Page 1

Central Florida • Tampa • St. Petersburg Business•Connection•Culture•Lifestyle

Vol 2 Issue 1

SEP 2006

亞 洲

Anniversary Special

風 行

Anniversary Issue The Sights and Sounds of

Taipei,

Taiwan

Come on and Dance – Ivan Mao Mid-Autumn Festival Why Learn Chinese Special

Anniversary Section Pg 11 & 26

w w w. a s i at r e n d m a g a z i n e . c o m


That’s why We SHOP in M D

MD ORIENTAL MARKET 好 又 鮮 超 級 巿 場 The Best Quality and The Best Selection 貨 品 最 新 鮮 最 齊 備 • Live Seafood • Fresh vegetable • Chinese Medicine • Fresh Bakery • Hong Kong Style B.B.Q. • Red Wine • Asian Grocery • Restaurant Wholesale Supply

Japan import:

Skin Care products

S

好又鮮 MD Office Depot

12th Street

1106 East Fowler Ave. Tampa, FL 33612 Tel: 813-868-1688 Fax: 813-868-6868

Nebraska Ave

We accept credit card

Open 7 Days a Week: 8:30AM - 8PM

pecial

USF

E. Fowler Ave

F


Contents

S E P 2

0

0

6

Suzy Guttler, Teri Mitchell, Ada Wong, Shally Wong and Gary Lau. The Founders of Asia Trend Magazine

COVER STORY/TRAVEL

013 The Sights and Sounds of Taipei, Taiwan

ASIA TALK

005 007

Come on and Dance – Ivan Mao Cornerstone for Diversity – David Wong

ASIA NEWS

009 015 017 043

Top of the world Toshihiro Nagata —Serving his internship at MANATEES Mid-Autumn Festival Get out the Vote this Fall

ASIA CULTURE 016 020 042

Between Ignorance and Enlightenment Dressing the Part – The Filipino Traditional Wear Why Learn Chinese

ASIA EATS

FENG SHUI

019 Feng Shui is the path of life

ASIA HEALTH

021 The Art of Belly Dance 044 5 to 9 A Day for Better Health 046 Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

ASIA TREND

034 Collecting Tin Toys 036 Life in Style 038 Japan Kei Car

ASIA BUSINESS

030 Hong Kong Trade Development Council 031 Tradeshow Highlights in Asia

COMMUNITY NEWS

027 040 045

2nd Annual Asia Pacific Student Assembly, UCF Classified & Asian Associations Local Events and Activities

Unbeatable Price each

0 $188onl.0 y, design is $80 extra

for self-uploaded image dling charges additional shipping & han e Orlando sid out applied to shipment

021 Restaurant Guide 024 Review

– Ayothaya

For Advertising, please call 407-808-0497 or visit our web site for details.


4

Magazine Online at www.asiatrendmagazine.com

Dear Asia Trend Readers! This month marks Asia Trend Magazine’s 1st year anniversary. Join us as we celebrate a year of the latest in Central Florida’s Asian lifestyle, culture and events.

www.asiatrendmagazine.com Asia Trend Magazine

This issue highlights the successes of Asian Americans in the contemporary workforce, and emphasizes the prevalence of diversity in all sectors of our economy- with the story of David Wong, accomplished Software Engineer at Lockheed Martin, and a one year anniversary follow up with Ivan Mao – New Age Line Dance champion and trainer. We also take a close look at the importance of Asian Americans’ involvement in national issues-and the differences that can be achieved through active participation in the voting process.

Publisher

Indulge your cravings in the best of Asian cuisine-tried and tested by our editors- in our Asian Eats section, and check out the Life in Style section for the latest in this season’s beauty must haves, Asian celebrity news, and the art of belly dancing-an ancient form of Oriental art! Read up on the importance of learning Chinese and the different programs offered in the Central Florida area.

Marketing/Sales Executive

We also take you to Taipei, Taiwan – and give you a snapshot of why this city makes a popular travel destination. Plus, an exclusive look at the skyscrapers towering Asia’s economic hubs. Finally, we’ve got the most comprehensive coverage on events this month-including the Asian Assembly at the University of Central Florida, and the Mid-Autumn Festivities celebrated in Hong Kong. All this and more in our Anniversary issue! It’s been a phenomenal year for everyone here at Asia Trend Magazine. Thanks to all the contributors who have selflessly devoted their time and effort to ensure that the original inspiration for Asia Trend continues. It really has been a great experience sharing with readers our passion for the communication of our cultures and lifestyles. And, finally, thanks to our loyal readers - who have provided invaluable support, positive feedback and an amazing response - without you, it just wouldn’t be worth it. This special first year anniversary issue is to all of you! Much luck to everyone as we go forward into another great year of Asian Trends! Suzy Guttler – Contributing Editor

Need a copy at you doorstep? Asia Trend now delivers to your homes, $15 for the year.

Suzy Guttler

Thank you for being Asia Trend Magazine’s advisors.

Ricky Ly

Lena Gia Linh

Aldo Basuki

Member of

Your point of contact for Asian American opportunities

Cuong Thiet Le

Kelvin Tsoi

Arthur Tsui

Pick up your next issue at Bank of America

20 Alexandria Blvd, Oviedo 700 S Alafaya Trail, Orlando 3117 E Colonial Dr, Orlando 7605 Aloma Ave., Winter Park 1905 Aloma Ave, Winter Park

750 S Orlando Ave, Winter Park 7682 Dr. Phillips Blvd, Orlando 390 West State Rd 434, Longwood 7220 Sand Lake Rd, Dr Phillips

Please Visit www.AsiaTrendMagazine.com/AT_Distributing.html for other 100+ distributing locations.

www.asianamericanchamber.org

If you would like to contribute an article related to Asia, please send it to info@asiatrendmagazine.com. Article must be original and must belong to the sender. Further verification may be asked.

Global Media LLC Creative Director

Gary Lau

garylau@AsiaTrendMagazine.com

Gary Lau

Shally Wong

shallywong@AsiaTrendMagazine.com 407-808-0497 Marketing Director

Ada Wong

adawong@AsiaTrendMagazine.com 407-257-0004 Contributing Editor

Shally Wong

Suzy Guttler

suzyguttler@hotmail.com 407-572-3695 Contributing Writers

Aldo Basuki Puxiao Cen, M.D. Alicia Farinella Ada Wong Suzy Guttler Kerby Kuek Paul Lengemann Ricky Ly Teri Mitchell Kelvin Tsoi Master Hsing Yun Teri Mitchell New America Media Department of Health Hong Kong Trade Development Council Thank you for contributing articles and photos from overseas

Mingolo, Hong Kong Lee Chin Aik, Maylasia Yuko, Japan Eddie Chan, China Arthur Tsui, United Kingdom Leo Tsui, Macau Asia Trend Magazine is published the 15th of every month By Global Media LLC. The magazine is free and distributed at over 100 locations throughout Greater Orlando and Tampa Area. The rest of them are made available in the Asian Town Areas and various professional offices, Asian American Chamber of Commerce and different Asian Organizations. PO Box 5352, Winter Park, FL 32793-5352 Fax 407-273-9913 Copyright 2005-2006. Asia Trend Magaizne. All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be reproduced without the written permission of Global Media LLC. Neither the publishers nor the advertisers will be held responsible for any errors found in the magazine. The publishers will have no liability for the statement made by advertisers or writers.


Magazine Online at www.asiatrendmagazine.com

ASIA TALK

Come on and Dance ...

5

I interviewed Ivan Mao a year ago at my premier issue. Now, exactly 12 months later, here comes Ivan again with a year of accomplishments and challenges. Ivan inspired me the most is his attitude towards everything. Nothing is impossible including teaching me to dance.

 By Shally Wong

New Age Line Dance Performed at Casselberry City Hall on Aug 19, 2006

Ivan and Cecilia Mao

S: About a year ago, you encountered some serious health challenges such as an open-heart surgery. How are you now and how did they affect your dancing?

Those challenges were behind me now and I’ve felt great. Thanks for asking. I was through with the operations and recovery in mid-November last year, and immediately engaged into rigorous training. One and a half month later, I won my division at the World Championship in Sweden, and this time was at the Advanced level. So, I felt pretty good. S: Advanced level, eh? so where do you go from here in competition?

I don’t know really as I don’t have

specific goals at this point. I’m satisfied with my accomplishments, and there’re higher levels I can compete in. But, I’ve found great satisfaction in teaching and training others, and in promoting line dance as a sport to others, especially to young folks and to Asian-Americans. One thing was very interesting: I competed and happy that I won, but it never dawned on me that my winning as an Asian is supposedly special until some pointed it out. S: It’s been a year and a half now since you started teaching line dance in Orlando. How is it going? How many students? What are their ages and ethnic origins?

Going great. We’ve definitely grown. Now we have two classes for beginners and

one at intermediate level with a total of about 60 students. Age range is from early 30s to the three who’re in their 80’s, with median age in early 50’s. We have quite a mix in ethnic origins but Chinese is the majority. See, line dance in the U.S. traditionally is populated by white females over 50 (of age), who do cowboy stomping to country and western music. Our line dance is in completely different styles. And we’ve been wanting to have people who never linedanced before so they’d dance in our new style. So, the sources for us would have to be outside that traditional population. Equally importantly, after retiring to this area, Cecilia and I wanted to contribute to Asian communities in some meaningful way. So far we’ve been successful in getting into Chinese


6

Magazine Online at www.asiatrendmagazine.com

ethnicity, as evident by our current classes. But we’ve not at all in other Asiatic ethnicities. We’ve also failed to attract youngsters, teens and those in their 20’s.

We’re all Americans of

different ethnic backgrounds. We all need to become part of the mainstream America.

S: So, any plans to accomplish your goals?

As I indicated, we’d very much like to attract Vietnamese, Philipino, Thai, Korean,

Japanese, Indian and other Asian-Americans into our dancing. We’d like also very much to attract younger crowd. At shows, we generated a great deal of enthusiasm. We also have had exposures to this Chinese school and to Asian students in UCF. We really have had no shortage of publicity with our shows, Chinese media in central Florida, and with your Asia Trend magazine. But we just haven’t been able to get them into our classes. Honestly, we’re at a lost of what to do next. We know that we need to continue to do shows, and to work with your magazine and other Asian media channels and Asian community leaders and organizations. But concrete plans? none at this point. Any suggestions?

recently. Do you intend to use opportunities and network through Rotary club to promote line dance, and to bring further exposure of Asian culture?

S: You’ve joined the Rotary Club

 By Shally Wong

Yes and no. The intend of my becoming a Rotarian is not exactly with such motives in mind. I’m a Chinese-American, but an American. This is what America is all about. We’re all Americans of different ethnic backgrounds. Be a Chinese-American, Vietnamese-American, Hispanic-American, AfroAmerican, or Jewish-American, we all need to become part of the mainstream America. We each are proud of our own unique culture and be appreciative and respectful of other culture. Again, this is what America is all about.

► Danita Dohmer, Cecilia Mao, Ivan Mao, Karen Yiao and Pearly Shen

► Ivan Mao and some of his students

More pictures at http://www.asiatrendmagazine.com/ATM_EventsPictures.html

EZ Banner Stand starts from $188 each Call 407-808-0497 www.globalmediafl.com


Magazine Online at www.asiatrendmagazine.com

ASIA TALK

7

Completing the Leadership Development Program

I attended the University of Central Florida from 1997 through 2004, where I earned both B.S. and M.S. degrees in Computer Engineering. I currently work as a software engineer for Lockheed Martin while pursuing an M.S. degree in Engineering Management at the University of Florida. S: Does your ethnicity influence and/or play a role in your lifestyle?

