expertise on Israel and what he reads and who he consults to stay informed, Greenblatt said his main sources of information are daily email alerts, American Israel Public Affairs Committee materials and a weekly Jewish radio program featuring Malcolm Hoenlein, CEO of the Conference of Presidents of Major American Jewish Organizations. “I also speak to people who I would say are involved in the Israeli government at certain levels and hear their thoughts,” Greenblatt said. “ere’s just a tremendous amount of literature out there, emails and all that, so I read all of those as oen as I can.” ough he would help a President Trump navigate the complexities of Israeli-Palestinian affairs, Greenblatt has no Palestinian contacts. In fact, Greenblatt said he hasn’t met any Palestinians since he was a yeshiva student in the mid-1980s at Yeshivat Har Etzion, in a West Bank settlement bloc near Jerusalem, when he had some casual interactions with Palestinian laborers, gardeners and shopkeepers. (at was also when Greenblatt, like all students at the yeshiva, did occasional armed guard duty.) As Trump’s campaign for president has intensified, the Republican front-runner occasionally has tapped Greenblatt on Israel-related matters.

Baltimore Jewish Times April 29, 2016

Jason Greenblatt, Donald Trump's top real estate lawyer and an Orthodox Jew, is now the Republican presidential candidate’s top adviser on Israel.

Greenblatt says he was among those who helped Trump prepare his speech to the AIPAC Policy Conference in Washington in March. And when asked several days ago for a surrogate to write an op-ed in support of the candidate, the Trump campaign turned to

Greenblatt. A consultant to Trump on a variety of issues, Greenblatt could end up playing a crucial role in a Trump presidency. “I certainly will tell him my thoughts on something where I think I need to,” Greenblatt said in a wide-ranging, 90-minute


interview at Trump headquarters in Manhattan last week. “He’s very much open to listening. But people should recognize that Donald is his own person. An adviser is no more than someone who gives him context. He’s the one making the decisions.” Greenblatt’s positions on Israel are similar to those of his boss. Like Trump, Greenblatt supports a two-state solution, so long as it is reached by the parties themselves and not imposed by an outside body like the United Nations. He does not believe Jewish settlements in the West Bank are a core part of the problem. He says Trump, an “incredible facilitator,” should try to restart peace talks. “We kind of need to roll up our sleeves and try to attack it again and see what we can accomplish,” Greenblatt said. To get the Palestinians to the negotiating table, Greenblatt suggests threatening to withhold some U.S. funding from the Palestinian Authority. U.S. negotiators “need to lay down the law and explain that the [Palestinians are] not going to get the benefits they get from the United States unless they come to the table,” Greenblatt said. “I think they need to say: ‘Over the course of the next period of time, we will continue to provide funding, but in order to do that you need to do X, Y and Z, set concrete goals, and if you don’t we need to start tapering off the funding,’ and see what happens.” Also like Trump, Greenblatt believes Israeli-Palestinian negotiations can be handled similarly to Trump’s real estate negotiations, with money as a main incentive. “If you take out the emotional

part of it and the historical part of it, it is a business transaction. Land is going to be negotiated, water rights are going to be negotiated, security issues are going to be negotiated,” Greenblatt said. “So you need to say to them, ‘Listen, we want to discuss these two issues in this quarter, and then you’ll get your check, and these two issues in this quarter, and then you’ll get your check. At the end of the day you want to resolve all the issues. I think it isn’t a good idea to do partial negotiations and then hope for the best.” On Syria, Greenblatt said the United States should create safe havens for civilians fleeing the war, possibly by “borrowing land” from nearby Turkey and Jordan. On ISIS, he says the U.S. should marshal a worldwide coalition to address the problem. Asked how the Iran nuclear deal should be handled, Greenblatt says it’s too late simply to tear it up and that he’s not sure how to proceed. “I’m not an expert on it to answer that question adequately,” he said. is would be Greenblatt’s first real foray into politics. He said he hasn’t voted in primary elections and only registered as a Republican this year. He says he’s more liberal than Trump on immigration, and though he didn’t vote for Barack Obama, Greenblatt was excited by his election in 2008 as the nation’s first African-American president. He voted for John McCain in ’08 and Mitt Romney in ’12; he said he couldn’t remember whether he had voted for Bill Clinton for president. When Trump identified Greenblatt last week as his top presidential adviser on Israel,

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it appeared to be a spur-ofthe-moment decision. “I knew that he was relying on me for certain aspects of Israel, but I didn’t know I was his top adviser,” Greenblatt said. “I feel fortunate he said it.” Partway through a meeting with Orthodox Jewish reporters, Trump noted that he had plenty of Jewish friends and then asked his campaign manager, Corey Lewandowski, to bring Greenblatt and another Orthodox Jewish employee to the room. Shortly aer they arrived, Trump was asked about his views on the West Bank. He punted the question to Greenblatt. “I think the settlements should stay, but I think they have to work something out so that both sides are able to live in peace and safety,” Greenblatt said. It was in an answer to a followup question that Trump said Greenblatt would be his go-to man on Israel. “I don’t think I can find better,” Trump said. Greenblatt later said he didn’t even know that a meeting with Jewish reporters was scheduled; he simply came to the room when summoned. Raised in an Orthodox neighborhood of Queens, Greenblatt is a product of Orthodox Jewish day schools. He went to Yeshiva University’s high school for boys, the Marsha Stern Talmudical Academy and then to Yeshiva College aer a year of study in the West Bank yeshiva. He obtained his law degree from New York University and worked for a law firm doing real estate transactional work — and tried to launch a startup cappuccino company — until a recruiter brought him to

Trump. Greenblatt said Trump has been hugely understanding about his religious needs (Trump’s daughter, Ivanka Trump, converted to Judaism before marrying husband Jared Kushner, and the family is involved in Orthodox observance). Greenblatt recalled the time he was leading a complex negotiation when he sheepishly told Trump he had to stop everything for a threeday Jewish holiday. “He said, ‘Go home, go pray, be with your family, and we’ll pick it up aer the holiday,’” Greenblatt said of Trump. “He didn’t just not make an issue of it; he made me feel great about it.” As a manager, Greenblatt has more free time these days than he did as a young lawyer. He and his wife, a full-time psychiatrist, take their family on two 10- to 14-day trips every year. He teaches a weekly real estate class at the Y.U.’s Sy Syms School of Business, and he’s on advisory boards connected to Y.U., the Orthodox Union’s youth organization and Frisch, the northern New Jersey Jewish day school that his 17-year-old triplets attend. Greenblatt said he considers himself very lucky that he may get the chance to play a historic role helping Israel. “I’m in this unique, amazing position where I might be able to help a country like Israel that I love so deeply by being where I am,” Greenblatt said. “When Donald negotiates deals in the White House, I know how he thinks, I know how to get his bidding done, so I could be useful. And I’d love to help change this country for the better.” JT


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Cover Story »

WATER

A Land Flowing With Milk, Honey and …

Desalination Innovation Infiltrates Israel’s Economy By Daniel Schere

One of Israel’s efforts toward making its water usage more efficient and environmentally sustainable came to fruition in 2005 with the construction of the Ashkelon Desalination Plant on the Mediterranean coast. ere are now four plants with a fih scheduled to open later this year at Ashdod. e most recent plant to open was at Sorek in 2013, when the desalination company IDE Technologies partnered with Merkerot, Israel’s national water company, to implement a much more advanced reverse osmosis process converting salty water from the Mediterranean Sea into potable water. “Ten years before, the ques-

tion was: Who can make desalination? Of course, in those days a lot of companies made desalination,” said Boris Liberman, chief technology officer and vice president of IDE. Liberman explained that Israel does not have separate water systems for drinking water and irrigation, but Sorek treats water for both purposes. “It’s one common system, but the standard of the water we are producing is the highest standard,” he said. With the production capacity of 624,000 cubic meters of water per day (164.8 million gallons), Sorek is the largest seawater desalination plant in the world. Water first undergoes the pre-treatment stage,

where all suspended solids are removed, and “we try also to remove a little bit of the dissolved organic material as much as we can,” Liberman added. e water then passes through long, tube-like structures called membranes, where dissolved salts are removed from the water in two stages: first from the seawater and then again from the brackish water (a mixture of seawater and freshwater). Due to its increased production, Sorek uses 16-inch membranes, which are twice the size of those in any other plant in Israel. “e size of the membrane is related to the size of the desalination you’re doing,” Liberman said. But “when you actually start

to design this plant, you understand that a huge membrane is not cost-effective.” In the post-treatment stage, a bit of limestone is added to the water in the absence of fluoride for drinking water. “People need calcium for their bones, so somehow we have to add calcium,” he said, which limestone provides. Liberman said each pump can produce about 2,500 cubic meters of potable water, which, he said, is unique to anywhere else. Despite the larger, more expensive membranes, Liberman said Sorek’s cost of production is no different from that of Ashkelon’s or a plant in Hadera.

Sorek DesalinationPlant :Courtesy of IDE Technologies Ltd.

EVEN AS ONE OF THE WORLD’S SMALLEST COUNTRIES, ISRAEL IS IN ITS SECOND DECADE OF PROGRESS TOWARD TACKLING ONE OF THE WORLD’S LARGEST PROBLEMS: WATER SCARCITY.


Sorek, which opened in 2013, is the largest seawater desalination plant in the world.

Sorek DesalinationPlant :Courtesy of IDE Technologies Ltd.

Drought-Propelled Innovation For many years, the Sea of Galilee was Israel’s major source of water, but drought conditions in the 1990s caused lake levels to become low and led to contamination, said Ehud Zion Waldoks, a spokesman for Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. But the desalination plant project initially lacked public support, which caused delay and put Israel in “dire water straits,” even to the point of people not washing their cars. “In 1999, it rained a lot, and people asked, ‘Why do I need an extremely expensive desalination

“The unique thing about our technology is that this is very important. You can incorporate it into a new system, or you can also incorporate it in an existing system.” — Dr. Noam Perlmutter

plant?’” he said. Israel now uses a combination of freshwater from the Kinneret and desalinated seawater from the Mediterranean as its potable water sources for both drinking and irrigation. More than 80 percent of Israel’s treated wastewater is recycled

and is used for irrigation of crops, which is higher than anywhere else in the world. Next is Spain, which recycles 20 percent of its wastewater. At the helm of much of Israel’s water innovation has been BGU’s Zuckerberg Institute for Water Research. e

university was established in 1969 by the Israeli government with the purpose of economically rejuvenating the Negev. It has produced a number of technological innovations such as the startup company ROTEC, which designs mineral scaling technology that prevents mineral salt jewishtimes.com

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than that. Today, you’re using desalination in every aspect of the industry.”

Wastewater Treatment ROTEC’s latest pilot project is a flow reversal unit that is being tested at the Shafdan Wastewater Treatment Plant, which supplies water to the Dan region of Israel and includes Tel Aviv. It’s is the largest waste-

Baltimore Jewish Times April 29, 2016

Zuckerberg Institute staff: Daniel Schere; Student photos: Ben-Gurion University of the Negev

At Sorek, almost 160 million gallons a day pass through tube-like structures called membranes that remove salts from both seawater and brackish water.

