Page 1

2014 – 2015


Auckland Zoo and the support of wildlife conservation in the wild Zoos play an increasingly important role in the conservation of species and habitats in the wild. Members of the World Zoo and Aquarium Association (WAZA) currently collectively spend an estimated $425 million per year on conservation actions in the wild. Zoos are therefore the third largest supporter of wildlife conservation globally. Auckland Zoo’s mission is to, ‘Bring People Together to Build a Future for Wildlife’. One of the four strategies identified to help deliver on this mission is, ‘Conserving wildlife in wild places’. Two of the key ways in which Auckland Zoo supports wildlife conservation in the wild – both in New Zealand and around the world – is by providing financial support to conservation projects through the Auckland Zoo Conservation Fund and by providing Zoo staff to work in conservation projects in the wild. In 2014/15 the Auckland Zoo Conservation Fund supported 22 projects and awarded $284,167 of grants. Eight of these were within New Zealand and a further 14 in the following countries: Samoa, Rarotonga, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Namibia, South Africa, Ecuador, West Africa (Côte d’Ivoire and Guinea), Pakistan, Madagascar and India. A total of $36,483 from the fund was directed to facilitating Zoo staff spending time in the field on conservation projects by covering the cost of equipment, transport and other logistic support. Details of these grants and the projects they supported are contained in part 1 of this report. Additionally, 90 Auckland Zoo staff and volunteers spent almost 12,000 hours working on over 30 field conservation projects during this reporting period. Of these hours, over 8,500 were staff doing field work outside the Zoo (as opposed to planning field conservation projects etc). This equates to over four people working full-time on fieldwork projects throughout the year. Almost 40% of the field work undertaken by Auckland Zoo staff in 2014/15 was on the Rotoroa Island project in Auckland’s Hauraki Gulf. This project, a partnership between the Rotoroa Island Trust and Auckland Zoo, aims to develop Rotoroa as a venue for innovative and internationally significant environmental education. The Zoo and Aquarium Association of Australasia and the Association of Zoos and Aquariums of North America include additional categories of support in their definition of Field Conservation. These include: 

conservation breeding as part of wildlife agency (e.g. Department of Conservation) mandated breed-for-release programmes 2


  

veterinary support for threatened species in the wild and those held as part of approved conservation breeding programmes (above) field conservation advocacy (not including on-site interpretation) providing staff time to manage and coordinate the Zoo’s contribution to field conservation

According to this definition, Auckland Zoo provided $1.6M of financial and in-kind support to field conservation projects in 2014/15. This represents approximately 12% of the Zoo’s annual operating expenditure. Auckland Zoo believes that the best place to conserve wildlife is in the wild. Our objectives and activities – both in the zoo and beyond the perimeter fence – reflect this priority of supporting and delivering effective field conservation.

3


Index Part 1: Auckland Zoo Conservation Fund Summary category 1 & 2 domestic grants Summary category 1 & 2 international grants Summary category 3 grants

7 7 8

Domestic Portfolio 2014/2015 Category One and Two projects 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Kakapo monitoring - Sky Ranger- DOC Pest control western Otago skink- DOC Wetland Restoration (Te Henga) - Forest & Bird Biodiversity Management Plan - Noises Trust Biodiversity Enhancement Plan - Motuihe Restoration Trust Weed Control - Hauturu Supporters Trust Kakariki research Tiritiri Matangi Island NZ sea lion research

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

International Portfolio 2014/2015 Category One and Two projects 9. Giraffe Conservation Foundation 10. Red Panda Network 11. The Sumatran Orangutan Conservation Programme 12. Centre for Conservation and Research Sri Lanka 13. Biodiversity & Elephant Conservation Trust (Sri Lanka) 14. 21st Century Tiger 15. Cheetah Outreach Trust 16. Samoan Conservation Society 17. Takituma Conservation Area

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27

Small Grants Programme 2014/2015 18. Amphibian Ark 19. Wild Chimpanzee Foundation

29 30 4


20. Aro Velona Institute 21. Dhartee Development society 22. Turtle Survival Alliance

31 32 33

Part 2: Auckland Zoo’s Contribution to Field Conservation 1. Introduction 2. Auckland Zoo staff involvement 3. Geographical distribution, project location and fieldwork time at key locations 4. Project focus and time distribution

Appendix I.

Summary of Auckland Zoo’s 32 fieldwork projects 2014-2015

34 34 34 36

38

5


The Conservation Fund supports conservation efforts in the wild in two main ways:  Supporting our field conservation priorities by providing financial resources to initiatives and projects carried out by external organisations and individuals  By supporting our own staff to develop or utilise specialist skills and participate in field conservation initiatives – this can include both projects led by Auckland Zoo and those led by other conservation organisations. Financial support through grants from the Auckland Zoo Conservation Fund are divided into three categories;  Category 1 projects are those that have been supported by the Zoo for at least three years. They are usually relatively large projects to which the Zoo makes a significant financial contribution.  Category 2 projects are either one-off projects or projects which the Zoo has supported for less than three years.  Category 3 projects are selected from applications sought twice a year via the Zoo’s website. Category 3 grants are for small projects (with a total project budget no more than NZ$20,000) are awarded for a maximum of NZ$5000. They are usually one-off projects and may be awarded to anyone in New Zealand or a developing country (i.e. outside the first world) The 2014/15 year involved preparation for a new structure to begin at the end of the financial year. The new structure will begin a partnership with Auckland Communities Foundation who will host the fund and take on the onus of administration of grant payments and allow us to maximise investment return on any funds held before distribution while providing a solid platform for future fundraising initiatives. In spite of a challenging operating environment, the Zoo directed significant funds totalling $284,167 in direct financial support to twenty two different projects.