Cornerstone for Diversity

in Today’s Workforce The contemporary American workforce is characterized by a mélange of cultures, ethnicities and talent. Diversity is no longer a forward looking phenomenon, it occurred yesterday. Asia Trend sits down with Central Florida local, David Wong, who speaks of diversity initiatives in the workplace, and the incessant influx of Asian American talent in all facets of the nation’s economy. As a young, achieving engineer, David emphasizes the opportunities for success that is realized through expression of genuine passion, unremitting hard work, and an understanding of the most important things in lifeone’s ethnic identity.

S: Tell us a little about yourself.

I was born in 1979 in Central Florida, where I’ve resided ever since, which makes me an American Chinese because both my mother and father are of Chinese descent. After graduating from Lake Brantley High School, Diversity in the workplace

My ethnicity definitely has an influence on my life. In fact, it affects all aspects from my work life to my social life. At work, the number of Asian Americans has been increasing steadily over the past few years to the point where an Asian social organization has been created. I thought that after leaving the Asian Student Association in college, there wouldn’t be any more opportunities to join such a club again, but that proved to be untrue. Outside of work hours, my social activities have everything to do with being Asian. Some examples would include getting boba tea with my friends, eating pho every other day, and going karaoke in Korean bars on the weekends. As you can see, despite living in the United States, being Asian is my life. S: How did you choose your career field?

Ever since high school, I’ve always wanted to be an engineer, and doing bad in every other class except math


 only strengthened my decision. I also remember getting my first personal computer and doing example programs from a book that I was given for my birthday. However, I would say that the Computer Engineering curriculum and the co-op programs at UCF really encouraged me to stay in the engineering field by exposing me to the types of jobs that would be available upon graduation. S: Describe your education/pre employment experience?

I feel that it is imperative to get as much working experience as possible during the college years. In fact, I would say it’s almost as important as getting good grades in classes. Looking back, I believe I had a healthy work/school balance. My work experience included PC repair, application development, web development, and being an engineering assistant. All of these positions were internships that laid the foundation for me to succeed in my career. S: What lead up to your current position with your company?

My co-op experience definitely helped in getting my career started with Lockheed Martin. I just had to get my foot in the door and work really hard to prove to myself and others that I am capable of performing at a professional level. S: Do you feel that being Asian American contributed to or hindered your success in pursuing your career?

I have never considered being Asian American a hindrance in anything that I pursued. We have extra benefits that others don’t, such as extra scholarships, special treatment in certain places, and even finding a job is easier. It’s all about how you use it and not letting it go to waste. S: What can you say about diversity in the workforce?

I’m actually quite impressed and satisfied with how companies are hiring people of different ethnicities, cultures and genders. There is no doubt that there have been many sacrifices and a lot of work in the past to get us to where we are today, and it’s only going to get better. S: Does your company observe any diversity initiatives or diversity promotion?

My company is actually really big on diversity. They have established numerous diversity councils nationwide to link diversity

Social activities outside the workplace

Despite living in the United States, being Asian is my life.

to their business objectives, and they also coordinate cultural heritage events to promote an inclusive environment. In addition, all employees are required to take diversity training as part of our annual training curriculum. S: How do you promote diversity at work or in your community?

S: Any specific plans for the future? What do you hope to accomplish within 5 years? 10 years?

Five to ten years from now, I plan to have completed my graduate degree program and establish a leadership role within my company. Having completed a leadership development program and attended numerous conferences, a lot of time and work have been devoted to prepare myself for management responsibilities. I would like nothing more than to see them finally pay off in the end.  By Suzy Guttler

I try to promote diversity by attending as many cultural events as possible. Not only are they fun and entertaining, they also provide a way for Asians in Central Florida to get back in touch with their heritage. I also enjoy meeting a lot of people and making new friends along the way. S: Tips/advise to individuals hoping to pursue a profession similar to yours?

For those who are still in school and wanting to pursue any kind of profession, I would recommend to just get involved. Become active in everything that you are interested in, because the people you meet can possibly become valuable resources in the future. As a minority, also look for and take advantage of the extra benefits that are given to you, such as scholarships.

David Wong, Software Engineer at Lockheed Martin


Top

Magazine Online at www.asiatrendmagazine.com

ASIA ARCHITECTURE

ute. A visitor can travel up to the 89th floor in 39 seconds. The most unique part of Taipei 101 is its 730-ton mass damper. In a region known to experience powerful earthquakes, typhoons, and wind these damper ensure Taipei 101 does not become the world’s largest Janga tower. No building in Asia would be complete without adhering to local customs and tradition. The art of Feng Shui is responsible for Taipei 101 distinctive exterior design. The shape of the building is fraught with symbolism of financial success. The distinctive sections are reminiscent of gold ingots, used in ancient China as currency by royalty. There are 8 of them, each with 8 floors. The number 8 is unique because it sounds like “earn fortune” in Chinese. There are also 4 circles on each side of the building near the base, to represent coins.

of the World

Petronas Towers (Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia)

b

c

a

Some say it’s the ability of man to conquer nature. Others say it’s a symbol of freedom and economic power. To me it’s the defining characteristic of a great city. Skyscrapers are a modern day symbol of greatness. They tower high above us and remind us that there is nothing that cannot be achieved. Today eight out of the ten world’s tallest buildings are located in Asia, a testament to Asia’s roll in our global economy. Besides pushing the limits of engineering each building has a unique design often blending Eastern and Western culture. Taipei 101 (Taipei, Taiwan)

This unique building is now the record holder for the tallest building in the world. Towering high above Taiwan’s capital of Taipei it stands 1,667 ft (508m) from base to top. Taipei 101 features 101 floors (hint

9

Taipei 101) of office space, retail stores, restaurants, and parking. In many aspects Taipei 101 is the most advance skyscraper today. To accommodate passengers Toshiba designed double decker elevators, which run 1,010 meters per min-

Up until October 17, 2003, the Petronas Towers in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia shared the distinction as the world’s tallest and second tallest building. Today the Petronas towers are in the record books as the 2nd and 3rd tallest buildings in the world. The tower’s unique look is heavily influenced by Malaysia’s Islamic heritage. The basic design of the building is based on Islamic geometric forms of two interlocking squares creating a shape of eight-pointed stars. Upon the eightpointed stars, are eight superimposed semicircles softening the inner angles. Again the number eight is significant in Asian culture. Petronas is Malaysia’s national oil company and they set out to build the world’s tallest skyscraper. In an unusual move two companies were contracted to construct the two towers. Both companies were encouraged to race against each other for the completion of the two towers. The builders of Tower 2, Samsung Constructions, won the race, despite starting a month behind, although Tower 2 ran into problems when they discovered the structure was 25 millimeters off from vertical. Looks can be deceiving and although the Petronas Towers do not look taller then Chicago’s Sears tower, they are constructed in a spires design giving it a greater overall height. Tower one is solely occupied by the Petronas Company and its subsidiaries. Tower two is mostly used as office spaces. The base of the two towers feature a shopping mall, Suria


10

Magazine Online at www.asiatrendmagazine.com

World Finance Center (under construction). International Finance Centre 2

(Hong Kong, China)

d

KLCC. The biggest attraction for visitors is the skybridge that connects towers one and two. Located on the 41st floor the floor it is 170m (558 ft) high and 58m (190 ft) long. Skybridge is open to visitors but limited to 1,400 visitors a day. Jin Mao Tower (Shanghai, China)

To no surprise China’s economy has been soaring. Along with a booming economy comes a soaring skyline. Rural farmlands are now converted into metropolitan areas. Five out of the top ten world’s tallest buildings are located in China. Jin Mao Tower is the newest landmark skyscraper in Shanghai’s ever changing skyline. It is hard to imagine that Pudong district in Shanghai was once farmland ten years ago. Now it is probably one of the most recognizable skylines in the world, featured in films like Mission Impossible III. At first glance this structure looks like a giant pagoda, a homage to local culture and heritage. Jin Mao tower holds the number eight in high regards, a recurring theme in Asian architecture. The number eight is associated with financial prosperity in Chinese culture. It has 88 floors, 8 super steel columns, 8 exterior columns, and its base is a octagon shape. The tower is mostly used for office space and headquarters for China Jin Mao Group Co. Ltd. Its also home to Shanghai’s five star Grand Hyatt hotel, one of the highest hotel in the world. Jin Mao tower also provides shopping malls, restaurants, boutiques, and nightclubs, making it a very attractive place to stay in Shanghai. Good things only last so long as Jin Mao Tower is set to be dwarfed by Shanghai

This building is the newest addition to Hong Kong’s concrete jungle, this structure towers above Hong Kong’s many skyscrapers. Designed exclusively to house numerous Hong Kong and Asian financial firms. The top floor is actually slightly taller then Hong Kong’s most popular tourist attraction, “The Peak.” Floors 14 and 24 are omitted because of local customs as taboo floors, which means definitely die and easy to die respectively. CITIC Plaza (Guangzhou, China)

CITIC Plaza is the tallest building in China and sixth largest worldwide. Currently it is the worlds tallest concrete building. This 80 story building is mostly used as office space and a hub for rail and subway routes. Shun Hing Square (Shenzhen, China)

Completed in 1996 this was the tallest building in china for one year. It features 69 floors and mostly used for office and commercial spaces Central Plaza (Hong Kong, China)

This unique building utilizes a triangular floor plan. This 78 story building is built with reinforce concrete and features office and commercial spaces. Its gold color exterior design enhances Hong Kong’s skyline. Bank of China Tower (Hong Kong, China)

This building is designed by world renown architect I.M Pei, the same architect who designed the Lourve and JFK Library. Built in 1989 the Bank of China towers 1,209 ft over Hong Kong’s skyline. The design is meant to resemble growing bamboo shoots, symbolizing livelihood and prosperity. Controversy exist over the design of the building and its adherence to local Feng Shui customs. Practitioners of Feng Shui criticize the sharp angles and numerous “X” shapes. Urban legend says that these sharp angles are meant to reflect bad Feng Shui onto the governor’s mansion, then inhabited by British appointed governor. The underlining assumption was that the building was delib-

erately built this way to reflect bad Feng Shui onto the British governmental house. This is even more apparent because the building looks like a cleaver when observed from the HSBC headquarter. The Governor took note of this and immediately planted trees to block the bad Feng Shui and a reflecting pound was installed in the government mansion to reflect the remaining bad Feng Shui away. Needless to e say Feng Shui is taken very seriously in Hong Kong. It would be bad custom not to take it seriously. A comprehensive list of the worlds tallest buildings can be found at: www.infoplease.com/ipa/ A0001338.html Future

Naturally there is a frenzy to build the world’s tallest buildings. Nowhere is this more apparent then in Asia where records are broken year after year. Cities like Shanghai, Hong Kong, Guangzhou, Taipei, Seoul, Singapore, and Kuala Lumpur are all participating in a fight to build the world’s tallest building. The areas with the greatest amount of growth is South Korea, Russia, China, and Dubai. Dubai currently has the world’s tallest proposed building that is under construction as of today. The builders of the Patronas Tower, Samsung construction, has won the contract to build the Burj Tower in Dubai. The skyscraper of the future will surely push the limits of design and construction. They will put to rest any doubts about what mankind can or can not achieve. For a complete list, information, and pictures on proposed skyscrapers under construction visit: www.skyscraperpage.com  By Kelvin Tsoi

a/ International Finance Centre 2 b/ Petronas Towers c/ Bank of China Tower d/ The World’s tallest skyscraper chart e/ Burj Dubai


Anniversary Sp ecial Magazine Online at www.asiatrendmagazine.com

1st Anniversary Special Section

Anniversary I

11 ssue

See what people are saying about Asia Trend Magazine

Congratulations to Asia Trend Magazin e on your 1st anniversary. You have be en dedicated to providing information and news about Asian comm unities, business, life style and trends. Be wishes to you as yo st u continue to provid e the tools of information for local Asian busin ess connections. Keep up the good work!

