Issuu on Google+

NEWS Singh caught doping

EXCLUSIVE Interview with George Schwartzel

INSTRUCTION Putting tips and mastering the one-piece waggle

EQUIPMENT The season’s hottest woods, irons & balls

PG

PG

PG

PG

4

24

20

30

WIN

TEE TO GREEN

February 2013 www.tee2green.co.za

A SET OF MIZUNO JPX 825 IRONS + AN AEROLITE 5 BAG WORTH R8 800 PG

OOSTHUIZEN VS

SCHWARTZEL

2013’S DUEL TO WATCH

YOUR FREE COPY

32


G25_driver_210x275.indd 1

14/01/2013 15:13

G25_driver_210x275.indd 1

14/01/2013 15:13

G25_driver_210x275.indd 1

14/01/2013 15:13


1

A GAME FOR ALL

TEE TO GREEN www.tee2green.co.za

EDITORIAL BOARD EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Dennis Bruyns bruyns@icon.co.za teetogreen@ballyhoomedia.co.za PUBLISHER Eric Bornman eric@ballyhoomedia.co.za CREATIVE DIRECTOR Steven Macbeth FINANCIAL MANAGER Morgan Lufumpa CONTRIBUTORS Theo Bezuidenhout, Dave Edwards, Dr Rowena Thomson-Selibowitz PHOTOGRAPHY COVER: Warren Little/ Scott Halleran Getty Images/ Gallo Images, Sunshine Tour/Gallo Images Ballyhoo Media Company Reg No 2007/207595/23 14 6TH Street, Parkhurst, Johannesburg South Africa, 2193 PO Box 3125, Parklands, 2121 Tel: 086 111 4626 Fax: 086 6706429 Printed by Paarl Coldset Tee to Green is published monthly by Ballyhoo Media. Opinions expressed are not necessarily those of either parties. No responsibility is accepted for errors as all information was believed to be correct at the time of print. Copyright subsists on all content within this publication. Any reproduction without consent is strictly prohibited and may constitute a criminal offence.

FORE WORD

W

hat do sports stars like Michael Jordan, Jacques Kallis, Ricky Ponting, Ivan Lendl and actors Michael Douglass, Bill Murray and Joe Peski have in common? Yes they are amongst the vast band of celebrities from the world of sport and show business who in their leisure time play golf. And that is what they have in common with us, in that their skill levels vary from the very average to the very good. This one would expect from sportsmen. The hand eye co-ordination, the concentration levels etc. required to be successful at other sports are similar and often the same as those needed to be successful at golf. How good are some of these players? Better than you might think and often you might wonder how much better they could have been had they decided to make golf their primary sport. Ricky Ponting has got down to a scratch handicap. After Ivan Lendl packed his rackets away for good he actually played in a number of “mini tour” golf tournaments in the states (and by states I don’t mean the Orange Free State) and then went to the PGA Tour School in an endeavour to get his Tour Card. The late Corrie Sanders swopped his boxing gloves

FOLLOW THROUGH Got something to get off your chest? Have something good (or bad) to say about the paper? Any feedback and ideas are welcome so go ahead and mail us on teetogreen@ballyhoomedia.co.za. The winning letter will receive a pair of Tag Heuer sunglasses. CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR NOVEMBER WINNERS Tag Heuer Eyewear: Darel Orkin, Brian von Sorgenfrei. Volvo Golf Champions: ProAm spot – Sol Morris, Hospitality tickets – Graeme Forbes, Access tickets – Khambule Mandla.

for the tighter fitting golf variety and also played from scratch winning his local club championship. Alice Cooper the shock-rock icon joined some of the marquee players for a challenge match prior to the Omega Dubai Desert Classic. A self-confessed golf addict, the Rock Hall of Fame inductee and School’s Out hitmaker, Cooper has often credited golf with helping him to kick his crippling drinking addiction in the 1980s. Today, Alice Cooper, the stage name for singer Vincent Furnier and his band, is a famed fan of the fairways, playing regularly in celebrity golf tournaments. “I love the game of golf. It’s never a bad day for me on the golf course,” says Cooper, who has risen from hacker to scratch golfer to serious Pro Am competitor. “I’ve hit bad shots, but I’ve never thrown a club. I play a different course every single day,” said Cooper. In a tell-all memoir - Alice Cooper, Golf Monster - the world’s most beloved heavy metal entertainer talks candidly about his entire life and

career, how he fell in love with the game of golf, how he dried out at a sanatorium back in the late ’70s, and how he put the last nails in his addiction’s coffin by getting up daily at 7am to play 36 holes. My own experience with golfing celebrities goes back to the early days of the Nedbank Golf Challenge, when the Pro Am format of play included some top celebrities such as ”Bond, James Bond” (Sean Connery), Formula 1 Champion James Hunt, the very eccentric British comedian Peter Cook and some ‘almost celebrity’ celebrities such as Lou Ferrigno, at the time TV’s Incredible Hulk. Ferrigno’s character is known as the green monster and that’s what his golf game was like – monstrous. In fact he arrived at Sun City never having played before. Thank goodness he soon realised that he would not be able to just “get angry” and wing his way through the game. He withdrew without hitting a shot saving himself from some real embarrassment. Next time the TV camera pans through the crowd and focusses in on Mick Jagger watching football or cricket, or you see Jack Nicholson sitting ringside for some World Championship boxing bout know that the next day they will not be putting on boxing gloves for a few rounds in the ring or kitting up with pads and a helmet to face Dale Steyn in the nets. Indeed no, but they might be out at Riviera Country Club or at Wentworth or the like taking in 18 holes of this wonderful diverse game for all - golf.

Dennis Bruyns Managing Editor

eyewear in motion * RACER Curved and wrap-around shape Frame and temples in very light Composite material high sensitive photoChromiC lenses

Sport Vision 011.836.0241. www.picotandmoss.co.za


taylormadegolf.co.za ©2013 Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc. #1 Driver in Golf claim based on combined 2012 wins and usage on the PGA, European, Japan Golf, Web.com, Champions and LPGA Tours, as reported by the Darrell Survey Co. and Sports Marketing Surveys, Inc. Lofts measured within standard 8º-12º range.


ONLY ONE CAN.

R1 can tune every loft, every look and every flight. Distance comes from being tuned. R1 is our most intuitive and simplest driver to tune ever. R1 has 12 different loft settings so you can tune in the loft that generates the most distance from your swing. Then, tune your face angle to find the perfect look at address. Finally, choose your ideal shot shape by adjusting the weights. The more R1 is tuned to you, the longer your drives will be.

See what R1 can do with the R1 Driver Tuning app. Make it


4

news

anchorIng Issue contd.

Tim Clarke speaks out against ban PG

9

Snedeker had just five holes on the delayed final round to try and put some sort of pressure on Woods, but he could produce no late heroics and had to settle for a final round 69 and a tie for second place alongside Josh Teater, who also carded a three under par round. The Masters is two months away, but Tiger Woods’ four-shot victory in San Diego made the bookies in Las Vegas take notice. And it is no surprise that he has been installed as the early favourite to win golf ’s first major championship of the 2013 season. Woods can now look ahead to the year’s majors filled with confidence even though he has not won at Augusta National since 2005 and is a 9-2 pick to win his fifth green jacket.

“It got a lIttle ugly towards the end”

Woods early failure then victor

Tiger’s bounce back at Torrey Pines augers well for the season ahead.

I

n golf, as in other sports, money talks, but money does not guarantee the desired result. Proof of that came in Abu Dhabi last month when the two biggest and best paid names in the game - Rory McIlroy and Tiger Woods - travelled to the Gulf to kick-start their seasons and both fell at the first hurdle. McIlroy was feted after arriving in Abu Dhabi to sign one of the biggest sponsorship deals in sport with Nike, reported to be in the region of $250 million over 10 years, although there was no official confirmation of this figure. Woods, the player who has defined the modern game and who is currently trying to climb past McIlroy to regain the world No 1 spot, was believed to have been paid $3 million (R21million) in appearance money alone. Their duel in the desert was top billing, the first round of a rivalry many believe could fire up golf for the next five years. They drew big crowds to the splendid Abu Dhabi Golf club as they played together on Thursday and Friday and at times it was compelling viewing as both golfing giants struggled with their games. Woods has the excuse that he would have ducked under the cut were it not for a tough two-stroke penalty, imposed on him after his second round for a misread of the rules on the fifth hole( see rules article). But such was the general

waywardness he showed once again off the tee that there must be concerns in his camp that the radical swing changes he has been taking on board for the last year have still to be fully accommodated. The story is that McIlroy will now take four weeks off to work on the flaws in his swing before he returns to the United States to begin his preparations for the year’s first major, The Masters, in early April. Four weeks off ?? He has only been on one week and this after a four week break over Christmas and New Year. Woods on the other hand made the trip to one of his favourite hunting grounds (8 times a winner at the course) for the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines and despite some nervous moments at the end of the final round he recorded his 75th US PGA Tour title, now just 6 short of Sam Snead record of 81 titles. Woods came into the fifth day of play with a six shot lead over nearest challengers Brandt Snedeker and Nick Watney and with just 11 holes to play, it would have taken an unlikely sequence of events to deprive the World Number Two. He was far from his fluent best and even though he dropped four stokes in three holes from the 15th, it did not threaten to derail his charge to victory and he finished on 14 under par overall - four strokes clear of last year’s winner Snedeker. “It got a little ugly towards the end,” admitted Woods.”I just lost my concentration a little bit.”

After the ‘05 victory, Woods posted six consecutive top-10s at the Masters before slipping to a tie for 40th last year, when Bubba Watson defeated Louis Oosthuizen in a playoff. At the end of last season, when Woods won three times and signalled that he was back on his game, he was a 6-1 co-favourite with Northern Ireland’s Rory McIlroy to win at Augusta. Woods’ victory last week at Torrey Pines, swung the oddsmakers toward Woods, while McIlroy remains a 6-1 selection. Phil Mickelson, a three-time winner at Augusta, is the third choice, at 15-1. It’s unclear when Woods will return to the PGA Tour, though he likely will play two to four more events before the drive up Magnolia Lane in April. Early BEtting to Win thE 2013 MastErs 9-2 Tiger Woods 6-1 Rory McIlroy 15-1 Phil Mickelson 25-1 Luke Donald, Lee Westwood, Adam Scott, Justin Rose, Bubba Watson, Louis Oosthuizen 30-1 Charl Schwartzel, Brandt Snedeker 40-1 Sergio Garcia, Ian Poulter, Keegan Bradley 60-1 Graeme McDowell, Martin Kaymer 80-1 Ernie Els 125-1 Brandon Grace And if you want to take flutter and call back the past how about R10 on Tom Watson at 1000-1.


