__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

NEXT ISSUE: SENIOR LIVING

VOL. XCV NO. 22

OCTOBER 31, 2020 | 13 CHESHVAN 5781

Atlanta Then & Now and Professionals

Then

Now

Then

Now

Then

Now


Alluring

cosmetic & Family Dentistry

COSMETIC, IMPLANT & GENERAL DENTISTRY FOR THE FAMILY.

An international leader in cosmetic, implant and general dentistry for more than three decades, Dr. David Mastro’s patients travel world-wide for his Atlanta cosmetic dentistry and report that he is one of the country’s top cosmetic and general dentists.

NOT YOUR ORDINARY DENTIST, NOT YOUR ORDINARY DENTAL OFFICE.

DR. DAVID MASTRO 80 Mansell Road Roswell. Georgia 30076 770.642.9900 1.888.SeeMySmile alluringcosmeticdentistry.com

Dr. Mastro is a unique dentist with his artistic expression developed through years of hand crafting crowns, veneers and bridges. Today, with the aid of the most advanced technology available, Dr. Mastro can care for patients’ complete dental needs from oral surgery and implants to fillings and general cleanings. Dr. Mastro is legendary for quality dentistry and for transforming smiles for people from all walks of life.


PUBLISHER

MICHAEL A. MORRIS

michael@atljewishtimes.com

MANAGING PUBLISHER & EDITOR KAYLENE LADINSKY

kaylene@atljewishtimes.com Executive Assistant

JODI DANIS

jodi@atljewishtimes.com

EDITORIAL Associate Editor

RONI ROBBINS

roni@atljewishtimes.com Contributor & Proofreader

FRAN PUTNEY

CONTRIBUTORS THIS WEEK ALLEN H. LIPIS BOB BAHR CHANA SHAPIRO DAVE SCHECHTER FLORA ROSEFSKY JAN JABEN-EILON MARCIA CALLER JAFFE MARTINE TARTOUR RACHEL STEIN ROBYN SPIZMAN GERSON RUSSELL GOTTSCHALK SUSANNE KATZ TERRY SEGAL

ADVERTISING

Senior Account Manager

BRENDA GELFAND

brenda@atljewishtimes.com

THIS WEEK Those Were the Days Let’s take a walk down memory lane, to a simpler period when the corner deli was the local hang-out and you’d go there to see and be seen in Jewish Atlanta. Some may believe that there are places that capture that feeling today. In this Then & Now issue, we bring you back in time about a century ago, comparing our current pandemic to the 1918 Spanish flu. You’ll see how similar the two events, yet how much worse it was some 100 years ago. Learn about the classic Jewish restaurants and delis of our past with names such as Siegel’s and Norm’s Place, Ess ‘N Fress and Snack ‘N Shop. We have a story on the multi-generational Alterman family grocery business, which began with the Cash and Carry on Decatur Street in 1923 and expanded to Food Giant and Big Apple stores, later dominating the industry. Find out how African American home cooks integrated into the Jewish community and eventually became our kosher caterers, some of whom even spoke Yiddish they learned along with the family recipes. From the graduates of the former Yeshiva High School to the Spicy Peach and

Richards Variety Store, we offer a historical reference for how life has changed over the years. Also in this issue we interview a few professionals who are making a mark in the community. Those businesspeople include Jenny Levison of Souper Jenny, traveling West in a rented RV for her Kindness Tour, serving free soup to those in need. There’s the millennial who began a luxury clothing store at Lenox Square 10 years ago that has since expanded to other cities, thriving despite the pandemic. The increase in anxiety due to the global health crisis keeps one Atlanta psychiatrist busy, and Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta benefits from the generosity of philanthropist Arthur Blank, in the news yet again. Plus, right in time for Election Day you won’t want to miss our last-minute voting how-to. Current to past, old to new, young to old, this issue runs the gamut. Stay tuned for our next issue too when we share how seniors remain a vital part of our community and its history, despite their struggles in recent months as our most vulnerable population. ì

Cover image: A collage of photos from this Then & Now issue featuring delis and grocery stores, not to mention the pandemic. See how much has changed – or not.

CONTENTS NEWS������������������������������������������������� 6 ISRAEL NEWS������������������������������� 10 OPINION����������������������������������������� 12 THEN & NOW��������������������������������� 20 PROFESSIONALS������������������������� 34 DINING�������������������������������������������� 38 BOOK FESTIVAL��������������������������� 40 CHAI STYLE����������������������������������� 45 CALENDAR������������������������������������� 48 COMMUNITY��������������������������������� 52 NEW MOON MEDITATIONS����� 53 OY VEY�������������������������������������������� 54 BRAIN FOOD���������������������������������� 55 OBITUARIES���������������������������������� 56 CLOSING THOUGHTS����������������� 60

Senior Account Manager

MICHAL BONELL

michal@atljewishtimes.com Account Manager

LORI GLUCK

lori@atljewishtimes.com

CREATIVE & MEDIA Creative & Media Designer

LILLI JENNISON

lilli@atljewishtimes.com Online Content Coordinator

ANNA LEVY

anna@atljewishtimes.com

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT Community Events & PR Manager

AMY SEIDNER

amy@atljewishtimes.com Intern

ELIANA WEISS

GENERAL OFFICE 404.883.2130

The Atlanta Jewish Times is printed in Georgia and is an equal opportunity employer. The opinions expressed in the Atlanta Jewish Times do not necessarily reflect those of the newspaper. Periodicals postage paid at Atlanta, Ga. POSTMASTER send address changes to Atlanta Jewish Times 270 Carpenter Drive Suite 320, Atlanta Ga 30328. Established 1925 as The Southern Israelite www.atlantajewishtimes.com ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES (ISSN# 0892-33451) IS PUBLISHED BY SOUTHERN ISRAELITE, LLC © 2020 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES Printed by Walton Press Inc. MEMBER Conexx: America Israel Business Connector American Jewish Press Association Sandy Springs/Perimeter Chamber of Commerce Please send all photos, stories and editorial content to: submissions@atljewishtimes.com

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES OCTOBER 31, 2020 | 5


NEWS Palestinian Human Rights Activist Praises Israel By Jan Jaben-Eilon

and indeed, he was showered with queries about his life, about the Palestinian educaEast Jerusalem resident Bassem Eid built tional system and textbooks, and about how his worldwide reputation college students on Ameras a human rights activist ican campuses should by reporting on abuses by respond to organizations the Israeli authorities. It that criticize Israel. was only in 1994, after the The latter questions Palestinian Authority was came from Weber Hecreated and empowered brew teacher and Rams to govern the Palestinadvisor Michal Ilai and ians in the West Bank and Weber student Carly Gaza, that Eid turned his Spandorfer. focus to the human rights Ein responded, “I abuses of the Palestinian “The Israeli media gives me a huge have visited college camleadership. stage from which to criticize human puses and I feel the IsIt was the latter part rights violations,” Bassem Eid said. raeli-Palestinian conflict of Eid’s life that was spotlighted in a Zoom more on college campuses than in [Palesconference sponsored by the Atlanta Israel tinian West Bank city] Ramallah and JeruCoalition and The Weber School Rams for salem, and I wonder why you’re fighting in Israel Oct. 18. During the hour-long conver- the United States. Don’t you have problems sation, Eid spoke about the controversial in the United States?” he joked. Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions MoveEid, who grew up in the Shuafat refugee ment, the move of the U.S. Embassy to Jeru- camp where several siblings still live, started salem and the Hamas leadership in Gaza. his career as a journalist and then became a Prior to the event, AIC founding execu- senior field researcher for B’Tselem, the Istive director Cheryl Dorchinsky told the AJT raeli Information Center for Human Rights that Eid would be “open to any questions,” in the Occupied Territories. While with

B’Tselem, Eid was arrested by the Palestin- of the Palestinian Authority. According to ian Authority after he started monitoring Eid, they tell him: “You are the voice of those Palestinian human rights violations. After who don’t have voices.” In 1996, he founded only 25 hours, he was Jerusalem-based Palestinreleased after appeals to ian Human Rights Monithen PA Chairman Yassir toring Group. Two deArafat by former U.S. Seccades later, he became the retary of State Warren chairman of the Center Christopher and Israeli for Near East Policy RePrime Minister Shimon search. Today, he said, he Peres. is a “completely indepen“I am a lucky perdent person” and refuses son,” Eid told Atlantans. to be associated with any “During my arrest, the organization. “I try to PA realized that I am an The adviser for Weber School keep a distance from pointernational figure, not Rams for Israel, Michal Ilai, helped organize the Zoom event. litical organizations.” a local figure. The PA conHowever, he does urge the leaders of siders me a fact on the ground.” Eid pointed out that he’s never been ar- the world to put pressure on the “Arab leadrested by Israel, even during the more than ership.” He called the latter, a “handicapped seven years he worked for B’Tselem. “Nobody leadership.” The younger Palestinian generation is can deny that Israel is the only democracy in more violent than previthe Middle East,” he said. ous generations, he said “The Israeli media gives but “people today care me a huge stage from more about their ecowhich to criticize human nomic situation than polrights violations. The life itics. Their economic situof a Palestinian under Isation is getting worse.” raelis is much better than In addition to the in any other country of Weber Rams, the “Israel the world.” Today” program had Eid spoke about the about 15 local Jewish warming relationships organizational partbetween Israel and some ners, including several of the Gulf states like Founding executive director of Atlanta Israel Coalition synagogues, Hillels of the United Arab EmirCheryl Dorchinsky said her Georgia, B’nai B’rith and ates and Bahrain. “Israel organization is non-partisan the Israeli American doesn’t look like 20 years and non-denominational. Council. According to ago today. It’s not isolated from Arab countries.” The world needs Dorchinsky, a few hundred participants technology and security, he said, and “that’s from around the world listened to the program, with more expected to view it on the what Israel has.” Spandorfer asked Eid how his family YouTube channel once it was posted on handles his being an outspoken opponent AIC’s Facebook page. ì

Diamonds!!! 1179 Haven Brook Court Brookhaven, Georgia 30319-2669 Only $399,000 • 1,400+ sqft

Dr. Andi Stein, Realtor

• Meticulously Maintained

404.314.1760 (direct)

• 2 bedrooms/2.5 bathrooms • Basement

• Private Park-Like Backyard 6 | OCTOBER 31, 2020 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

“I Make House Calls”

404.844.4198 (office) AndiSellsAtl@gmail.com

1820 Independence Square # C, Dunwoody, GA 30338 (770) 396-3456 Max Haviv www.hajewelry.com Graduate Gemologist

Haim Haviv

Owner


NEWS

For Arthur Blank, Big Gifts Are Personal By Bob Bahr When Arthur Blank announced Oct. 12 he was giving Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta $200 million for its new hospital and medical center, it was believed the largest amount given to a free-standing children’s hospital in the country. For the medical nonprofit, the gift has boosted what is said to be the largest healthcare project in Georgia’s history, a 1.5 million-square-foot hospital expected to be the state’s most advanced Arthur Blank is committed to giving away facility for pediatric transplant services, at least half of his $6 billion personal fortune during his lifetime. He’s pictured cardiac care and cancer treatment when here with CHOA’s mascots Hope and Will. it opens in 2025. The immense gift was given with On Oct. 19, just a week after the a strong sense of gratitude by Blank, a feeling he described to the AJT as being large gift in Atlanta, Blank announced another major grant with a considerable close to home. “Recently my granddaughter need- amount of personal meaning. He is gived a procedure on her heart. When ing $20 million to the University of Texmy daughter and son-in-law took her as at Austin to establish the Arthur M. to New York to see one of the most re- Blank Center for Stuttering Education nowned pediatric cardiology groups in and Research. In his recently published the world, they said, ‘Do this in Atlanta, book “Good Company,” featured Monyou won’t get anything better than you day at the Book Festival of the MJCCA, Blank describes how he grew up “maliwill right there.’” The operation was done at CHOA ciously picked on for stuttering.” It runs in the family, he and according told the AJT. to a thankful “Stuttering grandfather has genetically was a success. been part of my After raising family as long six children in as I know. My his own family, uncle stuttered, he’s had considmy older brotherable personal er has a stutter, experience with one of my sons the hospital. has a stutter “Children and I stutter. I represent our The 19-story Arthur M Blank Hospital is part got a lot of enaspirations and of a 78-acre children's health care center. couragement our hope for the future, and to know that they are being from my mother, who said, ‘What you taken care of in a world-class system full have to say is important, say it, and peoof love is a tribute to the incredible work ple will wait to hear it.’” People soon learned that when of Children's Healthcare of Atlanta.” Donna Hyland, CEO of CHOA, once Arthur Blank spoke he did have much worked with Blank at Home Depot head- that was important to say. His success quarters. Blank co-founded The Home as one of the founders of Home Deport Depot. Hyland expressed her organiza- has helped him amass a personal fortion’s appreciation when the gift was tune, which is now estimated by Forbes magazine at over $6 billion. Today he announced. “Today’s milestone marks an im- owns the Atlanta Falcons and Atlanta portant step in making this hospital a United Soccer team, Atlanta’s 70,000reality, which will ensure we can meet seat Mercedes-Benz Stadium, the nathe growing patient demand, bring hope tionwide chain of PGA Tour sporting to families and provide access to the goods stores, and extensive ranch land unique specialized care offered by Chil- acreage in Montana. In his new book, Blank notes that dren’s. We are beyond grateful to Arthur and his family foundation for this gen- “we all have our limitations, but we can’t let those things define who we are or hinerous donation.”

On Oct. 19, Blank donated $20 million to the University of Texas at Austin. He is pictured here with Dr. Courtney Byrd.

der us from pursuing our purpose in life.” His success and how he’s used it has won him the admiration of his good friend Ed Mendel, a prominent Atlanta philanthropist in his own right. “Few people hit a financial grand slam. He’s hit four or five grand slams. What is more remarkable is that he’s done it with a sense of generosity. He understands the importance of giving back: it's not how much money he makes

but what he does with it for others.” All three of the principal founders of Home Deport have made major commitments to health care. Bernie Marcus has donated hundred of millions in gifts to build the Marcus Stroke and Neuroscience Center at Grady Hospital, a new Piedmont Hospital building and ongoing support for the Marcus Autism Center. Kenneth Langone, early financial backer of the Home Depot, has made a similar commitment to the New York University Medical Center and recently announced a $100 million gift to ensure that doctors at NYU’s medical school have their entire medical education underwritten. All three Home Depot co-founders have made a commitment to give away at least half of their immense fortunes during their lifetime and much of the rest to be donated to their personal charitable foundations. Blank writes in his book that he is “humbled and grateful” for the success that he has enjoyed. He added, “When I think about my grandparents coming to this country with nothing but the clothes on their back, I’m inspired.” ì

DON’T LET COVID AFFECT YOU IN THIS NEW YEAR! Ser vices EPA CERTIFIED/NON TOXIC DESTROYS COVID & PROTECTS: Your Family Your Students & Faculty Your Members Your Employees & Guests www.cleanwell.services 404.669.6178 | COVID19@cleanwell.services ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES OCTOBER 31, 2020 | 7


NEWS

Election Day is Near By Dave Schechter

for 2020’s general election. The data suggests that a significant number of people By now you’re tired of the incessant who applied for and received absentee baltelevision and radio advertisements. Tired lots decided instead to vote early in-person and surrendered their absenof the back-and-forth barbs tee ballot when they went to between the candidates and vote. their surrogates. Tired of If you still plan to vote panels of talking heads on by absentee ballot, hurry up; television. Tired of the deballots must be in the hands bates, or whatever they were. of county election officials by Tired of the yard signs litter7 p.m. Nov. 3. ing the neighborhood. If you plan to vote on For you, Election Day Election Day, some 2,400 cannot come soon enough. polling places statewide will It will all be over soon, right? open at 7 a.m. and close at Maybe, maybe not. Secretary of State Brad There are more than Raffensperger has until Nov. 7 p.m., unless they remain 7.58 million registered voters 20 to put the state’s stamp of open longer to accommoapproval on the numbers. date voters waiting in lines. in Georgia. By Oct. 25, some 2.75 million — more than one in every three The Atlanta Journal-Constitution crunched – had voted, either by absentee ballots (35 the numbers from the June 9 primary and percent) or during in-person early voting (65 reported that 11 percent of polling stations stayed open at least an hour past 7 p.m., at a percent) that ends Oct. 30. Four years ago, a record 76.5 percent significantly higher rate in precincts with a of Georgia’s registered voters cast ballots in majority African American population. To avoid a repeat of problems that the presidential election. This year’s turnout plagued the primary and made Georgia an might rival that figure. As of Oct. 25, more than 3.52 million object of ridicule, the state hoped to hire Georgians had requested absentee ballots more than 25,000 poll workers – many

8 | OCTOBER 31, 2020 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

younger than usual, as the threat of COV- includes work with political candidates ID-19 caused many seniors to back out – in- and campaigns. “As anyone who has ever crease the number of voting machines state- come home from a long vacation to find a wide to 34,000, and bring in more technical large pile of mail knows, processing a large volume of mail takes time. In support staff. past elections, the percentNov. 3 will be the largest age of people voting by abtest of the state’s new $104 sentee ballot has been small. million voting machines, But in 2020, because of the manufactured by Dominion pandemic, there is a massive Voting Systems, which are number of people voting by designed to back up the comabsentee ballot. Counting puter screens with a paper those votes will take time.” trail, a system that critics say And with perhaps 2 milremains open to tampering. lion or more Georgians votA federal judge found some claims made by election “We have been accustomed ing by absentee ballot and the hours that will be needed integrity activists to have to learning the results of an election on election to count those ballots, the merit but rejected a request that the state be barred from night, or at least in the wee outcome of some races may hours of the morning after not be known until Wednesusing the machines and inElection Day,” said Atlanta stead use hand-marked pa- attorney Marc Hershovitz. day. Or Thursday. Or Friday. The state gives the counper ballots. Those voting on Election Day may no- ties 10 days, until Nov. 13, to certify results tice people wearing labels that identify them and Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger, as an “official poll watcher.” These folks, a Republican, has until Nov. 20 to put the usually tasked by the political parties, are state’s stamp of approval on the numbers. registered with the election offices and can Georgia does not automatically recount observe the process inside a polling station votes in close races. Candidates may request but are not allowed to interact with voters. a recount, paid for by the state, within two They can’t use video cameras or cellphones days of county certification, if the margin is to record people voting or poll workers do- less than or equal to 0.5 percent. In races where no candidate wins a ing their job. Depending on local rules, they can raise any issues with poll workers or majority of the vote, runoffs for state and election officials. The parties also may des- local offices will take place Dec. 1 and for ignate people to watch the vote counting federal offices Jan. 5. A runoff is likely in the process. They can monitor, but not interact 21-candidate, open primary to fill the final with the people counting votes, addressing two years of the term of retired U.S. Sen. Johnny Isakson and is possible in the other any issues with election officials. The Republican Party, in particular, has Senate race, between incumbent Republimounted an extensive effort, hoping to put can David Perdue, Democratic Jon Ossoff, some 50,000 people in this role into poll- and Libertarian Shane Hazel. Readers who remember the term ing places nationally. A federal court decree that had blocked Republicans from such ef- “hanging chad” already have been through forts since 1982 because of findings that the a presidential election that ultimately was party had engaged in voter suppression ef- decided by the Supreme Court of the United forts against minorities in New Jersey, was States. The Republican and Democratic lifted by a federal judge, effective at the end parties have teams of lawyers who will be standing by Election Day and in the days of 2018. On the night of Nov. 3, the results you’ll after, if necessary, if they feel there is a case see reported first likely will be from votes to make. There is one thing attorney Hershovitz cast that day or during early in-person votwould like to see. “There is no rule or law ing. Be wary of those numbers. that says results have to be announced imThe state allows the counties to bemediately. But television networks and stagin processing absentee ballots two weeks tions like excitement and drama, and every before Election Day — but they cannot be newspaper wants a banner headline. They counted until Election Day. The idea is that are conditioning the public to think that opening the envelopes, taking out the balresults must be known immediately. If the lots, and gathering together will speed up media were to take a collective deep breath the counting process. “We have been accustomed to learn- on Election Day and say ‘just go about your ing the results of an election on election days like normal and we’ll let you know night, or at least in the wee hours of the what the results are in a week or two after morning after Election Day,” said Atlanta all the votes have been counted,’ we’d all be attorney Marc Hershovitz, whose resume better served,” he said. ì


NEWS Early Voting So Far The following numbers are evidence of the intense interest in this year’s election and offer a look at how votes are being cast in advance of Election Day on Nov. 3. For instance, as of Oct. 25, 32 percent of the early votes cast nationally were in-person, compared with 65 percent of those cast in Georgia. Meanwhile, the upward trend in voting by absentee ballot continues, in Georgia and nationally. Georgia/registered voters November 2016: 6,657,000 October 2020: 7,587,625 Source: Georgia Secretary of State www.sos.ga.gov/index.php/elections/georgia_easy_voter_registration_options_break_new_records

2020 election/national There are 209.2 million registered voters in U.S. As of Oct. 25: Ballots cast: More than 59.1 million (28.2 percent of the nation’s registered voters). Absentee: 39.9 million ballots (67.5 percent of ballots cast) Early in-person: 19.2 million (32.5 percent of ballots cast) www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/us/elections/absentee-ballot-early-voting.html

2020 election/Georgia There are 7,587,625 registered voters in Georgia. As of Oct. 25: Ballots cast: 2,755,027 (36.3 percent of Georgia’s registered voters). Absentee: 960,153 (34.9 percent of ballots cast) Early in-Person: 1,794,874 (65.1 percent of ballots cast) Source: Georgia Secretary of State

National turnout by voting eligible population (by percent) 2000: 55.3 2008: 62.2 2016: 60.1 www.electproject.org/2016g

National/mode of voting (by percent) Election Day in-person 2000: 85 2016: 60 Early in-person 2000: 5 2016: 20 Absentee/mail 2000: 10 2016: 20 www.electionlab.mit.edu/research/voting-mail-and-absentee-voting

National/voting by mail (by percent) 1996: 7.9 2000: 10.1 2004: 12.9 2008: 16.4 2012: 18.5 2016: 20.9 www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2020/06/24/as-states-move-to-expandthe-practice-relatively-few-americans-have-voted-by-mail/

By Dave Schechter

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES OCTOBER 31, 2020 | 9


ISRAEL PRIDE

NEWS FROM OUR JEWISH HOME

Dvir Adani on his ambucycle.

Former Partyer Turned EMT Helps COVID Patients

With his bright purple hair and numerous body piercings, Dvir Adani is a free-spirited man who, before the coronavirus outbreak, hosted parties for the public in Tel Aviv. However, once the outbreak hit, the 30-year-old abandoned his partying lifestyle to become a full-time EMT specializing in transporting COVID patients to and from corono hotels across the country. Adani joined United Hatzalah in his late teenage years, making this his 12th year of service. So far, he has driven a total of over 100 patients to and from hotels and hospitals since the pandemic started. He describes himself as a “people

Today in Israeli History Oct. 31, 1924: Yehuda Amital, the founder of Yeshivat Har Etzion, is born in Oradea, Romania. The school he establishes in Gush Etzion is meant to be less doctrinaire than many yeshivas. Nov. 1, 1945: The newly unified Jewish Resistance Movement sets off explosions at more than 150 railway sites and blows up three British gunboats in the Jaffa and Haifa harbors in what is known as the Night of the Trains.

Photo by Hans Pinn, Israeli National Photo Collection // Having regained the premiership

the previous November, David Ben-Gurion attends a Bastille Day reception at the Jaffa home of the French ambassador, Pierre Gilbert, and his wife, Paula, on July 14, 1956.

Nov. 2, 1955: Israel’s first prime minister, David Ben-Gurion, replaces his successor, Moshe Sharett, after returning to the government as the defense minister in February. Sharett soon resigned, sparking an election. 10 | OCTOBER 31, 2020 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

person,” and does everything he can to make sure his patients feel comfortable. A few weeks ago, while driving an entire family from a distant city to a corono hotel, something happened with the reservation, and the family was forced to return home. To cheer up the children, he stopped at a gas station and brought them candies and chocolates, which immediately brought smiles to their faces. “I love all people, no matter what race, ethnicity, or religion,” Adani said. “After all, we are all the same at heart.”

Israeli Startup Plans to Grow Steaks on Mars

Aleph Farms, Ltd., is a startup company that grows meat directly from cattle cells. Now, they are hoping to set up collaborations with space agencies and technology companies to grow meat locally on Mars and the moon, according to The Times of Israel. The startup’s main interest in partnering with these companies comes from a desire to produce meat even in the harsh and desolate extraterrestrial environment. Last year, Aleph Farms demonstratNov. 3, 1840: A coalition of Austrian, British and Ottoman forces bombards the port city of Acre and drives out the Egyptian garrison during the Second Egyptian-Ottoman War.

One to test new ways of creating meat with zero resources and reducing the footprint.”

Protection Against Medical Cyber Attacks

An illustration of startup Aleph Farms, which hopes to grow meat on the moon or Mars.

ed proof of concept when it produced meat on the International Space Station. The company grew bovine cells harvested on earth into muscle tissue using a 3D printer. In May 2019, the company also secured $12 million in funds from venture capitalists and strategic partners, The Times of Israel reported. Co-founder and CEO Didier Toubia says that manufacturing in space is “a way for us to push the boundaries of the production process.” Just like cars test out new technologies in tough conditions such as Formula One races, he told the newspaper, “the space is our Formula Rebbe, is born to a Hasidic and Zionist family in Bohush, Romania. He and his wife smuggle themselves into Palestine in 1946.

Nov. 4, 1995: Yigal Amir, a Jewish West Bank settler and a law student opposed to the Oslo peace process, fatally shoots Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin after a peace rally in Tel Aviv.

Nov. 9, 1924: Avraham Tamir, who serves in the Haganah and the British army and rises to IDF major general, is born. He is one of the first Israeli officials to meet with PLO Chairman Yasser Arafat.

Nov. 5, 1990: Rabbi Meir Kahane, 58, the founder of the anti-Arab Kach party, is shot dead by Egyptian-American El Sayyid Nosair in a Manhattan hotel while addressing a crowd of mostly Orthodox Jews.

Nov. 10, 2004: The Knesset officially adopts “Hatikvah” (“The Hope”) as Israel’s national anthem. The action has been delayed for decades over concerns that non-Jewish Israelis feel excluded by the Zionist lyrics.

Nov. 6, 1987: Zohar Argov, 32, who as one of Israel’s first Mizrahi music stars is known as the “The King” but battles addictions to cocaine and heroin, hangs himself in jail after being accused of attempted rape.

Nov. 11, 1902: Yisrael Amir, the first commander in chief of the Israeli Air Force despite his lack of aviation experience, is born in Vilna in the Russian Empire.