Sylvia Davidson

Director of Sales and Ma rketing Sheraton Suites Orland o Airport

many

a Congratulations on r! yea rst fi ul erf wond rk All of your hard wo rst fi a in ed ult res has u Yo n. rate publicatio have become a fantas t ou ab d an tic source of ity un mm co ian As the u in Florida. I wish yo s! ces years of continued suc

Puxiao Cen,

Florida Heart Group

Conchita Hsu,

e has Asia Trend magazin mad an wn gro y evidentl rdu ys wa tured in many to e Tru r. yea st pa ing the kept your mission, you’ve e to a balanced coverag fer please readers of dif s. itie nic eth ic iat ent As ed joy en e Personally, I’v ding mber of minutes rea nu g sin rea ny spending inc ma t tha ue to issue. I note the magazine from iss on sights and events in are stories and reports out the s” in Asia. What ab nd ela om “h t en fer dif s being ian As t ou ab What now home in the U.S.? naturalized. As Asianor rn Americans, native bo sting erica, there’re intere Americans living in Am s, and unique issues poern stories, common conc work places. You don’t at d an ly ial litically, soc aight e or take stands, but str tiv ca vo pro be to ed per ne pro is ng ati co arno sug forward reports with od service. journalism, and a go the New Age Line Dance Ivan Mao, Founder ofSubscriber s and the First Asia Trend’

Y. LING HEUNG REALTOR®

Miss Wong, I just wa nted to tell you how mu ch I love your magazin e! You and your team ha ve done such a wonderf ul job in creating som ething that the As ian community really ne eds and has been missi ng. When I first moved to Orlando I had no idea that there was such a thi munity”. I credit your ng as an “Asian commagazine for the sen se of cohesion I now ha ve. It for all the Asian cultu provides information res that are widespr ead throughout central Flo rida. I especially en joy the Feng Shui tips an d featured food sectio ns. Keep up the great wo rk, ward to reading the ne as I always look forxt sary, and hopefully ma issue. Happy Anniverny more successful yea rs to come.

Firefighter Pamel

OCFRD.

向玉玲

Mandarin, Cantonese & English

精通國粵英語

RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE, INC.

, Mortgage, Relocation, & Property Mgt.

Principal of Chinese Sch ool ( 中佛州中華學校校長 of CAACF ), www.orlandochine seschool.org

ia Each issue of As is Trend Magazine by ted ipa tic an rly eage er myself and a numb stu i Ch i Ta er oth of for u yo k dents. Than doing the articles on s Wah Lum. I alway riva at gre ur yo joy en our topics of interest to ety and coverage on community. er - Women Today Radio Chris Shenk, Produc rg www.womentoday.o

a Yen,

Continued on Pg26

C E L L : (407) 529-4762 F A X : (407) 774-8117 EMAIL : Ling@LingHeung.com

Owned And Operated By NRT Incorporated.

The Chinese Scho ol of CAACF commen ds the anniversary of Asia Trend magazin e, representing the maturation of the Orlando area Asian community . Asia Trend, much lik e the Chinese School, has shown it is po ssible to integrate int American culture an d yet preserve the glo o rious ancient heritages an d languages of our As ian backgrounds, sharin g the ate a diverse commun m with others to creity.

2160 W. Hwy 434, Suite 100 Longwood, FL 32779

www.LingHeung.com


12

Magazine Online at www.asiatrendmagazine.com

ASIA TRAVEL

The Sights and Sounds of Taipei, Taiwan Taipei, situated at the center of the Taipei Basin is the political, economic, cultural and educational center of the province of Taiwan.

台 北 l F l owe r of

Ta i

wa n

iona t a N

—plum blossom

C

ulture and tradition is very much alive and celebrated beneath the modern, vibrant city of Taipei. Treasure is held in Taipei’s National Palace Museum, which contains the world’s largest collection of Chinese artifacts. The city’s most celebrated monument is the museum dedicated to the former Chinese president, the Chiang Kai Shek Memorial Hall. Lungshan Temple, south west of the city center, is the place to be in the early evening. Next door, to complete the picture of Taiwan’s Chinese style, are jars of pickled snakes and demonstrations with live pythons at the Huahsi Night Market, known locally as Snake Alley. Taipei is a gourmet’s paradise, boasting cuisine from every region of China. When the eating is done, there’s karaoke, live music, dancing and festivals throughout the year. National Palace Museum

Key Attractions: National Palace Museum The National Palace Museum is considered one of the three top museums in the world and is home to over 650,000 priceless Chinese artifacts - the world’s largest collection. Chiang Kai-Shek Memorial Hall Chiang Kai-Shek Memorial Hall is an imposing tomb and shrine to Taipei’s most well known leader, which also houses Taipei’s main venues for the performing arts, the National Theater and National Opera House. Taipei 101 The tallest tower in the world, Taipei 101 offers 101 floors of entertainment and dining. Everything is here bars and restaurants, a health club, a cinema and designer boutiques. While you’re there, take the fastest lift in the world up to The Observatory for the ultimate city view. Lungshan Temple


Magazine Online at www.asiatrendmagazine.com

ASIA TRAVEL

13

Lungshan Temple This, by contrast, is the cities most atmospheric Taoist temple-with dragons, incense and burning paper ‘ghost money’. Night Markets As shopping and eating are the top entertainment activities in Taiwan, a good place to experience these are at the many night markets throughout the city, many open until midnight. ShihLin night market is the largest and a popular favorite, while Huashi Street Night Market (Snake Alley) is the most famed. These night markets sell everything from snake soup to painted umbrellas to a much needed shoulder massage after all the shopping. Don’t forget to bargain. Warner Village Cinema Multiplex Located in Shin Yi District, the Warner Village is also a great area for eating, drinking and shopping.

Getting Around:

Public Transport There are two main public transportation routes around the city: the metro and the bus. The MRT Mass Rapid Transit System has signs in English and is an efficient way to get around the city; it is also inexpensive. Its six lines cover major areas and trains run every 4 to 7 minutes. Taipei also has an astounding number of buses. City bus services are frequent, reliable and comfortable. Taxis Taxis are inexpensive and plentiful; they are also the most convenient way to get around if you’re new in the city. They operate on a meter and can be hailed on the street, picked up outside hotels, or a dispatch taxi may be called via an Englishspeaking radio calling system from almost any destination.

Shop Till You Drop

Taipei is also known as a shopping haven for travelers. With specific destinations for every interest, Taipei’s main shopping districts are Simending, Jhongsiao and Sinyi. Theme streets such as the jade markets and computer lane make shopping for one item convenient. The Living Mall, is known as the largest shopping mall in Asia, but the newest and largest shopping and leisure extravaganza is in Taipei 101 Mall. Here international designers from Armani to Louis Vuitton exhibit alongside local designers. Dihua Street and the Chinese Handicraft Mart is a one stop shop for inexpensive traditional items, great for bargain souvenirs to bring home.  By Suzy Guttler Night Markets

▲Warner Village Cinema Multiplex

►Chiang Kai-Shek Memorial Hall

◄MRT Mass Rapid Transit System

▼Simending Shopping District


14

Magazine Online at www.asiatrendmagazine.com

ASIA TRAVEL

www.chinagardenwp.com

Hong Kong Style Chinese Cuisine 118 S Semoran Blvd Winter Park, FL 32792

(Corner of 436 & University Blvd.)

407.671.2120 Fax:

407.671.2189

Rated “Excellent” by Zagat Survey 2001-2005


Magazine Online at www.asiatrendmagazine.com

ASIA NEWS

15

Toshihiro Nagata —Serving his internship at MANATEES

Toshi at work – Space Coast Stadium

Teri: “What made you interested in this opportunity?” Toshi (as he is usually called): “I played baseball through elementary to high school. I was a baseball fanatic, and I still am. When I finished high school, around 18 – 19 years old, I was inspired to have a job related to baseball.” Teri: “What kind of work do you do every day?” Toshi: “Collecting sponsors for marketing, guest services such as navigating guests, selling programs, taking care of shop guests, throwing give-away T-shirts at intermissions, and so on. Planning and enforcing events, such as ‘Halloween in Summer’. If you come to the stadium in a costume, you can get a special deal; beer and hot dogs are only $1 each. Another event is guests can take photos with the players.” Teri: “How long do you serve your internship?” Toshi: “It’s about a month, from July 31st to September 6th.”

Teri: “How is this job for you?” Toshi: “It’s very interesting. I’m enjoying it. This experience will be very useful when I’m back in Japan.” Teri: “How is your relationship with the players?” Toshi: “It’s quite good. I play table tennis with them in the locker room, and go out to eat with them and the other staff members.” Teri: “What do you do on your day-off?” Toshi: “Relax on the beach. I may start surfing sometime soon.” After going back to Japan, he has arranged to work for one of the pro baseball teams; Tohoku Rakuten Golden Eagles from April 2007. “I would definitely like to use all these fan services I learned here, in Japan,” says Toshi. He is a great new hope for marketing the Rakuten team. http://www.rakuteneagles.jp

Brevard County MANATEES Space Coast Stadium 5800 Stadium Parkway, Viera FL 32940

321.633.9200 http://www.minorleaguebaseball.com


16

Magazine Online at www.asiatrendmagazine.com

ASIA CULTURE

Between Ignorance And Enlightenment 

Door To Door

With determination, one will have a goal. With practice, one will have success.

Once, a young man applied for a job with Microsoft, and, after the interview, he was offered the position. Just as he was about to leave, the personnel manager said, “We will contact you by e-mail.” The young man replied, “I don’t have e-mail.” The manager responded, “We don’t hire anyone without an e-mail address.” So, the young man was rejected. On his way home, he realized that he only had ten dollars left in his pocket, and he did not have a job. Just as he was beginning to feel hopeless about his situation, he decided to take his last ten dollars and buy a large sack of potatoes. He went from door to door selling the potatoes and made a hundred dollars. He found new confidence in himself, and the next day he bought more potatoes and again sold them from door to door. A few months later, he was able to buy himself a car, and a few years later, he opened a factory. Many entrepreneurs wanted to be friends with him, and once they started talking, they would often say, “I’ll e-mail you.” The young man replied, “I don’t have e-mail.” Everyone was surprised, “How can you have such a large factory and not have email.” The young man explained, “I only have ‘door to door.’ I don’t have e-mail. Nowadays, when young people want to start a career, they say, “I don’t have an office, capital, telephone, secretary, computer, or a car.” Looking back at this young man, he did not even have the very popular e-mail, but he had the “door to door” spirit, so he was able to establish his business. What is the meaning of “door to door?” I mean spirit, will, and determination, and when we have these, we have no fear of failure. There are many cases where we see people who have property, companies, cars, computers, and e-mail, but if they just talk and do not work, they often end up with nothing instead. Conversely, those who have spirit and drive and are willing to work hard, persevere, and weather disadvantages can start from zero and end up with everything. When we have our minds set on a goal, we can realize it with the “door to door,” and we will gain tremendously. Therefore, those who want to start a business and make a profit first need to have the diligent spirit of going from “door to door,” and then they will certainly succeed in whatever they do.  By Venerable Master Hsing Yun www.ibps.org/florida


Hong Kong Tourism Board www.discoverhongkong.com

ASIA NEWS

17

Mid-Autumn Festival —in Hong Kong The festival commemorates a 14th Century uprising against the Mongols. In a cunning plan, the rebels wrote the call to revolt on pieces of paper and embedded them in cakes that they smuggled to compatriots.

