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NEXT WEEK: JEWISH LOVE & SINGLES

VOL. XCIII NO. 27

Are Jews More Susceptible to Depression & Suicide? DEPRESSION & SUICIDE

THE JEWISH PRECEDENT & PERSONAL STORIES FROM THE COMMUNITY WITH THERAPISTS' INSIGHTS. COVER STORY, PAGE 12

GRADY'S NEW WHEELS

GEORGIA'S FIRST MOBILE STROKE TREATMENT UNIT FROM THE MARCUS STROKE CENTER. HEALTH & WELLNESS, PAGE 9

THE LOWDOWN

WAYNE SAXE OPENS UP IN AJT'S SECOND "I BET YOU DIDN'T KNOW ..." COLUMN. COMMUNITY, PAGE 31

JULY 13, 2018 | 1ST OF AV 5778


2 | JULY 13, 2018 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES


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Contributors This Week DAVID SCHECHTER RABBI DAVID GEFFEN MARCIA CALLER JAFFE SHERRY FRANK AL SHAMS JAN JABEN-EILON RACHEL STEIN ZACH RICHTER KEVIN MADIGAN SHAINDLE SCHMUCKLER

To Life! L’Chaim! Preserving life, visiting the sick and weekly prayers for healing are some of the ways we focus in the Jewish spiritual world on health and wellness. Not to mention the impressive number of Jewish doctors we proudly count among our ranks. No doubt health and wellness have become hot topics in the news lately. Take the growing opioid epidemic in Atlanta and elsewhere and a string of celebrity suicides drawing attention to these painful issues nationwide. Loss of life through suicide or drug overdose doesn’t just affect the families, as we learn in this health and wellness issue. Through the stories of those affected by the needless deaths and the counselors who help heal them, we see that such tragedies affect the entire Jewish community. Talking about certain previously held taboos such as suicide, anxiety and depression shouldn’t have to be considered a scandal or shande (shame), better ignored or squelched. We hope in this health and wellness issue we can shed light, in some small way, on these difficult subjects and bring attention to the need for more education

THIS WEEK and awareness. In this regard, we interviewed a pharmacist who rescues drug abusers from the brink of death. And we have two pieces exploring the healing profession of integrative health and how to soothe our body, mind and spirit. Some of the do’s and don’ts involve eating better. Spoiler alert: Aloe vera, cucumbers and ice cream will cool you down in more ways than one this summer. It’s not all about health and wellness. We interview the Democratic hopefuls for the 6th Congressional district involved in a July 24 runoff before facing Republican Karen Handel in the Nov. 7 general election. There’s also an article on how some members of our Atlanta-area law enforcement traveled to Israel to learn from the masters how to improve our public safety. They studied the latest advances in community policing, counterterrorism, emergency management, safety technology and homeland security. On the lighter side, we have an interview with the showstopping Jewish singer-comedian Nancy Gaddy, whose antics will remind you of being in a Borsch Belt cabaret. Our engaging community section also includes our new Jewish joke of

the week, sure to send you on your way with a little giggle each issue. So, while we all want to be safe at home and healthy at heart, we hope you keep talking about the issues that help improve our community and the lives we hold dear.

CONTENTS LOCAL NEWS.....................4 POLITICS...........................6 BUSINESS..........................7 ISRAEL NEWS..................10 HEALTH & WELLNESS.....12 ARTS...............................26 COMMUNITY...................28 THE LOWDOWN...............31 CANDLE LIGHTING..........34 BRAIN FOOD....................36 OBITUARIES....................37 MARKETPLACE...............38 CLOSING THOUGHTS......39

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ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES JULY 13, 2018 | 3


LOCAL NEWS POP-Up Builds Philanthropic Ties

Kids at In the City Camp can participate in a number of arts and crafts projects.

By Sarah Moosazadeh sarah@atljewishtimes.com In the City Camp was the first of many organizations the Jewish Federation of Greater Atlanta Women’s Philanthropy chose to visit June 26 as part of its new POP-Up initiative. The initiative, which stands for philanthropy, opportunity and purpose is an opportunity for female donors in the community to get involved in women’s philanthropy and to see different projects the Federation is supporting. It also

provides an avenue for them to engage in community service or to create programs and start new initiatives. “We feel that our donors need a connection to where their dollars are going, and if they can see all the different needs then it is a much easier ask for them to support the Federation than getting a phone call once a year and not having any idea where their dollars are going,” said Women’s Philanthropy campaign chair Deborah Levinson. “We can’t necessarily take them overseas, but we can show them all the wonderful local things

that are happening.” In the City Camp is one of many camps the Federation’s philanthropic dollars help support to create and build Jewish confidence among youth. Others include Marcus Jewish Community Center of Atlanta day and overnight camps, Camp Barney Medintz, Camp Judea, Camp Ramah Darom and URJ Camp Coleman. In the City Camp Founder and CEO Eileen Snow Price privately funded the camp herself before she applied and received a grant from the Federation’s Jewish Innovation Fund. But she said the Federation was a tremendous help. “They are the engine that is Jewish Atlanta and their partnership with us has proven invaluable as part of our growth.” She added, “I hope the Federation continues to support different endeavA camper enjoys hanging from the obstacle course while at In the City Camp.

ors because our community really needs that, and I think it’s the Federation’s goal to help change with it and help evolve the Jewish community to the best it can be in 2018.” Women’s Philanthropy is trying to schedule two more Pop-Up programs that will highlight Jewish Family & Career Service’s Ben Massell Dental Clinic and the William Breman Jewish Heritage Museum. Women's Philanthropy President Linda Silberman spoke about her experience. “It was inspiring to hear Price speak. I have been to one of the camps before but to just see the growth and the space, how the children are learning and growing and the fact that they are making all these Jewish memories is wonderful.” She added, “We want to share all the amazing things that are going on in our community, so as we grow and want to influence more people, we can obviously get more donors and support. But it’s also very important that they see the work that we are doing as opposed to just hearing about it.” ■ In the City Camp founder and chief executive officer Eileen Snow Price shares a hug with one of the campers during a tour of the camp.

Some campers spend time outside playing football, which is one of many activities the camp offers.

Women's Philantropy leaders and supporters listen to Debbie Levinson discuss Federation's funding and introduce the first POP-Up. 4 | JULY 13, 2018 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES


LOCAL NEWS

Georgia’s Police Brass Learn From Israel’s Finest By Roni Robbins roni@atljewishtimes.com Symbolic of their profession saving lives, 18, chai (life), is the number of public law enforcement leaders from Georgia who returned in late June from a public safety leadership training program in Israel. Assistant DeKalb Police Chief Sonya Porter headed the delegation. “It was an awesome experience and I’m thankful I got to go,” Porter said of her first visit to the country. One of the most valuable lessons she said she learned was how the entire Israeli police force, trained uniformly throughout the country, uses technology to improve communication between the stations. While she doesn’t think Georgia and the United States will ever switch to a national police force, she believes technology can be used more effectively to improve interaction between community police services. For example, DeKalb and Atlanta police, also represented on the trip, can share information to protect themselves better from terrorism, Porter said. Like she learned from Israel, she said she also would try harder to recruit from other religions that might not be represented well in the police force. “Our diversity is by races,“ Porter said. “We have to have diversity of religions to connect more to the community.” The 18 Georgia police chiefs, sheriffs, and public safety commissioners and officials —along with a senior corporate security manager—returned after two weeks of training with the country’s top policing execs. The Georgia group was part of a 21-member delegation of senior law enforcement officials from Georgia, Alabama and Tennessee who participated in the Georgia International Law Enforcement Exchange’s 26th annual peer-topeer training program in partnership with Israel. While there, they studied the latest advances in community policing, counterterrorism, emergency management, advanced technologies and homeland security policies. GILEE Founding Director Robbie Friedmann said from Israel that among the highlights of this year’s trip were: seeing how Israel’s police are increasingly recruiting from the country’s Muslim Arab population; learning about community policing in AKKO, near Haifa, where four religions are concentrated in a small area; and visiting the 9/11 Living

The Southeast delegation poses in front of the Israel Police Headquarters.

Assistant DeKalb Police Chief Sonya Porter receives a gift from Israeli Police Commissioner Roni Alsheikh.

Memorial to World Trade Center victims in Jerusalem. “Our GILEE delegates have returned with new ways of developing, collaborating on and using police and intelligence strategies to minimize the production of crime,” said Friedmann, who is also professor emeritus at Georgia State University. This year’s peer-to-peer training emphasized community policing, the textbook definition of which Friedmann developed while a Georgia State professor. “Community policing is a policy and a strategy aimed at achieving more effective and efficient crime control, reduced fear of crime, improved quality of life, improved police services and police legitimacy, through a proactive reliance on community resources that seeks to change crime-causing conditions. It assumes a need for greater accountability of police, greater public share in decision-making and greater concern for civil rights and liberties,” said Friedmann. Rome Police Chief Denise DownerMcKinney was among those who participated in GILEE’s 19th delegation to Israel and recently shared her experience, “The phenomenal GILEE program makes us think outside the box, understand the importance of building and maintaining strong relationships and partnerships. “It is critical that we continue to work diligently to forge and build public and private partnerships in our local communities and throughout Georgia. We must continue to develop and strengthen these relationships, along with our local business and community partners, to ensure our children and communities are safe, and that we have the tools to make this happen.” Friedmann said, “In GILEE’s 26 years, our partnership with the world’s top pub-

The Southeast police delegation witnesses a medical drill at Rambam Health Care Campus.

lic safety experts has returned more than 720 public safety officials home with the knowledge and skills they need to keep our communities safer. “Among the program’s many benefits, our delegates return home with a better understanding of effective ways to address modern policing challenges and increased communications and collaboration among different agencies, external organizations and the greater community.” Founded in 1992, GILEE is a Georgia homeland security program. The organization works continuously to improve public safety by enhancing inter-agency

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cooperation, partnerships and professional educational training among the world’s top law enforcement communities, most recently in Israel and Hungary. To date, it has offered more than 200 special briefings to more than 32,000 law enforcement officers, corporate security personnel and community leaders. GILEE has carried out more than 450 programs and produced more than 1,500 graduates. GILEE is a research unit within Georgia State’s Andrew Young School of Policy Studies. Learn more about GILEE at www. gilee.org. ■

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POLITICS Dem Hopefuls Face 'Uphill Climb' in 6th District By Dave Schechter dschechter@atljewishtimes.com Kevin Abel and Lucy McBath hope to do what Jon Ossoff and millions of dollars could not: Elect a Democrat to represent Georgia’s 6th District in Congress. Whichever candidate wins a July 24 runoff (early voting began July 2) will contest the November 7 general election against Republican Karen Handel, who has served a year in the House of Representatives after defeating Ossoff in a special election in June 2017. “It’s an uphill climb” was the assessment from one of 225 people who attended a June 27 forum featuring Abel and McBath at The Weber School, sponsored by the Jewish Democratic Women’s Salon and moderated by political reporter Greg Bluestein of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Neither Abel nor McBath has raised anything close to the money that backed Ossoff in the most expensive House race ever. And the 41,603 votes cast in the March 20 Democratic primary-- in which McBath finished first and Abel second out of four candidates -- totaled only onethird of what Ossoff received in his loss to Handel. The 6th District includes portions of eastern Cobb County, northern Fulton County and northern DeKalb County. It has the highest percentage of Jewish residents among Georgia’s 14 congressional districts and is home to more than 40 percent of metro Atlanta’s Jews. President Donald Trump narrowly carried the district over Hillary Clinton in 2016, 48 percent to 47 percent. “This is a Republican leaning district. We need a Democratic candidate who can turn out not just Democratic

6 | JULY 13, 2018 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

Kevin Abel is sensitive to immigration issues, having emigrated at age 14 from South Africa.

votes, but win independent voters and independent-minded Republican voters as well,” said Abel, an Alpharetta resident and co-founder, with his wife, of Abel Solutions, a technology consulting company. “I am the candidate who can win these votes that are needed to flip the district. . . I am the candidate who can beat Karen Handel in the fall.” McBath, who lives in Marietta, had intended to seek a seat in the Georgia House, but changed her focus after the Feb. 14 shootings at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., in which 17 people were killed. She became a gun control activist after her 17-year-old son was shot to death in November 2012 by a man angered at the volume of music coming from a car in which the teen was sitting at a Jacksonville, Fla., gas station. “I would never have imagined standing here in front of you tonight,” she said. When her son was killed, “Everything I knew about my life changed,” said McBath, who worked for Delta Airlines for 30 years as a flight attendant. “Everything I’ve gone through has prepared me for this moment.” “What I have is credibility and a reality of experiences that speaks to the crucial and the critical conflicts, and crises, and visions that you are making in

As a two-time survivor of breast cancer, Lucy McBath’s experience fighting disease informs her stance on health care.

your own families,” said McBath, who is active at Seven Springs Church in Powder Springs. Abel and McBath aimed their rhetorical guns primarily at Handel and Trump. Both decried the administration’s “zero tolerance” immigration policy and criticized Handel -- as she presided over the House chamber -- for telling a Democratic member to stop playing audio of crying migrant children who had been separated from their parents. Abel’s sensitivity is rooted in his having emigrated to the United States from South Africa with his family as a 14-yearold. “The calculated, dispassionate separation of children from their parents . . . harkens back to the darkest days of our American history,” Abel said. “We are a great nation, not because we’ve always been perfect, but because we always strived to be better, to live up to an ideal of what America is meant to represent.” “I understand first-hand what it’s like to have a family ripped apart,” McBath said. “That’s not who we are as Americans. That’s not the global image that we want our international partners and allies to see of us.” Abel and McBath both favor a “twostate solution” to resolve Israel’s conflict with the Palestinians, but disagree on Trump’s move of the U.S. Embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. “Jerusalem has always been the capital of Israel. . . I do support the move of the Embassy to Jerusalem. I just hope that this does not pre-signal any aspect of final status issues,” said Abel, a member of Temple Sinai. “I oppose, at this time, the moving of the American Embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem until a deal for peace has been brokered,” McBath said, adding that she considers Jerusalem to be Israel’s capital. McBath said that her experience as a two-time survivor of breast cancer informs her stance on health care. “When I was diagnosed, not once, but two times, those were very critical times in my life when I was scared to death,” she said.

