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NEXT WEEK: SOME OF JEWISH ATL'S CUTEST PETS GRACE OUR PAGES, ONE LANDS THE COVER.

VOL. XCIII NO. 25

JUNE 22, 2018 | 9 TAMMUZ 5778

Home & Garden

Sandy Springs: A Little Slice of Jewtopia City Springs is the new heart of town on pages 16-17 CHAI STYLE HOMES

SANDY SPRINGS ARTIST INVITES US INTO HER COLORFUL HOME. HOME & GARDEN, PAGES 23-25

MARCUS OFF THE CUFF JEWISH NETWORK ATLANTA HOSTS THE HOME DEPOT CO-FOUNDER FOR A Q&A. COMMUNITY, PAGES 36-37

THE LOWDOWN

SELIG OPENS UP IN AJT'S INAUGURAL "I BET YOU DIDN'T KNOW ..." COLUMN. PAGE 39


2 | JUNE 22, 2018 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES


OPINION Letter from the Publisher Your community paper is stronger, more vibrant, more engaging, more involved with the community, and more committed to its mission than any time in the previous decade. While I am personally sorry to see Michael Jacobs go, and we as a community will miss many facets of his involvement, the Atlanta Jewish Times is dedicated to continuing to maintain its leadership in news dissemination, event coverage, fostering debate, and ultimately bringing our diverse and geographically dispersed community together. The AJT is again engaged in virtually every aspect of Jewish communal life in Greater Atlanta. The paper covers breaking news and accolades; is a key resource for Jewish thought, tradition and debate in our community; educates the Atlanta Jewish community in our synagogue life, Jewish Arts & Culture, Jewish communal organizational events, needs and goals; shares simchas, life cycle events, and our children’s accolades; provides articles on spiritual and ethical guidance, leads discussions on important topics facing our community including local politics, laws, policy and regulation; and, of course we cover Israel and provide entertaining social vignettes. In addition to coverage, the AJT is involved in many community initiatives. We are key contributors to the Atlanta Jewish Film Festival, The Book Festival of the MJCCA, Atlanta Jewish Music Festival and the Atlanta Kosher BBQ Festival. We recently launched the Atlanta Jewish Connector, which is both the community calendar, Jewish Arts, Culture & Events guide, as well as a Jewish Community Resource and Simcha guide. We

WE BROUGHT 47 TH STREET TO ATLANTA

Haim Haviv Owner

PUBLISHER

MICHAEL A. MORRIS michael@atljewishtimes.com

also publish a yearly resource guide and other key quarterly publications like Atlanta’s Best. But there is more we need to accomplish. We need to be a source for Jewish business news, coaching and mentoring. The AJT needs to offer relevant material for millennnials on a social, religious, networking and purely entertainment basis. We need to augment our online

Owner & Publisher By Michael A. Morris michael@atljewishtimes.com

presence with engaging video, pictures, podcasts, speeches and music. We need to cover and be more involved in philanthropy. We need to make sure our coverage is unbiased, inclusive and is relevant to every generation in our community. And we need to reach and engage more of the Jewish community in Greater Atlanta. We have come a long way in the three years I have owned the AJT, but we have much room for growth and improvement. Our paper must change, adapt and grow into the 21st century. Kaylene Ladinsky, in her new title as managing publisher, will find a new managing editor with the same goals that I have outlined. One of my goals is to create a team that will bring collaboration to a new level. The publisher and editor need to challenge themselves to make this paper a model for papers around the county. The American Jewish Press Association (AJPA) already considers us to be in the top quarter of Jewish papers in just three years, but

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MANAGING PUBLISHER KAYLENE LADINSKY

kaylene@atljewishtimes.com

ADVERTISING Senior Account Manager

BRENDA GELFAND brenda@atljewishtimes.com

there is still more to accomplish. Equally important, the publisher and editor need to strike the right balance between substantive content and entertainment, as well as print and digital, to ensure that your AJT can sustain itself financially and maintain itself as an ongoing operation for the next generation. We are not there yet, but it is within our grasp. Michael Jacobs will be missed, but his accomplishment and stamp on the paper is respected and will remain. The Southern Israelite, currently dba the Atlanta Jewish Times is more than 20 years older than Israel! Editors, publishers and even owners will come and go. Michael follows in the proud footsteps of Adolph Rosenberg, Vida Goldgar, Neil Rubin and others, all of whom have brought their strengths and viewpoints to the community. I am extremely appreciative of Michael for his contribution to bringing the paper back to the roots of community engagement and relevance. The Atlanta Jewish Times has a dedicated full-time staff, led by myself and Kaylene. In addition, we have a cadre of over 40 dedicated freelance writers, editors and proofreaders, each with more than a decade – and many with decades – of journalistic experience. These people will ensure the continuity of the paper over the interim and the long run. They will fulfill our mission to the Atlanta community. The transition will go smoothly because of the strength of the organization we have created. Soon we will celebrate our 100th anniversary and I eagerly anticipate this landmark occasion. My job is to ensure the relevancy of the AJT and the corresponding ability to maintain it as a perpetual entity for our community. That means tough choices. But ultimately, I promise, as owner and benefactor, we are going from strength to strength. Please say a shehecheyanu with me this Shabbat around the dinner table for the new iteration and growth of the AJT. We want to hear from you. Give us a few weeks to put our vision in motion and tell us what works and what is not. Looking forward to the future! ■

Senior Account Manager

MICHAL BONELL

michal@atljewishtimes.com Account Manager

LLOYD STARK lloyd@atljewishtimes.com

EDITORIAL Interim Editorial Supervisor

RONI ROBBINS

roni@atljewishtimes.com Staff Writer

SARAH MOOSAZADEH sarah@atljewishtimes.com Copy Editor & Writer

LEAH R. HARRISON leah@atljewishtimes.com

Contributors This Week BOB BAHR SKYE ESTROFF HAROLD KIRTZ RABBI DAVID GEFFEN MARCIA CALLER JAFFE FRAN PUTNEY DAVE SCHECHTER TERRY SEGAL BREANNA WEST

CREATIVE & MEDIA DIRECTOR DEBORAH HERR

deborah@atljewishtimes.com

COMMUNITY LIAISON JEN EVANS

jen@atljewishtimes.com

CONTACT INFORMATION GENERAL OFFICE 404.883.2130 KAYLENE@ATLJEWISHTIMES.COM The Atlanta Jewish Times is printed in Georgia and is an equal opportunity employer. The opinions expressed in the Atlanta Jewish Times do not necessarily reflect those of the newspaper. Periodicals Postage Paid at Atlanta, Ga. POSTMASTER send address changes to Atlanta Jewish Times 270 Carpenter Drive Suite 320, Atlanta Ga 30328. Established 1925 as The Southern Israelite Phone: (404) 883-2130 www.atlantajewishtimes.com ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES (ISSN# 0892-33451) IS PUBLISHED WEEKLY BY SOUTHERN ISRAELITE, LLC 270 Carpenter Drive, Suite 320, Atlanta, GA 30328 © 2018 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES Printed by Walton Press Inc. MEMBER Conexx: America Israel Business Connector American Jewish Press Association Sandy Springs/Perimeter Chamber of Commerce Please send all photos, stories and editorial content to: submissions@atljewishtimes.com

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES JUNE 22, 2018 | 3


OPINION

Our View

Why Sandy Springs? Some may ask why we’ve chosen to focus on Sandy Springs in our Home and Garden issue. Simple: It’s one of the largest Jewish communities in Atlanta and it’s seen some tremendous growth in the past 13 years since becoming a city - a figurative comingof-age bar mitzvah, if you will permit the literary license. Members of the Jewish community have played a key role in the growth and expansion of the city and its new City Springs development dedicated last month, from the city’s first mayor, Eva Galambos, to Steve Selig, one of the project developers. City Springs is being hailed as the central community gathering place for the new city and its true heart or downtown. You can read more about the novel 14-acre mixed-use development of civic, cultural, retail and residential components in these pages. We interviewed businesses and residents who endured the construction and are looking forward to new multi-cultural programming, restaurants and experiencing what they see as a walkable city with green space and interactive fountains. With a four-acre park, lots of shade trees and new workout facilities, City Springs is literally a breath of fresh air, encouraging exercise and an appreciation of nature in what could otherwise be a concrete jungle. City Springs also boasts a variety of retail, residential and cuisine options we explore along with an interview of an interior designer about new trends in home decorating and an article on two homes that have been popular gathering places for 4 | JUNE 22, 2018 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

many in Atlanta over the years. Aside from home and garden, there are more reasons to highlight this growing community that houses several Jewish day schools, preschools and synagogues. The city honors the legacy of its founding mayor, Eva Galambos, a Jewish Holocaust survivor, with its government building at 1 Galambos Way. She was the primary motivator behind Sandy Springs becoming a city, a struggle that began in 1966 and ended nearly 40 years later in 2005. The city also has a sister-city relationship with cities in the Western Galilee in northern Israel. In 2015, an official Sandy Springs delegation signed a Sister City agreement with the Western Galilee cities and local authorities. Our concentration on Sandy Springs also continues the focus we began with our Jewtopia real estate section two months ago showing where Jews are choosing to live and why. Sandy Springs is one of those areas. In that special issue such neighborhoods as Buckhead, Dunwoody, Toco Hills and Sandy Springs emerged as prime areas for Jews to locate. Then there are the lesser-known Jewish neighborhoods inside and outside the perimeter. So just because your neighborhood wasn’t spotlighted in this Home and Garden issue doesn’t mean it won’t be highlighted in the future. Stay tuned for more on Jewtopia in future issues. Your neighborhood could just be next. ■


OPINION

Separating Children from Parents

Photos courtesy of Getty images

A young girl cries while her relative is inspected by border patrol (far left). A little boy is assigned the number 47, taped to his sleeve.

It is simply incongruous – and chilling – to see children separated from their families as a policy of the current administration. The comparable images that come to mind are the heart-rending stories that we as Jews hear about all the time. The fact that families were torn apart once they arrived at the concentration camps should cause all of us to be alarmed at the sight of family separation at our borders. We recall the stories of some family members being ordered to march to the left and others ordered to march to the right after getting off the trains that arrived at the concentration camps. They never saw each other again. Fortunately, the holding camps and buildings today are not the ghastly death-producing places that the Nazis constructed. But they are bad enough. It is serious enough to have families detained in these holding camps while their refugee or asylum status is being determined. But the trauma that is being caused by separating 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7-year-olds from their parents is incalculable. The parents do not know where their children are from minute to minute; they do not know what kinds of conditions they are held under; they do not know when they will be reunited; they do not see what kind of trauma the children are experiencing. Imagine that you are traveling with your children or grandchildren in another country and you are separated from them, not knowing how they are being treated or for how long. It is hard to imagine that the U.S. government would not use its resources to correct

that situation as quickly as possible. Yet this same government is doing precisely what it would oppose for another country; it is doing so as a matter of governmental policy.

decades from such a system. But we have many people who are willing to let the government separate families today. We must loudly and persistently call for the end of such a practice. There are many other things that we can do to work towards a balanced immigration policy, but the current Congress will not

do anything productive. We must insist that Congress and the Administration do their jobs to create an effective and humane immigration policy that adequately reflects the values of our nation. ■ Harold Kirtz is president of the Jewish Community Relations Council of Atlanta.

Guest Column By Harold Kirtz

The Atlanta JCRC (Jewish Community Relations Council) has this week signed on to a letter to the administration sent by many national and local Jewish organizations, including AJC, ADL, the Central Conference of American Rabbis, the Rabbinical Assembly, the Union for Reform Judaism, the United Synagogue for Conservative Judaism, the Orthodox Union, Hadassah, NCJW, Reconstructionist Rabbinical Association, HIAS, American Jewish World Service, Jewish Council for Public Affairs (JCPA, JCRC’s umbrella organization), and many others. The letter pleads with the administration to immediately rescind the “zero tolerance” policy and uphold the values of family unity and justice on which our nation was built. From the letter, I quote: “As Jews, we understand the plight of being an immigrant fleeing violence and oppression. We believe that the United States is a nation of immigrants and how we treat the stranger reflects on the moral values and ideals of this nation.” These American values are not what America has at times upheld itself. The separation of black slave families was a practice for years in many states, including Georgia. Fortunately, we are many ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES JUNE 22, 2018 | 5


OPINION

Rescuers rush to provide aid to victims after a volcano erupts in Guatemala.

Israel’s Concern for the World

Smoke and ashes spew out of a volcano in Guatemala.

This Time Guatemala Since I was younger than 45 when our family made aliyah I was eligible to be drafted for two months of basic training so I could be in the reserves of the IDF-TZAHAL. Having been in the American Army, I had a little sense of what military life could be like. Each of the 35 men there with me were interesting, but I really do not want to talk about them. Hope they are still alive. The first month of our training we learned how to march. I am not sure why. We were taught how to fire a rifle; I rarely hit the target. We were supposed to climb a rope, but for most of us it was too difficult. We had several hikes just with our backpacks and several in which we carried one of the trainees on a stretcher. There were other “military training activities,” but I imagine that I have repressed them. The second month we had five days in the field, including training with our gas masks, crawling under simulated enemy fire, and loading and firing our rifles on various types of terrain. Our commanders knew we were not youngsters, so they had pity on us. Our dog tags were made of cardboard, which 6 | JUNE 22, 2018 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

tells you how highly our military skills were valued. However, we did have some real training related to what the delegation of Israeli physicians were doing for the volcano-suffering Guatemalans. We were not doctors, but we were trained to assist with home-front casualties,

Guest Column By Rabbi David Geffen

helping to free them from large blocks of concrete and other big items that might have fallen on them. Clearly we worked with soldiers who could operate the various cranes, bulldozers and other large equipment. We had to simulate pulling the individuals out and then providing medical care for dummies used for training. I had a special task I won’t describe, but suffice to say it is only practiced with Israeli or Jewish casualties. What the world seems to forget is that Israel, for its size, provides more assistance for natural and other types of

disasters than any other country in the world. Israelis know, literally from birth, that mass casualties are a responsibility of our nation in any place in the world we are permitted. The IDF has special units trained to fly quickly at any time, anywhere in the world to save people struck by calamities. Now it is Guatemala, where a volcano erupted. On TV we could watch the lava pouring out and running down the hill, turning all it touched into fire balls. Any houses, shacks, cars, fields were covered with the lava and disappeared in flames. The TV cameramen can capture all this but, from what I know, there is no way to halt the lava flow. Nor could we see many of the victims. I saw on TV tonight, the Saturday after Shabbat, the team of Israeli specialist physicians who have arrived in Guatemala. They were in makeshift medical tents assessing the wounds of those burned by the lava and who had roofs fall on them. This is a real disaster. The Israel medical flights also brought medications needed for the Guatemalans who had been hurt, some mildly and others very seriously. To emphasize the severity of the situation, burials were done just of bodies that

could be identified. Since we have lived in Israel, I can recall when Israelis rushed to Turkey and then Mexico City, where massive earthquakes had occurred. I’m sure that you all recall Israelis working to remove the rubble and trying to save those who might have survived. The most moving sights were Israelis carrying children, just rescued, from the buildings and homes that had disintegrated and trapped unsuspecting victims. I am very proud that a basic principle of Israel is to “help your fellow human being.” When misery and the danger of loss of life is faced, our citizenry here is prepared to act immediately in whatever part of our planet assistance is required. I assume that, in Atlanta, collections of money, food, clothing, medications and other required items are underway. I am certain the Jewish Federation and Atlanta Jewish organizations are moving quickly to help. Israelis have flown out and are helping on the spot. I assume American specialists are in Guatemala too. Each of you is to be thanked for all you are doing. ■