Today, during the festival, people eat special sweet cakes known as “Moon Cakes” made of ground lotus and sesame seed paste, egg-yolk and other ingredients. Along with the cakes, shops sell coloured Chinese paper lanterns in the shapes of animals, and more recently, in the shapes of aeroplanes and space ships. On this family occasion, parents allow children to stay up late and take them to high vantage points such as The Peak to light their lanterns and watch the huge autumn moon rise while eating their moon cakes. Public parks are ablaze with many thousands of lanterns in all colours, sizes and shapes. Also not to be missed is one of the most spectacular celebrations you’ll ever see which takes place in Causeway Bay during the Mid-Autumn Festival on the 14th

- 16th day of the eighth lunar month. It’s the fire dragon dance in Tai Hang - a collection of streets located in behind the Causeway Bay recreation grounds and features a dragon measuring 67 metres. Over a century ago, Tai Hang was a vil-

wreaked havoc on the village. While the villagers were repairing the damage, a python entered the village and ate their livestock. According to some villagers, the python was the son of the Dragon King. The only way to stop the havoc which had beset their village was to dance a fire dance for three days and nights during the upcoming Mid-Autumn Festival. The villagers made a big fire dragon of straw and stuck incense into the dragon. They lit firecrackers. They danced for three days and three nights and the plague disappeared. Quoted from Discover Hong Kong website:

lage whose inhabitants lived off of farming and fishing. A few days before the Mid-Autumn Festival a typhoon and then a plague

Please refer to Pg 45 for Moon Festival Events in town.

1st heir to the Chrysanthemum Throne in 41 years—JAPAN Princess Kiko, the wife of Prince Akishino who is the Emperor’s second son, gave birth to a boy, a long-awaited male heir to the Chrysanthemum Throne, at 8:27am on Wednesday, Sept. 6th at Aiiku Hospital in Minato Ward, Tokyo. The baby is the first male born to the imperial family in 41 years and the third in line to the throne after Crown Prince Naruhito and Prince Akishino. The birth will put off the succession crisis facing the imperial family for a while. The Imperial House Law allows only males with emperors on their father’s side to ascend the throne.  By Teri Mitchell Prince Akishino (left) and Princess Kiko (right) ►


18

ASIAN RESTAURANT HOT PICKS

Chinese Authentic ■ China Garden Restaurant

118 S Semoran Blvd Winter Park FL 32792

407-671-2120

■ Jasmine Thai Cuisine & Sushi 750 S Hwy 17-92 Longwood FL 32750 407-331-2901

■ Kanpai of Tokyo

Magazine Online at www.asiatrendmagazine.com

Tea & Coffee

■ Lollicup Coffee & Tea 1212 E Colonial Dr Orlando, FL 32803

407- 897-1377

Vegetarian ■ Garden Cafe

810 W Colonial Dr Orlando FL 32805 407-999-9799

Vietnamese

6687 S Kirkman Rd Orlando, FL 32819

■ Q-Cup Comtemporary Oriental Cafe

■ Nagoya Sushi

407-291-8140

6417 Raleigh St Orlando FL 32835

1106 E Colonial Dr Orlando FL 32803 407-423-8539

Thai

■ Phở Hòa

6700 Conroy Rd Orlando, FL 32835

Coming Soon – Market Place at Dr Phillips

Dim Sum

■ Oyaji Japanese Cuisine

7555 W Sand Lake Rd Orlando FL 32819 407-345-0040 www.ayothayathai.com

www.chinagardenwp.com

■ China Town Seafood 1103 N Mills Ave Orlando FL 32803

407-896-9383

■ Magic Wok Restaurant 407- 522-8688

■ Golden Lotus Chinese Restaurant

8365 S John Young Parkway Orlando FL 32819

407-352-3832

■ Ming’s Bistro

1212 Woodward St. Ste 6 Orlando, FL 32803

407-898-9672

■ Taste of Hong Kong 6540 Carrier Dr Orlando FL 32819 Tel: 407-248-2863

Indian

■ Spice Cafe

7536 Dr. Phillips Blvd Orlando, FL 32819

407-264-0205

407-352-4811

407-290-9411

6935 Municipal Dr. Orlando FL 32819

407-354-0860

■ Ran-Getsu of Tokyo 8400 International Dr Orlando FL 32819

407-345-0044

■ Sachi Sushi & Thai Grill 4060 Town Center Blvd Orlando, FL 32837 407-857-5173

■ Saikyo Saigon-Tokyo 1185 Spring Centre Blvd. S.

Altamonte Springs, FL 32714

407-788-9388

Korean

■ Korean Kitchen

Japanese

3255 W Colonial Dr Orlando, FL 32818 407-295-8522

7460 Universal Blvd Orlando, FL 32819

■ Shin Jung Korean Restaurant

■ Aki Restaurant 407-354-0025

■ Ginza Japanese Hibachi Steak & Sushi Bar 8933 W Colonial Dr Ocoee, FL 34761

407-523-8338 ■ Gizmo Sushi

110 S Semoran Blvd Winter Park FL 32792

407-677-5800

5086 W Colonial Dr Orlando, FL 32808

■ Ayothaya Thai Cuisine

■ Bangkok Restaurant

260 Douglas Ave Altamonte Spring FL 32714 407-788-2685

■ Jasmine Thai Cuisine & Sushi 750 S Hwy 17-92 Longwood FL 32750 407-331-2901

■ Royal Thai

1202 N. Semoran Blvd Orlando, FL 32807

407-275-0776 ■ Soong Thai

9448 W Colonial Dr Ocoee, FL 34761 407-822-8200

■ Little Saigon

649 N Primrose Dr Orlando FL 32803 407-895-6098

■ Phở Saigon Restaurant 5100 W Colonial Dr Orlando FL 32808 407-253-7013

■ Phở 88

730 N Mills Ave Orlando, FL 32803

407-897-3488

■ Saikyo Saigon-Tokyo 1185 Spring Centre Blvd. S.

Altamonte Springs, FL 32714

407-788-9388

Chinese Bakery ■ Sun Pearl Bakery

5082 W. Colonial Dr, Orlando, FL 32808

407-299-3256

Would you like to be listed here? Please call 407-808-0497 for more information

1638 E Colonial Dr Orlando, FL 32803 407-895-7345

Philippine

■ Cafe Mindanao

10705 E Colonial Dr Orlando, FL 32817

321-235-7465

Coming soon in September 2006 – www.AsiaTr endMa gazine.com


Magazine Online at www.asiatrendmagazine.com

FENG SHUI TALK

19

Feng Shui is the Path of Life!

 By Master Kerby Kuek

Chinese Metaphysics Whenever someone mentions to you ‘Chinese metaphysics’ you should ask him or her which one they are referring to. After all, Chinese metaphysics (術數) is also known as ‘Five Metaphysics’ (五術). These five variations evolved from observing the principles of nature and the interactions within different contexts. And, they are based on none other than the theories of Yin and Yang, Five Elements, Lok Shu Magic Square, Ten Heavenly Stems and Twelve Earthly Branches. As such, their roots are not surprisingly from I-Ching, the Book of Changes. The Five Metaphysics, known as Mountain (山), Medical (醫), Predictive (卜), Life (命), and Facial (相), are each briefly described below. The word ‘mountain’ alone is associated with hard geography but the practice of such includes Ham (堪) and Yu (輿). The word Ham (堪) is related to sky or heaven or anything above the ground. While Yu (輿) is associated with ground, hill, mountain or anything below ground. In simpler terms, Ham is associated with studying astrology, the movements of solar and lunar planets, and the calendar and so on. While Yu is associated with land forms, energies permeating and forming the land and the living environment of human beings. The naturally protective of human beings, seeking security and health, led to the development of martial arts. Striving to harness the best energies in the environment led to the study of Feng Shui. Traditional Chinese medicinal study, termed Central Medical (中醫), is an ideal set of systematic, integrated theories. This unique medical approach diagnoses patients through observation (望), inquiry (問), smell (聞) and attention (切), while using herbs (草藥), acupuncture (針灸), pressure point massage (穴位按 摩), qigong (氣功), massage therapy (跌打), therapeutic and acupressure therapy (火罐,刮痧) and diet as remedies. The intent is to utilize preventative, rather than curative measures. Ancient Chinese used all sorts of predictive methods to forecast or foretell future events and life activities. Still in use today, these predictive tools include Man Wong Gua (文王卦), Miu Fa Yik Sou (梅花易數), Kei Mun Tun Kap (奇門遁甲), Five Element Changes (五行易), Yik Lam (易林), Yin Kam (演禽), Yin and Yang Bowl (陰陽杯) and Kau Chim (求簽). They are used to determine the auspicious or inauspicious occasions of certain events that are associated with certain time frames. The changes of life’s events and activities are shaped in a bell curve and, therefore, the journey of life is patterned in such a way whereby occurrences are bound to happen repetitively. The study and tools for analyzing these repetitive life path patterns have been passed down from generation to generation for some 4,000 years. The predictive tools include the Four Pillars of Life (子平命理), Zhi Mei Astrology (紫薇斗數), Tik Pan San Sou (鐵板神數), Wong Kek Yin Sou (皇極易 數), Seven Major and Four Minor Stars (七政四餘), Three Generation Life (三世 書), Yin Kam Fa (演禽法), Chin Ting Sou (前定數) and Leung Tou Kam (兩頭 鉗). These tools can help determine a person’s life journey and identify patterns of auspicious or inauspicious energies that may lead one to make certain critical decisions in life at certain points in time. Face and palm readings, as well as aura and vocal energies, are used to analyze and predict a person life’s destiny. Often requiring the rare ability to read subtle energy, these unique observational techniques are still practiced today. Master Kerby Kuek Email: info@misterfengshui.com

Face Reading Tips: 何知君子多災困, 春夏額上常昏昏. How do you know this person will encounter misfortunes and tragedies?His forehead is dark during spring and summer seasons. 何知君子百事昌,準 頭印上有黃光. How do you know that this person has smooth life path? His nose tip and between eyebrows glow with yellow light.

Are you always quarrelling with your loved ones? Don’t blame your spouse. Blame it on Feng Shui! Every year, the number 3 star in the ‘quarrel’ sector instigates agents that cause nice couples and family get into ‘oral’ fights that strain their relationships. If this number 3 star is found located in your front door, bedroom or kitchen, you will face constant and unnecessary arguments over tiny little issues. This star is wood-in-nature according to the Five Elements theory. The good news is that solving such a problem is easy. Place any one (but not all) of the following items to drain the wood energy in such location. 1. Red or pink carpet/curtains/cloths 2. Red labels with auspicious words (i.e.,Merry X’mas, Happy Chinese New Year - Gong Xi Fa Chai, etc.) 3. Music box - play it constantly TIP: 2006 number three star is located in the central sector.


20

Magazine Online at www.asiatrendmagazine.com

ASIA CULTURE

Dressing the Part The Filipino Traditional Wear

The Philippine national costume is characterized by a unique blend of influences from the east and west. The year 1521 marks the beginning of the westernization of the archipelago, and consequently of varied sets of costume traditions. Perhaps inevitably, the encounter created a hybrid dress sense, combining the tradition systems of the indigenous and the alluring western. These two concepts, together, reoriented the Filipino costume.

The Maria Clara One rather spectacular costume is the Maria Clara, which was popular during the Spanish Era of the Philippines history. They are so named in honor of the legendary Maria Clara, who remains a symbol of the virtues and nobility of the Filipina woman. Maria Clara was the female character of Jose Rizal’s Noli Me Tangere. Complete with butterfly sleeves, a matching neck scarf worn over the shoulders and long sweeping dress, this dress is very ornate and features a floorlength paneled skirt of silk or satin in stripes of contrasting colors, or of floral print or embroidery. The blouse has wrist-length, richly embroidered flowing sleeves and is made of pine (pineapple fiber). A triangular collar scarf, covering the back and shoulders is worn and the footwear consists of beaded or embroidered slippers. The Maria Clara is the ideal of Philippine beauty and innocence.

pine President Ramon Magsaysay, who wore it to most official and personal affairs, including his inauguration as president. The barong was officially made the national costume by a decree from President Ferdinand Marcos in 1975. The Philippine costume is made with three different types of fabric. Pina: Handwoven from pine-apple fiber, which is delicate and difficult to weave; therefore, this is the most expensive. Jusi (pronounced “husi”): Handwoven from banana fiber or abaca, which also is rare. Silks or synthetics: Because of the expense and difficulty in finding pina or jusi, many costumes are now made of conventional Western fabrics. Those t h a t most closely imitate the natural pineapple and banana fibers are silk organza, nylon and some polyesters.  By Suzy Guttler

The Barong Tagalog A Barong Tagalog (or simply Barong) is an embroidered formal garment for the Filipino men. It is very lightweight and worn untucked, similar to a coat. It is the common wedding and formal attire based on Spanish influence. The term “Barong Tagalog” literally means “Tagalog dress” in the Filipino language. The barong was popularized as formal wear by Philip-

Check out theCheck Asia Trendout Magazine edition at ouronline website!

www.AsiaTrendMagazine.com www.asiatrendmagazine.com 中文網站請瀏覽: http://hk.myblog.yahoo.com/asiatrendmagazine


Magazine Online at www.asiatrendmagazine.com

The Art of Belly Dancing

ASIA HEALTH

21

Traditionally known as the “Oriental Dance,” belly dancing has been celebrated for centuries by royalty, writers, poets, artists and musicians.