6


Summary category 1 & 2 domestic grants

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Partner organisation

Amount to date

Amount 2014/15

Department of Conservation. Kakapo Department of Conservation. Otago Skink Forest and Bird habitat te Henga Noises Trust Motuihe Restoration Trust Little Barrier Island (Hauturu) Supporters Trust Auckland Zoo kakariki research on Tiritiri Matangi NZ Sea lion research

$37,500 $20,831 $23,200 $8,500 $5,000 $50,000 $38,669 $25,000

$12,500 $1,438 $10,600 $8,500 $5,000 $50,000 $4,000 $5,000

Total

$208,700

$97,038

Summary category 1 & 2 international grants

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

Partner organisation

Amount to date

Amount 2014/15

Giraffe Conservation Foundation (Namibia) Red Panda Network (Nepal) Sumatran Orangutan Conservation Programme (Indonesia) Centre for Conservation and Research (Sri Lanka) Biodiversity and Elephant Conservation Trust (Sri Lanka) 21st Century Tiger (Indonesia) Cheetah Outreach (South Africa) Samoan Conservation Society Takituma Conservation area project

$44,692 $50,471 $395,514

$15,000 $10,000 $57,105

$67,648 $64,098

$32,556 $20,159

$117,424 $47,400 $9,000 $9,760

$2,449 $7,500 $9,000 $9,760

Total

$806,007

$163,529

7


Summary category 3 grants Project

location

18

Club P.A.N. - environmental education for children in Côte d’Ivoire and Guinea / West Africa to protect wild chimpanzees and their habitat the tropical rainforest

West Africa

$5,000

19

National Amphibian Conservation Coordinator for Ecuador

Ecuador

$5,000

20

Gyps Vulture Safe Zone Project

Pakistan

$5,000

21

Tackling the overexploitation of the remaining forest of Dabolava a home of the Endangered Propithecus coronatus (sifaka) through the development of the Economic Wood Burning Stove Project (Madagascar).

Madagascar

$3,600

22

A Pilot Reintroduction of the Northern River Terrapin India (Batagur baska) in the Sunderban Tiger Reserve

Total

Amount 2014/15

$5,000

$23,600

8


Domestic Portfolio Category one and two domestic grants

The Conservation Fund Working group and the Conservation Fund Committee approved 18 separate domestic grants to 10 organisations including eight in partnership with the NZ Department of Conservation for projects in 14 different locations around NZ. What is a Category 1 project? On-going annual support of projects (three or more years) for which the Conservation Fund allocation represents a significant part of the project’s overall budget. Category 1 projects will often have direct Auckland Zoo staff involvement, will link directly to species or exhibits/zones at Auckland Zoo and will feature heavily in the interpretation/conservation messaging of that exhibit/zone. Category 1 projects potentially have no upper limit for financial and in kind support. What is a Category 2 project? Shorter-term support of projects (less than three years) where Conservation Fund support will be specifically directed towards getting new initiatives started or supporting specific components of an on-going project (e.g. a training programme, short research project, construction of facilities, purchase of field equipment etc.). These projects may or may not have direct Auckland Zoo involvement, but should link clearly to species or exhibits/zones at Auckland Zoo. Category 2 projects can be elevated to Category 1 projects after a period of three years of continuous support. The eight domestic grants included two in partnership with Department of Conservation helping to protect the Otago skink and monitor kakapo on Little Barrier Island (LBI). A further grant to the Supporters of LBI to help with pest plant control of $50,000 was our largest domestic grant to date and illustrates the serious threat of pest plant species to NZ’s biodiversity. Grant to projects on the Noises, Motuihe and Tiritiri Matangi islands along with support of the Te Henga wetland project cement our role as conservation providers in the wider Hauraki Gulf Auckland region. Our continued support of the world’s most endangered sea lion (the NZ sea lion) extended our reach to the very bottom of the NZ’s main islands with support of survey work on a new colony on Stewart Island.

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1. Partner organisation: Department of Conservation Website: http://www.doc.govt.nz Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/wildsidenz

Programme: The Night

Project title: Kakapo Sky Ranger Project overview: The Sky Ranger project enables the Kakapo Recovery team to monitor the health and activity of the kakapo population on Hauturu Island through the use of a fixed wing plane and new transmitter technology. The “smart” transmitters report the Kakapo position; whether they are alive or dead, whether the females are nesting and, if so, for how long. The males’ transmitters provide information about which females they have mated with and when. Without ‘Sky Ranger’ rangers have had to physically track the birds to get the transmitter signal and data which is difficult on Hauturu due to its size (3100 ha) and steepness. The “Sky Ranger” project will allow effective monitoring of this very important Kakapo population on Hauturu.

Focal species Kakapo Strigops habroptila

Threat status Critically Endangered

A 2014 kakapo breeding season on Whenua hou has given the team ample opportunity to ground truth the new smart transmitter technology. Check mate transmitters have performed very well, logging numerous matings and enabling the team to effectively plan for subsequent nest management. It will be later in 2014, following the DNA analysis of chicks, before the team will know if any matings went un-detected by this technology. Grant Total $ to Partner AZFP amount date since project? 2014/15 $12,500

$37,500

June 2013

Yes

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2. Partner organisation: Department of Conservation Website: http://www.doc.govt.nz

Programme: The High Country

Project title: Last chance for the western Otago skink Project overview: Otago skinks are listed as Nationally Critical. Endemic to Otago, they were once widespread across the tussock and schist rock landscape but are now restricted to remnant populations at the eastern and western edges of their former range. The widelyseparated eastern and western populations of the skink are genetically distinct and are considered separate evolutionary significant units for management purposes. Effective protection is currently in place in the Macrae’s Flat, where a large-scale DOC predator control operation is resulting in an increasing in skink numbers. Auckland Zoos initial investment was to establish a trap network to provide protection to (previously unprotected) Western populations, which were thought to be dangerously close to catastrophic collapse and extinction. Our annual grant commitment from 2013 -2018 is to support maintenance of the trap network.

Focal species Otago skink: Oligosoma otagense

Threat status

Nationally critical

Grant amount 2014/15

Total $ to date

Partner since

AZFP project?

$1,438

$20,831

April 2013

Yes

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3. Partner organisation: Forest and Bird Website: http://www.forestandbird.org.nz/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ForestandBird

Programme: The Wetlands

Project title: Te Henga wetland restoration Project overview: To control mammalian predators in an area of some 500 to 600ha including Te Henga wetland, Bethell’s Beach and Lake Wainamu. Pateke were introduced in January 2015 with further releases anticipated in 2016 and 2017. Future stages of the project may also involve rodent control in selected parts of the wetland or surrounds.