6 news on tour

Hope on hold

WeStWood ConFident

T

he Sunshine Tour, in conjunction with the International Federation of PGA Tours, announced that the much-anticipated US$8.5million Tournament of Hope has regrettably been put on hold for the foreseeable future. Scheduled for a first staging in late November 2013, the Tournament of Hope is sanctioned by all the member Tours that make up the International Federation of PGA Tours. However, the Sunshine Tour has confirmed that its commercial partner has been unable to fulfill the expectations of potential sponsors for various reasons beyond its control. While the necessary funding for the event was originally in place, the recent weakening of the Rand has added more pressure to the budget and it has been decided it would be unreasonable to expect sponsors to commit to the event at this stage. “It is deeply regrettable that we have had to take this decision,” said Selwyn Nathan, Executive Director of the Sunshine Tour. “However, we as a Tour cannot be associated with an event that cannot deliver all of our sponsor’s expectations at a fair price and therefore puts them and us at risk. We will continue to work with the International Federation to implement suitable guarantees to sponsors who commit to the event, which will allow us to move forward to the first staging of the Tournament of Hope. “There has been an overwhelming amount of support for this event from South African and international sponsors and we thank them for their commitment and interest. We look forward to making further announcements in due course that will provide clarity on the way forward in order to deliver this world-class event to South African golf fans.” The Sunshine Tour has been engaged in ongoing discussions with Sun International and Nedbank to explore the possibility of combining the Tournament of Hope and the Nedbank Golf Challenge. With these recent developments, both Sun International and Nedbank have reaffirmed their commitment both to the growth of the game in South Africa and to the staging of the 33rd Nedbank Golf Challenge in its traditional year-end period within the Sunshine Tour’s 2013 summer swing.

CLoSe miSS For george george CoeTzee had no regrets after narrowly missing out on a first european tour title once more at the Commercial Bank Qatar masters. the South african finished tied second behind Chris Wood – who ended his own lengthy wait for a first title at doha golf Club with an eagle at the last which saw him leapfrog Coetzee and Sergio garcia. Coetzee has now had 21 top-ten finishes without victory – three of them this season – but believes that, like Wood, his time will eventually come after a third runner-up finish. “he deserves it,” the 26 year old said of Wood’s success. “he did well and he played well all week, and it’s always good if you can hold the lead on Sunday because it’s very difficult. i thought to myself, all i

have to do is get past 15 and make him shoot a number, and luckily for him, he did.” “it feels good. Blimey, i’ve seen a few mates picking up trophies and i’ve been waiting patiently for my time,” Wood said. “i felt like i was due to win for a couple of years.” as for the eagle, Wood added: “nice way to finish!” his 69 gave him an 18 under par total of 270 and should take him from 142nd on the official World golf ranking into the top 64, who will contest the WgC-accenture match play in arizona next month, although the cut-off is not for another two weeks. Coetzee was left as the nearly man once more - this was his 21st top-ten finish on the circuit - despite a superb 65 containing an eagle and six birdies.

having moved To Florida towards the end of last year, Westwood has spent the offseason practising and honing his short game in the sunshine – a welcome change from the snow of Worksop - and believes he is starting this campaign better prepared than any other. englishman Lee Westwood opened his 2013 campaign at the omega dubai desert Classic. the 39 year old has an enviable record at the emirates golf Club, taking the runner-up spot three times, in 1999, 2010 and 2012, and amassing a total of seven top ten finishes. “i played a lot more this winter than i would normally play,” said the World number eight. “there’s no rust. the main reason for moving to Florida was to get more games of golf because i wouldn’t play normally when i’m at home because of the weather. “Last week i had shorts on and was out playing with Luke donald. Living in england i’ve always finished the year, gone home, packed the clubs away and came back out trying to catch everyone else. my short game is sharper from being out there, especially my putting.” obviously Westwood’s eyes are on the majors as he chases that elusive first victory. at the moment he carries the worst moniker in golf – the best player in the world not to have won a major.

Winged Foot For 2020 US open ChampionShip The UniTed STaTeS golf association (USga) announced that Winged Foot golf Club, in mamaroneck, new York, will host the 2020 United States open Championship. “We’re thrilled to bring the US open back to this outstanding club,” said thomas J. o’toole Jr., USga vice president and Championship Committee chairman. “Winged Foot offers a spectacular setting in a dynamic market, and has justifiably earned its reputation as one of the premier US open venues in the nation. and it joins an impressive line-up of future US open Championship locations that players and fans alike can eagerly anticipate.” this selection marks the sixth time that the West Course at Winged Foot will have hosted the US open. this will also be the 12th USga championship conducted at Winged Foot, all but three of which were held on the West Course. the dates for the 2020 U.S. open are June 18-21.

“Winged Foot is a quintessential US open golf course ,” said mike davis, USga executive director. “With its wonderfully challenging green complexes and dogleg holes that emphasize proper placement off the tee, Winged Foot offers the best players in the world a spectacular test of golf and delivers to spirited new York golf fans one of the most exciting venues in the game.”

Winged Foot golf Club, located 25 miles north of new York City in Westchester County, last hosted the US open in 2006, when geoff ogilvy outlasted phil mickelson, Colin montgomerie and Jim Furyk for a one-stroke victory. the club also hosted the U.S. open in 1929 (won by Bobby Jones), 1959 (won by Billy Casper), 1974 (won by hale irwin) and 1984 (won by Fuzzy Zoeller).


news

7

No Lance Armstrong’s in Golf

P

erformance Enhancing Drugs (PEDs) have been getting a lot of attention lately, and with good reason. The Summer Olympics and the whole Lance Armstrong drama… just be glad this isn’t an issue in golf – or is it? Many avid golf fans aren’t aware that the various professional golf tours including our own Sunshine Tour started random drug testing for players as far back as in 2008. And now for the first time a prominent player is at the centre of a drugs controversy. That player is the 49-year-old Vijay Singh a winner of 3 majors. It is said he paid one of Sports With Alternatives To Steroids’ owners $9,000 in November for a specialized deer-antler spray and other products. Singh released a statement at the Phoenix Open confirming he had taken it, but that he was “absolutely shocked that deer-antler spray may contain a banned substance and am angry that I have put myself in this position.” Singh, who won the last of his 56 titles in 2008, said he will cooperate with the tour’s review of the issue. Bob Charles, the 1963 British Open winner, said in New Zealand he also used and promoted deerantler spray for more than 20 years, and was surprised to learn it contained a banned substance.

Age QuotA for WAlker Cup The amaTeur golfer comes in various guises. on one hand, there is the “common amateur” who tees it up week-in and week-out with a swing with more moves than a can of worms. on the other, there is the “career

Charles was a spokesman for the deer-antler product and used it daily over two decades. Despite Singh’s admission, most professional golfers said they felt the measures in place to combat doping in golf, including random testing, were adequate. “I don’t think doping is a problem in golf whatsoever. I really don’t,” Paul Casey said. “There are so many facets to our sport. Why was he taking it? Was he taking it to recover from injury? It doesn’t help you get the ball in the hole at the end of the day. This is the first case I’ve heard where a guy admitted to taking anything.” The oddity of deer-antler spray being used by golfers was the talk on the Dubai course with Lee Westwood among the players having a good laugh about it. Most said they had never heard of it until the story on Singh. “Deer-antler spray? That sounds like something you wax your car with, doesn’t it?” Westwood said. “I’ve never heard of it. ... You have to be careful about what you take. I try not to take anything now, really, other than Corona and vodka.” Sing’s career is not without controversy when it comes to breach of rules. An alleged incident happened in 1985 when he was playing the Asian Tour. After the second round of the Indonesian Open, the tournament director ruled

amateur”, those with an aptitude and flair for this royal & Ancient pursuit who can still hold down Monday to friday employment as an accountant, attorney, doctor, stockbroker or the like while rising to the occasion of high-level competitive action. then you have the so-called “professional amateurs”, that swelling posse of young, cocksure, full-time campaigners that can click their fortunate fingers and enlist a kind of pandering support network consisting of a golf coach, personal fitness trainer and sports psychologist to get them ready for that plunge into the paid ranks. In these reach-for the-stars times, when the amateur-to-pro turnover has never been greater and in many cases more reckless (over 200 wannabee professionals teed up the recent Sunshine tour Qualifying School), it was interesting to hear word of developments from the good old uS of A recently. Ahead of September’s Walker Cup match in

“(i’m) absolutely shocked that deerantler spray may contain a banned substance” that Singh had improved his score by 1 stroke after signing his scorecard. He was disqualified and later indefinitely suspended from the tour. Singh was forced to take a club pro job in Borneo and eventually made

his way to Europe. He has long maintained there was a “misunderstanding” and has expressed frustration that those events dogged him for many years. Singh didn’t make it to the PGA Tour until age 30 in 1993, but he managed to overcome the fallout and become a Hall of Famer. Perhaps the final word is best left to Ernie Els. “There is a list of substances they ban. I take Advil (a brand of US Painkiller) for pain and discomfort and anti-inflammatories and something for my knee when it gets damp; and I take Guinness.”

New York, where great Britain & Ireland’s golfers will be defending the silverware they plundered in fine style at royal Aberdeen in 2011, the top brass at the united States golf Association announced that a minimum of two mid-amateur players – middle aged golfers who tend to work full-time – will be part of the American side for the biennial bout. long before the invention of fist-pumps, high-fives and do-or-die rallying cries that are now par for the course in team golf, the Walker Cup, named in honour of former uSgA president george Herbert Walker (the great-grandfather of former president george Bush), was a genteel occasion designed to “foster international goodwill between the uS and great Britain & Ireland.” In this win-at-all-cost era, where folk would trample their own granny into the ground just to get an X-factor audition, the uSgA’s surprising decision has been warmly received in many quarters. It’s certainly a nod to the more

traditional values of the contest; an opportunity for career amateurs to reach the very pinnacle of their sport at a time when the amateur game at the top level is dictated by world ranking points and is almost a closed shop for those who are not full-time, professionals in waiting. It’s perhaps unsurprising that Jim Holtgrieve, the current uSA captain, has welcomed the news with open arms. the 65-year-old won the uS Mid-Amateur crown in 1981 before having a brief and unfulfilling stint as a professional on the over-50s circuit . “I went to play only for money and forgot about having fun,” said Holtgrieve, who was reinstated as an amateur in 2007. everyone wants to win, but it’s also about what Mr Walker had in mind to begin with,” Holtgrieve added. As the increasing professionalism of the amateur game continues and the boundaries become ever more blurred, is there anything wrong with harking back to a more traditional approach?


What Is It With Ireland And The Majors?

Time To Find Out. Six majors captured by Irish players in just a few years is more than just coincidence. Find out exactly what it is by playing the courses where these champions shaped their games. World-beating links, exceptional parkland courses. It’s all here. And when the round ends, the fun is only beginning. This is Ireland, after all.

Time To Play.