Many experts say belly dancing is the oldest form of dance, having roots in all ancient cultures from the Orient to India to the Middle East. Throughout history, this ritualized expression has usually been performed for other women--generally during rites and social festivities. Belly dancing is natural to a woman’s bone and muscle structure with movements emanating from the torso rather than in the legs and feet. The dance often focuses on isolating different parts of the body, moving them independently in sensuous patterns, weaving together the entire feminine form. Belly dancing is generally performed barefoot, thought by many to emphasize the intimate physical connection between the dancer, her expression, and Mother Earth. East to West

In America, belly dancing enjoyed its first significant renown when the famous dancer, Little Egypt, performed at the Chicago World’s Fair in 1893. Americans found themselves fascinated by the exotic body rhythms and music, eventually including them in many silent films made just a few years later. Costumes and dancing styles were given a distinctive Hollywood flare and, in turn influenced dancers in the Middle East, thus evolving the art form to a new level. Since the turn of the century, belly dancing has grown enormously in popularity across the United States and the world. Belly dance festivals, workshops, and seminars take place constantly, attracting large audiences of interested, involved men and women. Many dancers now study the art form intensively, traveling to the Middle East and elsewhere to experience it where it originated.

Belly Dancing for Health and Fitness

are governed by your personal taste, ambition, talent, physical ability, and dedication to practice. To begin: Register for a local belly dancing class and /or buy a few home instructional videos. Videos and DVD’s fit nicely into the convenience of your lifestyle-they enable you to work at your own pace, at your own schedule. Beginning with belly dancing videos and DVD’s provide you with a framework of the basic steps at which to build confidence and self esteem. Once acquainted with the dance moves, it’s time to sign up for some classes and have some fun!

Belly dancing is a great way to exercise. The more you dance, the more exercise you get. This oriental dance form can offer the same health benefits as other types of aerobic exercise-strengthen your cardiovascular system, ward off osteoporosis, and improve your stamina, leading to a life of fitness, and best of all, it’s a fun way to shed off a few pounds. Some dance classes give you a more vigorous workout than others. If weight loss is a priority for you, choose a belly dancing teacher that keeps you moving continuously throughout the class time. The class will be especially valuable if it involves traveling steps, because moving the large leg muscles burns more calories than moving other, smaller muscles. When practicing at home, you’ll get maximum weight loss benefits by using drum solos, medium-speed, or fast music and incorporating a large number of moves that engage your legs and hips. Why Belly Dance:

• Exercise and fitness • A fun hobby that nurtures self expression, celebration and fantasy • Community and sisterhood • Cultural involvement • Physical and psychological strength  By Suzy Guttler

For the Beginner

Belly dance is suitable for women of all ages, body types and professions. Interested students should consider their expectations and set personal goals. There are numerous styles and approaches to belly dance that

belly dance class


22

Magazine Online at www.asiatrendmagazine.com

ASIA LIFESTYLE

Orlando Ballet’s 2006-2007 Season You won’t want to miss this!!

 By Alicia Farinella

The 2006-07 Season marks a debut of the NEW Orlando Ballet. This season promises to take Orlando Ballet to new heights. Audiences will be enthralled with the powerhouse productions of A Midsummer Night’s Dream and Swan Lake, the revived tale of Spartacus, and the eclectic repertoire program showcasing George Balanchine’s choreography in Masterworks: The Genius of George Balanchine. And, of course, the Ballet brings to life the exciting fantasy world of The Nutcracker. A Midsummer Night’s Dream October 13-15, 2006

A story of crossed loves, trickery, and merriment are woven together with a touch of magical charm in this spell-binding ballet perfect for the whole family. Masterworks The Genius of George Balanchine February 2-4, 2007

Photo by Michael Cairns

Experience one of ballet’s greatest choreographers George Balanchine as he brings the music of Tchaikovsky, Stravinsky, and Gershwin come alive in Serenade, Agon, and Who Cares? in this season’s repertory program. Spartacus March 9-11, 2007

Returning to the stage by popular demand this heroic and passionate ballet is based on legendary events from the history of ancient Rome Swan Lake May 10-13, 2007

One of the most renowned and technically demanding of all classical ballets, Orlando Ballet closes its extraordinary 06-07 Season with this full-length production, accompa-

資深會計師樓,專精個人及商業稅務 精通國、粵、英語,竭誠為您服務

nied by the Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra. You won’t want to miss this grand production. The Nutcracker December 14-17, 2006

You mustn’t miss everyone’s favorite holiday classic accompanied by the Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra. What holiday season is complete without the beloved classic of The Nutcracker? A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM rlando Ballet’s 2006-2007 Season opens with Bruce Wells’ interpretation of Shakespeare’s whimsical romance. A Midsummer Night’s Dream, tells the tale of romantic adventures and misadventures. Love and mischief take the stage with a delightful story of the transforming power of love in a world bordering reality and dreams. Succumb to the enchantment as Orlando Ballet ignites the stage bringing fairies, mortals and even a dancing donkey to life in this hilarious romantic comedy. A story of crossed loves, trickery and merriment are all woven together with a touch of magical charm in this spell-binding ballet. Perfect for the entire family!! Orlando Ballet will perform A Midsummer Night’s Dream at the Bob Carr Performing Arts Centre, October 13-15. For tickets call 407-426-1739, 407-839-3900, or visit ticketmaster.com.

O

“This season brings Orlando Ballet to the pinnacle of what the art form is, a collaboration of great music and dance in the grand style.” – Bruce Marks


23

Magazine Online at www.asiatrendmagazine.com

Best Japanese— Orlando Sentinel Foodie Award Critic’s Choice 5 years in a row

Freshly made Hong Kong Style Dim Sum and Gourmet Dishes Available Everyday

20 different kinds of Sake

揉合南北美食•有口佳碑•令人回味 精美點心•即叫即蒸•南北麵點•粵菜小炒

GOLDEN LOTUS Chinese Restaurant

Sand Lake Rd Wal-Mark

Tel: 407-352-3832

528

441

8365 S John Young Parkway Orlando, FL 32819

John Young Parkway

Traditional Chinese Gourmet Chef

GOLDEN LOTUS

Open 7 Days

6417 Raleigh Street Orlando, FL 32835 (Metro West Shoppes)

Te l : 407-290-1288 Fax: 407-290-2313

Coming Soon Market Place at Dr Phillips


24

ASIA EATS

Ayothaya  By Teri Mitchell

— Thai

Cuis i n e

f

Ayothaya is an award-winning Thai restaurant. They opened in Kissimmee in 2003 and moved to Orlando in April, 2004. The owner, chef Rick, specifically selected this fast-growing beautiful city of Orlando where 60 million people visit every year for their current location. Ayothaya is located in the Dr. Phillips area with easy access to I-4, I-Drive and major theme parks. Besides their authentic tasty Thai cuisine, the restaurant has a very attractive interior. Rick’s philosophy of cooking is to prepare homey healthy dishes at the optimum temperature, cleanness and attractive presentation, as is required in authentic Thai cooking. “We will adjust the spiciness for each customer, however, they can experience real original Thai taste. We do not serve ‘Americanized’ Thai food. You can learn true Thai food from Thailand,” says Rick. The name ‘Ayothaya’ comes from one of the famous cities in Thailand with a 700 year history. It originated from a place important to Buddhism in India where the king of Buddhists was born.

I highly recommend the five items I tried (photos shown). And the owner, chef Rick recommends; * Fried/Steamed Red Snapper – Sweet & sour sauce on top * Ayothaya Sukiyaki * Gulf of Thai – Combination of seafood steamed, fried and grilled

They also serve ‘Today’s Special’ menus and have a kid’s meal. You will feel comfortable whether you are by yourself or with your family.

Ayothaya received an award every year from 2003 to 2006 such as the 2nd place of The Top 50 out of 3,500 Thai Restaurants in the U.S.A. and Best of the Best in Central Florida 2006 as published in Orlando Leisure.

e

d

b

a

a/ Award-winning (2003) Pad Thai Awarded at Thai Food Festival in Florida, sponsored by Prime Minister of Thailand, held every year. Made with Rick’s original sauce. Tamarind sauce flavors it sweet and sour. Topping with crushed peanuts adds aromatic flavor. b/ Green Curry Lunch $7.95 Dinner $12.95 Even if you don’t normally enjoy spicy food, you will enjoy this meal. Mild with coconut milk. Veggies and chicken are seasoned well. Completely matches Jasmine rice. c/ Chicken Salad ‘Laab Gai’ $14.95 Wrap the salad and sticky rice with a lettuce leaf. Salad roll or Thai style Sushi?! Lettuce and rice mellow the sour and sharp taste of the salad.

Ayothaya Thai Cuisine 7555 W. Sand Lake Rd, Orlando, FL 32819 407.345.0040

Web site: www.ayothayathai.com Delivery: Office delivery. Order $150 minimum. Within 3 miles. Takeout: Yes Catering: Yes

d/ Tom Yum Seafood $5.95 Thai style hot & sour soup with a natural taste. e/ Baked Taro Custard $5.00 Thick texture. Mildly sweetened. Topped with fried sliced garlic. Unique taste. Healthy dessert. Take a bite with sweet sticky rice. f/ Spice Tray (Right: Ground peanuts Left: Chili paste Front: Chili powder Back: Jalapenos) Add some of these seasonings for your own taste. Add some of these seasonings for your own taste.

f

c


25

Magazine Online at www.asiatrendmagazine.com

SUN STAR

DVD & CD KINGDOM (Florida Branch)

日星影音城 ( 佛 州 分 店 )

Chinese, Japanese, Korean & Vietnamese

Asian Imported DVD, Karaoke, CD “Adult Movie” section

G R A N D O P E N IN G SPECIAL FREE DVD Pla

ye (Multi-Region r ) with a $190 DVD/CD purchase

5104 W. Colonial Dr. Orlando, FL 32808

(next to 1st oriental Supermarket)

407-294-1088

Complete Solution for your online printing Business Cards•Postcards•Flyers Brochures•Posters•Door Hangers

1,000 5,000 5,000

Full Color

Full Color

Full Color

Full Color on both sides & printed on high quality 12pt. stock with UV Glossy Finish

Full Color on both sides & printed on high quality 12pt. stock with UV Glossy Finish

Full Color on both sides & printed on high quality 12pt. stock with UV Glossy Finish

Business Cards Business Cards 4”X6” Postcards

$69.95

$89.95

$179.95

Best Price in Town. Price is for printing cost only. Typesetting, Design, Shipping and Sales Tax are extra. Prices are subject to change without notice.

Specializing in Creative & Graphic Design

407.666.5611

fax: 407.898.4445

saigonprints@yahoo.com

At the AAA National Office, located just north of Orlando, Florida, in the Heathrow International Business Center, your path to tomorrow is wide open. Exciting experiences and career milestones appear on the landscape, with horizons full of promise and opportunities.

• Accounting

Our organization supports over 48 million members across 1,100 AAA club offices, extending the best in automotive, travel, insurance, and financial products and value-added services. Come explore the opportunities as we move ahead with more than 100 years of service behind us.