ISRAEL NEWS A Continuing Crisis Between Israel & American Jewry Last week, June 10 to 15, it was “Jewish Religion” week here in Israel. But you can challenge me and ask: “Isn’t Jewish Religion a major component of Israel all the time?” From what happened in those six days in June one would wonder. Israel was filled with 2,400 members of American Jewish Committee (AJC), here for the first time for its Global Assembly. The newspapers wrote a lot of stories; not sure there was much on TV. That was natural because Israel TV enjoys exploiting Jewish religion. The newscasters recognize haredi Judaism or the settlers’ Judaism only. The AJC made a different point dramatically and I think it was done well. Not sure it will change much, but the AJC took this “Jewish Religion” matter very seriously. On Monday, June 11 Harriet Schleifer, chairwoman of the AJC Board of Governors, appeared before the Knesset Committee for Immigration, Absorption and Diaspora Affairs. She was there with several colleagues each bolstering the other. She warned that “with young Jews increasingly distancing themselves from Israel, AJC might not have the means to continue to advocate for Israel.” Then she made an even stronger point. “We go around the world to speak on behalf of normalizing Israel among the nations of the world, and we have access like almost no other Jewish organization to world leaders.” Then she wanted the Knesset members to know how much Israel means to her and her members. “We have Israel in our kishkes (guts) already. But if you don’t have the succeeding generations willing to devote their time and personal money, to speak on behalf of Israel and Jews worldwide, you’re going to lose not only the U.S. diaspora but our voice around the world.” Her statement was only carried in the Haaretz English edition. Neither Haaretz Hebrew edition nor any other Hebrew paper, not even the Jerusalem Post, carried her comments. Schleifer was dealing with a real issue: “Jewish Religion in Israel and the United States.” At the meeting on Monday, June 11 of all 2,400 of the AJC delegates, it was labeled as an “extravaganza” in the newspaper. Although every attempt was made to slide over the differences between Israel and the rest of the Jewish world, President Reuven Rivlin noted, in his welcoming address, that “the gaps

are getting deeper and deeper.” Yehudah Glick, a religious Jew in Likud, tried to play down what is happening. He said that “the press and the polls paint a more negative picture than the reality of Israel-Diaspora ties.” A lot of laughter was heard when he said, “the very fact that the Israel-Diaspora ties is a central topic of discussion proves that Israel

Guest Column By Rabbi David Geffen

cares about it.” The president of the German Jewish Student Union argued that Israeli leaders frequently speak in the name of Diaspora Jewry but have failed to sufficiently take their stance into consideration. She suggested the creation of an instrumentality in Israel which would deal with worldwide Jewish issues. This is a nice pipe dream, but the Jewish Agency, which is supposed to act in this fashion, rarely deals with issues equally for Israel and Jews around the world. In terms of “Jewish Religion,” wrote Jeremy Sharon of the Jerusalem Post. “Divides are also clear and significant on attitudes to Jewish life in the Jewish state. An overwhelming majority of 80 percent of American Jews want progressive Jewish weddings, divorces and conversions to be recognized by the State of Israel, compared to just under half, 49 percent, of Israelis.” The number of American Jews who want changes in issues dealing with Jewish life events is high because they do not live in Israel. The Israeli number indicates that Israelis don’t want changes because they are still afraid of what will happen to the Jewishness of the Jewish state if major changes are made. This, to me, is very significant. Case in point, 73 percent of American Jewry feel a mixed-gender prayer area should be established at the Wall. Only 42 percent of Israelis want such an area while 48 percent oppose such an area. “In the face of rising extremism, more Israelis leaving Orthodox Judaism” was a headline one day last week. The longest article on “Jewish Religion” was how Orthodox individuals were found to be leaving that group. The story was extensive and carried many examples about the first time an orthodox Jew

broke the halachic rules and he or she was not struck by lightning. In Israel the phenomena are such that a Hebrew name has been created for them: “datlashim,” an acronym for “datiim lesheavar” (formerly religious). The article by the Jewish Religion columnist, Judy Maltz, dealt in depth with many problems that Israelis of this ilk face. In many instances, their parents will not allow them in the house and will not speak to them on the phone. Minister of Education Naftali Bennett had his own personal approach to the “Jewish Religion” problem. “If there is one thing that keeps me up at night, it’s not Iran but the future of the Jews in America and we have to face this together,” he stressed in his speech at AJC Conclave. Bennett told the story of how his non-religious parents came to Israel from San Francisco 40 years ago. In Israel they became “religious” modern Orthodox, so the minister was raised as an Orthodox

Jew moving more to the right in his political career. When challenged about the great divides in the AJC poll, he wanted people to know it was a concern. “What the poll reflects is that Israelis are going more rightward and favoring more traditional Judaism, as opposed to secularism which exists here, whereas American Jews are more to the left and more liberal.” Then he used his favorite lines. “I’m not going to whitewash that, but it shouldn’t be the reason for us to fall apart. So, we don’t agree on everything, but we are all Jews, for heaven’s sake. We’re all one family.” So that is how an Israeli right-wing religious minister left it: we are all one family. In families there can be compromises, but not in this “Jewish Religion” family. Only one branch of Judaism believes themselves to be authentic. When they get back home, they may try to make something happen. Israel grew and reached 70; American Jewry started 364 years ago. ■

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES JUNE 22, 2018 | 7


ISRAEL PRIDE

Good News From Our Jewish Home JERUSALEM

Arabic Blessings

A clay amulet with a blessing in Arabic dating to the Abbasid period was discovered in the Givati Parking Lot in the City of David in the Jerusalem Walls National Park, in an archaeological excavation conducted by the Israel Antiquities Authority and Tel Aviv University. According to the directors of the excavation, Prof. Yuval Gadot of Tel Aviv University and Dr. Yiftah Shalev of the Israel Antiquities Authority, “the size of the object, its shape, and the text on it indicate that it was apparently used as an amulet for blessing and protection.” The tiny object was discovered in a small room, sealed between plaster flooring. Pottery sherds uncovered at the site, including a complete lamp, date back to the Abbasid period.

Photo by Eliyahu Yanai, City of David Archives According to the directors of the excavation, Prof. Yuval Gadot of Tel Aviv University and Dr. Yiftah Shalev of the Israel Antiquities Authority, “the size of the Abbasid pendant, its shape, and the text on it indicate that it was apparently used as an amulet for blessing and protection.

Natural Killer Cells

Researchers at Hadassah Medical Organization in Israel have identified “natural killer cells” as a key component in answering why each pregnancy is easier and healthier than the first. According to Ellen Hershkin, president of Hadassah, the Women’s Zionist Organization in America, Inc., the study results, published in the May 15th issue of the medical journal “Immunity,” are the product of six years of research led by Dr. Simcha Yagel, head of OB/GYN at HMO, and included analyzing tissue samples from more than 450 pregnancies. Yagel and his team discovered a population of natural killer cells found in repeated pregnancies which has a unique transcription and epigenetic signature. They named them “Pregnancy Trained Decidual Natural Killer Cells.” The team notes that therefore preclampsia, a condition caused by inadequate placentation, drops in subsequent pregnancies. Yagel’s goal is to develop a test to screen risk factors. He said, “by understanding 8 | JUNE 22, 2018 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

how natural killer cells work, we can ask what’s missing in the first pregnancies and eventually develop a treatment.”

BE’ER SHEVA

Streamlining Technology

The Israeli army has selected Israel’s Shikun & Binui and Africa Israel (AFI Group) to build its new tech campus in the south of Israel, where the IDF plans to relocate many of its units as part of a multiyear plan of streamlining. The IDF said its new information and communications technology center will cost is estimated at $2 billion. They will build, operate and run the center for 25 years, the army said in a statement. The campus, spread over an area of 150,000 square meters (180,000 square yards), will serve some 5,000 soldiers and career officers from the IDF’s intelligence units, including its cybersecurity units, which will relocate from the center of the country. The army also hopes that the campus will lead to a flourishing of the local economy, through the employment of hundreds of workers and the creation of new jobs around the campus. Soldiers will closely interact with with researchers and development at the university, leading to joint projects and a fertile exchange of ideas, the army hopes. The digital center is just one of a number of projects the army has initiated in the south of Israel, at a total cost of some 15.7 billion. One of the projects that is already operational is the setting up of a training center that hosts some 10,000 soldiers and career officers. Lt. Col. Yael Grossman of the Cyber Defense Division said that the transfer of the technological elite units provides the IDF “with a golden opportunity to lead the digital transformation” of the army.

The IDF’s tech campus, spread over a built area of 150,000 square meters, will be erected at the tech park of Gav-Yam. In the proximity of the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, in Beer Sheva. (IDF spokesperson unit)

TIBERIAS

Cave Uncovered

Tiberias Municipality contractors were baffled, as all the concrete they poured into the 65 feet deep foundation

holes they had drilled before building a new neighborhood disappeared. Suddenly, as a mechanical digger exposed a cave entrance, they found their missing concrete — and a unique 2,000-yearold burial cave. The three-room cave includes a decorated entry way and two burial chambers. The entry, slightly damaged by the digger, still shows remains of painted walls, with glimpses of red, yellow, and white still visible to the naked eye, said Israel Antiquities Authority archaeologist Yair Amitsur. The ossuaries and niches for laying the corpses are clues in dating the cave, he said. From the first century BCE until circa second century CE, burial practices included laying out the dead in niches, and then returning a year later to collect the bones and place them in small ceramic coffins or ossuaries. Tiberias was named in honor of the Roman Emperor Tiberius and founded in 18 CE by the son of Herod the Great, Herod Antipas. The cave is undergoing more testing and Mayor of Tiberias Yossi Ben David promised that the new neighborhood’s plan will be adjusted to protect and conserve it.

Today in Israeli History

Items provided by the Center for Israel Education (www.israeled.org), where you can find more details. June 22, 1939: Ada Yonath Is Born Nobel Prize-winning biochemist Ada Yonath is born into an Orthodox Jewish family in Jerusalem, then part of the British Mandate of Palestine. June 23, 2011: Orna Barbivai Becomes First Female IDF Major General Brigadier General Orna Barbivai is promoted to the rank of major general, becoming the highest-ranking female officer in the history of the IDF. June 24, 2007: The Modi’in Miracle defeats the Petach Tikvah Pioneers 9-1 in the inaugural game of the Israel Baseball League (IBL). The game is played before a crowd of more than 3,000 at Yarkon Field in Petach Tikvah. June 25, 2005: IDF soldier Gilad Shalit is captured by a group of Palestinian militants and is held hostage for over five years before being exchanged for 1,027 Palestinian prisoners. June 26, 1944: At the 1944 Republican Party National Convention, New

Burial chamber: A three-room 2,000-yearold burial cave near Tiberias, June 2018 (Miki Peleg, Israel Antiquities Authority)

TEL AVIV

Basketball Win

Maccabi Tel Aviv won the national basketball championship taking their 52nd trophy and ending a four-year drought after trouncing Hapoel Holon in a 95-75 victory. The Tel Aviv players came out looking for revenge after being defeated by Holon in the State Cup final earlier in the season. Maccabi stormed into the game with a 13-0 run, while Holon struggled to put points on the board throughout the first half. Jake Cohen was the top Maccabi scorer with 18 points, followed by Michael Roll’s 15. John Dibartolomeo and Norris Cole scored 13 each and DeAndre Kane added 10 of his own. For Holon, Tu Holloway scored 20 points, Glen Rice Jr. scored 14, Joe Alexander finished with 13 and Tamir Blatt with 12. Team captain John DiBartolomeo invited former captain Itay Segev, who was dismissed from his position, to lift the championship plate alongside him.

York Senator Thomas Dewey’s strong support for the establishment of a Jewish state in Palestine captures the attention of Zionists in Palestine and, more notably, American Jewry. June 27, 1967: Israel Annexes East Jerusalem After June 1967 War. Following Israel’s victory and subsequent acquisition of Jordan’s territory along the West Bank of the Jordan River in the war, the Israeli government annexes roughly 70 square kilometers of land next to West Jerusalem. June 28, 1919: Republic of Poland Minorities Treaty Is Signed. During the Paris Peace Conference, one of the major initiatives undertaken by the Allies is recognition of minority rights in European states. While addressing the rights of minorities in general, the Polish Treaty specifically mentions Jewish cultural and civil liberties.


LOCAL NEWS

Jewish candidate Ellyn Jeager won the Democratic primary in Georgia on May 22.

Jeager Wins State Senate Primary By Breanna West On May 22, Jewish candidate and mental health advocate Ellyn Jeager garnered 64 percent of the vote to win the Democratic primary in Georgia State Senate District 56, which included part of Sandy Springs. She will face Republican John Albers in the general election November 6. From Long Island, N.Y., Jeager has been a resident of Georgia for 41 years. She is the previous director of public policy and advocacy for Mental Health America of Georgia. She has been visiting classrooms around the state as an instructor for Mental Health First Aid for youth and adults. Often, participants came to her after class and shared personal stories about their struggles with their mental and physical well-being. They expressed problems that ranged from suicide in the family to Alzheimer’s and access to health insurance or medical assistance. She described these stories as “emotional, gut-wrenching and infuriating,” and was “constantly moved and heartbroken.” Jeager has spent 30 years listening to people’s stories and said it has been “very humbling, very educational and has helped me grow.” She said she would like to see steps taken for a more “mentally and physically healthy state.” The solution is early mental health intervention geared towards youth as well as the expansion of Medicaid, Jeager said. “Some kids feel isolated [and] angry. There are always signs that let you know there is a problem.” She urges public awareness

about mental health. “We do everything in crisis mode. We get the best results when we start it early.” Jeager is an advocate for the use of mental health and substance abuse courts to reduce the rate of juvenile incarceration. These courts focus less on punishment during the sentencing. “I don’t think people should be locked up for exhibiting signs of their illness,” Jeager said. She is concerned about the lack of accessibility to health care for communities living in rural Georgia. “Hospitals are closing. Half of the counties don’t have a pediatrician.” When there is a medical emergency, it may be 100s of miles away, she said. In her mid 70s, Jeager decided to run for the Senate because “policy is something I’m very interested in.” About incumbent John Albers, she said, “We are very, very different.” She envisions change to make Georgia to be “welcoming and progressive” and wants to see public policy “equal, not just for individual communities, but for everybody.” Jeager values the diversity in Georgia. “I enjoy when I hear many languages spoken; it’s a much stronger and more interesting state.” A first-generation American, her parents were Russian-Jewish immigrants. She is an active member of Congregation Or Hadash in Sandy Springs. As a Jew, Jeager says, she has an instilled sense of responsibility to help others. “I cannot keep talking about what has to change if I’m not willing to be a part of the change.” ■ ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES JUNE 22, 2018 | 9


LOCAL NEWS

Photos by Sarah Moosazadeh

Lois Blonder presents a speech after receiving the Lifetime of Achievement Award.