Focal species Pateke: Anas chlorotis

Threat status Near Threatened

Pest mammal management will allow existing wetland species to recover and additional species may selfintroduce. The project forms a continuous corridor from the Ark in the Park to the sea coast. Community involvement is present and increasing and ways to showcase wetland species and values are being investigated. Auckland Zoo’s financial support covers ongoing pest control contractor services. Grant Total $ to Partner AZFP amount date since project? 2014/15 $10,600

$23,200

June 2012

No

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4. Programme: The Islands

Partner organisation: Noises Trust

Project title: A biodiversity management plan for the Noises Island group Project overview: The Noises islands have been periodically invaded by rats since 1956 and rodents have been eradicated several times in response to invasions. The Noises became a site for research on rat invasions as they were small and easily accessible enough to eradicate rodents without using aerial techniques. They are now rodentfree. When nearby Rakino Island came rodent-free in 2002, and Motutapu became rodent free in 2009, the chances of an unintended rodent incursion dropped significantly. The Noises islands are some of the most undeveloped of any in the Hauraki Gulf. They are breeding sites for many seabird species such as fluttering shearwater, common diving petrel, grey-faced petrels and whitefaced storm petrels. As well as having some diverse and relatively undisturbed (i.e. weed free) coastal vegetation, they also provide habitat for the rare flax snail Placostylus hongii that was transferred there by A W B Powell in 1934. The islands have been and will continue to be an important seed source of coastal plants for native revegetation of other nearby islands. Otata Island has also been used as a source of common geckos for several translocations to other islands.

Focal species Habitat

Threat status N/A

Grant amount 2014/15

Total $ to date

Partner since

AZFP project?

$8,500

$8,500

July 2014

Yes

13


5. Partner organisation: Motuihe Restoration Trust Website: http://www.motuihe.org.nz/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MotuiheProject

Programme: The Islands

Project title: Biodiversity enhancement plan for Motuihe Project overview:

Focal species Habitat

In a similar vein to the vision for Rotoroa Island, the implementation of this Biodiversity Enhancement Plan will aim to set Motuihe apart from other Islands by providing a unique conservation experience and enhancing those values that already make Motuihe distinct. Such efforts are important to helping ensure that wildlife sanctuaries in the Hauraki Gulf complement (rather than compete with) each other for their biodiversity values and visitor experience. At the same time, there is potential for this Biodiversity Enhancement Plan to be adopted and modified for use on other Islands, and it is certainly hoped that the value of this Project extends beyond Motuihe Island. Grant Total $ to AZFP Threat status amount Partner since date project? 2014/15 N/A

$5,000

$5,000

August 2014

No

14


6.

Programme: The Islands

Partner organisation: Little Barrier Island (Hauturu) Supporters trust Website: http://www.littlebarrierisland.org.nz/

Project title: Weed Control - Pampas Project overview: Pampas grass was first recorded on LBI in 1974 on the south west coast near the Awaroa stream and upstream. By 1978 pampas appeared to be widespread on the island and little hope was held for its control. In 2004 a programme was initiated to control it to a zero density. This was revised to the more manageable conservation outcome “nationally threatened species conserved to ensure persistence via protection of the flora and fauna of LBI from the impact of pampas invasion�.

Focal species Pest plant control/habitat

Threat status N/A

Various methods of control have been used over the management period including boom spraying, wrecking ball spraying and most successfully personnel strop spraying. Most of the island now receives follow up control spraying rather than intensive knockdown treatment. Funding from Auckland Zoo will facilitate a much more extensive and extended weed control season with special emphasis on pampas. Grant Total $ to Partner AZFP amount date since project? 2014/15 August $50,000 $50,000 No 2014

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7. Partner organisation: Auckland Zoo Website: http://www.aucklandzoo.co.nz Programme: The Islands

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AKLZOONZ

Project title: Red crowned parakeet (Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae) health, disease and nesting study on Tiritiri Matangi Project overview: Currently Auckland Zoo is undertaking two long-term (5 year) studies with red crowned parakeets on Tiritiri Matangi. The first is a nesting study to evaluate reproductive success and chick health, and the second is an annual mist-netting trip for health and disease screening of the adult population. Both projects aim to build on previous work carried out by Dr Luis OrtizCatedral and Dr Bethany Jackson and will provide a long-term dataset needed to understand to factors influencing annual variations in the health and reproductive success of this island population. This will provide us with important data to assist in future management and conservation efforts in Redcrowned parakeets (RCP).

Focal species

Threat status

Grant amount 2014/15

Total $ to date

Red crowned parakeet: Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae

Near Threatened

$4,000

$38,669.96

Partner since

June 2011

AZFP project?

Yes

16


8. Partner organisations: Wildbase, Massey University/Department of Conservation

Programme: The Coast Project title:

Pup production and re-colonisation of NZ sea lions – Stewart Island, New Zealand Project overview: NZ sea lions are a nationally critical species in decline at their main breeding area at the Auckland Islands. This decline is mainly due to the impacts of humans, particularly fishing and in the past hunting. Part of DOC’s threat species management plan is encourage the expansion and recolonisation of sea lion breeding areas to areas outside of the NZ subantarctic. Stewart Island is an area only recently (2010) determined to have breeding NZ sea lions, however since this date there have also been a three year old female sea lion and more than three adult male sea lions, known to have been shot on Stewart Island. This research is to undertake a survey of Port Pegasus, Stewart Island to understand the number of pups being born in that area and their distribution, therefore giving an estimate of the NZSL population at Stewart Island. This research will enable DOC to understand more about New Zealand sea lion numbers and distribution on Stewart Island and therefore help to try and reduce direct (shooting) and indirect conflicts that may occur with human activities.

Focal species New Zealand sea lion: Phocarctos hookeri

Threat status

Endangered

Grant amount 2014/15

Total $ to date

Partner since

AZFP project?