Refer to page 38 for special travel packages to Ireland

Go to discoverireland.com/golf


news

9

Anchoring issue headlines Tour players’ meeting

A

ustralian Geoff Ogilvy described the typical 90-minute PGA Tour players’ meeting as “boring,” a “cure for insomnia” and, at its best, a “pretty good Ambien substitute.” Not so last month when top of the agenda was the governing bodies’ proposed rule to outlaw the anchored stroke. When announcing the proposed rule in late November, Davis and R&A chief executive Peter Dawson cited a “tremendous spike” in usage and a “growing advocacy” among teaching pros and tour players. More important, though, they stressed that the ban was not simply a reaction to the fact that three of the past five major champions (Keegan Bradley, Webb Simpson and Ernie Els) have used a belly putter. “This is fundamentally about what we think is the right thing for the game,” Davis said at the time.

A few plAyers reportedly noted thAt tim ClArk, who is not plAying this week’s fArmers insurAnCe open but flew in for the meeting, spoke AgAinst the bAn. Golf ’s proposed ban on anchored putting dominated the conversation as PGA Tour Commissioner Tim Finchem held a press conference at Torrey Pines the morning after the USGA’s Mike Davis addressed a players’ meeting to talk in more detail and take questions about the ruling. “We were pleased that the USGA availed themselves of actually presenting the detail of the rule to the players, so the players, as a body, had an opportunity to understand some of the nuances of the rule,” Finchem said. “It also gave the players an opportunity to provide their own perspective, in some cases.” Reporters were not allowed into the meeting at the Torrey Pines Lodge. A few players reportedly noted that Tim Clark, who is not playing this week’s Farmers Insurance Open but flew in for the meeting, spoke against the ban. Clark anchors his long putter against his sternum.

“After the USGA left, we continued the discussion,” Finchem said. “It was primarily designed to allow players to be able to give their opinions.” The commissioner said he sees both sides of the issue and it’s too early to jump to any conclusions. Several questions remain unanswered, among them whether the Tour will adopt the ban or ignore it, which would amount to a so-called “bifurcation” of the rules. Although Finchem said he sees no harm in the Tour occasionally bucking the regulations as set forth by the USGA, he didn’t sound eager to do so.

Els starts sEason with substitutE caddiE Although the focus in the early part of the season is on rory Mcilroy and tiger woods’ season debuts, there was one global star who has gotten off to a solid start in 2013 despite a significant change on his bag. Ernie Els, who tied for 39th abu dhabi and was 18th in his ’13 debut at the Volvo Golf champions, begins the new season with a new caddie as his normal looper continues to undergo treatment for what doctors believe are blood

clots. colin byrne, a veteran looper who has worked for many top players including retief Goosen, has stepped in for the south african’s normal caddie ricci roberts, who flew to England following last year’s bMw championship to receive treatment for the leg ailment. byrne first worked for the south african at november’s wGc-hsbc champions and said he is scheduled to be on the bag through March.


10 BLAST FROM THE PAST

The Evolution of This spreads over more than 500 years with the first known balls being made of wood, probably Beech or Boxroot in the mid 1400’s to the high tech multi compound golf balls of today.

FEATHERIE

GUTTA PERCHA OR ‘GUTTY’ BALL

There must have been many hand jarring moments when the old style wooden club came into contact with the wooden ball so no doubt it was a very welcome and exciting time when the ‘Featherie’ ball was introduced to the game during the early part of the 17th century. The ‘Featherie’ used a hand sewn pouch (probably cowhide) which was stuffed with either chicken or goose feathers and then the hide was painted. The amount of feathers used could fill a gent’s top hat. The feathers were boiled and stuffed into the wet cowhide bag, the bag shrunk as it dried out and the feathers expanded as they dried out forming a hard object. Stitching was used to close the bag and then the object was hammered into a round ball ready for play. These balls were not only expensive to produce, they were quite fragile and did not last long when being struck with Blacksmith irons and heavy wooden headed clubs. Initially the cover of the ball was smooth and untarnished and only after being used did the leather “skuff ” up. It was found that a used ball travelled further and straighter through the air. Soon players began taking the new ball and cutting lines and patterns into the leather. Unbeknownst to them they were giving the ball aerodynamic qualities in the same way that dimples give the modern ball today. The featherie was the ball of choice for over two hundred years.

Gutta Percha is the sap (latex) produced by various tropical trees mainly found in Southeast Asia. The word ‘gutta-percha’ come from the plant’s name in Malay, getah perca, which translated means ‘percha sap’. There are numerous stories as to how and who invented the ‘Gutty’ ball but most golf historians believe that the Rev. Dr Robert Paterson, a young clergyman in St. Andrews was the first person to produce a Gutty ball made from Gutta Percha which had been used as packaging material for a gift his father had received from the Far East. He was a keen golfer and quickly realized that this substance could be moulded when heated and after a few crude trials he visited a nearby Links to test the new ball. The result was positive and although numerous improvements were necessary the Gutty ball was now a serious threat to the old Featherie because it was far more durable and considerably cheaper to produce. Despite this fact there was fervent resistance to the introduction of the Gutty by certain golf purists at that time. Some traditionalists decried the introduction of the gutta percha, particularly ballmakers who had devoted years to learning and perfecting their craft. None were more vigorous in their opposition to the changeover than Scottish golf professional Allan Robertson, who plied his trade in St. Andrews. Considered by many to be the finest player of the mid19th century, Robertson was just as respected as a ballmaker. He produced as many as 2,500 balls a year, exporting many of them to America and elsewhere. At one point, Robertson supposedly ordered a large shipment of gutta percha balls for his shop, only to set them on fire to keep them from winding up in golfers’ hands. For all its initial popularity, the gutta percha lasted just a short while by golf standards; just over half a century. The new ball would eventually replace the Featherie by the early 1880’s and remained popular until the end of the century when the ‘Rubber’ ball was invented and patented in 1898 by Mr Haskell in America, this would again revolutionise the game.

Robertson supposedly ordered a large shipment of gutta percha balls for his shop, only to set them on fire to keep them from winding up in golfers’ hands


11

the Golf Ball THE HASKELL Mr Haskell’s first rubber balls were made by winding rubber thread under tension around an inner core and then encapsulating the thread by using Gutta Percha for the outer cover. The initial tests astounded people as to how far this new ball could travel compared to the Gutty and they could not wait until the ball was made available for purchase. However production was initially very slow and it took nearly 2 years before a machine capable of mass production had been invented. The machine’s inventor was John R. Gammeter who worked in the tool room at B.F. Goodrich Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio. He finally devised a machine that could wind balls of rubber thread and submitted patent applications by the end of 1899, these were granted in both Britain and America by April the following year. Players in America immediately started to use the new rubber ball but there was opposition from the R & A in Britain because Links courses had been designed and laid out for the Gutta Percha ball. However rulings were over turned and by 1904 the rubber ball also commonly known as ‘the Haskell’ was being used with a number of British rubber manufacturers and ball makers turning their attention to producing this new style ball which inevitably saw the end of the Gutty. The first rubber balls looked very much like the Gutty using the mesh and dot pattern but it did not take long for new patterns to materialize such as the ‘Bramble’ and the ‘Dimple’, the latter probably being one of the most important inventions in the history of golf. The inventor of this pattern was William Taylor who in 1905 patented his ‘Dympl’ ball. He sold the rights of the patent to Spalding’s who for seven years had a wonderful advantage over their competitors because even though they tried to mimic the dimple using circles and other type patterns, their balls were just not as good in flight. After a long history in which the golf ball has changed drastically in materials and style, its current construction is directly related to the dynamics of its flight path (trajectory). The lift and drag properties of the golf ball and its speed and spin rate have been – and continue to be – critical components in how golf balls are constructed.

DISTANCE AND DIRECTION Golf is just a game of distance and direction. The aim simply is to hit a golf ball from a starting point to a target in the least number of hits. The complexity is that the target is a hole in the ground only 4.25 inches in diameter and it is placed anywhere from 100 to 600 yards away. It is no wonder that the golf ball plays such an important role in this game. In fact the ability of the ball fly through the air long distances and in controlled direction are the most important features in equipment development. And how have the various balls used over the years stacked up? Let us look at the tale of the tape. The first golf balls were originally made from wood and they travelled no more than about 100 yd (91 m). A well stuck used featherie would probably fly 150 to 170 yards. The great Tom Morris jnr was known for his long hitting and he was known to strike his driving wood 175 yards. When the Gutty became the norm players found they could hit the ball over 200 yards The Haskell design enabled golf ball manufactures to innovate in terms of aerodynamics and soon the golf ball when hit by a skilled player would go as far as 250 yards. This remained the more or less the same for many years and only in the

late 70’s and e80’s did the distance really change again. Driving statistics from the PGA tour show that the average drive of the professional Tour players in 1980 was 257 yards. Although many factors have made a direct impact on increased driving distances in golf (such as improvements in drivers), one of the most important factors has been the improved construction of the golf ball. In fact, in great part due to improved golf ball construction, touring members of the Professional Golf Association (PGA) have increased their average driving distance to about 280 yards in 2001.

WHY DID THE PROFESSIONALS HIT THE GOLF BALL IN 2001 FURTHER THAN 1980? The distance the ball travels in controlled by the following elements – swing speed, ball velocity leaving the clubhead, launch angle and spin rate. Improvement has occurred on all these. 1980

2002

swing speed

110mph

114mph;

ball velocity

158mph

165mph;

launch angle

7,5deg

9,0deg;

spin

3600rpm

2900rpm

Even though the R&A and the USGA have introduced restrictions with regards to the production of the golf ball, refinement of the process and the personalized matching of the ball to the club to the players swing have resulted in the top players hitting the ball further and further with more and more control. Obviously this is not just as a result of the golf ball. Such factors as fitness, materials, condition of courses, and technique, have helped increase the driving distance over the years. As a comparison, tests were done by Nick Faldo using a modern golf driver, on a gutta percha ball, and the ball did not travel more than 150 yards. When he used an old wooden golf club, and a modern golf ball, the ball travelled more than 260 yards. This showed that the modern golf ball is definitely the key to distance.