Sorek Desalination Plant: A. Lavin; Other photos: Daniel Schere

deposits from collecting in membranes during the desalination process. e company has also brought its technology to Jordan, the United States and several countries in Europe. Dr. Noam Perlmutter, one of ROTEC’s founders, explained that the desalination in Israel has ballooned to a roughly $30 billion- to $50 billion-per-year industry for revenue. “e unique thing about our technology is that this is very important,” he said. “You can incorporate it into a new system, or you can also incorporate it in an existing system.” Desalinated water has become a hot commodity around the world, used by large corporations such as IBM and Coca Cola. Perlmutter said ROTEC is developing a project with Coca Cola but is still in the early stages. “In the United States, desalination is taking out water from the sea and [creating] potable water,” he said. “But desalination is much more


Zuckerberg Institute staff: Daniel Schere; Student photos: Ben-Gurion University of the Negev

Water desalination research is never-ending, from hands-on studies at the Ramat Hovav industrial zone (top left) to efforts in Yerucham to provide fish-friendly treatments (top right) to all-important membrane improvements at the Zuckerberg Institute (above, left and right).

water treatment plant in the country. Treating wastewater requires less pressure than seawater, Perlmutter added. Shafdan can process 7.5 cubic meters of wastewater per hour (almost 2,000 gallons) and can recover up to 90 percent of the water by reversing the direction of the water’s flow and create a highly concentrated brine. e unit would be used only for nonpotable water purposes. Perlmutter said that in Israel

brine can be put back in the sea — there is no other current use for it — but other countries such as the United States and Australia forbid this practice. “is is why in some cases the desalination of brackish water is not economically viable,” he said. “is is a big problem when you’re trying to get this much water [out of] the desalination process.” But the presence of an advanced water infrastructure in Israel dates back further than

15 years. e remains of the ancient Israelites’ irrigation system from the seventh century B.C.E. can be seen on the site of Tel Beersheva, just east of the modern-day city of Beersheva, and is open to the public. BGU archeology professor Steve Rosen said the water system was set up in order to manage flash flooding at Wadi Beer Sheba. Rosen said all of the work in constructing the cistern would have been done

with iron picks and that the engineering feat was “genius” for its time. “ey have no optical instruments. ey have obviously no mechanical instruments. e whole thing is dug by hand with picks. e dirt is removed on the backs of donkeys and on the backs of people,” he said. “You’d take three steady rods to line them up, and if they’re lined up in a straight line, you get plumb bobs to get a straight line going down. And you had to do all of that to make sure that they had a slope that would bring the water into the system.” Rosen said most likely the majority of the work was done by slaves, due to the pyramid-like social structure of the ancient jewishtimes.com

37


Israelite society. “You would come out during the season and work on the king’s lands unless you were part of the aristocracy,” he said. “If you got to be in the upper class it was great, but how many people were in the upper class, 2 percent?” Rosen himself was a part of the excavation team that uncovered the site in the 1970s and said that upon digging, the

researchers discovered that much of the rock that was used in the construction collapsed in order to stabilize the ceiling, which is made of limestone block. Rosen said the ancient civilizations typically did not drink the water due to the fact that it was full of waste but would typically elect to drink alcohol. “We know from the Roman and Byzantine texts that you would not drink the

water,” he said. “You would mix the water with wine, and they actually say it cleaned the water, which makes a little bit of sense because the wine had alcohol and the alcohol probably killed some of the bugs.” Rosen added that some of Israel’s ancient cisterns still collect water, but it typically turns into green sludge that “you don’t want to put your toe in, let alone drink.” JT dschere@midatlanticmedia.com

A Nutritious Negev for Noshing

38

Baltimore Jewish Times April 29, 2016

goats,” Anat said. e Kornmehls raised the goats for five years only to be repeatedly met with red tape. “We got to a point where we said enough is enough. We either sell the goats or else I don’t know what we’re going to do,” she said. ey ended up settling on governmentowned land just north of the Sde Boker kibbutz in 1997. Four kids and almost two decades later, the couple still does not have a permit, but they have been living on the site and going strong with their business.

“is is why we live in a compound, we can’t build a house yet aer 18-and-a-half years,” she said. In addition to the restaurant they offers tastings and opportunities to watch the goats being milked. March and April, Daniel said, is when farmers see their largest yield of goat’s milk, because mother

goats usually get pregnant in July and start producing milk two months before they have kids. But the kids drink some of the mothers’ milk during infancy, which is around November and December. e hard cheeses are in season first during the spring, and they then become progressively soer as the warm months progress. Kornmehl’s menu is none too overwhelming but includes a series of effective outlets for getting cheese in the stomach including a calzone with goat cheese, tomatoes and red peppers and fried filo dough-wrapped goat cheese pieces that express “fresh from the farm” like no other style of goat cheese. You can also order a sampler plate that includes a selection of hard and so cheese varieties. JT — Daniel Schere

Photos by Daniel Schere

T

he concept of Jews having “made the desert bloom” may not be completely visible as you travel along Route 40 through the bare hills of Israel’s Negev desert, but venturing off the beaten path between Beersheva and Sde Boker may turn you on to one of the region’s most delicious hidden treasures. e Kornmehl Goat Cheese Farm and Restaurant was started almost 20 years ago by Anat and Daniel Kornmehl, who had been studying agriculture at Hebrew University. Daniel had also studied cheese-making in France. Aer graduating and traveling around Australia and the United States, the couple came back to Israel with the intent of raising goats and starting their own cheese business. “I was working in the Ministry of Agriculture in the extension service for farmers,” Anat said. “I was teaching sheep and goat farming, and then we decided that this is what we want to do. We want to practice agriculture and sell a product.” ey wanted to start their business in Jerusalem but were put off by the bureaucracy, so they decided to raise their own goats. e Kornmehls went to the land authorities and applied for a grazing license, only to be told they needed the actual goats first. “At that time, Daniel was starting cheese-making in one of the places in Jerusalem, and they got an agreement that instead of getting money for the work that he did there, he [would] get 12 young


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INSIDE: 44 AGING IN PLACE WITH PRACTICAL OPTIONS

46 TOP MEDICAL ISSUES FACING SENIORS RUN GAMUT

50 CHANGING PRIORITIES AS YOU AGE

54 UNTIL 120: A MIXED BLESSING?

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Mom is home alone and slips in the kitchen. Or Dad is out in the yard when he loses his bearings. The worst time to have the “how can we best support mom and dad?” conversation with your family is when you absolutely have to. “I can’t stress enough that the most important thing is to make a move before you need it,” says Diane Stinchcomb, 44

Baltimore Jewish Times April 29, 2016

director of sales at Edenwald, a continuing care retirement community in Towson. “Don’t wait for a crisis to happen.” Edenwald offers three core levels of care: independent living, assisted living and skilled nursing. “I think that it’s important that residents consider communities that have all three levels [because] it’s just a lot easier

of a transition,” says Stinchcomb. “If at some point they need to transition into assisted living, it’s still right here in the same community.” “Skilled nursing has the old stigma,” says Troy Kirk, vice president of customer transitions at Lorien Health Systems. “Say 20 years ago, that’s all we had. So a lot of people thought that [these communities

©iStockphoto.com/Bitter

Help your senior family member make the best choice for the next phase


©iStockphoto.com/Bitter

CHAI HELPS SENIORS! were] where people go to die.” Today, the picture is somewhat brighter — many people opt to move into adult living centers so they can function more efficiently day to day and make more time for friends, family visits and, yes, fun. “I really try to get people to understand that it’s the next phase of retirement.” Lorien Health Systems, located in Ellicott City and Columbia, offers the three core levels — and rehabilitation services as well for those that need them. In some cases, health impediments can be successfully rehabbed and the patients returned home. After you’ve found the right place for Mom or Dad — with their blessing, if at all possible of course — there are simple things you can do to help your aging parents adjust to their new environment. When they make the move, downsizing is usually a difficult reality — but new residents can choose to keep the items that they hold dear, such as old tables or special collections. Bear in mind: While you may think something is dated or outmoded, Mom and Dad know better. “You know Dad will want to bring an old ratty recliner and the kids will say, ‘You can’t take that there’,” Stinchcomb says. Let Dad choose. “We try to have a lot of empathy for our clients,” says Kristy Kruger, vice president of sales and marketing at Broadmead’s continuing care retirement community in Cockeysville — it offers short-term rehabilitation as well. “Clients are moving from houses or condos that they

may have lived in for over 20, 30 or even 40 years. It’s an emotional change.” Springwell, a retirement community in Mount Washington, features 136 units making it a smaller, more intimate facility. They offer the three core levels and specialize in memory care. “Some will adjust right away, but on average it can take four to six weeks,” explains Phil Golden , director and principal at Springwell. He suggests getting the apartment or room ready for your family member ahead of time. “at way, it’s familiar for them.” “We also encourage families to check our site for activities and encourage their loved one to participate,” adds Stinchcomb. Your impulse may be to visit often — on a daily or weekly basis — but excessive visitation could prevent your family member from fully socializing. “You want them to make friends on their own.” Choosing — or helping to choose — the right senior living facility for your parent or other loved one can be overwhelming. Each facility or community is going to be nuanced in their approach. Health concerns, aesthetic, lifestyle, geography, pet policies, social needs … there’s so much to consider. Through it all, keep your senior family member’s needs the center of the conversation, and you can’t go wrong. “Ask them what they want,” says Kirk. “Ask them what they would like to see happen.” ✧

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Photos Provided

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Top Medical Issues Facing Seniors Run Gamut The advent of humans living longer — sometimes into triple digits — has brought on a plethora of health problems that seniors must cope with. While some issues are remnants of past health choices, there are measures that seniors, and soonto-be seniors, can take to mitigate future health concerns. Dr. Steven Gambert is a professor of medicine and director of geriatrics at the University of Maryland Medical Center. He classified geriatric health problems into three categories: normal age-relatedchanges, age-prevalent diseases and diseases that present 46

themselves in an atypical way. “It’s usually the latter that causes most problems in older people who don’t even know they have a problem until later in the course of their illness,” said Gambert. “Any change in their usual state of health or function needs to be taken seriously. Older people should not dismiss [small problems] like it’s just a part of old age.” He used the example that a heart attack can present itself as a shortness of breath or chest pain. For age-prevalent diseases, Gambert emphasized that

Baltimore Jewish Times April 29, 2016

everyone — not just seniors — should be aware of osteoporosis. “Osteoporosis is a disease of the bones that happens when you lose too much bone, make too little bone or both,” according to the National Osteoporosis Foundation’s website. “As a result, your bones become weak and may break from a minor fall or, in serious cases,  even from  sneezing or bumping into furniture.” According to the NOF, 54 million Americans have low bone density. One in two women and one in four men will break a bone due to osteoporosis, causing an estimated

two million broken bones every year. Gambert added that, if le untreated, the disease can cause respiratory failure due to the spine compressing and stopping the lungs from taking in enough oxygen. To prevent this, he recommended that people ensure they are getting enough calcium and vitamin D in their diets as well as speak to a doctor about bone density testing. Dr. Robert Graw Jr. is the medical director at Righttime Medical Care, and he spoke to concussions, an issue that has received more attention in recent years.