Nov. 7, 1878: Avraham Yeshayahu Karelitz, known as the Chazon Ish, one of the 20th century’s greatest Talmud scholars, is born into a family of rabbis in Kosava, Russia, now part of Belarus. Nov. 8, 1923: Yisrael Meir Friedman Ben-Shalom, the future Pashkaner

Nov. 12, 2009: Eliyahu Speiser, a Labor Party member who wins three terms in the Knesset, dies at age 79. He serves as deputy mayor of Tel Aviv and chairs the Association of Cities of the Dan Area. Nov. 13, 1949: Shimon Gershon Rosenberg, an Orthodox rabbi and Zionist philosopher known by the acronym

A team of researchers at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev have created an artificial intelligence solution to stop criminals from sabotaging medical equipment. This new technology will help stop malicious hacking of medical systems and even help reduce human error when using the systems. Tom Mahler explains that his system can detect two abnormal instructions indicative of an attack: context free attacks, such as an overdose of energy, and context sensitive attacks, something that looks normal at first glance, but given more context, is amiss (such as giving an adult dosage to an infant). According to Mahler, the new architecture could easily be implemented into existing machines used in the healthcare setting. Mahler said his program can help stop not just intentional crimes, but also any mistakes made by technicians. Shagar, is born in Jerusalem. Before being ordained, he serves as a paratrooper and a tank crewman.

Photo by Moshe Milner, Israeli Government Press Office // IDF soldier Gilad Shalit,

whose kidnapping in 2006 was masterminded by Hamas military chief Ahmed Jabbari, embraces his father, Noam, at Tel Nof Air Force Base shortly after his release Oct. 18, 2011.

Nov. 14, 2012: Ahmed Jabbari, the Hamas military chief, is killed in an airstrike on Gaza that marks the start of Operation Pillar of Defense, which aims to destroy rocket launchers targeting southern Israel. Items are provided by the Center for Israel Education (israeled.org), where you can find more details.


ISRAEL NEWS Israelis Believe COVID Lockdown Political By Jan Jaben-Eilon

goal with many days only seeing a few hundred new COVID-19 cases. Still, if As Israelis slowly start coming out of Israelis are feeling any relief, it’s not aptheir second nationwide lockdown due pearing in the polls and protests that conto the pandemic, reports and polls reflect tinue across the country. a shaken and disillusioned population. According to the latest IDI survey, Rather than feeling libonly 31 percent of Israeerated from restrictions lis trust Prime Minister that included not travelBenjamin Netanyahu ing more than one kito lead the country’s eflometer, or 0.62 miles, fort against COVID-19. from their homes, a maWhile this has slightly jority of Israelis believe improved from the 27 the more-than-threepercent who expressed week lockdown was trust in Netanyahu last politically, rather than month, it is still considmedically, inspired. erably lower than the The Guttman Cen57.5 percent of the popter for Public Opinion ulation who reported Only 31 percent of Israelis trust and Policy Research at trusting him during the Prime Minister Benjamin the Israel Democracy first lockdown. Netanyahu to lead the country’s Institute recently re- effort against COVID-19, according In contrast, IDI released the latest of 13 ported that 61 percent to the latest IDI survey. surveys examining the of the public expressed public’s attitudes towards government faith in the efforts of Ronni Gamzu, Ispolicies on the COVID-19 outbreak and rael’s national COVID-19 coordinator. its economic consequences. The study The national crisis spurred by the showed 55 percent of Israelis believe that pandemic appears to have more starkly “political considerations” were behind revealed pre-existing divisions within the lockdown while only 39 percent be- the Israeli population. At one point durlieve that “health considerations" guided ing the second lockdown, a top Health Israel’s decision-makers in taking this Ministry official reported that 34 percent unprecedented step. of those diagnosed with COVID-19 were Israel was one of the first countries among the ultra-Orthodox community, to enter a second nationwide lockdown, despite it constituting only about 12 perdoing so on Sept. 18, cent of the population. the eve of Rosh Ha“The ultra-Orthoshanah. The country’s dox sector, due to overfirst, in March, brought crowding and prayers the new COVID-19 case which sometimes vionumbers and deaths late the rules of condown drastically. The duct, has reached a high caseload remained low level of morbidity,” said in April through June, Health Ministry Direconly inching up to 2,000 tor-General Chezy Levy. new cases a day in July According to Isand August. It was raeli newspaper reports, widely reported that the many Israelis believe The IDI survey showed that 61 country opened up its the whole country was percent of the public expressed schools and businesses put in lockdown rather faith in the efforts of Ronni too quickly, resulting in than just the hot spots Gamzu, Israel’s national new cases skyrocketing. in the ultra-Orthodox COVID-19 coordinator. By September, communities or neigh4,000 or more new cases were reported borhoods because of political pressure every day, including one day of 6,000 on the prime minister from his ultra-Ornew cases, and more than 8,000 cases thodox coalition partners. The ultra-Ora day several times in October, accord- thodox party leaders did not want their ing to the Israeli government. When the constituencies to be singled out with regovernment decided to enter the sec- strictions. ond lockdown, the Health Ministry said On Sunday, Oct. 18, some ultra-Orthe rules could be eased if the daily rate thodox elementary and middle schools dropped to 1,000 cases. reopened for tens of thousands of stuIsrael has now finally achieved that dents despite lockdown regulations that

dox community has only fueled the only allowed preschools to open. The government acknowledged that anti-government protests that call on there was no way the police could control Netanyahu to resign over his trial in and fine schools breaking the lockdown three corruption cases and his governrules. In the past week, the Justice Min- ment’s handling of the coronavirus criistry drafted a plan to strip funding from sis. Hundreds of small businesses closed or were teetering due to the schools that reopen lockdown restrictions, in violation of the emerand unemployment gency coronavirus regureached nearly 1 millations, reported Israeli lion, according to the newspaper Haaretz. Israeli government. “Institutions and By Oct. 20, howorganizations that vioever, lockdown restriclate the rules and break tions were being lifted the law risk adminiseven from most ultratrative or criminal proOrthodox areas, and in ceedings, the cancela promising sign, the lation of their licenses Israeli Employment Serand the cancellation of At one point during the vice reported that the their funding in approlockdown, Health Ministry daily number of people priate cases,” said Maj. Director-General Chezy Levy returning to work was Gen. (Res.) Roni Numa, reported that about one-third of double the number of who is coordinating the those diagnosed were from the ultra-Orthodox community. those registering for unHealth Ministry’s efforts against the virus in the ultra-Ortho- employment. Despite the good news, no Israeli is dox community. Anger against what is seen as pref- counting out a third national pandemic erential treatment of the ultra-Ortho- lockdown. ì

LAW OFFICES OF

Evan M. Altman ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR AT LAW

OUR TEAM HAS BEEN ABLE TO ATTAIN FORMIDABLE RESULTS FOR OUR CLIENTS OVER THE LAST 30 YEARS BY COMPETENTLY AND THOROUGHLY REPRESENTING HUNDREDS OF CLIENTS IN THE FOLLOWING AREAS: Bankruptcy | Litigation | Corporate Law | Estate Planning | Real Estate | Premises Liability | Products Liability | Wrongful Death | Whistle Blower Cases | Medical Malpractice | General Personal Injury

Northridge 400 8325 Dunwoody Place Building Two Atlanta, Georgia 30350 Telephone (770) 394-6466 | Telecopier (678) 405-1903

evan.altman@laslawgroup.com www.evanaltmanlaw.com ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES OCTOBER 31, 2020 | 11


OPINION It Was All Greek to Me As the story goes, I was not supposed to be working on Nov. 2, 1980, but filled in for another reporter. Po l i t i c s always has Dave Schechter been a favorFrom Where I Sit ite subject, so I likely welcomed the assignment to cover an event sponsored by the John Anderson presidential campaign at the Olympic Flame restaurant in Silvis, Ill. Anderson, a Republican congressman from northwest Illinois, was running as an independent. That Sunday was two days before Election Day on Tuesday, Nov. 4. The candidate’s wife, Keke, would be the guest speaker. I was told in advance that I would get five minutes with her. In those days, I dressed like a cliche of a newspaper reporter, wearing suits usually in need of pressing (with a reporter’s notebook stuffed into an inside breast pocket), wing tips with worn soles and heels, and a trench coat. (Give me a break.

I was two years into my first full-time job and looked the part. No, I did not wear a snap brim fedora, like “Gus,” the paper’s long-time, old-school police beat reporter.) Arriving early at the restaurant, I looked over the room, found a place to park myself, and in a glance, noticed one of the campaign’s local organizers, a young woman who was scurrying about making final preparations. More on her later. Once Keke arrived, I was ushered to her table and reminded again that I would have five minutes. We had a delightful 45-minute conversation, discussing her husband’s positions on the issues of the day and her experiences on the campaign trail. What I remember most was Keke’s lament that all of her events seemed to be at Greek restaurants. Keke Anderson, nee Machakos, was a proud “daughter of the Hellenes,” as her husband called her, and the campaign apparently thought it appropriate that every stop on her schedule be at an Olympic Flame or its ilk. A waiter brought her a plate of saganaki, the flaming Greek cheese dish. Keke laughed and said, since we were in

San Francisco and I was hoping for some good Chinese food, but no, Greek again. After Keke delivered her remarks to the crowd assembled in the dining room, I slipped out and drove back to the newsroom, which was on the Iowa side of the Mississippi River. I wrote up the event, beginning with a trite lede sentence that has not improved with time: “In her heart of hearts, Keke Anderson truly believes her husband will be elected the 40th president of the United States.” Keke’s enthusiasm notwithstanding, I was under no illusions that this was even a remote possibility. My article was published on the front page of Monday’s morning paper. At some point that day, that young woman from the Anderson event called, offering compliments on the article. She might have said something to the effect that I could call her if I had any other questions about the campaign. I don’t remember what reply I no doubt stammered out. But I did walk back to the “morgue,” where the newspaper kept envelopes full of clippings and photographs, crowded

into file cabinets alphabetically, by name or subject, and found the folder on her father, who had been a city councilman and interim mayor of a city on the Illinois side of the river. In that folder, I found an article that included a family photograph with his eldest daughter; just to refresh my memory, you understand. On Election Day, the Republican challenger, Ronald Reagan, was elected president. The former film star and former two-term governor of California received 50.7 percent of the popular vote, carrying 44 states, winning 489 electoral votes. Incumbent President Jimmy Carter, a Democrat, received 41 percent of the vote, claiming just six states and the District of Columbia, good for 49 electoral votes. Anderson received 6.6 percent of the vote, won no states and no electoral votes. Some three weeks after the election (and a couple of more looks into that clip file in the morgue), I worked up the nerve to ask out that young woman. Skipping ahead from 1980 to 2020, that is why, every year on or about Nov. 2, Audrey and I make it a point to go out for Greek food and offer a toast to Keke Anderson. ì

Skillful Artistry, Extraordinary Outcomes Transform your appearance through surgical and non-surgical techniques.

facialplasticsatlanta.com | (404) 297-1789 12 | OCTOBER 31, 2020 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES


OPINION

The Innovation Edit Innovation is defined as a new product, method or idea. I like this broad definition as I prefer labelling to be as inclusive as possible. And Russell as the innoGottschalk vation manGuest Contributor ager of Jewish Federation of Greater Atlanta, we receive a wide range of new products, methods and ideas that aim to positively impact and transform the lives of Jewish Atlanta. Having an inclusive label for innovation gives us the space to reimagine solutions to the widest range of challenges from young adult engagement (Moishe House, OneTable, Trybal Gatherings) to social justice (Be’chol Lashon, Repair the World) and health/wellness (The Blue Dove Foundation, Jewish Fertility Foundation). Recently, I was convinced that innovation is also the removal or edit of an old idea. In order for a new thing to take hold, something old may need to make space, whether that’s taking a step back or being pushed aside. In this way, thanking something for the role it has historically played and gracefully saying goodbye can be a critical first step in the innovation life cycle. And we’ve seen this dynamic play out twice last month in Jewish Atlanta. This year’s high holidays were unlike any other in modern history. Houses of worship gathered online for virtual services and/or held smaller, socially distanced, in-person prayer services spaced throughout the day. Some congregants and community members leaned into the new normal because they desired connection and the old way was simply not possible, given the health risks associated with large crowds and singing. Other people, like myself, chose to adopt new traditions during the high holidays to find meaningful moments in and around our homes. For the Days of Awe, I spent 30 minutes each day “forest bathing” in Perkerson Park to slow down, observe my surroundings, contemplate my purpose, and provide a space, both physically and mentally, for reflection. This practice provided me inspiration and renewal, two values that I seek in a traditional high holiday experience. And there is no way I would have taken such an innovative approach if I

didn’t first discard my traditional way of high holiday participation. This first example is an innovation by forced rejection of the old way. Most, if not all clergy and synagogue leadership would have preferred to have no pandemic and to hold in-person services just like the decades of high holidays before 5781. I too would have preferred a “normal” high holiday ritual flow, but that was simply not possible. However, it is possible to choose to have an innovation edit, and in some ways that can be even more powerful. We recently witnessed that with the Atlanta Jewish Music Festival. I founded AJMF in 2009 with the support of a dozen community volunteers, and in the summer of 2018, I passed the mic to my successor Joe Alterman. As a native Atlantan and jazz pianist, Joe was inspired by our mission and the community we had built. But he wasn’t thrilled with the name; Atlanta Jewish Music Festival was too confusing (with its sibling Atlanta Jewish Film Festival), too verbose (4 words, 10 syllables!) and not “cool” enough. So, before he knew what the new name would be, he was ready to move on from the past. He had taken the first step in the innovation life cycle. I’m extremely excited to see where he, his team, and 3 Owl – the branding firm that helped reimagine this nonprofit – landed with Neranenah, the new name for AJMF. This new moniker addresses Joe’s initial concerns with AJMF and also opens new doors to engagement inspired by other live performance arts like spoken word poetry and comedy. It’s a new idea with great promise that successfully followed the dismissal of an old idea. As we continue to innovate because of and through this pandemic, I invite you to think about what you can push aside as much as, if not more than, what you can create. Like my virtual high holiday experience and Neranenah, new ideas can take hold because something that served its purpose before is no longer useful. Not every new idea comes at the expense of something existing, but we need to think about innovation in terms of entries and exits. This is a lesson I am applying to my work with Federation Innovation, and I will seek to inspire similar thinking in peers throughout the community. ì Russell Gottschalk is the innovation manager at the Jewish Federation of Greater Atlanta.

Want a Financial Plan? Take the First Step and Call Us! Laura K. Schilling, J.D., CPA, Certified Financial Planner (CFP®), Certified Senior Advisor (CSA®), is principal and founder of Financial Innovations, LLC and Laura K. Schilling, Esq, CPA, CSA, Estate Innovations, LLC. She is licensed to practice law in Georgia and Florida. Laura has been published in Forbes Magazine as well as Best Self Magazine. Clients benefit from Laura’s legal, accounting, and financial planning expertise. This diverse background enables her to review a client’s financial situation from many different perspectives. Securities offered through Triad Advisors, LLC. Member FINRA/SIPC. Advisory services offered through Financial Innovations, LLC. Financial Innovations, LLC is not affiliated with Triad Advisors, LLC. Over 4000 Jewish Atlanta voters participated in this year’s readers’ choice, to nominate and vote for their favorite business in a variety of categories. Laura Schilling won top ten place in the category of Best Investments and Financial Services in the 2020 Special Edition “Best of Jewish Atlanta: Readers’ Choice Awards.

Laura K. Schilling, J.D., CPA, CFP®, CSA® Financial Innovations, LLC and Estate Innovations, LLC

6111 Peachtree Dunwoody Road, Suite F101 Atlanta, GA 30328 Main 404-458-0065 laura@financialinnovations.biz www.financialinnovations.biz ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES OCTOBER 31, 2020 | 13


OPINION

Political Hatred Is Not Welcome Here Have you ever been subjected to political hatred? I have been personally, and the AJT has been getting bashed on social media for covering both sides of the news regarding the election. As editor and managing publisher, I take this very personally, as does the AJT staff. The truth is that it hurts very much. But I suck it up and hold my head high. I know Kaylene Ladinsky that I make plenty of mistakes Editor & Managing in my work and I am learning Publisher as I go, but I promise that I take my work very seriously and that the AJT staff works very hard, some 50 to 60 hours per week, and we are all here because we want to serve the community. We want to be a part of Keeping Jewish Atlanta Connected. The Atlanta Jewish Times is a bipartisan and non-denominational communication hub for everyone in our community, whether you are a Democrat or Republican, Reform or Orthodox. We are here to share news, feature stories and community updates. When I took on this position it was important to me to make the paper more diverse. I want to publish more stories about our community’s Jews of color and our LGBTQ members as examples. It’s important to our mission to be inclusive. This is a very big election year for everyone. Jewish Atlanta is very engaged in this election and is actively participating. This is great. We recently published a story about how Jewish organizations are protecting voting access around the country, organizations such as the Jewish Council for Public Affairs. These groups are mobilizing legal teams to report voter suppression, educating voters and helping people sign up. Several organizations say they are united in fighting minority disen-

franchisement. We should all support and encourage our community to vote. There is no place for political hatred in our community. It’s wrong. It does not matter whether you are a Republican or Democrat, this polarizing political hatred must stop. We all realize that there are many people who dislike President Trump. There are many reasons why that is understandable. But it’s not worth hurting others publicly and starting a hatred train of comments. According to U.S. News & World Report’s political writer Susan Milligan, “America has always known political polarization. But now the divide is driven more by hatred of the other side than devotion to one’s own.” She added, “This campaign year, the unofficial theme is fear – of the other side, other races and ethnic groups and, most of all, the person running in the other party.” Hate speech in the United States is not regulated due to the robust right to free speech found in the American Constitution. The U.S. Supreme Court has repeatedly ruled that hate speech is legally protected free speech under the First Amendment. According to the Pew Research Center, political polarization is the vast and growing gap between liberals and conservatives, Republicans and Democrats, and is a defining feature of American politics today, one that the center has documented for many years. Our community needs to come together and stop being a part of this unofficial election theme –“Fear.” We need to stop the political bullies and make an effort to not participate in their hatred. We can say, “Stop being a political bully!” I understand that there are a lot of emotions invested in our votes this year. It is fantastic that the majority of our community is invested in this election, but we need to use this energy to report voter suppression, educate voters and help people sign up to vote. Don’t be a part of the fear mongers’ hate; don’t be a part of the political bullying on social media. Whether you dislike

Trump or Biden, be respectful of someone else’s opinion and don’t bully others and create fear over their choices. It is one thing to debate your thoughts and ideas, and it’s another to bully, cause fear and spew political hatred against someone in our community. Be kind to one another and respectful. Appreciate our differences and encourage our community to VOTE. ì

Screenshot and example of political hatred over an opinion piece that was posted in favor of President Trump, “Deeds Versus Words: Why Jews Should Support Trump.” The Facebook post is prefaced by the statement: “This is the Rep. op-ed by Chuck Berk in the political Dem./Rep. side-by-side. To see the Dem. op-ed, please visit here: www.atlantajewishtimes. timesofisrael.com/why-jewish-voters-should-support-biden.” Of course, the op-ed for Biden was posted at the same time. They were posted side by side in the print issue. 14 | OCTOBER 31, 2020 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES


Keeping Jewish Atlanta Connected

A PodCAst brought to you by the AtlAntA Jewish times

CheCk out Jewish time:

AtlAntA Jewish times’ 2020 PresidentiAl eleCtion debAte

ChuCk berk, of the rePubliCAn Jewish CoAlition And miChAel rosenzweig, of the Jewish demoCrAtiC CounCil of AmeriCA debAte the PresidentiAl CAndidAtes they bACk.

AtlAntAJewishtimes.Com/AtlAntA-Jewish-times-

2020-PresidentiAl-eleCtion-debAte

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES OCTOBER 31, 2020 | 15


OPINION Letter to the editor,

NOT OUR FRIEND Due to the largesse of out-of-state donors and dark money aimed to thwart local control of elections, I have been treated to see a lot of money used to put Lucy McBath ads on all the primetime networks. Not bad for a first-time Congresswoman with little leadership background and few legislative accomplishments in her first term. The problem I have is what has McBath done in her two years in the spotlight. She certainly did not work for an anti-Semitic resolution in the House condemning her mentors [Congresswomen Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Ayanna Pressley and Rashida Tlaib] despite her supposed love of Israel and Jews, who sponsored a free trip to Israel with AIPAC almost immediately. McBath has not come out against Biden’s support for re-entering the Iran nuclear deal, which threatens Israel and world peace. Every civilized country calls Iran the biggest supporter of state-sponsored terrorism and to get [the deal] written, Ben Rhodes and Susan Rice [former deputy national security adviser and national security adviser] lied to the country. We paid these miscreants $150 billion cash to continue their anti-Israeli and anti-Sunni activities. McBath has not called out Black Lives Matter for their tacit support of anti-Semitic speakers and positions. She has not chided her fellow Congressional Black Caucus members for their support for Louis Farrakhan. Her biggest issue is gun control and, in her ads, she visits the grave of her son Jordan, who was tragically shot three years ago. Has she visited the graves of the hundreds of Black children who have been shot on the streets of mostly Democrat controlled cities? The homicide rate in Chicago, Baltimore and New York are rivaling those of third world countries. Where are the gun laws she promised? On the contrary, she nor her fellow Democrats have condemned the violence in Portland, Baltimore, Minneapolis, Kenosha, Seattle, etc., lest they antagonize their progressive Antifa supporters. Yes Joe Biden, there is an Antifa. Statues of Lincoln and Teddy Roosevelt did not topple by themselves. City buildings do not burn by themselves. Gun sales have exponentially increased in the suburbs and most gun ranges now have you book appointments. Literally there are no legal guns for sale in stores, so I guess McBath’s failure to condemn riots has cleaned the shelves of weapons. Karen Handel was a Fulton County commissioner in a minority position and able to accomplish tax decreases and lower the cost of county government while working across the aisle. As secretary of state she was able to cut costs by making staff more responsible and manageable. She ushered through a voter photo ID law that was blessed by the Supreme Court. The result has been a surge in minority voting never seen before in Georgia that has continued to expand and grow. She has the makings of following in the large footprints of her predecessors [Newt Gingrich, Johnny Isakson and Tom Price]. Jeff Kunkus, Atlanta

16 | OCTOBER 31, 2020 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

Letter to the editor,

Let’s compare the articles written by Chuck Berk in support of Donald Trump and Michael Rosenzweig in support of Joe Biden in the 2020 Voters’ Guide. Mr. Berk enumerates dozens of examples of actions taken by the Trump administration, which have benefited Israel, minorities, the economy and foreign relations resulting in record low unemployment for Blacks, Latinos and women, strengthening NATO by encouraging member nations to pay their agreed share, ending one-sided trade deals, which thwarted employment and wage growth for blue-collar workers in America and the recent peace accords between Israel and two Arab neighbors. Mr. Rosenzweig offers only platitudes in support of Joe Biden such as: “decent and compassionate man who shares our values,” “exudes respect for others …,” “proIsrael record,” and “Biden is a mensch.” Most of Mr. Rosenzweig’s article is focused on attacking Trump for the canards we have heard for four years: racist, bigot, xenophobe, etc. Mr. Rosenzweig reduces Trump’s support of Israel to: “long on symbolism, short on substance.” How then should we view the historic agreements with the UAE [United Arab Emirates] and Bahrain, which he fails to even make note of in his article? Of particular concern is Mr Rosenzweig’s false statement “…and even now he accuses Jews who don’t support him of dual loyalty.” In fact, President Trump’s exact words were: “In my opinion, the Democrats have gone very far away from Israel. I cannot understand how they can do that. They don’t want to fund Israel. They want to take away foreign aid to Israel. They want to do a lot of bad things to Israel. In my opinion, you vote for a Democrat, you’re being very disloyal to Jewish people and very disloyal to Israel.” Sadly, Jews have suffered the consequences of the “dual loyalty” claim during the extent of the Diaspora. Clearly Trump was asking the opposite question: Why would Jews support politicians who do not advocate for Israel? Jon Barry, Marietta, Ga.

Letter to the editor,

I read with great interest the two opinion pieces by Chuck Berk and Michael Rosenzweig on “Why Jews Should Vote For…” I take issue with some points. Mr. Berk set forth his reasons why Jews should vote for President Trump. He addressed the ways President Trump repaired our imperfect world: • for the Black community and other minorities • on foreign policy with China, USMCA [United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement], NATO, Iran • at the UN • with Israel, from his flight from Saudi Arabia to Tel Aviv in May 2017 (chutzpah!) to peace agreements with UAE and Bahrain Mr. Rosenzweig identified how Mr. Biden repaired our imperfect world: the Iran Deal. Really? The cash the Obama-Biden Administration sent to Iran funded ISIS. I watched with horror the acts ISIS perpetrated on individuals. Iran was on track to have nuclear weapons by the end of the 10-year deal. On numerous occasions, President Trump declared that children, born and unborn, are created in the image of God, including: • his 2019 State of the Union address and more recently, • the March for Life on Jan. 24 • the Al Smith dinner on Oct. 1 • on Oct. 2 in celebration of the Down Syndrome Awareness month A search on “Joe Biden created in the image of God” produced no results. Decent and compassionate? What father would put his son in harm’s way for his own personal benefit—to the tune of millions? Joe Biden. Pomposity vs. Corruption, this is the choice. Biblical principles have never failed us. Lynne Schultz, Atlanta


Letter to the editor,

OPINION

The coming election is a choice between leadership that believes America to be good, and an ascendant progressive wing that sees America as fatally flawed. The Democratic Party has been taken over by a radical progressive wing that favors socialism, open borders, abortions up to birth, and gun confiscation. They are hostile to the Enlightenment values and principles that underlie our increasingly fragile American Experiment. Their goals will further shred the social fabric by elevating group rights over individual rights, thereby denigrating and diminishing the traditional meritocracy that has so well served our fellow Jews. Progressives have rewritten the definition of racism from personal prejudice to any statistical differences between favored groups, whatever the underlying cause. They have rewritten the definition of justice from equal opportunity to governmentally imposed equality of results. They have elevated the pseudoscience of implicit bias to religious canon, thereby wrongfully accusing and wrongly staining many, many of our fellow Americans with the taint of racism. Those that dissent and criticize are not engaged but canceled. Whatever you may think of the character and foibles of our flawed president, he is the best choice to protect against an increasingly illiberal opposition. Jacob & Sheila Sofsky, Atlanta

Letter to the editor

Jewish Attorneys Take Racially Charged Case The smiling faces of these two Jewish attorneys and, along with their snappy biographies, make a nice advertisement for their sordid defense of Gregory and Travis McMichael, the McMichaels, who perpetrated another modern-day lynching of a young Black man, Ahmaud Arbery. The lawyers state that the justification for this killing is a history of Mr. Arbery unlawfully entering into other people’s homes, implying that it was OK for Mr. Arbery to die for this sin. This is no better than the policeman putting his knee on George Floyd’s neck or the shooting of Breonna Taylor via a no-knock warrant. Nobody deserves to die at the hands of two vigilantes with no authority to arrest, let alone tragically kill this young man. I am disappointed that your reporter portrayed these two lawyers in such a positive light. And, by the way, did your investigative reporter ask which right-winged group is paying their handsome fee? Jeffrey Clark, Atlanta

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES OCTOBER 31, 2020 | 17


OPINION

Letter to the editor,

We Jews are Finally Waking Up Last year, most of the Democrat presidential candidates met last year at the J Street conference to explain why the United States should pressure the State of Israel to make concessions to terrorists, explain support for the Obama Iran Deal as well as other anti-Israel topics. However, in contrast, at the AIPAC meeting (non-partisan, pro-Israel), not ONE single presidential candidate showed up. The New Democratic Party made a huge statement to the Jewish community ... they didn’t show up, but some of the prominent congressional leaders still “mouth” some support for Jews and Israel (not actions). Many others don’t even pretend to support us. What is J Street? It is an organization that describe themselves as “Pro-Israel, Propeace” but when one looks deeper ... it is anything but the above. They are radical left. They welcome BDS [Boycott, Divestment, Sanctions] (anti-Israel) lobbyists to their meetings as well as other anti-Israel factions. They have supported Jon Ossoff in 2017 and presently. He has received over $50,000 from them for this campaign. To view their website, one has to be vetted. What does that even mean? How many Pro-Israel Jews have ties to Al Jazeera? He has done at least 10 films with them. (As a Jew, would you make pro-Nazi films even if it’s for business?) He has received PAC funding from outside of the state of Georgia. (Hmmm, he said he never takes PAC funding). He worked five years for Rep. Hank Johnson, a known anti-Semite, who used the term “Jews are like termites” referring to the Jewish settlers in Israel? (Didn’t Hitler compare the Jews to termites?) Yes, he is young, energetic, good-looking, fast-talking and people are now watching who he affiliates with ... not just what he says ... Ted Terry, one of the most radical far left politicians in the state of Georgia, endorses Ossoff, according to the AJC. What do these endorsements tell us? We Jews are FINALLY waking up! Susan Cohen. Tifton, Georgia

Letter to the editor,

I am writing this letter to express my desire to pursue the option of a kidney transplant for my wife, who has been accepted to the Piedmont Hospital living donor program. She has kidney disease and according to her nephrologists, a transplant is the treatment for patients with end- stage kidney disease. We have been told that a living donor transplant is the best scenario. She now goes to dialysis three times a week for four to five hours a day. Dialysis treatments take every bit of strength from her body; she is tired ALL THE TIME, feels weak and her nerves are on edge ALL THE TIME. Our goal is for her to be able to see all our grandchildren graduate college. Our four boys are the most wonderful thing in her life and every minute she spends with them fills her with joy. After many years of marriage, I still love my wife and want to spend many more wonderful occasions with her. We recently learned that one does not have to be an exact blood type or match, as long as they are healthy enough to be a donor. Thank you for taking the time to read our story. If donating a kidney to her is something you would like to consider, contact her transplant center directly at Piedmont Hospital, Julie Pfeiffer, 404-605-2950. Thank you, Mark Hersch, Alpharetta The AJT welcomes your letters. We want our readers to have an opportunity to engage with our community in constructive dialogue. If you would like your letter to be published, please write 200 words or less, include your name, phone number and email, and send it to editor@atljewishtimes.com.