“I do advocate a robust public option for all of us,” McBath said of the debate over the Affordable Care Act, also known as “Obamacare.” She and Abel both support expanding access to Medicaid in Georgia. “I firmly believe that health care is a right, and this being the richest nation on earth, no American should be one diagnosis away from losing their home or declaring bankruptcy,” Abel said. “As a cancer survivor myself, I know what it means to worry more about my medical bills than my diagnosis. This system is broken and I believe that the Affordable Care Act, while flawed, is the right framework for moving forward and moving us toward a health care policy that works in this country.” The candidates disagreed with the call by Rep. Maxine Waters, D-Calif. that Trump administration employees, such as Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders -- who was asked to leave a Virginia restaurant -- should be harassed publicly. “As Democrats we are so upset and frustrated at what has happened to civility in this nation. We lose if we start playing the game on their terms,” Abel said of the president’s supporters. “As Americans we have to lead the way to a better conversation, because the future of our country depends on it. This is not a game. This is deadly serious,” Abel said. “We must always be vitally aware of how corrosive our speech can be,” McBath said. “I do not agree with public shaming,” repeating Michelle Obama’s admonition that: “When they go low, we go high.” Both candidates sidestepped the issue of whether Trump should be impeached, saying that, if elected, they would face that issue if it moves forward. Asked how they would work across party lines, Abel referenced his experience dealing with employees, customers and vendors. “We don’t always agree on everything. . . . But we come to the table because we have a common goal,” he said. “Congress is not a business, but the concepts are the same. We’re people with different viewpoints, honest differences in our viewpoints about how we approach policy. Republicans are not bad people. They just see policy from a different angle,” Abel said. “I am a woman and we are problem solvers,” McBath said. “We do it every single day.” She touted her experience working with Republicans, both in Georgia and in Congress, “to find common sense solutions to gun violence.” ■


BUSINESS Immunotherapy Gives Hope to Cancer Patients

Dr. Scott Solomon uses immunotherapy to help more patients fight cancer.

Instead of directly targeting cancer cells, Northside Hospital doctors are indirectly stimulating a patient’s immune system to fight cancer. “The hopes of immunotherapy have been around for decades in the form of allogenetic stem cell transplantation, in which a related or unrelated donor’s bone marrow or blood is transfused into a patient to cure aggressive blood cancers,” said Dr. Scott Solomon, medical director of Northside Hospital’s Blood and Marrow Transplant Matched Unrelated Donor Program and Stem Cell Processing Laboratory. “Such transplants represented the first definitive proof of the human immune system’s capacity to cure cancer in patients who have failed all conventional therapies – in the same way newer immunotherapies are allowing us to do similar lifesaving therapies for patients with very difficult to treat cancers,” Solomon said. “Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy is one of the most exciting and most promising cell-based immunotherapies and has just recently been approved by the FDA to treat certain types of relapsed/refractory B-cell lymphomas and acute lymphoblastic leukemia up to the age of 25,” Solomon said. “It is giving hope to patients who previously did not have it. “CAR T-cell therapy works by taking a patient’s immune cells and genetically modifying them to be better tumor-fighting immune cells. Then, the cells are expanded to great numbers (tens of thousands) in laboratories and prepared for reinfusion back into the patient, where they can find and attack cancer. “CAR T-cell therapy is available to patients who have failed multiple rounds of conventional therapy. These patients historically have had very poor outcomes, very low chances of even brief remissions and certainly no chances of a cure prior to CAR T-cell therapy. Now many of them are alive months or years after therapy,” Solomon said.

The advantages of the program include increased research and development and cross-exposure to different countries and markets in Israel and the U.S., Shorer said. The hope is the Israeli partners will also consider putting an operation base in Georgia — adding intellectual capital, economic development and jobs. The “representative office” would “assist in boosting Atlanta’s profile as an important hi-tech hub,” Shorer said. The program seeks projects focused on such industries as: vehicle automation/ electrification; advanced materials; sustainable energy/water/agriculture; public safety; smart home; and data analytics.

Israel-based Startup to Open

Oktopost, a social media management platform, will open its first U.S. office July 18 in Atlanta Tech Village, according to Atlanta Inno. The Tel Aviv-based startup that caters to business-to-business (B2B) clients plans to hire 15 people by the end of the year. “This is a huge milestone for us,” Oktopost spokesman Sapir Segal told Atlanta Inno. “It’s also a great opportunity to expand our physical presence in the U.S. and more specifically, in Atlanta. “We believe that the tech ecosystem (and specifically SaaS) will continue to expand its presence in the Atlanta region, and we’re honored to be a part of that growth.” The company, which started in 2013, simplifies B2B social media marketing for management, measurement and engagement. “Oktopost makes it extremely easy to schedule large volumes of content across multiple social networks, engage with audiences at scale, and measure the success of their activities,” Segal told Atlanta Inno. ■

$2 Million For Georgia-Israel Tech Projects

Georgia and Israel’s “Startup Nation” – Atlanta-based Southern Company and Oded Shorer, director of economy and the Israel Innovation Authority – have commerce for the Consulate General of each put up $1 million to fund technologyIsrael to the Southeastern United States based and scientific projects that are a collaboration between the two regions. The $2 million will be allocated through grants. In the United States, the program will be managed by the Georgia Centers of Innovation (COI), a division of the Georgia Department of Economic Development. COI will help collect and screen applications of the projects and ideas that apply for funding, said COI Executive Director R. Steven Justice. “After this screening, both the Southern Company and Israel Innovation Authority will embark on direct negotiations with the selected applicants on the specifics of the project,” Justice said. Southern Company expressed interest in connecting with innovation from Israel, a country consistently recognized for its high-tech focus, he said. The Innovation Authority first offered this program to Georgia two years ago, but it took until recently to identify the company that would put up the initial funding, said Oded Shorer, director of economy and commerce for the Consulate General of Israel to the Southeastern United States. ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES JULY 13, 2018 | 7


REFLECTIONS Lights of Jerusalem

In the USA it was the Fourth of July and firework displays that lit up the skies across the 50 states. Here in Jerusalem, the annual light show transformed the Old City brick by brick, building by building, tower after tower into an amazing electric collage. Each year, for a week here in Jerusalem, “The Light Show” makes a bold statement with its intricate tiny flashing bulbs and its enormous lights: Jerusalem on the Fourth, a castle powered in the past with the electricity that keeps our world alive. Never having seen the show before up close, I made an entry with cousins from abroad into the fantasy land. Thousands of Israelis filled the streets, alleyways and courtyards of the Old City of Jerusalem. Ablaze with brilliant tones, the lights brought out beauty hiding in the crevices for centuries waiting to be seen again and then disappear for another year. About 10 years ago the municipality of Jerusalem decided that the ancient city itself should be permitted to make a statement for all who came from Israel and from around the world to experience the beauty and spirit of this ancient-modern capitol. This year the tensions, which have existed around Israel’s borders, needed an antidote. The Light Festival provided just that. One became a part of a crowd of all sizes and all ages, moving along while constantly making new discoveries. As I was about to begin my pilgrimage through the Jaffa Gate, I saw a “new world” which had been created by the multi-layered 3-D images. The wall at the back of the Jaffa Gate plaza was filled with shapes and newly created faces making their electrical illuminated way to Jerusalem, along with all of us about to enter the Gate itself. Dancing on that immense wall, accompanying us, they 8 | JULY 13, 2018 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

offered encouragement to all who came to visit a new Jerusalem waiting to be explored. After getting inside the gate and walking to the next destination, I saw windmills of light, beautifully taking the illumination available and creating a massive nature site, never stopping in its turning into a kinetic scene that pulled at your heartstrings. The sign with it suggested that you look through the prism of freedom, catch the

Guest Column By Rabbi David Geffen

flow of energy, and never hesitate to take a chance. When I entered the Jewish Quarter, I saw the Hurva Synagogue reflecting the spiritual flow of the centuries. Its dome had so many blinking lights around it, you would never realize that it took so many years to rebuild and now stands aglow with the creation of lights that illuminate the rising sides of the structure as it reaches towards the heavens. For me, one of the delightful presentations was to be able to paint with water. In front of you, at a certain alley in the Old City, was a large LED screen, which lit up when touched with anything damp. Tiny patches were used by us to draw pictures both large and small, both simple and intricate. “This Festival in Jerusalem contains light installations together with incredibly melodic local music, creating an unforgettable atmosphere of a fairy tale whose joy and happiness makes the eternal city revive in another cascading spiral of illumination,” one visitor wrote. I wish that I could have penned this before the festival but then it would just have been constructed from what I read or watched on the internet. How pleased I am, finally, to witness and absorb the beautiful manner in which our city was aglow. The radiant giant picture, piece by piece, enlightened me and many thousands of others seeking to find meaning in a world too focused on those acts that can sully our planet. ■

Looking Back on my Bar Mitzvah 50 Years Later Fifty years ago this month, I became a man – according to Jewish tradition, anyway. The anniversary of my bar mitzvah would have passed unnoticed had I not found a prayer book given me to mark the occasion. The Reform congregation north of Chicago was large enough to require a bar mitzvah partner. I was paired with a junior high school classmate with whom I was friendly, so that was a relief. I stood on the bimah and looked over the extraordinary sanctuary, the windows that peeked at Lake Michigan, the ceiling that soared over pews that could seat 1,000 (though barely a few dozen that morning). Looking down from the pulpit, I saw my parents, two younger brothers and two younger sisters, my mother’s parents, my father’s mother and her sister, assorted family friends, and a handful of my friends. My role in the service was far less extensive than what my three children would experience at our Reconstructionist congregation. I read just three lines from the Torah, with the blessings before and after, and three lines from the Haftorah, with the blessings. In a voice that had yet to mature, I delivered a speech that I doubt included anything memorable. There was no party. After lunch at the house I went with a few friends to see the movie “2001: A Space Odyssey.” The gifts I received included a couple hundred dollars (mostly in savings bonds) and, yes, a pen-and-pencil set. Looking back, it feels like an unremarkable day – in a wholly remarkable year. My bar mitzvah was a year after Israel’s victory in the June 1967 six-day war, a stunning strike launched against Arab forces massing on its borders. Whatever apprehensions or apathy American Jews might have felt about the 20-year-old nation had been replaced by a euphoric pride and communal resolve to support Israel in whatever way possible. Zionism became a tenet of Jewish life in America. But like many of their fellow citizens, American Jews were increasingly skeptical about the Vietnam War. The 16,592 lives lost would make 1968 the deadliest year of the war for American personnel. The trust, even reverence, that Amer-

icans had invested in institutions such as the Pentagon and the White House was being questioned as never before. A counter-culture movement that went well beyond sex, drugs and rock ’n roll was pushing against the mores on which life in America was grounded and

From Where I Sit By Dave Schechter dschechter@atljewishtimes.com

challenging organized religion. University students, who found their voice opposing the war (then men benefitting from draft deferments), were rebelling against the rules and assumptions by which they were expected to live. The civil rights movement that sought equality for black Americans – in which Jews had played a supporting role (though tensions between them were developing) – was inspiring women and other minorities to mobilize. The Kerner Commission reported in 1968 that America “is moving toward two societies, one black, one white – separate and unequal” – a forecast prescient in identifying issues that persist today. The assassinations of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. on April 4 and Robert F. Kennedy on June 4 were body blows to the hopes that many held for improvement in race relations and an end to U.S. involvement in Vietnam. Later that summer, I watched on television as, a 45-minute drive away, the anti-war movement and counter-culture ran head-long into the nightsticks of Chicago police outside the Democratic National Convention. America, it appeared, was tearing itself apart. One measure of the resistance to this upheaval came in November, when Republican Richard Nixon was elected president, defeating Democratic Vice President Hubert Humphrey (who received an estimated 81 percent of the Jewish vote), and segregationist George Wallace. Standing on the bimah on that July morning, I was fixated on not messing up, in English or Hebrew. Jewish tradition aside, I was still a boy, aware that I lived in turbulent times, though it would be years before I understood how transformative they had been in reshaping the world I inhabit five decades later. ■


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR It Takes a Village

At 33, the life of vivacious Julia Travis tragically ended. Julia had a brain tumor when she was 7. The treatment that prolonged her life ultimately took it away. Radiation she received as a child caused the arteries in her brain to narrow, which caused a fatal stroke. Julia graduated Centennial High School and Warren Wilson College. She was a spokesperson for the Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation, a participant in Ride for Kids and a political activist, following in the footsteps of her mother, Fran, and her grandfather, Paul Kulick, who was executive director of the Savannah Jewish Council. Her Facebook page is a testament to a remarkable young woman who touched lives of everyone she met. No parent should have to endure the loss of a child, but Julia’s death is doubly profound. She was the glue that kept her family together. Her 37-year-old brother, Scott, who suffers from bipolar disease, has been in and out of facilities for two decades. His needs placed a huge financial toll on the family. Both parents, who are 74, are barely subsisting on Social Security. Julia’s dad, Bob, formerly a criminal defense attorney, is unable to walk or care for himself due to complications from back surgery, and is in a nursing home. Her mom, Fran, who was political liaison for National Council of Jewish Women, is living in the Jewish Tower, but cannot remain unless she has 24-hour care. The death of her daughter has exacerbated Fran’s dementia. An anonymous donor funded the cost of caregivers, but that money will soon be gone. Fran would likely be best in a memory-care facility, but there are no funds for this through Medicare, and her Social Security isn’t enough to cover the monthly expenses. Waiting lists are two to three years for Medicaid beds. Bob and Fran miss each other terribly, but since neither can care for the other, they must

In earlier years, Bob, Scott, Fran and Julia celebrated simchas, but no more.

live apart. The grief of losing their daughter and not being together to mourn has added to their stress. “The Village,” Fran’s friends, are dealing with what Julia had been handling: the family’s finances, taking Fran to appointments, etc. Jewish Family & Career Services has been terrific, but we need more. If there is anyone in the community that can help guide us, has the financial means to assist, or knows of foundations we might appeal to, please contact me: queenesther1966@ gmail.com - Rhonda Gottlieb, Atlanta

Immigration/Separation of Children

A letter sent to my Senators and Representative Barry Loudermilk: You and your Senate/House colleagues must reject the US Administration’s family separation policy and support legislation that will bring this deplorable, reprehensible, immoral and unconscionable situation to an end. This is a moral issue, not a political one. If you and your fellow legislators continue to stand by and say or do nothing, then you are spineless and complicit with this policy and as immoral as your Administration. I am involved in Holocaust education. We are re-living Nazi concentration camps and Japanese internment camps all over again - explain that to your children and grandchildren because your silence and inaction is indicative of your complicity. In Holocaust vocabulary, you are a Bystander. - Judy Bauer Cohen, Atlanta ■

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ISRAEL PRIDE Good News From Our Jewish Home Israel Ranked Eighth Most Powerful Country

Israel was ranked the eighth most powerful country in the world, according to a survey published by U.S. News & World Report. The rankings look at the influence of a nation as well as its political, economic and military power. A country’s alliances factor in as does its influence and whether the country is a leader, the publication said in its description of the rankings. The United States was ranked the world’s most powerful country, followed by Russia, China, Germany, Britain, France and Japan. Israel ranked behind Japan.