$5,000

$25,000

2011

Yes

17


International Portfolio Category one and two international grants Conservation Fund allocation represents a significant part of the project’s overall budget. Category 1 projects will often have direct Auckland Zoo staff involvement, will link directly to species or exhibits/zones at Auckland Zoo and will feature heavily in the interpretation/conservation messaging of that exhibit/zone. Category 1 projects potentially have no upper limit for financial and in kind support. Category 2 – Shorter-term support of projects (less than three years) where Conservation Fund support will be specifically directed towards getting new initiatives started or supporting specific components of an ongoing project (e.g. a training programme, short research project, construction of facilities, purchase of field equipment etc.). These projects may or may not have direct Auckland Zoo involvement, but should link clearly to species or exhibits/zones at Auckland Zoo. Category 2 projects can be elevated to Category 1 projects after a period of three years of continuous support. Realising our goal to further develop our pacific Island programme saw us add two new partners to our international portfolio, the Samoan Conservation Society and the Rarotonga Takituma Conservation Area Project, both projects are working with species on the brink of extinction. Our relationship with the Sumatran Orangutan Conservation Programme goes from strength to strength with our keepers now making regular visits to assist with husbandry. It was a very tough year form our Red Panda Network partners in Nepal having to cope with devastating fires and earthquakes. In the face of these challenges it was gratifying for us to be able to provide additional emergency support. Our African partners, Cheetah Outreach Trust and the Giraffe Conservation Foundation continue to do important and ground breaking work with their respective target species.

18


9. Partner organisation: Giraffe Conservation Foundation (GCF) Website: http://www.giraffeconservation.org Programme: Africa Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/GiraffeConservationFoundation/213643668667273 Project title: Giraffe conservation – education, awareness & conservation Project overview:

Focal species

Threat status

Giraffe: Giraffa Camelopardalis

Least concern

Unlike most other large mega fauna, giraffe remain largely under-studied researched in the wild. Giraffe populations are in decline across Africa, with an estimated population of less than 80,000 down from 140,000 in the late 1990s. GCF and several associated researchers are at the forefront of giraffe conservation in Africa. While giraffe as a species are not considered threatened according to the IUCN, mostly due to data deficiency, two (sub) species are already listed as endangered and others have alarmingly low numbers and are in urgent need of conservation status review. GCF works on collating data from across the continent to help develop new profiles, materials and status reviews leading to new IUCN Red Listing for giraffe. GCF will also continue to take DNA samples from giraffe populations across Africa to clarify (sub) speciation of giraffe for the continent. Preliminary analysis of the Auckland Zoo supported research in Namibia indicates new and exciting results, which might change our view on giraffe taxonomy and distribution in Africa, and highlights more sampling is required to fill the few remaining gaps. Grant Total $ to Partner AZFP amount date since project? 2014/15 $15,000

$44,692

June 2012

No

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10. Partner organisation: Red Panda Network Website: http://redpandanetwork.org/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/redpandanetwo rk

Programme: Nepal

Project title: Community-Based Monitoring and Awareness Creation for Red Panda Conservation and Development of the Red Panda Network Community Conservation Resource Centre in Taplejung District of Eastern Nepal Project overview:

Focal species

Threat status

Red panda: Endangered Ailurus fulgens

Red Panda Network targets communities surrounding forest habitat in the Panchthar-Ilam-Taplejung Corridor that supports approximately 25% of Nepal’s red panda population. The habitat is under threat from various anthropogenic activities. The proposed project addresses such threats by making local community feel responsible for conservation initiatives. The project will train 16 community forest guardians (FGs) for regular red panda monitoring and data collection, sensitize local people via workshops and media campaigns and form red panda conservation committees in each of the eight village communities, covering 14 community forests. Two additional grants were awarded in the 14/15 period to provide emergency funding firstly following devastating fires destroying the RPN offices and many employee homes and proceeds from a give-a-little campaign following the 2015 earthquakes. Grant amount Total $ to Partner AZFP 2014/1 date since project? 5 $21,326

$61,798

2010

No

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11. Partner organisation: The Sumatran Orangutan Conservation Programme (SOCP) Website: http://www.sumatranorangutan.org Programme: Sumatra Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sumatranorangutan Project title: Jantho Orangutan re-introduction Project Project overview: A total of 17 orangutans have been transferred into Jantho Nature Reserve since 1 July 2014 – 31 July 2015 bringing the total population to 70 orangutans. All orangutans which have been sent to Jantho have been released into the forest, except two – Ganteng and Locky. Both are taken to the forest daily and locked in cage overnight, as they are conditioned to the forest and learning critical survival skills. A total of 811 follows of orangutans were carried out and the animals monitored from nest to nest throughout this annual period. Monthly phenology data is continuing to be recorded from 16 permanent phenology plots and has been regularly recorded throughout the annual period. Over the past six months, staff have been using animal training skills to get small orangutans and two problem animal facilitate reintroduction back to the forest. Today, all animals go out in a school based process and are learning all forest skills, interacting with wild animals and starting to build nests. This has been excellent progress and the staff can now take data on each animal. This year Auckland Zoo were also fortunate to host a visit and fundraising talk by SOCP director Dr Ian Singleton this allowed us to increase our grant by an additional $5105.

Focal species

Threat status

Grant amount 2014/15

Total $ to date

Partner since

AZFP project?

Sumatran orangutan: Pongo abelii

Critically Endangered

$57,105

$395,514

2002

Yes 21


12. Partner organisation: Centre for Conservation and Research Sri Lanka. (CCR) Website: http://www.ccrsl.org

Programme: Sri Lanka

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CCR.Elephants Project title: GPS-satellite tracking of Sri Lankan Elephants Project overview:

Focal species Asian elephant: Elephas maximus

Threat status

Endangered

Human- elephant conflict is a significant problem in Sri Lanka. On average in a year 148 elephants and 59 humans are killed. Due to the reduction of elephant habitats, these conflicts are inevitable and increasing. The present elephant population is estimated at around 5,500. With such annual losses, this population is severely threatened. Long and short-term strategies, are urgently needed if these elephants are to be saved. One of the main constraints for effective environmental conservation in Sri Lanka is the lack of scientific information to develop management plans, and guide environmental conservation and management. CCR was set up to fill this need by conducting, supporting and encouraging research into all aspects of the environment. CCR have conducted many research projects over the years including 17 years of research CCR’s team have put into studying Sri Lankan elephants using radio telemetry and more recently GPS- Satellite tracking. The success of their findings is now influencing government decisions. Grant Total $ to Partner AZFP amount date since project? 2014/15