12 cover story


13

2

0

1

3

no more mr nice, guys PREVIEW

They say one should never make predictions in sport and certainly don’t put them in writing. That way you can never be called to account. Dennis Bruyns does just the opposite.

hankfully I have some early form to go on but sometimes one must go with one’s gut feel so this will be a combination of both. Early form promises an exciting season of golf ahead of us. After failing to make the cut in the desert at Abu Dhabi Tiger Woods showed he is ready for the year with a fine victory in the Farmers Insurance at Torrey Pines. However are we reading too much into that win? He loves the course having now won there 8 times. But the field although including many fine players did not have much of an International presence to it and very few of the world’s top 20 were there. They say you can only beat the players who play and that he did comfortably. There is no doubt he will be a contender this year but how will he react to the extra pressure down the stretch in the majors this year. More impressive by far was the wire to wire victory of Phil Mickelson at the TPC Scottsdale in the Phoenix Open. Not only did he lip out on the 18th when looking to join that very exclusive club of players who have broken 60 on the PGA Tour he went on to post scores of 65, 64, 67 tying the tournament record at 28 under par. And there he was doing the Mickelson thing with a broad smile on his face and looking every bit a champion in front of 500,000 loud fans. Yes that’s correct the Phoenix Open has by far the biggest crowds in golf, many of whom find their way to the 16th hole where something like 70,000 screaming fans circle the par 3 every day. As a four time major winner Mickelson was so in control of his game that he only played two holes out of 72 over par? He made 29 birdies and an eagle and led the field in greens in regulation, as well. And the way Mickelson was talking after his round, with equal parts confidence and enthusiasm, there


14 cover story 2

0

1

dates to diarise

3

PREVIEW could be many more in store this year. No doubt about it Mickelson has Georgia on his mind “It’s important to start building momentum,” Mickelson told Golf Channel about the April 11-14 Masters at Augusta National in Georgia. “But it’s more important what you do closer to Augusta, that you start feeling confident in your game then, that you start getting good touch on quick greens. “Certainly having been in contention and being able to come out on top is an important element going into the Masters if you want to do well because you’ve got to deal with some of the greatest pressure you will ever feel at the Masters.”

there he was doing the Mickelson thing with a broad sMile on his face and looking every bit a chaMpion in front of 500,000 loud fans

DATE

TOURNAMENT

DEFENDING CHAMPION

April 11-14

Masters, Augusta National

Bubba Watson

June 13-16

US Open,MerionGC

Web Simpson

July 18-21

The Open Championship, Muirfield

Ernie Els

Aug 8-11

PGA Championship, Oakhill CC

Rory McIlroy

If it is important to build up some momentum, then what is world no1 Rory McIlroy up to? Paid an obscene amount of money to tee up in Abu Dhabi he left before the weekend after missing the cut. It was then reported that he would be taking the next month off to work on his game, this after coming from a six week break over the festive season. This really does not seem to be the best way to prepare, but then again he has so much talent and he is young and will continue to surprise us. But somehow I don’t think this will be his year. And I see him slipping from his number one spot. All good and well but my crystal ball has not come up with anything but generalizations so far. Let’s get to the thrust of it all. Will it be a McIlroy v Woods year with Mickelson as the wild card? NO! The movers and shakers this year will be two South African playersLouis Oosthuzen and Charl Schwartzel. Louis will close in on that number one ranking, in fact by year end he will be the number one golfer in the world. And Charl will move comfortably into the top ten. The signs are there to see. Charl’s end of season form was outstanding. And Click here to see Phil’s new secret weapon


Adizero Ad (320x225).indd 1

2013/02/04 5:10 PM


17

cover story it was not just the fact that he won the last two events he played in, it was more the manner in which he won them. Anytime you put a double digit number between you and second place is memorable but to do it twice in a row is simply fantastic. And Louis looked every bit the King as he strode to victory against a high class field at the season opener at Durban Country Club. With that cheeky grin on his face he ruled over the best Europe has to offer (sans McIlroy that is). Forget the Woods, McIlroy rivalry at the end of 2013 everyone will be talking about the rivalry between two South African friends Louis Oosthuzen and Charl Swartzel. Bold statement indeed. And what else do I have to go on. I have the distinct pleasure each year to officiate at the Nedbank Golf Challenge. This gives me the opportunity to mix in a relaxed atmosphere with golf ’s best players. In December last year the great Tom Watson, his caddie and I were more or less shooting the breeze in the scoring hut after Tom had completed his round. We were basically solving the world’s problems – this and that for the middle east,

They have The besT golf swings by far, good TemperamenT, wonderful shorT games and They boTh have won Their maiden majors, ofTen The ToughesT To do. what should be done with regard to neuclear disarmament. The discussion then moved onto something we all knew a lot more about – golf. Watson then remarked that he felt that Schwartzel and Oosthuizen were potentially the best players in the world. Naturally I asked why he thought this? Quite simply they have the best golf games he said. They have the best golf swings by far, good temperament, wonderful short games and they both have won their maiden majors, often the toughest to do. Who am I to argue with a man who won eight majors and has now played the tour for 40 years. Let’s get specific. The Masters will be won by Phil Mickelson. I take Louis Oosthuizen for the US Open, Lee Westwood for The Open Championship and Charl Schwartzel for the PGA Championship There you have it look out for the “Oosthuizen v Schwartzel” showdown this year.

2

0

1

3

PREVIEW

World ranking as at the 4th February 2013 1

Rory McIlroy

Nir

2

Tiger Woods

USA

3

Luke Donald

Eng

4

Justin Rose

Eng

5

Louis Oosthuizen

Zaf

6

Brandt Snedeker

USA

7

Adam Scott

Aus

8

Lee Westwood

Eng

9

Bubba Watson

USA

10

Phil Mickelson

USA

11

Jason Dufner

USA

12

Ian Poulter

Eng

13

Steve Stricker

USA

14

Keegan Bradley

USA

15

Sergio Garcia

Esp

16

Dustin Johnson

USA

17

Webb Simpson

USA

18

Charl Schwartzel

Zaf

19

Graeme McDowell

Nir

20

Peter Hanson

Swe

5 years oF Major Winners Now I’m delving into the world of Nostradamus and the Mayans and looking five years ahead. Over the next five years 20 majors will be played. Here are my predictions of who will win majors over this period and how many. Must admit that some of these come from the heart and not from a logical analysis. NAME

NO OF MAJORS

Louis Oosthuizen

3

Charl Schwarzel

2

Tiger Woods

2

Rory McIlroy

1

Phil Mickelson

1

Ernie Els/Retief Goosen

1

Lee Westwood

1

Adam Scott

1

Sergio Garcia

1

Justin Rose

1

Martin Kaymer

1

Other Americans

5


18 rules

Tiger rules

Are golf officials intimidated by the personas of the superstar players when giving them rulings. According to Dennis Bruyns the evidence shows not, and it is an even playing field out there – well most of the time.

D

espite a recent return to form Tiger Woods starts the year as the world’s number 2 golfer, with the young Rory McIlroy occupying the top spot. And it would seem that this might relieve Woods of some of the off and on course pressure and controversy that has beset him over his career. In the past every move he made was under the spotlight and this included accusations of preferential treatment. Yes, the suggestion was that on Tour there were the rules that applied to the rest of the field and then there were “Tiger Rules”. What was in dispute and frankly not only in dispute but just plain incorrect was the suggestion that officials around the world treated Tiger in a different way. This was highlighted just last month when European Tour official Andy McFee penalized Tiger two strokes for taking an incorrect drop. The end result of the penalty was that Woods missed the cut by one stroke in Abu Dhabi. An expensive absentee from the last two days, it would seem, if one believes the astronomic figure that Woods is receiving these days in appearance money (some say as much as $3m). Was there any question about the validity of the ruling in Abu Dhabi and what about those earlier incidents?

EmbEddEd ball – abu dhabi hSbC ChampionShip Tiger Woods incurred a two stroke penalty when his ball was embedded in sand in the rough and he thought he was entitled to relief without penalty. Under Rule 25-2, a player is entitled to relief without penalty when his ball is embedded in its own pitch-mark in the ground in any “closely mown area” through the green. “Closely-mown area” means any area of the course including paths through the rough that is cut to fairway height or less. This is the Rule we golfers play to every day. It is permissible to introduce a Local Rule extending relief to “through the green” which the European Tour had done, but crucially that Local Rule goes on to say that a player may not take relief if his ball is embedded in sand in an area that is not closely mown, i.e. there is no free relief if the ball is embedded in sand in the rough - a very important limitation especially when playing a desert style golf course with vast areas of the rough that are just sandy wasteland. As Woods was not entitled to relief without penalty, he was penalised two strokes for moving his ball at rest and not replacing it (Rule 18-2a).

The reason that the Local Rule excludes relief for balls embedded in sand in the rough is that there is nothing abnormal about such an occurrence, i.e. it is normal for a ball to embed in sand, so it is considered inappropriate to give free relief in such cases. ClubhouSE inCidEnt – bridgEStonE invitational Armchair viewers were astounded when Tiger Woods received a drop from what they were told was a ball hit out of bounds. Part of the blame should go to the ill prepared commentators who had not taken the time to find out the local rules in play for the week. Playing from the rough Woods had hit a 9-iron that jumped out of the clump of grass and was headed toward the flag until it kept going -- and going -- all the way over the grandstand, off the cement path, over fans in the balcony and onto the roof of the clubhouse. Moments later, catering assistant, Josh Stuber was unloading his pies when a ball with a black swoosh rattled his golf cart. “I said, ‘Who’s throwing golf balls at me?”’ Stuber said. He picked up the ball and set it

in the cup holder of his golf cart, then drove off to a villa to set up a corporate party, no idea whose ball it was or how it got there. “I went down to the lodge, and the next thing I know, everyone is looking for me,” he said. “They said, ‘You stole Tiger’s ball.”’ Lucky for Woods was the fact that rules official Mike Shea said the ball was located -- or enough evidence to figure out what happened -- seconds before the five minutes allowed to search for a lost ball expired. Rules official Slugger White pointed out that the clubhouse was and has never been deemed to be out-of-bounds. In fact, he said Woods’ ball could have bounced across Warner Road and onto the North Course and still would have been in play. Woods got a free drop because the grandstand behind the green is a temporary immovable obstruction and this interfered with Woods’s line of sight to the pin. Rules officials had to walk in an arc away from the back of the clubhouse, then used lasers to determine the yardage -- 97 yards -- and Woods eventually hit a lob wedge to 30 feet and twoputted for bogey. Mike Shea and Slugger White are well respected officials and have both visited our shores to officiate at the Nedbank Golf Challenge at Sun City. Club officials should note that the status of the clubhouse should be clearly defined. There is no assumption that it is out of bounds and if it is not declared out of bounds it becomes an Immovable Obstruction and Rule 24-2 applies. The rule referred to covering temporary immovable obstructions is a special local rule applying in Pro Tour events. This rule gives the player line of sight relief from temporary structures such as TV Towers, grandstands, toilets etc. pEbblE, StonE, roCk or bouldEr – looSE impEdimEntS all A common design feature of many modern courses are large sandy waste areas, much the same as you find playing at Lost City. During the 1999 Phoenix Open Tiger’s drive on the 13th hole finished in just such an area. The ball stopped about two feet behind a boulder that was roughly a meter high and wide. Woods called for a ruling and was advised when dealing with loose impediments there is no reference to size or weight, the object must be loose and it must be natural to the environment. The boulder was loose and natural and even though it took a number of Tiger’s fans to roll it aside the rules had been correctly applied. pga ChampionShipS – thE loSt SECondS In this case Tiger’s tee shot went way left of the fairway towards an out of bounds area. After a slight delay


rules shot down the middle of the fairway and end up in a divot. That’s all part of the game. As regards “Tigers Rules” - he is treated like any other player. Now that Tiger is no longer the world number 1, he seems to have some real competition in Rory McIlroy. This both in terms of on course performances and off course as the young man seems intent on providing us scribes with plenty to write about. Just consider his comments on the Ryder Cup (not such a big deal he basically said) and the Olympics (not sure who he will play for so might not play at all).

when dealing with loose impediments there is no reference to size or weight, the object must be loose and it must be natural to the environment

the ball appeared, bouncing back towards the semi rough. Overhead shots from the Goodyear Blimp showed no spectators in the rough and in the absence of evidence that the ball had come to rest and was moved by an outside agency, it was determined that Tiger had just got a good break. What the ball hit we do not know, but from a golfing point of view it was just luck and in this case it was in Tiger’s favour. The message to be taken for the average golfer is to know the rules. And if “the rub of the green” works to your advantage accept it. But be assured the “Golfing Gods” will balance the books and somewhere down the line you will hit a perfect

B

ut seeing we are talking rules, has there been any incident yet of “Rory Rules”? Indeed there has!