18 | OCTOBER 31, 2020 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES


ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES OCTOBER 31, 2020 | 19


THEN & NOW The 100-Year Pandemic By Roni Robbins

Estimated Toll of Worldwide Pandemics

Herbert Taylor was 23 when a dangerous flu spread through soldier ranks during World War I, nearly a century ago, and wiped out thousands a day. The Southern Jewish Archives of the William Breman Jewish Heritage Museum records the his1918-1919 Pandemic tory of the 92-year-old Atlanta native, recalling his service during the war and his Infected: 500 million (one-third of encounter with what became a global panthe world’s population) demic. Died: 50 million worldwide; 675,000 Taylor was training at Camp McLelin the U.S. lan in Alabama and was supposed to head Source: Centers for Disease Control to Camp Dix in New Jersey when the “flu” and Prevention in Atlanta broke out. “We lost 2,000 men a day to the flu. When the flu was over, we didn’t have 2019-2020 Pandemic enough men left … So they sent us back to Camp Gordon” in Atlanta, according to an Infected: 43.5 million interview conducted in 1987 through the Died: 1.2 million worldwide, 224,000 Cuba Family Archives. in the U.S. The history captured by the Atlanta Source: Estimates by the Centers museum, along with national Jewish orgafor Disease Control and Prevention nizations and public health records, bears in Atlanta and Worldometer dataan uncanny resemblance to what the Jewbase. Soldiers from Fort Riley, Kansas, ill with the Spanish flu. The pandemic was ish community and the world is experiencreported to have first appeared there and spread easily among other training ing today. It helps to put our present global camps during World War I, according to The Breman Museum archives. health crisis in perspective to read about tion, Ethnicity, and the Pandemic,” that the with higher concentrations of Eastern Euthe pandemic that occurred soon after the rily familiar to what is occurring in 2020. From the archives of the JDC (Joint “Spanish influenza epidemic of 1918” was ropean Jewish immigrants? turn of the 20th century. In the fall of 1918, a primary task of the In a footnote of the transcript from Distribution Committee), a Jewish relief arousing fears of anti-Semitism within the 20-year-old Jewish Daily Forward newspathe Taylor interview, the flu of that time agency, we learn that fundraising had to Jewish immigrant community. “History had taught Jewish spokespeo- per, New York’s Yiddish-language daily also was further defined as the 1918/1919 flu be suspended due to the restrictions of the known as Forverts, health care authori- ple that they must pandemic or the was to explain the ties concerning “an at all costs deflect Spanish flu. illness to the Jewish unusually deadly blame for the pan“In the U.S. it immigrant commuinfluenza pandemic demic away from first appeared in a nity and why cases that affected JDC Jewish immigrants military camp in must be reported. operations domesti- less they trigger the Kansas. Ironically Kraut wrote, “The cally and overseas as sort of medicalized the close concentrapaper warned, ‘Inanti-Semitism they well.” tion of large numfluenza is often the On Oct. 8, 1918, had left Eastern Eubers of soldiers in prelude to pneumoJDC admitted that rope to escape,” Alan training camps for nia, which ends very on account of “the Kraut, who had World War I hasPhotos courtesy of the Breman Jewish Heritage often with death.’ epidemic of Spanish a doctorate from tened the pandemic Museum // Gisela Meyer Spielberg Family Papers // Heinrich (Henry) Meyer, Noting that previInfluenza . . . it would the American Uniand increased the second from right, standing, as a German ously flu need not be be impossible to get versity history detransmission of it. soldier in World War I. Circa 1918-19. reported, the article together the crowd partment, wrote in It returned in a secemphasized, ‘The the NIH report. “At ond wave in 1918, which proved even dead- at the meeting scheduled in New York.” The Epstein School was among schools Health CommisOn Dec. 11, 1918, Harry Plous, a mem- the same time, the that reopened for the fall after being lier than the first.” closed and operating virtually for sioner has ordered The pandemic raged from January ber of the Upper Peninsula Organizing health and safety of several months during the pandemic. that from now on, 1918 to December 1920, according to the Committee, informed JDC’s Secretary Al- the people had to be transcript footnote. “It was one of the dead- bert Lucas, “We are getting ready for that protected by discussing disease prevention doctors should report on every case of inliest natural disasters in human history. great relief campaign, but on account of in every available public forum. In Denver, fluenza and pneumonia, exactly as they do Ultimately it infected 500 million people the Spanish Influenza, we are going to public health officers praised the Jewish for [other] contagious illnesses.’ Likewise, the Forward kept its readers apprised of worldwide, of which some 50 million … died. make a big stop in this work. It is not al- community for its compliance.” That praise came despite the high the epidemic’s spread.” It was especially fatal to young adults,” ac- lowed to hold, not only mass meetings but On Sept. 21, the Forward “informed cost of medical care at the time. “Although not even four persons can assemble.” cording to the transcript footnotes. Elsewhere around the country in 1918, physicians held a place of great admiration readers that 47 new cases had been reported Those figures are a far cry from the latest figures from 2020, showing nearly the Spanish flu was also wreaking havoc in and respect among Eastern European Jews, to the New York Board of Health, but that physician care was a luxury that few could the Commissioner had been reassuring nev43.5 million cases of COVID-19 have been the Jewish community. ertheless and explained that meetings were The National Institutes of Health re- afford,” according to Kraut’s reporting. reported worldwide and 1.2 million deaths. What would happen in communities being held to prevent the flu’s transmission. Still, some of the reports from 1918 are ee- ported in a 2010 article entitled, “Immigra20 | OCTOBER 31, 2020 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES


THEN & NOW

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention // The Boston Red Cross during the pandemic.

Tony Dejak, Associated Press // Testing for COVID-19 in Ohio in mid-March.

Meanwhile, the Forward advised readers tioned, ‘Do not let your child play with to ‘be cautious; if anyone should sneeze, he things that belong to other children.’” In October 1918, all stores except food should not sneeze into someone’s face, but into a handkerchief.’ Such advice did not stores were ordered to close no later than consider the obvious. For impoverished im- 4 p.m., Kraut’s NIH report continued. The migrants, many from rural villages, stan- Board of Health ordered that landlords were dards of etiquette and urban hygiene were legally required to provide heat to tenants still lessons to be learned. Not everyone by Nov. 1. “Each home in the city must now be heated. It is a danger for people who are owned a handkerchief.” Cases continued to mount and almost recovering from influenza and pneumonia every issue of the Forward included new to be in cold houses. Cold residences also enrules on flu prevention, Kraut wrote. The courage the development of the sickness,” paper “advised readers to not use hand the order stated, as reported by Kraut. While the Forward was skeptical of towels in public places and not to drink from cups that others had used. Knowing the government response to the pandemic, the popularity of candy stores and soda the Jewish community, known for being fountains in immigrant neighborhoods, self-sufficient, particularly in the face of anti-Semitism, Yiddish-speaking mobilized to help Jews were retheir own, acminded, ‘Above cording to Kraut. all you should “At the time in particular be of the influenza careful in iceepidemic, New cream soda placYork’s Jewish es: do not drink if community had the glass has not formed a kebeen completely hillah, a commuand appropriateGetty Images // Like today, people wore nal organization ly cleaned.’ There face masks to work in 1918 to protect to govern itself. … were warnings against the spread of influenza. Although it only against public spitting and using ‘any napkins, handker- lasted from 1908 to 1922, the New York chiefs, clothes or bedding that an ill person Kehillah published the names of 65 Jewish has used.’ In a community where many organizations in New York where help and smoked, pipe smokers were reminded, ‘Do information were available during the innot smoke from a pipe that has been in fluenza epidemic. One such organization, another’s mouth.’ While few Jewish immi- the Workmen’s Circle or Arbeiter Ring, grant households in this era had their own offered medical assistance to its members telephones, many used public phones and and their families. “Funerals were an equally important were reminded, ‘When you speak on the telephone, keep your mouth farther from matter. Observant Jews must be buried in sacred ground separate from non-Jews. In the receiver.’ “These were familiar words of advice, the fall of 1918, the Workmen’s Circle apnot unlike reminders designed to avoid pointed its first funeral director to watch transmission of tuberculosis, the bane of over the growing number of funerals of fluimpoverished immigrants. Children were stricken members in the Greater New York of special concern and readers were cau- area wanting to be buried in Workmen

Circle cemeteries. During the height of the presence of an epidemic in one region is a epidemic, there were 14 to 16 funerals a day menace to the world, as the influenza epiamong Circle members, an unprecedented demic has already taught us,” Plotz wrote in a letter recorded in the JDC Archives. He daily toll. “Religious organizations in the immi- was speaking specifically about the control grant communities also sought to protect and eradication of typhus fever, which he their communities. Many churches agreed believed would be accomplished by worldto remain closed during the epidemic or in- wide cooperation, a plan which I hardly creased the number of masses to spread out think feasible at this time.” If today’s health battles seem dauntthe congregation and prevent opportunities for infection. In the Jewish community, the ing, consider that back some 100 years ago, head of the rabbinic court or Beis Din of the “Spanish influenza” was just one of a New York announced that Jews in mourn- string of maladies afflicting the globe. For instance, a report of the activities of ing who must sit shiva ‘can and must be lenient with regard to the laws of mourning.’ the American Zionist Medical Unit between Mourners were required by Jewish law to 1918 and 1920, significantly subsidized by stay at home, do no work or domestic tasks, JDC, presented a desperate situation in Palestine, acor even change cording to its clothes or archives. bathe. Howev“Shortly er, because of after arrival of the flu, mournthe Unit in Palers were told, estine a chol‘He who lives era epidemic in narrow broke out in rooms or such Tiberias,” the a one who report to the must have JDC stated. fresh air may “The military go around outauthorities side for a few took hold of hours each day the situation on account of After months of delaying and rescheduling simchas, energetically health.’ The some resumed by taking health precautions such as being held outdoors or requiring masks. Arthur … There were bereaved were Oysgelt and Alyse Finkel surrounded by family at the time told they could June 14 in Congregation B’nai Torah’s garden. about 7,500 buy food and need not go barefoot, ‘even at home, but people in Tiberias, 4,000 resident Jews, wear shoes in order not to catch a cold. God 1,100 Jewish refugees from Jaffe, 2,000 Muslims and 3,000 Christians. To meet the forbid.’” Towards the end of the pandemic, needs of this population afflicted with enin October 1920, JDC medical advisor Dr. demic meningitis, Spanish influenza, maHarry Plotz prepared a report about his laria, dysentery and other gastro-intestinal trip to Eastern Europe in which he visited disturbances, and the usual eye diseases, a and inspected health conditions of cities, polyclinic was opened.” And we think we have a massive globorphanages, schools and refuge camps in Poland, Lithuania and Ukraine. “The al health crisis today. ì ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES OCTOBER 31, 2020 | 21


THEN & NOW

Atlanta’s Kosher Classics By Chana Shapiro

Federation. Needing more space, I set up a professional operation in my home basement and quickly gained a customer base,” he said. “My primary business was with major Atlanta synagogues (including Ahavat Achim, Or VeShalom, Shearith Israel, B’nai Torah, Chabad of Georgia) and the kosher hotels (Peachtree Plaza, Crowne Plaza Ravinia, Doubletree Concourse Perimeter, Marriott). I baked bread for Harry Baron’s delicatessen in Phipps Plaza, high holiday challahs for suburban Kroger and Publix supermarkets, and filled weekly challah orders for customers who picked up orders from my basement and later from my store. I also supplied both the Greenfield Hebrew Academy and Torah Day School of Atlanta with a weekly order of challahs (I included a weekly printed d’var Torah) for students to take home for Shabbos.” Idov opened a popular bakery in the Toco Hill Promenade in 1990, which he closed in 2000 to focus on raising his children. Popular items included apple strudel and old-fashioned sourdough rye bread, and Atlantans remain nostalgic about his challah and black and white cookies. Bernie the Baker’s fans included prominent rabbis and visitors from cities with kosher bakeries, who stocked up on his challahs and specialties to take home with them.

Raizel and Jacob Siegel with son Yoshi, left, in front of their original location before moving next door to a larger wooden building.

Siegel’s

Full-service kosher restaurant: 1930s to 1950s Raizel and Jacob Siegel From the mid-1930s until the early 1950s, Siegel’s was the place to go for a delicious Europeanstyle fleishig (meat) meal. Its most well-known location was a large wooden house with a wrap-around porch on Capitol Avenue across the street from the Jewish Educational Alliance, which predated Atlanta Jewish country clubs and the Atlanta Jewish Community Center, and was the site of English-language classes for immigrants. Siegel’s had two large dining rooms that were always crowded on Sunday, their busiest day. The restaurant was unpretentious, with unmatched chairs and simple wooden tables, yet for Jews in Atlanta and those visiting from other cities, it offered the luxury of “eating out” in a kosher restaurant. Siegel’s was open for lunch and dinner Sunday through Thursday and catered for simchas at then-Orthodox congregations Shearith Israel and Ahavath Achim. Owners Jacob and Raizel Siegel took turns cooking in the kitchen and waiting tables while mixing with the customers in front. Grandson Murray Siegel remembers that one of the waitresses had been with the Siegels so long, she conversed with them and customers in perfect Litvak-accented Yiddish. He also recalls his grandparents preparing a bountiful kiddush for his bar mitzvah at Congregation Ahavath Achim, when it was on Tenth Street, and he fondly recalls the large family Passover seders, which took place in his grandparents’ restaurant. “Our whole extended family was there, and my Bubbie and Zaydie did all the cooking. There was usually another family there, too, who ran their own seder, while my grandfather led ours, going a mile-a-minute, entirely in Hebrew. It was memorable; a big thing!”

Bernie the Baker

Sabbath-observant, kosher-certified bakery: 1970s to 2000 Bernie Idov Bernie Idov grew up in an Atlanta family of heimishe (folksy) cooks and bakers, and most of his recipes were adapted from those of his mother and grandmother. He also recalled recipes from the Old King Cole bakery, from his childhood, whose baker helped Idov with facets of the baking industry and in selecting equipment for his Bernie Idov works in his professionally outfitted home bakery. home bakery. “I ventured into the baking business in the late 70s, after Manhattan Bakery closed, because I felt that our community needed quality kosher-certified baked goods. I baked for kiddushes in Congregation Beth Jacob’s kitchen and provided baked goods for Sally Hillsman, who catered for the Atlanta Jewish 22 | OCTOBER 31, 2020 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

Norm’s Place, near Emory University and the Toco Hills Jewish community, was a welcome addition to kosher options in Atlanta.

The Schlosses opened a kosher restaurant to accommodate the people who sought a kosher option for dining out.

Norm’s Place

Toco Hills’ kosher restaurant since the 1950s: 1980 to 1983 Norman and Lydia Schloss Norman and Lydia Schloss opened Norm’s Place, a full-service kosher restaurant on Briarcliff Road, in 1980. The New Yorkers were wellseasoned in “kitchen culture.” As a teen, Lydia worked at Camp Moshava in Indian Orchard, Pa., where she cooked three meals a day for 500 campers all summer. Norman mastered kitchen management working for the National Council of Synagogue Youth on weekends. “For years, I’d get a call on Monday, rent a truck to pick up food for 200 to 250 kids, and set up and manage kitchens for all meals at teen Shabbat retreats all over the northeast, from Wilmington, Del., to Bangor, Maine.” Lydia’s sister Evi, a friend of Norman’s, lived in Atlanta. She introduced them, and Norm summarizes their frequent visits, “We liked what we saw!” However, it took the New York City blackout of 1977 to convince the newly married couple to decide to leave. In Atlanta they rented a two-bedroom apartment with a swimming pool for half the rent they had paid for a one-bedroom in New York. They soon accepted leadership roles in the Orthodox community and decided to respond to one of its needs, a full-service kosher restaurant. Norman tells their story: “We lived in Atlanta for two years before opening Norm’s Place. Herb Black, of blessed memory, and Rabbis Emanuel and Ilan D. Feldman, oversaw our kosher certification. Supreme Foods in Atlanta and Quality Frozen Foods in New York were our suppliers, and we also got meat from Arthur Strauss’ and Bernie Russo’s Atlanta kosher butcher shops,” Norman Schloss said. “Norm’s Place was a family-oriented restaurant, with good, old-fashioned Jewish cooking. And we offered takeout and catering. I was the maître ‘d and front counter person, and Lydia ran the kitchen. (Atlantans can now sample her culinary talent with food she prepares at The Spicy Peach). We were open and successful for three years, but closed due to a medical situation. Norm’s Place provided food for many happy occasions, from brises to bar mitzvahs, in which we were fully involved. “My most touching moment was when we closed and a customer said to me, ‘Your restaurant made it easier for me to start and maintain a kosher home.’”


THEN & NOW Eden’s Café and Catering

Atlanta’s vegetarian kosher restaurant Rica Sabetai and Donna Sabetai Krombach Eden’s Café and Catering, in the Briar Vista Shopping Center, opened in 1984 for lunch and dinner and for private parties of up to 60 people. It hosted engagements, birthday parties and even a couple of weddings, however most of Eden’s business was delivery, takeout and catering. Eden’s was primarily a Mediterranean, Middle Easternstyle restaurant in which many of the menu items had a Greek Sephardic touch. Donna Sabetai Krombach remembers, ‘Mama’ Rica Sabetai was a Middle “We were a family business, with my mother Eastern chef with a Greek twist. as chef, using her recipes from Salonica, Greece. We were also a pizza restaurant, with vegetarian dishes and vegan specials, everything made from scratch. We offered salads, falafel, pita wraps, pizza with 16 different toppings, fresh fish, bourekas, lasagna, moussaka and sandwiches. If we didn’t have it, we’d find a way to make it for our customers, serving a lot of things daily that were not on the menu,” Krombach said. “Our dessert case held kourabiedes (butter cookies), rosquitas (a twisted cookie) and pastries made with phyllo dough. We baked chocolate chip cookies in the pizza ovens hourly, while my mom made baklava in the kitchen. “Mom cooked for synagogues, friends and private parties. Everyone knew her as ‘Mama,’ and whatever she cooked had a Greek touch. Egg bread, tsoureki, came out of the oven every few hours. Customers bought the whole pan; we couldn’t make it fast enough,” Krombach continued. “Every day, when my father Mike closed his barber shop around the corner, my mom had family dinner ready on a restaurant table. You could find him in the back of the store, playing his bouzouki and dancing with my mother and son, Shmuli.” Eden’s Café closed in 1989, having been featured in Creative Loafing and other local papers. Combining kosher and vegetarian, it attracted Jews, vegans, Emory University students, Muslims, Ethiopians and Greek families. In 1986, WAGA-TV, channel 5, named it Best Pizza Place in Atlanta.

ready for some test runs. To gauge peoples’ reaction, Robbins organized two fund-raising dinners at Congregation Beth Jacob. A prominent Atlanta rabbi called his idea a “pipe dream,” and a well-respected local journalist tried to dissuade him, reasonably citing the failure of past attempts to sustain kosher eateries in Atlanta. Robbins was undaunted. Chai Peking opened in 1997 and has flourished for 24 years. In a New York Times best-seller, “The Fortune Cookie Chronicles,” Robbins was interviewed about Chai Peking, which is touted as the only place to buy kosher Chinese food between Maryland and South Florida. Robbins candidly tells his story: “There were obstacles, but I believed that I could run a first-of-its-kind kosher place. With a loan from Wachovia Bank who believed in my concept, and my own determination, I wanted to make it easy for more people to keep kosher or try kosher, while enjoying Chinese food. Jews like Chinese food! And I was confident that I could make a living. “I also understood that offering only take-out would help me succeed. My prices would be lower than a sit-down place, and I’d have the advantage of shoppers picking up a kosher Chinese meal while they did their marketing. The Kroger in the Toco Hills Shopping Center was--and still is--the perfect spot for Chai Peking,” he said. “My longtime friend, Danny Eng, who owned the popular Lotus Garden restaurant on Buford Highway, was a valuable consultant. He recommended Chinese cooks, one who has been with me for 23 of my 24 years in business. I’ve added items and deleted items from the menu, dropping fortune cookies and adding Chinese hot dogs, for example. I try to respond to reasonable customer requests and to accommodate customer food issues, like allergies and food intolerances,” Robbins said. “My intention is to find the right buyer to take over my business, maintain food quality and cheerfully serve my customers. As soon as that happens, I’ll head to Israel, where I’ve always planned to live, spend time with friends, finally not stand on my feet all day, and study Torah.” ì

Reuven Michoel Robbins greeting customers at his counter in the Toco Hills Kroger several years ago.

Chai Peking

Atlanta’s kosher Chinese restaurant Reuven Michoel Robbins Reuven Michoel Robbins, by his Reuven Michoel Robbins at work own count, worked in at least six difin full COVID-19 garb today. ferent retail venues before venturing into the food business, in which he had no hands-on expertise. After a couple of years exploring the novel idea of Chinese food for Atlanta’s kosher community, in the late 1990s he was ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES OCTOBER 31, 2020 | 23


THEN & NOW

The Home Cooks of Kosher Kitchens By Chana Shapiro In the first half of the 20th century, skilled African American women worked as cooks in kosher Jewish homes in Atlanta and in neighboring Southern towns, and some of them went on to establish their own successful catering businesses. The cooks used their intelligence, fortitude and skills to build careers as chefs and caterers. With their knowledge and experience as respected kosher cooks in and around Jewish Atlanta, they often had the opportunity to hire, train and educate others who followed in their footsteps. Here are some of their stories gathered from family members and Atlanta historical archives. Part of the family This story begins with Rabbi Tobias and rebbitzin Sara Hene Geffen of Congregation Shearith Israel in Atlanta from 1910 to 1970. In the late 1920s, African American cook Mamie Smith Walden was hired and soon became an integral member of the Geffen household. She was so closely associated with her prominent Geffen employers, she was widely known as “Mamie Geffen,” and her obituary, singularly unique for an African American cook and caterer, appeared in The Southern Israelite (the forerunner of the Atlanta Jewish Times) in 1976, under the name “Mamie Geffen.” The rebbitzin taught Walden the detailed laws of kosher cooking, and over the years with the Geffen family,

Photo courtesy of the Geffen collection, Rose Library archives, Emory University // Mamie Walden, who got her start in

the kitchen of Rabbi Tobias and Sara Hene Geffen, was a well-known personality in the Atlanta Jewish community.

she became completely fluent in Yiddish. Later, during the late 1940s and early 1950s, Nellie Peterson, another African American cook, worked for the Geffens, where she mastered the laws of kashrut, along with rudimentary Yiddish. The Geffens’ grandson Rabbi David Geffen recalled,

FOREVER PLAN "Limited Time RATE LOCK"

Investing in Your Care and Lifestyle Pays Off At Inspired Living the welfare of our residents, employees and families is our top priority. During these times, we are here for you as you consider whether assisted living or memory care services is the solution for you, or a loved one. Our Inspired Living amenities include: Resort Style Living In-House Gourmet Meals 24/7 On-Sight Nursing Care Resident Engagement Activities Professional Maintenance Team Weekly Laundry and Housekeeping Sliding Scale Diabetic Care, Full Incontinence Care Assistance with Medication Management and Activities of Daily Living Forever Plan Lock-In Rates are available, in addition to current Specials offered this month. To book a virtual tour with one of our Sales Directors, please contact us at Inspired Living! Inspired Living at Alpharetta 11450 Morris Rd, Alpharetta, GA 30005 470-297-6866 Visit us at inspiredliving.care 24 | OCTOBER 31, 2020 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

“My grandmother Sara Hene was very close with Mamie Walden, who conversed with my grandparents in Yiddish. She understood the rules of kashrut, and my grandparents completely trusted her cooking and baking. “She mastered Ashkenazi culinary classics, including kneidlach, gefilte fish, cheese pie, cheese kugel and blintzes. My great aunt Annette Geffen Raskas’ husband owned a kosher dairy in St. Louis, and he sent the Geffens kosher essentials every month, with which my grandmother taught Mamie to create traditional kosher dairy foods,” David Geffen told the AJT. “Mamie and Nellie cooked for other kosher families, too, including Rabbi Harry and Riva Epstein of Congregation Ahavath Achim. Even if Mamie had big catering jobs, she helped my grandparents prepare for Pesach.” Both Walden and Peterson became premier kosher Atlanta caterers, Walden until the late 1970s and Peterson through the 1980s. They were always heavily booked because of their organizational expertise and ability to adapt a “gourmet” menu to kosher standards. Walden even built a separate fully stocked kosher kitchen in her home, where she, who personally observed the laws of kashrut, scrupulously prepared all of her own meals and from which she often catered. Walden and her sister Katie, who had worked for the Geffens’ daughter-in-law Anna Geffen, went on to train other African American women in kosher cooking. One of them was Sally Hillsman, who also became a caterer. Congregational Catering Hillsman was an accomplished disciple of the Waldens and Peterson when she started working with Stanley Birnbaum, whose kosher catering business in the 1980s and ‘90s began as a sideline but soon expanded. In need of an assistant and co-chef, Birnbaum hired Hillsman, who had catered for the Atlanta Jewish Federation and knew how to apply her ethnic Southern-style cooking to Ashkenazi cuisine. Although she had a wide spectrum of admired dishes in her repertory, local lore has it that her kosher fried chicken and fried okra were among the most memorable items served at Birnbaums’ catered events. Birnbaum was a talented amateur cook who initially began catering for Congregation Beth Jacob celebrations and retreats. When he decided to expand his business, in addition to hiring Hillsman, he often brought her daughters, Jackie and Barbara Jean, to work with them. Hillsman was responsible for selecting and personally supervising a topnotch kitchen staff of African American women, most of whom had some experience in kosher cooking. In addition to events at Beth Jacob, the team of Birnbaum and Hillsman catered for other Atlanta synagogues, including Or VeShalom bond dinners. For many years, they ran kosher events at the elegant Peachtree Plaza hotel in downtown Atlanta, which had a kosher-equipped kitchen. Today African American men and women, mainly trained by Hillsman such as Sherman Goodwin, work for large catering companies and manage kosher events in private homes. Kosher in Dalton Jewish families in Dalton, Ga., got their kosher meat from Chattanooga or Atlanta, packed in dry ice and sent on a bus, then picked up and often prepared by home cooks. Esther and Sam Millender, who moved to Dalton as newlyweds in 1930, employed Catherine Wofford as cook and


THEN & NOW

The Goldring/Woldenberg Institute of Southern Jewish Life // Temple Beth-El in Dalton

celebrates its 40th anniversary in 1980. Earlier in the synagogue’s history African American women served as kosher cooks for events held in its social hall.