$32,556

$67,648

June 2012

No

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13. Partner organisation: Biodiversity & Elephant Conservation Trust

Programme: Sri Lanka Project title: Schools Awareness Programme/national parks Project overview:

Focal species Asian elephant: Elephas maximus

Threat status

Endangered

Education up and coming generations is a long term approach building awareness and appreciation for elephants. The present elephant population is estimated at around 5,500. With such annual losses, this population is severely threatened. Long-term and short-term strategies, are urgently needed if these elephants are to be saved. The creation of awareness is one of the conservation strategies that have been adopted, especially for those living in the areas of human-elephant conflict. Awareness creation is an integral part of the conservation plan for the wild elephant. The Biodiversity & Elephant Conservation Trust has launched an awareness program in schools in the areas that have been affected by these conflicts. Through our interactive program, we address the value of elephants, the causes of conflict, how to minimize the conflicts and stress the need for conservation. The sessions have been successful in changing children’s attitudes. The Schools Awareness Program has covered, in the last 10 years, at 150 schools per year, over 1,500 schools. The year 2014 is the twelfth year of this project. The success of our efforts has spurred us to continue and expand this program which is having a very positive impact. Grant Total $ to Partner AZFP amount date since project? 2014/15 $20,159

$64,098

November 2011

No

23


14. Partner organisation: 21st Century Tiger Website: http://www.21stcenturytiger.org/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/21stCenturyTige r

Programme: Sumatra

Project title: Kerinci Seblat Tiger Protection & Conservation Project overview:

Focal species Sumatran tiger: Panthera tigris

Threat status

Endangered

Kerinci Seblat National Park (KSNP) is the largest protected area in Sumatra covering more than 1.38 million hectares (5,350 square miles) of tropical forest in 13 districts and two municipalities of the provinces of West Sumatra, Jambi, Bengkulu and South Sumatra. The park protects Sumatra’s single largest tiger population with a population of at least 166 individuals - excluding tigers moving at park-edge or in forests bordering the park - and the highest tiger occupancy (83%) of any protected area in Sumatra. The 2014/15 grant amount was raised through the generosity of artist Hilary Weeks who held an exhibition of works with proceeds going to the Auckland Zoo Conservation Fund for tigers in the wild. Grant Total $ to Partner AZFP amount date since project? 2014/15 $2449

$117,424

2006

No

24


15. Partner organisation: Cheetah Outreach Trust Website: http://www.cheetah.co.za Programme: Africa

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CheetahOutreach

Project title: Conservation of South Africa’s free-ranging cheetah, through farmer-wildlife mitigation, Territory East. Project overview: In alignment with South Africa’s National Action Plan for the Conservation of Cheetahs (2009), the aims of this project are: 1. Conservation of free ranging cheetahs, and farmland biodiversity protection, through farmer-wildlife conflict mitigation, and the establishment of a livestock guarding dog culture throughout South Africa. 2. Education of relevant stakeholders regarding effective livestock husbandry practices. 3. Promotion of co-existence between predators, game farmers and livestock farmers, and supporting farming communities as custodians of indigenous biodiversity. 4. Assessing the impact of the guarding dogs on predator ecology and cheetah presence. 5. Raising the status of the cheetah, and increasing national awareness and educating learners to develop an understanding of the value of their natural wildlife heritage. With 166 dogs placed, there are now more than 250,000 hectares of “predator safe” farmland in South Africa, where the farmers have committed to no longer using lethal predator persecution methods. As part of the programme’s ongoing development, Cheetah Outreach has re-established its presence in Limpopo Province, now managing the livestock guarding dog placements there.

Focal species Cheetah: Acinonyx jubatus

Threat status Vulnerable

Grant amount 2014/15

Total $ to date

Partner since

AZFP project?

$7,500

$47,400

2007

No

25


16. Partner organisation: Samoan Conservation Society

Programme: Pacific Islands Project title:

Saving the critically endangered Manumea/ tooth-billed pigeon Project overview: The Tooth-billed pigeon or Manumea is believed to have declined from 4,800-7,200 in the mid-1980s to a few hundred by 2006. It has recently been upgraded to critically endangered by the IUCN but population numbers are not yet clear. Since then only individual birds have been sighted, raising great concern over the long-term trajectory for the species. One juvenile and an adult were both spotted in December 2013 on the same site, confirming the species is still reproducing in the wild even if at low numbers. Habitat loss and degradation remain among the primary threats illegal hunting and impacts from invasive species compounding the situation. In 2006 a Recovery Plan for Tooth-billed Pigeon was developed, highlighting key actions to prevent possible extinction. Amongst these actions is the need to develop conservation and management of key forest areas to secure remaining populations and to provide them safe habitats. Three sites stand out as priority areas for protection based on new findings 2013-2014 as a result of a conservation program funded by Conservation Leadership Program In February 2014 community consultation workshops were held involving three communities with customary ownership over these sites. Recommendations included need for developing community conservation areas spanning the habitat.

Focal species Tooth-billed pigeon: Didunculus strigirostris

Threat status

Grant amount 2014/15

Total $ to date

Partner since

AZFP project?

Critically Endangered

$9,000

$9,000

December 2014

Yes

26


17. Partner organisation: Takitumu Conservation Area Project

Programme: Pacific Islands Project title:

Continuing Management of the Recovered Population of the endemic Kakerori on Rarotonga and Atiu Project overview: The Kakerori Recovery Programme was started in 1987, when its first census found 38 birds. Numbers fell to 29 by 1989, making Kakerori one of the world’s ten rarest, but by then we knew that Ship Rats were preying on nests, and Feral Cats were catching foraging birds. Regular, consistent rat poisoning was started forthwith to protect breeders. Numbers of birds increased immediately and have increased nearly every year up to the present. At 134 birds in 1996, the Takitumu Conservation Area started, with 5 years of GEF funding, and took over the KRP. The TCA Project is community based; its only revenue is from Eco tours. 50% of Eco tour profits (usually <$5k pa) is returned to the three landowning clans for community use. The balance maintains the area itself, with only leftovers to support the bird work, which has relied on external funding since (and before) GEF. In 2000, IUCN upgraded the 200+ Kakerori on Rarotonga to ‘Endangered’, and again to ‘Vulnerable’ in 2012, at a time when combined numbers on Rarotonga and Atiu had topped 500. Achieving ‘Vulnerable’ was a milestone, but it still means just that. On Rarotonga, with its world-wide transport links, 400 birds would be threatened should a new danger arrive. Although the bird will be saved more surely only when the Atiu population reaches 500 breeders; our present aim is to get it beyond 250.