Bunker rage – Masters Every weekend golfer knows the feeling. You are having a terrible round, can’t keep the ball on the fairway and end up in yet another bunker. Your first attempt at extricating your ball from the sand fails and you lash out at the sand in frustration. And the penalty stroke counter starts ticking over. At the 2009 masters McIlroy was made to sweat for more than four hours before officials reached their decision in a similar incident - a decision that many knowledgeable

19

rules officials certainly dispute. At issue was the question of whether the teenager from Northern Ireland, was on the wrong side of the rules when he momentarily lost his cool in a bunker on the 18th hole. The incident came at the end of a rollercoaster round; having started in 39th place, McIlroy had moved up to sixth before three disastrous holes saw him slip down the leaders’ board. Having failed to get the ball out with his first attempt, he appeared to kick the sand before playing his next stroke. That was potentially illegal because Rule 13-4 a) states: ‘The player must not test the condition of the hazard or any similar hazard’. In kicking the sand as he did was he was merely ‘smoothing’ it in an attempt to restore the bunker to its original condition or was it what looked like - an ill-judged swipe and nothing of the sort. At the end of the day he got the benefit of the doubt – the first example of “Rory Rules”? Only time will tell.

LARGEST DEDICATED GOLF CAR DEALER IN SA

New and used golf cars available in 7 colours Full selection of new Yamaha golf cars COMPETITIVE PRICES 2, 4, 6-seaters and utility vehicles Best service and technical support Fleet rentals and sales

ACCESSORIES:

Trailers All-weather enclosures Windshields Lights Cooler-box Club and ball washer Hi-lift kits and other

www.golfcarassociates.co.za

For more information contact: Charles on 083 307 1580 or Dean on 083 701 5332 Unit A4, The Palisades Business Park, 39 Kelly Road, Jet Park, East Rand, 1459 | Tel: 011 397 6671 | Fax: 086 615 8280 | E-mail: dean@yamahagolf.co.za

GolfCarAssociates_0412.indd 1

2012/07/03 10:49 AM


20

INSTRUCTION By Dennis Bryuns, Illustrations Dave Edwards

GO SHORT NOT LONG

Looking for the quickest way to reduce your scores? Look no further than your putting.

Eyes not positioned directly over the ball.

Keeping one’s arms straight with a standardlength putter usually means standing upright.

SWITCH TO A SHORTER PUTTER Develop a stroke that uses just the arms and shoulders with no wrist break at all. In other words let the arms hang loosely from the shoulders with little or no bend at the elbow. Unfortunately, with a standard-length putter, keeping the arms straight usually means standing straight up, which makes it difficult to see the line of the putt. The solution may be a putter significantly shorter than normal, such as 32 inches or less (standard length is 35 to 36 inches). You’ll be able to crouch slightly at address, positioning your eyes directly over the ball, with your arms hanging straight down from the shoulders. This stance encourages a natural pendulum action as your arms swing freely with the rocking of the shoulders. The result is a longer, smoother stroke and more control. You could grip down to the exposed shaft of your regular-length putter and accomplish the same thing. But gripping down has its drawbacks: 1) Rather than holding a real grip, you’re holding metal or metal wrapped with tape; 2) The grip you’re not using can throw off the balance of the club, which is designed to be used at its full length; Take your putter off to your local PGA Professional and let him shorten the shaft and while you’re about it let him re-grip it with a slightly thicker grip. This encourages you to grip the putter in your hands rather than your fingers again taking the small muscles out of the stroke. And remember this is not instant coffee; you will need to spend some time on the practice green grooving your new stroke.

Eyes positioned directly over the ball. Arms hang down. A shorter putter will allow you to crouch slightly at address.

T

he usual suggestion for a golfer struggling to groove a steady putting stroke is to take the small muscles out of the stroke by switching to a long putter. And it certainly does work or all those Senior Tour players and many regular Tour players would not have made the switch. However the powers that be feel that this is just “not Golf’ and have put all golfers on notice that anchoring of the putter (the basic technique used in a long putter stroke) will be outlawed from 2016. Remember it is the small muscles we are trying to eliminate and there is another way to do this?


21 PULL OUT AND KEEP

THE ONEPIECE WAGGLE

A one-piece waggle will encourage a backswing controlled by the torso turn.

The start of the swing will often determine the how the rest of the swing will follow. And seeing that this is a short deliberate movement it is one we can get right.

T A wrist-only waggle can promote a faulty takeaway.

he waggle is a familiar sight and part of many pre-shot routines. The golfer moves the club back and forth by gently hinging and unhinging the wrists. It’s a good way to minimise muscle tension during the swing. This was the preferred way for years and years especially when “wristy” swings were the norm. Today we recommend a one-piece takeaway – in which hands, arms and shoulders move the club back together. In a way this is a rehearsal of how you want to start the swing. The old style waggle is likely to lead to starting the swing by breaking the wrists, which can pull the club off line and throw your timing off at impact. For this reason, try the one-piece waggle during your preshot routine: keeping the wrists firm, move the club back and forth by rotating the shoulders. Make two or three “waggles”, then swing. This will encourage a backswing controlled by turning the body, rather than lifting the club with the hands and arms. The result will be a bigger turn and more power.


Don’t let INFLAMMATION become a PAIN

Research suggests that a new natural ingredient Celadrin® may help with the cause of joint pain and promote healthy joint function by reducing inflammation and restoring mobility. An all-natural proprietary blend of eight cetylated fatty acids, Celadrin® is thought to enhance the fluids that cushion your bones and joints to maintain flexibility.

SOLGAR

Vitamins |

INNOVATION AND QUALITY

Since 1947

Available from Independent Health stores and Healthcare practitioners For more information email infosa@solgar.com | www.solgar.com | Tel 011 462 1652 CAREFULLY MANUFACTURED

in the USA

BY SOLGAR LABORATORIES


23

LUCKY NUMBER 13

L

et’s face it 2012 was one tough year. Wherever I have gone lately I hear people talk about how they would not want 2012 over. However, as with most ordeals they do eventually end and as South Africans we have once again shown that “vasbyt” we are renowned for. The golfing industry was also hard hit in 2012 and it is no surprise that a lot of keen golfers did not have the time to play as regularly as before. Fortunately it seems that many of these golfers are planning to return to the golf course with a bang in 2013. To help those of you who intend to make 2013 your luckiest (and best) golfing year ever, we have set up a Q and A that will assist you in overcoming some common mental stumbling blocks that prevent good years from becoming great years. “What can I do mentally to help me bring my handicap down?” Probably the most important thing to do is to pay attention to what better players than you are doing. Do they take fewer risks than you off the teebox or are they much better at the short game? By isolating the differences between your game and the game of a scratch handicapper you can start to work out what you may have the time (and often the money) to improve. It is very important to be honest with yourself in this regard in that if you only have an extra hour a day to practice there is no use in practicing the things that you are good at. Rather consult a teacher and ask them to spend time with you on the areas that need the most work. By being realistic early in the year you can make potentials weaknesses potential strengths by next summer, all ready to swing into action in the last third of the year. “I haven’t played much over December, what can I do to get back into the game without losing hope or confidence?” Think of when you get to work after a long

break. The first week you are back at the office or even when you get back to school or university, the first week is all about getting your organization and systems right. In a golfing sense this would entail having a serious look at your basics. By starting with the small but fundamental things first you can prevent a total breakdown of your game later in the year. In fact at the end of each season

At the end of each season Jack Nicklaus and his coach Jack Grout were known to spend a serious chunk of their time together taking care of the Golden Bear’s basics

SWING THOUGHTS By Theo Bezuidenhout

Jack Nicklaus and his coach Jack Grout were known to spend a serious chunk of their time together taking care of the Golden Bear’s basics. Re-visiting your basics also has a very important psychological benefit. By starting with the easy things first you can build confidence very quickly in the aspects of your game that you are comfortable with. However, if you decide to take on Gary Player CC for your first round be prepared to be disappointed as this will only frustrate you and kill the little bit of confidence you may have. So in the beginning of the year pick your battles and if you can make sure you win more than you lose. You will be thanking me at the end of 2013. “I played some really good golf in 2012 and I want to continue the trend, how do I approach this from a psychological point of view?”. The first and most important thing to do is to write down why you felt 2012 was such a great year and what you had done differently to make it the great year it was. Then once you have read through this piece of paper a few times and assimilated the information on it, take it tear it up and dump it in the dustbin. A little dramatic I know but it is very important that you get complete closure from the year before. You can also approach it from the point of view of a professional player. At the end of each season the order of merit gets wiped clean and everyone starts from scratch. The worst thing one can do is to get stuck in how great last year was instead of incorporating the things that made it a great year, into your game. If you spent more time on the putting green or on you game from a 100m and in keep that as your focus. Rather than just blindly trusting that the work you did in 2012 on those areas of your game will stay like that without effort. “My club champs/important club competition is coming up soon,

how can I make sure that I peak at the event?”. As a good friend of mine, and physical therapist for many touring pro’s, Garth Milne always says, you need to build down to an event you shouldn’t build up to it. The best example of this is when the Springboks play a test match they get the hardest physical sessions out of the way early in the week on the Tuesday. Then they have their least strenuous session, the Captain’s run, on the Friday afternoon before the game. How can you incorporate this mindset from rugby into your preparation for an important event? Firstly, when you are playing the course a few months or weeks before make sure you make it harder for yourself than it may be when you play the event. This may entail playing it off back tees every few holes or playing practice rounds where you play two balls for every approach shot. Hitting one shot from the fairway and another from the same yardage but in the rough or a bunker. You may also want to practice putting at the most difficult pin placements on each green. Thus simulating how you might find it on the last day of club champs. All of these techniques will help you to get the fear of the most difficult aspects of the course out of the way early, thus building down to the event by taking away possible anxieties and not building up to the event like most (unsuccessful) golfers will do.

PROFILE: Theo Bezuidenhout is a sport psychologist in private practice and consults with golfers of all abilities and ages. His clients include top juniors, amateurs and Sunshine Tour professionals. Theo has been a columnist for Tee to Green for over seven years. He is also an ambassador for Volvo South Africa and Volvo in Golf as well as a Titleist ambassador. He has a special interest in parental involvement in sport and has also been involved with the Glacier Junior Series for the last two years as a consultant. He refuses to divulge how often he gets to work on his own golf.