Sherman Goodwin, who was trained by Sally Hillsman, manages kosher events in Atlanta.

Ivan and Shirley Millender stand with their son Michael and top-tier Atlanta caterer Nellie Peterson, who meticulously prepared and presented the food for Michael’s bar mitzvah.

housekeeper from the 1940s to the 1970s. Esther and her mother taught Wofford the rules and recipes of kosher cuisine; however, Wofford was so respectful of the kosher laws and traditions that she would not cook in their kitchen unless Esther or Esther’s mother was present. At Temple Beth-El in Dalton, under the watchful eye of congregational women, local African American women served as kosher cooks for events held in the social hall. The most memorable of these women was India Harris. She reigned supreme in the synagogue kitchen with her hand-picked assistants. Her culinary presentations were elegant and elaborate, and India had to be booked to cater events well in advance. Jewish families depended on her to arrange bar and bat mitzvah receptions, holiday dinners and other celebrations. She was stylish, dignified and greatly respected. The Millenders’ son Ivan noted, “There was a ‘pecking order’ among the network of the African American ‘kosher specialists.’ It’s likely that most of the cooks spoke and understood some Yiddish. I was told that the reason the Jewish families had the finest cooks in town was that our families paid them better than the non-Jewish ones. I’m sure that’s true." ì

Mamie Smith Walden was so beloved by the Atlanta Jewish community that her obituary appeared in The Southern Israelite, the forerunner of the AJT, under the name Mamie “Geffen,” the rabbinical family for which she cooked.

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES OCTOBER 31, 2020 | 25


THEN & NOW

Snack ’N Shop: Iconic Gathering Place

Passover food was for sale every year for customers of the Snack ’N Shop.

By Susanne Katz Snack ’N Shop was one of Atlanta’s iconic delis and gathering places for 43 years. Founded in 1958, the Landau and Feldman families owned and managed this popular destination until Dave Landau retired and the Feldman family closed it in 1996. Landau and Saul Feldman were brothers-in-law. Landau married Saul’s sister,

Fran in 1953 and they had two children; Saul Feldman married Renee and they had three. It seemed like a family reunion whenever members of both families came together. Several reminisced with the AJT recently and shared memories. The first of the family’s delis was located in the Plaza shopping center on Ponce de Leon Avenue. Renee Feldman recalled, “It was known as Angels and was owned

THE SONENSHINE TEAM

Atlanta’s Favorite Real Estate Team

DEBBIE SONENSHINE Top 1% of Coldwell Banker Internationally, Certified Negotiator, Luxury, New Homes and Corporate Relocation Specialist Voted Favorite Jewish Realtor in AJT, Best of Jewish Atlanta

Debbie Sells Houses!

BEST OF JEWISH ATLANTA

Atlantic Station - $184,900

• Best Buy in Art Foundary!

• Granite Counters, Newer Appliances, New Carpet

• Updated One Bedroom Unit Overlooking the Pool.

• Near Wellness Gym, Spa, Pool & Grill Area

direct 404.250.5311 | office 404.252.4908 Follow Us On Facebook

Debbie@SonenshineTeam.com | www.SonenshineTeam.com ©2018 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. Coldwell Banker is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Operated By a Subsidiary of NRT LLC.

26 | OCTOBER 31, 2020 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

Some may argue that Jewish-style delis such as Golbergs and Bagelicious try to capture the Snack ‘N Shop neighborhood feel.

and run by my mother-in-law Sylvia Feld- Sunday school, and then come for coffee, man and my husband, Saul. It opened as a chat, and to buy food before picking up a delicacy store and delicatessen takeout. their children and heading home for a There were no recipes at the time; every- fresh deli lunch.” Renee Feldman thing was made the added, “We were so way it was in Eastern connected with our Europe.” synagogues. I was In 1958, Saul Feldthe first baby naming man and Dave Landau during Rabbi Joseph joined together and Cohen’s time at Or Vemoved the deli to a Shalom, and Saul was larger shopping center brought up at Shearith close to Emory UniverIsrael, so we became sity at Clairmont and a wonderful blend of North Decatur roads. Sunday morning Breakfast Club Board Sephardic and AshkeWith only four tables, of Directors had their own gavel. The Jewish Breakfast Club was relaunched nazic. it became known with in 2017 after a 16-year hiatus. the Emory crowd and the nearby Jewish community as the place Jewish Deli “We kept kosher at home, and we wantto see and be seen. In 1961, Feldman and Landau opened ed the deli to be kosher, but it also carried a second store at the intersection of West non-kosher items and was open on SaturPaces Ferry Road and Northside Parkway, days. First, we bought bagels from Manhatand that location became a bigger center tan Bakery and then bought loose pasta of activity. “There were eight tables and six from New York. Later we added packaged and other specialties, including cole slaw booths,” Renee Feldman explained. and potato salad. We learned how to cook Community Hangout homemade gefilte fish “A group of local and chopped liver.” guys came and went Lewin contribto a back corner table uted, “I still get asked every Sunday mornto bring my granding. They were known children’s Eastern Euas the Sunday Breakropean potato salad fast Club and even to events. The recipe had their own Sunwas always a famday Morning Board of ily secret. One of my Directors plaque for favorite memories is the table,” according running to the back of to Jan Landau Lewin. the store and scooping (The Jewish Breakfast Club was relaunched Renee Feldman with her daughter, Olga, up a bowl of still-warm show off vintage Snack ‘N Shop mugs. potato salad from in recent years.) “Men from Ahavath Achim Syna- Cherry, a woman who worked at the store gogue would drop off their children for for years and was like family.”


THEN & NOW

Galilee Culinary Institute by the Jewish National Fund is a one-of-a-kind culinary institution that combines culinary and restaurant expertise, tourism and entrepreneurship. Based in the heart of Israel’s Galilee, a mountainous region and micro-climate where fertile lands, mountains, and rivers create an unparalleled location for a thriving agricultural region, GCI is a total-immersion culinary institution. Renee Feldman and former NFL running back Harmon Wages at Snack ‘N Shop.

Dave and Fran Landau in 2009 at a family celebration.

Customer Service Movers and Shakers Danny Saul, who lived nearby, Snack ‘N Shop was popular and beloved by the Atlanta community, Lewin said. shared some memories of Snack ‘N Shop. The walls and meat scales were often cov- “In a strip center in Northwest Atlanta, Snack ‘N Shop was ered with articles and located, and it was photos of Atlanta’s always our ‘go to’ well-known folks who place after school or ate there on a regufor Sunday brunch. lar basis, including At this neighborLester Maddox, Mayhood deli, the Feldnard Jackson, Rodney mans and the LanCook, Sam Massell, daus knew everyone. Ted Turner and Jane Whether eating at a Fonda. “You knew table or picking up you had made it when an order, friendly your name was taped faces were always to the meat scale. It present. was not uncommon to “I was introsee Braves and Hawks duced to the deliplayers, the CEO of ciousness of pastraHavertys or The CocaFormer Braves manager John Schuerholz mi and corned beef Cola Company at the remembers Shack ‘N Shop. in their sandwiches. store having a meal.” Renee Feldman said, “I loved seeing ev- The customer service and quality of food eryone and having our finger on the pulse was a constant. There were not too many of the community. We served as a gathering delis in the South or in Atlanta in the 60s, place, which kept us all interconnected with 70s, and 80s. With Snack ‘N Shop, we the Jewish and the greater Atlanta commu- only needed the ONE! Nothing has taken nity. Some special memories include our the place of this nostalgic neighborhood matzah brei cookoff in the kitchen and lin- deli. The Atlanta Jewish community still misses them!” ing up Rosh HashaSome may argue nah orders in brown that Atlanta’s curbags all around the rent Jewish-style store each year bedelis, such as Goldcause there were so bergs and Bagelimany to fill. cious, have tried to Another unforcapture the same gettable time was neighborhood feel. when Samuel VenAs she turned able, then head of to go inside her the Ku Klux Klan, Atlanta home fola regular customer, lowing an AJT was questioned by interview, Renee Saul’s mother, SylFeldman smiled via, who asked him, ”I like seeing and Dave Landau and daughter Jan Lewin share a and said of former moment at the Decatur Book Festival in 2010. customers, “’Love talking with you when you come in for our food, but why do of good food I learned from you,’ they said. And they live far and wide.” ì you hate the Jews so much?”

( This ad was paid for by Michael Miller, JNF Trustee)

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES OCTOBER 31, 2020 | 27


THEN & NOW

Richards Variety Retains Attraction

Photos courtesy of Richards Variety Store //

Richards Variety Store continues to be a popular destination

Richards Variety Store features essential items such as school and office supplies.

By Robyn Spizman Gerson As a native Atlantan, I have fond memories of Richards Variety Store in the Peachtree Battle Shopping Center. I loved riding the mechanical horse for 10 cents as a child and selecting a toy, and years later, I took my own kids to ride the pony, which originally resided out front on the sidewalk. Then and now, it remains a wow.

I recently spoke with Robert Klenberg, who owns and operates the Buckhead store with his wife Rachel. “Richards Variety Store opened at the Peachtree Battle Shopping Center on May 15, 1958. Our second store opened in Midtown on Oct. 6, 2008 and is now located at Ansley Mall and owned and run by my former wife Ming Yang.” Klenberg continued, “The stores were founded by my grandfather Frank Garber,

Move-In Specials

FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED “BEST VALUE SENIOR LIVING & MEMORY CARE” IN THE HEART OF SANDY SPRINGS ALL - INCLUSIVE RATES Community Is Almost Finished with New Updates, Call Now for your Discounted Renovation Special

CALL TODAY 404-843-8857

690 MOUNT VERNON HWY, SANDY SPRINGS, GA 30328 VERNONSPRINGS.COM

CURT@VERNONSPRINGS.COM 28 | OCTOBER 31, 2020 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

The mechanical horse is still in operation for 10 cents at Richards Variety Store.

my uncle Richard Garber, and my father, took off and are still selling well. Since the Max Klenberg. Fifty years ago there were lockdown started, people have been remod500 stores like Richards within a 500-mile eling and hardware is selling more as a reradius of Atlanta. Today there are two – sult. Add eating at home and home-cooking Richards Midtown and Richards Buckhead. and we also had a pick-up in cookware from No matter how much we change the store, kitchen gadgets to all sorts of pans and pots. it stays the same. The horse at Peachtree What’s wonderful about Richards is that Battle still costs a dime and was inspired by we are a family store where a family can shop together." He said the options at Richthe Lone Ranger and Silver. ards allow families to “Richards Variety “do something they Store is a shopper’s enjoy at a time when paradise,” he boasted. so many of their other “We carry housewares, outlets are curtailed; greeting cards, hardthey are amused here, ware, toys, classic entertained and can American icons like buy really cool stuff.” Mr. Potato Head and While looking Tinker toys, office supback on those wonplies, games, novelties, derful days browsing and cookware. Our true through my memories patrons are children of of shopping at Richall ages, who frequently ards, I recently learned protest loudly when it’s that our friend and time to leave. We have neighbor Philip Karlick the biggest selection A fabulous selection of greeting worked there part time and best prices of LEGO, cards await the card sender. as a teenager during Thomas the Train, Calico Critters, Bruder trucks, Playmobil, and high school. Checking in with him, he said, “I loved working at Richards and enjoyed waitchildren’s books in the city of Atlanta.” Of the pandemic, Klenberg shared, ing on customers and working for Robert’s “COVID has certainly affected retailing con- dad Max, who was such a mensch. This was siderably and different companies in differ- our neighborhood store, and it will always be ent ways, particularly the brick and mortar a kid’s paradise and Atlanta landmark.” Fast forwarding to the present, Klenstores. We recommend masks and we ask berg said some of the store’s employees everyone to stay 6 feet apart.” So what are the best-selling items? “It have been working there for decades. The is almost impossible to say. Day to day and fact that much of the store hasn’t changed the time of year varies what flies out of our speaks to the treasure trove of items discovstore since we carry thousands of items. ered within. After all these years, no matter how Before COVID, the book section had grown and is doing well. We carefully curate our often the store is updated, the look and feel book selections, and we carry every major stays the same. As an essential business, publisher for all ages including children and Richards Variety Store at Peachtree Battle Shopping Center’s COVID hours are 12 p.m. adults. “During the onset of COVID we were to 5 p.m., Monday through Sunday seven also selling tons of jigsaw puzzles and they days a week. ì


Give the Gift that Keeps Giving All Year!

A gift SubScription for 1 yeAr! onLy $65 per yeAr

Subscribe at www.atlantajewishtimes.com/subscribe-to-home-delivery

Give your friends and family the gift of home delivery of the Atlanta Jewish Times. They will love knowing what’s going on in the community and beyond!

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES OCTOBER 31, 2020 | 29


THEN & NOW

The Alterman Brothers Model Family Legacy

The Alterman brothers exuded personality and management sechel. From left: George, Dave, Izzy, Max, Sam. Izzy was “the boss.”

Zaydie Louis Alterman started the original Cash and Carry on Decatur Street in 1923.

By Marcia Caller Jaffe

and Rabbi [Tobias] Geffen to drive to shul. Sometimes all five brothers showed up and waved the others on, so it was covered.”

Third generation Richard, Steve and Bruce Alterman share endearing stories and business gems about growing up in the fam- Business Lessons Learned Stories of learning from the five brothily food empire of Big Apple and Food Giant, which dominated the Atlanta market for ers are legend in that generation of a selfmany decades. As a carefully well-oiled flow made, hard-working and charismatic, intrichart, cousins and siblings had each others’ cately intertwined family business. Richard laughs at backs with healthy combeing the “low man on petition and best busithe totem pole” when ness practices. All agree he was assigned grass that jumping into the mowing on the emcar with a dad or an unbankment at the warecle to survey the stores house. He recalled, “At was the most fun and the facility on Lee Street productive experience there was a freezer area, in which they learned dry groceries and 60 how to treat employees trucks.” from brothers Izzy, Sam, Steve added, “I unGeorge, Dave and Max. Richard Alterman with his musical son Joe. loaded boxes for $3 an “When we came of age, it was all about putting the right peg in hour! Every summer we kids were required to work. Cousins came up from Miami to the right hole,” Steve said. join in.” Steve went on to the University of Pennsylvania and wanted to proceed to law Humble Beginnings Zaydah Louis Alterman ran the Cash school. “Dad had a fit. It was only the family and Carry on Decatur Street in 1923. His business for me.” In 1969 he filled the available spot wife died in childbirth. Bruce lamented, “After that was an arranged marriage, not un- at the distribution center. He elaborated, usual at the time. A woman was picked and “The new warehouse on Selig Drive was sent down from New York City to manage 650,000 square feet, and plans called for what must have been an impossible situ- an engineer. They said, ‘Congratulations, ation: Eight children running from 18 to 3 you’re the engineer.’ Three years later we and a new baby. They were so poor, the new were up and running. We were relied upon baby had to be given to a neighbor. When I to figure things out. One [time at] midnight say ‘poor’: padlock on the refrigerator door, Max called, ‘There’s a problem.’ I ditched my three brothers in the same bed on an un- date and jumped into the car to find a devheated porch. My dad Max’s first birthday astated-looking movie set where lightening cake was at 16. These brothers didn’t go to hit a transformer. Max said, ‘Call me when you figure it out.’ That’s how we learned college.” Steve lovingly recalled Louis’ dedica- about life.” Steve went on to be the director tion to Congregation Shearith Israel. “Daily of warehouse systems, data processing and one brother was assigned to pick up Zaydah labor negotiations.

30 | OCTOBER 31, 2020 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

Bruce remembered riding to stores on weekends as a 10-year-old with Dad, … working in the warehouse starting at 10 a.m. stamping cigarettes, loading trucks and unloading box cars. “I never considered doing anything else. When my college friends were going to career days, I was going into my family grocery business. I look back on it as a privilege to be part of something so unique.” Richard said that Dave knew that computers were the wave of the future and converted inventory onto one of first IBMs. Then Sam was believed the first person to be on the cover of the Atlanta Business Chronicle, “Mr. Sam, Successful Operator” when “we hit 100 stores,” Richard said. He became assistant to Sam in charge of store layout, planning, real estate and fixtures. Family Business Politics Bruce recalled, “Family was close. I was the youngest son of the youngest brother. I remember backyard barbeques at Uncle George and Aunt Rosalie’s. In addition to running the stores, my dad was the candy buyer. There was always a cabinet full of “samples” at my house, and boy did my friends know where I lived! “Family was the default that allowed for the conflicts that had a part of a rapidly growing family business. It never had to be said.” Steve concurred, “Everyone looked out for each other. Problems remained silent to the public and were resolved behind the scenes. If four brothers agreed and voted on something, they ALMOST won – except if Izzy was against it.” Selling the Business In 1980 the business was sold to Belgian firm Delhaiz while Kroger was setting up in Atlanta. There was also A&P, Colonial, Big Star. Richard stated, “After they took it over, it was the survival of the fittest; they couldn’t compete, and it went the way of all

poorly managed companies.” Bruce said, “At the time the business was sold, we had 101 stores in three states. Incidentally, our store at Highland Avenue had a heavy concentration of Jews. The one in Opelika? Not so much.” Steve stayed four years after the sellout as director of store operations. He went on to co-own Rio Bravo with Ray Schoenbaum before the Horseradish Grill, which just sold last year. Steve served as president of Congregation Beth Tefillah. Bruce with wife Sally operated The Brickery Grill & Bar in Sandy Springs from 1992 until 2015. He relayed that being head of produce gave him an appreciation for running a successful restaurant and understanding where the food came from. Richard went on to produce the most “famous” Alterman, jazz pianist Joe, director of the Atlanta Jewish Music Festival. ì

Alterman Family Business Team Members Izzy President Malcolm Institutional Foods Terry Kelly Institutional Food Sales Herb Singer Preserving plant Sonny Kaplan Non-Foods

Sam Real estate Paul Meat Department

George Purchasing Perry Administration Bill Carol Institutional Food Sales

Dave Independent stores Richard Real estate Steve Operations Max Operations Peggy Consumer Affairs Robert Dairy/Advertising Bruce Produce


THEN & NOW

Meeting ‘n Mating on Ess ’n Fress Menu By Bob Bahr

Atlanta to meet a mate than the singles bars that were just taking off. Ess ‘n Fress became Charlie Copeland was selling furniture the place to be if you were Jewish and sinat the Modern Living store in Atlanta in the gle, according to Stephanie Copeland. “We 1960s just before it closed. Looking around made many marriages at that place. They’d for a new job, his wife Stephanie suggested be standing out the door waiting for a table.” Jewish singles flocked that he try something comto Atlanta from all over pletely different. the country for the oppor“I [asked] him, ‘Why tunities that were quickly don’t you go into the resdeveloping in the city. Ess taurant business on Bu‘n Fress opened a few years ford Highway?’ And that’s after Atlanta gained a new before so many Jewish international airport, a people really moved there major league baseball franand Corporate Square was chise and a reputation as a first being built. He listened Southern city “too busy to to me and he did.” A large bowl of matzah ball soup Copeland grew up in set you back 85 cents on this Ess hate.” Marcia Caller Jaffe, a an Atlanta Sephardic fam‘n Fress menu from the 1970s frequent AJT contributor, ily where the deli food of Eastern Europe was largely unknown. He came to the city from Lexington, Ky. She made a quick trip to New York with his remembers the Buford Highway neighborfather-in-law, Larry Nager, who had been hood, with apartments such as the Seville president of Congregation Beth Jacob. Co- and Bryton Hill, being referred to as “The peland needed to get a feel for the menu of Jewford Highway” or “The Gaza Strip.” Jaffe elaborated, “Sunday morning was traditional soups and sandwiches that he THE gathering place to see ‘who was with would be serving. whom’ or meet a new The new place was ‘whom.’ My roommate named Ess ’n Fress, Yidand I begged Charlie to dish for eat and enjoy, let us waitress. This was even though he didn’t a compact five hours speak Yiddish and starting at 8:30 on Suncouldn’t understand the day morning with backcustomer who came to-back table turnovers. in one day asking for a We each took in $45 cash pound of gehakte leber, one tips, and we got a first of prized specialties of his look of who was new to new, suddenly successful Atlanta.” restaurant. Fortunately, But success came his wife and her mother, with its own problems. who were Orthodox, were Stephanie Copeland in the restaurant that day. remembers several of “He was coming in the waitresses taking for chopped liver,” Stephtheir $45, which is over anie said. “People would $300 in today’s money, come from all over to buy to spend a weekend it. Every Friday morning in Florida rather than I’d have to go down to Gilwaiting tables. And she ner’s kosher meat market Like most Jewish delis of the recalls the cook, who got to buy the chicken livtime, there were plenty of choices fed up with the pressure ers. When this customer and the price was right. on Sunday morning, came in, my mother and I and left through the back door during the had to translate for him.” It didn’t take long for Charlie Copeland height of the Sunday rush. Or there was to learn the ins and outs of the deli world that kitchen worker, who was always using that he had so suddenly begun to inhabit. A the restaurant’s phone for her other job, three-page menu was crowded with the tra- running numbers in an illegal gambling ditional Jewish comfort foods for the grow- operation. It was the kind of stress that came ing community of young Jewish singles and couples who lived along Buford Highway with running such a successful operation, and had made the deli a neighborhood hang Stephanie Copeland said, that caused her husband to give up the business. out, particularly on weekends. “Charlie realized, my gosh, Debbie, our It even got a prominent write up in Cosmopolitan magazine as a better place in daughter, is 13 years old and I don’t even

The owners of Ess ’n Fress, Charlie and Stephanie Copeland were a young married couple very much like their Buford Highway customers.

Today’s International Café on Buford Highway was once Ess ‘n Fress, a mecca for Jewish singles in Atlanta.

know her because I am always at work, six days a week. So we bought a sandwich shop downtown, across the street from the old Macy’s store that was a big success, too, for almost 20 years, but only five days a week.” The Copelands sold Ess ‘n Fress in 1977 and it lived on under several owners. But the neighborhood was changing. The new arrivals were not Jews from New York or South Florida but were from Vietnam, Mexico and South Korea. Yet, there is still a restaurant at 3066 Buford Highway, where Ess ‘n Fress was located. Appropriately enough

it’s called the International Café. They even have Reubens and pastrami sandwiches on the menu, although its not likely that the cold cuts come from New York like in the old days. Charlie Copeland died in April at the age of 86, fondly remembered by those who, for so many years, had enjoyed his sandwiches and his matzah ball soup. Just before he was buried, his wife Stephanie, to whom he was married for 60 years and who worked side by side with him during all that time, dropped an old Ess ‘n Fress menu into the grave. ì

LEXX HOMECARE AGENCY personnel has been providing quality home care since 2001, so be assured will send quality professionals to your home. We understand that most seniors would want to stay in their homes for as long as possible. LEXX Home Care allows you to do this! Our State background checks and fingerprinting assure you that LEXX HOMECARE is sending trusted, dependable and reliable caregivers. We love caring for seniors, and “Our Personal Touch Makes The Difference.”