President and the Prince

Ben-Gurion University of the Negev President Rivka Carmi was among a select group representing academia and science invited to meet with Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, during his visit

Immune System Technology Key to Analyzing Data

Ben-Gurion University President Rivka Carmi met Prince William.

to Israel June 26. A lively exchange ensued at the formal reception at the home of the British ambassador to Israel when Prince William learned that professor Carmi was a pediatrician. The prince mentioned that there was a shortage of pediatricians in the United Kingdom. Carmi, who is leaving BGU at the end of the year, told the prince without missing a beat, “I’m available as of January 1.”

Technology developed at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology will provide the scientific community with innovative tools to gain an in-depth understanding of the immune system in health and disease. The technology, which researchers have named immuneXpresso, scans millions of scientific publications and maps diseases' immune profiles. These maps, which have already identified previously unknown biological interactions, will enable development of personalized, immuno-centric therapies. In the past decade, the scientific community has developed innovative tools for precise and broad measurement of cells, proteins and genes. These tools provide a wealth of information, but immuneXpresso is expected to help with the interpretation of the data.

Four female soldiers become tank commanders for the first time in IDF history.

IDF Crowns First Female Tank Commanders

For the first time in IDF history, four female soldiers became tank commanders after successfully completing a 16-month-long pilot course, IDF reported. During the course, the female soldiers mastered loading shells rapidly and operating the tank’s brake pedal, which requires physical strength. In July 2017, 15 women began the grueling training program within the Caracal Battalion, an infantry combat battalion composed of both male and female soldiers. They were chosen through a tough selection process that identified “high levels of motivation” for combat service. Only four of the initial 15 completed the course. ■

Today in Israeli History

July 13, 1978: Six months after his historic visit to Jerusalem, Egyptian President Anwar Sadat invites Israel’s Foreign Minister Ezer Weizmann to meet with him in Salzburg, Austria. July 14, 1555: Pope Paul IV issues the papal decree Cum Nimis Absurdum, which subjects Jews under his dominion to a myriad of restrictions and humiliations, most notably forcing them to live in ghettos. July 15, 1908: Max Fisher is born in Pittsburgh to Russian Jewish immigrants. He dedicates much of his life to the Jewish State, raising hundreds of millions of dollars through his career as a leader in nearly every Jewish organization in North America. July 16, 1927: Born in Kippenheim, Germany in 1926, Stef Wertheimer immigrates to Mandatory Palestine in 1937. A philanthropist and ardent peace activist, Wertheimer has dedicated more than $100 million of his own money to build industrial parks in the Galilee. July 17, 1895: Born in 1888 in Buczacz, Galicia (later part of Ukraine), Shm10 | JULY 13, 2018 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

Max Fisher (left) meets with Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon in Jerusalem in 2001.

uel Agnon is the first Israeli to win a Nobel Prize and remains the only Hebrew writer to receive this award in literature. July 18, 1290: Following decades of exploitation and persecution that included heavy taxation and attempts at forced conversion, King Edward I of England issues an expulsion order for the Jews of England. July 19, 1940: A close associate of Theodore Herzl, Max Bodenheimer is the first president of the Zionist Federation of Germany and is a leader in the establishment of the Jewish National Fund (JNF). He dies in Jerusalem. ■ Items provided by the Center for Israel Education (www.israeled.org), where you can find more details.


ISRAEL NEWS

Out of The Ashes: Dousing Gaza Fires

Photos by Israel Fire and Rescue Services/Courtesy of the Jewish National Fund.

An Israeli fire truck tries to douse a devastating fire in Eshkol, Israel, caused by flaming kites.

Atlanta businessman Allan Zachariah, a member of the Jewish National Fund’s Century Council, recently returned from witnessing the fire-ravaged communities along the Gaza border. That’s where flaming kites have set fire to large swaths of land. Zachariah visited the Eshkol region of Israel in early June and saw up close the damage caused by the incendiary kites. “These kites are being used as a new form of terrorism against our people and we should be supporting them, (JNF) dur-

ing this time of need,” said Zachariah, who is co-CEO of Pathstone, a wealth management company. “We have an opportunity to support our brothers and sisters in the Western Negev who are living in fear and danger.” Since March, more than 450 incendiary kites, balloons, and rockets have been launched from Gaza towards the communities of Eshkol and Sha’ar HaNegev, destroying more than 6,500 acres of agricultural land and forests that the people rely on as their main source of income and economic development, JNF

said Yoram Levi, spokesperson for Israel Fire and Rescue Services. The existing fire stations in the area can have a response time of 15 minutes, but having local firefighters and fire wagons has cut the waiting time down to two to three minutes, JNF reported. In a show of Atlanta resident Allan Zachariah (right) speaks to strength and solia security official in Eshkol about recent fires. darity, people from around the region and the world are doreports. For the region’s children, a famil- ing their part to help. Local kibbutzim iar and seemingly safe object, a kite, has have allocated housing and meals for now become a symbol of terror and fear, firefighters, who are staying on-site at JNF said. all times; volunteers have joined the fireResponding to the fires, JNF donors fighting efforts; JNF forestry workers are from around the country have provided trying to stop the spread of the fires; and emergency support in the form of nine the Israel Defense Forces has provided new fire wagons. off-road vehicles and reserve firefighters “The fire wagons can reach deep into to help efforts. the fields and places that regular trucks In the United States, JNF lay leadercannot, and they have greater extin- ship maintained constant updates and guishing abilities. The sooner you get to fundraising efforts through social media, the site where an incendiary balloon hits local campaigns, and personal support of the ground, it minimizes the damage,” fundraising. ■

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES JULY 13, 2018 | 11


COVER STORY The Double Pain of Depression and Suicide By Marcia Caller Jaffe I admit that I was indeed rocked by the recent suicides of Kate Spade and Anthony Bourdain. They had “everything.” Why did family/friends not know? The news was abuzz with statistics that more Americans die of suicide than car accidents and homicides. Local psychiatrist Steven Jaffe (no relation) says, “The incidence of suicide is indeed up. Those who are depressed and vulnerable can be influenced as copy cats, especially with the media glamorizing the phenomena instead of focusing on the wasteful outcome. Internet bullying is another factor.” Jews are believed to have established the field of psychiatry as a way to deal with problems. Freud, Bettelheim, Adler, Fromm and Maslow were Jewish forefathers who had a penchant for expressing and analyzing emotions. Jews make up 29 percent of the American psychiatrists, and 13 percent of medical doctors overall, according to a 2007 study by the University of Chicago Medical Center, “Psychia-

trists are the Least Religious of all Physicians.” The early Jewish texts show King David struggling with depression and Deuteronomy referring to shigaon, the root word for meshuganah, Yiddish for crazy. And dare to imagine what happened at Masada. Maybe Jews bring a neurotic, anxiety-prone persona upon ourselves. Woody Allen often appears as a stereotypical high anxiety mess. Studies by the National Institute of Mental Health in 1992 showed that Jews with manic depression were within the normal range of the population at large. In a study done in 2012 (Elizabeth Midlarsky, Columbia University) Jews, more so than Catholics and Protestants, were shown to be tolerant of not stigmatizing therapy and seeking professional help. In “Why Jews Make Good Therapy Patients,” an article in the Pacific Standard the same year, writer Tom Jacobs stated, “Jews as a whole are found to encourage introspection and self-knowledge…and downplay blame.”

Lon Goodman (right) often speaks of the good times with son William, who committed suicide at age 19.

Mitch Cohen poses with wife Suzette who took her life 15 months after this photo.

Epigenetics & the Holocaust

Clockwise from top left: Sigmund Freud, Bernard Jean Bettelheim, Alfred Adler, Erich Fromm and Abraham Maslow.

12 | JULY 13, 2018 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

A controversial epigenetics study at New York’s Mount Sinai Hospital (2015 Rachel Yehuda) shows evidence that communities like Holocaust survivors that suffered persecution and trauma actually had genetic changes that were transmitted to future generations via molecular switches. Others seek to debunk Yehuda’s findings stating that her sample size was too small and that it takes four generations to scientifically determine switching. They suggested the likelihood of growing up with parents who were fearful, chronically sad recounting first-hand stories of suffering, as environmental.

Family Tragedies

In “The Forward” (Aug 2015) Judith Posner, who lost a son to suicide, spoke of not using the word “commit” when referring to suicide. “It’s a double whammy. The taboo of the taboos. Was I an inadequate parent? Does it make others uncomfortable?” Atlantan Lon Goodman is not uncomfortable. He encourages his friends to speak often of his late son William. In 2012, Goodman kissed William (19) goodbye, as he drove himself back to Alabama for the start of college. William, who was not under the care of a therapist, nor on medication, took his own life the next day. “This was totally out of character. He was a happy go lucky guy. He even took extra bagels for several days ahead.” Goodman went to a grief counseling program at Jewish Family & Career Services. “It was helpful, but from that point, I came to terms with it and did not ask ‘Why?’ I made the decision to accept what ‘was.' I told friends not to walk on eggshells. William is part of my life. We talk about him as if he was enjoying the golf tournament with us.” Although William was on Facebook, Lon says there was no bullying or hint of suicidal inten-

tion in his social media. Mitch Cohen’s wife Suzette, 53, took her own life while looking forward to her son’s wedding four months later. After that, Cohen went to the Link Counseling Center for grief support before starting his own group. “People commit suicide for two reasons: they want the pain to stop or they feel those around them will be better off without them. Suicide is a permanent solution to a temporary situation. Suzette showed no symptoms until she experienced menopause and got fired from her job, which set this off,” said Cohen. (Note that Suzette’s father was a Holocaust survivor and suffered from bipolar disorder.) Cohen urges rabbis in all sectors of Judaism to remove the religious stigma that dishonors families of suicide victims by insisting on burial plots outside the boundaries of the regular cemetery. My own grandmother was buried in Columbus, Ohio, on the outside of the Jewish cemetery fence. Dr. Jaffe notes that rabbis can find a basis to disqualify the suicide label by understanding the state of mind was not sound and allowing traditional burial.


HEALTH & WELLNESS

Susan Shapiro McCarthy, LPC (left), has worked for over 40 years treating young children with depression. Steve Jaffe, MD (right), local psychiatrist, cautions that media needs to continue to not glamorize suicide to influence those who are vulnerable.

Alan Brandis, PhD (right), speaks of the connection between anxiety and depression. Howard Maziar, MD (left), says recognition and awareness of psychiatric conditions have improved.

Therapists Weigh In

Dr. Alan Brandis of Atlanta Area Psychological Associates, says, “Depression and anxiety used to be considered separate problems, but they frequently co-occur and may be treated successfully with similar approaches. I have found in my clinical practice that medication often speeds up the process and makes psychotherapy work faster, makes it easier to learn new coping skills and helps the patient experience improvements while they are still learning. “Jewish culture’s emphasis on learning, achievement and competition can be a contributing factor to anxiety and depression. The feeling that we are not living up to our parents’ expectations can be painful and affect our relationships and feelings about ourselves. Jews tend to be obsessive (We question: Is that a bad thing?) and overthinking contributes to anxiety and worry. Modern Jewish literature is littered with anxiety, guilt and depression, like author Philip Roth who was roundly criticized for exposing the emotional underbelly of Jewish life in such works as “Goodbye, Columbus” and “Portnoy’s Complaint.” Brandis continues, “My father’s family escaped Germany in 1938; other relatives never got out. Separation anxiety was a foundational element of my family dynamic, and my father eventually developed a problem with prescription anxiety medications. There are programs devoted to the emotional effects on the next generation caused by living with Holocaust survivors. The intergenerational transmission of anxiety and depression is one of the main consequences of failing to

It’s all about getting out of pain. Also, I find that some of this impulse can be related to using alcohol.” Dr. Howard Maziar, who has been practicing psychiatry in Atlanta for 40 years, states that the recent tragedy of high-profile suicides has once again brought the issue of mental health to the forefront. “It is important to understand that psychiatric disorders are illnesses like any other. There continues to be debate whether the incidence of psychiatric disorders is increasing, or it’s the same but recognition and awareness improved. New treatments are constantly being introduced. Treatment is available and effective. Overcoming mental illness is not a matter of will. One cannot ‘just get over it,’’” he said.

“As a guide for living a psychologically healthy life, I have always found great wisdom in the serenity prayer by theologian Reinhold Niebuhr and adopted by 12-step programs.” ■

God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change; courage to change the things I can; and wisdom to know the difference.

For help dealing with depression and suicide prevention, contact these support groups:

■ Jewish Family & Career Services: 770-933-0081 resolve and treat the effects of trauma. The goal of treatment is to make life better, through learning ways to manage uncomfortable thoughts and feelings to maintain emotional balance,” Brandis said. Susan Shapiro McCarthy, licensed professional counselor at Atlanta Area Psychological Associates, P.C., has treated depressed children for decades, 35 years of which were in the public school system. She cautioned, “Sometimes it’s hard to discern warning signs in depressed young children. The main thing to emphasize is a change in behavior from a standard way to a different one, usually with negative aspects. “Watch for noticeable markers like clinginess, crying, anger outbursts. Particularly in younger children, there could be a reversal of toilet training. For adolescents, behavior might be isolation, not wanting to go to school or interact with others, losing interest in activities, spending long periods of time using social media versus face-to-face interactions,” McCarthy said. “I see increasingly more middle school children harming themselves by self cutting with sharp household objects. Changes in eating and sleeping habits should be noted. I’ve had cases of children who are hiding food in their rooms.” Dr. Jaffe says, “I see no difference in Jewish suicide incidence versus the main population. Sometimes we see an unexpected blow by the ‘perfect kid, straight A’ student who is so brittle that one small stress puts [him] over the edge, contrasting [with] the other group one might suspect -- long suffering from bipolar illness.