• Human Resources

We hire experienced, self-motivated, success-minded professionals who want to make important individual and team contributions within a flexible, casual, and open workplace. So think of us as your vehicle to a unique career journey leading to family-friendly benefits, real growth potential, and a future driven by you!

• Automotive • Cartography • Corporate Affairs • Financial Services • Geographic Information Systems (GIS) • Information Technology • Marketing • Public Affairs • Publishing • Strategy & Planning • Travel Information • Travel Services & More

Visit Us Online @

www.aaa.com/jobs How did you hear about us? Let us know!

TAKE YOURSELF PLACES EOE

Production Services/C 98069-OR AAAXXX 4” x 10.75” Bethany A 8.29.05 nk 8.30.05 nk


Anniversary Special

26

1st Anniversary Special Section, See what people are saying about Asia Trend Magazine

 Continued from Pg11 Asia trend magazin e can easily catch ou r eyes because of tha t colorful and atrac tive cover page. Th e magazine itself makes me enjoy reading ver y much because they always pick the articl es that I want to know about. I also like the fact that this magazine is representing all Asian countries. I think it’s great!

Chiaki Yasukawa,

Orlando Ballet Professio

nal Dancer

ia “I like to read As an is it use trend beca rn excellent tool to lea lcu ian As about the the as ll we as e, tur pevents that are ha ian As the in g nin pe community in Florida.” school teacher e Cheung, elementary

Anniversary Issue Congratulations to the of 1 year Anniversary an As e. zin ga ma your avid reader, I can see e how your magazin y improved with an s ay alw th wi , ue iss new . new exciting topics s Ad th wi ion dit ad Your mpa Area is great. My Ta the in es ess sin bu k of pic to r ge ea s ay are alw self and all my friends nth. ur magazine every mo yo if ue iss w ne a up vepro im d an s ces ous suc Wishing you continu e. zin ga ments with your ma Trend Magazine JOHN+, reader of Asia

L.

Dear Shally and Gary, I am very happy for yo u, I bet you are proud of your endurance, right?

Hazel Sun,

Remax 200

Celin

Photo Magic PRO LAB & STUDIO, INC.

SUNRISE

L E N D I N G

Becky Szymanski

President / Licensed Principal Broker

Providing the Best Commercial & Residential Financing Solutions for you!

15+ Years Experience 4 Monthly Payment Choices Low Minimum Payments Generate High cash Flow Commercial & Residential Financial Solutions Te l : 407-251-6883 Fax: 407-386-6627 sunriselending@att.net 4700 Millenia Blvd., Suite 175 Orlando, FL 32839

www.sunriselending.web-loans.com

Full Digital Services

•One hour Photo •Enlargement up to 40X60 •Slide, Black & White, Digital •Photo Restoration and Retouch •Wedding Photography & Video •Special Occasion Studio on Premises

(Proof in One Hour)

•Videos Duplicated - DVD Services •Home movie transfer to DVD, VHS •Album & Frames •Passport & Immigration Photos for All Countries •All Kinds of Personalized Photo Image

3804 E. Colonial Dr, Orlando FL 32803

407-896-3747

Email: photomagic3804@bellsouth.net www.photomagiclab.com

Congratulations on a wonderfully suc cessful year! Through your efforts, the local Central Florid a community now has a better understandin g of the Asian America n culture and the various trends affecting entertainment, econo mics, cuisine, fasion, and much more for our fut ure. Asia Trend Magazin e ha lens that enables rea s provided the unique ders to peek into the diverse and dynamic wo rld of Asia and hopeful ly take a little with them along the way. I appla ud the magazine, its ed itors continuing to strive for and contributors for exc tively portray the Asian ellence and to posiAmerican in a realistic light. It is rare to find a magazine or a gro up of people who care so passionately abou t the community and that sets an example for the rest of us to continu e to the best for the maga build always. I hope zine and wish for mu ch success and prosperit y for the future and ma ny years to come!! Asia Trend is the BEST ! Ricky Ly, Student Go ver Senator Chair, Asian Pac nment Association, ific University of Central Flo American Coalition rida


Magazine Online at www.asiatrendmagazine.com

“2nd Annual Asian Pacific Student Assembly welcomes students to college life at UCF”

O

COMMUNITY LINKS

27

►Winfield Huang, Hoang Nguyen, and Josh Alicea perform the story of the Rice Cake Banh Trung for VASA

rlando, FL - Over 400 students packed the Cape Florida ballroom in the UCF Student Union last Friday August 25th 2006 to participate in the 2nd Annual Asian Pacific American Student Assembly. The program, started last year by students who wanted to spark change and better student life at UCF, is jointly sponsored by the Asian Pacific American Coalition, Asian Student Association, Filipino Student Association, Vietnamese American Student Association, Delta Phi Lambda Sorority, and a group of Asian American men. The assembly is the first collaboration event of the school year for the associations in a sign of solidarity and unity as a community. Over half the room was freshmen that evening, new students to UCF and new to college life. The program was designed to welcome the new students and to help introduce them to the networks and resources available to them as Asian Americans at UCF. In 2001, the UCF Office of Diversity Initiatives released a study on minority and ethnic students and discovered that Asian Americans were the least satisfied with their college experiences out of any racial group including White, Hispanic, and African American students. Problems such as lack of cultural programming at the university, lack of understanding by professors, and lack of

resources were cited as issues. Additional studies have shown that depression and suicide rates are unusually higher in Asian American students than other groups. In order to help alleviate this problem, students came up with the Asian Pacific American Student Assembly as a solution. “I think I enjoyed the skits and the performances the most. A lot of times we go through school and don’t see any culture represented in the curriculum. By joining an organization, we can develop and further our knowledge and awareness of Asian American culture.” stated Christina Ly, president of the Vietnamese American Student Association (VASA) at UCF. Xi Guo, electrical engineering major and treasurer of the Asian Pacific American Coalition agreed. “In order to understand ourselves and who we are and where we are going in life, we must learn about our past and our unique and rich cultural heritage. It is crucial in college time to develop this sense of identity and purpose and to look inside ourselves and see what truly lies in our character.”

◄UCF Filipino Student Association showcases traditional Filipino dances Tinikling and Maglatik

▲Judy Liu,Theresa Mai, Cecilia Mai, Krystle Nguyen, Christina Nguyen, and Victor Ma pose for the party picture

In addition to performances, the Student Body President Mark White spoke on the importance of leadership development for college students and why it is important to get involved with the community. It was an exciting night which ended with delicious and generous donation from China Garden Restaurant located near UCF on the corner of University Blvd and Semoran Blvd. “The food was awesome and amazing! Thanks China Garden!” exclaimed Kim Tran, member of Four Seasons dance group and vice president of VASA. A group of Asian American men showcased a humourous video concerning why we should be “Fearless” like Jet Li, in facing every day situations such as Asian stereotypes, acts of righteousness, the importance of studying hard for academics, and friendship at UCF. The Filipino Student Association performed three dances both modern and traditional, the Vietnamese American Student Association performed a skit on the creation of Banh Trung the rice cake, the Asian Student Association performed a skit concerning how to defeat haters by use of matrix-style kung fu, and the Delta Phi Lambda sorority stepped and strolled, a sign of unity and sisterhood. After the event, several members socialized and met and discussed their futures to the beat of dance music in the Orlando community. The next event is the APAC Bonfire and Community Potluck on September 8th at UCF Lake Claire. Everyone is welcome for a night of fun, games, and roasted marshmallows by the fire. See you there!  By Ricky Ly ◄A Group of Asian American Men at UCF dedicated to change the community


28

ASIA MOVIE

Magazine Online at www.asiatrendmagazine.com

“Crazy Stone” made the Chinese crazy for it

A Chinese film is giving Hollywood movies Mission Impossible III and Superman Returns a good run at the box office. The Chinese are going crazy for Crazy Stone. Crazy Stone is a humorous story about stealing and protection of a rare piece of emerald. The storyline is that a precious stone is found in a small handiwork factory on the verge of bankruptcy. The stone gets displayed at an exhibit before it gets auctioned off. Both local and international thieves are drawn to the treasure. They have to avoid the traps set out by the factory’s security chief, not to mention fighting amongst themselves over the stone. Crazy Stone cost less than 5 million yuan, or about 600 thousand US dollars to make. It’s earned over four times that amount in less than a month. It’s become an instant box office smash, surpassing other mainland films, and posing a serious challenge to other Hollywood blockbusters showing at the same time. I spoke to some moviegoers about this low-budget film. “It’s good. It’s humorous and interesting really. It’s beyond my expectations.” “’Crazy stone’ is a novelty. The director’s way of telling the story and expressing his ideas is interesting and funny. I watched it twice and recommended my friends to watch it.”

Shall We Dance? Before Richard Gere and Jennifer Lopez ever put on their dancing shoes, there was the original Shall We Dance?, the winning Japanese comedy that inspired the American remake! On the surface, Sugiyama Shohei (Yakusho Koji) seems to have it all: a supportive wife and a child, a nice house, and a well-paying job. But for some reason, that certain “something” is missing from Sugiyama’s life. On his evening commute home, Sugiyama notices a beautiful woman staring out the window of a dance studio. One fateful night, he decides to get off the train

Some fans also like the movie because it reflects the distinct Chinese culture. It also includes some rich Chinese dialects. Many of the actors speak in the Chongqing dialect because the movie is set in the southwestern municipality. There is also a mixture of northeastern accents and Cantonese. This is one of the drawing points for many audience members. Director of this movie, Ning Hao, is a new face in the film circle. The young talent says he wanted to make a good entertaining film with a good plot that will do well at the box office. “I think film industry should stand on its own, instead of relying on government support or other industries. Otherwise, it will never attain real development. Then there will be no hope of development not only for China’s commercial film, but also art films. So what we are thinking right now is how

CRAZY STONE poster

A Chinese film “Crazy Stone” is giving Hollywood movies Mission Impossible III and Superman Returns a good run at the box office. The Chinese are going crazy for Crazy Stone.

to make films more marketable. If you cannot even support yourself, feed yourself, how can you make good films?” But nonetheless, the formula of “Crazy Stone” worked in the Chinese market, although it still needs testing in other world markets. As actor Guo Tao says, Crazy Stone is the most entertaining thing this Summer, second only to French soccer star Zinedine Zidane head-butting an Italian player during the World Cup finals.  By Arthur Tsui

◄Andy Lau (Hong Kong Actor) invented the film ‘Crazy Stone’

and seek this mystery woman out, a decision which would soon plunge him headlong into the competitive world of ballroom dancing! Ashamed of his hobby, Sugiyama keeps his dance lessons a secret from his wife, who becomes suspicious enough to hire a private eye to investigate her husband...with comic results! Among the ragtag group of misfits Sugiyama meets at the dance studio, the standout would have to be his coworker Aoki (Takenaka Naoto in a scene-stealing performance), who - through the power of dance - transforms himself from a nerdy office worker into a hilariously over-the-top (and poorly-wigged) “Latin Lover.” What started out as a lark soon becomes a passion for Sugiyama as he slowly begins to fall in love...with the art of dance. With its uplifting

message and irreverent sense of humor, Masayuki Suo’s Shall We Dance? is a feel-good motion picture you just can’t miss!  By Arthur Tsui


29

Magazine Online at www.asiatrendmagazine.com

Joe Laurenza

Licensed Independent Agent

Email: joelaurenza@earthlink.net 2254 Aloma Aveune Winter Park, FL 32792 Phone: 407-629-2011 Fax: 407-629-5445