Phone: 770-755-1600 Fax: 770-755-1601 www.lexxcares.com ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES OCTOBER 31, 2020 | 31


THEN & NOW

A Taste of Norm’s Place in Toco Hills By Flora Rosefsky

grilled panini sandwiches, soups, a new sushi bar and kosher foods not available in loAt a kosher specialty market opened cal grocery stores. in 2013, find a taste of In a recent email to the former Norm’s Place their customers to make at The Spicy Peach in Shabbat and Sukkot “deAtlanta’s Toco Hill neighlicious and easy,” an “Out borhood. of The Archives” sidebar One of the original featured Norm’s Place owners, Norm’s wife, popular menu items. “My Lydia Schloss, recalled husband Norm insisted how daughter Tzippy to be the one to make my Teller and Jodi Wittengazpacho soup recipe in berg had become close the tiny back kitchen,” friends from their days Schloss said. “This was as co-presidents of Beth Norm’s sole contribution Jacob’s Sisterhood. The as a Spicy Peach cook!” two young women made On a typical Indian a shiddach (match) with summer afternoon durSushi chef Biak prepares a Schloss to become entreing the pandemic, eight takeout order request. preneurs. tables and multiple In 2019, the store expanded when it chairs are spread apart on the sidewalk in took over Alexander’s of Atlanta fine jewelry front. A sizeable roof overhang gives some store’s emptied space next door, almost dou- protection on a rainy day. bling its size. Today you might be greeted During a recent visit, the AJT observed at Spicy Peach by Schloss, whose coleslaw, young men from the nearby Kollel saying potato and cucumber salads she once made a blessing before they dug into their salad for her husband’s restaurant, along with bowl lunch. Vehicles come and go in the

The three women who head Spicy Peach are Lydia Schloss, Jodi Wittenberg and Tzippy Teller.

front parking area to pick up catered orders. and Fridays. The food is often seasoned with Moroccan flaSchloss told me vors, echoing hints she has seen children of Rosh’s cultural sit with their parents background. The munching on soft ice dinners are cooked cream for pre-Shabin Chabad Israeli bos afternoon treats. Center’s kosher“Customers follow certified kitchen in CDC guidelines for Brookhaven. mask wearing when When asked in the store and soif there were any cial distancing both common threads inside and out,” she The Salomon family enjoy a Spicy Peach lunch outdoors. between Norm’s said. Unlike Norm’s Place, which served Place and Spicy Peach, Schloss alluded to meat such as corned beef and pastrami the feeling of community that they both shared. Even though cooked in special they may be 6 feet steamers, Spicy apart while in the Peach only carstore or eating outries dairy or pareve doors, people still foods. An exception enjoy the schmoozoccurs when Ising, she said. Both rael Rosh, chef and enterprises adhered owner of Kosher strictly to the laws Kreations, provides of kashruth and are home-cooked style closed for Shabbat menu items for and Jewish holiShabbat and Jewish days. ì holiday dinners. Rachael Goldsmith picks up her sushi order from assistant Felicia. To learn more Menus are posted every Thursday on Spicy Peach’s about Spicy Peach, visit www.thespicypeach. social media with pickups on Thursdays com.

A Family Law Firm Traci A. Weiss, Esq. Partner Family Law Attorney Guardian ad Litem

Traci is a highly experienced and respected attorney who passionately advocates for what is right and fair for individuals and their families, while helping them navigate challenging divorces and other family law situations with dignity and compassion. Warner Bates’ attorneys have 250+ years of collective litigation experience, handling complex matters while maintaining our core principles:

Integrity. Excellence. Results. 3350 Riverwood Parkway, Suite 2300, Atlanta, Georgia 30339 TWeiss@warnerbates.com | Learn more at www.WarnerBates.com | 770.951.2700 32 | OCTOBER 31, 2020 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES


THEN & NOW

Where Are They Now? By Allen Lipis

years ago, but speaks English fluently, another was born and bred in Atlanta and othIn the early '80s I was involved in Yeshi- ers entered the Yeshiva only several years va High School of Atlanta (now the Atlanta ago. And gradually, you are impressed with Jewish Academy). I served on the board and their caliber, individually and collectively. sent all of my three children to the high They are off to some of the finest colleges school. I attended in this country and all of their graduaIsrael – Duke, Tufts, tions, and each one University of Pennwas exciting because sylvania, Tulane, each graduate spoke New York University, about the school and Emory, Clark, and about their future. Hebrew University I was so impressed – a very impressive that I sent a letter list. Every one of to The Southern Isthem has their own raelite, the forerunsights set very high. ner of the Atlanta The highlight Jewish Times, about of the evening is the one such graduaspeeches of the gradSchool under construction: tion. Rabbi Cohen, AJA opened in 2017. uates. They speak for then head of school, themselves, of course, but collectively they liked the letter and posted it at the school for speak for the Yeshiva. They represent the many years. This is the letter I sent that was finished products of years of intensive and published on June 17, 1983: personal attention. They represent the best and the brightest of our Jewish generation Observations of a graduation to come. And we, who sat in the audience, Editor, came to believe that evening that we were It was only a class of 10, but it was like putting our future in good hands. no other graduation ceremony I’ve ever atThese graduates spoke beautifully. Boris tended. Last week the Yeshiva High School Penchenik held us in rapt attention with his of Atlanta held their annual graduation at sincerity and his strength; Mindee Nodvin the Jewish Commudisplayed her brilnity Center with a liance as a straight packed auditorium. A student; Liz Levy The experience was spoke with an eloboth moving and upquence and forcefullifting. ness rarely displayed; For two solid and Robyn Peskin hours we sat on the conveyed the idealedge of our seats, ism and determinamoved by the sheer tion that will take her simplicity of the certo Israel. Some spoke emony, cheering and from a prepared text, applauding for the quoting Tennyson graduates, and sadand Leo Rosten, while dened by the thought others spoke without that those who notes at all. Yet, all of would graduate that them spoke with sinevening would never cerity that seemed to be quite the same. say in ten different The teenagers we ways, “Thank you, had come to know Yeshiva, for what you were now adults in did for me.” age, thought and acThe climax of tion. the evening was a Allen Lipis wrote to The Southern The Yeshiva’s riveting audio-visual Israelite in 1983 about his impressions graduation, unlike presentation of the about Yeshiva Atlanta’s graduates. other graduations, is growth of these grada personal experience. In the course of the uates from baby pictures on up. Produced evening you come to know the graduates, by Ronnie Minsk, another of the graduates, each of them – where they came from, why it was both professional and touching – a fitthey are here, and where they are going. You ting end to a very personal graduation. find out that one came from Russia four I have attended these Yeshiva gradua-

Joe and Judy Levenson were married in 1981 by Yeshiva Atlanta head of school Rabbi Herbert Cohen and Rabbi Emanuel Feldman of Congregation Beth Jacob.

Rebecca Levin credits Rabbi Cohen’s English class for helping shape her future as a Shakespeare performer.

tions and each of them is something special. I go because it makes me feel young and excited again. I go because it makes me believe in our youth, in their commitment to a Jewish identity. I go to see their love of learning and to hear their optimism about the future. It was a marvelous evening for the Yeshiva High School and a rousing send off for this elite class. But more importantly, it was a statement to all of us that a first class Jewish and secular education will pay dividends for the rest of their lives and ours. - Allen H. Lipis

me an ambassador for Yiddishkeit. Yeshiva gave me both that desire and the ability.”

Because I was curious what happened to these graduates and others, I asked my daughter, Pamela, to help me track what those from the '80s and '90s she knew were doing today. We got the names by going to a Yeshiva group on Facebook and sent several hundred requests for an update on their lives and their experiences at the school. A few returned detailed responses. Joe Levenson and Judy Brown, who both attended YA were married in 1981 by Rabbi Cohen and Rabbi Emanuel Feldman of Congregation Beth Jacob. Joe is a national key account director for PharmaLink. Judy works for the Jewish Federation of Broward County. She said, “Yeshiva Atlanta changed our lives, made our life!” Rebecca Levin graduated in 1990 and is a musician and actor. She says of Yeshiva Atlanta that even with her learning disabilities they, “could accommodate my needs, even to rearranging my schedule so that I had a one-on-one math class during school hours.” She said she had Rabbi Cohen as an “English teacher that no doubt helped my career as a Shakespeare performer.” She concluded, “I have no doubt that the identity I still claim as a Jew is due in large part to the encourage-without-pushing attitude of the school and the Judaics teachers. … It makes

Here are 30 graduates and their careers as we know them: Benyomin Cohen, author and journalist Dani Cohen, senior rabbi Danny Frankel, lawyer David Frankel, dentist Pamela Lipis Glinsky, registered dietician Danny Glusman, real estate agent Faye Grossblatt, registered nurse Debbie Held, spins yarn Adina Hirsch, pharmacist Raphael Hirsch, mortgage underwriter Kim Hoelting, executive Saul Jacobs, physician Darren Joel, entrepreneur Nonny Spotts Kelly, immigration lawyer Jane Leader, senior recruiter Alane Levy, registered nurse Kim Slovin Linsider, speech pathologist Meira Merlis, TBS writer Alan Minsk, lawyer Elisa Minsk, entrepreneur Aria Mansouri, Los Angeles restaurant owner Hallie Raab, real estate agent Rachel Kessler Roth, AIPAC director of the real estate division Daniella Shloush Rudoff, marriage architect Dvora Meltzer Sinkoe, insurance agent Chanie Wilson Steinberg, physician Jeff Tuvlin, physician Joey Wilson, senior director Yaachov Ben Yaachov, technology innovator Arnold Zilberkant, Marine and psychologist ì ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES OCTOBER 31, 2020 | 33


PROFESSIONALS New Generation Retailer Soars at Lenox Square By Marcia Caller Jaffe When mainstream media refers to the retail sector’s reaction to the pandemic as an “apocalypse,” millennial Lizzy Pure counters, “The retail fashion industry as a whole is doing OK. New retailers have started during the pandemic; it’s only certain groups of merchants that are experiencing problems.” Smartly located adjacent to Neiman Marcus in Lenox Square mall, her eponymous store Pure rivals a Kim Kardashian and Kayne West closet with pricey brands including Hugo Boss, Balmain , Versace, Fendi Kids, Dsquared, Giuseppe Zanotti, Alexander McQueen, Moschino, Diesel, and Karl Lagerfeld; and who has heard of IH Nom Un Nit? Categories range from denim, eyewear, outerwear, shirts and tops, fur to home accessories, men, women and kids. Pure owns similar stores in Miami (Aventura), Houston (Galleria), and Charlotte (South Park Mall) in addition to Lenox Square. “Pure is redefining luxury boutique retail and the relationship consumers have with luxury fashion,” Liz

34 | OCTOBER 31, 2020 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

said. “While the designer assortment is exclusive, Pure’s culture is inclusive. Our team represents almost every gender, race, sexual orientation and age group. We have a celebrity wall with over 4,000 images of tastemakers shopping at Pure: superstars like Lil Nas X, Tyrese Gybson, French Montana and sports superstars like Cam Newton, Von Miller and Odell Beckham Jr. High-profile celebrities travel the world, see the best and choose to shop at Pure. That is the greatest compliment. Our strong relationships with celebrities lead to unique, amazing events at Pure Atlanta like private concerts and celebrity fashion shows.” Growing up in Davie, Fla., Liz graduated Florida State University and got her Master of Business Administration at Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton. Her career started as a 16-year-old sales associate. She knew immediately that retail was her calling and worked her way up through retail positions while in school. Then she left the safety of corporate retail to start Pure and never looked back. A few short months ago, she moved with her commercial real estate husband

to Sandy Springs and enrolled their two ers want a meaningful experience and children in The Epstein School. Between to feel brand energy, and want to conthe stores and the various fashion weeks, nect. The retail experience is different prior to COVID, she was averaging six from the past; now you need authentic flights a month. In terms of keeping all engagement with clients.” A smart marketer during the panthe balls in the air, she said, “The children come first. I balance my life by be- demic, she designed a line of Swarovskiencrusted face ing present. If I’m masks, averagat the dinner table ing $79 each. with my kids, I’m Fashion+Mask = not reading work “Fask” with 2 ½ emails; I’m comfilters. Some are pletely engaged being resold on with them.” eBay for $500Pure has been plus! in Lenox for 10 Liz predicts years. “Atlanta is that trends for the epicenter of 2021 will show the Pure culture as optimism. “This a progressive city, season we saw often adopting a lot of lounge trends early. Each wear. Spring/ Pure store is difSummer 21 looks ferent and reflects Liz’s clientele includes music and sports more refined, sigthe culture of that superstars. She has a wall of 4,000 nifying a return city. Pure was untastemakers displayed in the store. to normal life. I affected by the She hopes to star in a reality show that am head buyer pandemic. I am had traction before the pandemic. and while I have disturbed when the media discusses a ‘retail apocalypse.’ curated a strong assortment of estabThis is a market correction problematic lished designers, I am very passionate for retailers that are disconnected from about identifying unknown talent.” In terms of the future, she expounds, their markets. The pandemic will push a store that’s teetering on the edge, but “I get offers from malls monthly, with it will not close powerful market lead- several deals on the table right now; we ers. The current climate requires most just have to pick. I’m also working on sellto be specialists in their niche. The old ing a reality show about Pure.” She advises young people who want concept of ‘big blanket all category retailers’ doesn’t really resonate to big a retail career, “Always follow your spenders anymore; consumers are look- dream, and never give yourself a limit. ing for special items and specialty retail- This is America and Pure is proof of the ers. Retailers that have a strong focus American dream!” Not to mention that the “rag trade is with excellent customer service and brand messaging will flourish. Consum- part of our Jewish DNA.” ì


PROFESSIONALS

Psychiatrist Details Hike in Anxiety Cooper: Concerning women, it is not necessarily related to the situation; women are generally more likely to get treated for anxiety or depression. But In a recent study by the Centers young people are in a bad way. First, for Disease Control and Prevention, because friends, parties and outings the Atlanta-based health organizaare an important part of their social tion found that about a third of the development and they are deprived respondents reported symptoms of them. What’s more, they are ofof anxiety or depression, nearly as ten blamed for their risky behavior. many trauma or stress, and 13 perI don’t agree with the notion that cent started or increased drug abuse they are selfish. Young people don’t associated with COVID. have the same sense of fear that older The study conducted in late people have. … June assessed mental health, subConcerning elderly people, of stance abuse and suicidal intentions course, they are at risk. But, the irony with almost 5,500 adults responding. of the situation is that we are considNearly 11 percent of the responered high risk beginning between dents said they had seriously considthe ages of 60 and 65! And therefore ered suicide in the preceding 30 days, vulnerable. But we have created a somore than twice the rate reported in ciety which promotes anti-aging. We a 2018 survey, according to the CDC’s have to be in shape, have cosmetic Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Resurgery, look younger. With COVID, port issued Aug. 14. Dr. Annie Cooper specializes in we are now confronted with our fraDr. Annie Cooper, who specialanxiety and depressive illnesses. gility, with our REAL age. izes in anxiety and depressive illnesses, is not surprised by the data. She has been seeing a AJT: Do you see excess behavior or irrational fears? significant increase in anxiety, depression and stress in her Cooper: I know people who haven’t left their homes patients since the pandemic began. The AJT posed questions to the doctor via Zoom. Here since mid-March. It’s an overreaction, but you can’t force them to do things that make them feel uncomfortable. The are her responses: By Martine Tartour

Japanese identified this phenomenon; they call it hikikomori. It mainly concerned teenagers who stayed in their rooms for months or even years, connected only to a virtual world. On a lesser level, it is an irony of fate that hikikomori, this pathological state, is what we are now asking our children to do: stay in their room in front of their computer! … For healthy people, when it is safe to go outside, they will return to a normal social life. But for those who have latent symptoms of social anxiety (a form of fear of others) or avoidant disorder personality (when one does not want to be with others) one must identify one’s symptoms, even if they are minimal, in order to fight them now. It is essential to differentiate between the fear of going out because you are a person at risk as opposed to the fear of going out because you don’t want to go out anymore. ì

AJT: What makes this situation exceptional? Cooper: There has not been, in modern times, a pandemic of such magnitude and one that has caused such high rates of mortality, except perhaps during the Spanish flu [1918-19]. We are living in a state of exception with exceptional measures that hinder individual freedom. When this all started in March, people thought that within three months we would have answers and a path out of this situation. But we don’t see the end of the tunnel; our way of life is on hold until further notice. … In this situation, we don’t know, and this uncertainty contributes to the anxiety. AJT: What sources of anxiety, specifically related to COVID, do you notice in your patients? Cooper: Isolation is very difficult to endure. Everything that used to be a part of our lives is turned upside down. Even becoming a hermit in a monastery requires a preparation that lasts for years. You train yourself for isolation. Here, we were plunged into this state from one day to the next. We live in an abnormal situation and we were unprepared for it. The difficulty for the psychiatrist is that the solutions that are normally recommended to combat anxiety are no longer available. Seeing people, playing sports, using support groups, doing volunteer work (at church or synagogue) are now forbidden. Also, there are very realistic and legitimate fears at the source of anxiety. For some people, the fear of losing their job. ... I hear a lot of fear about insecurity and a very real fear of social crisis. AJT: According to the cited CDC report, these symptoms varied significantly depending on whether a woman, a young person, or an elderly person? ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES OCTOBER 31, 2020 | 35


PROFESSIONALS

Levison Heads West to Be Kind By Marcia Caller Jaffe Actress and food entrepreneur Jenny Levison has been observing the country’s divisiveness, feelings of loss, uncertainty and worry about illness. So she decided to do something. “I felt a call to action; that it was my time to give back. The world is in a tough place right now on all fronts. When I thought about what I could do to contribute, being kind was my number one thought. It’s the theme for our restaurants this year (and always!) I decided that I wanted to travel around the country, just being kind!” So on Oct. 15 she took a six-week sabbatical from her restaurant business, Souper Jenny, with five Atlanta locations, to head west in a rented RV to serve free food to those in need. Accompanying Levison on what is being called a Kindness Tour is Meg Gillentine Morris, her travel buddy, local actress and artist. The plan is to travel for 42 days, posting on Facebook and Instagram so they can be followed. She is researching two cities at a time. First, she will find a local farm to buy produce to turn into her celebrated soups. “We will find people in need or just lucky

36 | OCTOBER 31, 2020 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

Jenny Levison has supplied Atlanta with many of her talents, including acting and cookbook authoring in addition to restaurant entrepreneur.

Jenny Levison poses with Meg Gillentine Morris, who will accompany her on the tour, and Courtenay Collins Eckardt, Broadway actress and local music teacher, who came to Stone Mountain to lend moral support.

The T-shirts sell for $25 at all five locations with profits paying for tour soup prep.

strangers! We will make a 20-quart pot at a time and bring a second pot just in case.” On the menu will be her Dad’s favorite turkey chili, a hearty vegetable, or curry chicken, among others that are classified as hearty and autumn-themed. Of her travel companion, Levison explained, “Meg’s husband and son will be in their own RV behind us. We plan to shop at as many farms as possible and supplement with stops at groceries. Our plan is to sup-

port the cities we visit as much as possible.” Levison is also selling “kindness” Tshirts for $25 in all sizes at all the Souper Jenny locations. Each shirt purchase represents 20 quarts of a hearty soup to feed 40 people. All proceeds go directly to soup prep. Recently they took the RV to Stone Mountain for a dress rehearsal passing out free soup. Morris said, “There we learned the ins and outs of the RV and laughed our heads off. It was a big sign that we are ex-

actly where we are supposed to be in this adventure, … experiencing loads of joy and unexpected moments of delicious humanity.” Levison leaves readers with this charge: “I challenge others to perform random acts of kindness now.” ì To support the Kindness Tour through T-shirt sales, visit Souper Jenny locations in Roswell, Brookhaven, Buckhead, Decatur and the Westside.


PROFESSIONALS

Habif at 91 Makes Most of Real Estate

When he’s not walking or working out, Morris Habif can be found on the lake on his luxury boat.

By Marcia Caller Jaffe Morris Habif, 91, was born and raised in Atlanta where he attended Commercial High School. He served in the armed forces and went on to school on the GI Bill. He is believed the seventh-oldest member of the Georgia Bar. Habif credits much of his success for taking the long view. For years all he did was pay mortgages and not take any money out. Then he began selling things that made sense “piecemeal,” Habif Properties, one deal at a time. He eschews investing in the suburbs and residential properties, stating, “Timing is key. When you buy real estate that’s cheap enough, you hold on until things turn around. I look for ‘ugly duckling opportunities.’ In 60-plus years I have never lost money on a single property. Another key is using federal law 1031 when we sell, then roll over, reinvesting and postponing taxes. Selling is rare.” As background, Habif founded APD Transmission Parts in 1959. After relocating his wholesale business to downtown Atlanta, he noticed that many of the surrounding garment district buildings were vacated as tenants moved to more modern facilities near the Fulton Industrial district. He purchased these vacant properties, renting them for unique niches such as community theater and light manufacturing. Habif was a pioneer in converting vacant warehouse space into reasonably priced lofts for artists and small businesses. One of the first was the purchase by Habif and his partners of the Southern Cross Mattress Factory, where he oversaw their conversion into individual studio spaces. The Mattress Factory Lofts helped pave the way for a new generation of developers who unlocked the potential of downtown’s older buildings. He recounts that one of his business models is to buy shopping centers that are not cash-flowing, perhaps poorly managed, stabilize, and turn them around. “So far, we have not been hard hit by the pandemic,

The extended Habif family includes five children, 15 grandchildren and six great- grandchildren. He describes his late wife Susie as being “gracious and caring and Cuban.”

actually doing amazingly well; BUT a big recession could be around the corner. I worry that some of these overbuilt high rises will go into foreclosure.” He’s referring to the property of others. Versatility is Habif’s middle name. Some of his alternate strategies of clever land use are renting out cell towers (AT&T and Verizon are customers), parking lots, many downtown: by the Georgia Aquarium, Garnett Street by Municipal Court of Atlanta, and Marietta Street. One can imagine his headspace figuring calculations when he speaks of a truck lease lot parking facility he owns in Lithonia. “Think about it. Atlanta has many truckers who own their own rigs, two to five days in and out, paying $150 a month per truck, 300 trucks...” Credited with being prescient about his wildly popular Beltline properties around Inman Park and Grant Park, Habif is somewhat leery about the highly touted “up and coming” Bellwood Quarry area. “I feel it’s premature, still depressed and too close to areas with crime.” Out on his 40-foot-plus boat, Habif put his buddy Bobby Rinzler on the phone. “Morris is the finest, most giving partner. He calls every evening, does all the work and gives me half the money – for the past 50 years!” Some of the successful ventures he has done with Habif are 1776 Peachtree Road, four-year turnover; and the Fountains of Olde Towne turned over after 10 years. As the penultimate family man, Habif, a widower, said, “My secret weapon is son Michael, who is also a lawyer and has been by my side for 37 years. We have a very unusual father-son relationship. He’s smarter, but I have more experience.” A mutual admiration society, son Michael responded, “On days when he is not walking, he’s working out in his home gym. Every Sunday, I get a call from him while he’s at our office catching up on the week’s action. He really does still work full time (he says ‘part time’ because he only works 12 hours per day). He defies belief!” ì ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES OCTOBER 31, 2020 | 37


DINING Israeli Opens Multi-Cultural Hot Chick-Peas By Marcia Caller Jaffe

food bloggers find us unique and funky,” he said. “I grew up making fresh pita, tweakGotta love the double entendre ing Italian dishes name! Although with my siblings you might not enand cooking counter hot chicks with my father’s on Presidential influence from Parkway, we did Casablanca.” The find authentic, father of four, he fresh Mediterraserved as a medic nean street food. in the Israel DeIsraeli born Mark fense Forces folBen-Yoar came lowed by touroff a 20-year caguiding back reer in cyber sehome in Israel. curity-electrical The other part of engineering with this partner-manAT&T to fulfill his agement team is dream of returnfriend and chef ing to his IsraeliSaeed Hamana Moroccan culiand his sister Lunary roots. bina, both Chris“We are now Ben-Yoar poses by his “Shalom” plaque and shofar. tian Arabs from rounding out our first year in business; but imagine chang- Nazareth. The location of Hot Chick-Peas is ing course with eight months of the COVID situation. We are finding our way as certainly off the beaten path, near I-85

Closets, pantries, garages, offices and more!

BEST OF JEWISH ATLANTA

BEST OF JEWISH ATLANTA

Atlanta Custom Closets When Quality Counts! Design the Closet of your Dreams!

www.closetpro.net Rick Moore: 404-255-0589 38 | OCTOBER 31, 2020 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

The falafel platter is a popular entrée shown here with fresh-from-scratch hummus and baba ghanoush. Note the creative garnish detail.

and I-285 in an eclectic industrial area roasted cauliflower, tahini, purple cab“PREP Cook|Create|Connect, known as bage slaw, roasted potatoes, hand cut a commercial kitchen and culinary ac- fries, lamb kibbe, 12 pieces for $30, fresh celerator. PREP is a compendia of 200 stuffed grape leaves, $8. A wonderful food-related businesses: catering, food melt-in-your-mouth surprise was the iced truck home bases, gourmet dog foods, ar- apple cake dessert (enough for two) and tisans, bakers, food kit prep companies, pistachio baklava, a crunchy, less-sweet manufacturing, and private spaces 24/7, version versus the gooey Greek variety. including a handful of retail dining with Sometimes they serve knaffe, a cheesy orange-flavored outdoor table opIsraeli dessert. tions. Ben-Yoar teased, Noting this “The only comarea of Atlanta plaint we have is is rich in ethnic that the portions variety, Benare too big!” Yoar added, “We We were imspeak Arabic, pressed with the Spanish and Heartistic presenbrew. Here we tation and lively don’t do politics. The herb-crusted salmon came with action in the We talk about fragrant rice, red cabbage and tabouli. open kitchen. food, peace and love. We even have Syrian and Iraqi cus- The black olives with pits were authentic tomers in addition to Israelis who also and the salad dressing had a Greek vinuse our catering division. This year we egary bite. This perfect vinegar taste was rolled out our high holiday menu, which detectible in the red cabbage and tabouli. was very successful and had traditional The rice was Persian-like with a licorice food like brisket and salmon. Also a few fragrance. The roasted cauliflower was weekends ago here, we had an outside scorched and browned in shards of parsley, top-shelf olive oil and not too much street event for 350.” The food delivers on its promise. salt. A unique twist on the falafel was a Chef Saeed notes, “Everything is made ridge on the sides of the balls which may fresh daily with love and patience from be a result of a mini muffin-like scooper. scratch. We boil and grind our own beans The herb crusted salmon ($15.99) was to make the hummus and smoke the egg- enough for two meals and came with rice plant for baba ghanoush. And a bounty and side. Hot Chick-Peas is open 11 a.m. to of herbs and flavors: parsley, za’atar, serrano peppers, some Indian spices in our 3 p.m. Monday through Saturday, til 7 signature dish, hot chickpeas. Here you p.m. on Friday, and closed Sunday. There are some tables outside and 25 could be will find nothing frozen!” Popular dishes are shawarma, $12.99, seated inside pre-COVID. “We are still with rice or in platters with one side. experimenting and may add more hours. Falafel platter, $10.99, chicken schnitzel, Remember, because of COVID, we only kabobs, tabouli (cracked wheat salad) $5, got all our equipment in here in May.” ì


DINING

Local Chef Delights with Elaborate Cake

Nadia Deljou specializes in online classes and her own patio space for individually designed dinners for up to 10 guests.

The rose water cardamom cake delights tables year-round, though the Deljous served it for the high holidays.