■ Elijah’s Journey, focusing on suicide prevention among Jews: http://bit.ly/elijahjourney ■ National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 800-273-8255 ■ Mitch Cohen’s support group: 404-452-8438 ■ The Berman Center: 770-336-7444 For another view of suicide, read Atlanta author Melissa Fay Greene’s June 24 article in New York Magazine: “A Mother Considers Her Son’s Final Thoughts,” about her son Sol’s suicide, http://bit.ly/sonsfinalthoughts

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES JULY 13, 2018 | 13


HEALTH & WELLNESS

One Man’s Effort to Tame the Opioid Crisis if you intervene). Some insurance companies cover it.

By Marcia Caller Jaffe Ira Katz picked the Little Five Points area to open his independent drug store 37 years ago. Now he is saving lives by his own actions and by spreading the word in his industry and among private citizens that the Narcan device, an emergency nasal spray or injectable, can be bought without a prescription to reverse drug overdoses. “I have had three episodes in the last three weeks and saved all three,” Katz said. Local residents know to go or take others to the Little Five Points Pharmacy if an Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) cannot be located quickly. Read how Katz views his mission and how he is striving to make a difference: Jaffe: How did a New Yorker like you end up here? Katz: After pharmacy school, my wife and I loaded the car and headed to Atlanta. I joined a chain (Reed Drugs) at West Paces Ferry and later Howell Mill.

Narcan can be bought without a prescription to reverse drug overdoses. Ira Katz set up a pharmacy in Little Five Points 37 years ago. He promotes the use of Narcan to save lives from drug overdoses.

They were smart to put a Jewish guy in a Jewish area. Eventually I sought opportunities to open an independent pharmacy. I didn’t want suburbia. I saw Little Five Points as a good fit. It’s vibrant and young people are continuing to move in. At age 64, I work 50 to 60 hours a week. We sell everything from candy to commodes.

Jaffe: How does the device work? Katz: Narcan (naloxone) comes in two forms: Nasal spray ($150 to $195) and an injectable, which is only $25 to $35. I would call it a narcotic antagonist to opioids. It binds to the receptors and literally rejects the overdose. Sometimes CPR is needed, but in my last few situations, it has not been. I have hopped into the back seat of a car and done the injection. By the way, it is protected by the Good Samaritan Law (meaning you can’t be sued

Jaffe: How are you spreading the word about the availability and ease of use? Katz: I speak at state and national conferences to other pharmacists. I want everyone to be aware if they think they have a friend or family member using drugs, it is wise to keep it on hand. Note that some overdoses are from legal opioid/pain killer medications. We also know that children unfortunately get into adult medicine cabinets to access drugs. It’s “buyer beware” if users are securing drugs on the street when they don’t know with what it could be laced. Heroin, cocaine, fentanyl. It’s all very dangerous roulette. People come into the pharmacy here and give me hug. So we are trying our best to open eyes: 63,000 Americans died of overdoses in 2016; 1,394 of those were Georgians. “Police have been using Narcan for years. ‘Regular’ people need to be ready to save lives. ■

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES JULY 13, 2018 | 15


HEALTH & WELLNESS

Alternative Medicine Doctor Heals Mind and Body

Photos courtesy of the Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine

Sandra Banks graduated from Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine program started by Andrew Weil.

By Jan Jaben-Eilon Sandra K. Banks didn’t plan to be a doctor, let alone one with a specialty in internal and integrative medicine. She wanted to be a photographer. But her father, a dermatologist, wanted her to go into medicine. Growing up in Chattanooga, she “hung out” with her pediatrician, to whom she went for allergy shots. And she followed nurses around while waiting to see if she had a reaction to the shots. Once committed to medicine, she thought she’d be a pediatrician, but the kids “cried all the time.” Her father wanted her to be a dermatologist, “but that’s boring, only about cancer and acne.” Then she considered surgery, but decided it wasn’t for her. “Internal medicine is a little bit about everything, but not a lot about anything. It’s fun. It’s interesting. It’s fast paced. It requires a lot of mental juggling. And every patient is different. “I was always interested in alternative medicine,” she continued. An older cousin whom she adored had a big influence on her. He was licensed in every kind of medicine, except as an MD. “In 1988, I was in practice in North Carolina and I applied for the integrative medicine program at the University of Arizona, but they were only accepting new residents.” She left for Israel for 1 ½ years, writing for a women’s medical journal and interacting with in-patient, English-speaking doctors. “Then in 2001, I landed in Atlanta.” She has been associated with Primary Care Physicians of Atlanta ever since. “I thought it would be a three-month gig, and now it’s 17 years later.” Having adopted a young daughter,

Sandra Banks receives a medicine stick along with her diploma as part of the graduation ceremony.

which kept her from traveling for her Continuing Medical Education (CME) credits, she attended a University of Arizona nutrition and health conference in Atlanta and learned that the Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine had an online program that would allow her to get her fellowship at home, with only two weeks a year in Arizona. The program, started by Dr. Andrew Weil, defines integrative medicine (IM) as a “healing-oriented medicine that takes account of the whole person, including all aspects of lifestyle. It emphasizes the therapeutic relationship between practitioner and patient, is informed by evidence, and makes use of all appropriate therapies.” According to the Center’s website, the program focuses on three areas: education, health promotion and research. “We believe the best way to change a field is to educate the most gifted professionals and place them in settings where they can teach others.” Five years ago, Banks says she was the only IM board-certified doctor in Atlanta incorporating integrative medicine with the standard medicine she learned at the Medical College of Georgia School of Medicine, from which she graduated. “This differs from what I was taught. In those days, if you had a heart problem, you were taught just to go to a cardiologist. The brain and gut connection was a foreign language five years ago. What I do today is becoming mainstream. What I do now is not far out there; I just started it early.” According to Banks, integrative medicine looked at the history of medicine and took the “best and the brightest.” Outside the United States, the medical field looks at the whole-body system

and understands the connections, she says. “Integrative Medicine approaches the patient where they are, and it starts with doing the non-aggressive thing first, like looking at what the patient eats and getting them to exercise. Americans are about quick fixes. We want a diet pill.” Banks admits that her new approach requires much more time with a patient, which she provides for those patients willing to pay out-of-pocket for her thorough consultation. “It’s a lot about nutrition. I talk to the patient and ask what they eat, how much they exercise and what are they willing to change. We start with ‘don’t drink sodas or juices.’ Adults don’t need juice; it’s pure sugar. You lose the nutrition from the fruit when you juice it.” She says that Atlanta, not unlike other American cities, has “food deserts.” These are “poor areas in which the only place to buy food is the 7-Eleven or QuikTrip. There are no grocery stores. I give patients hand-outs which say, if you go to a farmer’s market, you can get a lot more for your $35. But then I have to tell them

Photo by Beth Intro

Sandra Banks wanted to be a photographer but became an integrative medicine doctor.

how to cook these things. People are trapped into bad habits.” Banks says she works the integrative medicine into her regular medical service. Because she thinks outside the box, she gets referrals from acupuncturists and chiropractors. Of course, not all her colleagues are open to her approach. “I got into a verbal fight once with a new gastroenterologist,” she admits. Apparently, her patients are much more supportive. She has received the patients’ choice award from Lyndhurst, N.J.-based Vitals, a healthcare database company, for the last two years. ■

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES JULY 13, 2018 | 17


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HEALTH & WELLNESS

Kidney Gives New Lease on Life By Sarah Moosazadeh sarah@atljewishtimes.com It’s been nearly a year since Ira Tedoff received a kidney transplant. After two donors fell through, he considered dialysis. But a conversation with a friend’s relative soon gave him another chance at life. The AJT first learned about Tedoff’s dilemma in spring 2017 during a Renewal gathering at Young Israel of Toco Hills to share stories of people who need and who have donated kidneys. The nonprofit helps people by connecting them to organ donors for kidney transplants. It was at that event that Tedoff first expressed how humbling the experience was to ask for a kidney. But after he received a call from a friend’s relative regarding a kidney donation, Tedoff’s outlook began to change. The relative knew someone whose daughter was on lifesupport and wanted to know if her kidney should be earmarked for Tedoff. Tedoff agreed, and on August 15, 2017, he had a kidney transplant at Piedmont Hospital. The organ was airlifted to Piedmont from Pennsylvania and was a perfect match doctors told Tedoff, because it belonged to a healthy female athlete in her early 30s. Once the surgery was completed, Tedoff remained in the hospital for three days before he began recovery. He initially started on a liquid diet but was almost immediately out of bed with the help of pain medication to ease the discomfort from the incision site. While recovering, Tedoff also got help from friends and community members, including Atlanta Scholars Kollel Rabbi Mayer Freedman. Freedman would often visit Tedoff and arranged meals to be delivered to his house every night. “We tried being helpful where we could, whether it was watching the children or preparing meal trains,” Freedman said. “I think our job in this world is to help take care of each other. Sometimes we are on the giver’s end and should help others and sometimes we are on the receiver’s end and that is part of the back and forth of assisting. Our job is to help out in every way we can.” What Tedoff doesn’t know is that Freedman also tried to donate his kidney through Renewal. But by the time Freedman reached out to Renewal, Tedoff had already found a match. Before Tedoff was matched with a donor he was scheduled to receive a kidney through Renewal, but after learning of Tedoff’s story the organization donated the organ to another recipient. Tedoff is not in direct contact with the family whose

relative donated the kidney, but he said he hears about them through his friend’s relative and hopes to eventually get in touch with them when the time is right. “We felt we should wait a year and allow the family to mourn the loss of their daughter before we contact them,” he said. Because the family wants to protect its privacy, the AJT is unable to share information about the kidney donor. Tedoff advises people who are in need of a kidney transplant to contact Renewal and to look for as many options as they can. “Don’t give up; you certainly never know when it’s going to happen,” he said. He also noted how thankful he is for the recent transplant. “Words can’t even describe it. I am very grateful. It’s a lease on life and a wonderful feeling. The family feels great and I feel great,” Tedoff said. Chabad Intown Rabbi Eliyahu Schusterman has been proactive in bringing attention to kidney transplants with support from community partners: Ahavath

Smile Smile

Ira Tedoff received a kidney transplant in mid-August 2017.

Achim Synagogue, Congregation Bet Haverim, Congregation Shearith Israel, Young Israel of Toco Hills, The Temple, Congregation Beth Shalom and Congregation Or Hadash. He said, “A kidney transplant or donation is lifesaving and is very much a Jewish value. As the saying goes: If you save a life, you save the world. So being able to help, even though I don’t think I have done much, I am grateful I did my part. I am thrilled for Ira and happy for his wife and children who will have a long life and many more years to celebrate wonderful milestones together.” ■

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Chabad Intown Rabbi Eliyahu Schusterman (left) has raised awareness about kidney transplants in the community. Atlanta Scholars Kollel Rabbi Mayer Freedman (right) helped Ira Tedoff during his recovery after he had a kidney transplant.

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HEALTH & WELLNESS

Grady Gets Georgia’s First Mobile Stroke Unit By Al Shams

Cutting the ribbon for the new Grady mobile stroke unit was (from left): John Haupert, of Grady Health System; Michael Frankel, Marcus Stroke Network and Vascular Neurology at Emory School of Medicine; Bruce Inverso, American Heart Association; and Jonathan S. Lewin, Emory University health affairs and Woodruff Health Sciences Center.

Grady Hospital recently dedicated its new Mobile Stroke Treatment Unit, the first in Georgia. On June 25, about 80 people attended the ribbon cutting. The ambulance represents the latest, cutting-edge technology in the prompt and effective treatment of stroke victims. It allows EMS responders to gather critical patient data, relay that data to Grady’s Marcus Stroke Center and provide some treatment options while the patient is en route. The truck has an onboard CT scanner, a telemedicine feature and even enables the doctor to personally interact with the patient. The Southeast is considered the nation’s “Stroke Belt,” so time is critical in the effective treatment of a stroke. This vehicle, along with the Marcus Stroke Center, has the goal of helping stroke victims avoid the worst consequences of stroke, return them to their normal pace, and reduce the high cost of long-term care for those afflicted. This vehicle represents the culmination of efforts by a number of dedicated professionals along with the support of Emory Health Care, Grady Hospital, the state of Georgia, the American Heart Association and the Marcus Stroke and Neuroscience Center headed by Dr. Michael Frankel. Over the last eight years, the significant donations from the Marcus Family and the Marcus Foundation have played a key role in creating, within Grady, a worldclass facility to treat stroke victims and to enhance their lives. The center has helped to save thousands of lives in Georgia. A $15 million gift from the Marcus Foundation will create the Marcus Stroke 20 | JULY 13, 2018 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

Network, an innovative partnership between leading health groups. This network will provide a 24/7 call center to serve as a central resource to help paramedics in their diagnosis and on-board treatment, and in locating the nearest suitable facility. The Georgia Department of Health helped establish the network and the Boca Raton Regional Hospital’s Marcus Neuroscience Institute will be a collaborating partner in the Marcus Stroke Network. Grady is at the forefront in providing prompt and effective care for stroke victims. It is envisioned that the center’s capabilities will be offered to other hospitals in Georgia and then the Southeast. During the mobile unit dedication, Frankel said that in “using this sophisticated telemedicine platform, our goal is to extend the experience of the center’s stroke specialists to participating network hospitals and more importantly, to offer stroke victims the best opportunity for a favorable outcome.” Bernie Marcus said in a news release: “This is an exciting and historic moment in the stroke care for the city of Atlanta. In a situation where every second counts, this specialized ambulance allows lifesaving treatment to begin for stroke patients before they reach the hospital. This is an important addition to the Marcus Foundation’s commitment to advancing stroke care.” ■ Al Shams is a former CPA, an investment professional with more than 45 years’ industry experience and a Sandy Springs resident.


HEALTH & WELLNESS

Health Task Force Tackles Big Problems

YES!