Joel Marks officially announces the end of his two-year term as chairman of the JFGA board during the 112th annual meeting of the Jewish Federation of Greater Atlanta.

Federation’s “Front Porch” View of the Future By Dave Schechter Joel Marks, wearing a kippah and matching socks honoring the University of Florida, sat on a rocking chair, presiding over the 112th annual meeting of the Jewish Federation of Greater Atlanta. Rocking back and forth, Marks began the meeting with an invitation: “I’ve been saving a seat for you on the front porch.” In front of a few hundred people in the auditorium of the Atlanta Jewish Academy, Marks conducted the final duties of his two-year term as chairman of the JFGA board. His successor, Mark Silberman, begins a two-year term as board chairman on July 1. The stage was set with red-andwhite striped cushions on a pair of rocking chairs, a couple of crates with a vase of daisies on top, and a section of wooden fence. The scene was intended to remind all present that JFGA’s “Front Porch” initiative will play a significant role in the

organization’s future. “For me, this has been an honor and a privilege; it’s been a humbling experience,” Marks said in his valedictory address. Marks read aloud from a 1969 letter in which Rabbi Harry Epstein, z”l, for 54 years spiritual leader of Ahavath Achim Congregation, lamented the apathy of Jewish youth and the need to make Judaism relevant to young people. “We’re struggling with those same ideals, same thoughts, 50 years later,” he noted. “Jewish education, Jewish literacy and Jewish tradition are central elements to a Jewish community,” Marks said, citing an increased focus by JFGA on growing educational opportunities. Marks also used the occasion to admonish those present to be careful about how they speak about Jewish organizations and individuals. “Tone matters,” he said. Referencing the Hebrew term lashon

Mark Silberman and his wife Linda take part in the 112th annual meeting of the Jewish Federation of Greater Atlanta. Silberman will begin a two-year term as board chairman July 1. 10 | JUNE 22, 2018 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

hara (evil speech), Marks said, “We’re experts at it in the Jewish community. . . I ask everybody in this room to be mindful of hurtful speech.” Marks noted that his term as chairman began about the same time that Eric Robbins became JFGA’s executive director. In turn, Robbins praised Marks for streamlining JFGA’s governance structure and for creating a a culture “where we literally have broken down walls.” Robbins also cited the Epstein letter, saying, “What keeps me up at night is apathy and relevance . . . That’s why we did the Front Porch,” a series of events held in a variety of settings that drew hundreds of people offering their thoughts about the Jewish community’s needs. “We have got to get everyone to care because Atlanta could be a model of how we’re going to address apathy and relevance in the 21st Century,” Robbins said. Acknowledging concerns about JFGA’s future, Robbins said, “Front Porch

wasn’t walking away from what this organization has been so committed to since it was founded, the continued support of the major organizations who have built this community and continue to serve this community. “JFGA remains committed to its traditional method of fundraising. Nobody is walking away from that campaign,” Robbins said. But innovation comes with a price tag, he continued, and greater resources will be needed, perhaps through the Atlanta Jewish Foundation, JFGA’s donoradvised funding program, to address those issues of apathy and relevance. “Put your seat belt on,” Robbins said. “If we want to solve today’s problems we have to try a whole bunch of stuff,” some that will succeed and some that may not. In an email sent after the meeting, the Federation highlighted two prototype programs already moving forward: * “One Happy Preschooler” is an

After serving as the founder and director of the Atlanta Jewish Music Festival for more than nine years Russell Gottschalk was honored with the Mary & Max London “People Power Award.


LOCAL NEWS initiative championed by incoming Board Chair Mark Silberman, a grandfather of five. The program will provide each of 10 families with $1,000 tuition grants to enroll their children, ages 18 to 24 months, in a Jewish preschool for the first time. The application deadline is June 29. * The idea for the “Israel Baby Grant” originated with the Atlanta-based Jewish Fertility Foundation. Funds will be allocated to send a local couple to Israel, where the cost of fertility treatments is significantly less than in the United States. From an initial investment of $2,500 to $3,000, the “Israel Baby Grant” may expand to serve additional couples. For his part, Silberman told the annual meeting that his two goals as chairman are to redefine the meaning of the word Federation,” and to raise the level of philanthropic giving, to “breed a culture” of philanthropy in the community. Silberman, with a nod to the pressures of the new position, joked that he was looking forward to when his picture is on the wall of past JFGA past chair people. He heads a lengthy slate of board members approved by acclamation during the annual meeting. Among the other officers will be Lori Kagan Schwarz, vice chair; Rob Leven, secretary; and Stan Sunshine, treasurer. The awards portion of the evening featured presentation of the Lifetime of Achievement Award to Lois Blonder, who along with her late husband, Jerry, z”l, endowed the Blonder Family Department for Special Needs at the Marcus Jewish Community Center and were benefactors of Jerry’s Habima Theatre. In her acceptance speech, Blonder recalled moving to Atlanta at age 18, with her parents, to attend the University of Georgia, at a time when the area’s Jewish population was less than 4,000, and there were six synagogues and three Jewish country clubs. She has seen great change in the Jewish community over 50 years. “I have likened it to a field of dreams,” Blonder said. “Not, if you build it they will come, but if it’s needed, we will provide.” “The innovators and visionaries are showing the courage to develop the potential of our community for tomorrow,” she said, looking in the direction of Marks and Robbins, who were standing on the opposite side of the stage. Adam Kazinec, co-chairman of the Federation’s upcoming 40-under-40 mission to Israel, received the Abe Schwartz Young Leadership Award. The Gerald H. Cohen Community Development Award was presented to Matt Shulman, whose community engagements include the Usher 1F Collaborative, a non-profit that funds research to save or restore the vision of those suffering from that disease. Jeremy Katz, the archivist of the Cuba Family Archives for Southern Jewish History at The Breman Museum, received the Marilyn Shubin Professional Staff Development Award. Russell Gottschalk, who is stepping down after nine years as founder and director of the Atlanta Jewish Music Festival, was honored with the Mary & Max London “People Power Award.” Sally Mundell, founder and president of The Packaged Good, an organization that encourages volunteerism among children, received the Tikkun Olam/ Community Impact Award. ■

Archivist of the Cuba Family Archives for Southern Jewish History Jeremy Katz receives the Marilyn Shubin Professional Staff Development Award.

President of The Packaged Good Sally Mundell received the Tikkun Olam/ Community Impact Award after creating an organization that promotes volunteerism among youth in the community.

Joel Marks and JFGA President and CEO Eric Robbins share some of the initiatives the Federation plans to continue for the future.

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES JUNE 22, 2018 | 11


BUSINESS ACG Atlanta Announces 40 Fastest-Growing Companies

The Atlanta Chapter of the Association for Corporate Growth® (ACG), a global professional organization with the mission of Driving Middle-Market Growth®, announced on May 14 the 2018 Georgia Fast 40, recognizing the top 40 fastest-growing middle-market companies in Georgia. Applicants were required to submit three years of verifiable revenue and employment growth records, which were validated by national accounting firm and founding Diamond sponsor, Cherry Bekaert LLP. An ACG Selection Committee evaluated each application and conducted in-person interviews with all qualified applicants. All companies on the list are for-profit and headquartered in Georgia. They reported year-end revenues ranging from $15 to $500 million.

New Directors Added to Buckhead Coalition Board

The nonprofit chamber-type Buckhead Coalition organization has tapped two new directors for 2018. Added to the roster of 100 members by invitation are Robert B. Aland and Michael D. Golden. Aland is president of Robert B. Aland Michael D. Golden the Private Bank of Buckhead, and Golden is a partner in the law firm of Arnall Golden Gregory LLP. In addition, the Coalition lists Christopher M. Godfrey as an ex-officio member for the year because of his position as president of the affiliated Buckhead Business Association.

Elovitz and Fodor Accepted to AIOFLA’s “10 Best”

The American Institute of Family Law Attorneys (AIOFLA) has recognized the exceptional performance of Georgia’s Family Law Attorneys Rachel Elovitz and Salmeh K. Fodor, Esq. as two of the 2018 10 Best Family Law Attorneys for Client Satisfaction.

Rachel Elovitz

Salmeh K. Fodor

Gray Accepted as Three Years AIOFLA's “10 Best”

Pamela J. Gray 12 | JUNE 22, 2018 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

The American Institute of Family Law Attorneys (AIOFLA) has recognized the exceptional performance of Georgia’s Family Law Attorney Pamela J. Gray as Three Years 10 Best Family Law Attorney for Client Satisfaction. The AIOFLA is a third-party attorney rating organization that publishes an annual list of the Top 10 Family Law Attorneys in each state. Attorneys who are selected to the “10 Best” list must pass AIOFLA’s rigorous selection process, which is based on client and/or peer nominations, thorough research and AIOFLA’s independent evaluation. AIOFLA’s annual list was created to be used as a resource for clients during the attorney selection process.


BUSINESS Beldick Receives Loan Officer of the Year Award

Allison Beldick

On May 11, Atlantic Bay Mortgage Group® announced that Allison Beldick was recognized as the Agents’ Choice Awards 2018 Loan Officer of the Year by Atlanta Agent Magazine. Atlantic Bay Mortgage Group is a privately owned national mortgage lender headquartered in Virginia Beach, Va. The Loan Officer of the Year award is voted on by industry professionals, including agents, developers and lenders, and recognizes those who excel in the industry. Allison has been an active member of the real estate community for more than 15 years.

Espeut Earns Local Finance Officer Certification

Jennifer Espeut earned Local Finance Officer Certification in the first quarter of 2018 through the Carl Vinson Institute of Government’s financial management training program. Espeut, who works with the Gwinnett County Department of Transportation, was recognized with Level II certification for pursuing professional development in such areas as governmental finance, accounting and budgeting. The Carl Vinson Institute of Government is a UGA Public Service and Outreach unit that offers training and technical assistance and conducts applied research to help local and state governments operate efficiently and effectively and provide improved service to the public.

PeachDish Features Resort Cookbook Recipes PeachDish, the Atlanta-based farm-to-table meal kit service, has partnered with Sea Island and The Broadmoor, two legendary, awardwinning resorts, to re-create four recipes from their new premier cookbooks, "Soul of the South" and "Spirit of the West." New and returning customers of PeachDish were able to create dishes from the Forbes Five-Star resort on Georgia’s coast, all from the comfort of their own homes the week of June 18. Sea Island and The Broadmoor will celebrate their 90th and 100th anniversaries, respectively, this year.

Slingshot Publishes Guide to Jewish Innovation

Slingshot, the organization that helps fund and shape innovation in the American Jewish community, has just published its 2018 Slingshot Guide to Jewish Innovation. It named Atlanta-based organizations SOJOURN (Southern Jewish Resource Network) and JScreen among the top 50 innovative Jewish organizations in America. This is the third time each of these organizations has been included in the Slingshot Guide. SOJOURN is a resource for Jewish & LGBTQ+ programming, education, support and advocacy. Programs provide students, teachers, clergy and communities with tools towelcoming to gender and sexually diverse people; to address gender equity; to enhance Judaic learning; and to prevent suicide. JScreen at Emory University provides early, affordable saliva testing for more than 200 genetic diseases that impact Sephardic, Mizrahi and Ashkenazi Jews. JScreen is currently working on a low-cost test for the BRCA cancer gene. Request your kit: https:// jscreen.org. ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES JUNE 22, 2018 | 13


BUSINESS

Sandy Springs Business: Increased traffic is mixed bag By Roni Robbins roni@atljewishtimes.com Depending on who you ask and where their business is located near the new City Springs “city center” in Sandy Springs, you might get a different reaction to the mixed-use project. Most are hopeful about positive changes to the area, but there are still some lingering concerns about traffic. For Cecily Ross, owner of Veronica’s Attic, traffic has improved in more ways than one. A new traffic light at Sandy Springs Circle and Galambos Way at the entrance to the shopping center that houses her store, along with the creation of a walkable city, more restaurants and retail stores, have all driven more foot traffic to her store, said the South African businesswoman. “I’m very positive about what’s going on in Sandy Springs. “I’m glad you didn’t call me 1 ½ years ago.” That was when construction may have slowed down traffic,” she said. “At the time many customers may have stayed away from the area. It did play a

little part.” Traffic lanes were blocked and there were power outages. But she said she didn’t suffer as much as other businesses. “I did feel the effect. But not to a great extent. Business during construction pretty much stayed the same. After construction, business got even better than it was before construction. It’s truly been, to date, a positive effect.” From customers’ points of view, it’s much easier coming in and out of the shopping complex with the new traffic light. She also has started to see more walk-in traffic from people working at City Springs and homeowners moving into apartments there. Near her, in City Springs, she’s noted an influx of new specialty restaurants, apartments, two workout places and a new theater. “If new people come to look at the area, they want to know what retail, restaurants, what health and fitness is around. People see what all is in the area.” She said she is looking forward to having new restaurants, concerts at the

President and Chairman of Selig Enterprises Steve Selig is one of two developers of the City Springs Project.

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new theater and the new Heritage Sandy Springs Farmers Market, previously in a different location. “Certainly, I’m looking forward to being able to close the store, go and catch a bite to eat and going to the theater, all the new activities the City of Sandy Springs will be offering. There’s going to be new and exciting venues across the road. That means many more people to explore the area. Exciting that they made the city of Sandy Springs a very walkable community.” Planning for the future, she’s already considering the idea of staying open later. “If traffic demands it, if people want us to stay open for early evening shopping, we’re looking into that.” Not all businesses paint a rosy picture about the newly constructed city center. Bob Brourman, owner of Fragile, has seen business drop by about 25 percent as a result of the construction. “I had a customer who we had special ordered something for and we were holding it for her and she said: ‘When construction in Sandy Springs is over, I will come over and pick it up.’ And that was not for an-

other 10 weeks. “It’s been a struggle for us.” Detours, one-way streets and traffic jams prevented customers from getting to his store without going a long way off their normal route, he said. Construction crews also parked in the shopping center, leaving less spaces for customers. Most of the construction is completed, so he’s hopeful customers will return to the area. But he still has concerns about future traffic congestion with more people living in the apartment complexes. “We think we are in a good position” to benefit from the growth. But so far, he hasn’t seen it. “We hope it gets better. It’s been a rocky road to this point. We know there are hurdles to jump and hopefully we are over the worst of it. We all hope there’ll be progress in Sandy Springs. We hope it will improve when, in the next couple of months, the entertainment arts complex opens. There is a lot left to be determined. For me, the jury is still out.” There’s no reason to be concerned,


BUSINESS said Steve Selig, president and chairman of Selig Enterprises, one of two developers of the City Springs project. “There was interruption with traffic congestion when the streets were closed, but now it's pretty much rectified.” He admits some may have temporarily lost business, but he suspects the project has reinvigorated the area now. “I think it should get slightly better, but time will tell.” Just replacing the old Target, Goodwill and lots of small businesses with seven curb cuts along Roswell Road was in improvement, Selig said. “The congestion was horrible then and now it’s better there.” There is now underground parking, and three access roads to the development will help with the traffic instead of pushing it toward Roswell and Johnson Ferry roads, said Selig Enterprises chief operating officer and project lead Jo Ann Chitty. “Traffic congestion is bad; traffic counts [for business] are good. Congestion during the day can be frustrating." As the owner of several Sandy Springs commercial and retail properties, Selig said he believes the project “will enhance the value of real estate, without a question. Selig Enterprises has already seen rental rates go up in the area in its office and retail space he said. “We are getting more calls from brokers. Rental rates are easing up because of the new focal point in Sandy Springs, and a lot more people are interested in the area.” Re/Max Realtor Jon Shapiro also has a mixed reaction to the growth. “Basically, the pedestrian aspect has been a plus. People like the walkability. If there’s one negative, it’s that there’s more traffic, a lot more congestion and a change in the feel of the area. Sandy Springs has become more urban. Sandy Springs had sort of a suburban kind feel to it. It used to be quiet and now there’s a lot of hustle and bustle. ” The traffic hasn’t hurt his business, he said. “I haven’t personally noticed a difference. Our business was doing well the whole time. We work with a broader geography.” The main difference is the traffic on Roswell Road and the city center, he said. “It’s more densely populated, creating more traffic.”