By Marcia Caller Jaffe Sandy Springs native Nadia Deljou graduated from The Weber School, Georgia State University, the International Culinary Center in New York, and then her real training ground in Manhattan, where she worked at renown Michelinstarred top shelf restaurants. Operating in Atlanta as Delle Dining, she has shifted during COVID-19 to include a virtual focus and community events. Delle is now offering private dinners on its patio space in Sandy Springs. Deljou books dinners for up to 10 guests and takes them through a multi-course menu paired with wine and music. This outdoor venue is reminiscent of a sukkah in far off Marrakech, Morocco, or Tuscany, Italy. She is also doing corporate online cooking classes, one recently on Moroccan cuisine for the Jewish Federation of Greater Atlanta, NextGen, and then OneTable a few weeks ago. She has also been doing a pastry pop-up on weekends and special-order cakes, most recently a fantastical wedding cake in Alpharetta. Otherwise, she has shifted her community online, allowing access to cooking tips, live video demos, original recipes and music reviews. It’s a membership-based online resource center called The Delle Community that elevates members’ relationship to cuisine music and culture, https://thedellecommunity.mn.co/. Here Deljou shares an irresistible and decorative gateaux Persian Roulette recipe. “This is a traditional dessert from Iran that’s very nostalgic. The cardamom and rose water flavors make it what it is and ties it into Persian cuisine,” Deljou said. “For our family, we like to serve it

for special occasions because it’s decadent and feeds 10 to 12. We just served it at Rosh Hashanah. It takes 12 minutes to bake, and all together, I’d say, takes an hour start to finish. There are multiple steps. You need either a hand mixer or stand mixer.” Persian Cardamom Roulette Servings: 8 to 10 Nonstick cooking spray or butter, for greasing the pan 7 eggs, room temperature ¾ cup + 3 tablespoons granulated sugar, divided 3 teaspoons vanilla, divided ¾ cup + 2 tablespoons sifted all-purpose flour 1 teaspoon ground cardamom 1 ½ pints (6 cups) heavy cream 2 tablespoons powdered sugar ½ cup pistachios, ground or finely chopped, for topping 1 ½ cups strawberries, thinly sliced, for topping Preheat oven to 375 F. Lightly spray or butter a 13-by-18-inch rimmed baking sheet with nonstick cooking spray and line the bottom with parchment. Set aside. Prepare a second sheet of parchment (or kitchen towel) about the same size as the one in the baking sheet and set aside. You will need a stand mixer. If using a handheld mixer, you will need a large mixing bowl and a chilled large metal or glass mixing bowl. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, beat the eggs and ¾ cup + 2 tablespoons of sugar on medium speed for 2 minutes. Add 1 teaspoon vanilla, and beat on the highest speed for 4 more minutes,

until it has thickened and the color is a light yellow. Reduce the speed to low and slowly add the flour and ground cardamom until just mixed. Pour the batter into the baking sheet, making sure to spread it evenly with an offset spatula. Bake until the cake springs back when touched in the middle and it has started to pull away from the sides, about 14 minutes. Let cool for 2 minutes. Evenly sprinkle the remaining 1 tablespoon sugar over the remaining piece of parchment or towel, then invert the cake onto it. Gently peel off the top parchment and roll the cake, starting at the long end. Let cool on a wire rack for 30 minutes. This helps to train the cake into the roulade form. While the cake cools, prepare the filling. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the whisk attachment add the heavy cream and mix on high until it has reached soft peak stage, about 2 ½ minutes. Add 2 teaspoons of vanilla and

the powdered sugar and mix until it has reached stiff peaks, 30 seconds more. Cover and refrigerate until ready to use. Filling On a clean work surface or large cutting board, unroll the cake, and use an offset spatula to evenly cover with 2 to 3 cups of whipped cream. Re-roll the cake and refrigerate for 4 hours. Keep the remaining whipped cream tightly covered in the refrigerator for the decoration. Decoration Once completely cooled, take the cake out of the refrigerator and transfer to a cutting board. Completely cover the cake with the remaining whipped cream. Next, sprinkle with ground pistachio and top with a line of sliced strawberries along the top. Slice into 1 ½ pieces and serve, with a few extra sprinkles of pistachio if you like. ì For more information about Nadia Deljou, visit www.delledining.com.

Open Enrollment Medicare (Oct 15 - Dec 7) Obamacare (Nov 1 - Dec 15)

Representing major insurance carriers: Medicare Advantage, MedSupps, Prescription Drug Coverage

Helping Families Protect Health, Wealth and Assets

NO FEE or obligation to review your Health & Life Insurance options Bob Smith

Under 65 health plans Hospital Indemnity, Critical Illness, Dental & Vision Final Expense Life Insurance

404-593-9663

www.BobCaresForYou.com Health and Life Insurance Advisor since 2009

From Obamacare to Trumpcare to BobcaresSM

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES OCTOBER 31, 2020 | 39


BOOK FESTIVAL Fame, Family and Redemption By Robyn Spizman Gerson From one of Hollywood’s most famous families arrives a book by Cameron Douglas, son of Michael Douglas and grandson of Kirk Douglas. Now on a positive and productive path, Cameron has penned a bold and often shocking book titled “Long Way Home.” His tell-all life story reveals his drug abuse, broken promises and prison sentence from 2009 to 2016. Chronicling his addiction, self-destruction and a rebirth from what he calls psychological warfare, he spares no detail. His repeated dance with death includes a triumphant journey prevailing against all odds. By the age of 30, Douglas had become a drug addict, a thief and— after a DEA drug bust — a convicted drug dealer. “I wanted to write a book that I felt good about, and the only way to connect with people is to be brutally honest. People can see through you if not and I bore my soul,” he shared with the AJT. “I didn’t write the book to share a lesson. I wrote the book to gain some understanding about myself, my own life and all the years invested in reckless behavior that landed me in prison. Plus, the relationships that I damaged, to try and gain some understanding. Also, hoping to help other families that are struggling with addiction, to give them insights.” Douglas continued, “In the throes of addiction, it comes to a point when it does not matter what anyone does, the person must get to the place where they are willing to

Cameron Douglas is the son of Hollywood royalty.

make some changes. For some, it never happens. And for some, like me, you go through long days down the unfortunate road of drug addiction and alcohol. You hope and pray they come to that understanding sooner rather than later,” he said. “While in prison each week, I waited for the book cart, which became a security blanket. If I had a stack of books in my cell, I knew I’d be OK. Books allowed me to take some

"Long Way Home" is Cameron Douglas' memoir about addiction.

of my freedom back, educate myself and grow. Stephen Crane’s book of short stories included ‘The Red Badge of Courage,’ which was life changing and gave me strength.” Now Douglas hones disciplines and characteristics working towards fulfilling a better life. “I am rebuilding relationships. That takes consistency and showing up. Walking the talk, not just talking the talk.” Regarding his family’s Jewish connection: “A fond memory is when my grandfather (Kirk) turned 70 and he had a bar mitzvah. He was a devout Jew all the way through the rest of his life. We all rallied around him and two of my younger brothers and sisters had a bar and bat mitzvah, which brought my grandfather a lot of happiness.” Every Sunday, and to this day, we gather as a family for a Jewish breakfast at his house. We talk about our lives with Grandpa’s wife. I have a few career things cooking I just finished such as an independent film and doing a lot of writing. My book is being turned into a fictionalized television series,” he said. “I am always learning things. My little daughter Lua (which means moon in Portuguese) is called ‘Izzy,’ named after the nickname of my Grandfather Kirk. She is my greatest teacher. We must become the energy we want to attract. It’s in a struggle where we grow.” The memoir “Long Way Home” is a powerful story of Cameron’s descent into the depths of addiction and selfdestruction, and his renewal of family ties that had become almost irreparably frayed. “Now I’m forced to make great decisions, dealing with entertainment lawyers instead of criminal lawyers, and these are the kind of decisions I want to be making. I feel very grateful for that.” ì “Long Way Home” will be featured at the Book Festival of the MJCCA 8 p.m. Nov. 11. 40 | OCTOBER 31, 2020 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES


BOOK FESTIVAL

‘Never Alone’ is Political Testament By Bob Bahr Natan Sharansky’s new book “Never Alone: Prison, Politics, and My People” sums up what he learned from nine years of imprisonment in a Soviet Gulag during the 1970s and 80s, his political life following his release and his nine years as head of The Jewish Agency for Israel, which ended last year. He co-authored the book with the prominent American-born historian Gil Troy, who also lives in Israel. We asked them recently about their book, to be featured in the Book Festival of the MJCCA Nov. 8. AJT: You’ve written about the importance of identity. How concerned are you about Jewish identity in the world today? Or are we moving toward a better acceptance of our identity? Sharansky: Well, we write a lot about this problem. The connection between liberalism and identity is the central theme, in a way, of this book. There is a movement in the world by those who want to restore national pride by destroying liberalism and we Jews are trying to keep these two things together. We want to be a Jew-

ish people and we want to live in a liberal society, and we have to keep these things together. Troy: Part of the motivation for writing this book, frankly, is it’s almost like a Valentine. It’s a love story about our connection and especially Natan’s connection with the Jewish people. It’s knowing that we’re never alone when we’re part of this amazing network. The real audience is the next generation. It’s a challenge also to the parents and the grandparents saying to them: “Tell the story, tell how American Jews helped save the Soviet Jews. Tell how we’ve passed on the torch from generation to generation.” But it’s also a challenge to them and an invitation to the next generation to say: “Find your identity. You can find your way of doing tikkun olam, helping the world, contributing to the world, being a good person through this amazing framework that we Jews have created.” We say let’s continue the conversation. Let’s learn who we are, who we can be and who we’ve been. AJT: One of the major changes that has occurred since you wrote this book is the agreements between Israel and the

United Arab Emirates and Bahrain. You were very critical about the Oslo Accords and the withdrawal from Gaza. What is your view of these new agreements? Sharansky: My criticism, over the Oslo Accords, was because I felt they were trying to find a dictator like Yasser Arafat who will rule Palestinians for us and will bring us peace by controlling Palestinians. What happened in Bahrain, of course, and Abu Dhabi is very different. The people there are standing in lines to have businesses with Israel, to visit Israel, to learn Hebrew. I think this normalization can be a turning point. I hope that this new cooperation will also include Palestinian businessmen and Palestinian culture exchanges. And as a result, there will be more ground for a real civil society, a real civil dialog between Israel and the Arabs. AJT: At a time when many feel isolated because of the pandemic, the title of your book, “Never Alone,” seems ironic. What advice would you give us at this challenging time? Sharansky: I would advise Jews to never forget that you are part of a great

“Never Alone” is the result of a three-year writing partnership between Natan Sharansky and the American historian Gil Troy, who lives in Israel.

people who have sometimes felt very separate, and in very lonely places, but who have always felt themselves connected. We had our own network long before we had the internet and that has been a great force. And that’s exactly what this book is about. It’s what helps us to be optimistic, in spite of all our challenges. ì Natan Sharansky and Gil Troy will discuss “Never Alone: Prison, Politics, and My People” at the Book Festival of the MJCCA at 1 p.m. Nov. 8.

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES OCTOBER 31, 2020 | 41


BOOK FESTIVAL

One Tough Woman By Marcia Caller Jaffe

and the Elderly. Along the way, she plugs in the true, but absolute worst legal Nancy Grace, a tough high-profile cases to substantiate the risks. What if dreaded household broadcast comnames such as Jaymentator-prosecee Dugard, who cutor, compiled was kidnapped 350 pages of jamand held captive ming and jammed for 18 years, had in information taken the precauthat might do two tions described in things: 1- Cause this book? extreme anxiety Back pedal to in digesting all the Grace’s original real-world dangers motivation for getlurking around evting so involved in ery corner. 2-Save this pursuit when, heartache and ulat 19, her fiancé timately lives by was murdered. getting the mind Some of Grace’s in defensive gear advice may be with proactive common sense. strategies. Then there are all “Don’t be a VicGrace’s book is a pragmatic guide the newer or evolvtim: Fighting Back with precautionary tips on how ing life changes/ Against America’s to stay safe in current times. “in your face” isCrime Wave” is broken into five parts: Protecting Chil- sues like phishing, internet dating, usdren, Yourself, Travel, Cyber Crimes, ing Uber, parties gone wild, using child

THANK YOU FOR VOTING US #1 LAW FIRM in 2018, 2019 & 2020 Best of Jewish Atlanta!

mona@shumanfamilylaw.com

eileen@shumanfamilylaw.com

SHUMAN & SHUMAN, P.C. A Family Law Firm

1851 Peeler Road Suite A Atlanta, GA. 30338 770.790.3700 | www.shumanfamilylaw.com 42 | OCTOBER 31, 2020 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

care, protecting yourself while jogging, shopping at a mall, camping or attending a concert. Speaking of malls, a friend hid in the Bloomingdale’s dressing room for hours during a shootout in the food court at Lenox Square. If you have a child going off to college or into the working world, this would be an eye-opening exercise. Think about checking a teenager’s text message codes: 303=mom; 53X=sex, CD9=parents are around; LMIRL = Let’s meet in real life, just to name a few. The Travel chapter is enlightening. Staying above the seventh floor decreases chances of fire, and try calling yourself at the hotel to see if the desk clerk gives out your room number. Riding an elevator could be another platform for assault. If you have a parent entering a senior facility, this is a valuable guide. Question her courage? She was a contestant (squished into a sequined costume) on “Dancing with the Stars.” Dr. Phil McGraw in his book “Life Code” said “There are no victims, only volunteers.” Grace, a Macon native, concludes, “Keep the faith, fight the good fight, stay

strong to the finish.” It’s a cruel and crazy world just walking down the street. Bottom line: forewarned is forearmed. ì Nancy Grace presented “Don’t Be a Victim” Oct. 27 as part of the fall lineup for the Book Festival of the MJCCA.

BEST OF JEWISH ATLANTA

Mona S. Shuman and Eileen J. Shuman, of Shuman & Shuman, P.C., are family law attorneys. We work exclusively with clients who require legal representation in family related cases. Together we handle divorce, custody, child support, modifications, pre-nuptial agreements, post-nuptial agreements and post-divorce issues. We provide legal guidance and understanding to clients during times of transition. We represent clients in all of the courts in Metropolitan Atlanta and the surrounding counties. We are supportive of using mediation and other forms of alternative dispute resolution to conclude a case. We are conveniently located off I - 285 and Chamblee Dunwoody Road in Dunwoody.


ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES OCTOBER 31, 2020 | 43


BOOK FESTIVAL

Son of a Sports Icon By Robyn Spizman Gerson

his dad. Dale’s journey, one of success mixed with addiction, is an inspiring triumph of It ain’t over till it’s over. family and the power of love. When you come to a fork in the His memoir “My Dad, Yogi” is road, take it. If you don’t know a must-read for baseball fans where you are going, you’ll end and fathers and sons everyup someplace else. where. In a phone conversation Everyone knows Yogi with Dale, he shared with the Berra, the beloved American AJT, “There’s been a million icon and Baseball Hall of Famstories and books about my er, whose words of wisdom, dad. He is a national icon, but called Yogi-isms, are national no one had heard from a famtreasures. ily perspective and what kind In “My Dad, Yogi: A Memof father and person he was oir of Family and Baseball,” away from the ballpark.” Dale Berra describes his book Yogi was a first-generaand tribute to his late father tion American, born in 1925 who passed in 2015 as painful, to Italian immigrant parents. joyous and a celebration of the With an 8th grade education, lasting love of an extraordihe went to work to help his nary dad. family and in 1943 joined the Growing up in Montclair, Navy and ended up at D-Day N.J., Dale and his two older storming the beaches of Norbrothers, Larry and Tim, all Dale Berra, son of iconic baseball star mandy. A 15-time All-Star, became professional athletes. Yogi Berra, describes life at home in New three-time American League Dale was a key member of an Jersey with his inspirational Dad. MVP Award winner and a 10exceptional Pittsburgh Pirates team, playing shortstop for several years before he was time World Series champion, he played in 14 worlds series traded to the New York Yankees and briefly united with and was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1972. Awarded the

“My Dad, Yogi” is Dale Berra’s tribute to his late father.

Presidential Medal of Freedom, Yogi Berra was beloved both on and off the field. In “My Dad, Yogi,” Dale honestly discusses his drug use and lightning-bolt intervention from his father that turned it all around 30 years ago. Starting in the Majors, Dale was 22 years old with a bright career ahead of him. When he began using drugs, it was cut short. Cocaine took Dale’s promising career away, and it could have taken his life too if it wasn’t for his father’s love. Dale tells the riveting story of how Yogi inspired his complete sobriety. “From that moment on, I have never done another drug and that was 30 years ago. I chose family,” the junior Berra relayed. When Yogi Berra wasn’t playing or coaching, he was home in the New Jersey suburbs, spending time with his beloved wife Carmen and three sons. “We grew up not feeling privileged, with Dad’s friends dropping by for a game of catch and dinner, like Mickey Mantle and Roger Maris.” The gloves, signed balls and other items his Dad brought home were used and enjoyed, rather than saved for their value one day. When I asked how he got the name Yogi, Dale responded, “When Dad was a kid and his entire life, he folded his arms and legs sitting like a yogi from India, meditating. Someone called him on it and said he looked like an Indian yogi, and the name stuck.” Yogi’s days of retirement were spent greeting visitors daily at the Yogi Berra Museum. He died in 2015 at a welllived 90 years of age. Dale leaves us with this about his famous father: “Dad taught us all about life with his Yogiisms: ‘If the world was perfect, it wouldn’t be.’” ì Dale Berra presents his memoir Nov. 10 at the Book Festival of the MJCCA. 44 | OCTOBER 31, 2020 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES


Duane Stork // Abstract expressionist artist Gayle Printz relaxes with two of her paintings in the background. “Pond,”

left, and “Friend.” “Pond” was one of the two works selected for the Paris museum display along with “First.”

Chai Style Art

Steven’s favorite work of Gayle’s is “Bird,” an intricate mixed media on canvas offered at $9,900.

Artist Emerges from COVID to Paris Exhibit Fresh from her international debut, attorney Gayle able that it all came so naturally to her. Every time I look Printz paints in a style compared to abstract expressionists at her paintings, I notice something I hadn’t seen before. Joan Mitchell, Hans Hofmann, Helen Frankenthaler, Lee She knows how to combine beauty with a deeper meanKrasner and Jackson Pollock, known for their use of color, ing, which is left to the viewer to assign based on their own layering and “dripping.” imagination and experiences. She doesn’t tell you what you Inspired to bring beauty back into her world, Printz should be thinking.” began painting during the COVID-19 crisis. In Printz often paints outside by her idyllic July, she submitted two paintings, “Pond” and pool, reminiscent of a European villa, with her “First,” to Musée de Peinture de Saint-Frajou in golden retriever, Harley, nearby. Paris for entry in the juried International Art Take the tour. Resilience Exhibition. The museum stated the exhibition’s purJaffe: Share your technique. pose and selection of artwork was “to present Printz: I use color, three-dimensionality works characterizing the rigor in a search for and distinct brushwork, rather than tangible artistic quality, creativity and technical masstructures, as tools of expression. While invittery.” Both paintings Printz submitted were acing the spectator to establish an intimate concepted and were exhibited for a month in Sa- Marcia nection with my work, I try to challenge them lon 6 of the museum. The online presentation Caller Jaffe to search for personal meaning through a subremains in the museum’s permanent archives. conscious journey. Printz, formerly with Powell, Goldstein, Frazer & MurUsing acrylic on canvas, I layer colors and textures, phy, said, “Painting brought me back to life during isolation. including sand, gels, tar, glass beads, metallics, glazes, and It never even occurred to me to paint before May. When crackling. From different angles, viewers will see different something calls to me, I tend to answer with determination. things in the same painting: faces, animals, landscapes and Even I was surprised when, three months later, I had two even unclothed bodies. I leave it to them to decide and, bepaintings on display in Paris.” cause of that, I tend to keep my titles nondescript: "Totem," Interior designer Bridgette Boylan also expressed "Bird," "Iridescence," "Control," "Blur," "Picnic," "Metallic," amazement. “When Gayle began painting, it was unbeliev- "Second," for example. Prices range from $700 to $19,900.

Jaffe: How did you discover the international exhibition? Printz: While investigating how to archive my collection, I noticed a “call for artists” requesting applications to enter the juried International Art Resilience Exhibition in Paris. Thinking the exhibition was about resilience during COVID, I sent two photographs of my work. The next day, I was informed both pieces were accepted and would be on exhibit for a month at the museum and online. As it turned out, the exhibition was not related to COVID at all. Art Resilience is an established international art movement, representing mastery of the synchronicity between beauty and universal meaning. Worldwide, only 69 artists, including eight American painters, were selected to present their work. So, for me, this whole experience can only be described as “serendipitous.” Jaffe: Have you continued the relationship? Printz: Yes. I currently work with Ksenia Milicevic, founder of Musée de Peinture de Saint-Frajou and co-founder of the international Art Resilience movement. Ksenia, a world-famous artist, took me under her wing and has become my mentor. Though our styles differ, I send her photographs of works-in-progress, and Ksenia gives me detailed technical direction. The time she has spent critiquing my work has already taught me how to invite the viewer into the painting and keep them there. She’s incredibly attentive; ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES OCTOBER 31, 2020 | 45


CHAI STYLE Printz’s side-by-side vertical tablets “Control” and “Totem” are displayed above the great room’s stacked-stone fireplace.

The north side of the living room is adorned by two of Printz’s acrylics on canvas: 36-by-48 inch “Blue Dog,” right, and 30-by-40 inch “Lake,” left, both layered in the style of Jackson Pollock.

we communicate several times a day. Her instruction has been invaluable. Jaffe: Who are some artists you collect? Printz: Much of our original artwork is by Jewish immigrants: Peter Max (née Finkelstein), famous for 1960s “Yellow Submarine,” “American flag” and “Statue of Liberty” paintings. Raphael Soyer, Russian born son of a Hebrew scholar, paints American scenes; Anatole Krasnyansky, whose family fled Kiev, paints abstracts and cityscapes; Itzchak Tarkay, a modern Israeli figurative painter, famous for his “Parlor

Ladies;” and Emile Dekel, who created “The Congregation,” a three-dimensional Judaic rendering in lucite. We also have “Dance Suite: I, II, III & IV” by Jurgen Gorg and a collection of Hanna-Barbera hand-drawn cartoon cels: the Flintstones, Jetsons, Yogi Bear and Huckleberry Hound. Jaffe: What is your husband Steven’s role? Printz: Steven, an attorney and CEO of ColorChem International, is also a fantastic photographer. He’s been kind enough to photograph my work with his Nikon Z7. We have a wall filled with his photographs of our travels. He was particularly taken with the animals in Africa and everything

Steven Printz poses by the couple’s handmade, wrought iron menorah in front of Gayle’s painting “Metallic.” Steven’s own photography is showcased at home and on Gayle’s website.

Printz’s vertical “Yellow” is 60 inches high by 20 inches wide and leaves much to the viewer’s imagination. 46 | OCTOBER 31, 2020 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES


CHAI STYLE Printz concentrates on perfecting the lines of “Shimmer.”

Printz often paints en plein air alongside their pool and private view of the Chattahoochee River national park.

about Antarctica. Jaffe: You plan to work with Jewish organizations? Printz: Steven and I are committed supporters of Israel Bonds, an organization, we believe, secures our future. We are charter members of the U.S. Holocaust Museum and strongly support many major Jewish charities. As for my artwork, Chabad of Atlanta offered to do a solo exhibition, but I’m holding off because of COVID. I do hope to donate paintings to Jewish organizations here and abroad. Jaffe: What’s next?

Printz: I will continue painting and hope to share the beauty. I have over 30 paintings here. Since mid-August, I sold several other pieces privately to collectors and another eight through my website at www.GaylePrintz.com. Though I have also been answering emails from museums, including Atlanta’s High Museum and D.C.’s National Gallery of Art, which have requested photographs to consider for their permanent exhibits, in reality, I paint all the time when I’m home. And, since May, I’ve been home an awful lot! ì Access the Paris museum’s online exhibition at www.artresilience.com/6-salon-international-art-r%C3%A9silience/

The living room has natural light to reflect the luminous colors that change at different angles of Printz’s 48 by 60.5-inch painting “Iridescence.”

Printz’s “Walk,” an abstract expressionist multilayered work, dons a wall in the front foyer above a green serpentine African art sculpture “The One and Only Son” by David Gopito of the Chapungu Sculpture Park in Zimbabwe. ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES OCTOBER 31, 2020 | 47


CALENDAR Virtual Classes and Events:

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 30 Atlanta Bar and Bat Mitzvah EXPO ONLINE – All Day. Atlanta’s top mitzvah pros join together online to give you a fun, safe mitzvah-planning experience as the EXPO goes online this fall! Expect fresh ideas, multi-media virtual vendor booths, Zoom panels on hot topics, live entertainment, door prizes, deals, and the Ultimate Mitzvah Giveaway! Add on the FREE Mitzvah Curbside Experience to pick up vendor gifts and treats at a drive-by with live entertainment and mitzvah décor display on the first day of the show. To register, www.bit.ly/3mCzRH4. Fresh Air Fridays –Kennesaw State University, Legacy Gazebo, 410 Bartow Ave., Kennesaw, from 12:30 to 1 p.m. Both faculty and students are slated to perform in the School of Music’s new “Fresh Air Fridays,” featuring live music at the Gazebo on the Kennesaw campus on Fridays beginning Sept. 11 and running through Oct. 30. Enjoy the concert from home or work; the concert will be livestreamed for free via ArtsKSU Virtual. Family Caregiver Support Group – From 1 to 2 p.m. This JF&CS weekly group will provide a safe space to share your thoughts and feelings and help you to develop a network

OCTOBER 30-NOVEMBER 14 of support related to being a family caregiver. For more information, call Debbie at 770-677-9338.

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 1 Kabbalah & Coffee – From 9:30 to 11 a.m. Discuss, explore and journey with Intown Jewish Academy. Learn about the world of Jewish mystical teaching and learn how to apply these profound teachings to your daily life. No prior Kabbalistic experience required. To register, www. bit.ly/2XYKXul

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 2 Lunch & Learn: Reading Torah with Midrash Tanhuma – From noon to 1 p.m. Join Rabbi Pamela Gottfried, Your Jewish Bridge and Congregation Bet Haverim for this weekly class as the new cycle of Torah reading is begun anew and explore what Midrash Tanhuma, one of the most interesting compilations of rabbinic interpretations says about human nature and how to be your best self. All are welcome, no previous experience necessary. To join, www.bit. ly/2EuL3V2.

Monday Night Parsha – From 7 to 8 p.m. Join Chabad of North Fulton for this virtual class by Rabbi Gedalya Hertz on the weekly parsha. To join, www.bit.ly/2zpsgIl. Medieval Jewry as Revealed in the Cairo Genizah – From 7 to 8 p.m.

Find more events and submit items for our online and print calendars at:

www.atlantajewishconnector.com

Calendar sponsored by the Atlanta Jewish Connector, an initiative of the AJT. In order to be considered for the print edition, please submit events three to four weeks in advance. Contact community relations director, Amy Seidner, for more information at amy@atljewishtimes.com. 48 | OCTOBER 31, 2020 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

Join Congregation Etz Chaim for this wonderful virtual Melton class taught by congregant Dr. Shelley Buxbaum, who also wrote the curriculum for this course. This ancientera version of reality TV gives you a front-row seat to the drama, gossip, legal transactions and other daily intrigues, straight from the Middle Ages. This course brings to life an exotic era in Jewish history, revealing the inner thoughts of real-life characters and exploring the daily interactions and behaviors of Jewish men, women and families living along the Mediterranean more than 1,000 years ago. All of this has been uncovered through the discovery of a collection of worn-out scraps, text fragments and documents from ancient times. Come along for a journey of intrigue and adventure! To register, www.bit.ly/3gXtlqh.