Focal species Kakerori: Pomarea dimidiata

Threat status Critically Endangered

Grant amount 2014/15

Total $ to date

Partner since

AZFP project?

$9,760

$9,760

October 2014

Yes

27


Category 3 (Small Grant Programme) A contestable grants scheme, designed to help provide relatively small levels of funding for on-going conservation projects or pilot programmes. This category of funding is open to individuals or small groups in New Zealand or in countries outside the first world. Applications are made using a standard form submitted to Auckland Zoo before the specified deadline of each funding round. There are two rounds of Category 3 grant funding each year. Category 3 funding will be provided up to a maximum of $5000, though normally awards will be in the region of $1000-2000. The award should represent a minimum of 25% of the projectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s overall budget. This means that the maximum budget of a project applying for a Category 3 grant can be $20,000 The popularity of the Small Grant Programme continues to grow evidenced by an ever increasing number of applications submitted. Only one round was considered in 2014/15 but this round attracted approximately 80 applications resulting in a very high quality shortlist. We anticipate considering two rounds in 2015/16.

28


18. Programme: Small Grants

Organisation: Amphibian Ark

Project title: National Amphibian Conservation Coordinator for Ecuador Project overview:

Focal species Amphibians

One of the key roles of the Amphibian Ark (AARK) is to assist countries and regions in identifying relevant conservation actions for their native amphibian species. To do this, the AARK Officers developed a Conservation Needs Assessment tool which is delivered through facilitated workshops. The Conservation Needs Assessments rely on national Amphibian Specialist Group members and stakeholders from a wide variety of backgrounds with the goal of determining the necessary actions for each species to contribute to their conservation and ultimately, survival in the wild. In many cases, there is a lack of a coordinated, national approach, and a lack of support for developing individuals to take these workshop outputs and lead the way in implementing them. A solution to this problem is the appointment of a National Amphibian Conservation Coordinator. Experience has shown that having a person dedicated to this type of role for a period after the assessment workshop leads to a more coordinated response, and conservation programs which have a better chance of attracting funding and achieving their aims. This project aims to identify and recruit a National Amphibian Conservation Coordinator for Ecuador, the third most amphibian-rich country in the world. Grant Threat status amount 2014/15 Various

$5,000

29


19. Organisation: Wild Chimpanzee Foundation

Programme: Small Grants Project title:

Club P.A.N. - environmental education for children in CĂ´te dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Ivoire and Guinea / West Africa to protect wild chimpanzees and their habitat the tropical rainforest Project overview: Wild chimpanzee populations are in decline: threatened by deforestation, bush-meat hunting, disease and pet trade. The West African chimpanzee has disappeared from 3 countries and is on the verge of extirpation in others. Because conservation education is seen as a priority long-term action for the conservation of chimpanzees the WCF started an environmental education program in 2007. The WCF nature clubs (Club P.A.N.) are a long-term approach oriented towards the next generation, each school year around 1000 children are participating from two West African countries and evaluations have shown a significant increase in knowledge and a significant change in attitudes. Each school year we have trainings for all local teachers and principals that participate, we have 11 nature clubs, preand post-evaluations for all children and we end with a large presentation of the children to their village and parents. Micro-projects in Club P.A.N. schools have their first success stories.

Focal species Chimpanzee: Pan troglodytes

Threat status Endangered

Grant amount 2014/15 $5,000

30


20. Programme: Small Grants

Organisation: Aro Velona Association

Project title: Tackling the overexploitation of the remaining forest of Dabolava a home of the Endangered Propithecus coronatus (sifaka) through the development of the Economic Wood Burning Stove Project (Madagascar). Project overview:

Focal species Sifaka: Propithecus coronatus

Threat status Endangered

More than 5600 people (around 860 families) living in the Commune of Dabolava (District of Miandrivazo) depend entirely on firewood and charcoal for cooking. Forest woods gradually become scarce depleting habitat which threatens the endangered Propithecus coronatu. This lemur species lives in a small and fragmented forest area and the GERP organization with the commitment of the local villager known as â&#x20AC;&#x153;CommunautĂŠ de Baseâ&#x20AC;? collaborates to conserve this species and its habitat through making forest patrol and developing tree nursery of indigenous and fast growing trees. The Aro Velona organization team has experiment on making Economic Wood Burning Stove and until now four types of firewood economic stoves have been created and developed in four villages of Madagascar. These stoves were created from cheap materials found in the project site and require 50% less wood compared to the traditional open fire stoves. The development of such economic stove project in Dabolava is a significant measure to mitigate the overexploitation of forest woods and help preserve valuable animal habitat. Grant amount 2014/15 $3,600

31


21. Organisation: Dhartee Development Society

Programme: Small Grants Project title: Gyps Vulture Safe Zone Project Project overview:

Three species of vultures i.e. Oriental White-backed Vulture (Gyps Bengalensis), Long-billed Vulture (G. Indicus) and Slender-billed Vulture (G. Tenuirostris) have suffered more than 97% decline, and one of them (Oriental White-backed Vulture) has already declined by over 99.9% over a period of just 15 years across the Indian Subcontinent. One of the issues facing vulture in Pakistan is feeding on disposed stock that have been treated with diclofenac (toxic to vultures). This projects objective is to contribute in the conservation work for a viable population of Vultures in a safe Zone and secure environment and to raise awareness in District officials, all vets, Drug officials / sellers, local Community Leaders, Journalists, Environmental NGOs and Livestock Owners for removal of Diclofenac drug and usage of alternative drug as pain killer, Promote use of Meloxicam by offering it to the livestock owners on subsidized rates through selected veterinary clinics/ doctors.