THE NEW TITLEIST 913 DRIVERS. MORE SPEED. MORE DISTANCE. MORE PERFORMANCE. PRO V1 & PRO V1x. THE BEST BALL FOR YOUR GAME. Learn more at titleist.co.uk

TeetoGreen_Titleist_225x55.indd 1

Learn more at titleist.co.uk 23/11/2012 15:46


24 GOLFING FAMILIES


25

FATHERS AND THEIR

SONS Like many golfing fathers, George Schwartzel was introduced to the game by his father and he in turn started his sons Charl and Attie playing golf years later.

G

eorge Schwartzel started playing golf when he was six or seven years of age. Both his parents played and the family lived in Messina across the road from the golf course. A few years later they moved to Phalaborwa and starting playing at the old course on sand greens. It was here that George achieved a special success on the newly built Hans Merensky Course. He birdied the par 3 4th hole (today the 13th) and three holes later recorded a hole in one at the 8th (today the 17th ) famous for the pod of Hippos that make the dam short of the green their home. He was just 12 years old at the time. Another move was on the cards in 1967 when his father went for an interview in Pretoria. The move was made early the next year and the first thing they did was find a golf club to be members at and then a house nearby. The club was Zwartkop and during an early visit George witnessed the 16 year old Dale Hayes win the Northern Transvaal Amateur at the club beating the best amateurs in the country. And so began a long friendship with Hayes family. George developed into a very good player in his own right, turning professional in the mid 70’s after a successful provincial amateur career. However that cool calm demeanour we see of son Charl was not part of his father’s make-up. George’s tantrums are the thing of legend. It made a monster out of me,” he admits of his golf frustrations. There was the time he missed a putt and tried to hit the sole of his shoe but broke his small toe instead.

THAT COOL CALM DEMEANOUR WE SEE OF SON CHARL WAS NOT PART OF HIS FATHER’S MAKE-UP. GEORGE’S TANTRUMS ARE THE THING OF LEGEND.


26 GOLFING FAMILIES

There was the time he lost his ball during a provincial team qualifier at Zwartkop and chased his caddie up the ninth fairway. But the best of all came in an SA Master tournament at Milnerton near Cape Town in 1978. The tournament was dogged by slow play and George was getting more and more frustrated. Eventually he just goes “walkabout” to take a swim in the sea. George explains: “It was slow play and such a beautiful day and the water looked so good. I love swimming, so I went swimming. The group I was playing with had already finished the hole and were a holeand-a-half ahead of me, so I had to play back through the field and catch up to them.” That was the end of Pro golf for George as he soon applied for reinstatement as an amateur and continued to play provincial golf well into the 80’s. The golfing anxieties that fuelled his temper as a competitor manifest themselves differently as an observer. He can barely watch his sons Charl and Attie compete. “I’ll watch a couple holes and then disappear and come back,” he said. “I find it’s difficult to walk all 18 holes.”

“...I WATCHED THE WHOLE THING,” GEORGE SAID. “IT WAS JUST MAGNIFICENT.” At Leopard Creek, when Charl won his first European Tour event, his nervous father ended up lying under a tree and taking a nap. “In 2010, when he played in the final group at Doral with Ernie, I told my wife, ‘I can’t watch this,’” George said. “I took a sleeping pill and went to his bedroom and slept. I said, ‘Only wake me up when he’s finished.’ ” That was his plan for Masters Sunday in 2011 when the anxiety bubbled up after Schwartzel’s approach on No. 1 settled into the gallery in an impossible spot. “I’m saying to my wife, ‘What is he doing? Why is he hitting there?’ ” he said. “She’s the positive one.” The stress built up as three-time Masters winner Nick Faldo told the TV audience how Schwartzel would do well to keep his third shot on the green and make a tough bogey. When Schwartzel chipped in with a 6-iron for birdie and elicited an “Oh my word!” from Faldo, his father had seen enough.

“After the chip shot I said, ‘Forget this. I’m going to take a sleeping pill,’ ” he said. Lizette, Charl’s mother, urged him to sit back down in front of the television. “So I watched the whole thing,” he said. “It was just magnificent.” George explains that this was the culmination of years and years of interest, discipline and dedication to the game for Charl. “We have pictures of him in nappies hitting with a plastic club. He was just four when he played his first nine holes in Pietersburg and then when we moved here to Maccauvlei he started playing junior golf. But not seriously at first, I would not let him” In fact the senior Schwartzel made sure that both sons, Charl and Attie played other sports at junior school only letting them specialize in golf when they were in their mid-teens. “Attie was bigger and stronger than Charl and he was a fine athlete at school still holding a number of records. But soon after Charl started high school I realized that this child was something special and by the age of 16 he was winning both junior and regular national amateur tournaments. He soon became the number one ranked amateur in the country.” As for coaching their first teacher was George himself. “We would watch golf video tapes from Dave Leadbetter and Nick Faldo and then once a year I would take him to a professional – almost like going to a doctor for a check- up. The Pro we went to first was Martin Whitcher and to his credit he gave Charl many drills to work on that have shaped his swing to today. By watching videos of his swing Charl now knows it better than anyone so in truth you can say he is his own coach. What helped a lot was the heavy driver I gave him early on. It was a regular club with a lot of lead tape on the head to make it heavy. To this day he swings with it and as you know it forces you to swing slowly and that is a feature of Charl’s swing – his slow lazy rhythm.” Yes, fathers and their sons. And if you visit Maccauvlei take a walk through the lounge and look at the honours board and there it is - George Schwartzel, Charl Schwartzel and Attie Schwartzel all three winners of the club championship.


28

28

HEALTHY GOLF

CLEVER CARRY

By Dr Rowena Thomson-Selibowitz

WINNING LETTER I picked up a few pounds over the Festive Season and would like to shake it. As I get older though, I find it more and more difficult to lose weight. Why is that firstly and is there anything safe I can take to help me? Jenny Havenga (Durban North) Dear Jenny, As one gets older one’s metabolism does tend to slow down a bit making it harder to shed those extra festive season kilos! There is no quick fix to losing weight. The important thing is to eat regularly (six small meals daily is often recommended) and to avoid high calorie, low nutrient foods such as crisps, pre-packaged foods and other refined carbohydrates. Research shows that by eating more lean protein (skinless chicken and fish) and wholesome vegetables and cutting down on carbohydrates, weight is managed better. There are some natural supplements that may assist you such as Solgar’s Green Tea extract and Whey To Go Protein Shake.

It’s very hot in Gauteng at the moment. Courses often have one or two taps in 18 holes! Is there a hydrating booster/ supplement you can recommend to take before or during in the absence of water. I don’t carry extra water because of the weight and because it doesn’t stay cold.

Frikkie Kotze (Pretoria)

Dear Frikkie, Unfortunately, there is no replacement for water in supplement form. The best suggestion I have is to try and ensure adequate hydration every day and not just when playing a round of golf. The average water

consumption on a daily basis is one 250ml glass of water per every 10kg of body weight. Other drinks do not hydrate your body as adequately as pure water does. I eat once a day as a rule yet I am overweight. I am a keen golfer but my weight seems to be holding me back. Any advice?

Thando Mdluli (Joburg)

Dear Thando, By only eating once a day, your metabolism is being slowed down as the speed at which our body’s run is determined by the amount of food

we eat. This is especially true if you skip breakfast and lunch and only eat a large dinner followed by sleeping. Try to eat small meals throughout the day that are nutritious and healthy- lean protein and some nice crispy salads. Try an apple as a healthy and sweet snack. Great column Doctor thanks for the advice. I get very tired half way through the second nine and Durban is hot this time of year which makes it even tougher. Can you give me some pointers? I think I’m fit but maybe not…

Pranesh Naidoo (Durban)

Dear Pranesh, In this heat, it is important to stay hydrated and cool, so wear light cotton clothing and make sure you drink enough water. Have a low GI, high protein meal to assist in maintaining energy levels

there is no replacement for water in supplement form

for longer. In terms of supplements a good B complex will help with energy production as well as Coenzyme Q-10. I am a diabetic and have high blood pressure but according to rules I cant take beta blockers. I love golf but this is debilitating. Please help.

Faan van Vuuren (W-Cape)

Dear Faan, It is true that beta blocker use is banned in competition however, if you need to take beta blockers for blood pressure concerns, a medical exemption may be applied for. I suggest you speak to your doctor. Will a fitness regime and a strict diet really improve my game. I like junkfood and lounging around and I see guys like Mark Calcaveccia, that fat Swedish dude (forgot his name), Craig Stadler and his son etc. win tournaments. So what’s up?

Waldo Borthwick (Free State)

Dear Waldo, Although natural ability is a wonderful advantage, the reality is, if you are fit and healthy your game will be better as your endurance and ability to stay focused will improve. Junk food tends to be high in saturated fats, salt and empty calories which will have an adverse effect on your body such as spiking blood sugar levels and not providing your body with adequate quantities of nutrients. It is always a good idea to take a multivitamin to ensure all your nutritional needs are being met. I recommend Solgar’s Omnium. Send though your health related queries to teetogreen@ ballyhoomedia.co.za. The winning letter will receive a Solgar Product Hamper.


30

EQUIPMENT

Time to spend that first salary of 2013 on one of these...

TAYLORMADE R1 DRIVER The new R1™ continues TaylorMade’s mastery of adjustable drivers by offering the greatest range of adjustability of any driver in the brand’s history. R1 gives the golfer 12 loft-sleeve settings and 7 face-angle positions, as well as two movable shot-shape weights. R1 also allows loft and face angle to be adjusted independently of each other – a critical benefit. The R1’s three adjustability technologies allow it to be tuned 168 different ways to specifically fit a player’s swing to optimise distance and accuracy. see more R4 299.00

CLEVELAND CLASSIC XL CUSTOM DRIVER Style and confidence are now tunable. The Classic XL Custom Driver has Cleveland Golf’s largest, deepest club face with an even larger sweet spot. An adjustable hosel and interchangeable weight port allow any golfer to tune the driver for precise performance. see more R3 199.99


School Going Golf Academy School Leaver, Executive & Corporate Options Available KeNako hosts students from Grade 7 to matric. Pupils can either board on a full time or weekly basis at KeNako or attend the academy on a daily basis. The school going academy program is for both boys and girls and includes: • Boarding (in a luxury) hostel for 10 months of the year (during school terms) • All food with input from a nutritionist and prepared by the KeNako chef during school terms • Use of all KeNako facilities • Specialized coaching programs including a. Golf technical coaching b. Mental skills coaching c. Physical programs d. EyeGym training (4 x 10 week programs) • Personal analysis and various tests conducted by KeNako’s Psychologist (aptitude/scholastic/emotional/life skills/strength finder tests) • 4 x 10 week sets of the EyeGym training program • Membership of Kingswood Golf Course • Membership of Oubaai Golf Course • Full use of Driving Range and Putting Green at all times • All local Southern Cape road transport costs EDUCATION OPTION • Cambridge Education system • Internationally recognised • On-line learning with live ‘Chat Forums’ and ‘Skype’ connections to specialist tutors • Full time in-class teacher monitoring progress • ‘Flag’ system highlighting problems • Allows more academy time without compromising education • Beneficial learning for after school studying HOLIDAY CAMPS • 3 Camps per year; April, July and December • For all young golfers, both boys and girls • For serious golfers; for recreational fun golfers; and those wanting to learn to play golf • Includes a variety of other exciting and stimulating life skills elements www.kenakoacademy.com info@kenakoacademy.com Tel: 044 8740370 Fax: 044 8740467