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 3 Brain Health Boot Camp – From 1 to 2 p.m. Join JF&CS to combat memory loss! This program is designed to provide memory enhancement techniques through cognitive stimulation, physical exercise, education and socialization. To register, contact Georgia Gunter at ggunter@ jfcsatl.org.

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 4 Torah Studies, Live – From 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. Join Intown Jewish Academy for an in-depth analysis of the Torah portion. This program brings you the tradition of classical Jewish learning in a series of inspiring and engaging weekly classes. The lessons probe the depths of contemporary Torah thought, with a special focus on issues surrounding spirituality, the human psyche, love and relationships. Every experience offers meaningful and timely lessons from the most timeless of texts. You will walk away surprised, inspired and knowing more about who you are — and who you can be. To join with Zoom, www.bit.ly/2VkBLjZ.

East Cobb Infertility Support Group – From 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. Join Jewish Fertility Foundation for a free virtual support group! Open to any woman currently experiencing medical infertility. To register, go to www.bit. ly/3e7ZFpC.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 5 Rabbi Mark’s Weekly Parsha Torah Study – From 11:30 to 12:30 p.m. Join Congregation Beth Shalom and Rabbi Mark Zimmerman for a virtual Torah study each week as the weekly parsha is discussed. To join, www. bit.ly/3km8rUn. Significant Others of Addicts Support Group – From 1 to 2 p.m. Free weekly support group from JF&CS. This group is for spouses, partners and/ or significant others of those struggling with addiction. To register and for more information, sanderson@ jfcsatl.org.

JFF Infertility Support Group – From 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. Join Jewish Fertility Foundation for a free virtual support group! Open to any woman currently experiencing medical infertility. To register, go to www.bit. ly/3e7ZFpC. 12 Step Spiritual Study Group – From 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. From Chabad Intown for loved ones of those affected by addiction: Do you suspect that drugs, alcohol and destructive behavior are taking over your loved one’s life? Is your child, friend, spouse, sibling or other loved one struggling with addiction? Is a loved one in recovery? Have you been through the devastation of losing a child, close friend, sibling or other loved one to addiction? Jeff’s Place presents a 12-week class and discussion with Rabbi Eliyahu Schusterman. The class will explore the 12 Steps through a Jewish lens and draw guidance and strength to navigate this excruciating challenge. To register, www.bit.ly/3hTPeqT. Think Different – From 8 to 9 p.m. Join Intown Jewish Academy for a


CANDLE-LIGHTING TIMES Lech Lecha Friday, October 30, 2020, light candles at 6:28 p.m. Saturday, October 31, 2020, Shabbat ends at 7:24 p.m. Vayera Friday, November 6, 2020, light candles at 5:21 p.m. Saturday, November 7, 2020, Shabbat ends at 6:18 p.m.

weekly group to study the single most transformative Jewish spiritual text written in the last three centuries with master Tanya teacher Rabbi Ari Sollish. To register, www. bit.ly/3eNGmCi

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 8 Cub Club: Be Kind Party – From 10 to noon. Calling all “Kind Kids” for a session celebrating kindness through story, games and activities. We all know that small acts of kindness can make the world a better place! Cub Club is a community program of The Davis Academy open to all families with children ages 3-5. To register, www.bit.ly/30DxeLL. Or VeShalom Israel Bonds Virtual Brunch – From 10:45 to noon. Congregation OVS Israel Bonds Virtual Brunch honoring Bela and Yuriy Akbashev, recipients of the Star of David Award. Boxed brunch available for pick-up at OVS from 8:30 to 10 a.m. Sunday, Nov. 8 prior to start of program. Registration deadline is Friday, Nov. 6 at noon. For more information and to register, www.bit. ly/2GWUsFU.

Don’t Go Viral! Hadassah Greater Atlanta Health Professionals – From 11 to 12:30 p.m. Join Hadassah Greater Atlanta’s Health Professionals Group for a virtual presentation about medical advances at Hadassah Medical Organization in Israel, Including COVID-19 treatment and

leaders, students and concerned community members by taking part in Never Is Now, the world’s largest summit on antisemitism and hate. Delivered virtually in 2020, Never Is Now is the best way to learn about and discuss contemporary drivers of antisemitism and hate and learn how to add your voice to the conversation in combating bias of all kinds. For more information and to register, www.bit.ly/33VXhjn.

research featuring Dr. Rachel Schonberger, national Hadassah vice president, speaking on Hadassah’s treatment and research on COVID-19. To register, www.bit.ly/2T4HM2i. Book Festival of the MJCCA presents: Natan Sharansky and Gil Troy, Never Alone – From 1 to 2 p.m. In Conversation with Nadia Bilchik, local media personality, author, and noted speaker. “Never Alone” is a classic account of courage, integrity and belonging. In 1977, Sharansky, a leading activist for the democratic dissident movement in the Soviet Union and the movement for free Jewish emigration, was arrested. He spent nine years as a political prisoner, convicted of treason against the state. To register, www.bit. ly/3nL0ytP. Teen Israel Leadership Institute – From 1 to 4 p.m. The nonprofit Center for Israel Education is holding its annual Teen Israel Leadership Institute online across two consecutive Sunday afternoons this fall, making it accessible for those who might not be able to spend a weekend on site with CIE. The interactive online workshop Nov. 8 and 15 offers Jewish 10th- to 12th-graders a variety of educational activities and experiences to enhance their knowledge about modern Israel and Zionism and enable them to share what they learn with others. To register, www.bit. ly/340jLi4.

Never is Now: 2020 Summit on Antisemitism and Hate – From 8 to 9 p.m. Join ADL and thousands of experts, community and business

Book Festival of the MJCCA presents: Joan Lunden, Why Did I Come Into This Room? – From 8 to 9 p.m. In Conversation with Holly Firfer, CNN journalist, a funny “What to Expect When You’re Expecting” for the aging woman, acclaimed journalist and Baby Boomer Joan Lunden delves into various phases of aging in her most candid and revealing book yet. Lunden takes the dull and depressing out of aging, replacing it with wit and humor. To register, www.bit.ly/3dtEyis.

vors of their respective families, for Esther, the Holocaust loomed in the backdrop of daily life, felt but never discussed. When Esther’s mother casually mentions an astonishing revelation—that her father had a previous wife and daughter, both killed in the Holocaust—Esther resolves to find out who they were, and how her father survived. To register, www. bit.ly/3jZ9usZ.

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 10 Book Festival of the MJCCA presents: Rachel Beanland and Kristin Harmel – A Two-Author Event – From 1 to 2 p.m. In Conversation with Andrea Peskind Katz, founder, greatthoughts. com; Great Thoughts, Great Readers Book Salon. Beanland’s novel, “Florence Adler Swims Forever,” takes place in 1934, is based on a true story and is an uplifting portrayal of how the human spirit can endure after a tragedy. Kristin Harmel’s “Book of Lost Names” is inspired from a true story from World War II. It is the tale of a young woman with a talent for forgery who helps hundreds of Jewish children flee the Nazis. To register, www.bit.ly/340tLZT.

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9 NCJW Atlanta 2020 Election Analysis – From 7 to 8:15 p.m. Featuring these fabulous panelists: Mary Carole Cooney, chair, Fulton County Board of Registrations and Elections; Tia Mitchell, Washington correspondent; Atlanta Journal-Constitution; Melita Easters, founder and executive director, Georgia WIN List and Lindy Miller, principal, CenterPoint Properties. To register, www.bit. ly/3onnEqy Book Festival of the MJCCA presents: Esther Safran Foer, I Want You to Know We’re Still Here – From 8 to 9 p.m. Esther Safran Foer grew up in a home where the past was too terrible to speak of. The child of parents who were each the sole survi-

ConnecTivism – Connect to Israel Activism – From 8 to 9 p.m. The Israeli American Council is proud to offer a five-session activism module (10/22, 10/27, 11/10, 11/17, 11/24). In partnership with the Atlanta Israel Coalition, this innovative and interactive content is taught by activism experts. The program delves into subjects that are critical in building and strengthening Jewish leaders. Through interactive online sessions, participants follow an activism journey that guides and empowers them to become Israel activists. Space is limited, to register, www.bit. ly/30i20cU. ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES OCTOBER 31, 2020 | 49


Advocate for No Place to Hate. ADL and Temple Kol Emeth invite you to an online workshop to examine issues of privilege and bias and to gain the skills to respond to incidents of bias and hate. The workshop will address the hateful rhetoric and incivility that is becoming more commonplace in our society. To register, www.bit.ly/3lYnmEH.

Book Festival of the MJCCA presents: Dale Berra, My Dad, Yogi – Everyone knows Yogi Berra. The American icon was the backbone of the New York Yankees through 10 World Series Championships, managed the National League Champion New York Mets in 1973, and had an ingenious way with words that remains an indelible part of our lexicon. But no one knew him like his family did. “My Dad, Yogi” is Dale’s tribute to his dad, a treat for baseball fans and a poignant story for all fathers and sons. To register, www.bit. ly/3dwecfK.

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 11 Book Festival of the MJCCA presents: John Grisham, A Time for Mercy – From 3 to 4 p.m. Join John Grisham for a Zoom talk. The author’s latest book brings back Jake Brigance! The hero of “A Time to Kill,” one of the most popular novels of our time, returns in a courtroom drama that showcases #1 New York Times bestselling author Grisham at the height of his storytelling powers. There is a time to kill and a time for justice. Now comes “A Time for Mercy.” To register, www.bit.ly/2HcaICH. A Call to Action: Becoming an Ally – From 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. Become an 50 | OCTOBER 31, 2020 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

Book Festival of the MJCCA presents: Cameron Douglas, Long Way Home – From 8 to 9 p.m. From the scion of Hollywood royalty – son of Michael Douglas, grandson of Kirk Douglas – a moving, often shocking, ultimately inspiring memoir detailing his struggle to regain his dignity, humanity and place in society after many years of drug abuse and almost eight years in prison. On the surface, his life seems golden. But by the age of 30, he has taken a hellish dive. He’s become a drug addict, a thief, and – after a DEA drug bust — a convicted drug dealer sentenced to five years in prison, with another five years added to his sentence while incarcerated. Sparing no one in his sphere –-least of all himself — Cameron Douglas gives us a raw and unstintingly honest recounting of his harrowing, remarkable, and, in the end, inspiring life story. To register, www.bit.ly/3lQJGjy.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 12 Book Festival of the MJCCA presents: Michael Oren, The Night Archer and Other Stories – From 2 to 3 p.m. Join author Michael Oren for this Zoom talk and Q & A. “The Night

Archer and Other Stories” is a collection of startling short fiction by New York Times bestselling author and international statesman Michael Oren. A medieval slave-turnedsultan, an alien who declines to visit Earth, a prophet who dares to ask “is God funny?” and a ghost who fears the living — these are among the terrifying, tragic, passionate and comic characters who animate Oren’s stories. To register, www.bit.ly/3dvu3Li. Book Festival of the MJCCA presents: Jim McCloskey and Philip Lerman, When Truth is All You Have: A Memoir of Faith, Justice, and Freedom for the Wrongly Convicted – From 8 to 9 p.m. “When Truth Is All You Have” is McCloskey’s inspirational story, and as those unjustly imprisoned, a chronicle of faith and doubt, triumphant success and shattering failure, a soul-bearing account of a man who has redeemed innumerable lives—and incited a movement – with nothing more than his unshakeable belief in truth. To register, www.bit.ly/33YlUff.

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 14 Book Festival of the MJCCA presents: Lawrence Wright, The End of October: A Novel – From 8 to 9 p.m. In this riveting medical thriller from the Pulitzer Prize winner and bestselling author Lawrence Wright, Dr. Henry Parsons, an unlikely but appealing hero, races to find the origins and cure of a mysterious new killer virus as it brings the world to its knees. At an internment camp in Indonesia, 47 people are pronounced dead with acute hemorrhagic fever. When Henry Parsons — microbiologist, epidemiologist — travels there on behalf of the World Health Organization to investigate, what he finds will soon have staggering repercussions across the globe. To register, www.bit.ly/3iZYY3G.

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 15 Mini Cubs: The Language of L.O.V.E – From 10 to 10:30 a.m. Baby sign language allows infants and toddlers to communicate emotions, desires and objects prior to spoken language development. With guidance and encouragement, Mini Cubs and the adults who love them will learn signage to communicate in a fun, developmentally appropriate way. The Davis Academy Mini Club program is open to all families with children to age 2. To join, www.bit. ly/33vNMXO.

Book Festival of the MJCCA presents: Raffi Berg, Red Sea Spies: The True Story of Mossad’s Fake Diving Resort - From 3 to 4 p.m. With special guest former Mossad Commander Dani Limor and inspired by the Netflix drama, “The Red Sea Diving Resort.” In the early 1980s, on a remote part of the Sudanese coast, a new luxury resort opened for business. Catering to divers, it attracted guests from around the world. Little did the guests know that the staff members were undercover spies, working for the Mossad, Israel’s secret service. Written by longtime BBC Middle East correspondent Raffi Berg, this page-turner tells the true story that inspired the recent Netflix drama “The Red Sea Diving Resort.” What began with one cryptic message pleading for help turned into the secret evacuation of thousands of Ethiopian Jews and the spiriting of them to Israel. To register, www. bit.ly/2FAPkXA.


Connector Chatter Directory Spotlight

www.atlantajewishconnector.com

AAA - The Auto Club Group In conversation with Kathryn Thrasher How long has your organization been in Atlanta? AAA has been serving members in Atlanta for over 40 years, however AAA has been in existence for over 115 years. How does your organization help the community? We serve over 1 million AAA members in Georgia with Emergency Road Services, in addition we serve the community by providing charitable contributions and outreach programs to support traffic safety initiatives. Where do you see your organization in 10 years? Our strategic roadmap for the future includes continuing to help AAA members enjoy life’s journey with peace of mind by providing innovative solutions, advocacy, and membership benefits wherever and whenever they need them.

Atlanta Israel Coalition In conversation with Cheryl Dorchinsky

Hadassah of Greater Atlanta In conversation with Joan Solomon

How long has your organization been in Atlanta? The Atlanta Israel Coalition was founded in late 2018 by a group of committed volunteers who strive to unite the pro-Israel community in Atlanta and beyond. As a non-partisan nonprofit organization, AIC seeks to inspire and educate through a collective effort. Through inclusive educational and community events, AIC unifies a broad audience, regardless of faith or political affiliation. AIC is a gathering place for multi-faceted conversations that combat media bias, a connector to foster a spirit of cooperation among pro-Israel organizations, and a means in which to amplify our collective pro-Israel missions.

How long has your organization been in Atlanta? Hadassah Greater Atlanta, the metro Atlanta chapter of Hadassah, was founded in 1916, and is proudly approaching our 105th year.

How does your organization help the community? AIC is a dynamic organization that has been active in providing informative Israel education and advocacy programs. AIC’s premiere event took place in January 2019 and was an exclusive screening of “Black Forest,” a chilling 50-minute Israeli documentary, which chronicles the brutal slaughter of two women, and the extraordinary survival of Kay Wilson, who joined us to tell her story. Most recently, AIC hosted human rights activist Bassem Eid, a Jerusalem-based political analyst, human rights pioneer, and expert commentator in Arab and Palestinian affairs. In less than two years, AIC has hosted or partnered on more than 20 diverse Israelfocused educational programs, which are detailed on AIC’s Facebook events page. Upcoming programs include “Celebrating Sigd with Naftali Aklum in Israel” (Nov. 13) and “Celebrating Hanukkah in the Old City of Jerusalem on a live virtual tour with guide David Sussman” (Dec.13).

In the Atlanta community, HGA sponsors Date with the State, an annual event in which Hadassah members meet with Georgia legislators to voice opinions on state issues that affect women. HGA regularly presents programs to address such educational topics as: BRCA testing; human trafficking; bullying prevention; Best Strokes to inform the public of the latest in breast and ovarian cancer research, education and treatment; and much more.

Where do you see your organization in 10 years? Over the next six months, the AIC is embarking on an organizational review to answer that exact question. Stay tuned!. We will be seeking feedback and input from individuals and organizations who would like to grow with us. To participate in this exciting process, please email atlisraelco@gmail.com. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter: www.facebook.com/AtlantaIsraelCoalition and www.twitter.com/atlanta_israel. Check out our past programs and subscribe to our YouTube Channel at www.youtube.com/channel/UCtZbUREs-4jPML4hcYbGGLQ.

Where do you see your organization in 10 years? Hadassah will continue to be the beacon for all Women Who Do, rising generation to generation, speaking words to power collectively in a voice of more than 300,000 strong, committed to the Coalition for Women’s Health Equity, combatting anti-Semitism and hate throughout the world. Hadassah standing together across all genders, races and nationalities … Healing the World Together!

How does your organization help the community? Hadassah is a strong global membership organization supporting medical care and research at the Hadassah Medical Organization in Jerusalem, with results of that research shared with the world. For example, the HMO is slated to begin a clinical trial with an Israelimade COVID-19 vaccine in October. One hundred volunteers are being recruited to participate at Hadassah and Tel Aviv’s Sheba Medical Center.

HGA also works with national Hadassah’s Department of Public Policy to help lead Jewish communal advocacy efforts for passage of federal legislation to prevent genetics-based insurance discrimination. We also help to inform the Jewish community about genetic testing.

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES OCTOBER 31, 2020 | 51


COMMUNITY What Did You Learn from Your Parents? lanta Jewish Academy] board president, I returned calls and emails and listened. In meetings, I wanted everyone’s ideas heard. I learned a lot about myself (not all of it good), and gained respect for those, like my parents, who assume leadership roles. I always start meetings on time! “When my parents thought something was wrong or could be better, they tried to be part of the solution, even at personal expense or inconvenience. At the same time, it was family first. Julie and I attempt to lead the balanced family/work/community life my parents modeled.”

By Chana Shapiro

Alisa Haber and her mother Sharon Harris discuss books every time they get together. Alan Minsk, right, with his wife Julie, left, and their children Kayla and Matthew.

Alan Minsk Parents Sheila and Donald Minsk “My parents were very involved in the Jewish community, especially Hebrew Academy and Beth Jacob,” Alan Minsk said. “My father was board president of the school and a VP at BJ [Congregation Beth Jacob]. My mother was a lifetime trustee of Hebrew Academy and BJ Sisterhood president. Jewish education and Shabbat observance remain a priority. Pre-pandemic, every week Matthew and I sat with my father, and Julie and Kayla sat with my mother in Shabbat services. “My father encouraged me to go with my gut and live with my decisions. I narrowed my college choices to the University of Pennsylvania or Brandeis, and most people recommended attending the ‘Ivy,’ Penn. My gut chose Brandeis. I apply this to many business and family decisions, tell this to my kids and to law school students,” he said. “I was encouraged to leave my comfort zone for new places, people and ideas. Mom said, ‘Be nice; don’t fuss at people; acknowledge feelings; if you make a mistake, apologize’. My father said, ‘Talk things out; be on time; every meeting is an opportunity.’ As AJA {At52 | OCTOBER 31, 2020 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

Alisa Haber Parents Sharon and Stan Harris and Richard Hornstein Alisa Haber is a legal aid elder law attorney who lives with her husband Arthur in a comfortable home with an organic garden. When Alisa is not advocating for the poor and the elderly, she is reading (she’s in three book clubs), going on long walks, and spending time with friends and family. “My parents divorced when I was very young, yet the friendship they maintained gave me steady encouragement. They both remarried, but there were some difficult times, which revealed the impact of the legal world on our everyday lives. Both my parents modeled questioning the status quo and speaking up when I see injustice. This realization sparked my career of working in poverty law,” she said. “I grew up in Virginia-Highlands in the '70s, and my dad took me to the High Museum of Art and the Garden Hills Cinema. At the age of 9, I saw ‘The Rocky Horror Picture Show’ and ‘Saturday Night Live,’ establishing my lifelong love of eccentricity and diversity; I learned to respect all people. My mom’s house has always been full of books, and I was free to read anything, from Fitzgerald, Khalil Gibran, and D.H.

Lawrence to Tolstoy and Potok. I vividly remember a detailed and descriptive book, ‘Where Do Babies Come From?’ And it had accurate pictures! To this day, any conversation with my mom includes books we are reading,” Alisa continued. “Before my parents divorced, we took family trips in our pop-up camper. When I was 13, my mom discovered the beauty of the Georgia coast, and we moved to St. Simons Island. We returned to Atlanta; however, I retained a love of nature and the coast. Every summer Arthur and I and our boys have gone to Jekyll Island, and it is where we plan to retire. Over the years, Arthur and I volunteered in the Boy Scouts, and we took our boys camping as much as we could. This love of books, nature and the pursuit of social justice has been a gift we have been able to pass on to our children.”

He worked for the Department of Relocation in the Bronx for more than 40 years, handling complex situations and personalities, and he never missed a day of work, except for all the Jewish holidays. I try to follow my father’s attributes: defend the underdog; fight for what’s right; your word is your bond. My father never backed down from a promise or commitment. Both my parents were ardent Zionists whose closest friends shared their passion for Israel and their Orthodox Jewish lifestyle.

Anders Johansson Parents Inga-Lena and Elof Johansson Anders Johansson and his wife Sheila live in a custom home, which Anders designed and helped construct. He is always immersed in a building project, which he conceives and executes using skills he acquired and honed in a number of challenging vocations. He graduatSheila Johansson ed as a naval architect from the Swedish Parents Sylvia and Zev Gingold Sheila Johansson is a retired educa- Naval Academy; imported Scandinavian tor and crisis intervention specialist who furniture to the U.S.; and won numerous worked in New York, Maryland and At- awards in kitchen design for firms such lanta. She and her husband Anders love as Viking Appliances. “I come from a small village in SweIsrael, and they visit their apartment there as often as they can. Sheila trea- den farm country, where I lived with my sures and lovingly uses family Jewish family in a modest home, before the days ritual objects, especially the silver pieces of socialism. The only social service was her father prized. She creates delicious free education, but books had to be purmeals in the kitchen she and her hus- chased. Everyone I knew was hardworking and frugal, and there was no crime. band designed, and she loves cars. “We planted fruits and vegetables, “I couldn’t help loving cars, because my father took me to automobile shows and we had chickens in the basement. from a very young age. He had a special My parents worked six days a week. My passion for sports cars, and I caught the father had a small business making tin roofs and providing bug. He taught me to mechanical services drive in New York, a big and equipment for the challenge, and I knew farming industry. My I had to pass the test mother offered nursing on my first try. I did. services for the elderly. I loved shopping with I started working for him in New York and my father when I was Israel. We once found 12, eventually welding an exorbitantly priced steel, painting, cutting glass and lucite table we and shaping metal. In loved; my father subsethe summer, I fished, quently figured out how sailed and rowed boats. to replicate it, and he In the winter my father made two: one for me and I went ice-fishing,” and one for him. Sheila and Anders Johansson Anders recalled. “I was raised to be enjoy living in a unique home “The most valuable independent. When I that Anders designed. lessons I learned from was 5 years old, my parents confidently put me on the New York my parents were to be honest, keep my subway, instructed me to count five stops, word, help those in need, work hard, nevthen get off where my grandmother met er give up, and fear G-d. These qualities engendered self-reliance, and ‘indepenme,” Sheila recalled. “My father was highly respected by dence’ became the most valuable word in young and old, Jewish and non-Jewish. the English language for me.” ì


NEW MOON MEDITATIONS Cheshvan: Bringing Inner Stillness to the Outer World Rosh Chodesh Cheshvan began Oct. 18 and continued through Oct. 19. This month is often called “Mar” Cheshvan, meaning “bitDr. Terry Segal ter,” without New Moon Meditations holidays to celebrate. This year, we might feel relieved that we’ve moved through Tishrei, having reimagined our observance of all of the holidays, and can now rest again, because there are none. That, alone, may flip the energy to ram, or elevated, Cheshvan. Making bitter better is our task this month. Cheshvan’s Zodiac sign is Scorpio, represented by the scorpion. People born under this sign are loyal, resourceful and passionate. With no gray area, they may be manipulative, controlling, obsessive and jealous. We have to monitor these qualities in ourselves, preventing the sting of the scorpion’s tail. Scorpio is a water sign, and

water is an important element this month. On the 7th of Cheshvan, we pray for rain in the land of Israel. In our history, it was the time of the Great Flood. We also shed watery tears for our matriarch Rachel, on her yahrzeit, the 11th of Cheshvan. The Hebrew letter is nun, like a scorpion with its tail raised. Currently, too many people are aligned with scorpion energy, ready to strike with poison at the hint of disagreement. There’s little tolerance, with many disowning lifelong friends because of differing opinions. At the start of this New Moon, both Mercury and Mars went into retrograde. Mercury is associated with consciousness and the ability to form clear thoughts and communicate them. Mars, the warring planet, is associated with courage, impassioned anger and self-assertion. There are two full moons, Oct. 1, and a blue moon, Oct. 31. It’s a rare occurrence and that’s where the expression “once in a blue moon” comes from. A blue moon occurs once every few years. Mercury is in retrograde through Nov. 3, which brings about breakdown in communication, appliances, as well as systems

such as government and the postal service, for example. It doesn’t bode well, considering that’s Election Day. With that in mind, we’d be best served by taking actions to put Cheshvan’s water, rather than fuel, on the fires that will, undoubtedly, erupt. Mars goes direct Nov. 13, but its wake will be felt through December. When the warrior planet is in retrograde, there’s depletion of energy. Our current astrology also suggests that this New Moon is different in that most herald a time to set forth plans and dreams for the month. This month, we’re advised to go inward to bring our inner stillness to the outer world. The Tribe is Menasheh, the firstborn son of Joseph, who could turn darkness into light. Each of us has this personal responsibility. We can’t put it on others to achieve. As is written in the “Pirkei Avot,” Ethics of the Fathers, “You are not obligated to complete the work, but neither are you free to desist from it.” The sense is smell, which scorpions use to find food and hide from danger. Intestines are the controlling organ. They excrete waste and remove toxins from the

body. Accumulated waste becomes combustible, seen as the “scorpion temperament.” Drinking water helps to quench the fire and flush the toxins. Meditation Focus: Imagine yourself floating on a raft on the ocean, tethered to Hashem so you won’t be lost at sea. Feel the magnitude of this moment in which you’ve arrived at the still point after the Holy Days, mindful of last year’s mistakes and your course in the coming year. Feel the waves gently lapping at the underside of your raft. Close your eyes or look up at the infinite blue sky. Hear the sounds of the seagulls flying. Breathe in deeply, smelling the salty air. Exhale tension. Lick your sunkissed lips and taste the dried salt. Touch the textures of the raft and the water beneath you. Feel the light of G-d flooding your heart. Drift. Slowly return to the present, recharged but conserving your energy for the road ahead. This month, let’s each plant a seed that holds the promise of a world, renewed, built on a foundation of love, integrity, peacefulness and hope. Then may those seeds be watered from above and may we become good stewards of this world. ì

Georgia's 5th District Special Election December 1

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES OCTOBER 31, 2020 | 53


OY VEY

JEWISH JOKE

OY VEY! HAVE I GOT A PROBLEM... ny incredible gifts surDear Rachel, inning, I realize how ma beg new a to s cle cir r t even within blessings, As the Jewish yea … I am truly blessed! Bu . job my ily, fam my , time I think about my round me: my health to navigate them. Each how rn lea st mu we d weeks’ time. Instantly, wrinkles come up, an t I will be giving in a few tha ion tat sen a pre ing es teaching a course to job, I picture an upcom . The presentation involv me ide ins rs my tte in flu es l confident a cluster of butterfli the material well and fee s in our agency. I know . After all, I have ible est dig group of new employee ily compelling and eas be l wil t tha y wa a in r position. So, why am ability to give it ove rently hold a managerial cur d an rs yea 10 for y to my presentation. Big been with this compan ervisor will be listening sup my e aus Bec es? rfli doesn’t hesitate to interI dealing with butte s on other occasions, she thi e don has she en Wh minute, I’m a qualified pre deal, right? Wrong. or offer correction. One nt poi a t ou g ng lin bri mb can bu te, I’m a rupt me so that she hands, and the next minu dents” eating out of my inished, like I’m dim g lin fee senter and have my “stu remarks. I wind up ed ect exp un her by off fool, totally thrown ry school principal. in front of my elementa gly uneasy. Do you have about 3 feet tall cowering , I am growing increasin ser clo ms loo e dat ion As the presentat hout my winged guests? I can get through this wit any suggestions as to how Sincerely, Worried Dear Worried, After reading your dilemma, I have drawn a mental picture of you as a confident, highly qualified, experienced professional. You have no qualms regarding your knowledge of the material and your ability to transmit the information to your audience. It is simply your supervisor, “The Principal,” who is getting in the way. Can you try using some imagery? What if you close your eyes and imagine giving a stellar performance? If Madame Supervisor keeps quiet, all will be well, and your presentation will be delivered with great aplomb. And if she does interject, can you politely thank her for her excellent suggestion and continue moving forward with confidence, poise and grace? I wonder if we can even find a gift in her presence and in the helpful tips she will undoubtably offer. First, the fact that she chose you to give this lesson underscores your value and competence in her eyes. Second, she is helping a talented individual grow even stronger and better; what a fantastic opportunity for you to progress! Keeping that in mind, maybe your “thank you” to her can actually be genuine! Every professional can benefit from a supervisor who will hold her accountable and point out areas where improvement is needed. Yes, it is difficult to be corrected mid-speech while facing an audience. But there are multiple advantages that can sprout from the situation. You will grow taller, stronger and eminently more capable from swimming through this challenging current. Perhaps you can also mentally remove her principal attire and redress her in the garments of someone less imposing. Can you clothe her like a beloved grandmother, mother or friend? How about transforming her into someone you can relate to, a warm, fuzzy presence who has your back and is rooting for you to succeed?