By Kevin C. Madigan The Task Force for Global Health, established in 1984, is reportedly the country’s second largest nonprofit organization. It focuses on access to medicines and vaccines, field epidemiology, health workforce development, and neglected tropical diseases. CEO Dr. David Ross, recipient of the 2018 Georgia Commission on the Holocaust Humanitarian Award, met with the Atlanta Jewish Times in his Decatur office. AJT: What does the Task Force do? Ross: We eliminate difficult, debilitating diseases that affect lots of people, and right now that clusters around neglected tropical diseases (NTDs). We also strengthen the systems that make health possible. It almost always involves building various partnerships, collaborative enterprises, acting as a secretariat. Our disease programs -- blinding trachoma, river blindness, lymphatic filariasis, intestinal worms, schistosomiasis, and leprosy – all involve convening a number of different partners and stakeholders who are trying to eliminate those diseases. And that involves bringing in the (pharmaceutical) drug companies that donate the drug. We convene expert scientific panels that decide which countries need those drugs, and how much. They continually work with us to monitor progress towards the goal. We are about measured progress to the end; we want to see end results. We also oversee, in the case of NTDs, the distribution of research money to understand the problems or barriers that are getting in the way of elimination. There is a lot of different research activity going on that we help fund, using funders’ money like from the Gates Foundation, USAID, and UK Aid Direct. We are guiding the money to researchers, bringing those results back and sharing it with the world’s community so that you make progress in the implementation activities it takes to eliminate a disease. That’s the NTD side. We also do it on the infections side; we are one of the key partners in the eradication of polio. Another side is what we call health systems strengthening. That means training the workforce, the field epidemiologists, or disease detectives. Every country should have what we have here in the US: a local health department, a state health department at the national level and the ability to detect emerging diseases and respond to those threats. We don’t have runaway disease outbreaks in this country for a reason. We have an infrastructure system, so we are helping build that ca-

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David Ross leads one of the nation’s largest nonprofits, which helps eliminate debilitating diseases.

pacity all over the world. One of our big things in Kenya now that’s starting to morph to other countries is the systematizing, licensing and credentialing of medical professions, so that they (can identify) the doctors, pharmacists, nurses, radiologists, lab techs, etc. They didn’t know that before. Now they are able to use their own donor money and country aid to plug the holes and develop their workforce. AJT: What is most challenging about your position? Ross: We have a legacy at the Task Force now that has evolved over time of actually tackling big problems and solving them on a very large scale. But there is always a hesitancy. People want to go small, ‘let’s chip away at the problem,’ when, in fact, sometimes it’s OK to envision the big problem and solve it. For example, we recently took on, as the secretariat, the global partnership for zero leprosy. What we are doing is helping the world’s leprosy community, nonprofits and groups in every country where leprosy exists, to understand that we can actually put our shoulders together and eliminate the disease. This biblical disease that seems to always be here can be eliminated. There is a pathway to doing that. It’s not just fantasy; there is a way to get there. Each one of the blocks of efforts we are working on, whether it’s a tropical disease or strengthening health systems, (helps to) field epidemiology capacity and stop future Ebola outbreaks; or across Latin America, (where we trained) 1,000 front-line workers how to detect and respond to Zika outbreaks in their communities. AJT: What else should people know about the Task Force? Ross: We are a well-kept secret, but that’s because we put the interests of the work and the partnerships ahead of promotion. Investing in us is an investment in improving health around the world. Atlanta has assets in global health that nobody else has, and we really should be understood by the world as the global health city. ■

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HEALTH & WELLNESS

DNA Results Reunite Family 80 Years Later A re-creation of the old Gottfried siblings photo showing descendants of the survivors. Front (from left): Judy Gottfried, Jennifer Thaw, Lisa Gottfried Feiner, Bob Gottfried. Back (from left): Jeffry Gottfried, Gary Shapiro, Bill Turcotte, Meg Thomson, Mauricio Smid.

The Gottfried family siblings in Vienna

By Sarah Moosazadeh sarah@atljewishtimes.com For years Lisa Feiner assumed that her family was small since most had perished in the Holocaust. Yet after obtaining some DNA test results and a photo from 1924, she made an incredible discovery.

22 | JULY 13, 2018 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

When Feiner’s mother passed away in 2011, she left a photo and a piece of hotel stationary which read “Gottfried 1924,” with a list of names. The remnant sparked Feiner’s curiosity to look for any remaining relatives. Feiner’s mother was one of 10 siblings, only five of which survived the

The Gottfried family receives a tour of The Temple during its first family reunion in Atlanta. (From left): Ariana Feiner, Lisa Gottfried Feiner, Cliff Feiner, Jennifer Thaw, Gary Shapiro, and Meg Thomson.

Holocaust. She was placed in an orphanage during the war in Belgium and relocated to the United States as a refugee in 1947. She had limited knowledge of her siblings who immigrated to America, Mexico and Israel. Until Feiner began her investigation 80 years later. In the summer of 2017, Feiner and her sister Meg Thompson took Ancestry DNA and 23andMe to trace their family’s history. Five weeks later she discovered she had a cousin in California named Jennifer Thaw. She reached out to Thaw, who had performed a 23andMe test two years earlier. The two began to question how they were related and realized they also had some older cousins. Little by little, Feiner and Thaw began to locate more relatives, and after flying to New York, they met their cousin Bob, an immigration lawyer, in addition to their cousin Mauricio, who was the child of an only child from Mexico City. In mid-November Feiner began organizing the first Gottfried family reunion at the Mandarin Oriental, Atlanta. Relatives from New York, Mexico and California all flew in for the occasion and wore nametags that depicted their name and which of the 10 siblings they descended from. A family portrait was also taken similar to the Gottfried photo from 1924. While visiting Atlanta, Feiner’s relatives also had the opportunity to receive a personal tour of The Temple by Rabbi Peter Berg. “The meeting was magical,” Feiner’s

daughter, Ariana, wrote on her Facebook page. “It felt like a combination of meeting new people and reuniting with loved ones that you’ve known forever. We talked about our lives, shared pictures of our history, ate great food, took a tour of Atlanta, laughed a lot, and cried a little. We are all so excited for the future our family will have together.” Since its initial gathering, Feiner said her family has grown from 10 to about 45 or 60 people. “Growing up we had a small family and we always used to say, ‘We are small but close,’ but now the narrative has changed,” Ariana said in a phone interview. Feiner also has made some additional discoveries since her investigation first began. For example, she learned that each of her cousins has a photo of the 10 siblings hanging in their home and has been receiving messages from distant relatives in Israel after Ariana posted photos of their reunion on Facebook. Feiner has remained in contact with her extended family since the reunion and looks forward to future gatherings. She said, “It feels like we have known each other all along.” In a Facebook post Arianna said: “The reunion was amazing because none of us knew that the others’ grandparents had made it over from Europe, let alone survived; we had all been living our lives without knowing that the others were there all along.” ■


HEALTH & WELLNESS

A Stolen Son The following essay comes from Steven Waronker, chief of anesthesiology for Emory Speciality Associates. Having lost his son to an opioid overdose, Waronker asks, “What’s being done now to stop this, and what more can we do?” Steven Waronker (left) is the father of Brian Waronker pictured below with his memaw, Mary Lou.

more and more brave men and women are standing up for ethics and morals, at the risk of their own livelihoods, by becoming whistleblowers and exposing dubious, unethical, and perhaps illegal practices in the pharmaceutical industry. Thanks to them, we are now more seriously questioning why opioids are so widely available to those suffering from addiction. There are many who desperately want to stop, but simply cannot in a world of such plenty. We ask how “big pharma” distributors can, in good conscience, ship huge quantities of pain pills to small towns, knowing the ultimate destinations will be big city streets. Where is the justice as pharmaceutical profits soar into the billions, at the expense of more than 50,000 innocent lives lost every

year to addiction and abuse?  I could not be more grateful that questions like these are finally being asked so publicly. It will take the best-inclass of the departments and agencies of the FDA, HHS, and DEA to turn off the spigot of this poison. Our elected officials will have to commit to putting the right laws and regulations in place. This will  require tremendous willpower— standing tall and not acquiescing to the huge and diverse pharma lobbyists. Talented class-action trial attorneys need to continue plowing forward relentlessly. And it will take you and me to support them all. Our society deserves better. We deserve better. My beautiful Brian certainly deserved better. ■

The Berman Center The Berman Center offers a path forward for those dealing with addiction and/or mental health issues. Based on the Jewish values of community, healing, and wholeness, our spiritually-holistic approach helps participants transition from merely surviving to thriving. We offer a customized, multidisciplinary treatment plan that supports both the individual and their family and exceptional post-treatment community integration programs.

After five years of hoping, and ultimately in vitro fertilization, our Brian joined the family. Five years younger than his brother, Jeffrey, he was our “easy” son. He was mellow at age two. He grew quickly and was off the charts in height, weight, and smile size. He was truly a gentle giant at six-foot-five and 250 pounds. He was focused only on becoming a future Georgia Bulldog when college time came around. He loved to eat at newly found multiethnic food restaurants in every nook and cranny of Buford Highway. He was our Bri Bri until his senior year of high school, when things changed. The smiles became fewer and he hung around with a wilder crowd. We didn’t learn until freshman year at his beloved UGA that he had become hooked on opiates after surgery in his junior year of high school. He got help and did great for more than five years. He graduated from Kennesaw State, had a great job, and was loving life. On December 29, 2017, he was all packed to go to L.A. to see the Dawgs play in the Rose Bowl when he took multiple Oxycontins and never woke up. As we prepared for the funeral, the rabbi asked me what he could share with the friends and family. I said, everything. He was astonished and happy he could talk about the opiate epidemic and acknowledge openly that it’s what took our beloved Brian at such a young age.

I am a physician of 30 years, and I did a lot of pain management in my early career. I’ve also personally experienced excruciating physical pain for long stretches, often at a level of 10 on a 10-point scale due to two major lumbar spine surgeries and a host of related procedures. At any time, I could easily have prescribed  long-acting opiates for my patients’ pain, and asked my treating physicians to do the same for me. But for 99 percent of patients, myself included, there is zero need for any of these longacting, sustained-release addictive narcotics.  Zero. So why do we have a 99 percent abuse problem? There is no single cause for the opioid epidemic, but the abuse—and the addiction that almost inevitably follows— starts with prescription medications. High school and college kids usually get their first samples from a prescribing doctor, their mom and dad’s medicine chest, or from some opportunistic dealer who preys on poor people that he convinces to fill their own scripts for profit, not pain. Certainly, heroin and fentanyl are components of this crisis, but they often come after access to pills has been reduced and street costs have gotten too expensive. What’s being done now to stop this, and what more can we do? Lately, media outlets have been shining a revealing light on the harrowing realities of this crisis. At the same time,

Finding hope, igniting purpose. For more tips on how to approach the above types of situations or answers to your questions related to mental illness and addiction, call The Berman Center at 770-336-7444, or email questions@bermancenteratl.com. Inquiries are held in the strictest of confidence.

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES JULY 13, 2018 | 23


HEALTH & WELLNESS

Balanced Pitta By Gedalia Genin If you’re a bit more irritable than normal, have slower digestion or possibly a skin rash, this could be a sign of an imbalance in Ayurvedic medicine called pitta. (No, not the pita bread you eat with falafel.) Ayurvedic medicine, sister science to yoga, dates back more than 5,000 years and is a science of natural healing and prevention. Ayurveda considers the “whole” person, body, mind and spirit, to create positive health rather than just waiting for disease to set in. In Ayurveda each season is governed by an energy in the environment that directly affects our body. The summer heat is called pitta, which is the energy in our body responsible for metabolism, absorption, heat regulation and sweating. Too much heat can trigger pitta to become imbalanced, and can even affect the mind and emotions, making a person feel overheated and impatient.

What can you do to balance your pitta? 1. Just as warm foods in the winter soothe a chill, cooling foods help to clear heat. It's said that cooling foods help to clear heat and toxins from the body, whereas warming foods can increase energy and circulation. Try adding cooling foods to your diet such as coconut water, watermelon, peaches and mint. You know the saying “cool as a cucumber.” It’s true! Cucumbers are cooling, hydrating and high in vitamin B for energy. It is easy to make a soothing drink right at home by slicing a few peeled cucumbers into a pitcher of filtered water. 2. Another powerhouse of health benefit and a pitta pacifier is aloe vera juice. The National Center for Complimentary and Integrative Health states that the use of aloe juice dates back to early Egypt, and it is known as “the plant for immortality.” Aloe vera juice benefits the skin, supports digestion, cleanses the liver, is hydrating and provides heartburn relief. I recommend Lakewood Whole Leaf Pure Aloe with Lemon Juice, which can be purchased at Whole Foods. 3. Keep cool with ice cream. The sweet properties of milk in Ayurvedic medicine have a cooling effect on the body/mind. By increasing self-awareness and understanding of eating with the seasons you are making daily deposits toward balance and whole health. Stay cool! ■

24 | JULY 13, 2018 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

Gedalia Genin holds a Ph.D. in natural health focusing on women’s health through Ayurveda. She practices within an integrative medical office in Atlanta, and she makes house calls.