SPACE FOR RENT This space is available as low as

$60/month Call 407-808-0497 to reserve your space

www.asiatrendmagazine.com

1155 West S.R. 434, Suite 123 Longwood, FL 32750 Phone: 407-265-2011 Fax: 407-265-2022


30

For more opportunities connect at www.tdctrade.com

China’s Explosive Growth Continues

S

ome say you could have too much of a good thing and some asses the same about the Chinese economy. On July 18, China’s National Bureau of Statistics reported their economy grew 10.9 percent for the first half of the year. Fixed assets investments increased 29.8 percent and construction shot up 22.2 percent. June’s monthly trade surplus accounted for $14.5 billion. China’s foreign reserves total more than $941 billion making them the world’s largest holders of reserves. Many economists prognosticate China’s economic growth will not slow down. Fan Jianping, deputy director of economic prediction department of the state information center, told reporters, “For the first half of the year, the characteristics of economic performance can be summarized in two phases: full speed growth, increasing month by month.” His figures don’t lie. For 2006, first quarter growth was 10.3 percent but grew 11.3 percent in the second quarter. But, inflation hasn’t put a damper on this robust economy. Stephen Green, economist at Standard Chartered Bank, remarked, “Maybe this is a new economy…Maybe China can grow fast without inflation.” Many Chinese officials appreciate the fast economic growth which reduces poverty levels; pays for governmental reforms, and creates millions of jobs for laid-off workers, migrant laborers and new university graduates. But other Chinese officials expressed concern that danger lurks ahead. Fan Jianping explained, “The illusion of bubbling demand resulting from over-relaxed monetary liquidity is expanding. Consumption factor continues to be marginalized. This growing pattern in the short term, can be sustain ably maintained, but will bring about problems in the long run.” Yuan Gangming, institute of economic research fellow Chinese academy of Social Sciences, worries, “Except for the monetary credit, all other various indicators increased in the second quarter by exceeding the security margin. In terms of these figures, the economy

 By Tom Pauken II Associate Editor / Columnist

may have overheated.” Economic fundamentals describe China’s overheated market. These problems are; 1. production oversupply in about two to three years, 2. low efficiency and low level enterprises won’t last – will weaken macro-economic efficiency, 3. delay in improving in China’s economic growth pattern. Chinese exporters fear reprisals by the U.S. and EU governments. The manufacturing industry in the U.S. and EU suffered from trade deficits with China. They’re clamoring for China to resolve the disparity by increasing the value of the Chinese Yuan currency. When the Yuan appreciates Chinese exports get more expensive while imports are cheaper. Nonetheless, China has taken measures to reduce trade disputes. July 12, 2005, they revalued their Yuan by scrapping its decade long peg to the dollar and setting it free to float with managed bands against a basket of currencies. At the time the Yuan was trading at 8.11 per dollar but as of July 21, its 7.985 per dollar. Global investment companies believe revaluing the Yuan should not be the greatest concern for China. Andy Xie, analyst at Morgan Stanley in Hong Kong, said, “This is out of control…The bottom line is lending is crazy even after repeated warnings from the government.” If any factor could lead to a financial collapse of their economy it would be over lending activities. Banks make money from interest accrued from loans but lose money if customers don’t pay back the principle. These would be defaults and if too many occur banks might go bankrupt which causes a chain reaction. Most world-wide economic depressions were caused by a banking crisis. China is taking small steps to prevent this disaster. July 21, China’s Central Bank said it would raise bank’s reserve requirements by half a percentage point to 8.5 percent effective Aug. 15 to strengthen liquidity management and slow excessive credit. Last April they raised bank lending rates from 5.58 percent to 5.85 percent.

The big question for every business person is: “will the U.S. economy go into a tailspin?”

No one has the answer, of course. Unfortunately, no business person worth his of her salt can count on the government – national or local – to tell the truth and that includes high-ranking officials in the Department of the Treasury or the Department of Commerce. Even the Federal Reserve, which most of the time is clear and honest about its projections, is fudging the figures. The reason is simple: its election time. What we can depend on are the numbers and projections made by industry associations and private research firms. The entities are pointing to serious problems ahead and more serious problems if a sudden jolt hits

the economy. The general consensus is that the economy will be weakening, lead by a slump in real estate. The fact that fewer people are rushing to buy real estate is only a small element of the housing slump. Of far greater impact is the decline on real estate construction. It affects the use of raw materials and the hiring of workers. The declines here may be gradual and they will be longer-term and sustaining. It is this scenario every business person needs to watch because there is a risk for it to have an impact on everything we do. Since housing was the driving force be-

 By Paul Lengemann

hind the economy for the past five years, housing will be the lead force pushing the economy into recession. With luck this recession will be modest as interest rates are kept from rising too much from here on. On the positive side, the slow-down of general economic demand will push energy prices lower. That force should help minimize economic contraction. However, if the political forces at work now bring about another oil shock, the outlook can become very unpleasant. What does all this mean? Be prepared for tough times ahead and hope for the best.


Magazine Online at www.asiatrendmagazine.com

ASIA BUSINESS

31

China’s mobile-phone user base rose to 431.80 million at end of July

T

here were 431.80 million subscribers of mobile communication services in China, as of the end of last month, increasing by 5.43 million from a month earlier and accounting for 32.7% of the country’s population at that time, according to statistics published on August 23 by China’s Ministry of Information Industry (MII) on its Chinese-language website. Also at the end of July, there were 366.60 million subscribers of fixed telecommunication networks in China, translating into a user density of 28.0 %. Last month, mobile-phone subscribers in China sent 35.54 billion short messages, averaging 2.67 short messages per phone number a day. Source: MII China’s Internet-access user base Internet-access mode

Number of subscribers at end of July 2006

Dial-up (narrow band)

30.14 million

Dedicated lines

66,391

Broadband

46.38 million (of which 33.31 million used xDSL)

More than 160 billion mobile text messages being transfered so far in China  Tim Wang

A

new statistics from Xinhua.net indicates in the past 8 months, there have been over 190.6 billion text messages being transferred over the Chinese mobile SMS! Chinese mobile communication companies charge 0.1 yuan (1.5 cents in CAD) per message, this means there has been over 19 billion yuan (2.8 billion dollars in CAD) in profit being made on short messages alone! According to this number, the total amount of messages using Mobile SMS will easily proceed last year’s record (220 billion messages). There are currently 3700 million mobile phone users, approximately 28 phones every 100 Chinese.

For more opportunities connect at www.tdctrade.com Source: www.tdctrade.com

2006 Oct Trade Show Highlights in Asia Events

Date

Venue

Highlight

China Sourcing Fair: Electronics and Components

Oct 11 - 14

Hong Kong - AsiaWorldExpo

Electronics Components, Electronics, Computer Products, Telecom Products Tel: (852) -8199-7308

GlobalTRONICS 2006

Oct 10 - 13

Suntec Singapore International Convention Centre

Passive and active components, test and measurement, metal stamped parts, optoelectronics, EDA Tel: (65) -6780-4621

Hong Kong Electronics Fair Autumn

Oct 13 - 16

Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre

Audio visual products, digital imaging, electronic accessories, electronics manufacturing services, electronic parts, components and production technology Tel: (852) -2311 8216

Canton Fair (Phase I)

Oct 15 - 20

CECF Pazhou and Liu Hua Complexes, Guangzhou

CECF Pazhou and Liu Hua Complexes, Guangzhou Industrial products, textiles and garments, foodstuff and medicines Tel: (86) 20-2608-8888

Shanghai Toy Expo

Oct 18 - 20

Shanghai Mart

Mechanical toys, electronic toys, toy figures, plush toys, Christmas tree decorations, festive articles & decorations, model construction, creative design & games, outdoor toys & sports articles Tel: (49) 911-998-1350

Hong Kong International Toys & Gifts Show

Oct 20 - 23

Hong Kong Convention & Exhibition Centre

Toys, Gifts, Premium and Household Products Tel: (852) -2311 8216

Giftionery Taipei

Oct 24 - 26

Taipei World Trade Center

General giftware, souvenirs, porcelain & glassware, tableware & kitchenware, stationery, art supplies, seasonal gifts, premium & incentive items, electronic novelties, handicrafts, school & office supplies Tel: (886) 2-2725-5200


32

This article is brought to you by TurCon Travel Group

Shopping in

London

Summer may be over and most children are back in school. But that does not mean it is not a good time to travel. In fact it is a great time to travel, especially overseas. The big crowds are gone and one can visit the popular tourist destinations without being hassled. One of the great places to go at this time of year is England and Scotland. The weather is still acceptable, albeit cool. Especially Scotland can be quite chilly. But then again Scotland is never warm. A sweater and a raincoat are definitely a must as part of the travel gear and so is pair of sturdy shoes. For those who want to visit England and Scotland, there is plenty to see and do. The shopping is fabulous and the sight seeing is grandiose. On a seven-day trip to the British Isles you can have a thorough tour of London, including the major sights, such as Parliament, Buckingham Palace, the Mall, Trafalgar Square, the British Museum, the National Museum, the Victoria and Albert Museum. You will have to choose what you want to see because it will be impossible to fill everything into that space of time. Food is not one of the main attractions of London, unless you want to spend hugesums of money. It is often best to dine in the hotel you are staying at. London, however, has a decent China Town with plenty good small restaurants, all of them reasonably priced. Italian restaurants also are to be recommended. The big thing about London is shopping. Here are some suggestions: Bond Street

New Bond Street boasts one of the biggest and best concentrations of designer shops in the world, including Donna Karan, Prada, Louis Vuitton, Chanel, Nicole Fahri, Armani, Versace and Ralph Lauren. Quintessentially English style can be found at Mulberry and Burberry’s new flagship store. Bond Street also plays host to Sotheby’s auction house; a number of antique stores and markets have also popped up in the area. If it’s diamonds and costly baubles you’re after, Cartier, Tiffany and Asprey & Garrard are among the jewelers dwelling on this exclusive stretch. For fashion, the King’s Road offers High Street staples such as Jigsaw, French Con-

nection and Benetton. Vintage Levis can be found at American Classics, while Johnsons stocks 50s and 60s inspired velvet suits and bowling shirts. One-of a-kind boutiques and designer stores radiate sartorial elegance. Not to be missed are Ben de Lisi’s store in Sloane Square which offers the ultimate in evening wear, and his near neighbor Philip Treacy, who does the same for millinery . Lulu Guinness’s highly collectible and novel handbags can be purchased on Ellis Street, while Emma Hope designs exquisite women’s footwear for those in the know. Jo Malone on Sloane Street (and now in New York) stocks the latest in chic skincare and scents. Finally, for home improvements on the Fulham Road, check out the Conran Shop for modern lines and chic timeless pieces; Divertimenti where Italian and French kitchenware comes into its own; Jerry’s Home Store for a British take on American kitsch. Knightsbridge

Knightsbrige is one of the most unchanged and recognizable areas of central London, where shops and restaurants abound. Harrods is the most famous of the local stores, employing over 3000 staff in more than 300 departments. Harvey Nichols is an upscale alternative to Harrods, with three floors of designer wear, a huge beauty department and delectable delicacies on the fifth floor, all at extremely high prices. Oxford Street

With over 300 shops and 5 million square feet of retail space, Oxford Street lays claim to being London’s busiest street. The opening of Debenhams and Selfridges in 1909 marked the beginning of the street’s domi-

nance as a shopping mecca. Debenhams has a great line of designer garments at more affordable prices. Look for Jasper Conran and Lulu Guinness. From fabric to feather boas, children’s toys to cutlery, John Lewis stocks the lot. They have a ‘lowest price’ guarantee so you can buy with confidence and the simple lay out means you won’t spend hours searching for it either! Selfridges is the department store of Londoners. It boasts of a noteworthy selection of British and International designers, as well as plenty of great restaurants and cafes in which to chill out when you get a bit tired. Oxford Street also offers some of the best choices in terms of High Street fashion, if you can fight your way through the crowds. You’ll find it’s worth the effort. The stylish Spanish favorites Zara and Mango, as well as Topshop’s flagship store (also soon to have a New York store) are represented here. Familiar faces, such as Benetton, French Connection and H&M complete the brilliant assortment. There are many more interesting addresses such as Portobello Road and Notting Hill. I recommend a guided tour of sights and shopping for seven days to London, the south of England (with a visit to Stonehenge and Bath) and a trip to Shakespeare’s Stratford-on-Avon. An all inclusive guided tour can be had for less than $2,000 (without air fare). Contact me at 407-620-6563 for more details.  By Paul Lengemann


33

Magazine Online at www.asiatrendmagazine.com

國語專線: 407-342-5252 粵語專線: 407-808-0497

E-Commerce

– Complete Solution for your online business

w w w. i n t e l l i e a g l e . c o m

• Restaurant Online Order Network, as low as $19.98/month • E-Commerce Website Development—Selling online, Shipping everywhere • Full Service Website Design in English, Chinese, Japanese, or Vietnamese • Information System Design

Call us now at 407-342-5252 for a Free Estimate or email us at marketing@intellieagle.com

GetThetheName houseYou you’veTrust always dreamed of….. Whether you’re buying or selling, our Real Estate Agents will be by your side from beginning to end protecting your interests.