Skills for Life

TM

Embracing the technical, physical and mental aspects of the game


WIN WITH ONE LUCKY READER WILL WIN A SET OF MIZUNO JPX 825 IRONS (#4 - PW, STEEL SHAFTS) WORTH R7299.00 + AN AEROLITE 5 BAG WORTH R1499.00 To enter, please mail us your name, age and what you think of the new glossy format to info@teetogreen.co.za NEWS Singh caught doping

EXCLUSIVE Interview with George Schwartzel

INSTRUCTION Putting tips and mastering the one-piece waggle

PG

PG

PG

4

24

EQUIPMENT The season’s hottest woods, irons & balls

20

PG

30

WIN

TEE TO GREEN

February 2013 www.tee2green.co.za

A SET OF MIZUNO JPX 825 IRONS + AN AEROLITE 5 BAG WORTH R8 800 PG

32

OOSTHUIZEN VS

SCHWARTZEL

2013’S DUEL TO WATCH

YOUR FREE COPY

NEWS Singh caught doping

EXCLUSIVE Interview with George Schwartzel

INSTRUCTION Putting tips and mastering the one-piece waggle

PG

PG

PG

4

24

EQUIPMENT The season’s hottest woods, irons & balls

20

PG

30

WIN

A SET OF MIZUNO JPX 825 IRONS + AN AEROLITE 5 BAG WORTH R8 800

TEE TO GREEN

February 2013 www.tee2green.co.za

VIEW THE LATEST ISSUE OF TEE TO GREEN ON YOUR PC, TABLET OR MOBILE PHONE FOR FREE AT WWW.TEE2GREEN.CO.ZA

PG

OOSTHUIZEN VS

SCHWARTZEL

2013’S DUEL TO WATCH

YOUR FREE COPY

32


EQUIPMENT

TAYLORMADE LETHAL BALL

33

CLEVELAND 588 MT & 588 TT IRONS

Having amassed global success with its PENTA franchise, TaylorMade Golf Company today announced its next generation of golf ball, set to be played by hundreds of professional golfers. Introducing LETHAL™, a premium, five-piece multi-layer golf ball aptly and memorably named for its remarkable tee-to-green performance. R480.00 per pack of 12

Mid Trajectory (MT) irons help you find more greens with an unparalleled combination of forgiveness and feel. Take your accuracy to a new level with the tour-caliber flight and feel of the Tour Trajectory irons (TT). Both ranges are fully interchangeable with each other so you can build your perfect set. Steel R7 199.99 (4-SW), graphite R8 199.99

see more

see more see more

SRIXON ZSTAR/ ZSTAR XV BALL R41.99 per ball see more

TAYLORMADE ROCKETBALLZ STAGE 2 Following the most successful fairway wood launch in the history of golf, which catapulted the company to a record metalwood market share, TaylorMade Golf Company is adding another equipment breakthrough to its industry leading-portfolio.  Introducing the new RocketBallz Stage 2, a fairway wood that promotes up to 10 yards of distance for better players in addition to the 17 yards gained with the original RocketBallz fairways. R2 699.00 see more

ADIZERO SHOES adidas Golf, an industry leader in innovation, technology and performance footwear, has announced the release of their new  adizero golf footwear collection. Revolutionising the fit, feel and   shape of adidas Golf footwear, the new adizero line has been specially-engineered from the ground up to include only what’s essential to perform, and deliver everything a golfer needs to finish strong when it’s needed the most.  It’s so light, it’s like wearing  nothing at all. see more R1 999.00


34 travel

Golf’s Original Island Green Duncan Cruickshank recalls his visit to the TPC at Sawgrass and playing the famous par 3 17th.


35

i

have been very privileged to have been able to play some amazing golf courses, both in South Africa and around the world. While I haven’t exactly traversed the US – Florida, South Carolina and Georgia have been the sum-total of my golfing states – I have played a few incredibly good and fairly well-known courses. None though, come close to the TPC at Sawgrass, home to the headquarters of the PGA Tour, The Players Championship and, of course, arguably the most notorious island-green hole in all of golf. When the chance came, almost exactly a year ago, to play the famed course, I jumped at it as several of my friends and journalistic colleagues – this publication’s editor-in-chief included – had regaled me with tales of their heroics on the 17th and I was just a little jealous. TPC at Sawgrass is an impressive facility; designed by the legendary Pete Dye, it was to be the first of the PGA Tour’s “stadium courses”, designed with spectators in mind,

Ah, the pressure! Just one chance to be able to say: “I hit the green on the 17th at Sawgrass!” affording them the very best views at all parts of the course. Cheap it is not and a round there will set you back close to R2000 and you’re expected to take a forecaddie which will probably end up costing you at least another R500. But this is also not a place where you worry about exchange rates and Rands and cents – this is all about the experience. And it is worth every cent! I have to admit that, despite watching many Players Championships over the years, most of my knowledge of the front nine came from watching my sons rip the course apart on Tiger Woods 2012, So, while most of the holes looked

eerily familiar, I was put off by the fact that there were no animated crowds cheering my every move. Playing a course that is best known for just one hole means that, for much of the round, there is a very real sense of anticipation for what is to come. But the holes preceding the 17th are magnificent and it is not difficult to understand why this course ranks regularly among the US’s top 50 and among the top three in Florida. As the back nine unwound in front of me, I found that my game was steadily improving and I decided that playing 16, 17 and 18 in level par should be my goal. As we were playing the course in late March, there was


36 travel Other (must play) Island Greens The Coeur d’Alene resorT Golf Course - home of The World’s only floATinG Green. The Coeur d’Alene Resort Golf Course is nestled in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains on the shores of beautiful Lake Coeur d’Alene in North Idaho. Designer Scott Miller’s vision was to create a golf course that offered a stimulating round of golf, surrounded by a park-like environment. Anticipation builds towards the world renowned 14th hole, the world’s only par 3, floating movable island green. Don’t be intimidated by the 15,000 sq. ft. putting surface as it beckons your challenge, quietly floating 150 yards off the lakeshore. Confidence is your key to success. Board the Putter Boat shuttle, and enjoy the short ride over to finish the most unforgettable island golf green in the world. Don’t misread your putt... remember, everything breaks towards the water. TPC sCoTTsdAle PAr 5 15Th. Although more famous for the stadium hole par 3 16th where over 60,000 people pack in to watch the pros in the Phoenix Open, the TPC at Scottsdale also features one of the most beautiful island greens in golf.

there was plenty of activity on the course in preparation for the 2012 Players Championship, with the championship tees covered over and hospitality marquees and stands going up all over the place. So we were playing off the club tees, which made the course a little short, but very enjoyable all the same. I bombed my tee shot straight down the middle of the par-five 16th, leaving myself just over 200 yards to the green. With the flag at the front and a slight helping breeze, I chose a 3-iron for my second. Being a little snatchy with my downswing, I looked up to see my ball disappearing in the direction of a particularly large construction way left of the green. A disconcerting clattering sound signalled its return to earth and my goal of par, par, par seemed suddenly a little tough. But, remarkably I found my ball on the other side of the mounding with a clear(-ish) shot to the green and I managed to leave my third on the fringe, just short. Two solid putts for par and I could start the famed walk to the 17th tee. Of course, it is nothing like the cauldron that is the 16th at the Phoenix Open, but it must be an incredible atmosphere when the crowds are packed in for Sunday at the Players. The traditional championship tee was closed, but I was able to tee up in line with it towards the left. The flag was positioned (ridiculously) front right, so I knew right from the get-go that

middle of the green was my only target. I had 133 metres to the middle and there was a gentle breeze blowing straight into us, so I knew it was just a regular 8-iron for me. No heroics, just get it on the green. Ah, the pressure! Just one chance to be able to say: “I hit the green on the 17th at Sawgrass!”. And how sweet it was when I felt the ball come solidly out the clubface and soar towards the green, albeit a little left of where I really wanted it to be. With little fanfare, it found the putting surface and I gave a little fistpump of triumph. Not satisfied, I decided to hit another, but as I made contact, that little headwind decided to go elsewhere and I watch as the same shot I had hit just minutes before sailed over the green to join thousands of others in its watery grave. Getting to the green, I realized that I was faced with a monster of a snaking downhill putt that very easily could find its way into the water if I gave it just the slightest of too much oomph, but remarkably I came within inches of sinking this hallelujah and tapped in for par. What a great feeling! Par, par and now just the par-four 18th to negotiate. What an intimidating tee shot. Even with my very best “don’t-go-left” thinking, I hit it left-going-left into the middle of the large expanse of water that flanks the 18th fairway. What a stupid hole!


SWING INTO FORM AT THE 18 TH CONSECUTIVE FANCOURT AMATEUR OPEN: 14 –19 MAY 2013 The format of play is a 72 hole Medal Competition for A division players (0 - 9 handicap) and Individual Stableford for B Division Players (10 – 18 handicap). The event is played over 2 courses, alternating on Montagu and Outeniqua with a two tee start each day. There will be a separate section for ladies. Nomads rules apply.

COSTS: R8990 PER GOLFER SHARING (non-playing partners R6555). Single supplement, an additional R540 per night. The above includes: 5 night’s accommodation; 5 breakfasts; welcome carvery dinner ; Italian dinner and enter tainment; Barbeque Spectacular with prize giving and enter tainment; 5 x 18 holes golf; golfing gift per player ; tournament entry.

• Amateurs entering with friends will definitely be paired together to ensure a really fun competitive time! • Daily prizes for 1st, 2nd & 3rd in each division and overall prizes from 1st to 5th in each division will be awarded with trophies for the winners sponsored by Shamwari Group, Grants, Beacon Island, Fancourt & Callaway.