Focal species Oriental Whitebacked Vulture: Gyps Bengalensis

Threat status

Critically Endangered

Grant amount 2014/15 $5,000

32


22. Programme: Small Grants

Organisation: Turtle Survival Alliance

Project title: A Pilot Reintroduction of the Northern River Terrapin (Batagur baska) in the Sunderban Tiger Reserve Project overview:

Focal species Northern River Terrapin: Batagur baska

With less than 100 known adults the Northern River Terrapin is the world’s second most endangered turtle. Intense exploitation of adults and eggs is the key driver of this massive decline. In India and Bangladesh, remaining individuals are so few and scattered that the only recourse is acquiring surviving terrapins, captive propagation and re-establishment at a suitable time and place. TSA and the West Bengal Forest Department have been partnering to recover this species. In 2008, TSA surveyed a pond in Sajnekhali range of the Indian Sunderbans and 10 adults were captured. This led to the breeding program being reinstated after a hiatus of 20 years. Periodic husbandry improvements supported by TSA have led to breeding successes from 2012 till date. The 153 individuals currently at Sajnekhali represent the world’s largest colony. Reintroduction is the logical next step following sustained increases in captive stock. These need to be carried out after understanding species requirements and according to established guidelines. This project is to conduct a pilot reintroduction of the species. Specific components include raising awareness on the initiative, purchasing ultrasonic transmitters, screening and sexing animals, constructing a ‘soft’ release enclosure and monitoring the soft-released cohort. Grant Threat status amount 2014/15 Critically Endangered

$5,000

33


Auckland Zoo Staff in the Field 2014-2015 1. Introduction During the 2014/15 financial year, 90 Auckland Zoo staff spent a total of 11,850 hours working on 32 field conservation projects. This equates to 5.7 members of Auckland Zoo staff working full time on fieldwork projects for the year – with an equivalent financial value of $433,445.00. Of these 8,626.75 hours were actual ‘fieldwork’ hours, where staff worked directly on projects at the field site. This is the equivalent of having 4.15 full time Auckland Zoo members of staff in the field every day for the entire year. Table 1 summarises how time spent on the Rotoroa project was apportioned. Of the 6,049.75 hours, 3,121.5 hours involved direct fieldwork on the island. This equates to 36% of all direct fieldwork carried out by Auckland Zoo staff for 2014/15. An additional 2928.25 hours were invested in other Rotoroa Island project activities.

Table 1. Staff time allocation for delivering the Rotoroa Island project. Project component Fieldwork - wildlife programme Fieldwork - schools programme Visitor Engagement – talk on island Pre-school visit teaching trip Wildlife programme co-ordination and management Schools programme co-ordination and management Translocation related animal quarantine and husbandry TOTAL

Staff hours 2014/15 2,410.5 690 21 36 2,353.75 506.5 32

Equivalent $ value $81,792.00 $33,004.00 $1,044.00 $1,932.00 $106,944.75 $27,318.00 $1,056.00

6,049.75

$253,090.75

2. Auckland Zoo staff involvement All 32 field projects Auckland Zoo was involved with during 2014/15 are summarised in Appendix I. This table provides details on the number of Zoo staff and time commitment involved during 2014/2015.  A total of 90 members of Auckland Zoo staff, from 19 different teams worked out of the zoo on field conservation projects during 2014/2015.  57 members of Auckland Zoo staff, from 17 different teams carried out direct fieldwork on Rotoroa Island.

3. Geographical distribution, project location and fieldwork time at key locations Table 2 below provides details on the number of domestic and international field locations worked at, the number of projects and the amount of fieldwork hours spent at each location during 2014/2015. 34


Table 2. Summary of the number of projects and fieldwork time spent at key locations for 2014/2015. Project location DOMESTIC North Island, NZ Rotoroa Island Rangitoto and Motutapu Motuora Island Tiritiri Matangi Island The Noises Islands Inner Hauraki Gulf sub-total Little Barrier Island Burgess Island Outer Hauraki Gulf sub-total Hauraki Gulf sub-total Western Springs Waitakere Ranges Pakiri Beach Hunua Ranges Coromandel peninsula Purerora Forest Whareorino Forest Te Ureweras Bushy Park Rest of North Island, NZ sub-total North Island, NZ total South Island, NZ Alexandra, central Otago Te Anau South Island, NZ total DOMESTIC TOTAL INTERNATIONAL Sumatra Sri Lanka INTERNATIONAL SUB-TOTAL OVERALL TOTALS

Number of projects

Time in hours

2 5 2 2 1 12 2 1 3 15 1 3 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 13 28

3281.5 874 136 892 104 5,287.5 420 48 468 5,755.5 34 1240.25 32 246 50 216 80 517 8 2423.25 8,178.75

1 1 2 30

16 192 208 8,386.75

1 1 2 32

104 136 240 8,626.75

3.1 . Geographical distribution and project location  During 2014/2015 Auckland Zoo staff worked on a total of 32 field projects; an increase of two projects since 2013.2014.  All fieldwork was carried out across a total of 20 locations (18 domestic and 2 international).  Of the 32 field conservation projects Auckland Zoo staff were directly involved with during 2014/15, 30 were located within New Zealand (Domestic projects) and 2 were overseas (International Projects).  The majority (28 out of 30) of Domestic projects were situated in the North Island, with a particular concentration of projects located in the Hauraki Gulf (12 projects in the Inner Gulf and 3 in the Outer Gulf). All of these projects took place on seven island locations (Rotoroa, Rangitoto and Motutapu, Motuora, Tiritiri Matangi and The Noises in the inner Gulf and Little Barrier and Burgess Islands in the outer Gulf). 35


 Of the remaining 13 projects situated in the North Island, 7 (54%) were located within the wider Auckland region.  A further 6 projects were situated in the central North Island, ranging from Whareorino in the west to Te Urewera in the east.  The most southerly of the North Island fieldwork projects was located on the west coast at Bushy Park Sanctuary.  Of the 2 projects situated in the South Island, 1 was located in Alexandra, Central Otago and 1 at Te Anau.  In 2014 /15 Auckland Zoo staff also travelled internationally to carry-out fieldwork in Sumatra and Sri Lanka.