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ARTS Liftoff!, Life Support and The Missing Peace A Triple Book Review By Rachel Stein It’s been a long day. The possibilities for stress lurk everywhere, just waiting in the shadows for an opportunity to pounce on an unsuspecting bystander. They may appear in the form of a demanding boss, a moody spouse, challenging kids, snarls of traffic. So, dear unsuspecting bystander, you deserve a break. Why not treat yourself to a no-fail recipe guaranteed to help you unwind from your daily rigamarole? Here are the three essential ingredients: one aromatic cup of coffee, a plush, leather ottoman and a compelling read. Do I have suggestions for reading material? Why, I thought you’d never ask. “Liftoff!” is a collection of 23 real-life stories about people who faced challenges, yet managed to overcome them with remarkable courage, faith and strength. All the stories are true. All of them happened to “ordinary” people like you and me. All of them have the ability to uplift and transform each one of us with the

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message of the power of the human spirit and the uniqueness of the Jewish soul. “Liftoff!” was born from a column I wrote for the Yated Ne’eman, a national Jewish weekly publication. It was my job to find people with inspiring stories. The more I listened and wrote, the more inspired I became. These people were remarkable. I felt awed each time I chronicled their stories. How did they manage with their life circumstances? Why, intrepid soul that I am, crises like searing heat or midnight encounters with six-legged creatures leave me gasping, my heart drumming a wild rhythm. But these people lived through real challenges. And, not only did they live through them, they emerged, like butterflies, more vibrant and resilient. Some raised handicapped children, lived through a tornado, sent children off into an unknown future, changed the course of their entire lives to embrace a Torah lifestyle, survived a terrifying carjacking, or suffered imprisonment when an emotionally challenged child called

Rachel Stein (pictured right) adds another adult book to her prolific lineup.

the police. Standing tall, every one of them refused to buckle during turbulent storms that would have felled weaker saplings. Writing these inspiring journeys helped me realize that regular people can achieve the impossible if they set their minds to it and believe in themselves and in their Creator. My goal is to share this message so that each one of us will spread our wings and achieve the vast potential embedded within us. In addition to “Liftoff!” I have authored two other books for adults along with children’s books for various ages. “Life Support” is a diary of my experiences, sometimes harrowing, always enriching, that occurred during my chaplaincy training. It’s an awesome responsibility to care for the sick, yet there was always a positive thread in each situation that helped me learn and grow. Many colorful characters crossed my path while I was on call in the hospital, yet each one taught me something invaluable. There were also many obstacles strewn in my path. It was my job to figure out how to navigate my way around these hurtles, sometimes through laughter, sometimes with tears. Writing my experiences was therapeutic, a way for me to process the deep and emotional journey I was traveling. “The Missing Peace,” or the secularized version, “When Ice Cream is not Enough” (available on Amazon) brims with scenarios depicting conflicts between family members, friends and acquaintances. After reading the first vignette, your

initial reaction may be: “He’s right.” But once you read further, you may waver and decide: “No, she’s right.” How can both parties in a conflict be right? Herein lies the key to “The Missing Peace.” Reading stories told from both sides of the fence, the reader gains insight into another person’s perspective. The ability to understand someone else’s viewpoint provides the ability to help manage interpersonal conflicts, enhancing significant relationships. And who doesn’t want more intimate and satisfying relationships? One of the highlights of writing “The Missing Peace” and “When Ice Cream is not Enough” was co-authoring this book with my only sister, Esther Gendelman. Her experience as a veteran educator and a mental health therapist greatly enhanced the insights we were able to provide. Besides that, it gave us time to laugh, enjoy and just be sisters working on a project together. As a writer, I feel energized by spilling words onto paper. My wish is that you, the readers, will feel just as energized after enjoying these stories and absorbing their valuable messages. If you are looking for a lift, some life support, or that missing peace that’s eluding you, one stop will take care of your needs. “Liftoff!,” “Life Support” and “The Missing Peace” are available at Judaica Corner. Happy reading! ■


ARTS

Comedic Songstress Charms Atlanta Golden girl: Nancy Gaddy’s musical comedy shows include selfdeprecating humor.

Nancy Gaddy played Columbia in the national touring company of “The Rocky Horror Show.”

A few weeks ago my friend and mega promoter Robyn Spizman Gerson more than gently encouraged me to spend a fun and different Saturday night out to hear the “Jewishy singer and comedian” Nancy Gaddy. And predictably true to her word, Robyn was right on. Gaddy was talented on all fronts. The Passover-themed show was replete with humorous tunes and family memories like: “Will my chametz be P or K?” As impressive as her gags is the ability to deliver sentimental and show-stopping tunes. The backup trio of musicians were top notch. We pretended we were at a New York cabaret. Her old standards included: “Big Spender,” “Sunny Side of the Street,” “I Won’t Dance,” “If they Could See Me Now,” “The Way You Look Tonight,” and “I Can’t Give You Anything but Love” Some of the lyrics were changed to make room for her humor to the tune of: “A Few of my Unfavorite Things: Joints ache, hips break, does Medicare pay for raging?” Much of the routine is lovingly selfdeprecating: Zaftig in middle age, sex among seniors, finding a “normal,” eligible man, and working out at the gym (or not).” Don’t be fooled by the comedy, Nancy can really deliver musically. Hear what Gaddy says about the re-launch of her career and the heart of her humor: Jaffe: Much of your show relates to your Jewish upbringing. From what does that stem? Do you look at it with fondness or Jewish angst?

of “Fiddler on the Roof” and Columbia in the national touring company of “The Rocky Horror Show.” I have also been in productions of “Side by Side” by Sondheim, “Oh! Calcutta!” and “Nunsense.” And in the mid-70s to mid-80s, I did a lot of dinner theater and summer stock. I was also part of a touring theater company, The Iron Clad Agreement, that performed at the Edinburgh Festival in Scotland, and we were artists in residence at the Smithsonian. (I was also a featured zombie in “Dawn of the Dead.”) Humor and song: Nancy Gaddy brings her schtick to musical comedy shows.

Gaddy: I come from a large, loud, lively and loving family. I had a lot of great aunts and uncles, all from Eastern Europe. Most spoke little, or broken, English and everyone spoke Yiddish. Always a lot of cooking and eating, lots of massive family dinners and gatherings, and going on trips with huge entourages of cousins and “mishpocha.” I look at it all with fondness. Luckily, I didn’t inherit the Woody Allen/Larry David Jewish angst gene.

Jaffe’s Jewish Jive By Marcia Caller Jaffe mjaffe@atljewishtimes.com

Jaffe: How did you get your voice training? Were you talented as a child? Gaddy: I’ve been singing all of my life. In high school (Pittsburgh), I was selected to be part of the Centers for the Musically Talented, a pre-college music program that included music theory and private voice lessons. I have studied with vocal coaches on and off for years. I have also sung with professional choirs in Atlanta, Dallas, Los Angeles and Pittsburgh and for many years sang with Congregation Ahavath Achim’s choir during the high holidays. Jaffe: Have you ever played any musical theatrical roles or performed off-Broadway? Gaddy: I was a theater major in college and have worked professionally and semi-professionally off and on for years. I played Chava in a touring company

Jaffe: What do you find unique about Atlanta audiences? Gaddy: Atlanta audiences don’t hold back. They are responsive, interactive and really get into the performance. Jaffe: What’s your ultimate professional goal at this stage in life? Gaddy: I hope to spend the next 10 to 15 years performing, developing the cabaret act and taking it on the road.

I would love to spend 30 to 40 weeks each year doing the show and establishing myself as a sought-after singer and comedienne. I am also now the same age as many of the “characters” I have played for so many years. With all of the TV and film work, and the plethora of great theatre happening here in Atlanta, I hope to work steadily as an entertainer and actress. Jaffe: Leave us laughing: What do you think is your funniest schtick? Gaddy: That’s hard for me to answer. The act is constantly evolving and we are always trying out new material and developing new schtick. I do homage to the late, great comedienne, Totie Fields, with some really outrageous physical comedy bits. That may be some of the funniest, but I will leave that for my audiences to decide. ■ Gaddy will appear with hometown favorite Jerry Farber in “Together Again For The First Time” Friday, August 3 at the Red Light Café. $20

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COMMUNITY Pole Vaulting By Sarah Moosazadeh sarah@atljewishtimes.com

Recent Davis Academy graduate Alon Rogow and Riverwood International Charter High School sophomore Nick West have qualified for the USA Track & Field National Junior Olympic Championships in pole vaulting after West placed 3rd and Rogow placed 5th in their age groups. The boys are the first Davis alumni to qualify for the meet and will participate in nationals July 24-28 in Greensboro, North Carolina. Before qualifying for nationals, West and Rogow placed first and second, (in that order) in their age groups in the state at the USA Track & Field Junior Olympics regionals on Sunday, July 8. They competed against athletes from South Carolina and Florida. At the meet Rogow broke West’s school record in the pole vault by jumping 11 feet 10 1/2 inches, which placed him fourth in all jumps in the middle school’s history in pole vault. Meanwhile West jumped 12 feet 10 inches in his meet, which led the boys to advance to sectionals. “I have been coaching track and field for 15 years now and this is hands-down one of the proudest moments in my coaching career to take my former students and athletes to the nationals, which is something they worked so hard for this past year and now it is all paying off,” said Pole Vault Atlanta coach Matthew Barry. “I am so impressed with the boys because they are so driven to come to practice in the summer, fall and winter, and at each meet they just get better. This also is impressive for me because the kids embrace the sport and want to continue doing this. They want to work hard to beat their friends' records more than anything else.” Barry has two more Jewish kids from Davis who have entered pole vaulting as well as kids from The Epstein School, The Weber School, and Atlanta Jewish Academy. “I kind of laugh because it’s not like pole vaulting is an easy sport that doesn’t require athletic ability, but it’s a technical event and the kids learn the technical stuff really well and pay attention. We have had middle school state champions and my kids have won the pole-vault championships seven years in a row now. It’s like second nature for them now and they expect it,” Barry said. “The kids put in the effort and the time and are always ready to go.” ■

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Coach Matt Barry (middle) stands with Nick West (left) and Alon Rogow (right), who qualified for the National Junior Olympic Track & Field championship.


COMMUNITY

King Center At 50

Reflecting on Coretta Scott King

Sherry Frank speaks at a lunch celebrating women and the 50th anniversary of The King Center.

Sherry Frank gave this speech at the “Women: Soul of the Nation” lunch June 26 celebrating the 50th anniversary of the King Center. When I come to The King Center, I feel a flood of warm memories. During my 25 years as the Southeast area director of the American Jewish Committee, I often felt that my car was on auto-drive to this special place. Whether I was working with Mrs. King on the myriad of details around King Week or the countless meetings of the Atlanta Black-Jewish Coalition, The King Center was ground zero for energy, planning, bridge building and in a special way, for working towards Dr. King’s dream of the beloved community. As early as 1983, I was here wishing Mrs. King good luck as she left for D.C. for the 20th anniversary of the March on Washington. In the years that followed, along with members of the Atlanta BlackJewish Coalition, I joined the march in 1988. In 1993 we funded 30 students to participate and I worked closely with Mrs. King as she asked me to co-chair the Atlanta mobilization for the march. After an intense week of planning, I remember the enormous crowd gathered at The King Center and the numerous busses that took us to Forsyth County for the Mobilization Against Fear and Intimidation. Mrs. King’s hand was in all the details. It was a frightful time to march with Klansmen in robes, carrying hateful signs on the side of the road, national guards alongside of us and planes overhead protecting us. In 1984 when my community was responding to Minister Louis Farrakhan’s vile statements calling Judaism a

gutter religion and Israel an outlaw state, Mrs. King joined the Black-Jewish Coalition press conference and denounced these statements. She was a consistent and strong voice against all forms of bigotry and prejudice. In 1988 when Mohammed Massarwa came to Atlanta as Israel’s first Arab consul general, Mrs. King graciously hosted a reception for him at The King Center. Her warmth and commitment to peace and understanding was unwavering. At critical moments, she stood up for Israel and joined the AJC efforts to urge the UN to treat Israel more fairly. I have a wonderful picture of Mrs. King with Lillian Lewis, Ingrid Saunders Jones and Elaine and Miles Alexander at a Black-Jewish Coalition sponsored book signing with Congressman John Lewis when we received copies of his first book, “Walking With The Wind.” This sacred place, The King Center, was home to so many significant events – all with the loving support of its founder: • Demonstrating against violence when the gay community was under attack • Providing space to honor Mahatma Gandhi • Filling a gift shop with material about Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement. We used Christine King Farris’ books when Coalition members held “teach-ins” in the Atlanta public schools and Jewish day schools during King Week • Participating in Coalition forums with important guest speakers to foster understanding about issues varying from changes in South Africa to advocacy on behalf of the King holiday. • Hosting members of the national Rabbinic Assembly in 1987 I treasure most of all the personal times I felt Mrs. King’s special friendship: • The call I received to join her on election night when Martin Luther King III was running for Fulton County Commissioner • The books she gave me when I told her I was going to visit activists in the former Soviet Union. She autographed three and asked me to give them to women whose husbands were in jail. In Riga, Moscow and Leningrad (now St. Petersburg), they all were touched and knew the story of Dr. King. • The annual phone calls I received, requesting a rabbi to read from the Old Testament during the interfaith

Atlanta leader Bernice King also attended the 50th anniversary lunch.

Attending the “Women: Soul of the Nation” lunch are: Atlanta leaders Hala Moddelmog, Leona Bar-Davaport and Sherry Frank.

service on the King holiday. She was so respectful and inclusive of all faith traditions. I felt the impact of the work Mrs. King did in preserving Dr. King’s work and words in a personal way in 1988 when Soviet Jewish activist Natan Sharansky was in Atlanta. He wanted to hear Dr. King’s words, so I arranged for him to come to The King Center.

In a small executive conference room, with a monitor up on the wall, we listened to a video of Dr. King speaking. All of a sudden, in a surreal moment, Sharansky started talking as if he was speaking to Dr. King, acknowledging that he felt the same way, locked up in prison, yet spiritually free in conscience and soul. The documents and history that strengthen our heroes have been preserved in this important place. ■

ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES JULY 13, 2018 | 29


COMMUNITY

Raising Green on the Greens for Israel By Zach Richter

Glen Golish, board chairman of Helping Israel Fund, Inc., (left) poses with corporate sponsors, Billi and Bernie Marcus.

The Helping Israel Fund Annual Charity Golf Tournament took place on June 25, 2018 at The Standard Club in Johns Creek. The tournament raised $37,000 for the Helping Israel Fund, which supports young men and women serving in the Israel Defense Force (IDF) by funding non-military projects. This includes providing winter wear and water backpacks, building “Warm Corner” rest stations, and funding academic scholarships. More than 50 people from the Atlanta Jewish community attended the tournament and competed in an 18hole golf scramble, with longest drive and closest to the

What You Missed Operation Understanding DC Explores Civil Rights in Atlanta Jewish and black activists visit The Temple as part of their Atlanta civil rights tour.

Young Jewish and black activists from the Wa s h i n g t o n , D.C., area came to Atlanta July 4-6 to learn about the civil rights movement. Operation Understanding DC (OUDC) is a crosscultural, social justice program based in the nation’s capital that involves a select group of young Jewish and/or black youth. For OUDC’s Summer Journey, the 21 young students loosely followed the path of the Freedom Riders, building on the lessons of the past to become our next generation’s leaders. Atlanta and Camp Ramah Darom are among the 11 stops. While in Atlanta, OUDC students toured the Wil30 | JULY 13, 2018 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

Glen Golish discusses the accomplishments of the Helping Israel Fund.