©iStockphoto.com/vm

By Justin Katz


Photos Provided

Dr. Steven Gambert

“[We knew] people could hit their heads and could have problems but as far as jostling the brain around a bit, we didn’t attribute [many problems] to that,”

Dr. Robert G. Graw Jr.

said Graw. “[During] the last 10 years, researchers are finding the brain does not tolerate that well.” He explained that when people age, they have less new

Dr. Martin Edelman

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ways, some of which are subtle such as not sleeping well or irritability. Graw emphasized that the treatment for seniors who have fallen or tripped has become prescribed and that doctors “know what to do if [a senior] gets a head injury and how bad

“I have always been a very involved person, and leading the Sabbath service and Yiddish Club here gives me a great feeling. I’m enjoying being an active part of the North Oaks community.”

health.” However, he added, between 10 and 15 percent of lung cancer patients have never smoked. According to the American Cancer Society, there are approximately 250,000 cases of lung cancer each year. (This means between 25,000 to

“Any change in their usual state of health or function needs to be taken seriously. Older people should not dismiss small problems like it’s just a part of old age.” — Dr. Steven Gambert, professor of medicine and director of geriatrics at the University of Maryland Medical Center

— Paul Wartzman, Resident since 2014

This is my

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48

Baltimore Jewish Times April 29, 2016

it can be, but the focus should be on preventing it.” Another disease that has come to the forefront is cancer, but Dr. Martin Edelman, professor of medicine and director of solid tumor oncology at the University of Maryland Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, believes seniors should be particularly vigilant. “Cancer is the disease of aging,” said Edelman. “e older you get, the greater your chances are that you will develop a cancer somewhere.” He said the most common cancers in the country are breast, prostate and colorectal. However, the cancer with the highest mortality rate, which is also his specialty, is lung cancer. The average age of lung cancer patients is 70. In terms of prevention, Edelman said, “It’s never too late to stop smoking. at is the best thing anyone can do for their

37,500 lung cancer patients are nonsmokers.) e symptoms of lung cancer can be more difficult to detect as they are issues that oen come and go such as aches and pains or coughing. Edelman said a persistent cough or coughing up blood isn’t inherently a sign of cancer, but when these common issues persist for an extended period of time then that is a signal to seek medical attention. Gambert added that beyond understanding their own medical issues, one of the most important things seniors can do is share their medical histories with their family. Said Gambert, “Tell [your] children and grandchildren; [people should] learn from [their] elders. Not just stories and knowledge, but also their medical history” ✧ jkatz@midatlanticmedia.com


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CHANGING

Priorities

ging requires resiliency, creativity and adaptability, and it can lead to great self-discovery. Why are we sometimes surprised when someone in their 60s, 70s, 80s or 90s becomes more creative, starts a new meaningful relationship, offers sound advice or begins a new endeavor or interest? Since growing older is an inevitable part of life, why not look at these questions, focus on challenging negative stereotypes and reinforce positive contributions that occur as we age? Over the past decade, society has begun to change its views about aging. Older politicians, rock-and-rollers and actors, such as Sen. Harry Reid, Betty White and e Who, now appeal to younger audiences. is is the beginning of a transformation of how we view the senior years with a focus on redefining one’s purpose and an emphasis on creativity, resilience and respect for experience. So, let’s work together to create a new image of the senior years.

A

50

Baltimore Jewish Times April 29, 2016

First, envision and define what you want your purpose to be. It is important to challenge previous beliefs that one’s

The ability to take risks that were previously not considered because of family and career obligations may contribute to greater creativity. purpose in life is finished when one retires, ages or reaches a specific birthday. A 2015 study on healthy aging by the Rush University Medical Center in Chicago showed that having a sense of purpose in life during one’s senior years

AS YOU AGE

can provide a shield against the development of Alzheimer’s disease. According to Gene Cohen, a pioneer in recognizing the creative aspects of aging, developing one’s purpose is crucial as positive changes lead to new opportunities for creative expression as we age. e ability to take risks that were previously not considered because of family and career obligations may contribute to greater creativity. According to author Jeffrey Kluger, it may be no coincidence that so many creative types live long lives, since they are doing what they love. According to Cohen, “the greater freedom and courage that many older adults exhibit helps explain why, throughout history, many older adults beyond the age of 70 have assumed the role of shapers or shakers of society.” Major contributors include Socrates, Copernicus, Gandhi, Golda Meir, Frank Lloyd Wright and Benjamin Franklin. Wright died at 91 — just before his Guggenheim Museum opened — and

©iStockphoto.com/AleksandarNakic

By Jill Krystkiewicz


©iStockphoto.com/gradyreese

piece, creation or life is perfect. All lives have challenges and roadblocks. e senior years are a balancing act between physical changes, evolving roles and creating a new purpose and examining new potentials. It is not a period of life where you

should feel you need to stop learning or growing. On your blank canvas, it is important to recognize that there will be rough edges, challenges, roadblocks, bumps and bruises, but at the same time it can include brightness, spirit, possibilities and hope. According

to Benjamin Zander, conductor, motivational speaker and writer, it is the time to “live the rest of your life in possibility.” ✧ Jill Krystkiewicz is communications assistant at the Madlyn and Leonard Abramson Center for Jewish Life in North Wales, Pa. This article originally appeared in The Jewish Exponent.

©iStockphoto.com/AleksandarNakic

Benjamin Franklin negotiated the Treaty of Paris at 77 and signed the Constitution at 81. Today, Wayne iebaud, 95, and Alex Katz, 88, are nationally recognized artists, and Edith Pearlman, 79, debuted her short stories in 2011 and won the National Book Critics Circle Award for fiction in 2012. Now is the time to start thinking about your own senior years with purpose and appreciation. is new thinking should include teaching our children the positive aspects of aging. Of course, every senior doesn’t need to be famous or create a masterpiece. Designing one’s life during the senior years takes strength, resilience, respect and reinvention. Your senior years should be a blank canvas with new possibilities. No invention, artistic

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iNSIDER

UNTIL 120: A Mixed Blessing?

IN GENESIS 6:3, after creating people and watching them multiply, God promptly put a limit on humans’ lifespans, setting the maximum number of years at 120. If that’s the number we’re shooting for as a species, we haven’t quite reached our full potential yet. But would we want to? “Depressive disorders are much more common” in people who have had strokes, heart attacks or other ailments associated with aging, says Marc Zisselman, director of geriatric psychiatry at Einstein Medical Center in Philadelphia. “Functional impairment, cognitive impairment, uncontrolled pain, insomnia, isolation — they’re all strongly associated with depression. Individuals in nursing homes have a very high prevalence.” Depression affects more than 6 million Americans over age 65, according to 54

Baltimore Jewish Times April 29, 2016

the Geriatric Mental Health Foundation. The American Psychological Association says there is evidence to suggest some of the natural physical changes associated with aging may in fact increase the risk. (Zisselman does point out that depression, however common, is not considered a “normal” part of aging. Grief and sadness in response to life events, on the other hand, are.) One hundred years ago, there were fewer than 4 million Americans 65 and older. In 2010, there were more than 40 million, according to the Census Bureau, which predicts that by 2050 that figure will have more than doubled. The fastest-growing subgroup in that population is the 85- to 94-year-olds. Living longer means, of course, being healthier for longer, at least relatively — but there’s a huge discrepancy among the older set, Zisselman says. “If you take a

bunch of 25- or 30-year-olds, they’re much more alike than dissimilar. If you take a bunch of 75-year-olds, they run the gamut from people who are CEOs of Fortune 500 companies to people in a vegetative state or suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. “Most baby boomers, in the scheme of things, are interested in living longer, but they’re more interested in maintaining a high quality of life,” he adds. Medical research is working on maintaining that high quality of life by trying to prevent the diseases of aging before they occur. Scientists are identifying the biomarkers — the biological molecules found in the body that indicate risk for certain ailments — and coming up with treatments that can be started well in advance of a disease appearing. Low bone mineral density, for example, can be a biomarker of osteoporosis. High blood pressure might be another

©iStockphoto.com/freemixer

By Rachel Vigoda


©iStockphoto.com/freemixer

RATHER THAN LOOKING AT OSTEOPOROSIS OR HEART DISEASE OR STROKE AS SOMETHING THAT JUST HAPPENS WHEN YOU GET OLD, THEY’RE NOW SEEN AS AVOIDABLE — OR AT LEAST DELAYABLE. biomarker and “an argument to intervene,” says Jason Karlawish, a professor of medicine, medical ethics and health policy and a fellow of the Institute on Aging at the University of Pennsylvania. His research focuses on dementia. “ere’s no question a variety of common events seen as people age are, more and more, being regarded as discrete diseases that are amenable to diagnosis and intervention,” Karlawish says. In other words, rather than looking at osteoporosis or heart disease or stroke as something that just happens when you get old, they’re now seen as avoidable — or at least delayable. Like Zisselman, Karlawish points out the “tremendous variability among older adults” but adds that some diseases are common enough that “packaging the phenomena of aging as discrete diseases” and focusing research on preventing each one individually makes sense. Many times prevention comes in pill form, but there are other ways to stay healthy

longer. Karlawish compares seniors in the U.S. with those in Italy, who are generally more functional, he says, because “for much of their lives, Italians were walking around, climbing hills, carrying groceries — they have a regular chronic exercise habit. Habits and physical activity absolutely influence what we call aging.” On a public health level, Karlawish suggests revamping cities and towns as a way to encourage habitual exercise and a healthier, more independent old age. He also thinks it’s time to change the conversation about aging entirely. “We need to explore new opportunities for thinking about what it means to grow old in America. Instead of seeing the end as retirement for many, many years, people should go through different phases of working,” he says. ✧

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May 1

Forest Park High Reunion

Class of June 1956 holds its 60th reunion 11 a.m. Suburban Country Club, 7600 Park Heights Ave., $50. To register call Joyce Wormser Goodman at 410-484-6364.

May 2

Gemilut Hasidim Committee Meeting

Chizuk Amuno Congregation holds a meeting for the public to learn about community service projects. It will be led by Mark Brodinsky, a board member of Ronald McDonald House. 7:30 p.m. 8100 Stevenson Road, Baltimore. Contact Cheryl Snyderman at csnyderman@chizukamuno.org.

May 3

Hello Baby

The Owings Mills JCC hosts a class for new moms with a JCS

parenting expert and includes music and sensory stimulation with their babies. 11 a.m. to noon. 3506 Gwynnbrook Ave., Owings Mills. Call 410-559-3524.

May 4

‘A Wing and a Prayer’

Beth El Congregation hosts a screening of the film “A Wing and a Prayer,” which tells the story of former World War II aviators who risked their lives in 1948 to prevent what they viewed as an imminent second Holocaust. Included is a discussion with writer/director Boaz Dvir. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. 8101 Park Heights Ave., Baltimore. Call 410-484-0411.

May 5

Yom Hashoah Commemoration Baltimore Hebrew Congregation holds a communitywide memorial service in observance of Yom Hashoah. There will be a reception for Holocaust survivors and their

families preceding the program. 7 p.m. 7401 Park Heights Ave., Baltimore. Visit baltimorehebrew.org.

May 6

Dementia Conference

The Alzheimer’s Association of Greater Maryland Chapter holds its annual Dementia Conference at the Baltimore Sheraton North in Towson. $35 for care partners/ students and $95 for health professionals. 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. 903 Dulaney Valley Road, Towson. Visit alz.org/maryland to register.

May 7

The Baltimore Zionist District holds a memorial ceremony honoring Israel’s fallen soldiers and victims of terror. 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Beth Tfiloh Mintzes Theater. 3300 Old Court Road, Baltimore. Visit bzdisrael.org.