Re/Max Realtor Jon Shapiro has mixed reactions regarding the growth in Sandy Springs.

Veronica’s Attic owner Cecily Ross (right) and her In terms of property values, Shapiro believes daughter Eryn Spector believe traffic is hardly a growth will have a positive impact in Sandy Springs. problem for their Sandy Spring boutique. “Actually, with the growth it should become more desirable. It has been steadily performing. There’s been no drop in home sales. The trend should con- the project was to make Sandy Springs more livable, aptinue in a positive way.” pealing, and a place for city government, concerts, a betFrom Selig’s point of view, “The project is going ter lifestyle.” ■ to change Sandy Springs for the better and give everyone a focus point. It will be a gathering place for everything from business meetings and city council meetings to high school graduations and concerts. Part of the inspiration for

Sandy Springs Plaza houses such local businesses as Fragile. ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES JUNE 22, 2018 | 15


COVER STORY City Springs Opens as New Heart of Sandy Springs to attain cityhood for Sandy Springs. She was its first mayor from 2005 to 2014. The complex has a vari The long-awaited new downety of functions and venues. town and heart of Sandy Springs is a The five-story City Hall houses nearly all central community gathering place that of the offices of the Sandy Springs govbrings together civic, cultural, retail and ernment, most of which relocated from residential amenities. the Morgan Falls center. Many of the City Springs, dedicated on May building’s third floor meeting and coning place for people who live and visit.” “The vision was that Sandy Springs 7, was developed as a public-private ference center rooms are available for City Springs is made up of a 14-acre did not have a city center,” said Steve partnership between the City of Sandy community use by reservation, including triangle bounded by Roswell, Mt. Vernon Selig, president and chairman of Selig Springs, Selig Enterprises and Carter & an outdoor area called City View Terrace, and Johnson Ferry roads. Enterprises. “There was really no focal Associates. which is soon to feature a water wall. The address of the city building, 1 point for the city or community. It was based on a master plan creSpecial rates are available for non-profit Galambos Way, is a tribute to Eva Galam"I think that this development will ated in 2012 with much input from the groups. City Hall’s lobby offers both open bos, the Jewish pioneer who played an serve that purpose. It’ll not only be a community itself, according to Sandy and private areas with tables and seating important role in the decades-long effort place for city government, but a gatherSprings Mayor Rusty Paul. that can be accessed by anyone any time the building is open. Byers ThePhotos provided by City Springs & Selig Enterprises // Renditions depict community members strolling Sandy Springs' new development City Springs. atre, 1,100-seat state-of-theart Performing Arts Center, is the true “showpiece” of City Springs, Selig said. “It’s absolutely beautiful.” The theaterwill host a 10-event performance series, including dance, theater, music and comedy, in addition to a speaker series. It’s also the home of the City Springs Theatre Company and a new collaborative initiative making arts education and programming accessible to people of all backgrounds. By Fran Putney

16 | JUNE 22, 2018 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES


COVER STORY The Performing Arts Center’s inaugural season kicks off with a 12day celebration in early August and includes a concert by the Branford Marsalis Quartet on Aug. 11 and a film, “Heading Home: A Tale of Team Israel,” presented by the Atlanta Jewish Film Festival, on Aug. 19, Studio Theatre, located between City Hall and Byers Theatre, is a 5,000-square-foot multi-functional space that can be used as a black box theater or entertainment venue. Its 250 seats can be literally rolled back and the room reconfigured to accommodate meetings or other events. Outdoors, City Green is a four-acre park with shade trees and interactive fountains. It’s the new location for the Heritage Sandy Springs Farmers Market on Saturday mornings, spring through fall. As a mixed-use development, in addition to the city-operated building, City Springs also has a residential component consisting of 275 flats and 19 townhome apartments, along with about 28,000 square feet of retail space on the ground floors of those buildings. “We focused on restaurants, food, exercise and health as gathering places for people” when selecting the retail tenants, said Selig Chief Operating Officer Jo Ann Chitty, who served as one of the primary project managers. Mayor Paul is thrilled about the potential that City Springs has in creating community in Sandy Springs. “The aspiration is to have enough kinds of different events here in this area that every resident of the city will find something that they absolutely, positively can’t miss at least once or twice a year.” ■ For more information, visit www.citysprings.com.

President and Chairman of the Board of Selig Enterprises, Inc. Steve Selig

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES JUNE 22, 2018 | 17


HOME A Look at Sandy Springs in Year 13 By Fran Putney You might say Sandy Springs is celebrating its bar mitzvah this year. It’s been 13 years since it officially became a city. With its prime location, excellent schools and growing cultural scene, Sandy Springs continues to evolve as an attractive community for families and people of all ages. Noted as the sixth largest city in Georgia, Sandy Springs’ growing population now exceeds 105,000 residents, according to Mayor Rusty Paul, who says that the city has “the greatest neighborhoods on the planet.” Its 38 square miles encompass areas that extend from Sandy Springs Mayor Rusty Paul inside the I-285 perimeter and northward to Roswell. From the west it extends toward I-75 and the new SunTrust Park to an eastern “peninsula” surrounded by Dunwoody neighborhoods. This large geographic area includes a diverse population, business and health centers as well as 30 parks and natural resources such as the Chattahoochee River. “Sandy Springs is a very beautiful part of the Atlan-

ta area. It’s older, so it’s more developed, and the landscape is more mature,” said Eydie Koonin, realtor with Atlanta Fine Homes, Sotheby’s International Realty. Before it was incorporated as a city in 2005, Sandy Springs grew more as a sprawling suburb than a cohesive communiAtlanta Fine Homes ty. But in early May, the city of Eydie Koonin Sandy Springs realized a longtime goal of creating a community gathering place. The new City Springs development houses the City Hall as well as two state-of-the art theaters and multi-functional meeting and event space. The building complex, located off Roswell Road between Mt. Vernon and Johnson Ferry roads, also has a residential and retail component. “It’s very exciting,” said Coldwell Banker agent Debbie Sonenshine. “There’s a lot going on. Sandy Springs always had a soul, but it didn’t really have a heart. Now, to have Coldwell Banker government offices and a per-

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forming arts center all in one place, it will be a real heart of the city.” The Sandy Springs housing market offers a variety of choices, “from new and old, from first time homebuyer condos and starter homes to some of the most prestigious mansions in the metro area and wonderful mixed empty nester neighborhoods.

“Because of the variety of options, home prices range from moderate to millions,” Koonin said. Still, affordability is becoming a concern for some Sandy Springs residents. In response, the mayor has started a task force to redevelop the city’s north end – known for a declining retail environment and decadesold low-density housing – in a way that especially benefits lower-income residents. Rising property values in other areas of the city are a reflection of its success, said Mayor Paul. Sandy Springs has become an important economic engine for the region. It is home to a number of Fortune 500 and other major companies such as Graphic Packages, UPS, Mercedes-Benz and Cox Communications. Even the New York Stock Exchange is owned by a Sandy Springs company, Intercontinental Exchange.

Top schools are family magnet

The city’s excellent public and private schools are key factors that make Sandy Springs an attractive choice for families, Koonin said. Heards Ferry Elementary, on the west side, for example, opened a new building just a few years ago. At the high school level, Riverwood is an International Baccalaureate school and North Springs is a magnet school specializing in the arts and sciences. Sandy Springs is also home to many of Atlanta’s Jewish day schools, such as Chaya Mushka, The Davis Academy, The Epstein School and The Weber School, as well as several Jewish preschools. Similarly, the area’s sizeable Jewish population supports a number of synagogues as well as kosher markets. Mayor Paul says he is proud that the Jewish community is part of Sandy Springs’ diversity and was pleased to set up an Israeli sister-city program with the Western Galilee Cluster, a group of cities in northern Israel. The relationship was established, in large part, to honor Sandy Springs’ founding mayor, Eva Galambos, a Jewish Holocaust survivor.

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18 | JUNE 22, 2018 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

New Mercedes-Benz headquarters in Sandy Springs.


HOME

Sandy Springs residents Sam, Marc, Alba, Sopia, and Zach pose for a family portrait.

Other amenities that make Sandy Springs a desirable place to live and visit, according to the mayor, include great shopping, a growing cultural and arts scene that will be enhanced by the new City Springs Performing Arts Center and wonderful parks and recreation areas. The mayor also points to a low crime rate managed by the 140 sworn officers of the Sandy Springs police department. And while traffic continues to be a challenge, as in any large city, Sandy Springs has easy access to MARTA, is close to two major highways, and is becoming more pedestrian-friendly with trails and smart development.

Central Atlanta location

The King and Queen buildings are landmarks in Sandy Springs.

Abernathy Greenway park draws a number of community members for a stroll or some fun times on the playground.

Location was what sold Kelly and David Gold on their house in Sandy Springs when they moved from Boston about a year ago. David’s job with an international consumer electronics company was what brought them to Atlanta, but Kelly continues to fly to Boston every few weeks for her job handling mergers and acquisitions in the biotech industry. They needed a location that was easy for David’s commute to Johns Creek and had quick access to the airport. The couple also wanted a larger home than they had in Boston that could grow with their family of three young children, ages 1, 3 and 5, their live-in nanny and dog, and easily accommodate visiting grandparents. They did their research and initially thought they would move to Buckhead or Virginia-Highland, but after Koonin heard their wish list, she directed them to Sandy Springs. On a visit with her youngest child in tow, Kelly accompanied Koonin to find the perfect Sandy Springs home in the Lake Forest neighborhood. “Sandy Springs is so good for families,” Kelly said. She added that they love being just minutes from the stores at The Prado and close to Chastain Park, where they spend a lot of time. Their children attend Temple Sinai’s preschool, where they’ve made friends with other parents. Next year, their daughter will attend kindergarten at the Galloway School right in the neighborhood. Convenience was the primary factor for Marc Baylin, a work-at-home wealth manager who, after selling a house in Sandy Springs near the Dunwoody area, sought Sonenshine’s help to buy a home in Sandy Springs inside the perimeter. “It’s convenient to everything,” Baylin said. That includes his wife Alba’s work commute downtown and an easy drive to take his youngest son to The Weber School. The couple is happy with their new home, which was rebuilt in 2008 and features a private backyard and pool, and is about a mile from Chastain Park. Baylin says he also loves the character of the “non-cookie-cutter” neighborhood, which has both older and newer homes. With all the growth, especially in the last decade, Mayor Paul said the main focus for the immediate future is to “fulfill the promise” of enriching the city’s quality of life through a stronger sense of connected community. ■ ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES JUNE 22, 2018 | 19


HOME The dining room walls and ceiling are painted high-gloss lacquer, Sherman Williams’ Still Water. With well-scaled molding, the balanced room showcases the graphite art of Jennifer Teyf’s maternal grandmother, Shirley Portman.

Photos by Duane Stork // Local designer, Amy Spanier (pictured right) worked with Jennifer and Roman Teyf on their home, bordering Sandy Springs and Dunwoody. Featuring layered lighting and colorful accents, the living room is painted Benjamin Moore’s Iron Gate.

Design Tips & Tricks for Insta-worthy Interiors By Deborah Herr deborah@atljewishtimes.com Those of us who scroll Instagram for interior design inspiration can get lulled into an infinite grid of chic and inspiring spaces. It takes an expert – or savvy homeowner – to transform these digital rooms into real, habitable spaces. Instead of trying to glean this year’s interior design do’s and don’ts from my feed, I enlisted a local designer with 38 years of experience to answer hard-hitting questions about DIYs, rug sizes and more. Amy Spanier, owner of S.N.O.B. (Slightly North of Buckhead) design and I.D.E.A. (Innovate Design Exhibit Art) gallery, agreed to be AJT’s “Ask Amy” for home design this week.

AJT: What are your top three do’s and don’ts of interior design? Amy: • Do always try to infuse your family’s personalities into each space. When in doubt, call an interior designer. You can hire them for a consultation, advice on what you’re thinking, or to bring your feelings to fruition. • Do consider the scale of all elements in a room, getting it right from the furniture to [crown] molding. Buy a durable, luxe sofa with quality construction and fabric. The best interiors should take you and your lifestyle into consideration. • Do accessorize. Accessories are the jewelry of design. Layer lots of lighting too.

• Don’t hang artwork too high. Place a piece so its bottom is approximately 3 to 8 inches above furniture; 12 inches is OK too. You can go lower for large pieces and slightly higher for small pieces. When there is too much space between furniture and art, the eye rests on the void, blank space. • Also don’t hang light fixtures too low or high. • Don’t choose the wrong-size rug. Placing an area rug that’s too small for a seating area instantly throws the room out of scale. Make sure the rug touches every piece of furniture. All the furniture will relate to each other. If you have small rugs you love, you can layer them.

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20 | JUNE 22, 2018 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

Painted millwork holds artwork, books and even accent lighting that liven up this home office.


HOME AJT: What DIY projects should homeowners attempt, and which should they save for the pros? Amy: I think people can do just about any DIY job. It’s about getting all the right information, practice, prep and confidence. Some things not to DIY are obvious, like a new roof. Also, I would never suggest a DIY with electrical, plumbing or climbing really high ladders. AJT: What advice do you give your clients to help them define their personal style? Amy: Always listen to your instincts, and keeping a sense of humor never hurts. Call a designer to help refine and guide you. AJT: Pantone’s color of 2018 was ultra violet. Did you see this successfully or unsuccessfully integrated into interiors this year?

Amy: Ultra violet is a lovely color in moderation. Accessories like pillows, the matting around art or photos, even an accent chair or woven into a rug is wonderful. Also, a feature wall. AJT: Do you prefer stained wood or painted kitchen cabinets? Amy: I prefer painted cabinets to stained. AJT: Do you have any trend predictions for 2019? Amy: More color. Younger generations will recognize the importance and value of original art. Interiors with reduced clutter, clean lines, but keeping things warm and cozy. ■

As an art gallery owner, Spanier's interiors display artwork hung at the ideal height for viewing (top) and complementing furniture (left). Chandeliers also add warmth and interest to dining rooms (far left).

