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Courtesy of Bang Zoom! Entertainment

The Sounds of Oz James Scullion ’07 talks with Jarrad Jinks about music, grumpy old audio guys, the sounds of sorcery and winning an Emmy with the Lost in Oz sound editing team.

Dorothy, Toto and Scarecrow move cautiously through the hidden depths of Glenda the Good’s flying castle—a palace kept aloft by way of witchcraft. At the bottom of a dimly-lit staircase they come across an effervescent and incandescent blue lake of oblivion water. The Good Witch of the South is missing and finding her may be key in Dorothy’s quest to return home to Kansas. The lake hisses as Scarecrow, Glenda’s right-hand man, approaches. The oblivion water’s sound warning that a single touch will slowly sap remembrance from any who touch it. They enter a nearby boat with a thud

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THE AMERICAN SCHOOL IN JAPAN

and the motor hums quickly to life. The water reacts with a sizzle and continuous, nearly inaudible chimes as the propeller churns and the trio venture deeper into the cavernous void of the castle’s depths, surrounded by the memory-erasing reservoir that likely stole Scarecrow’s recollection of Glenda’s whereabouts. In Lost in Oz, an imaginative retelling of Frank L Baum’s classic tale, Dorothy, Toto and a number of other familiar characters find themselves beautifully animated and surrounded by a multi-Emmy awardwinning soundscape in Amazon’s original TV series. As part of the sound editing team that won a

Profile for The American School in Japan

The Ambassador. Fall, 2017  

The American School in Japan's community magazine.

The Ambassador. Fall, 2017  

The American School in Japan's community magazine.

Profile for asij