CLOSING DATE FOR ENTRIES: 29 MARCH 2012 ENQUIRIES: ANNIE LAWSON SPORTS PROMOTIONS Tel: 044 870 0973 Fax: 086 606 2556 Cell: 083 251 9581 Email: Annie.law@iafrica.com www.fancourt.co.za


38 ACADEMIES

‘KE NAKO’

[‘THE TIME HAS COME’]

In line with its literal meaning, KeNako Academy is defining a new space within the sphere of golf and sports academies, not only in South Africa but around the world. KeNako is not just a golf academy – it includes health and wellness, making the total offering even more complete. ighly qualified professionals offer technical and scientific analysis that is linked to real life experience and this allows KeNako to be at the cutting edge of its industry niche. On top of this, KeNako must surely offer the best golf academy facilities anywhere in the world. GLOBALLY ACKNOWLEDGED After a visit to the KeNako Academy, renowned and respected Australian golfer and coach Jack Newton was interviewed on television and when asked about the KeNako Academy he said “I’ve got nothing but praise for it. I think that it is a wonderful facility…..it’s got to be close to best in the world.” Newton heads up an extensive junior coaching program in Australia looking after as many as 5,000 young golfers and he is respected throughout the world, so this is huge praise. In 2012 KeNako hosted a Swiss National Junior squad for a training camp and after their visit coach Simon Hilton wrote to KeNako “I

ANTICLOCKWISE FROM TOP: Students and outside clients, both juniors and executives, work with KeNako’s golf professionals on the Kingswood Golf Estate Driving Range; 3 times a year KeNako hosts Holiday Camps where participants enjoy a golf program and a variety of other challenges; KeNako has a fully equipped private gymnasium; KeNako’s auditorium is used for Mental Skills lectures, to watch selected tournaments or a weekend movie; At the start of 2013 KeNako Academy launched a school that is teaching the Cambridge Education system but with online learning support and using the very latest in technology; KeNako offices – bordered by Kingswood Estate and The Links of Fancourt.

would once again like to express my sincere thanks. The ten day Training Camp I organized at Kenako Sports Academy was fantastic. We were able to train and play under ideal conditions. It’s just the perfect place, with access to all the amenities at the Academy including the backup from the highly Professional and helpful Kenako Team and just over the road the challenging Kingswood Golf Club and Practice facilities. I would also like to congratulate you..... We are greatly looking forward to returning next year to the Kenako Golf Academy for our 2013 Winter Golf Camp.....“ KeNako academy will shortly be hosting not only the Swiss Junior Squad for their second visit but also the German National Junior Squad, so the reputation of KeNako is growing around the world. More South Africans need to take advantage of this wonderful facility that is on their doorstep and based in the most beautiful surrounds! ROGER WESSELS Roger Wessels is Head Golf Professional. It is rare to have a man of the quality of Roger involved as a full time coach – Roger could be playing on one of the senior tours in Europe or the USA but he has decided that he wants to share his knowledge and experience with young golfers and he is truly passionate about what he is doing. During his playing days Roger enjoyed many career highlights, some of which included representing South Africa at the World Cup of Golf in 1994, beating Mark James (who won a Senior Major in 2012) in a play of to win the PGA Championship in 1991 and winning the Canadian Masters amongst his many tournament victories. Roger retired from the European Tour and competitive golf at the end of the 2003 season and then studied before embarking on his new career. Roger has the unique ability of being a good player who is an equally good coach. His experience of having played around the world is of significant value; the KeNako students are privileged to be able to share and learn from Roger.


39

KENAKO SA WORLD JUNIORS 2013 IS THE THIRD YEAR that the KeNako Academy will be hosting the KeNako SA World Juniors tournament at the Kingswood Golf Estate in George. This unique tournament is one of South Africa’s hidden gems, with players from many countries of the world participating in this official World Junior Golf Series event. During the 2012 tournament several international coaches and manages rated the KeNako SA World Juniors as one of the top junior tournaments played anywhere in the world. The tournament includes both boys and girls who are 19 years and younger, playing in separate divisions but on the same course and at the same time. Besides the individual strokeplay event, which is the major attraction and which carries maximum world junior ranking points, teams of two players represent their countries in a Team Trophy. The tournament is due to be played from Tuesday 5th March to Thursday 7th March over 54 holes. Entries from around the world have been received and countries with first time participants include Canada and Indonesia. Ultimately there will be players from close to 20 different countries travelling to South Africa to play in the event. The timing of the event usually means spectacular weather and the magnificence of the Garden Route truly sells South Africa to its visitors! South Africa’s top junior golfers are included in the field and have the opportunity to test their games against some of the world’s leading junior players. The South African players qualify according to specified criteria as set by SAGA and Woman’s Golf S.A. and participation depends on National Order of Merit rankings and seeding in their home provinces. Besides its international flavour, the tournament allows young players an opportunity to experience what it is like to play in a major event. It is a fantastic tournament with wonderful hospitality played at an excellent course. Players all stay in a Golf Village set up at the hotel and they get to enjoy excellent social interaction at different themed functions each evening. The KeNako SA World Juniors is the first tournament of the year on the World Junior Golf Series schedule. Other WJGS tournaments are played in Poland (July), Germany (August) and the United States (December) with a ‘Tour Championship’ to be played in Bermuda. The World Junior Golf Series is a non-profit organisation dedicated to creating and developing young golfing talent on an international basis. The WJGS has created an international “tour structure” that gives juniors the opportunity to compete against their international counterparts in different countries of the world. As at the today’s date entries from 15 different countries have already been confirmed for the forthcoming KeNako SA World Juniors. Of further interest is that National Junior Squads from 2 countries are travelling to South Africa early to train at the KeNako Academy. KeNako Academy is proud of its continued involvement in the promotion of junior golf in South Africa. The tournament is one of South Africa’s leading international events in any sporting discipline and for the local golfers it also counts towards the National Order of Merit. KeNako Academy has managed to arrange for direct acceptance into the tournament for selected development players, for which a special concession was granted by the WJGS Board. This very special golfing week commences with an Am-Am on Sunday 3rd March at the Kingswood Golf Estate. One of the world junior players plays with 3 amateur players and the Am-Am is followed by a luncheon and prize giving at the KeNako Academy. Anybody interested in playing in the Am-Am with one of the future stars of golf can enter by contacting Nadia at nabrahamse@kenakoacademy.com or Tel 044 874 0370.

OTHER PROFESSIONALS KeNako employs and works together with a variety of other professionals, each one a specialist in their particular field of expertise. Jan Fourie, KeNako’s full time Biokineticist, works very closely with Roger. The two of them are evolving some dynamic and cutting edge programs that are hugely beneficial to an aspiring young golfer. The school going students are in their teens and this is a vital time for them to learn how to train correctly and effectively without doing damage to their bodies. Besides helping to improve their golf swings, the students become much more aware of and proud of their bodies. This knowledge will assist them throughout their lives, whether they succeed as golfers or if they become businessmen and women. Mariette le Roux is KeNako’s Psychologist. At the start of each year she completes a variety of tests on each student and amongst the many benefits of these tests is the fact that the professionals have an enhanced understanding of each and every student, allowing them to improve communication and to react most appropriately to the student during both their good times and their bad times. Better appreciation of limitations and strengths adds value to the students life, their goals and their capabilities.

Dr Sherylle Calder needs no introduction. Her visual performance work is globally respected. Some of her highlights include being the only person in the World with 2 World Cup winners medals (England 2003 and South Africa 2007); working together with Ernie Els before his 2012 British Open triumph; and more recently being employed by Cricket Australia to work with their national team – Mickey Arthur previously worked with Sherylle when he was the South African coach. Even more interesting is that research conducted both in the United Kingdom and in South Africa shows that Sherylle’s pioneering work improves not only sportsmen and sportswomen’s abilities but also a child’s ability to learn. Students who train on her EyeGym programs as instructed are able to improve their marks in school. A healthy diet and cooking suitable but enjoyable meals are another two aspects that the students at KeNako benefit from and enjoy. They are truly spoilt! KeNako is an amazing facility and it really stands out from the crowd! It is not just your ‘run of the mill’ academy offering. For further information go to www.kenakoacademy.com or write to info@kenakoacademy.com

NO ONE SAYS ,

HERE COME AND STAY W OLF AG A IN? ” OU’RE PL AYING G “Y

a City Lodge. feel right at home at s ay alw u rooms, yo t tha d You’ll fin guests comfor table home. We offer our of do. nt to ou at am wh ht u rig yo g the But just And no one tellin . lue va at gre d an a warm welcome

www.citylodge.co.za • 0800 113 790

116095 CL golf print 160x112.5.indd 6

2011/08/29 10:13 AM


40

humour Illustration Dave Edwards

the Top 5 ReasoNs why older Men play golf

5 you can smoke those godawful cigars and no one complains.

10 Golfing Laws 7 1

No matter how bad your last shot was, the worst is yet to come. This law does not expire on the 18th hole, since it has the supernatural tendency to extend over the course of a tournament, a summer and, eventually, a lifetime.

2

Your best round of golf will be followed almost immediately by your worst round ever. The probability of the latter increases with the number of people you tell about the former.

3

Brand new golf balls are watermagnetic. Though this cannot be

Too foggy To see Two dim-witted golfers are teeing off on a foggy par-3. They can see the flag, but not the green. The first golfer hits his ball into the fog and the second golfer does the same. They proceed to the green to find their balls. One ball is about 6 feet from the cup while the other found it’s way into the cup for a hole-in-one. Both were playing the same type of balls, TopFlite 2, and couldn’t determine which ball was which. They decided to ask the golf pro to decide their fate. After congratulating both golfers on their fine shots, the golf pro asks, “Which one of you used the yellow ball ?” The Pro and The Judge The Justice of the Peace in a small town was about to tee off with two

proven in a laboratory, it is a known fact that the more expensive the golf ball, the greater its attraction to water.

a golfer hitting into your group will always be bigger than anyone in your group. Likewise, a group you accidentally hit into will consist of a football player, a professional wrestler, a convicted murderer and a tax agent -- or some similar combination.

4

Golf balls never bounce off of trees back into play. If one does, the tree is breaking a law of the universe and should be cut down.

8

5

9

6

10

The higher a golfer’s handicap, the more qualified he deems himself as an instructor. Golf carts always run out of power at the farthest point from the clubhouse.

other friends one day when the club pro volunteered to join them. It seemed like the perfect opportunity for a free lesson. But instead of being helpful the pro was openly critical of the JP’s game. At every bumbled shot, the pro made a joke about the justice. But the criticism didn’t even stop at the end of the round. The pro continued to embarrass the JP in the clubhouse among his friends. Finally the pro got up to leave and said, “Judge, let’s do it again sometime. If you can’t find anybody else to make a foursome, I’ll be glad to play with you again.” “Well that would be fine,” the justice of the peace said. “How about next Saturday? I don’t think any of my friends can join us, so why don’t you just have your parents join us, and after our round I can marry them.”

The person you would most hate to lose to will always be the one who beats you.

The last three holes of a round will automatically adjust your score to what it really should be. all vows taken on a golf course shall be valid only until the sunset of the same day

More excuses when you just have to go play golf! • I’m home shopping, and my real estate agent is taking me golfing to show me a few houses on golf estates. • I’m so late for work that I’m just not even going to go in. • I’m trying to promote the use of “green” energy solutions , and the course uses electric carts. • It is a three-day weekend and my wife has to work. • It is an opportunity to meet new friends. • It is the first day all week it has not rained. • It’s a holiday; what else should I do? • It’s a requirement at the next sales meeting. • It’s the only place where I know women won’t bother me. • It’s the perfect way to get know my future father-in-law.

4 you can pee in the woods without being arrested. 3 your wife acquiesces because she’d rather have a root canal than play golf with you. 2 you can tell all those dirty jokes you used to tell at the office. and the number one reason why older men play golf: Because it’s expensive as hell and they can afford it



Tee to Green February 2013