Jason Adler shares his experience as the father of Jacob Adler, an IDF lone soldier from Atlanta.

pin competitions. The tournament was followed by a lunch reception and silent auction. Helping Israel Fund Board Chairman Glen Golish discussed the extensive work the Helping Israel Fund has completed in Israel. In particular, he highlighted a “Warm Corner” rest station that was recently built. The rest station is a small hut providing free food and drinks in a comfortable environment to give IDF soldiers a brief respite from their challenging jobs. The opening of the “Warm Corner” in Nokdim was attended by Helping Israel Fund representatives and Avigdor Li-

liam Breman Jewish Heritage Museum and The Temple to learn about Jewish history and culture in the city. They met with civil rights icons Hank Thomas and Charles Person and visited the Martin Luther King Jr. National Historic Site and the Center for Civil and Human Rights. The group ended its trip with a Jumu’ah service at Atlanta Masjid Al-Islam. A student on the trip, Jonasia Nance, said The Temple tour “showed me the despicable persistence the KKK displayed in order to discourage the Jewish population from supporting the civil rights movement….I felt the pain that the congregation might have experienced to see their house of worship being destroyed merely because they believe in equal rights.” The purpose of OUDC is for youth to lead the fight for equity and justice. OUDC programming is split into three parts: understanding history, living history and making their own history. In the first part of the program, before the Summer Journey, OUDC young leaders learned about past civil rights events and the historical connections between black and Jewish communities.

eberman, Israel’s Defense Minister. At the reception, Jason Adler, a local community member, shared his experience as the father of a lone soldier from Atlanta, Jacob Adler. Adler felt an immense sense of pride that his son was protecting the Jewish homeland. The reception also included special guests from Israel: Lt. Col. Rabbi Yedidya Atlas of the IDF rabbinate and Leon Blankrot from Yashar L’Chayal, another organization that provides non-military supplies to soldiers. ■ nities throughout the nation as part of USY On Wheels stopped over in Marietta. Etz Chaim has a strong USY presence with leaders who traditionally serve on the youth group’s regional, sub-regional, national and international boards. While in Atlanta, they toured: World of Coke; Centennial Olympic Park; the World of Coca-Cola; Ebenezer Baptist Church; Martin Luther King Jr.’s gravesite; and Stone Mountain State Park laser light show. “The purpose of the teen tour is to expand participants’ horizons and show them that no matter where they travel, they can experience the joy of living Jewishly,” said Laurie Kamens, United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism (USCJ) spokesperson. ■

Touring Teens Get Taste of Atlanta During Marietta Stop

Jewish teens from United Synagogue Youth (USY) traveling cross-country this summer were hosted July 1-3 by Congregation Etz Chaim families in Marietta. About 40 teens experiencing different Jewish commu-

Photos courtesy of USY

USYers from around the country get a taste of Atlanta at the iconic World of Coke.


COMMUNITY

The Lowdown

I Bet You Didn’t Know …

Atlanta is chock-full of interesting movers and shakers, some bent on creativity, others on activism, some on just plain having fun and living the good life. Lean in to hear some of their offthe-cuff remarks as to what makes them tick.

Wayne Saxe OWNER, THE GOLDBERG GROUP, WHICH IS A GOOD DEAL MORE THAN SUPERB BAGELS. With multiple locations at the Atlanta airport and retail locations all around the city, Goldberg’s Bagels & Co. just opened in New Orleans, yet another captive audience for the winning combo of authentic New York Deli and Southern hospitality. Wayne is personable, confident and forward thinking. Get to know him better right here.

What was your first job? Accounting clerk in Johannesburg (South Africa).

What’s the best piece of advice your dad gave you? Lead by example. What’s the best advice you give out? Be humble. What makes me anxious is … Running this business and all its moveable parts 24/7 including over 750 employees. My comfort food is … Bagels and lox. But very specifically- a thin slice of nova, one slice of tomato and one slice of onion. What’s your favorite exotic vacay spot? Kruger National Park. I like the lions. I’m a Leo. I am currently reading … Elon Musk’s “Tesla, Space X, and the Quest for a Fantastic Future.” My best DIY project … That’s the problem. I’m a workaholic. I try to do everything myself. Reported by Marcia Caller Jaffe ATLANTA ATLANTAJEWISH JEWISHTIMES TIMESJUNE JULY 13, 22, 2018 | 31


COMMUNITY Atlanta Jewish Times Advice Column

OY VEY! I’VE GOT A PROBLEM Dear Rachel, , Dina’s weded my best friend iv ce re ly nt ce re I to celebrate the can hardly wait d an n tio ta vi in ding , with whopr. Until I realized he ith w t en ev joyous nflicts with my t, that the date co en m nt oi pp sa di in an overping Judaic counselor as b jo er m m su ountains. At dream in the Catskill M d le st ne p m ca school, I am night g pharmacology tin ua ad gr of sp the cu n that this job of the rejuvenatio ed ne in y el at er desp And yet, Dina so tantalizingly. e m of t on fr in waves shared so much sister. We have y m e lik t os m is al not be at her could I possibly ow H s. ar ye e th over ent of her life? t monumental ev os m e th ng ri du r job? Or is side search for anothe Perhaps I should wouldn’t expect en a best friend Ev ? us lo cu di ri that r one night. Or entire summer fo an up ve gi to me would she? the bonds of d desire verses Personal need an the right course ould I decide on sh w ho ; ip sh nd frie of action? Regards, lanta Judgment Call, At

Got a problem? Email Rachel at oyvey@atljewishtimes.com 250 words or less describing your problem. We want to hear from you and get helpful suggestions for your situation at the same time! Identifying details will be changed upon request.

Communication Is the Key Dear Judgment Call, The way I see it, the resolution to your dilemma is strictly a matter of choice, not responsibility. You don’t owe it to Dina to be present at her wedding when it poses a significant conflict in your life. In a perfect world, you would be able to dance at her wedding and accept the camp job. But since when do we live in a perfect world? After careful deliberation, here are some suggestions: Call the camp that offered you a job and explain the situation. Ask if you can possibly start your job a day or two late because of your best friend’s wedding and see what they say. In the best-case scenario, they will agree. Of course, the worstcase scenario would be a flat refusal of your request, along with the caveat: either you work the entire schedule or forfeit the job. If the camp allows you to start late, you’ve hit a home run – your dilemma is solved! If they say no, let’s move to step two: Sit down and have a talk with your best friend. Share what’s going on, tell her how torn you feel, and see what she says. She may tell you that she needs you on her special day, that she “can’t get married” without you. Or Dina may understand what an opportunity this job is for you and insist that she doesn’t want you to give up your chance for a plum job. Honest and loving communication, my dear, is the key. No matter which way the discussion evolves, be prepared to face some level of disappointment. You badly want to do both things and will have to let one go. It’s okay to grieve. Allow the waves of sadness to wash over you, feel the loss of your dream. And then, when you’re ready, tilt your chin high and march forward. Warm wishes for continued success, Rachel Stein

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4 Questions

With Sarah Bernstein By Sarah Moosazadeh sarah@atljewishtimes.com Sarah Bernstein is excited about her new role as the PJ Library family impact associate at the Jewish Federation of Greater Atlanta. Originally from Detroit, Bernstein graduated from Eastern Michigan University with a bachelor’s in social work and became a teacher at The Weinstein School at the Marcus Jewish Community Center of Atlanta. She moved back to Detroit, but returned to Atlanta in 2013. When Bernstein is not busy being involved in different community events, she enjoys walking the Atlanta BeltLine with her 7-year-old daughter and trying new restaurants. The AJT recently caught up with her to ask her four questions and learn more about her new role at the Federation: AJT: What will your new role be with PJ Library? Bernstein: I’m excited to support the Jewish community in my new role at Federation. As family impact associate, I am supporting many of the incredible PJ Library experiences, including the Summer Series, Book it to Shabbat (our weekend retreat with Ramah Darom), and the When I Grow Up series (for PJ Our Way families). AJT: What are some skills you are bringing with you? Bernstein: I previously worked as a preschool teacher at The Weinstein School at the Marcus Jewish Community Center of Atlanta and I love exploring educational aspects with young children. I’m bringing a fun and creative storehouse of crafts to more PJ Library families, and we will explore building experiences around families and their needs.

SPOTLIGHT Jewish Joke of the Week The Dream

Provided by David Minkoff www.awordinyoureye.com

Moshe was talking to his psychiatrist. “I had a weird dream recently,” he says. “I saw my mother but then I noticed she had your face. I found this so worrying that I immediately awoke and couldn’t get back to sleep. I just stayed there thinking about it until 7am. I got up, made myself a slice of toast and some coffee and came straight here. Can you please help me explain the meaning of my dream?” The psychiatrist kept silent for some time, then said, “One slice of toast and coffee? Do you call that a breakfast?”

Sarah Bernstein looks forward to assisting families in her new role as PJ Library’s family impact associate.

AJT: Why did you choose to work at the Jewish Federation of Greater Atlanta? Bernstein: I truly believe in the Atlanta Jewish community and Federation’s role in it. I have seen firsthand how much it has grown and look forward to helping shape new experiences for families with young children. In my new role, I am able to continue to work with families outside of the classroom as well as support many of the community preschools.

Simcha Notices ■ Drs. Jeff & Adina Jagoda on the engagement of their granddaughter, Esther Schoemann, daughter of Danny & Naomi Schoemann of Jerusalem, to Shimon Sasson. ■ Rabbi Norman & Lydia Schloss on the engagement of their daughter Devora to Gabe Mandel, son of Dr. Morris & Tova Mandel of Cleveland, Ohio.

There was an engagement party Sunday, June 24, at their home. ■ Aaron & Michelle Saltzman (and big brother Ari) on the birth of a daughter, Mira Shaindel. ■ Dr. and Mrs. Nison Shleifer of Atlanta and Mr. and Mrs. Ezra Hershman of West Hempstead, N.Y. announce the marriage of their children, Gabriella Meira and Harold Mark. The couple lives in Woodmere, Long Island.

AJT: What is the biggest change you have noticed since moving back to Atlanta? Bernstein: I’ve been living in Atlanta for the past five years with my daughter, and it’s been great to see this city grow. I am learning a lot about the different offerings that are available for families. ■

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CALENDAR THURSDAY, JULY 12

Dupree Drive, Sandy Springs at 11 a.m. Free. For more information, www.templesinaiatlanta.org/event/1968-summer-film-series.html or 404-252-3073.

“It’s Not Easy Being Green:” Conser-

vation through Amphibian Education – Center for Puppetry Arts, 1404 Spring St. NW, Atlanta, at 12 p.m. In conjunction with the Atlanta Botanical Gardens. Hear about Kermit the Frog’s creator, Jim Henson, and his passion for the environment. Free. For more information, https://www.thebreman. org/lunchtime-culture-2018.

CANDLE-LIGHTING TIMES

Matot-Massei Friday, July 13, light candles at 8:32 p.m. Saturday, July 14, Shabbat ends at 9:32 p.m. Devarim Friday, July 20, light candles at 8:29 p.m. Saturday, July 21, Shabbat ends at 9:28 p.m.

Frankly Speaking with Sherry Frank – National Council of Jewish Women Atlanta, Section, 6303 Roswell Road NE, Sandy Springs, 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. Lunch and discussion group. Free. RSVP by the day before the meeting to christineh@ncjwatlanta.org or call 404-843-9600.

Dive into Shabbat – MJCCA, 5342 Tilly Mill Road, Atlanta, from 5 to 7 p.m. MJCCA hosts families for swimming, challah, grape juice and ice pops for children. Free and open to all. For more information, https://www.atlantajcc. org/pldb-live/dive-into-shabbat-outdoor-pool-party-at-the-mjcca-40026/.

Friday Night Alive Service and Pot

Luck – Congregation Beth Shalom, 5303 Winters Chapel Road, Dunwoody, 6:30 to 9 p.m. Join Rabbi Zimmerman for musical Kabbalat Service. Free. To RSVP, https://www.bethshalom.net/ event/potluck-dinner.html.

Beginners Mahjong Night – Congregation Beth Shalom, 5303 Winters Chapel Road, Dunwoody, from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Free. For beginners or those needing a refresher course. Free. For more details visit https://www.bethshalom. net/event/weekly-mah-jongg13.htm.

toric Fourth Ward Splash Pad, 800 Dallas St. NE, Atlanta, at 10 a.m. Free and open to all. https://www.atlantajcc. org/interior-pages/family-programsintown-programs/.

– Atlanta Community Food Bank, 732 Joseph E. Lowery Blvd. NW, Atlanta, 1 to 4 p.m. Volunteer opportunity at the Product Rescue Center. For more information, http://thesixthpoint.org/ calendar/.

Summer Dinner and a Movie – Congregation Beth Shalom, 5303 Winters Chapel Road, Dunwoody, from 6 to 9 p.m. Israeli meal prepared by Chef Schulman. $25 per adult. RSVP at https://www.bethshalom.net/event/ summer-movie-dinner-event.html.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 18

Infertility Support Group – Intown Jewish Fertility Foundation, 60 Lenox Pointe NE, Atlanta, 7 to 8 p.m. Facilitated by licensed therapist Ashley Marx. RSVP, https://www.jewishfertilityfoundation.org/sandy-springssupport.html.

JULY 20 - JULY 21

Summer Shabbaton Chant Retreat - Congregation Bet Haverim, 2074 LaVista Road, Atlanta, 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Open to CBH and community. $36 suggested donation. To register, https:// www.congregationbethaverim.org/.

SATURDAY, JULY 21

Shabbat Kulanu – Congregation Beth Shalom, 5303 Winters Chapel Road, Dunwoody, from 10:45 a.m. to 12 p.m. A special mini minyan for parents and children in kindergarten through 3rd grade. Kiddush lunch following services. Free.

SATURDAY, JULY 14

Georgia Master Gardener Marketplace – The Galloway School, 215 West Wieuca Road NW, Atlanta, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Plant, garden, art and craft vendors. Free and open to the public. For more information, https://www.facebook.com/events/181379522582302/.