3.2.

Direct fieldwork time distribution across geographical locations

 The majority of Auckland Zoo’s fieldwork was carried out within the Hauraki Gulf, with 68% of fieldtime spent working on projects located here.  For a second year running, over one third (36%) of fieldwork time was spent on Rotoroa Island.  Of the other Hauraki Gulf Islands, Auckland Zoo staff spent the most time working on Rangitoto and Motutapu Islands.  Ark in the Park in the Waitakere Ranges continues to be the second most significant location for Auckland Zoo in terms of amount of fieldwork time dedicated to projects there.  During 2014/2015 Auckland Zoo staff spent less time working on field projects in the South Island – representing 2.4% of field-time compared to 9% in 2013/2014.  The amount of fieldwork hours spent overseas remained the same this year as 2013/2014, with approximately 3% of field-time spent working on international projects.

4. Project focus and time distribution  Table 3 below shows how project focus and proportion of time was distributed during 2013/14.  Rotoroa Island remains Auckland Zoo’s largest field conservation project in terms of staff fieldwork time. This integrated conservation projects involves several components including wildlife translocations, wildlife management, surveys and monitoring. This project has elements of several species-specific focused work, as well as habitat restoration and creation. It is also the only field project that contains an Auckland Zoo-led education component.  31% of fieldwork projects worked on in 2014-15 were bird-focused projects, with 32.5% of all field time spent working on these projects.  31% of fieldwork projects worked on in 2014-15 were ectotherm projects, with 13% of field time spent working on these projects.  19% of all projects were focused on reptile, with 10% of field time spent working on these projects.  11% of all projects were focused on amphibians, fish and invertebrates (combined), with 3% of field time spent working on these projects.  16% of projects were focused on native habitat restoration (including animal and plant pest control), with 11% of field-time spent working on these projects.

Table 3. Project focus and proportion of time distribution. Project focus Mammals Sumatran orangutan Lesser short-tailed bat

Number of projects

Time in hours

1 1

104 56

36


Mammals sub-total Birds Red crowned kakariki Pateke Takahe Kiwi Seabirds (multiple species) Kokako Kakapo Birds sub-total Ectotherms Lizards (multiple species) Duvacelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gecko Otago skink Tuatara Archeyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s frog Black mudfish Red finned bully and koura Giant weta Ectotherms sub-total Plants New Zealand woodrose Restoration Native habitat restoration Animal pest control Education Conservation education and community awareness Integrated conservation Wildlife management, education, training and research Technical skills development Tracking surveys Training TOTAL

2

160

1 1 2 2 1 2 1 10

860 32 300 106 48 1200.25 260 2806.25

2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 10

606 112 16 160 80 32 8 104 1,118

1

128

2 3

374 575

1

136

1

3,121.5

1 1

48 160 8,626.75

37


Appendix I: Summary of Auckland Zoo’s 32 fieldwork projects 20142015 Project name Rotoroa Island Bird banding and mist net training Lizard surveying and monitoring on Rangitoto and Motutapu Habitat restoration on Rangitoto and Motutapu Redfin bully and koura surveying on Motutapu Island Post release monitoring of Pateke on Motutapu Island Takahe management on Motutapu Island Kiwi chick release on Motuora (ONE) Duvacel’s gecko research on Motuora Island Duvacel’s gecko post release monitoring on Tiritiri Matangi Islands Red Crowned kakariki nesting study on Tiritiri Matangi Tanslocating wetapunga to the Noises Islands Seabird monitoring and conservation on Burgess Island Kakapo health checks and transmitter changes on Little Barrier Island Tuatara surveys on Little Barrier Island Predator trapping - New Zealand dotterel nest protection Black mudfish surveys Kokako monitoring at Ark in the Park Predator control at Ark in the Park Tracking surveys at Ark in the Park Kiwi surveys, Te Mata Reptile monitoring Project name Kokako translocations

Location NZ, NI Inner Hauraki Gulf NZ, NI Inner Hauraki Gulf NZ, NI Inner Hauraki Gulf NZ, NI Inner Hauraki Gulf NZ, NI Inner Hauraki Gulf NZ, NI Inner Hauraki Gulf NZ, NI Inner Hauraki Gulf NZ, NI Inner Hauraki Gulf NZ, NI Inner Hauraki Gulf NZ, NI Inner Hauraki Gulf NZ, NI Inner Hauraki Gulf NZ, NI Inner Hauraki Gulf NZ, NI Outer Hauraki Gulf NZ, NI Outer Hauraki Gulf NZ, NI Outer Hauraki Gulf NZ, NI Auckland NZ, NI Pakiri Beach NZ, NI West coast Waitakere Ranges NZ, NI West coast Waitakere Ranges NZ, NI West coast Waitakere Ranges NZ, NI Coromandel NZ, NI Hunua Ranges Location NZ, central NI

Staff hours 2014/15

No. of staff 2014/15

3121.5

54

160

6

360

8

366

16

8

1

32

1

108

2

56

7

80

2

32

1

860

13

4

80

48

1

260

4

160

2

34

1

32

2

1168.25

16

24

3

48

2

50

1

246

4

Staff hours 2014/15 32

No. of staff 2014/15 4

38


Lesser short-tailed bat conservation Population monitoring of the New Zealand woodrose Archeyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s frog population monitoring Animal pest control Track maintenance and pest control Takahe management Otago skink release Elephant education programme Sumatran Orangutan Conservation Programme quarantine centre

Pureora forest NZ, central NI Pureora forest NZ, central NI Pureora forest NZ, NI Whareorino Forest NZ, NZ Te Ureweras NZ, NI Bushy Park Sanctuary NZ, SI Te Anau NZ, SI Central Otago Kiritimati Island, Republic of Kiribati Batu Mbelin, Medan, Northern Sumatra

56

1

128

4

80

2

517

9

8

1

192

2

16

1

136

1

104

1

39

Profile for Auckland Zoo

Auckland Zoo field conservation report 2014/15  

Auckland Zoo field conservation report - 2014 - 2015

Auckland Zoo field conservation report 2014/15  

Auckland Zoo field conservation report - 2014 - 2015

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