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Photos by Duane Stork

Fran Scher poses with her own paintings in the colorful dining room. Far left “Bathed” in Gray,” far right “Bathed in Orange.”

Chai Style Homes

Jaffe: How does your creative system unfold? Fran: It’s a straight-forward process. I don’t outline a sketch. I don’t refer to photographs or other peoples’ references. I close my eyes and turn to the canvas and start immediately with paint not knowing where it’s going to head. It is the spontaneity of the undiscovered that makes it exciting.

Sandy Springs Artist’s Metamorphosis A

fter decades of artistic expression, spanning colorful acrylics, pet portraits, family monochromes, her own studio at Tula, one woman shows, and first prizes, Sandy Springs resident Fran Scher is positioned only months into her new and most satisfying freeform genre. The petite artist presides over an art filled home filled with a custom cocktail table by California artist Todd Gray, to glasswork by Rich Royal, who was once the head gaffer for Dale Chihuly. But the core of the art here is of her own design, and is as varied as her talent. Now represented by IDEA Gallery in Chamblee and Anne Jackson Gallery in Roswell, Scher finds herself most proud of this new role as an abstract artist. Her large canvases match their joyful names such as “Feelin’ Good” and “Wanna Dance?” Jaffe: What does it mean to re-create one’s self? How does that process unfold?

Fran: My undergraduate degree is in art education, as I taught art in New York. Decades ago I studied with Phyllis Franco, whom I admire. In July 2017, I took a workshop by the inspiring Leslie Newman, where everything changed! I felt like I got the freedom and

Chai Style Homes By Marcia Caller Jaffe mjaffe@atljewishtimes.com

methodology to dive differently into my work. I begin the process with granite and paint; then it becomes an intuitive process. Over the years, I’ve taken classes locally from wonderful artists like Gary Bodner, James Richards, and Chris Meadows.

Jaffe: You have been active on so many fronts in the Atlanta art scene. Fran: I’ve had displays at Peachtree Center, Atlanta Artists Center, Marietta Cobb Museum of Art and many galleries like Mason Murer and dk Gallery. One very creative job was that of director of the well-respected Vespermann Gallery, which sold museum quality glass. Jaffe: What are some of the most unusual things you have created? Fran: Our great room showcases a triptych I painted of the same couple as they modernized and evolved over decades. I also created a Jackson Pollockstyle painting in the den. I have a fascination with the Kennedys and you will see my JFK interpretation high up in the entrance and Jackie O in the guest room. Jaffe: What are some of the most edgy and cherished works of others that you have collected? Fran: The lithograph in the dining room, “Morning Coffee,” is by Malcolm Liepke, who has created covers ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES JUNE 22, 2018 | 23


for Newsweek,Time, Forbes, Sports Illustrated and Fortune magazines. His is self taught and uses clove and linseed oils to make every brush stroke count. The “Bonnie and Clyde” sculpture by British artist Mackenzie Thorpe, who is collected worldwide by notables like Queen Elizabeth and Elton John. He is known for large headed youths evocative of his own learning disabilities and subsequent ostracized childhood. We also have some collectible pieces: Ed Moulthrop wooden bowls, Cynthia Consentino’s “Daisy,” Krista Grecco’s “Strawberry Lady,” Mary Lou Higgins' “Get-

ting Ready for Tea,” and most notably, Kirstin Stingle’s sculpture composed of an old bundt pan. Our doll, from the Akira Studios in Tennessee, is similar to the figures in the permanent collections in the Louvre and White House. All these interplay in the great room. Most visitors comment on the large orange ceramic by James Marshall, a student of Zen Buddhism, and the ethereal life-sized white paper dancer by Ursula Brodauf from Salt Lake City, Utah.

Husband Jerry has followed Fran’s transition though the decades. The painting of the young girl is titled “All Our Children.”

Jaffe: Jerry, what’s your role in this? Jerry: We have been married for 50 years and

Asheville, North Carolina, artist, Mary Lou Higgins’ “Getting Ready for Tea.”

The dinette set is Scandinavian with a custom cut glass top. The wall displays Zulu and Ndebele from South Africa made of beads, wire and plastic. 24 | JUNE 22, 2018 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

“Morning Coffee” by Malcom Liepke, who has done covers for top tier national magazines. His work lends a feeling of soul and place.

“Bonnie and Clyde” sculpture by British artist Mackenzie Thorpe, collected worldwide by notables like Queen Elizabeth and Elton John.


Fran’s abstract (1985) is over the fireplace. Todd Gray designed the intricate cocktail table. Ethereal life-sized white paper figure from Salt Lake City by Brodauf (back left). Scher’s triptych of the same couple through the decades (back wall). Treasured art from artists Kirstin Stingle, Cynthnia Consentino, and the Akira Studios line the console. Right “Boston Symphony Couple” presides over the orange ceramic by James Marshall, a student of Zen Buddhism.

Jaffe: Share some facets about your personal life. Fran: I have completed the Peachtree Road Race 23 times, most notably with my father who was 88 at the time, and believed to be one of the oldest people to cross the finish line. I have been on the board of the William Breman Jewish Home for many years as vice president of special events. I have volunteered there on a weekly basis for the past 18 years. Ann Kay and I were both honored with the Volunteers of the Year Award for 2015-2016. Also I seem to have the perfect window for making orchids thrive. Friends bring me their “ailing” plants that come back to life in my kitchen… magenta blooms, happy yellow exotics.

"

Fran has painted through the decades. I would concur that her recent contemporary style is very exciting. Fran paints almost every day and whenever the creative juices flow.

[Abstract art is] like music. It’s about how it makes you feel.

"

Jaffe: Your kitchen has an opalescent, “sea foam” aquamarine glow. Fran: The granite island is a one-of-a-kind piece. The dining chairs are Scandinavian from Domus many years ago. The glass top is custom cut. The Far wall displays Zulu and Ndebele figures from South africa composed of beads, fabric, wire and plastic. They each tell a story with clues that describe their life positioning. Each doll is unique because they are handmade and passed on through generations. Jaffe: How do you explain abstract art? Fran: It’s like music. It’s about how it makes you feel. Jaffe: What’s next for you? You are a hot bed of creativity. Fran: Come to my solo show opening July 12 at the Ventulett Gallery and find out. ■

Fran’s studio showcases her contemporary designs. ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES JUNE 22, 2018 | 25


HOME

Sandy Springs Revamps Residential Complexes By Sarah Moosazadeh sarah@atljewishtimes.com Almost everywhere you look in Sandy Springs there’s a new apartment complex or restaurant in development. Perhaps one of the most notable developments has been the construction of residential complexes on Roswell Road such as Aston at City Springs and The Cliftwood, which have garnered attention because of the price range, level of style and amenities offered in each. With an average price point of $1,400 to $1,500 for a one bedroom, $2,000 to $2,700 for a two bedroom and about $3,000 for a three-bedroom, Aston City Springs is the latest complex to be built in Sandy Springs. The apartments offer a number of standard interior features such as quartz countertops, stainless steel appliances, double vanities and frameless shower doors. All the units have balconies, and the townhomes and three unit bedrooms come with wine fridges. Select units also come with custom closet systems from

26 | JUNE 22, 2018 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

California Closets. In its common area, ACS offers a club room with a serving kitchen, fire place with a reading lounge area, large outdoor courtyard with two grilling stations, and a swimming and lap pool. The building also has a fitness area equipped with Peleton bikes, yoga room and fitness on demand as well as a system for residents to have packages ordered online delivered to individual lockers. But one of its largest amenities is City Springs park and the retail in the area, said Carter Executive Vice President Jerome Hagley. One of the reasons Hagley says the development company choose to construct the large units is because they are finding a market for it known as renter’s choice. “There are a lot of people who can afford to buy but choose to rent because they want the flexibility of not carrying a mortgage,” he said. People want to have all the amenities in terms of the feel and finish level, which we can provide at a cheaper occupancy.” That mentality is the reason devel-

opers were able to attract a diverse demographic, including empty nesters, young professionals and those who don’t want a large house but want to be in a pedestrian and pet friendly environment, Hagley said. “That was the trend. We didn’t see that there are obviously more residential products brought to the market since we started, but we feel where we set ourselves apart is what we offer inside units.” Hagley said. “These are homes, they are not units, and there are custom features that you look for and expect in a custom home or condo, which we brought to Aston.” Also built just off Roswell Road are Sandy Springs’ new residential apartments, The Cliftwood. A one-bedroom ranges from $1,575 to $2,290 and two bedrooms are $1,955 to $2,710. A three bedroom is $2800 to $3,630. The complex offers a club room equipped with a sports, gaming and video viewing area, salt water pool, full fitness center and rooftop deck with views of Sandy Springs. “Cliftwood offers ame-

nities that are comparable to any alternatives people might expect in Buckhead or in Midtown,” said Arris Realty Partners President Steven Cadranel. “Developers decided to build the class A level apartment with higher-end furnishes because of the location’s demographics,” he said. “If you look at the Sandy Springs market and the sub-market we are in one of the highest income neighborhoods in Atlanta. So we are at the convergence of what we see as major employment centers such as the Perimeter, the Galleria, the hospital district and the emerging growth of the Sandy Springs market with the new Mercedes Benz headquarters.” Before Arris developed its project, there were complexes in Sandy Springs that were more than 20 years old, which


HOME

Photos courtesy of Aston City Springs

Aston offers a lavish pool (top) for residents to use as well as a lounge room (right, top) where guests may relax. 6400 Blue Stone Rd, Sandy Springs, GA 30328

Photos courtesy of The Cliftwood

On opposite page, Cliftwood boasts luxury finishes in apartments and a lavish pool (bottom) for residents. 185 Cliftwood Dr NE, Sandy Springs, GA 30328

made the timing perfect, Cadranel said. ECI groups Chief Executive Officer Seth Greenberg agreed that the area was ripe for this kind of development. “The developers had the vision of seeing downtown Sandy Springs as a walkability area tied to the Hammond Drive location, where it becomes a city center unto itself and creates its own sense of place, which didn’t necessarily exist two to three years ago.” But what sets Cliftwood apart, Cadranel says, is the location and standard of service that the ECI team delivers to the residents. “What we are hearing from people who shop the market and ultimately make a decision is that they prefer our layouts, amenities and our accessibility … It’s a very well-planned community and we also have the advantage of being just off Roswell Road, so we are a little bit quieter.” Cliftwood is home to an array of different renters simply because of its location, Greenberg said. “We have access to 285, have people who have been living in Sandy Springs for a long time or are coming from Mercedes Benz headquarters, or have couples who work in Buckhead and Kennesaw and see this as a half way point,” he said. “We try to satisfy people with a lot of different wants.” ■

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HOME

A Tale of Two Houses

Families together created 70’s hub for Jewish philanthropy and fun

Photos courtesy of Dorsey Alston Realtors

The Dubrof family home, including the indoor pool house addition.

Photo grab from former Redfin listing

A view of the Dubrof family pool showing the ceiling that drops down to provide space for meeting, entertaining or dancing.

By Leah R. Harrison The houses sit side-by-side on Tanglewood Trail, a wooded cul-de-sac in a spacious Chastain Park neighborhood in Sandy Springs. They appear both gracious and innocuous, yet are steeped in Atlanta Jewish history and lore. Chances are, if you lived in the city in the late 60s or 70s, you were solicited for funds in support of Atlanta Jewish Federation or the state of Israel there, or you attended a party or BBYO sleepover. The first house appeared on our radar when present owner Andrea Davis Goldklang emailed the AJT, saying, “Apparently I have a somewhat famous Jewish house. Every time someone who grew up in Jewish Atlanta comes to the house, they say, ‘I know this house,’ or ‘I came to so many BBYO parties here,’ etc.” Formerly owned by Alan and Renay Levenson of Turtle’s Records & Tapes fame, this house has an outdoor pool and features a tennis court that is on shared

land with the next-door neighbors, with whom they are still dear friends. Renay said the children were also good friends and the court brought lots of people. All three Levenson children were in BBYO, and the girls hosted many sleepovers and BBYO meetings. Renay said they also had lots of parties at their home for young couples that were getting married. Of her home for 38 years, Renay said, “I felt like it was really a good luck house. We had a good life there. I told the new owner so. I hope they’re having good luck in it too.” The house to the right was designed and built on 2.1 acres by architect Earl McMillen in 1966 and features reclaimed brick flooring from the Old Grady Hotel. It was owned by Jerry and Judy Dubrof, who also had three children. Jerry was not a golfer and wasn’t interested in joining a country club, yet as a Federation campaign chair in 1973 and staunch Israel advocate through the

Community Relations Council, he wanted a place to entertain, solicit funds and hold meetings. He was also on the community center board and was active in the then National Conference of Christians and Jews. The Dubrofs added a sizable structure to their home. Beyond a weight room, his and her bathrooms, a steam bath, a bar and a kitchen, the addition has an indoor pool with a ceiling that, when lowered, becomes a cover for the pool, creating an area that can be used as a dance floor, or for meetings and entertaining. The ceiling can be hoisted down atop the pool on six cables, which are then unhooked and hauled back up, fitting into the ceiling behind plates, which then conceal them. Jerry said he also wanted an indoor pool because the Atlanta winters are cold, so this one could be used yearround. The dimensions of the room are considerably larger than the 20-by 40-

The tennis court jointly built by the Levenson and Dubrof families. Photo courtesy of Andrea Davis Goldklang // The Goldklang home in

Sandy Springs, formerly the home of the Levenson family.

28 | JUNE 22, 2018 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

Infamous logo of the Levenson family business (inset).

foot pool, to leave space for surrounding tables and chairs. With the ceiling down, he described it as a ballroom or entertainment room, “most often used as a room to collect money.” He said the running joke was that if you didn’t give money, you would be closed in under the floor. “It was a good place to gather people and solicit them,” he said. Daughter Cydnee Dubrof remembers “all kinds of funny stories” of their years in that home, including the time a streaker came through Jerry’s very elegant surprise 40th birthday party. The brainchild of a mischievous friend, according to Jerry, the streaker sat on his lap and gave him a kiss before running off. “We had tons of parties,” Cydnee said, many of which were “quite memorable for whoever came, even the police.” One such party was held while Jerry and Judy were out of town, and was only revealed when “the maid squealed on Cydnee,” Jerry said. Cydnee said she got her love of entertaining from her parents and spoke of fond memories of the neighborhood, adding, “It felt like a nice, safe place to grow up.” Although this house is not yet on the market, you can contact Kathy Ghirardini for information, at 404-583-9771 or kathyghirardini@dorseyalston.com. While both Jerry and Renay initially seemed baffled at the interest in their former homes, Jerry conceded that, in retrospect, the combined features did make them “rather memorable.” ■


FOOD

Foodies Take Note:

Chef Rob's Caribbean Kitchen Cafe jerk chicken plate.

Sandy Springs Cuisine from Turkey to Caribbean By Skye Estroff Atlanta is one of the largest sprawling cities in the country. We’re lucky to have a city center with a diverse mix of ITP (inside the Perimeter) neighborhoods, all equipped with flourishing food scenes. The good news is, the culinary reach is expanding beyond the Perimeter. One of the most sought after cities for restaurants is now Sandy Springs. Over the past few years more and more restaurateurs have brought their talents and creativity to Sandy Springs. Now the food scene is speckled with landmark restaurants that have been in the area for decades, intermixed with the new spots that are here to stay. From kebabs to carrot cake, there’s something for everyone in Sandy Springs.