May 13

Beth Kaplan

Baltimore Jewish Times April 29, 2016

Yom Hazikaron Community Memorial

May 8

Beth El Congregation hosts a gathering led by Rabbi Dana Saroken during Mother’s Day weekend that will be filled with storytelling and memories. 7:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. 8101 Park Heights Ave., Baltimore. RSVP to rachels@bethelbalto.com.

May 9

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May 10

May 12

The Gordon Center for Performing Arts hosts a performance by the talented teens of HaZamir, who will perform a diverse and inspirational repertoire of traditional and contemporary Jewish choral music. 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. 3506 Gwynnbrook Ave., Owings Mills. Call 410-356-7469.

Beth El Congregation hosts a screening of “In Our Own Hands: The Hidden Story of the Jewish Brigade,” which tells the story of 5,000 men from Palestine sent by the British to fight during the final months in World War II who eventually helped implement the creation of the State of Israel. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. 8101 Park Heights Ave., Baltimore. Contact Ellen Marks at 410-580-5166.

entitled “Reputation: Your Most Important Asset.” 8 a.m. Free for members and $25 for nonmembers. 3300 Old Court Road, Baltimore. Visit bit.ly/1yCaV2X to register.

Mother Love

HaZamir Baltimore

May 11 >> The Jewish Brigade: Soldiers, Assassins and Heroes

COMMUNITY CALENDAR FOR MAY 1 TO MAY 14

Beth Tfiloh Congregation hosts a breakfast and meeting with corporate executive Beth Kaplan, who will speak about how she has become one of the top leaders in corporate America in a program

Yom Ha’atzmaut Celebration

Ohr Chadash Academy hosts a family-friendly program commemorating Israel’s 68th birthday. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Shomrei Emunah Congregation. 6221 Greenspring Ave., Baltimore. Call 410-999-2200.

‘Romeo et Juliette’

The Patricia and Arthur Modell Performing Arts Center at the Lyric presents its production of “Romeo et Juliette,” featuring the Concert Artists of Baltimore orchestra. 7:30 p.m. 140 W. Mount Royal Ave., Baltimore. Call 410-547-7328.

May 14

Buying Into Baltimore

Baltimore Polytechnic Institute hosts a home-buying fair, where home buyers can choose from a variety of workshops. 1400 W. Cold Spring Lane, Baltimore. Visit LiveBaltimore.com.

To see a full calendar of events or to submit yours, visit jewishtimes.com homepage (submit calendar button on right) or send information to mshapiro@midatlanticmedia.com. Include a summary of the event and date, time, cost, address and a contact for additional information. Must submit at least two weeks prior to event date, not all events will appear in the print edition due to space availability.

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Arts & Life »

Music to His Ears

BALTIMOREAN DEBUTS AT CARNEGIE HALL By Hannah Monicken

S 60

Baltimore Jewish Times April 29, 2016

and I would see these famous pianists come and play with the orchestra, and they would really inspire me.” It was sometime in high school that his attitude changed about his music, eventually attending the Manhattan School of Music for his bachelor’s degree. He couldn’t stay away from his hometown

for long, however. Eichner completed his master’s degree at the Peabody Institute of the Johns Hopkins University and he and his longtime girlfriend, Rebecca, were married. Despite the Baltimore area being home for both of them, they moved down to South Carolina so that Eichner could pursue his doctorate of musical arts at the

istockphoto.com/Jonathan Woodcock; photo provided

Solomon Eichner

is about to do something on Saturday that very few 27-year-olds — very few people of any age — can claim: play his debut concert at Carnegie Hall in New York. ough he now lives in South Carolina, Eichner’s local roots run deep. He’s a Pikesville native who attended Beth Tfiloh Dahan Community School. Growing up, he and his mother lived with his grandparents, Gail, a Holocaust survivor, and Mark Fleischmann, whose home included a beloved piano. “Growing up in Baltimore and Pikesville I was sort of in this bubble, this Jewish bubble, where all the people around me I related to, and they supported me,” Eichner said. “And now, moving away, I do miss that home feeling — there’s not too many Jewish people in South Carolina.” Despite his current passion and accomplishments, Eichner was a normal, recalcitrant child when it came to practicing ; but his mother, Marlene, insisted — even attending lessons with him. “I actually never thought he would pursue music as seriously as he has,” she said. He also kept it to himself. When Marlene went to pick him up from school once, and he was surrounded by friends, she asked if he was planning to perform in an upcoming talent show. “His friends were all surprised. No one knew he even played,” she said. ankfully, he’s grown up since then. “It’s because of her I play,” Eichner said. “But, when I was younger I used to go to Baltimore Symphony concerts downtown


istockphoto.com/Jonathan Woodcock; photo provided

“Growing up in Baltimore and Pikesville, I was sort of in this bubble, this Jewish bubble, where all the people around me I related to, and they supported me.” — Solomon Eichner

University of South Carolina. He has one semester le. “It was a good fit here because I’ve already been to conservatory and now I’m at a university, where I’m getting different experiences — teaching, accompanying people,” he said. While completing his degree, Eichner has competed both nationally and internationally, and it was through winning the Golden Key Debut International Piano Competition that Eichner will perform at Carnegie Hall.

Remarkably, this isn’t his first time onstage at the renowned concert hall. He participated in the American Fine Arts Festival at age 17, where he, among many others, played one piece during a concert there. “e hall has so much history. All the great performers have come through there, and yeah, I’m excited,” Eichner said. “e hard work is paying off.” Aside from his Carnegie performance, Eichner will perform on June 5 for the Music in the Great Hall series from the

Chamber Music Society of Maryland. He will play with two friends — JacquesPierre Malan on cello and Nikita Borisevich on violin — as a trio. Tickets are not yet available. Eichner is a romantic at heart, when it comes to his composers, that is. His favorites include Chopin, Liszt and Brahms. He demurs, however, when asked if he has a favorite piece to perform. “Every year, I have a new program with new pieces that I play, depending on the engagements that I have,” he said. “I always love the pieces that I am playing at that moment.” For Eichner, it always comes back to the music. It’s why he does what he does. “It has the ability to really connect all of us together,” he said. “It embraces all of these different emotions and feelings that the composers had and the audience I play for can relate to. It’s something that touches them. It’s very personal.” JT hmonicken@midatlanticmedia.com

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61


Arts & Life »

Not a GNOME or a WIZARD, Just a Guy Who Likes to Wave By Meital Abraham | Photo by Marc Shapiro

David Alt stands with his signs on the spot where he waves to cars passing by on Park Heights Avenue.

You can’t miss him. From the PVC pipe and cinderblock contraption that displays bold-print messages such as “Shabbat Shalom,” “Happy Spring” or the occasional advertisement for Fox TV show “MasterChef Junior,” to the tangle of green mesh surrounding the area, to the array of string dolls and other homemade cras that populate the lawn, and finally to the man himself, donning worn-out overalls, faded flannels, a beanie and a white beard resembling Gandalf ’s (a comparison he himself drew) and standing front and center in his driveway on Park Heights Avenue waving to 62

passers-by — needless to say, it is quite a spectacle. e object of Pikesville urban legend, David Alt, 73, is affectionately known by the community as the Park Heights gnome or “that guy who waves to us on Park Heights Avenue” or the wizard of Park Heights, among other names. While most who encounter Alt would likely agree that seeing him in his driveway brightens their day or makes them smile, the entire community seems to shrug its shoulders with regard to who this guy is and why he stands there. e growing curiosity with Alt’s back-story has inspired much folklore and speculation.

Baltimore Jewish Times April 29, 2016

“I have heard that he suffered a loss and because of this, he likes to watch people drive by, specifically the school bus that stops by his house,” said Adee Jakob, 18, a graduate of Beth Tfiloh Dahan Community School and a freshman at Emory University. Audrey Monroe, a senior at Beth Tfiloh, said that she has heard that “he waves to all that pass because he looks very similar to a character from the popular show “Duck Dynasty’ and he wants to mess with people.” “Word is that [he] … waves at everyone who drives by, especially the buses from Bais Yaakov School for Girls. Apparently, he

customizes his greeting signs just for them,” Monroe added. So now, the real story behind this local celebrity. Alt, an only child and a former drasman, has lived on his property since he was 7 years old. One aernoon three years ago, aer the death of his mother, Alt stood in his driveway waiting for the mail. Aer a few minutes, Alt experienced the first of many interactions with the community. “[A] big white van drove by, and there was this one girl sitting in it, and she waved. So I waved back, didn’t think anything of it,” Alt said. “From there, it escalated to five or six vehicles, to 10 or 20 vehicles.”


“I mean, what the heck, I don’t have anything else to be doing. I figure that if they enjoy it, then what the heck.”

Pikesville Farmers’ Market OPENS MAY 3rd!

— David Alt

Since then, his popularity has skyrocketed. Alt said that when it all started, he didn’t bother counting. “But aer a while I thought, how daggone many of these kids are waving?” Alt said with a chuckle. Now, he said he counts anywhere between 50 to 60 vehicles that wave to him daily. In addition to smiles, honks and waves, Alt has received all manner of gis, including cookies, lollipops, Slurpees and various other snacks. Some of the most interesting treats he has received, however, have come from the Jewish community, he said, though he is not Jewish. “One time, around Chanukah, I got this little bag tossed out at me with little chocolate gold coins,” he said, referring to gelt. “I got a small loaf of bread one time, and the next time it had three apples and about five little jars of honey.” He has even received an entire eight-pack of pull-apart challahs — “Love those things!” he said with a smile. “I have no idea what I’m going to get from these characters. I enjoy it, but I’m not asking for it. I’m not trying to be out there peddling, but they just do it, and it boggles my mind,” Alt said. Alt supposes that this strong connection with the Jewish community in particular stems from the good wishes he expresses on Jewish holidays via the large

PVC pipe signage that he assembles in his yard. He has put out signs for Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur, Passover, Chanukah and Shabbat. Along with the many edible gis he has enjoyed, Alt has also received numerous letters in his mailbox, many of which he dates and carries with him in a small portfolio he stores in the back pocket of his overalls. e cards have messages such as: “When you wave to us, it cheers us up, and when we wave to you, we hope it cheers you too,” or simply, “You’re funny, have a great weekend!” A few of the cards are even signed “from your friends at Bais Yaakov.” Some include inquiries such as one that reads “I love [what] you do, but why do you stand outside like that every day?” — the same question that many others are asking. At this point, Alt knows the schedules of when the local schools get out and the prime time to stand outside and wave. You can find Alt outside Monday through Friday in the aernoon, “when the weather is decent.” “I mean, what the heck, I don’t have anything else to be doing. I figure that if they enjoy it, then what the heck,” Alt said. JT

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POMONA SQUARE 1700 Reisterstown Road For a list of vendors log on to www.pikesvillechamber.org/pages/FarmersMarket/

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Meital Abraham is a senior at Beth Tfiloh Dahan Community School and an intern at the Baltimore Jewish Times.

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Arts & Life »

‘Seinfeld’ Star Jason Alexander Talks Judaism, Show Biz By Marc Shapiro

Jason Alexander

It was the aernoon before the first seder and Jason Alexander had his plans figured out. e “Seinfeld” star, born Jay Scott Greenspan and best known for his role as George Costanza, isn’t particularly observant; neither is his friend who he was spending the first night of Pesach with. “We have the strangest evening coming up because a very good friend of mine who is a lapsed Jew, a Buddhist, feels like we should do something. I think we’re going to say ‘God’ four times and then eat whatever,” he said. “And then tomorrow night I have a real seder so my mother won’t be mad.” e star of stage and screen speaks at Baltimore Hebrew Congregation’s Night of the Stars on May 12. e event benefits BHC’s youth community. Alexander’s manager, Carol Yumkas, is a member of the congregation. e Jewish Times caught up with Alexander to hear about his Jewish upbringing, his Middle East peace work and his theater and television career.