Business Turnaround Sam meets his friend Moshe at a neighborhood shopping center. “Hi Moshe, I haven’t seen you for some months. So nu? How is the company doing that you set up with Maurice last year?” “Well, as I told you then, I put up the money and Maurice put in his business knowledge. But things have changed a bit since then.” “What do you mean?” Sam asks. “Now Maurice has the money and I have the business experience.”

Wishing you a successful presentation without unwanted invaders, Rachel Atlanta Jewish Times Advice Column Got a problem? Email Rachel Stein at oyvey@atljewishtimes.com, describing your problem in 250 words or less. We want to hear from you and get helpful suggestions for your situation at the same time!

YIDDISH WORD OF THE MONTH Schlemiel

‫שלעמיל‬‎ An inept clumsy person; a bungler; a dolt. Probably from the Hebrew name Shelumiel; OED) The word is widely recognized from its inclusion in the Yiddish-American hopscotch chant from the opening sequence of the American sitcom Laverne & Shirley.

54 | OCTOBER 31, 2020 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES


BRAIN FOOD

Can You Find Him? By: Yoni Glatt, koshercrosswords@gmail.com Difficulty Level: Easy 1

2

3

4

5

6

8

9

10

11

15

14 17

18

20

21 23 27

28

29

30

31

51

57

58

36

39

40

42

44

33

26

35

41

32

22 25

38

13

16

24

37

12

19

34

50

7

43

45

46

48

49

52

53 61

47

54

55

59

60

63

64

65

66

67

68

56

49. Field that replaced 20-Across 50. Shows excitement, like a dog 1. ___ Adumah (red heifer) 53. Funny Macdonald 6. Wonder Woman’s makes you tell 55. Angels or Devils, e.g. the truth 59. French for “yes” 11. Sliced item 60. Book whose title character is 14. Talmudic sage easy to find in 44-Across and a bit 15. Villain in 60-Across found in harder to find in 17-Across 27-Across 63. Has too much, for short 16. Israel’s army, for short 64. Female friend of 38-Across 17. ___ the aisle (making like a 65. Cold home kallah) 66. In good shape 19. Jerusalem Har 67. “Chew the scenery” is one 20. Former blue Queens stadium 68. Appears to be 21. Saul did not kill him...but Samuel did 22. Like a win with many errors DOWN 23. Something passed in class 1. 50-Down has them 25. Jewish sch. in the Bronx 2. Torah measurement 27. No pork, and no meat and milk, 3. Part to name two 4. State with zero professional 34. They’re only drunk on Shabbos sports teams in some families 5. Bali or Tel 35. German “one” 6. One chopping down trees 36. 1-1, e.g. 7. “___ bit of sugar” (recipe direc37. Spanish “three” tive) 38. Original name of the title char- 8. Laborious work acter in 60-Across 9. It has teeth but can’t chew 40. “Stop!” 10. Dominate, in sports talk 41. Crossword’s most common fish 11. Phone beep 42. Jonah of “Moneyball” 12. Biblical nono 43. Some dos 13. “Eifo ___?”, 60-Across in Israel 44. Jerusalem hotel located at 18. Robinson who played for the Gershon Agron Street 26-28 Knicks and Hapoel Tel Aviv 48. Like the Negev 22. Address letters

ACROSS

62

24. Quaker Honey Graham cereal 25. Walkman pioneer 26. They can improve business 27. Country where the title character in 60-Across is Walli 28. Wide receiver Beckham Jr. 29. Chap 30. Chanukah liquid 31. Pong pioneer 32. Female friend in 60-Across books 33. Prepares (a table) 34. It’s like cholent 38. Lean and flexible 39. TV alien 40. Most Jews are proud of theirs 42. ___ HaHar 43. Kitchen item 45. Tooth driller’s deg. 46. Yell 47. Allen and Burton 50. K-9 friend in 60-Across 51. German car 52. Basic (idea) 53. Hungarian aunt 54. “... ___ not. There is no try.” (Yoda) 56. Palindromic fashion magazine 57. Israel’s Magen David that saves lives 58. Farm sounds 60. Setting of “1917”, for short 61. “If only ___ listened!” 62. Cheesehead state: Abbr.

LAST ISSUE’S SOLUTION 1

M

13

2

I

3

C

S

A

U

I

T

L

L

R O C

K

U

S

20

23

28

S

A

R

E

T

I

G O R

F

O R M U

E

N

48 53

S

P E

I

S

54

58

L

F

R O G U

E

S W O R

D

S

68 71

H

65

E

A

N

T

E

N G C

H

24

31

L

S

49

L

D O A

64

A

40

45

8 15

I

32

K

H

37

B

L 50

A

S

46

I

41

51

E

A

59

A 60

E

C

K

O

T

E

A

S

E

Y

E

69

72

Y

E

P

A

L

I

R 34

25

S

26

R

27

A

N

C

E

R

M A

H

E

R

43

47

G O R G

55

12

N

38

N G

S

S

O U 42

11

E

A M M

33

S I

A

I

10

V

19 22

Y M O N

66

9

M E

16

R

B

D O O R

B

63

25 Years Ago//October 27, 1995 ì The Atlanta Jewish Community Center’s Keshet Parents Group hosted the “Magic Carpet Sale and Bazaar” to raise money for the AJCC preschool programs. Participants could drink tea, handle, haggle and buy from a private collection of more than 100 rugs.

B

30

R

44

15 Years Ago//October 28, 2005 ì The AJT’s Suzi Brozman interviewed human rights symbol Natan Sharansky. Topics of discussion included challenges facing Israel and the Jewish people, conflict in Gaza, and America’s role in the future relationship between Israel and Palestinians. ì In a special centennial issue of the Atlanta Jewish Times, the AJT takes a look at the last 100 years of the Jewish Federation of Greater Atlanta: where it’s been and where it’s going.

I

T

36

7

L

18 21

L

39

6

E W W

14

O

35

Remember When

29

5

S

E

17

ì

4

A

56

L I

M O D

E

E

O U

S

L

T

57

52

S

E

B

T

O R

R

A

I

L

O R

C

A

G D

A

Y

67 70 73

61

62

S

The bar mitzvah of Martin Ian Hochberg of Marietta took place at Congregation Etz Chaim. Martin is the son of Eleanor and David Hochberg. ì Atlantan Brenda Novak participated in the Leukemia 26.2 Mile Marathon for the second year in a row. In addition to competing. She was also a trainer for the team and recruited two members for the team: her husband Leon Novak and Suzanne Dinur.

50 Years Ago//October 30, 1970 ì The Beta Phi chapter of the Phi Sigma Sigma sorority at Courtesy of Government Press Georgia State University began a new season. To celebrate, they Office // Former Prime held a picnic event at Stone Mountain. The pledges went searching Minister Shimon Peres for Mouseketeer hats and wooden nickels for a scavenger hunt. Afwelcomes Natan Sharanksy ter, the sisters went trick-or-treating for UNICEF and threw a Halto Israel in 1986 after being loween party. held for nine years in a Soviet prison and labor camps. ì Temple Or VeShalom Breaks Ground: Congregation members crowded into the social hall of their synagogue and took the final steps to start physical operations in their new house of worship.ì ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES OCTOBER 31, 2020 | 55


Living Your Best Life At

OBITUARIES

Stewart (Stew) Irwin Aaron 81, Atlanta

Active Adult Living, Assisted Living and Memory Care Why we are the healthiest place to live in Atlanta! UV Lighting throughout all common areas Negative Ion Emission Full Building Water Filtration System Balconies and Porches for Fresh Air and Sunlight Fresh Farm to Table Food Full Service Spa, including Salt Water Pool HydroWorx pool used for rehab injuries and reduces inflammation Large campus to walk Indoors and Outdoor The Healthy Climate UV light emits ultraviolet energy that has been proven effective in reducing microbial life form (viruses, bacteria, yeasts and molds) in the air. The Negative Ion Emissions lifts mood and kills mold, bacteria and viruses as well as reducing allergens in the air. Some metropolitan water systems have been tested with up to 50+ micro drug residues in the water. That is why we install a full building water filtration system to deliver the best water possible.

Schedule Your Tour Now! 404-496-6794 1882 Clairmont Road Decatur, GA 30033 www.holbrooklife.com 56 | OCTOBER 31, 2020 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

Stewart (Stew) Irwin Aaron, age 81, of Atlanta, passed away Oct. 17, 2020, after a courageous fight with Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Stew graduated from the Pennsylvania State University with a Bachelor of Science degree in business followed by a Master of Business Administration from George Washington University. Stew was in ROTC and upon graduation, entered the United States Navy as an ensign with his first post aboard the aircraft carrier USS Independence as a communications officer. Following the Navy, Stew was with DuPont in Seaford, Del. Moving on, he came to Baltimore, Md., for Sagner, Inc., then transferred to Atlanta as the regional director for the men’s clothing firm. After a few years he started his own real estate firm, Atlanta Syndicates, Inc. His final stop was as the founder and president for over 30 years of LABS, Inc., where he worked with his two daughters and son-in law. Stew was also involved in the community, where he was president of the Gate City Lodge of B’nai B’rith. Temple Emanu-El was an important part of his family’s life and he served in many positions there, including president. At Emanu-El, Stew participated in Chevra Torah every Saturday morning for the past 27 years. He loved biking and was a proud Bad Boy Biker, a group he started 20 years ago with now over 200 riders on the email list. Stew also enjoyed entertaining family and friends at Lake Oconee. An avid Costco regular, he could be seen there a few times a week shopping and talking to friends. Stew was predeceased by his mother Charlotte Weinberg, father Abraham and sister June. He is survived by his beloved wife of 57 years Beverly Legum Aaron; his cherished children Lisa and Andy Schwartz, Amy Ripans and fiancé Don Pozin; and was PopPop to his adored grandchildren Amanda and Jeremy Schwartz and Hannah and Max Ripans. Memorial donations may be made to Temple Emanu-El, 1580 Spalding Drive, Sandy Springs, Ga. 30350. Arrangements by Dressler’s Jewish Funeral Care, 770-451-4999.


OBITUARIES

Michael Gutman 78, Sandy Springs

Michael Gutman, 78, passed away unexpectedly at home in Sandy Springs Oct. 13, 2020. Michael was born on June 28, 1942, in Brooklyn, N.Y., to Zelda and Jack Gutman. He graduated from Lafayette High School in 1960. Following high school, he attended City College and received a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering. He later received a master’s degree in computer science from Pennsylvania State University. After moving to Philadelphia, Michael began working for Magnavox as a computer programmer. He had a great passion for mathematics and technology. However, his greatest sense of pride was derived from his children and their accomplishments. Michael was a witty individual who loved community and sharing his interests with others. He was an active and dedicated member of Congregation Ariel. He cherished his friendship with Rabbi Binyomin Freidman, a source of great joy to Michael, for which his family is truly grateful. He is preceded in death by his mother Zelda and father Jack, of Brooklyn, N.Y. Michael is survived by his son and daughter-in-law, David and Heather; daughter and son-in-law Alisa and Marc; four grandchildren Jacob, Lily, Zosia, and Sam; sister and brother-in-law Ellen and Ira, of Florida; and his beloved dog Tanner. Due the COVID-19 pandemic, funeral services were held privately with Rabbi Freidman officiating. Donations can be made to Congregation Ariel, 5237 Tilly Mill Road, Dunwoody, Ga. 30338 (congariel.org). Arrangements by Dressler’s Jewish Funeral Care, 770-451-4999.

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES OCTOBER 31, 2020 | 57


OBITUARIES

Arvin Harold Reingold

Irene Seligman

Arvin Harold Reingold, 90, died Oct. 18, 2020 in Atlanta. He was born on July 22, 1930, in New York, N.Y. As a teenager his family moved to Chattanooga, Tenn., where he lived until 2015. Arvin was the youngest of three children to Fannie and Joe Reingold. Arvin graduated from the University of Chattanooga and from the University of Tennessee Law School and practiced law in Chattanooga until 2015. He served in the Tennessee state legislature as a representative and was also a municipal court judge in East Ridge for many years. Arvin was a veteran serving in the Army during the Korean War. He was an avid tennis player and season ticket holder for Volunteer football for decades. Arvin never met a stranger, and it would take hours to walk with him a few blocks as he would talk to so many people along the way. He was very witty and was admired by everyone. The most important thing to Arvin was his family, and he enjoyed being involved in every way possible with their happiness and growth. Arvin is survived by his wife of 69 years Lillian; his two children Gayle Steinberg (Toby) and Arthur Reingold (Susan); six grandchildren Lauren Steinberg, Eric Steinberg (Jessica), Melissa Ginsberg (Adam), Chad Sunstein (Eva), Joey Reingold, and Ellie Reingold. In addition, Arvin had four great grandchildren; Blake Ginsberg, Cole Ginsberg, Isabella Steinberg and Lilah Sunstein, and many nieces and nephews. Funeral services were held at B’nai Zion Cemetery, 605 Lullwater Road, Chattanooga, Tenn., Oct. 20. Due to COVID-19. the service was held for immediate family only. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to B’nai Zion Synagogue, P.O. Box 3293, Cleveland, Tenn. 37320 or Chadas, 207 Spears Ave., P.O. Box 4797, Chattanooga, Tenn. 37405. Arrangements by Dressler’s Funeral Care, 770-451-4999.

Irene Seligman of Atlanta passed away peacefully Oct. 8, 2020. She was born March 17, 1925, in New York City to Isidore and Goldie Gartner. She married Leonard Seligman on his birthday, Nov. 4, 1951, and moved to his hometown of Atlanta, where she never let anyone forget she was from the Bronx. “I’m a New Yorker, sugar.” Irene lived her life on her own terms, always having fun with family and friends. She was quite the entertainer and provided many laughs with her sharp sense of humor. She was predeceased by her husband Leonard (2005), as well as her brother Saul Gartner (1971), sister Frances Gartner (1982), and nephew Ira Gartner (1994). She is survived by her great nephews Daniel Gartner and Joseph Gartner, and great niece Laura Medina. She also leaves behind many loving nieces and nephews of the Seligman family. The family wishes to thank the staff of Somerby Sandy Springs for the attentive and loving care Irene received while living there the past two years. A graveside service was held at Greenwood Cemetery Oct. 9, 2020. Due to COVID-19, the funeral was restricted to family members only. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to the charity of your choice. Arrangements by Dressler’s Jewish Funeral Care, 770-451-4999.

90, Atlanta

‫זיכרונה לברכה‬

58 | OCTOBER 31, 2020 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

95, Atlanta


OBITUARIES

Regina Tourial 99, Atlanta

Regina Tourial, age 99, of Atlanta, died Oct. 18, 2020. Regina was born at Crawford Long Hospital to Daniel and Sarah Rousso and was a graduate of Girls High. She was a dedicated life member of Congregation Or VeShalom, where she opened her home to OVS Sunday School, was an honorary Sisterhood president, and spearheaded the first OVS Hanukkah Bazaar more than 50 years ago. An avid fan of old Hollywood movies, it was a highlight for her and Ralph to attend the premiere of “Gone with the Wind” at the Loew’s Grand Theatre in 1939. She was a proofreader for the Georgia state Senate for 40 years and was a volunteer coordinator for DART (Dial-A-Ride Transportation, part of JFGA) even though she never drove a day in her life. Regina wrote songs and plays, loved to sing, and played canasta and mahjong. She was a friend to anyone she ever met. Regina was preceded in death by her husband of 60 years, Ralph Tourial, brothers, Morris and Jack, and son-in-law Morton Grosswald. She is survived by her children Sidney and Susan Tourial, Sara Grosswald, Peggy Tourial, Danny and Annie Tourial, and David Tourial; sister, Marie Saffan; sister-in-law, Corrine Rousso; eight grandchildren, and 13 great-grandchildren. She had 42 first cousins, whom she loved dearly and with whom she stayed in touch. Graveside services were held Oct. 20 with Rabbi Josh Hearshen officiating. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to The Tourial Torah Fund at Congregation Or VeShalom or Jewish HomeLife Communities. Arrangements by Dressler’s Jewish Funeral Care, 770-451-4999. Obituaries in the AJT are written and paid for by the families; contact Editor and Managing Publisher Kaylene Ladinsky at kaylene@atljewishtimes.com or 404-883-2130, ext. 100, for details about submission, rates and payments. Death notices, which provide basic details, are free and run as space is available; send submissions to editor@atljewishtimes.com.

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES OCTOBER 31, 2020 | 59


CLOSING THOUGHTS Character Improvement Based on Torah Values About 15 years ago, I began to seriously study “Pirkei Avos,” Ethics of the Fathers, a part of the Talmud that deals with character improvement. Allen H. Lipis Last year, workThe Bottom Line ing with Rabbi Menashe Goldberger, I began to summarize what I learned that I expect to become a book on the subject. This article is merely the beginning if you want to improve your behavior based on Torah values. What is good character? Jews and Christians have concluded that the only moral code that applies to humanity is the moral code given by God. If you don’t follow God’s ways, you will be a slave to your passions, the mores of society, or controlled by fashionable cultures. The Jewish view is that such a moral code comes directly from the Torah. The greatest rabbis have discerned what that moral code is, and they have written various commentaries to explain the code over time. What God wants God has provided a roadmap in the Torah on how to improve. God did this because we are created in the image of God, and we have the potential to be Godlike, to develop Divine qualities. So, where do you find God’s attributes? The answer is in the Torah. Some of them are: mercy, compassion, slow to anger, abundant in kindness, forgiver of sin if the sinner repents, and holiness. These are some of the characteristics that we should emulate. It is the proper way to live. When is the right time to change your behavior for the better? There is a famous story attributed to Rabbi Israel Salanter, the creator of mussar, Jewish ethics. The rabbi lived in the 1800s and told the following story: “One night as I walked past the home of a shoemaker. I noticed that despite the late hour, the man was still working by the light of a dying candle. I asked him why he was still working when it was so late, and the shoemaker said that as long as the candle is still burning, it is still possible to accomplish and to mend.” The rabbi thought that if the shoemaker can work at a late hour as long as there is light, then “why can’t I improve my 60 | OCTOBER 31, 2020 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

life as long as I am alive?” It was a remarkable insight that the light of the candle, as long as it is burning, is an analogy to the light of your life. As long as you are alive, you have the chance to mend your ways and to improve your behavior. A partial list of traits you might want to change Here is a partial list of behavior changes that you might want to consider, if you believe they apply to you: 1. Do you want to do more Torah learning? 2. Do you have a hard time controlling your anger? 3. Do you consider yourself a miser? Do you want to be liberal with your money? 4. Do you often interrupt people, or a specific person, like your wife, your husband or your children? 5. Are you often rude or dishonest? 6. Do you avoid helping the poor, orphans, widows and strangers? 7. Do you care and inquire about friends and relatives that become sick? 8. Do you offer gratitude to others who help you? 9. Do you ask forgiveness when you make a serious mistake? 10. Are you discouraged with your life? Unless you master your negative character traits, you will be eaten up by frustration, anger, greed, envy, and lust. Only when you have mastery over your negative traits can you live a completely happy life. Perhaps you know the person you want to be and also the person you don’t want to be. You may not want to be angry, discouraged, unhappy, jealous and arrogant, among other negative traits. Perhaps you want to be: mellow, unafraid, wise, never in a rush, never lost, never confused, always with the right answers, facing life with equanimity for yourself and for others. The goal in life is to be happy and joyous as often as possible. Yet, we have to deal with so many other emotions that prevent that. Happiness is this easy-to-remember formula: difficulty leads to a challenge; a challenge leads to a solution; and a solution leads to joy. Success in changing your behavior for the better comes one step at a time. You take the first step to begin and you work on the change over time. Make the decision right now to take control of your life. If not now, when? Stop procrastinating. If you do not begin today, you may never do it. ì


MARKETPLACE LEARN

VISIT OUR WEBSITE

w w w. At l a n ta J e w i s hTi m e s .c o m F O R M O R E O F W H AT YO U N E E D

Development Corp. for Israel | 404-817-3500 Eleventh Series Jubilee Bonds 2.15% Eleventh Series Maccabee Bonds 2.00% Eighth Series Mazel Tov Bonds 1.80% Eighth Series eMitzvah Bonds 1.80%

LOAN

PLOTS FOR SALE

Loss of Income? We can help. Jewish Interest Free Loan of Atlanta. Call Elizabeth 470-268-5665. www. JIFLA.org

2 –Side by Side Plots in the Beth Shalom Serenity II section of Arlington Memorial Park in Sandy Springs. (Lot52C, # 3 & 4) Must be a member of Beth Shalom. Listed for $6,995/each. Contact owner: 917-822-6884

don’t miss our uPcoming issues A PodcAst brought to you by the AtlAntA Jewish times

Learn Canasta on Zoom LEAGUE of AMERICA

Patti Wasserman Certified Canasta Instructor 561-350-7124 playcanasta@yahoo.com KEEPING THE JEWISH SOUTHEAST CONNECTED

You spoke. We listened. Check out your new Atlanta Jewish Times. senior living

Ads due: november 5

winter style mAgAzine Ads due: november 12

wellness, gift guide & holidAy flAvors

Ads due: november 19

chAnukAh

Ads due: december 3

to Advertise cAll: 404-883-2130 SENIOR

JOB

WANTED: INDIVIDUAL WITH NURSING HOME CONTACTS We need an individual with an ability to reach out to nursing home owners to introduce them to our Compliance & Ethics Program and other services. A Compliance & Ethics Program is now required by federal government regulations to insure a high quality of care as well as the elimination of fraud, waste and abuse.

Interested individuals send cover letter and resume to: scott.demonte@mednetconcepts.com

FOLLOW

: HOME

We Never Miss a Spot At V Cleaning, we provide you with expert cleaning, warm customer service, and excellent attention to detail. Serving clients around the Atlanta, Georgia area, you get to take advantage Check out our reviews on

678-271-7373 v_cleaning@hotmail.com www.vcleaning.net


MARKETPLACE COLLECTIBLES

HOME

THE DUSTY COIN, LLC

ALL TECH APPLIANCE SERVICE

“Shekels For Your Collectibles”

We Service All Major Appliances Office Call or Text

678-906-1881 • Coins • Bullion • Jewelry • Sterling •

COMPUTER

COMPUER HOUSE CALLS

Voted #1 by Atlanta Jewish Community

770-527-3533 www.HealthyComputer.com

As Seen On BEST OF JEWISH ATLANTA

Over 30 Years of Experience

404-263-2967 Strict Confidentiality • References Upon Request Member: ANA, NGC, PCGS & PMG

1 Year Warranty On All Repairs

FOOD

AUTO

It’s Time to Call for Help! COMPUTER

FAKAKTA COMPUTER BEST OF JEWISH ATLANTA

BUY • TRADE • SALE

B

A

DESKTOP & LAPTOP REPAIR HOME/BUSINESS NETWORKING

10% OF PROFITS THR

WE BUY

Cars, Trucks, Vans & ATV'S (running or not) ALL MAKES (damaged or not) Professional hassle free pick up. Fair cash prices paid on the spot.

ADVERTISE WITH THE

AUTO Everyone Knows Someone Who Loves Their SUBARU

Winner of Salesman of the Year Award for 3 consecutive years

Ralph Kurland Sales Representative 905 Ernest Barrett Pkwy, NW Kennesaw, GA 30144

cell: 678-665-1024 dealership: 770-419-9800 ext. 312 rkurland@subaruofkennesaw.com www.subaruofkennesaw.com

404-883-2130

Call me to test drive any of our new or used cars!

PERFORMANCE UPGRADES2019 WILL BE DONATE APPLE DEVICE SUPPORT

JEWISH CHARITIES.

VIRUS/SPYWARE REMOVAL

404.954.1004

Same DayDAMON.CARP@GMAIL.COM Appointments • Reasonable Rates • All Services Guara

10% OF PROFITS THROUGH 2020 WILL BE DONATED TO JEWISH CHARITIES.

• Same Day Appointments • Reasonable Rates • All Services Guaranteed

COMPUTER

BEST OF JEWISH ATLANTA


Profile for Atlanta Jewish Times

Atlanta Jewish Times, VOL. XCV NO. 22, October 31, 2020