Grilled meats, vegetables and spicy peppers are all on the menu at Mandolin Kitchen. While this restaurant opened less than a year ago, Mandolin Kitchen has already grown a loyal following. This Turkish restaurant offers familiar Mediterranean flavors like za’atar spiced kebabs and sauces like tzatziki, hummus and babaganoush. The food is authentic and is boldly showcased in an atmosphere of bright natural light and clean, white everything. Some of the most popular dishes are: grilled chicken kebabs served with baldo rice, hummus, babaganoush (made with fire-roasted eggplant mixed with tahini, lemon, garlic and extra virgin olive oil) and Doner kebab (homemade rotisserie grilled beef served with baldo rice).

Mandolin Kitchen is one of many restaurants that recently opened in Sandy Springs. The kitchen offers an assortment of Mediterranean dishes, including spiced kebabs and sauces such as hummus, babaganoush.

Another new spot to the Sandy Springs community is Crafthall Kitchen. This space is a 4-in-1 restaurant with distinctly different menus for each stall. Crafthall Kitchen offers a variety of approachable, delicious and convenient food options. The umbrella name “Crafthall Kitchen” is comprised of four different concepts: brunch all day (Salt & Pfeffer), fried chicken (Fowl & Scratch), grain bowls (Bowl Cookhouse) and sandwiches (Urban Sammie). Henri’s Bakery & Café is an iconic Sandy Springs destination. Indulgent baked goods like brownies, black and white cookies, croissants, cakes and doughnuts are offered alongside savory café items. Some favorites include: Po Boys, roast beef sandwiches, fresh baked bagels and even homemade soups and handcrafted salads. Henri’s may be on its 9th decade of business, but we don’t see it stopping any time soon. Need a Caribbean escape but don’t

have time for a vacation? Drive over to Chef Rob’s Caribbean Cafe and take a break from the high-intensity city life. Chef Rob’s keeps reggae music streaming and rum drinks on deck to provide some beachy contrast to your day. The food is authentic and covers all the Caribbeancuisine basics: from jerk chicken to ackee and saltfish. This restaurant has been serving the Sandy Springs community since 2006 and has developed quite a following for this flavorful, fresh and funky menu. Stay up to date with the best food and restaurants in Atlanta: Follow Taste of Atlanta on Facebook (Taste of Atlanta), Instagram (@TasteofAtlanta) and Twitter (@TasteofAtlanta). You can also follow my food stories on Instagram (@skyemichelle58). Taste of Atlanta will be in Historic Fourth Ward Park October 19-21. Save the date and read more details on TasteofAtlanta.com. ■

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ART

Hanna Dettman draws her inspiration from her Jewish religion to paint Jewish-themed artwork, including themes such as Torah and Shabbat. She says she sees Israel as a subject of artistic expression.

Spiritual Connection Inspiring Art By Breanna West

Hanna Dettman

30 | JUNE 22, 2018 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

An intense spiritual connection with G-d was what Hanna Dettman said inspired her to paint Jewish-themed artwork. It was not an audible voice, said the 61-year-old artist, but an overwhelming feeling that “G-d was pushing me gently towards this. I was very thrilled.” Dettman’s line includes 12 paintings with themes of Shabbat and Torah. Her work lies within the realm of the abstract, paintings “inspired by things that are more emotional, not quite technical.” She paints on water color paper and combines different media such as pastels, tissue paper, acrylic paint, color pencils, ink and colored pens. Using a technique for printmaking called block printing to produce a multi-dimensional piece, the paintings “have some texture to them. It’s a little more tactile.” Dettman sees the Holy Land as her subject of artistic expression. She took a trip to Israel in 2014. “Israel has such contrast in it, such great emotion.” When she paints, she relies primar-

ily on color to capture emotion. Israel is figuratively colored by grievances, grief and conflict. “Israel has very intense conflict, but there is really great power there,” she said. Dettman sees the tension in Israel and feels hopeful for change. “G-d has wonderful things happen there. The fact that Israel even exists is so huge; it’s a miracle.” Shabbat is her first Jewish-themed line because the weekly day of rest is “a joyous celebration of the fact that G-d is involved in every part of our life and wants us to think of Him all the time.” Originally from California, Dettman knew since childhood she was an artist. She took art classes the University of California in both San Diego and Los Angeles, but studied European Jewish art and the history of Jewish art on her own. In the future, she would like to visit primary schools and hold guest workshops. “Kids are really in touch with their creativity. They are really free.”

Anyone can produce art, but when it is from a genuine, integral place from within, technique is inconsequential, she said. “I would like to encourage the young people that they can make something beautiful.” Artistic expression is not always driven by perfection and too many people are held back by a lack of confidence. “So many more people can enjoy expressing themselves with art,” she said. Dettman sells her artwork on Redbubble, an e-commerce site that produces her paintings on t-shirts, tote bags, iPhone cases, pillows, clocks, mugs, greeting cards, and notebooks. She will soon expand her Jewish line to incorporate Rosh Hashana paintings, but always through the guidance of G-d, she said. If you are interested in Dettman’s work, visit: https://www.redbubble.com/ people/hdettman/collections/892860spiritual ■


ART

A Conversation with Film Festival's Kenny Blank By Bob Bahr During the past few years the Atlanta Jewish Film Festival has not only become one of the largest Jewish film festivals in the world, but a source of new and innovative programming year-round. Recently I spoke with Kenny Blank, the executive director of the festival about its latest project, Cinebash, being held Saturday evening, June 23, at Contemporary Art on Atlanta’s Westside. AJT: Why did you want to do Cinebash? Blank: There are really two drivers of this. Part of delivering on our vision as a separate non-profit is to start producing different kinds of programming throughout the year that would reach new audiences. Cinebash fits into that strategic goal of having different offerings throughout the year for different audiences. The second consideration is finding different ways to celebrate Jewish film and what that means. Cinebash is not a traditional film screening. It is taking a film artist, Saul Bass, and Jewish film culture, and exploring it through a kind of multi-media, multi-sensory immersive experience. This event will combine art, food, music and different design elements in really creative, innovative ways and allow people to literally step into these worlds. AJT: Is Cinebash an attempt to reach younger audiences? Blank: Anyone who likes a great party or a unique experience, whatever your age, will come and find something that will appeal to them. In the branding we have not emphasized the Atlanta Jewish Film Festival aspect of this or the AJFF brand because we want to reach new audiences and invite them in. We want to reinforce this idea that all the programming we do has something for everyone. AJT: How did you did you develop Cinebash? Blank: This is an AJFF production. Danny Davis is the producer and the creative vision behind this, but the concept is ours. It was partially inspired by the “Art Party” we did for several years as part of the Festival. With Cinebash we wanted to take that kind of experience outside the annual festival and give it a place to shine during the calendar year. We also wanted to produce it at a higher level and promote

it at a higher level. It’s really a standalone event and something that needs its own space and its own venue, attention and love. AJT: So are you putting the AJFF on the map in a much broader sense, not defined by just how many tickets you sell, but by making yourself a really innovative, different kind of film festival, nationally and internationally? Blank: I think our goal has long been to redefine what Jewish cinema is, to tell that to the community. This is a great cultural experience that is universal to the cultural consumer. And yes, that means partnering with organizations, places you wouldn’t necessarily expect to see AJFF producing different kinds of arts programming. So yes, we want you to expect the unexpected. AJT: To redefine what the Atlanta Jewish Film Festival is? Blank: Yes, absolutely. A film festival is more than just about showing films. It’s the conversation that happens around the film, the dialogue that sparks the education that happens, the appreciation of the craft as much as the Jewish cultural aspects. It takes many different forms and we see that, absolutely, as part of our mandate.

Kenny Blank and AJT contributor Bob Bahr takes time for a bite at Cinebash.

Atlanta Jewish Film Festival Executive Director Kenny Blank delivers a speech during Cinebash.

different types of programs, different formats and different platforms. We are doing the mini-festival AJFF on the Emory campus. We are doing our monthly film series, AJFF Selects. We are also doing AJFF Connects, which is how to connect Jewish film with diverse audiences, really focused on the intersection of Jewish life with other ethnic, cultural

and religious groups. We want to put a lot of different things out there and find different ways to reach new audiences. ■ Bob Bahr has created a new six-week series on American and Israeli film and documentary entitled “Israel At 70 - Public Perceptions In The Media Age” at Temple Sinai that began Tuesday, June 19.

AJT: Is part of this the AJFF answer to Amazon and Netflix, HBO and all these new sources for film that are now available in the home? How difficult has this new environment been for you to deal with? Blank: I think that film festivals provide a unique experience that you cannot get at home. We are showing the film that often you still can’t see anywhere else. And even when you can, you are still not having that richer experience provided by the film festival environment that features the filmmakers and the dialogue that happens with an audience. I am not as threatened by the digital platforms and all of that. We just have to make sure we are bringing added value to the experience in a thoughtful way. AJT: Are we likely to see more of events like Cinebash in future years? Blank: I certainly hope so. What we are committed to doing is taking creative risks. The community is looking to us to guide them to what the whole world of Jewish cinema can include. What we want to do is challenge the notion of what Jewish cinema can be, and expand that for the community by these ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES JUNE 22, 2018 | 31


ART

Peter Yarrow, Folk-Singer and Political Activist, Performs at Temple Beth David Peter Yarrow, now 80-years-old, is passionate about the depolarization of America. By Breanna West Peter Yarrow, folk-singer and former member of trio Peter, Paul and Mary, not only has a singer’s voice, but a political one as well. Yarrow will perform at Temple Beth David in Snellville at 7:30 p.m. June 26. He will speak to the congregation about his past political activism in the civil rights movement and in the anti-Vietnam war demonstrations. The set list includes “This Land is Your Land,” “Puff the Magic Dragon,” “Leaving on a Jet Plane” and others. “It’s a privilege to do this,” Yarrow said. He will also speak about what it means to be Jewish. “What’s important to me in my Jewish background is how I live my life,” he said. Yarrow went with 12 other songwriters to meet Parkland students, many of whom are Jewish, to “help the students write songs that express their convictions, tell their story and amplify their message,” he said. He explained the effort simply as “that’s what I do: tikkun olam.” Yarrow expressed that the nation is in a “painful and challenging direction” and called for everyone to “reassert what is good and caring within us.” He sees the political polarization in America as deeply destructive, an obstacle to open-communication, most alarmingly, one that hinders the discussion of the issues that threaten “basic human rights.” Yarrow is involved with Better Angels, a nationwide non-profit organization that goes into local communities and organizes workshops for Democrats

and Republicans to engage in conversation and listen to the other side’s viewpoints on issues. Yarrow co-produced a documentary with director Jim Brown that features a Better Angels workshop of 15 Republicans and Democrats from Lebanon, Ohio, a town that voted 80 percent for President Trump. Throughout the workshop, the community members “realized they did not have to hate and vilify each other.” The working title for the upcoming program is “Better Angels: Bringing America Together,” to be released on PBS by Twin Cities Public Broadcasting Station, the date yet to be determined. Yarrow attended and performed at the 2018 Better Angels National Convention in Harrisonburg, Va. The convention brings together 150 delegates from across the nation, both Republican and Democrat, for the purpose of developing new relationships between each other and strategies for better communication, collaboration and public engagement. Yarrow talked with Trump supporters and said they are “wonderful people, loving and caring people,” and the only dividing line between he and them is political alliance. “We can hate the policies that are coming down, despise them even, but cannot despise our fellow Americans,” he said. In January, Yarrow traveled, along with 40 other artists, to the Negev Desert with the non-profit Seeds of Peace Organization. Musicians, dancers and graphic designers created songs, art and dances that pertained to the theme of

peace in the Middle East. Yarrow wrote an original song titled “Beyond Right and Wrongs,” virtually unknown to the public. “My song is a call to us all to transcend the fear and hatred of the past, build trust in one another and thereby forgive one another, so we might end the cycle of war,” he said. On behalf of the organization, he performed the song at Temple Emmanuel in New York City on May 10. Yarrow lives in Manhattan, close to his adult children and grandchild. “I am

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Folk singer Peter Yarrow is scheduled to perform Tuesday, June 26 at Temple Beth David.

very grateful for my good fortune,”he said. ■ Temple Beth David 1885 McGee Rd. SW, Snellville, GA 30078 General seating: Adults $25 Children under 13 – $10 VIP seating: (stage front) $50 Doors will open at 7 p.m. on June 26 Buy tickets in advance: https:// templebethdavid.ticketspice.com/peteryarrow-in-concert-temple-beth-david


EDUCATION Temima Graduates Thankful for Lessons Learned By Sarah Moosazadeh sarah@atljewishtimes.com There comes a time when some things come to an end, but that’s part of life’s cycle, said Rabbi Yitzchok Tendler, executive director of Congregation beth Jacob. Tendler shared those words with 12 graduates at Temima's class of 2018 graduation ceremony on Thursday, June 14 at Congregation Beth Jacob. Joel Marks, intermediate past chair of the Jewish Federation of Greater Atlanta, commented on the support the Federation has provided in the last few years to the Temima Richard and Jean Katz High School for Girls. Marks’ wife, Charlotte, served as a previous board member and volunteer for Temima and its students whom he has seen graduate over the last few years. “It’s tremendous to see the transformation of the girls before and after they enter Temima and to know that they are leaving as independent women. We look forward to watching you grow,” he said. A few of the dozen graduates shared stories about the lessons and skills they

learned during their four years. Class of 2018 graduate Shoshana Tress said that one of the teachings she is taking away with her is that happiness is not hard to find and already a part of people when they perform mitzvot. Shira Kalnitz spoke about her fear of public speaking and how she was able to overcome it through Hashem’s help. “The gift of speech can be used in a powerful way, and the words we choose can be used to create a positive impact on the world.” Graduate Lani Lewis reflected on the community’s theme of unity and kindness during Hurricane Irma, which she said is a common thread not just in Toco Hills but in Temima’s class of 2018 graduates. Tendler spoke about the graduates’ last four years at the school and urged them to never forget what they learned at Temima. “Always have goals for yourself, and even if you don’t at this moment, as long as you have one in sight you will always have a new beginning.” Shalom Teller received a tribute for serving as a Temima board member the last five years and imparted three things

for the graduates to keep in mind. He encouraged them to always say “yes” to opportunities and take things one step at a time, to maintain their passion for Judaism, which their parents have taught them, and that they have responsibility to their community. “Wherever you go and whatever you do, you are a part of a community, and we are in this together.”

Class of 2018 Shira Kalnitz Adina Adatto Rina Levitt Elisheva Kaplan Lani Lewiss Miriam Malka Gross Sarah Siegal Kaila Grossblatt Shoshanna Herscovici Bracha Sobel Shoshana Tress Brachi Ingber

Executive Director Rabbi Yitzchock Tendler presents a tribute to Shalom Teller for his service with presenter Rabbi Doron Silverman (right).

Temima board member Shalom Teller delivers a response (pictured right) after receiving a tribute for his dedication to the school as a board member.