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great metaphor for my Hebrew education. I have to come the conclusion that I have enormous spirituality and little religion. Religion as a formality does not represent how I believe we should be celebrating our creator. If you ask what my spirituality was, you’ll find it’s very much in accord with Judaism.

Could you tell us about your work with OneVoice International? eir mission is constantly changing is as everything in the Middle East, but OneVoice is basically an organization that is engaging moderates, both Palestinians and Israelis, in hopes of forming communication alliances that might

Baltimore Jewish Times April 29, 2016

result in a citizen-inspired peace initiative with the result being an acceptable two-state solution. OneVoice is not idealistic, and I don’t think you’d find anybody in the organization that thinks we’re anywhere near having formidable communication right now. I do love and continue to support the organization, for the people themselves are forming the basis of these negotiations.

What do you make of the American Jewish community’s divisions on issues related to Israel? ere is a split because it’s a very complicated problem. American Jews are a step removed from the reality of the day, and it’s like being an

armchair quarterback. What would you think if you were in the thick of it all? at’s the shoes I think I try to put myself in on both sides, with Palestinians and Israelis. I try not to make judgments or assumptions. I try to call things what they are and hold people accountable for their mistakes and point people towards all that is good because sometimes the bad is all we hear about. How much was “Seinfeld” influenced by Jewish humor? “Seinfeld” continued proving what has been true as long as there has been comedy in the United States, and that is Jews are funny. If you look at some

Provided

What was your Jewish upbringing like? I was raised in a house that was an odd combination of observant and not, so we lit the candles on Shabbos, but we didn’t really do anything else. We lit a candle. We had a kosher house, and we certainly didn’t break any of the kashrut laws. We’d go out to a Chinese restaurant and my father would have shrimp with lobster sauce, [and I’d think] what the hell’s going on? I was bar mitzvahed in a Conservative synagogue that leaned more toward the Orthodox side. I was not thrilled with having to go through that Hebrew school education. I can read Hebrew, but I don’t know what any of it means, which is a


Provided

of the greatest comics and comedic actors in our country, they’re Jews. ere’s something about the Jewish culture that creates wonderful comics, wonderful comedians, and that was extended and propagated by our show. Do you experience a resurgence in fanfare when there’s “Seinfeld” news, such as when the entire series became available on Hulu last year? Whenever something happens to the “Seinfeld” turf there tends to be a little media blitz for a while. So there was some media stir about the sale to Hulu, and I know that it was accompanied by some traveling version of the set that goes from city to city. ere’s a bar that’s opened in Melbourne, Australia that’s dedicated to George.

What was it like going back to theater after doing “Seinfeld?” ere’s a particular expectation for what a Broadway show is. e audience brings an expectation and an excitement because they believe this is the pinnacle of live theater. Now, if you add to that coming back to it post-“Seinfeld,” where they go, ‘Not only am I coming to Broadway, but I’m coming to see him,’ [there’s a lot] of anticipation, and so that’s the biggest change.

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What are you currently working on? I’m out selling two different film projects, directing the world premiere of a play, doing my standup shows and symphony shows, maybe another theater piece in New York next year. I teach all over the place as well. It’s like a mélange of crazy

2015-2016

Baltimore Guide to

JEWISH LIFE

jewishtimes.com A supplement to the Baltimore Jewish Times

Baltimore Hebrew Congregation’s Night of the Stars Thursday, May 12 7401 Park Heights Ave., Baltimore

Doors open at 7:30 p.m.; show starts at 8 p.m.

Premium seats are $225 and include a cocktail and light supper reception from 6 to 7:30 p.m. General seating tickets are $95, and balcony seating is $65. Visit bit.ly/1ruOsqX. The weirdness of my life as George is that somehow George and maybe all the characters have become icons in a way, where I’m watching MSNBC and all of sudden my picture is on the screen and someone says Trump is the Costanza of politics because he’s done the opposite of what you should do and he continues to succeed.

projects. When you are in my category, what you are tending to do is develop a variety of projects in a variety of different media and formats, and you have about 12 different irons in the fire at once. You’re constantly developing a lot in a ton of different areas. Right now, it looks like a lot of things are catching fire. JT mshapiro@midatlanticmedia.com

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65


e Jewish View | Rabbah Arlene Berger

Changing the World While Counting the Omer

HAVE A simcha IN THE FAMILY? SHARE YOUR GOOD NEWS where all your friends can see! Bar/Bat Mitzvahs, Births, Engagements, Weddings

Submit milestones to mgerr@jewishtimes.com or jewishtimes.com/milestones 66

Baltimore Jewish Times April 29, 2016

This shabbaT is the last day of Passover (Deuteronomy 14:2216:17 and Numbers 28:25), and we can put aside (or throw out) any remaining matzoh and return to our everyday lives. but can we really? is the holiday truly finished? Yes, Passover is finished here in the diaspora aer eight days, but it actually isn’t finished because Passover is inextricably linked to our next big holiday, shavuot, through the counting of the Omer. We began counting the Omer (originally sheaves of wheat from the beginning of the harvest, see Lev. 23:15) on the second night of Passover. We continue counting for a total of 49 days, until we reach shavuot, the 50th day. e Omer is a period of semimourning, but it is also when we celebrate the founding of the state of israel. a pilgrimage to offer the first fruits to God in the Temple in Jerusalem distinguishes all three of the pilgrimage festivals (Passover, shavuot and sukkot). ese holidays highlight Judaism’s big three — Torah, God and israel. We remember that if it were not for God we would still be slaves in Egypt; if it were not for God we would not have the holy words of Torah as an exemplar of life; and if it were not for God we would not have the land of israel as our spiritual and physical homeland. On Passover, we are enjoined to relive the story of our slavery as if we ourselves had been slaves and are now free.

en comes the Omer on the second night. What are we counting? We are counting up to the intellectual, spiritual and ultimately action-oriented places within ourselves to be the people who are continually

On Passover, we are enjoined to relive the story of our slavery as if we ourselves had been slaves and are now free. receiving the Torah and then take its teachings to better ourselves and the world through our actions. Fifty days to count, 50 days to contemplate, 50 days to formulate how we will actualize the godliness within ourselves to repair the world. as Rabbi Mordecai Kaplan noted, we live in multiple civilizations. is teaches me that we cannot afford to stop at the pshat, the surface level of our holidays, observances and teaching. We must take our particularist perspective and broaden it to the universal. We were strangers, we were slaves and now others are strangers, others are slaves. it’s our responsibility as both Jews and people of the world to make sure that no one lives in slavery, that everyone is free. JT

Rabbah Arlene Berger is the spiritual leader of the Olney, Md., Kehila.


The Community Page Out&About

THE REAL THING: To commemorate Passover, Krieger Schechter second-grade students imagined what it would have been like for the Israelites rushing to make their matzoh before beginning their journey out from Egypt. The students shaped their own matzoh dough without the luxury of rolling pins and baked it on an open fire.

PLAY BALL! Harel and Randi Turkel, along with their two children, enjoyed a behind-the-scenes tour of Oriole Park at Camden Yards as part of The Associated: Jewish Community Federation of Baltimore’s IMPACT and PJ Library event. The family made matzoh-themed pillows following the tour.

Overheard At Goldberg’s “Wow. There is nothing better than a real East Coast bagel and these are that! I discovered Goldberg’s Bagels when I recently visited Baltimore, and I am so excited I can now have them delivered to Seattle. Yummers …” – Knitfelt, Amazon Reviewer

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Out & About photos: provided; Snapshot: Courtesy of the Jewish Museum of Maryland, 2009.40.3989

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|Snapshots| A man and a woman sing at a Chanukah party at Baltimore Hebrew University in 1989. Can you identify anyone in this photo? Contact Joanna Church, 410-732-6400, ext. 226 or jchurch@jewishmuseummd.org. To see more of the Jewish Museum’s extensive collection and find out who has been identified in past photos, visit jewishmuseummd.org/tag/once-upon- a-time-2/. jewishtimes.com

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Obituary »

With Passing of Its Namesake, Tina’s Antiques to Close Shop By Marc Shapiro

While Johannson wasn’t Jewish, a large number of her employees and customers were. She attended a number of Jewish weddings and celebrated the holidays with Guy’s family.

A staple of Reisterstown’s Main

68

Baltimore Jewish Times April 29, 2016

“Everybody knew her. She was a real character.”

— Lynne Waranch

Tina Johannson (top) is being remembered by employees (from left) Nina Barry and Lynne Waranch and longtime friend Michele Guy.

“She would actually talk people out of sales, a little bit of fashion consulting,” said Clyde Strang, her husband. Johannson owned several properties in Reisterstown and would fix them up herself as she was very handy. For a time, she lived in a house across the street from her shop. “She thought she helped keep the street together because she was one of the main businesses there,” Strang said. “She had a lot of loyalty to Reisterstown.”

“She just loved sitting around the table. We have really big seders and Shabbos, I have a large family, and everybody loved her because she was so unique and very exciting, very colorful all around,” Guy said. “She just loved learning about the traditions, and my family is all about traditions.” Johannson is the only one who knows Guy’s bubbie’s “secret” matzoh ball soup recipe. Waranch, who called Johannson a “wannabe Jew,” said she requested one day of shiva when she passed away. While they did hold a shiva-like event, Waranch said they called it a celebration of life to not confuse people who are not familiar with shiva. “e best thing she did was create a family by the employees. We’re all like sisters,” Waranch said. “She created that family.” Wassel said this is “the end of an era.” “I’m sad the store’s closing, but the store’s not the store without Tina,” she said. JT mshapiro@midatlanticmedia.com

Tina Johannson: Provided; Group shot: Marc Shapiro

Street and one of many businesses that gave the historic district its “antique row” designation will soon close its doors following the passing of its owner. Tina’s Antiques is due to close at the end of April, but employees may extend the closing date to clear more merchandise out. e store’s founder and owner, Tina Johannson, passed away on March 28 at age 67. “Everybody knew her,” said Lynne Waranch, an employee of almost 29 years. “She was a real character.” e store, which Johannson opened 42 years ago in her mid-20s, is known for its one-of-a-kind eclectic selection of antiques, furniture, jewelry and even Judaica. It wasn’t just the store’s merchandise that attracted customers, however, as Johannson herself was quite the character. Customers and employees recall that one could oen find her smoking cigarettes outside of the store, ready to chat it up with customers and passers-by. “You always got a history lesson if you wanted it or not,” said Michele Guy, a friend of more than 20 years. Longtime customer Mindy Wassel said Johannson always had interesting stories and was eager to talk about the history of the buildings on Main Street. “She was so kind and just a little kooky. at’s Tina, kind and kooky,” Wassel said. “She was always smiling. She had a great sense of humor and sense of the ridiculous, which I loved.” Inside the store, Johannson would educate customers about jewelry, help them find the perfect pieces for weddings and bar and bat mitzvahs and talk people out of buying things that didn’t fit their style.