Community Tisha B’Av – Congre-

SUNDAY, JULY 15

Camp Barney Medintz Tour – 4165 Highway 129 N., Cleveland, at 10:30 a.m. Prospective families tour CBM while in session to see the camp in action: Free. RSVP required at campbar34 | JULY 13, 2018 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

cha Brazilian Steakhouse, 3365 Piedmont Road NE, Atlanta, from 7 to 9 p.m. Meet ORT’s CEO, Jeff Cooper, and hear from successful ORT graduates. $30, $36 for whiskey tasting add-on. To register, http://ortamerica.org/mensnightout.

– The Kehilla in Sandy Springs, 5075 Roswell Road NE from 7:30 to 10 p.m. To register, https://www.thekehilla. org/event/rosh-chodesh-av.

Intown, 928 Ponce de Leon Ave., Atlanta, from 8 to 9 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays through August 30. Learn strategies for making changes that are lasting and chart your own path to personal growth. Cost is $99 for single registration and $169 for double registration and includes materials, https:// intownjewishacademy.org/product/ character/.

FRIDAY, JULY 13

Volunteering at the Atlanta Community Food Bank with Sixth Point

THURSDAY, JULY 19

ORT Men’s Night Out – Chama Gaú-

Rosh Chodesh Av Ladies Paint Night

The Kabbalah of Character – Chabad

MJCCA Intown Summer Fun. His-

ney.org/summertours. Tours are for families who do not have children at CBM this summer.

1968 Summer Film Series – “2001: A Space Odyssey”- Temple Sinai, 5645

gation Etz Chaim, 1190 Indian Hills Parkway, NE, Marietta, from 7:45 to 10:15 p.m. Learn from different clergy and educators. Ma’ariv followed by Havdalah and megillah reading. Free. RSVP, etzchaim.net/tishabav.


JULY 12–27

FRIDAY, JULY 13 The Cakemaker Screening – Landmark Midtown Art Cinema, 931 Monroe Drive NE, Atlanta. A film by Ofir Raul Graizer, tells the story of Thomas, a young German baker, having an affair with Oren, an Israeli married man who has frequent business visits in Berlin. Check theater for times the week of the show. Tickets are $9 for seniors and $11 for regular adult admission. For more information, https:// www.atlantajewishconnector.com/events/the-cakemaker/.

TUESDAY, JULY 24

FRIDAY, JULY 27

Toco Hills Infertility Support, pri-

Shabbat in the Park – Decatur Toy Park,

vate residency from 7:30 to 8:45 p.m. Free. In partnership with Congregation Beth Jacob, Young Israel of Toco Hills, New Toco Shul and Chevra Ahavas Yisrael. RSVP for address, https:// www.jewishfertilityfoundation.org/ support. Questions, ashley@JewishFertilityFoundation.org.

133 Nelson Ferry Road, Decatur, from 5:45 to 7:30 p.m. Bring your own dish to share. Free. For more information and to register, https://www.signupgenius. com/go/5080e4aacac2da5fe3-shabbat.

DUE BY FRIDAY, JULY 13

Personal Classifieds – Submit your

WEDNESDAY, JULY 25

1968 Summer Film Series – “Barbarella”- Temple Sinai, 5645 Dupree Drive, Sandy Springs, at 11 a.m. Free. For more information, www.templesinaiatlanta.org/event/1968-summer-film-series.html or 404-252-3073.

FREE personal classified, whether you just want to find a new friend or love. Your identity will be kept confidential and you will have the opportunity to respond to personal ads by emailing your response to us. We will forward the correspondence and you decide what happens next. Submit yours at http://bit.ly/AJTsingles.

Find more events and submit items for our online and print calendars at:

www.atlantajewishconnector.com

This calendar is sponsored by the Atlanta Jewish Connector, an initiative of the AJT. ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES JULY 13, 2018 | 35


BRAIN FOOD Soccer Stars By: Yoni Glatt, koshercrosswords@gmail.com Difficulty Level: Manageable 1

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■ Rebecca and Michael Cohen of Atlanta announced the birth of a son, Daniel Robert, on July 18. Daniel has a brother, Jody Paul, and a sister, Melissa.

15 Years Ago // July 11, 2003 ■ Yeshiva Atlanta’s new alumni association raised scholarship money so needy students could continue their education at the 33-year-old Orthodox high school. The school’s new tuition policy, which required a minimum payment of $5,000, most affected students from immigrant families. The alumni association wanted to make scholarship fundraising one of its first activities. ■ The bat mitzvah ceremony of Kelsey Leigh Rogut of Dunwoody was held Saturday, June 28, 2003, at Temple Sinai. Kelsey is the daughter of Stephen Rogut and Claudia Forman.

36 | JULY 13, 2018 ATLANTA JEWISH TIMES

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25 Years Ago // July 16, 1993 ■ Shaun Traub, a junior at Riverwood High School, was Atlanta’s biggest winner at the 14th Maccabiah Games in Israel. Traub captured two gold medals in the 800 meters and the 1,500 meters, as well as a silver medal as part of the four-man team in the Swedish Relay (100m, 200m, 300m, 400m).

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Rabbi Richard Lehrman led Temple Sinai's first service.

50 Years Ago // July 12, 1968 ■ Temple Sinai, a newly organized Reform Jewish congregation in Atlanta, held its initial worship service on Friday evening, July 5, with Rabbi Richard Lehrman officiating. More than 300 people jammed the auditorium of Birney Elementary School, overflowing onto the stage and into the hallway outside. ■ The marriage of Kathy Lynne Dukoff, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Philip Dukoff of Flushing, N.Y., to George Michael Stanislawski, son of Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Stanislawski of Atlanta, took place on July 10.


Irving Adelman 89, Sandy Springs

Irving Adelman, 89, Sandy Springs, died June 30, 2018. Survivors include his daughter, Deborah Adelman; son, Barry Adelman; granddaughters: Melissa (Craig) Schwartz and Dayna Adelman; great granddaughter, Alani. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to the Emory Brain Health Center, the American Heart Association or the charity of your choice. A graveside service was held July 5, 2018 at Cedar Park Cemetery, Paramus, NJ. Arrangements by Dressler’s Jewish Funeral Care, Atlanta (770) 451-4999. Sign online guest book at www.edressler.com.

Cheryl Goldberg Andrews 68, Atlanta

Cheryl Goldberg Andrews, 68, passed away peacefully Saturday, June 23, 2018. Cheryl was a beloved, caring, and kind-hearted wife, mother, and grandmother. She was an active member of Temple Kol Emeth, where she was involved in the Sisterhood as well as the volunteer program. Cheryl was born and raised in Atlanta and was a Grady High School graduate. She attended the University of Georgia and remained an avid fan. Cheryl also shared a love of soccer with her son and enjoyed cheering on Atlanta United since its inaugural season. She worked for her family-owned business, Ace Electric Rebuilders Supply, for more than 20 years and served as a financial officer. She is preceded in death by her husband of 37 years, Sam Andrews. The two were passionate about traveling and exploring the world. They visited places near and far, including Germany, China, and most recently, the entirety of Route 66. She is survived by her son, Jason (Allie) Andrews and their son, Aidan. Cheryl is also survived by her sister, Judy Garber, and her brother, Martin Goldberg. A graveside service was held Tuesday, June 26 at Arlington Memorial Park, 201 Mount Vernon Hwy. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. Arrangements by Dressler’s Jewish Funeral Care Atlanta, 770-451-4999. Sign on-line guestbook: www.edressler.com.

Howard Stein 94, Atlanta

Howard Stein, of Atlanta, 94, passed away June 28, 2018. Howard was born in Brooklyn, N.Y. After finishing high school, he attended Brooklyn College, but interrupted his education to serve in the U.S. Army. Upon leaving the service, he returned to complete his education, where he met the love of his life, Irene, to whom he was married for 70 years. After graduation, Howard formed his own sales company, focusing his talents on the carpet industry. It was from here that he established his own carpet manufacturing company, Howard Carpet Mills, where his skills covered every aspect of the industry, from innovative product design, to manufacturing and marketing. He grew the company from five employees at its onset to over 700 by the time he retired. In his free time, Howard was an avid sports fan. He was a long-time season ticket holder for the Atlanta Hawks and enjoyed watching the Falcons. He was a passionate art collector, creating one of the largest collections of Toulouse Lautrec posters in the United States along with a collection of European sculptures. It was from this passion that he became involved with the High Museum of Art, serving on its board of directors. He and Irene traveled extensively, both for work and pleasure, often including his children and grandchildren on trips to Mexico, Canada, and Europe in their adventures. Howard was extremely dedicated to his family and was fortunate enough to have them all living in Atlanta. He was a doting grandfather, attending every sporting event, recital, and graduation that he could. He was a loving father, always being there for his children, especially for his son, Bruce, in his time of need.

OBITUARIES He was a devoted husband who would serenade his wife and blow kisses across the dining room table. Howard had a boundless amount of energy and loved being the life of the party, being out on the dance floor with whoever was game at trying to keep up with him and befriending anyone whose path crossed his. Howard is survived by his wife, Irene Stein; daughter and son-in-law, Cindy and Howard Goldberg; brother, Allen (Merna) Stein; grandchildren: Gregory, Jenny, Alex, and Jacob Goldberg; Max, Parisa, Sam, and Sophia Stein. He was preceded in death by his son, Bruce Stein. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to the charity of your choice. A graveside service was held Sunday, July 1, 2018 at Arlington Memorial Park with Rabbi Laurence Rosenthal officiating. Arrangements by Dressler’s Jewish Funeral Care, Atlanta (770) 451-4999. Sign online guest book at www.edressler.com.

Death Notices

Roselle Sherrod Serra, graveside services were held at Arlington Cemetery on Wednesday, June 27. Rhoda Levine, 92, died on June 23. Her funeral was at Crest Lawn Memorial Park on Monday, June 25. She is survived by her husband, Julius Levine; daughter, Holly; sons Jay, Donn and Wayne; seven grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.

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Arlington Cemetery Plots You cannot find a more beautiful & serene place to memorialize your loved ones than Arlington Memorial Park in the heart of Sandy Springs, GA, northern Atlanta. I own two adjoining burial plots in Garden F, Lot 46-C, spaces 1 & 2. Direct from cemetery price is $11,990 for both. I am asking $7750 for the two, including transfer fees.

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CLOSING THOUGHTS

Track 19 There we were, chatting about this and that, the way only sisters can, when I hear my sister say, we’d better ‘do’ Uber instead of the bus or train into the city. Wondering, I ask: Why, what’s the difference? Uber will take 30 minutes, train or bus could take 1 ½ hours. We would have to leave very early, she replies. I’m thinking: Are you kidding me? No contest. Uber got my vote -- early did not. She then continues with: Penn Station is closed for repair. I usually take the Amtrak train from Penn Station to go up to Massachusetts, and I am not sure how it will work from Grand Central. Wait, what? I say totally befuddled. How can a train station the size and importance of Penn Station be closed? (Commuters beware!) Will they accept our tickets, I ask? Yes, it’s not about the tickets, it’s about where to catch the train. Oh! When I lived in New York, the Bronx specifically, I never took a commuter train –- where would I go? I took the IRT or the BMT. Just run of the mill subways trains to run of the mill subway stations. I was really pumped to take an Amtrak train. I do love trains. What happens to all the commuters who need Penn Station? I ask, already worrying for people I have never met.

New Yorkers adjust. You would not believe how complicated the train schedules can get. If track 19 is closed, you figure you would take another track. Perhaps track 24? Only, 24 does not have a direct route to your ultimate destination. So, checking the map, it would appear the train on track 24 will take you halfway to your destination. Keeping

Shaindle’s Shpiel By Shaindle Schmuckler shaindle@atljewishtimes.com

Grand Central Station, a New York City landmark.

your map open, you notice at the halfway mark you must change trains, requiring you to run to yet another track. 17? However, this train is headed south. You were heading north. Or so you were hoping. Even a New Yorker can be heard screaming HELP! Or you might hear the ol’ Bronx cheer. Living in New York has so much to offer: art, music, the ferries, museums, the 42nd Street library, Central Park, beaches, Empire State Building, Broadway, Chinatown, Little Italy, spectacular shopping and so much more. Choosing to live in New York also means traffic, subways and crowds. New Yorkers adjust. So the next day my sister and I Uber (the verb) to Grand Central. The driver

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announces: Here you are. Both of us look up and see the Grand Central Hotel. Both my sister from the north and her sister from the south (me), say: No, this is a hotel, where is the station? He points ten feet ahead. Oh, we say, humbled. We are always so sure we know what we are talking about. Once again, New Yorkers adjust. The city of Grand Central Station, and it is indeed large and complex enough to be a city, is overwhelming, impressive and magnificent. And, just like in the movies, there really are numbered tracks. Every few minutes you hear an announcement of trains boarding and leaving from one of the tracks. I was in heaven. Did I mention I love trains? They feel so romantic. Trains feed my imagination of places yet to discover.

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I have two sisters, all three of us June babies. My sister and I were headed to Massachusetts, where my other Northern sister lives, for our annual sisters’ birthday celebration. The train ride up was lovely. I could see cities, towns, lakes, and folks living off the grid, through my window. Occasionally a conductor would announce the next station and the amount of time it would take to get there. Just like in the movies. Back to track 19, or was it track 24? I am so confused. Obviously, this girl can’t keep track of the tracks. I’m saddened by the realization I am no longer a New Yorker. New Yorkers don’t get confused. New Yorkers adjust. All hail to track 19? ■

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I WOULDN’T BE HERE WITHOUT GRADY. I FELL INTO THE ELEVATOR. I immediately recognized something was wrong. My doctor sent me straight to Grady’s Marcus Stroke and Neuroscience Center. From the moment I arrived at Grady, I knew I was in the right place. The physicians who are on the faculties of Emory and Morehouse medical schools and the nurses were so professional. These are people who know how to save lives. Today, I feel great and I credit that to the care I received at Grady. Everyone was so kind. I could tell it wasn’t just their job. It’s their mission.

Darryl Wiseman

Atlanta Jewish Times, Vol. XCIII No. 27, July 13, 2018  

Health & Wellness

Atlanta Jewish Times, Vol. XCIII No. 27, July 13, 2018  

Health & Wellness