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EDUCATION

TDSA Graduates Asked to Remember Who They Are By Sarah Moosazadeh sarah@atljewishtimes.com Congregation Beth Jacob Rabbi Ilan Feldman has been privy to a lot of graduation quotes this year that encourage graduates to pursue their dreams and passions. But Feldman chose to focus on how it’s important to know who you are. The rabbi imparted that sentiment to 35 eighth-graders during Torah Day School of Atlanta’s graduation ceremony Monday, June 11 at Congregation Beth Jacob’s Heritage Hall. The room was filled with families who had traveled more than several hundred miles. “There is no question that each of you is an individual, that each of you has a unique contribution to make. All that is true, but I think what really needs to be known is to know who you are,” he said.

Graduates from TDSA prepare for their graduation ceremony on June 11 at Congregation Beth Jacob.

“It is important for you to know that because what you harbor in your very being makes you a member of the most unique people in the history of the world. “It is terribly exciting to know that you have been given everything you need to know to determine who you are and as we send you into the next stage of your lives we are thrilled to know you are endowed with every single power and strength. Use it well, use it wisely. Seek advice from your parents, from your teachers and follow your own path.” Mark Silberman, the new chair of the Jewish Federation of Greater Atlanta’s Board of Trustees, shared some remarks about the Federation’s continued support for TDSA. Over $1.2 million of the Federation’s annual campaign is used to support Torah Day School as well as summer camps and experiences in Israel, in which the graduates will participate. Additionally, the ALEF Fund has provided nearly $30 million for 3,500 scholarships and has generated $200,000 supporting 11 eight-graders graduated from the Torah Day School of Atlanta as the class of 2018. 42 students at the TDSA. TDSA staff member Marcy Kalnitz presented the Sadell Sloan, a”h, Volunteer Award to Pescha Izenberg, who has participated as an active board member on the executive committee and general board at TDSA. She also updated the school’s family directory and has served as the chair of TDSA generations endowment committee, which helped raise $1 million. The students shared their favorite memories from their time spent at TDSA, including a photo story presentation. ■ Far left, TDSA staff member Marcy Kalnitz presents Pescha Izenberg a gift during the presentation of the Sadell Sloan a”h, Volunteer Award. Rabbi Ilan Feldman delivers the D’evrai Bracha to 35 TDSA graduates. 34 | JUNE 22, 2018 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES


EDUCATION

TDSA Graduates 38 Kindergarten Students

By Sarah Moosazadeh sarah@atljewishtimes.com After completing their first year at the Torah Day School of Atlanta, 38 kindergarten students took part in a graduation ceremony on Tuesday, June 12 at Congregation Beth Jacob. In their first year, the kids learn how to read in Hebrew and how to count money, and they participate in a program that teaches them the values of friendship and empathy. The graduates also possess a strong grasp of the parshah (weekly Torah portion) and can name people from each. TDSA provides a commitment to learning every day and offers a learning program over the summer that already has 25 kids signed up. Part of the TDSA mission is to create lifelong learners. Many of the students will remain with the school until they become eighth-graders. 38 kindergarten students graduated from the Torah Day School of Atlanta on Tuesday June 12. Many will continue their Jewish studies at the school.

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES JUNE 22, 2018 | 35


COMMUNITY Marcus Keeps Us Spellbound By Marcia Caller Jaffe Some label him the father of modern big box retailing. Some know him as a calm voice of conservative political wisdom, but most Atlantans see him as the one individual who has changed the face of our city and its healthcare within his own lifetime. Turning 89 last month, Bernie Marcus is no “spring chicken,” though he certainly acted like one at the Jewish Network Atlanta (JNA) dinner on June 18 at Taylor English Duma LLP. Without a single prepared note, Marcus started on time and held nothing back. “I have nothing to lose [by being open and frank]. I’m not running for office. And I am here to hear from you. Let the questions roll.” During the pre-function cocktail hour, young professionals oozed with adulation about the role Marcus is playing. “He is an icon and a huge role model for our clients, lawyers, and our children,” said Ilene Berman, vice chair at Taylor English. Emily Kapit, Refresh Your Step, added, “Look at his role in the eponymous MJCC [Marcus Jewish Community Center]. That is major.” Venture capitalist Brian Rosenzweig said, “I admire him for being a staunch Republican and I like that he supports Jewish causes.” And Graham Levitas summed it up: “Bernie Marcus is a household name.” Marcus was introduced by great nephew and JNA member Jason Smith, who recalled how the family would visit Manhattan and eschew sightseeing in favor of scouting inside Home Depot stores. Jason’s grandmother Bea Smith was Bernie’s older sister. “Bernie knew he had made it when he went to the Oval Office and President George W. Bush said, ‘I know you!’ first.” Marcus shared that he was worried about the younger generation not valuing the history of Jewish people and actually turning against themselves. “Plus 35 percent of college students think socialism is preferable to a capitalistic system. Realism is what will happen if everyone gets $15 per hour minimum wage; small businesses will close and there will be no jobs. We have to support deregulation. It’s nonpartisan. It’s real life … It’s a necessity to save jobs. Until Trump, small businesses were closing at alarming rates.” During part of the evening he participated in a Q&A: Audience member: How do you decide what charities to support? 36 | JUNE 22, 2018 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

Photos by Sarah Moosazadeh. // Home Depot Founder and philanthropist Bernie Marcus kept

the crowd fascinated with his straight-shooting advice and perspective.

Marcus: It’s not easy to give away money. We may get 50 proposals at a time that have to be whittled down to five. I remember how I made money working hard 80 hours a week. These charities have to show return on value, their plan and budget for our board to review. Sometimes I go against the board. (laughing) … they didn’t want to build the Aquarium, and look how that turned out! Audience: Do you regret taking Home Depot public and losing control? Marcus: Well, I didn’t like dealing with the a-holes on Wall Street; but we had like four stores, then four more. Then the rest is history. Audience: Since we are young and working our businesses to the max, is it OK to take time out away from charitable programs? Marcus: No! It is never ok to not concentrate on philanthropy. My mother had nothing and gave our ice cream money to buy trees in Israel. If you can’t give money, volunteer your time. Be a Big Brother or Big Sister. There is nothing like saving a life. I get thankful letters every day from Grady

Ladies Rule! JNA professionals labeled hearing Marcus "a very big deal."

Andy Grant, Jason Alder, and Dr. Loren Cohen came to hear Marcus, the Atlanta legend.


COMMUNITY

Taylor English Duma LLP members Eric Fisher, Ilene Berman and Raanon Gal were delighted to be hosts.

Jason Smith remembers trips to New York to "sightsee" at Home Depot stores with Great Uncle Bernie.

Graham Levitas, Ari Edlin and Nir Levy commented that their grandparents taught them at an early age about the Home Depot success story.

stroke victims or Piedmont Hospital patients. It’s very heartwarming. Audience: Will you reduce your big store ideals to trend with online shopping? Marcus: We will not give up store space. People like to shop in the store to buy lumber for example…and walk the aisles for ideas. We will play both games… and invest billions to beat Amazon at its own game. Note that we used to open 100 stores a year and have only opened three this year. Audience: You’re so vigorous at 89, how have you tapped the Fountain of Youth? What are your habits? Marcus: I keep busy and think about tomorrow ... not worrying about yesterday. I am planning two plus years ahead. I won’t live forever. But I don’t ruminate about mistakes. Audience: So don’t we need to learn from our mistakes? Marcus: Depressed people concentrate on mistakes. I’m happy that my successes outweigh errors. Sure, you should learn from mistakes. I think one of the worst is holding on to bad people too long by being emotionally involved. A bad CEO can ruin a business. Look at GE.

At Home Depot, we hired great workers … some may even have been so obnoxious that no one else would hire them. They were determined to get the job done. Audience: What’s the takeaway? Marcus: I was just speaking to Alan Dershowitz [Harvard lawyer, author, academic] who agreed that the Democratic party is turning against itself. We are frightened by so much anti-Israel, antiSemitic sentiment. Look what’s happening in Germany, England, France … Jews have nowhere to go but Israel. You think Russia and Iran want to sustain Israel? We have to fight the fight! JNA (Jewish Networking Atlanta) was founded in 2009 by Blair Rothstein, Adam Butler, and Jonathan Grant. They meet every other week, often with a goal to build a strong referral network while supporting one another personally and professionally, cultivating long-lasting relationships with like-minded Jewish professionals. They have members from a wide range of industries such as real estate, marketing, pest control, financial advisory, insurance, legal, and banking. Only one seat per field is allowed. As a result, members have procured invaluable monetary transactions.

Mac McCall, Matt Fishman and Brian Rosenzweig referred to Marcus as "powerful."

Alon's Bakery catered the event with a healthy flair.

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COMMUNITY NBC Screengrab

Georgia tech Engineering Student Elie Cohen competed in American Ninja Warrior as the World’s Strongest Man-dolinist.

A Fond Farewell The Temple marked the departure of its former rabbi, David Spinrad, on June 6 with a small gathering of friends and colleagues from the synagogue. People involved with the young adult service and organizers of the small groups at The Temple celebrated the rabbi at Nine Mile Station, the rooftop beer garden at Ponce City Market.

38 | JUNE 22, 2018 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

Our Very Own Ninja Warrior Elie Cohen, who professes to be the World’s Strongest Man-dolinist, might have missed a few beats at the American Ninja Warrior Southeast regionals live show in Miami June 13. He lost his grip on the ring turn after making it through three obstacles successfully. But the audience still got a glimpse of the bluegrass ninja playing mandolin along with a shot of his cheering Marietta family, members of Congregation Etz Chaim. Losing the competition hasn’t deterred the Camp Ramah Darom alum who helped start a ninja program at the camp last summer. “It was frustrating being so close, but not advancing to the city finals. I had high expectations going in, but I’d be a fool to be upset by one performance in my first run on the big stage of ANW. “Honestly, I felt pretty accomplished just finishing my submission video and going through the application process, so everything after that, from getting cast to being shown on TV, was bonus territory for me,” said Cohen, who is also a Weber School grad and Georgia Tech engineering student. “My whole family came down to Miami to watch me compete, which was probably the best part of the whole experience, and I’ll definitely be back to hit some buzzers and entertain the audience with some mandolin shredding next year for ANW season 11.”


COMMUNITY

The Lowdown

I Bet You Didn't Know ...

Meet AJT's new column. Atlanta is chock-full of interesting movers and shakers, some bent on creativity, others on activism, some on just plain having fun and living the good life. Lean in to hear some of their off-the-cuff remarks as to what makes them tick.

Steve Selig PRESIDENT AND CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD OF THE EPONYMOUS SELIG ENTERPRISES, INC. Selig is a kingpin of real estate development in Atlanta as well as the force behind many of Atlanta’s charitable efforts. He is a bridge builder and community leader in the truest sense. Get to know him better right here. What’s the best piece of advice your bubbie gave you? “You can never do wrong by doing right.” What makes me anxious is ... Intolerance. My comfort food is ... Banana pudding. My secret guilty pleasure is ... Not so secret..the Georgia Bulldogs. The last time I laughed out loud ... I laugh all the time – just this morning in our office meeting. I am currently reading ... “Red Notice” by Bill Browder. A true story of high finance, murder, and one man's fight for justice. Whew I’m glad you caught me actually reading a book! My best DIY project ... My kids! Reported by Marcia Caller Jaffe

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES JUNE 22, 2018 | 39


CALENDAR assists at North Fulton Community Charities, 11270 Elkins Road, Roswell, at 1 p.m. Free. Sign up via bfeldser@ jfcsatl.org.

FRIDAY, JUNE 22 CANDLE-LIGHTING TIMES

Korach Friday, June 15, light candles at 8:32 p.m. Saturday, June 16, Shabbat ends at 9:34 p.m. Chukkat Friday, June 22, light candles at 8:34 p.m. Saturday, June 23, Shabbat ends at 9:36 p.m.

Pride Shabbat. Congregation

Bet Haverim, 2074 LaVista Road, Toco Hills, commemorates the 49th anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising at 6:30 p.m. with a discussion of the “Prayer for the End of Hiding” and a dinner of salads prepared by a Syrian refugee. Admission is $15 for adults, $12 for 11to 17-year-olds, $5 for 3- to 10-year-olds and free for younger children, www. congregationbethaverim.org/event/ pride-shabbat-event.html.

Graduation. Yeshiva Ohr Yisrael holds its high school graduation at 7 p.m. at Congregation Beth Jacob, 1855 LaVista Road, Toco Hills. Free. www.ohryisrael. org.

A Mount Vernon Highway, Sandy Springs. Admission is a suggested donation of $5, info@atlantamikvah.org or 404-549-9679.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 27

Film screening. Temple Sinai, 5645 Du-

THURSDAY, JULY 12

“It’s Not Easy Being Green.” Conservation through Amphibian Education Efforts - Center for Puppetry Arts, 1404 Spring St NW, Atlanta, GA 30309 at 12 p.m. in conjunction with the Atlanta Botanical Gardens. Hear about Kermit the Frog’s creator, Jim Henson, and his passion for the environment. Free event. For more information https:// www.thebreman.org/lunchtime-culture-2018.

FRIDAY, JULY 13

pree Drive, Sandy Springs, shows “Romeo and Juliet” at 11 a.m. Free, www. templesinaiatlanta.org/event/1968summer-film-series.html or 404-2523073.

SATURDAY, JUNE 23

Happy hour. ORT Next Gen hosts Atlanta Jewish Bowling League. The

Cinebash. The Atlanta Jewish Film Festival celebrates art, film and Saul Bass with food, music and more at 7 p.m. at Atlanta Contemporary, 535 Means St., West Midtown. Tickets are $35, www. ajff.org/programs/cinebash.

SUNDAY, JUNE 24

PJ Library gatherings. PJ Library kicks off its Summer Series of family get-togethers at parks in Brookhaven, Decatur, Virginia-Highland, Alpharetta, Dunwoody, Fayetteville, East Cobb and Smyrna at 10 a.m. Free. RSVP at www.facebook.com/pg/pjlibraryatlanta/events and contact Nathan Brodsky at nbrodsky@jewishatlanta.org or 404-870-1870 for details. 40 | JUNE 22, 2018 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

coed league bowls at 6:45 p.m. each Sunday at Bowlero, 6345 Spalding Drive, Norcross. Call Alex Schulman at 404-667-7752 or Pauline Weiss at 404514-9036 for more information.

MONDAY, JUNE 25

IDF golf tournament. The Helping Israel Fund holds a fundraiser for Israel Defense Forces soldiers, with breakfast at 8:30 a.m. and golf at 9:30, at the Standard Club, 5230 Abbotts Bridge Road, Johns Creek. Registration is $375, helpingisraelfund.com/registration or 561869-4606.

Honeymoon Israel. Learn about next year’s trips for couples, for which the application period opens June 20, at 7 p.m. at 5 Seasons Brewing, 5600 Roswell Road, No. 21, Sandy Springs. Free, cloud4good.tfaforms.net/385523.

Poetry reading. Tarece Johnson performs her poems and premieres new writing at 7 p.m. at MACoM, 700-

a young-adult happy hour, including snacks and your first drink, at 7 p.m. at Fado Irish Pub, 273 Buckhead Ave., Buckhead. Admission is $18, ortamerica­.org/Schmooze.