Tina Johannson: Provided; Group shot: Marc Shapiro

« Obituaries COHEN — On April 18, 2016, JOEL S., loving husband of the late Joy Stephanie Cohen (née Sokolow); devoted and much loved father of his daughter Jaime Cohen and her boyfriend Michael Marcucci; beloved son of the late Morton and Blossom Cohen; loved brother-inlaw of Caryn (Douglas) Putchat; adoring uncle of Marlye and Colby Putchat; dear son-inlaw of Jacqueline and David Himelfarb; also survived by other loving family and dear friends. Interment at Har Sinai Cemetery, Garrison Forest Road. Please omit flowers. Contributions in his memory may be sent to the American Heart Association, P.O. Box 5216, Glen Allen, VA 23058 or the American Diabetes Association, P.O. Box 11454, Alexandria, VA 22312. COHN — On March 31, 2016, THOMAS ALEX, beloved son of the late Alex and Sylvia (née Epstein) Cohn. Please omit flowers. Contributions in his memory may be sent to the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, 100 N. Charles St., Suite 234, Baltimore 21201. FINE — On April 12, 2016, E. ALLAN, beloved son of the late Jeanette Hecker Fine and Hyman Fine; devoted husband of Celeste Friedman Fine; loving father of Elizabeth Fine Scott (Alan), Joan Fine Goldman (Jonathan) and the late E. Charles Fine; adored grandfather of Matthew (Staci) Scott, Jennifer Ashley Scott, Emma Goldman, Leah (Peder) Aursand and Sophia Goldman; loving great-grandfather of Lucas and Andrew Scott; beloved uncle of Tom Denniberg and Garry, Jay and Mark Friedman. In lieu of flowers,

memorial contributions may be made to the American Heart Association or the American Cancer Society. FINKELMAN — On April 14, 2016, CARY, brother of Larry Finkelman; loving son of the late Miltom and Edith Finkelman. Interment at Baltimore Hebrew Cemetery, 2100 Belair Road. Please omit flowers. Contributions in his memory may be sent to Hebrew Free Burial, Richard FriedlanderTreasurer, 14 Stone Hollow Court, Baltimore, MD 21208. MATISOFF — On April 17, 2016, JACK SOLOMON, beloved husband of Doris Matisoff (née Litman) and the late Bernice Matisoff (née Goldfein); devoted father of Sandy (Norman) Benney and Linda (Dennis) Dugan; dear brother of the late Nathan Matisoff and Elaine Goodman; cherished grandfather of Karen Brafman (Chris) Andrews, Julie Brafman (Murat) Dorkan, Greg Scott Van Allen, Bobby Lane (Lindsay) Van Allen and Randall Lee Van Allen; adored great-grandfather of Brooke Dorkan, Garrett Dorkan, Zack Kra, Colin Van Allen, Drake Pollock, Carter Van Allen, Drew Van Allen, Delaney Andrews, Luke Andrews and Olivia Van Allen. Interment Arlington Cemetery, Chizuk Amuno Congregation, North Rogers Avenue. Please omit flowers. Contributions in his memory may be sent to JSSA, 200 Wood Hill Road, Rockville, MD 20850; please direct gis to Hospice Services. PENN — On April 18, 2016, A. SAMUEL, beloved husband of Beverly Penn (née Max); devoted father of Mitchel (Sheri) Penn, Brian (Stefanie)

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Penn and Eddie Penn (Brian Gorman); dear brother of the late Lewis Penn and Bobbi Perlow; devoted brother-inlaw of Mitzi Penn, Sander and the late Betty Wise and the late Albert Perlow; loving son of the late Pauline and Sol Penn; adoring grandfather of Lia, Amy, Erin and Max Penn. Interment at Beth El Memorial Park, Randallstown. Please omit flowers. Contributions in his memory may be sent to Beth El Congregation, 8101 Park Heights Ave., Baltimore, MD 21208 or Sinai Hospital, c/o LifeBridge Health, Department of Development, 2401 W. Belvedere Ave., Baltimore, MD 21215 or WYPR, 2216 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218. POLLAK — On April 17, 2016, HENRY MARTIN, husband of Frances (Fine) Pollak; beloved father of Andrew Pollak, Lora (Otto) Placik; loving grandfather of Abby Placik, Madeline Placik, Taya Placik, Rachael Pollak, Lilly Pollak and Max Pollak. Interment at Congregation Mercy & Truth Cemetery, Pottstown, Pa. e family requests no flowers. Memorial contributions may be made to the Visiting Nurse Association (Hospice) 1963 E. High Street, #200, Pottstown, PA 19464 or the Israeli Cancer Research Fund, 295 Madison Ave., Suite 1030, New York, NY 10017. SILVER — On April 17, 2016, GERTRUDE (née Fried), beloved wife of the late David Silver; cherished mother of Rodni and Harvey Edelson; dear sister of the late Bernard Fried and Edgar Fried; devoted grandmother of Jonathan and Jill Edelson, Jason and Julie Edelson; loving great-grandmother of Malia, Leilana, 70

Jacob and Gavin Edelson. Interment at Oheb Shalom Memorial Park, Berrymans Lane. Please omit flowers. Contributions in her memory may be sent to Gilchrist Hospice Care, 11311 McCormick Road, Suite 350, Hunt Valley, MD 21031. SMITH — On April 18, 2016, JOEY, beloved husband of Natalie Smith (née Cohen); devoted brother of Kim (Andy) Sagor and Amy Smith; cherished son of Jimmy (Donna) Smith and Joanne Levin Smith; adored son-in-law of Stanley and Elaine Cohen; dear brother-in-law of James Cohen and Nichole Cohen; loving nephew of Louis Smith and Kathy (Sandy) Shapiro; cherished cousin of L.J. Shapiro and Johnny Shapiro. Interment at Arlington Cemetery, Chizuk Amuno Congregation, North Rogers Avenue. Please omit flowers. Contributions in his memory may be sent to support the research of Dr. Christine Hann. Gis can be made out to Johns Hopkins University and sent to the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center, 750 E. Pratt St., 17th Floor, Baltimore, MD 21202. SNYDER — On April 18, 2016, TINA W., beloved sister of Patricia Scherr, Charles Snyder, and Lynn SnyderDickinson, and the late George W. Stone, and Rodger C. Snyder; loving daughter of Dolores and the late Sidney Snyder; cherished aunt of Sandy Levin, Nicole Snyder, Megan Dickinson, Rodger Scherr, Wes Stone, Debbie Stone and Chris Williams; dear great-aunt of Danielle, Becca and Chelsea Levin, Sidney and Cheryl Scherr, Andrew and Regan Breedan, and the late Stefan Stone. Please omit flowers.

Baltimore Jewish Times April 29, 2016

Contributions in her memory may be sent to the Rodger C. Snyder Memorial Ladies Auxiliary #117 JWVA, 11 Slade Ave., #809, Baltimore, MD 21208. SOLLINS — On April 18, 2016, THEODORE (TED) LOUIS, beloved brother of Risa Sollins (Dr. Jay) Levinson and Charles “Chip” Sollins (Rachelle McBride); devoted son of the late Stanley and Elaine Sollins; loving uncle of Michael, Robert and Scott Jurewicz, Sydnée Sollins, Drew Sollins and Ilana Levinson (Pavel Rabinovich). Interment at Baltimore Hebrew Cemetery, 2100 Belair Road. Please omit flowers. Contributions in his memory may be sent to NAMI Metropolitan Baltimore, 6600 York Road, Suite 204, Baltimore, MD 21212 or Mosaic Community Services, 1931 Greenspring Drive, Lutherville, MD 21093 or Kadima, 15999 Twelve Mile Road, Southfield, MI 48076 or the charity of your choice. SPITZER — On April 17, 2016, ELTON L., beloved husband of the late Rinette Spitzer; devoted father of Shane Spitzer; dear brother of Stanley (Rose) Spitzer; loving son of the late Harold and Gertrude Spitzer. Interment at Beth Moses Cemetery, Pinelawn, N.Y. Please omit flowers. Contributions in his memory may be sent to the Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research, c/o Rachael Bulmer, Grand Central Station, P.O. Box 4777, New York, NY 10163. STRAUSS — On April 17, 2016, S. PAUL, beloved husband of Sylvia Strauss (née Bolotin); loving father of Lesly (late Noel David) List, Debra

(Arnold) Block and Marcie (Gene) Montanarelli; dear brother of the late Elaine Genendis; adored grandfather of Melanie Abramowitz, David (Chanit) List, Jessica (Phil) Greber, Amy (Frank) Jimenez, Nicole Montanarelli (Jamison Moran), Stephanie Montanarelli (Aaron Guy) and Gina (Gregory) MontanarelliMyers; cherished great-grandfather of Nathaniel List, Emma List and Noah Greber; loving son of the late Morris and Pearl Strauss. Please omit flowers. Contributions in his memory may be sent to Covenant Guild Inc., c/o Lois Balser, 2 Highstepper Ct., #604, Baltimore, MD 21208 WEINER — On April 16, 2016, JOANNE S. (née Scheinberg), beloved wife of Marvin Weiner; cherished mother of Gregory Stuart (Sylvia) Weiner and Nancy Gail (Andy) Schnydman; devoted sister of Linda Bittner; loving grandmother of Marc and Rachel Weiner, Chloe and Jason Schnydman; cherished daughter of the late Roy and Edith Scheinberg (née Turk). Interment at Baltimore Hebrew Cemetery, Berrymans Lane. Please omit flowers. Contributions in her memory may be sent to Feed the Children, P.O. Box 36, Oklahoma City, OK 73101 or the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, 100 Painters Mill Road, Suite 800, Owings Mills, MD 21117.

The Baltimore Jewish Times updates obituaries regularly on its website, jewishtimes.com/obituaries. To submit an obituary, contact Melissa Gerr at mgerr@midatlanticmedia.com or 410-902-2314.


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Baltimore Jewish Times April 29, 2016

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EMPLOYMENT ADVERTISING SALES CONSULTANT Our Company, Mid-Atlantic Media is seeking an Ad Sales Consultant to join our Baltimore team. Our media products include Baltimore Jewish Times, Smart Shopper, Baltimore Style Magazine, Baltimore’s Child, Washington Jewish Week and a Custom Media division that has a portfolio of various media products. Mid-Atlantic Media is seeking an extraordinary ad sales professional who is passionate about results to join our teams. The position is offering a strong book of business, base salary, generous commission and bonuses!

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C o rt in a Pr o d u c ti o n s i n M c L ea n VA is s ee ki n g a S to ck Fo o ta ge PA t o a ssist w ith st oc k f o o tag e an d imag e research fo r an in teract ive vid eo p roject . Th is is a 6 -m o n t h c o n tr ac t p o s it io n t h r o u gh D e ce mb e r 2 0 1 6. Mu st b e ava ilab le to sta rt M ay 1. Mu st h av e t he ab ility to wo rk in d epe nd en tly, ta ke d irect ion , an d c o m m u n i c at e w i t h t ea m m e m b er s i n a f a st -p ac ed en v iron m en t. The ideal candidate will have: • Strong organizational skills. • Knowledge of stock footage/still image resources, and stock vendors both in the US and Internationally. • Basic knowledge of copyright laws and licensing. Experience with rights and clearances preferred. • Must be proficient doing research online, using archives and databases, and keyword searches. Research experience and research organization is required. • Ability to multi-task and prioritize needs on a daily basis. • Must have prior video production experience, or related research experience. • Must be familiar with Microsoft Excel. • Preferred experience with Adobe Bridge and Adobe Premiere. • Knowledge of Jewish history and traditions a plus.