THURSDAY, JUNE 28

Book launch. Emily Giffin discusses her latest novel, the Nashville-set “All We Ever Wanted,” at 7:30 p.m. at the Marcus JCC, 5342 Tilly Mill Road, D u n w o o d y. Tickets, including a pre-signed book, are $30 for JCC members, $35 for others, www. atlantajcc.org/ bookfestival.

Dive into Shabbat. MJCCA 5342 Tilly Mill Rd, Atlanta, GA 30338 from 5–7 p.m. MJCCA hosts families for swimming, challah, grape juice and ice pops for children. Bring your friends! Free and open to all! For more information https://www.atlantajcc.org/pldb-live/ dive-into-shabbat-outdoor-pool-partyat-the-mjcca-40026/.

FRIDAY, JUNE 29

Dive into Shabbat. The Marcus JCC, 5342 Tilly Mill Road, Dunwoody, holds a pool party at 5 p.m. and Shabbat songs and blessings with Rabbi Brian Glusman at 6 p.m. Free to all, bit. ly/2IQsOJV or 678-812-4011.

Shabbat Together. Temple Emanu-El Rabbis Max and Rachael Miller organize a dinner at a private home for young adults at 7 p.m. Free, rkmiller@ templeemanuelatlanta.com.

SUNDAY, JULY 8

Volunteer. Jewish Family & Career Services’ VIA young-adult volunteer corps

“The Cakemaker” Screening. Landmark Midtown Art Cinema, 931 Monroe Drive NE, Atlanta 30308, A Film by Ofir Raul Graizer, tells the story of Thomas, a young German baker, who


JUNE 22-JULY 14 is having an affair with Oren, an Israeli married man who has frequent business visits in Berlin. Check theater for times the week of the show. Tickets are $9 for seniors and $11 for regular adult admission. For more information, https://www.atlantajewishconnector. com/events/the-cakemaker/.

SATURDAY, JULY 14

Georgia Master Gardener Marketplace. The Galloway School, 215 West Wieuca Road NW, Atlanta 30342, 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Plant, garden art/products and craft vendors. Come shop with some great vendors. Free and open to the public. For more information: https://www.facebook.com/ events/181379522582302/. Find more events and submit items for our online and print calendars at:

www.atlantajewishconnector.com

TUESDAY, JUNE 26 Peter without Paul or Mary. Peter Yarrow performs at 7:30 p.m. at Temple Beth David, 1885 McGee Road, Snellville. Tickets are $25 for adults, $10 for children or $50 for VIPs, bit.ly/2J2PTsG.

This calendar is sponsored by the Atlanta Jewish Connector, an initiative of the AJT.

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BRAIN FOOD "A Meal To Remember" By: Yoni Glatt, koshercrosswords@gmail.com Difficulty Level: Challenging 1

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25 Years Ago // June 18, 1993 ■ On June 15, 1993, singer Elton John flew into Israel, was kept waiting at Ben-Gurion Airport, was mobbed by photographers at the hotel, cancelled his Tel Aviv concert, flew back to London, then flew back to Tel Aviv to give the concert a day late. Elton John was the biggest news story in Israel since the expulsion of 400 Hamas activists

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10 Years Ago // June 20, 2008 ■ Classmates Jake Greenberg, Grahm Goldstein, and Carly Aronin helped a refugee family from Burundi settle in Atlanta. For their mitzvah projects, the trio worked with the non-profit organization Refugee Resettlement and Immigration of Atlanta (RRISA). They raised $550 to donate to RRISA, prepared a pre-Thanksgiving turkey dinner for the family, and brought the family presents for Christmas. ■ The bat mitzvah ceremony of Hannah Rose Siegel of Decatur, daughter of Andy Siegel and Caryn Hanrahan and Toddy Zacharchuk, was held Saturday, Jan. 19, 2008, at Ahavath Achim Synagogue.

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the previous December. ■ Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Arno II of Columbus, Ga., announce the engagement of their daughter, Amy Catherine, to Gregory Jon Smith, son of Mr. and Mrs. Alan M. Smith of Atlanta. A January wedding is planned in Columbus.

Elton John at his piano.

50 Years Ago // June 6, 1968 ■ Millions of American Jews reacted with profound grief and shock to the death of Senator Robert F. Kennedy who was struck down by an assassin’s bullet in Los Angeles. The sentiments of American Jews were expressed in scores of messages of condolence sent to the Kennedy family by the leaders of Jewish civil, religious, philanthropic and service organizations. ■ Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Hyman Levin of Griffin announce the birth of a son, Edward Scott Levin on May 28.


SIMCHAS Engagement

Zachariah-Tobin

Dawn Zachariah and Allan Zachariah of Atlanta, Georgia, happily announce the engagement of their son, Ben Zachariah to Rachel Tobin, daughter of Linda and David Tobin of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Ben’s grandparents are Shirley Massie of Atlanta, Georgia, and Anita Frankel and the late Harold Frankel of Louisville, Kentucky. Rachel’s grandparents are Harvey and Suzan Pollack and Carol and the late Sidney Tobin. Rachel’s stepgrandfather is the late Samuel Lewis. Ben graduated from the University of Indiana, Kelley School of Business in 2012 with a Master’s of Science in Accounting in 2013. He is a licensed CPA and a director of Tax Credit Investments with Monarch Private Capital. Rachel graduated from Emory University with a Bachelor’s of Science in Biology and is now in her fourth year at Duke University School of Medicine. Ben and Rachel will be married in Atlanta, Georgia, summer 2019.

Births, B’nai Mitzvah, Engagements, Weddings, Anniversaries, Special Birthdays

Have something to celebrate? Share it with your community with free

AJT simcha announcements. Submit them at atlantajewishtimes.com, or email them to submissions@atljewishtimes.com.

Scout Earns Eagle Award

Wallace

Miles Robbins Wallace, a rising sophomore at Pace Academy and a member of Temple Sinai, recently earned the highest ranking the Boy Scouts of America offers, the Eagle Scout award. A member of Troop 298 chartered at Northside United Methodist Church and led by Scoutmaster Lee Mann, Miles served as Senior Patrol Leader for two years, leading meetings and organizing troop campouts. The award is performance-based and incorporates the long-standing mission of the Boy Scouts: citizenship training, character development and personal fitness. For Miles’ Eagle project, he restored the entrance and landscaped his neighborhood Atlanta Fire Station #26 on Howell Mill Road. Miles was honored to have several firefighters attend his Court of Honor ceremony on May 19, 2018. Miles is the son of Carolyn and Nathan Wallace.

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES JUNE 22, 2018 | 43


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OBITUARIES Donald Appel

Paul Cohen

83, Atlanta

87, Palm Beach Gardens, Fla.

Paul Cohen, 87, passed away Sunday, June 10, 2018, in Palm Beach Gardens,

Fla. He is a former resident of Atlanta and a member of Congregation Or VeShalom. Mr. Cohen was a businessman and an entrepreneur. Most recently, he was co-owner of a promotional products company. He was preceded in death by his wife, Judy Cohen. He is survived by his children, Caren and Robert Rothstein and Bruce and Wendy Cohen; his grandchildren, Joshua and Joanna Rothstein, Alyssa and Gerard Kesselman, Erica Cohen, and Nikki Cohen; three great-grandchildren, Matthew, Justin and Paige; and his current wife, Marilyn Cohen. A graveside service was held Wednesday, June 13. Arrangements by Dressler’s Jewish Funeral Care, 770-451-4999.

Sarah Glustrom Shaffer 102, Atlanta

Sarah Glustrom Shaffer, 102, died peacefully Monday, June 11, 2018. Sarah was born in Atlanta on Sept. 7, 1915, to parents Solomon and Ida Glustrom. She was preceded in death by her loving husband, Hyman Shaffer, who died in 1970. She is still adored by her daughters, Rhina (Leon) Tuck and Sandra (Lance) Pittman; five grandchildren; 13 great-grandchildren; brother Simon (Helen) Glustrom; and brother-in-law Max (Freida) Shaffer. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Ahavath Achim Synagogue or Hadassah. A graveside service was held Thursday, June 13, at Greenwood Cemetery. Arrangements by Dressler’s Jewish Funeral Care, 770-451-4999.

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Donald Appel, 83, of Atlanta died on June 12, 2018. Don was born and raised in Brooklyn, N.Y. He attended West Virginia University, but adopted the teams of his children and grandchildren, so he also rooted for the University of Florida, University of Virginia, University of Michigan and Tulane. He was a former member of the board of directors of the Atlanta Apparel Mart and of the Winmark Franchisee Advisory Board, the latter of which gave him an opportunity to mentor other entrepreneurs, which he loved. Don’s early career was in sales and manufacturing. The last 16 years he was a small business owner, owning and operating two Plato’s Closet stores. His greatest joy was his family. He is survived by his wife of 60 years, Norma Feinberg Appel, Atlanta; son and daughter-inlaw, Larry and Caren Appel, Greensboro, N.C.; daughter and son-in-law, Karen and Chuck Kaplan, Atlanta; brothers and sisters-in-law, Bob and Helen Appel, Manhattan, N.Y.; and Joel and Kathy Appel, Scotch Plains, N.J.; and grandchildren, Molly, Becca, Michael, Hallie, and Jonah. Graveside services were held Wednesday, June 13, at Greenwood Cemetery with Rabbi Hillel Konigsburg officiating. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the Innovative Oncology Fund, c/o Dr. Mary Jo Lechowicz at the Winship Cancer Center, 1365 Clifton Road, Atlanta, Ga. 30322. Arrangements by Dressler’s Jewish Funeral Care, 770-451-4999. Sign on-line guestbook: www.edressler.com.

Lynnda Sherman Bloom 75, Atlanta

Lynnda Sherman Bloom, 75 , passed peacefully on Tuesday, June 12, in Atlanta, Ga. Born in Lynn, Ma., in 1943, Lynnda worked her entire career at New England Telephone, Nynex and AT&T in customer service and management until retiring at the age of 53. Lynnda was a devoted wife, mother and grandmother who enjoyed traveling and spending time with her grandchildren until the age of 67, when she was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. Survivors include husband Martin of Sandy Springs; daughters Meredith Cohen and Carrie (Sam) Kaplan, of Atlanta and Elissa Bloom of Philadelphia; grandchildren Rachel, Ava, Lauren, Danielle and Avi; and brother James Sherman of Marblehead, Ma. Services were held Thursday, June 14 at Arlington Memorial Park. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to The Alzheimer’s Association at 399 Market Street, Suite 102, Philadelphia, Pa. 19106 or by donating online at alz.org. Arrangements made by Dressler’s Jewish Funeral Care, 770-451-4999.

Death Notices

Eti Bershadskaya, 85, of Alpharetta on June 4. Julia Travis, 33, of Raleigh, N.C., on June 5. Daughter of Fran and Bob Travis and sister of Scott Travis.

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46 | JUNE 22, 2018 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

Obituaries in the AJT are written and paid for by the families; contact Managing Publisher Kaylene Ladinsky at kaylene@atljewishtimes.com or 404-883-2130, ext. 100, for details about submission, rates and payments. Death notices, which provide basic details, are free and run as space is available; send submissions to editor@atljewishtimes.com.


CLOSING THOUGHTS The Fire and Impulsivity of Tammuz Rosh Chodesh Tammuz began Wednesday, June 13. There are no holidays to celebrate this month and the fast on the 17th of Tammuz begins the three weeks of mourning. If the 17th day falls on Shabbat, as it does this year, the fast is postponed until Sunday. During this time, no weddings take place and new clothing isn’t worn. There’s no shaving or haircuts, playing musical instruments or listening to music. No celebratory firsts occur that would call for the recitation of the Shehecheyanu. The three-week period of mourning ends on the 9th of Av. During Tammuz, the focus of study is on the past historical events in Jerusalem, surrounding the destruction of the first and second temples that took place during this period. There was not only a physical displacement of our people, but also a spiritual one. It was a time of worshipping the golden calf and uncontrolled anger, during which Moses smashed the tablets. We must mindfully guard our safety and well-being to ward against current times mirroring the past. Fiery heat, flared tempers and uncontrolled, impulsive actions influence this month. Astrologically, this new moon is in Gemini, the sign of the twins. Astrologers link this related suffering twin energy to the two unrelated suicides of Kate Spade and Anthony Bourdain. Each of them was a popular iconic creator who put a new spin on products that had already been devised. Kate Spade designed the perfect, sleek, fashionable handbag. Anthony Bourdain, celebrity chef, author and television host, pushed the envelope on his life’s experience and invited us in to witness it. Spade, 55, was found dead in her New York home, from an apparent suicide. Bourdain, 61, was found dead in a hotel room in France, also from having taken his own life. Gemini rules children, so we can also expect to hear stories about children and families. There’s the ongoing immigration issue, as well as the human trafficking sting that recently took place in our own backyard in metro Atlanta. In it, 165 children were rescued. This new moon is in the 8th house which governs death and transformation. The death doesn’t have to be a literal one,

as in the case of Spade or Bourdain. It can refer to being complete with an energy and moving on from it. It can signal the end of a relationship that is no longer fulfilling, whether romantic or workrelated, the completion of a project, the

Nominate Jewish Atlanta’s 18 Under 18! We invite members of the community to nominate those under the age of 18 who they believe are Jewish Atlanta’s rising leaders in academics, religious and family life, as well as community action. WHO IS

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1 8 U N D H ATLANTA ER 18?

New Moon Meditations Dr. Terry Segal tsegal@atljewishtimes.com VOL. XC

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opportunity to change residences, or any reconfiguration or realignment. Our ancestors paid much more attention to astrology than most people do today. They dealt with the same planetary configurations as we do now, however, they utilized them to direct their path. For us, we can learn from the past and use it as a guide to charting our present and future. For example, when we find ourselves in a Gemini new moon, certain issues will be present each year. Tammuz will always be a fiery month with hot temperatures and tempers burning out of control. Depending upon the positioning of the other planets, we will have additional challenges in which the degree of difficulty may get ramped up. This month, because of the position of Venus, emotional reactions to changes regarding love, money and what we view as having value, will run high. It’s a time to be aware of how words, especially, can hurt or heal. We need to rein in our impulsivity as well. It’s the over-the-top emotional reaction that led to Moses’ breaking of the tablets that can lead despondent people into irrevocable actions such as suicide or homicide. Meditation Focus: Manipulate your breath, in and out of your body, to gain mastery over it. Then imagine exhaling a steady stream of breath as if to extinguish a birthday candle. Quell the fires that feel unbalanced within you. After, consider those you know, especially children and family who might be hurting or behaving impulsively, and take steps to help them. Remember to use healing words and reach out for help from others if needed. The National Suicide Hotline number is: 1-800-273-8255 ■

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A nominee must be Jewish, at least 10 years old and must not have turned 18 before July 25, 2018. You can nominate yourself, a friend, student or your child - anyone who meets the criteria. Nominees are judged on their academic and community achievements as an active member of Jewish Atlanta.

The deadline for nominations is Sunday, July 1, 2018. Please visit atlantajewishtimes.com/18-under-18/ for more information ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES JUNE 22, 2018 | 47


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