Dining Room Manager

No rt h Oa k s, a Life Care senior living community located in Pikesville, is dedicated to delivering high quality service and hospitality to our residents. We also provide a responsible and caring environment for employees. A career at North Oaks offers the opportunity to be involved in the meaningful and satisfying work of helping older adults continue to lead lives of vitality, satisfaction and security. Working in North Oaks makes you a part of a supportive team that includes other staff members, volunteers, residents and their families. We currently have a rewarding opportunity for an experienced Di nin g Roo m Ma na ge r to join a dynamic team. This position is responsible for creating an exceptional dining experience for residents and guests, as well as efficiently managing the overall operation of the dining room. The Dining Room Manager is also responsible for training, motivating and leading staff to ensure courteous and efficient service.

• Minimum of two years supervisory experience in hotel, club or similar institution • Ability to lead and motivate a staff • Excellent organization skills, effective communication and social skills • Bachelor’s degree preferred R e q u ir e m e n t s :

•Possess excellent hospitality skills • Be warm, engaging and respectful • Be enthusiastic with a positive attitude • Enjoy working with seniors T h e Id e al Ca nd i d ate wil l:

North Oaks is a great place to work, offering a competitive compensation, excellent benefits, and a supportive environment! Please submit your resume with cover letter and salary history. North Oaks Senior Living Community 725 Mt. Wilson Lane, Pikesville, MD 21208

FAX: 4 10 -6 0 2 -0 32 9 .

BOOKKEEPER

FLEXIBLE HOURS, Owings Mills Area, Light bookkeeping, Customer Service, Typing, Must be detail oriented and familiar with Quickbooks and Microsoft Word.

Call Mike at 410-800-8696

WE share WITH FRIENDS.

Please e-mail cover letter with day rate, resume, and references to: jo b s@co rt in ap rod u ct io n s. co m

CALL

E ma il: h r@n o rth o aks . ne t

410-902-2326 - --TO

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PLACE YOU R AD jewishtimes.com

75


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Baltimore Jewish Times April 29, 2016

ESTATE SALE (VWDWH6DOH3LNHVYLOOH4M[[\PIV WVMUQTMWNNWN\PM;\M^MV[WV:L M`Q\WNNWN!-`Q\

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*=A76-Q\MUWZMV\QZMM[\I\M +I[P+WV[QOVUMV\ 2W[MXP"! *5281'5(176:$17(' <788:1+-;8)1, +)442-::A"! 

ADVE RTI S E I N MAR KETPLACE for only $20.00* Deadline is Monday at noon. Get print and online exposure when you advertise in Marketplace! *$20.00 minimum charge for 10 words or less. Additional charges apply for more than 10 words.

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REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

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amazing WHAT PEOPLE ARE LOOKING FOR â?&#x2021; Selling? Buyers are flocking to the JTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Amazing Marketplace. To advertise, call 410-902-2326

BISHOP'S GARTH APTS. MULTIFAMILY SECTION 8 100-Q Charles St. Westminster, MD 21157 Now Accepting Applications

410-876-8212 jewishtimes.com

77


REAL ESTATE FOR RENT Now Overlook at Woodholme formerly known as The Excalibur

• •

• • • • • • •

DO YOU KNOW THE JEWISH TIMES READER?

Call today for information!!

Newly renovated apartments featuring new cabinets, granite countertops, wood floor and stainless steel appliances.

Rooftop amenities (Pool, outdoor kitchen and fireplace with outdoor sitting area)

24 Hour Key Fob Building Entry/ Gated Community Parking

*The average net worth of the Jewish Time’s reader is over $1.2 million? *Have an average home market value of $255,400? *40% are millionaires? *Our subscribers will create $315 million worth of residential real estate listings in the next 12 months?

24 hour fitness gym

1, 2 and 3 bedrooms

9 foot ceilings and scenic views

*70% of our readers are in Baltimore County/City?

Pet Friendly

T

Elevators

Lease terms are 2-12 months

We have the dedicated audience that need to buy or sell property

Visit our website www.overlookatwoodholm.com

Overlook At Woodholme 9050 Iron Horse Lane, Pikesville, MD 21208 410.484.6000 Office 410.484.8200 Fax overlookatwoodholmeleasing@laramarapts.com

Call Dawn Lewis, Real Estate Specialist 410-902-2325 or dlewis@midatlanticmedia.com

REAL ESTATE

Team Rosoff Seeloy Du Bois Beth McDaniels Stevens 410.205.0144 410.916.4974

DOLLY ROSOFF

Office 410-583-0400 • Cell 443-255-9810 Direct 443-632-0796 78

Baltimore Jewish Times April 29, 2016

Gary Williams 301.237.9343

APARTMENT FOR SALE 11 SLADE AVE Worry free lifestyle awaits you at 11 Slade Avenue. Rarely available 2 BR 2 BA co-op unit for $134,900 with a monthly fee of $1,259.00 which includes taxes, water, heat, cable, doorman services and use of all building amenities. This bright and airy unit boasts large rooms, renovated baths and kitchen, and a lovely view from every room. Call Melissa

Daniels of Remax Advantage Realty for a private viewing, 410-984-0888. Please note that this is a cash purchase only.


BRAND NEW LISTING 1807 AUTUMN FROST LANE MOVE-IN READY!! DON'T MISS THIS OPPRORTUNITY TO PURCHASE A FABULOUS 3 BEDROOMS, TWO AND ONE HALF BATHS GREENGATE TOWNHOME! ENJOY SUN FILLED ROOMS AND NEUTRAL DECOR THROUGHOUT! WONDERFUL OPPORTUNITY TO PURCHASE BELOW $250,000!! KATZNELSON BROTH TEAM OF LONG AND FOSTER REAL ESTATE

Shimmy was Guaranteed Rate’s #1 loan officer in Maryland for 2015 with nearly $32 million in total volume*. With amazing service and low, low rates, he helped 110 happy clients buy or refinance their home.

Shimmy Braun SVP of Mortgage Lending

o: (844) Shimmy-B (844) 744-6692

Make Sure You Have Representation! EVA KATZNELSON, GRI

JASON BROTH

(443) 386-5384 (C)

(443) 250-2100 (C)

shimmy@guaranteedrate.com guaranteedrate.com/shimmy 3940 N Ravenswood Chicao, IL 60613

THE " CLIENT ADVOCATES” REALTORS REPRESENTING YOU!

* As reported by Guaranteed Rate production report for 2015 NMLS ID:112849 MD - 112849 - 13181 NMLS ID #2611 (Nationwide Mortgage Licensing System www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org) • MD - Lic #13181

(410) 377-2270 (O)

Your Stories. Our Strategy. Many of the most respected names in town rely on us to produce creative, results-driven content solutions for their brands. Whether you’re looking to design a custom publication, refresh your website or find other innovative and affordable ways to engage your audience, make us your go-to marketing gurus.

Let’s meet

Mid-Atlantic CUSTOM MEDIA

— we’ll bring the coffee!

Please contact Jeni Mann, director of Custom Media, for more information. 410-902-2302 / jmann@midatlanticmedia.com

2000-B Burdock Road — 4 bedroom, 4.5 bath, 5300 sq. ft. home in Ashton Woods. Not visible from the street, set off in extensively wooded lot that can not be developed. First floor master bedroom and bath     plus newer gourmet kitchen. Recent updates include roof, driveway and stained exterior. Two car garage. Summit Park school district. Offered at $649,000 







Stanley Zerden MID-ATLANTIC CUSTOM MEDIA An integrated marketing firm from the publisher of Baltimore Jewish Times, Baltimore STYLE magazine, Mid-Atlantic Custom Media, Smart Shopper magazine and Washington Jewish Week.

410-583-0400 Off ice 443-632-0880 Direct 443-838-0138 Cell szerden@homesale.com

ACADEMIC | HEALTH CARE | NONPROFIT | LIFESTYLE | CORPORATE

jewishtimes.com

79




NEW LISTING 39 STRIDESHAM CT — SUMMIT CHASE

Beautiful end of group with garage! Neutral decor throughout with recently updated paint and carpet. Eat in kitchen features stainless steel appliances with granite countertops. Den/office on Main Level. This is the largest model in Summit Chase with spacious bedrooms. Expansive deck off the kitchen. Perfect for entertaining. Quiet, cul-de-sac location within the community! Offered at $365,000

INVESTMENT LEASED BUILDING

NEW LISTING 801 Key Highway Unit T-55 — Ritz Carlton Residences

Stunning 2BR 2.5BA corner residence offers breathtaking Inner Harbor views, meticulously executed custom design and exceptional attention to detail throughout. This bright, open and airy condo boasts an endless list of upgrades to include a Cook's kitchen featuring stainless Viking appliances, elegant lighting and window treatments, B&W in wall speakers, gorgeous Hardwood floors & so much more. You will fall in love! Enjoy all this and resort style living at The Ritz. Offered at $2,250,000

REBECCA PERLOW - C. 410.916.2888 JASON PERLOW - C. 410.456-3370

O. 410.583.0400

NEW LISTING! GREENE TREE OPEN SUN 5/1 1-3:00 PM 151 RIVER OAKS. Exceptional townhouse w/ 3 BR& 2 full & 2 -1/2 baths ;updated eat-in kitchen w/granite &SS appliances; hardwood flrs thruout lower level; updated HVAC; finished lower level clubroom;garage; gated community w/pool & tennis ct.

MAY 17TH AT NOON 808 Reisterstown Road

Pikesville, MD 21208 • • • • •

Tranzon Fox AU000002

TRANZON.COM

888-621-2110

REAL ESTATE NETWORKING BREAKFAST

THE BLUFFS AT THE QUARRY. This 2BR+2.5 Ba 2nd fl condo provides a fantastic view of entire lake; delightful sunroom leads to balcony; eat-in kit w/ granite &s/s; den/office; MBR w/adjoining lux bath; over 2200 square feet; community pool, tennis, exercise rm; garage; gated community. Shows like a model!

May 6th 9-11 a.m.

GREY ROCK. Wonderful 3-4 bedroom two level end TH w/2.5 baths. FIRST FLOOR MBR; Spacious eat in kit w/granite; large sep DR; LR leads to custom deck facing open area; upper lev w/2-3 BR’s, Full Bath + comfortable loft/den. Attached garage. Don't miss this one!! STEVENSON VILLAGE TOWNHOUSE. Rarely available beautiful 2 level townhouse; 3 bedrooms+21/2 baths; updated eat-in kitchen w/sl drs to front patio;spacious DR & LR w/hardwood floors & sl drs to private rear patio; peaceful view from deck off Master Bedroom; near all conveniences; shows great!! NEW PRICE! QUEEN ANNE VILLAGE. Exceptional TH w/2 MBR’s each w/FB & walk in closet; Eat-in kit; Spacious LD/DR w/beautiful blt-in & sliding doors to private patio fenced in rear yard.

Fully leased High traffic count Off street parking 2532 sf building 0.24 acres

The Suburban House Meet and greet with editorial and staff of

AND

Breakfast • Coffee • Mimosas • Desserts • Drawings

JEANNE WACHTER GRI, CRS, ABR Office 410-235-4100 • Cell 410-978-1183 View all listings at cbmove.com/jeanne.wachter

80

Baltimore Jewish Times April 29, 2016

FREE to thank the Real Estate community for their support! MUST RSVP by April 29, 2016 to dlewis@midatlanticmedia.com


8815 JOSHUA CT, PIKESVILLE

1806 COURTYARD CIR #B, PIKESVILLE

5 VICTORIA CT #24, REISTERSTOWN NEW PRICE!

$339,900 221 PIDCO RD, REISTERSTOWN

$279,000 7121 PARK HEIGHTS AVE #408, BALTIMORE

OPEN SUNDAY 1-3

$277,000 7 SLADE AVE #716, PIKESVILLE NEW PRICE!

$240,000

$121,900

$69,999

UNDER CONTRACT

149 FEDERAL ANN LN - $409,000

jewishtimes.com

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Harriett HarriettWasserman, Wasserman,, CRS CRS 4 410 410-458-5300 10-458-5 458 5300 5300 410-458-5300 PM :30 0-1

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1 BELLINGER COURT | $319,900 Terry Reamer 443-570-7672

VELVET HILL AMENDED | $324,500 Nancy Sacks 443-418-6300

REISTERSTOWN | $749,000 Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

THE RISTEAU | $699,900 Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

LIS

TIN

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MCDONOGH PARK | $299,900 Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

WATERSPOUT | $775,000 Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

VELVET HILLS SOUTH | $475,000 Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300 CT

TRA

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PARADISE VILLAGE | $465,000 Marni Sacks 410-375-9700

LONG MEADOW ESTATES | $429,000 Karen Glaser 410-456-2477

SPRINGLAKE | $425,000 Terry Reamer 443-570-7672

BOWIE | $409,000 Harriett Wasserman 410-458-5300

THE HARRIETT WASSERMAN TEAM FEATURING TERRY REAMER

LUTHERVILLE TIMONIUM | $348,800 Monye Weiner 410-382-2889

OWINGS MILLS | $289,900 Marni Sacks 410-375-9700

Nancy Sacks 443-418-6300

82

Terry Reamer 443-570-7672

Randi Sopher 410-299-7222

Terry brings extensive knowledge, professionalism, and understanding of the real estate market, building a long lasting relationship with all of her loyal clients. Raised in a “real estate family”, Real Estate has always been a major part of Terry’s life from being around it. She offers her clients an outstanding level of service with a patient approach and excels at every step of the real estate transaction. Terry is committed to providing a smooth, stressfree transaction at all times. Whether buying or selling, Terry understands the specific needs and aspects of the real estate transaction, and will provide the best possible service one expects of a dedicated real estate professional. For all your Real Estate needs, contact Terry at 443-570-7672.

Della Morton-Smith

410-458-1863

Baltimore Jewish Times April 29, 2016

David Pensak 410-908-2787

Monye Weiner 410-382-2889

Sharron Greene 703-867-3561

Toni Sherman 240-778-4401

Kristi Sachs 954-266-9267

WOODBRIDGE VALLEY | $292,500 Della Morton-Smith 410-458-1863 CT

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WILLOW GLEN | $185,000 Terry Reamer 443-570-7672

Leonard Bernhardt

410-207-2467

Karen Glaser 410-456-2477

410-484-7253 410-458-5300

©2015 BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently owned and operated franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.® Equal Housing Opportunity.

Marni Sacks 410-375-9700


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Rarely available stone semi-detached in Hampden’s Stone Hill. Three finished levels plus basement, gas heat, central air, Front porch and large fenced yard. Plenty of parking and loaded with character. 410-5302400

Hampden Stone Hill 718 Pacific St 21211

Single family 3-4 BR brick cape cod. 2 bedrooms on the first floor and a finished attic large enough for two more bedrooms. Central air, gas heat, wood burning fireplace, wood floors, large level lot and a two car garage make this a desirable place to call home. Minutes to the Metro with an easy commute to downtown Baltimore or DC. 410-530-2400

Historic Sudbrook

ILS DETA FOR L L A C

ILS DETA FOR L L CA

Gracious spacious pristine Center hall farmhouse built in 1812. 5 bedrooms 4 with attached baths 5 fireplaces! 10’ ceilings! Sitting at the top of 34 magnificent acres in the rolling hills of Monkton. Awesome views floor to ceiling windows and charming wrap around porch. Walk in pantry laundry has green house window. Modern kitchen with island and heated floors. Private river cottage with water access and spectacular views, great for kayaking, fishing and hiking! Oh So Pretty! 410-530-2400

1560 Blue Mount Rd 21111 - $849,944

S CRE S 34 AEPLACE R I F 5

7 Green Heather Court, 21208 - $699,944

NG ISTI L NEW

3 bedroom 2 bath finished LL, patio, fenced yard,shed. Wood floors,central air, eat in kitchen, Replacement windows. Stair gliders allow accessibility. TLC needed! 410-530-2400

3625 Clarenell Rd. 21229 $89,944

Grand West Towson beauty built in 1850 has 6 bedrooms,3 ½ baths, first floor master, high ceilings,3rd level floor ready to finish. Circular drive, 2 car garage and THREE sun rooms. Charming home with lots of history located in the heart of Towson minutes to the court house and Towson University. 410-530-2400

577 Woodbine Ave 21204 - $699,944

S OM N DRO SO 6 BE ST TOW E IN W

This luxury spacious penthouse (2700' ) is larger than most homes. Close to Pikesville, Sinai Hospital, 695 and 83. 3 bedrooms,2.5 beautiful baths, 3 skylights and a kitchen most people only dream about gourmet island, granite counters, tile floors, Viking appliances, abundant storage, bedroom balcony, full Laundry room, garage parking, replacement windows and a doorman. Elegant beauty is move in ready! 410-530-2400

Park Towers East Penthouse 21215 Unit 901 - $269,944

LE STY HS G IN BAT HIN 21/2 T Y S R EVE ROOM D 3 BE

Broker, Certified Negotiations Expert

Search over 50,000 active listings through my website. www.HomeRome.com • mrome@HomeRome.com

www.410-530-2400.com

Exceptional bright stone and cedar art lovers Deck House on a very private wooded lot. Custom gourmet luscious kitchen with granite and custom wood cabinets. Versatile 56 bedrooms, wood ceilings, luxury baths, gigantic dining room, sunroom, home office,2 fireplaces and a lovely in ground pool. This home is like living in a glass tree house. Superb for entertaining. If you love contemporary...this one is it!! 410-530-2400

FO CALL

S TAIL R DE

Charming home built in 1887 with gingerbread gazebo wraparound porch. 5-6 bedrooms with 3 full baths. Kitchen with sunroom, fireplace, cathedral ceilings and walk in pantry. 1.8 acres backing to county land. Separate garages with parking up to 9 cars. High ceilings, arched doorways. Attic loft apartment. Bay windows. Central Air! So much space. So much charm. Come fall in love! 410-530-2400

37 Sherwood Rd. 21030 - $549,944

G KIN PAR S AGE CAR GAR OR 10 F

Two Bedroom, two bath 4th floor condo close to the elevator with magnificent tree top views. Professionally designed by Richard Taylor. For Information please call 410-530-2400.

The Risteau Baltimore County 21208 - $399,944

DO CON ANT TY LEG . COUN E T MOSIN BALT

12 Chasemount Court, $339,944

410-922-6680

the right way

Rome

Margaret Rome author of Real Estate

Call in to ask questions about real estate!

Call in:

Hosted by Margaret Rome 12 noon Sunday on Talk Radio AM680/WCBM

“All About Real Estate”

4502 Bucks School House Road 21237 - $359,944

ING IAL LIST OLON NEWARSH C ITE M WH

Luxury, privacy and space in single family home. 2 car garage.Bright 2 bedroom 2 bathroom on first floor plus a sunroom, laundry,deck with views, great room, custom white kitchen with corian and hard wood floors. Amazing amount of space with soaring ceilings and open floor plan. Brand new central air(8/2015). All this plus a lower level with another bedroom/ office, bath and abundant storage. WOW

8605 SNOWREATH RD #8605 PIKESVILLE, MD 21208 - $324,944

OOR T FL OOM FIRS R BEDR E T MAS

w w w. H o m e R o m e .c o m | w w w. 4 1 0 - 5 3 0 - 2 4 0 0 . c o m

SELL YOUR HOME WITH MARGARET ROME


Marc Witman 443-463-6100 BRIDLE BRIDLE RIDGE

Michael Yerman 410-979-9790

$2,290,000

Brandon Gaines 410-804-9600

410-583-0400 | YWGTeam.com

GREENSPRING V VALLEY ALLEY $1,995,000

LLUTHERVILLE UTHERVILLE

2 Saddlebrook Lane Stunning home. Private location

10800 Baronet Road Stately manse, 10,000+ sq. ft.

8206 White Manor Drive Luxurious custom home

3205 Bridle Ridge Lane Grand open layout

Call Robert TUFTON TUFTON SPRINGS $1,200,000

Call Marc VELVET VEL LVET V VALLEY ALLEY $1,095,000

Call Marc A ANTON N TO N WOODS WO O D S $895,000

Call Joel or Michael SSTEVENSON TEVENSON $850,000

2saddlebrook.HShomes.info

10800baronet.HShomes.info

$1,575,000

8206whitemanor.HShomes.info

B BRIDLE RIDLE RIDGE

$1,495,000

3205bridleridge.HShomes.info

NEW LIS LISTING TING

2401 Tufton Springs Lane Stately new custom home 2401tuftonsprings.HShomes.info Call Marc

2503 Caves Forest Road Spectacular updated modernism

IVY HILL

W WORTHINGTON ORTHINGTO ON V VALLEY ALLE ALLEY $699,000

STEVENSON STEVENSON

OPEN SUN 12-2

NEW PRICE

$849,000

NEW LIS LISTING TING

2503 caves.HShomes.info

Call Marc

8 Chris Eliot Court Florida contemporary

3 Chellis Court Outstanding setting

Call Michael GREENSPRING V VALLEY ALLEY $454,900

Call Michael or Robert

8chriseliot.HShomes.info

3chellis.HShomes.info

QUARRY QUARRY LAKE

$400,000

3700 Michelle Way 3508 Woodvalley Woodva Drive Over 5,000 sq. ft/ of living space Spectacular renovated Mid-century 3770 00michelle.HShomes.info

Call Marc

$649,000

3522 Englemeade Road *DUGHQKLGHDZD\VWÀRRU0%5 3522englemeade.HShomes.info

Call Michael or Robert ELEVEN SLADE $175,000

3508woodvalley.HShomes.info

Call Marc

CAVES CA AVE V SV VALLEY ALLEY

$479,900

8 Cliffdweller Court Howard Rodman classic

8cliffdweller.HShomes.info

Call Marc THE CEDARS CEDARS $169,900

NEW LIS LISTING TING

444 Garrison Forest Road Valley splendor

3100 Stone Cliff Drive #113 Substantial upgrades

11 Slade Avenue #516 Huge corner unit

Call Michael

Call Marc

Call Michael

444garrisonforest.HShomes.info

Robert Ellin 443-255-8130

3100stonecliff.HShomes.info

Sue Clark 410-336-3494

Bob Clark 443-608-9110

11slade516.HShomes.info

Liz Etzel 410-599-4161

Colin Gaines 443-928-9737

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Jeffrey Gaines 443-845-6099

3828 Twin Lakes Court Fresh renovation

3828twinlakes.HShomes.info

Call Marc

Joel Goldman 410-917-7753

Lynn Gurley 410-404-3819

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