資深地產代理 貸款利息最低 擁有專業知識 精通中越英語

Elli Phuong Nguyen Broker/Realtor

138 E. Colonial Dr. Orlando, FL 32801 Tel: 407-447-SALE (7253) Cell: 407-733-ELLI (3554) Toll Free 1-866-377-7253 Fax: 407-839-3664 Email: c21capitalrealty@cfl.rr.com

www.c21capitalrealty.com


34

Magazine Online at www.asiatrendmagazine.com

ASIA TOYS

Greatest Hobby — Collecting Tin Toys Besides from collecting Comics, Action Figure, taking photos and designing... I also like collecting tin toys. Tin toy collection became my obsession after buying a NASA space wind-up toy from a flea market in Hong Kong for $1.5. This toy now costs more than $300 on ebay! I wasn’t born in an era where tin toys were popular and largely manufactured, but I like the nostalgic/retro look and the feel of tin. Nowadays, reproductions of vintage tin toys are mainly manufactured in China and Japan.

Gary Lau—Toys & Comics collector

Tin Toy History

The word,”Buriki”, which means tin plate in Japanese has originally derived from Dutch, “blic”, meaning shining plate. Until Mid 1870’s, most of the imported tin plates were used for the production of oil can. However, increasing number of imported tin plate toys from Germany brought about Japan’s entry into the tin plate toy business. At the time, while German craftsman specialized in highly artistic ornamental toys that include trains and boats, Japanese crafted conventional tin plate toys such as rattles, a toy Jinrikisha (a rick shaw) and so on. Initially, toy business in Japan was sluggish. However, following trhe Sino-Japanese war of 1894, the business started picking up. In the meantime, introduction of printing machines for the tin plate, and technology of clockwork from Germany accelerated Japan’s tin toy industry. Eventually Japan became the tin toy-producing center, leaving behind Germany which was totally devasted by the First World War. However, things didn’t work out smoothly for Japanese toy industry as people expected. The political uncertainty since 1938 had a devastating effect on the tin toy business. Many toy manufactures closed down. The Second World War broke out and effected the industry. Actually 1947 was the year when

luck finally turned for Japan’s favor. Under the American occupation, tin plate toy industry was granted a right to resume its operation and to export. In 1948, friction toys such as trains, fire engine trucks and automobiles emerged. Around 1955, electronic toys took over friction and wind-up toys. In the year of 1963, about 60% of the exported toys in Japan were made out of tin plate. However, this trend remained only until later half of 1960. The tin plate toys had gradually disappeared as plastic and superalloy toys emerged. Message

The tin plate toys are always happy reminder of that old favorite. I fell in love with the tin plate toys probably because I was chamed by the nostalgic atmosphere that these toys possess. Along with this, it is interesting to note that these toys play an important role to backtrack the history. The Japanese tin plate toys first appeared in the Meiji and Taisho era and gradually the toys had transformed. Althrough the majority of the toys were crafted, they were produced in large quantities. Shortly after 1965, tin plate toys started disappearing from the market, giving way to plastic toys. The crafted tin plate toys demonstrate piece of Japanese history and customs of the past.  By Gary Lau

▲ DAISHIN KOGYO 1960’s Battery operated. The actual product of NASA was the model for this 1960’s toy. The door opens and a stairway appears, followed by the astronaut.

Teruhisa Kitahara = Tin Toys Teruhisa Kitahara is a famous tin toy collector that is very active in sharing his collection and knowledge to the public.

Me at Kitahara’s Tin Toy Museum, Yokohama This is one of the many tin toy museums/shops Teruhisa Kitahara maintains in Japan.


Magazine Online at www.asiatrendmagazine.com

ASIA TREND

35

1

St 東 方 超 級 市 場 ORIENTAL SUPERMARKET

Live Seafood, 42,000 sq ft shopping supermarket. 1800 parking lot Chinese Medicine Hong Kong Style B.B.Q. Fresh Bakery, Restaurant Wholesale Supply

W Colonial Dr.

HWY 50

Kirkman Rd.

HWY 408

inter Old W

n Rd

Garde

Pine Hills Rd.

1st Oriental Supermarket

 N

OPEN 7 days 8:30AM to 9PM

接受各種信用卡、糧食券、EBT Card

5132 West Colonial Dr., Orlando, FL 32808

我們提供西聯 (Western Union)匯款服務

(407)292-3668 Fax: (407)293-9600 Tel:

www.firstorientalmarket.com

■ Noodle ■ Rice

Soup

Vermicelli

■ Vermicelli

Wrappers w/Rice Paper

■ Broken

(next to 1st Oriental Supermarket)

Mon-Thu: 9AM-9PM Fri-Sun: 9AM-10PM

Rice

The Best Thai Restaurant in Town

Tradition Vietnamese style:

[ Catering for all Occasions ] 7555 West Sand Lake Rd. Orlando, FL 32819 Tel: 407-345-0040 Fax: 407-345-0495

5100 W. Colonial Drive, Orlando, FL 32808

407-253-7013 407-253-7012

www.ayothayathai.com


36

Life in Style  By Suzy Guttler

Style File

CoCo LEE

B

李 美 林

orn in Hong Kong on January 17, 1976, Coco Lee moved with her mother and sisters to California at age ten, where she went through school while following her older sisters in entering several local singing contests. CoCo has often spoken of how close she is to her mother. Coco’s love for music and performing enticed her to enter in a TVB (a Hong Kong television station) singing contest, which landed her a contract with Capital Artists, recording four studio albums with them in 1994-95. Her career didn’t start soaring until a couple years later when she signed with Sony Music. It was at this time when her music and talent started to create a huge following in Taiwan and Southeast Asia.

Magazine Online at www.asiatrendmagazine.com

Kawaii These Japanese characters harness the super power of… cuteness.

Kawaii isn’t merely the Japanese word for cute. As Ken Belson and Brian Bremner point out in their book, Hello Kitty: The Remarkable Story of Sanrio and the Billion Dollar Feline Phenomenon, kawaii is a full-fledged cultural movement. In the early 1970’s, teenage girls were confounding their teachers with highly stylized handwriting embellished with cute characters. Fueling kawaii’s initial influence was the Sanrio Company’s character, Hello Kitty. Whether its Pichonkun charms dangling from cell phones or up-and-coming robots like eMuu, it’s easy to see why Belson and Bremner say kawaii is “the most widely used, or overused, word in modern Japanese.” Consider Pichon-kun, a water droplet that debuted in the spring of 2000-the mascot helped Daikin Industries improve its air conditioner sales and boosted the ad’s jingle onto the music charts. Kawaii is by no means confined to Japan - think Murakami’s sculptures that graced Manhattan last summer or Beijing’s 2008 Olympic mascots, The Five Friendlies. Massachusettsbased consumer electronics toy studio Mimoco recently introduced a line of cute flash drives. Kawaii has now become a worldwide phenomenon.

At the onset of the year 2000 and at the age of only 24, Coco already was one of the world’s biggest pop sensations, with sales topping nearly 7 million albums in Asia alone. It only seemed natural when the much anticipated English-language album, Just No Other Way, debuted world-wide on February 29, 2000, making her the first Chinese singer to go international. As of 2006, both CoCo’s English albums have sold modestly and often receive rave reviews by customers and fans. Her hit single, “Do You Want My Love”, remains a popular song at Discoteques and various internet radio stations. Her most recent English singles are No Doubt and Cool. Both singles have become instant hits in Hong Kong and Taiwan.

Pichon-Kun

Hello Kitty was “born” November 1, 1974


37

Magazine Online at www.asiatrendmagazine.com

PALETTE-ABLE It’s not always possible to lug around your entire makeup drawer (as much as we’d like to). This season’s handbags are huge, but even they have their limits. Keep it together with a charming makeup palette. It’s a clever way to put a little Picasso into your routine, with brushes and color for lips, cheeks, and eyes all in one paint palette. Here are a few that I absolutely love, and will go wherever you go!

Hard Candy Take Out Makeup Kit

Anastasia Beverly Hills All-in-One Palette

Cat Cosmetics Six Kitten Palette

Packaged in a Chinese takeout box, this makeup kit covers it all. Open wide for a built-in mirror and six Super Shine lip glosses. Then flip to find eight eye shadows, a classic black eye pencil, and black mascara. Finish your routine with two shades of concealer, a bronzer, and a blush. Chopsticks not included, but necessary applicators are ($25, hardcandy. com).

Eyebrow guru Anastasia preps you for beauty with her new all-in-one sleek compact. It has eight basic shades, available in warm or cool tones, for a flawless finish with a subtle hint of shimmer. Packed with vitamins C and E for antioxidant protection, the collection contains three eye shadows, lipstick, lip stain, lip gloss, blush, highlighter, and two professional brushes ($48, anastasia.net).

With an assortment of essentials right at your fingertips, this kit is just purrr-fect. The palette comes with four lip glosses, a blush, an eye shadow duo, and a shadow/liner duo. The eye and lip colors can be worn alone or mixed to suit your skin tone. What’s more, the colors are refillable. ($60, catcosmetics.com).

Editor’s Picks

Good Bye Shine! Asian skin tends to be just a little bit oilier than Caucasian skin. I love getting ready for evenings out, and glamming up for special occasions, but what’s really annoying is when the humidity hits in and your skin begins to feel and (even worse) look oily before you leave your house. And Florida’s 1,000,010% humidity doesn’t really help much either. Well here’s a way to shine free complexion - with Palladio Rice Paper Oil Blotting tissues. I tried it and absolutely love it! This powdery soft blotting paper is coated with rice powder, is all natural and works great for long lasting shine control. Available at Sally Stores. Got a cool beauty secret? Or a hip hair trick? Share it with Asia Trend !


38

Magazine Online at www.asiatrendmagazine.com

ASIA TREND

J a p a n

K e i c a r

Specializing in:

HOUSE OF PERORMANCE HOUSE OF PERORMANCE HOUSE OF PERORMANCE HOUSE OF PERORMANCE Make us your “ HOUSE One Stop Shop ” OF Tuner PERORMANCE Turbo Kits Superchargers Springs/Shocks Wheels/Tires Big Brake Kits Body Work and Paint And much more…

1702 W. Cass St. Tampa, FL

Dominic McGann

813-254-5050

LBeauty o-Ann Center Permanent Make Up Bridal Make Up Eyelash Extension Private Room for Nail Body Whitening Skin Care Plastic Surgery

by Florida Licensed Professionals

up on

FF Per ma nen $50 O F F E O y e 0 lash t Ma $5 Ex ke $15 OFF Fac tens ial i Our Services are provided

1809 E Colonial Dr, Suite 3 Orlando, FL 32803 Phone: 407-896-3749 or 321-961-7272

1

What is a K-Car? Japan is a modern industrial nation with almost zero natural resources. So wisely in 1949, the Japanese government started giving tax breaks to cars of certain size and ef2 ficiency. These cars became known as Kei Jidosha (Kei-Car, K-car), which is Japanese for “light vehicle”. According to regulations, K-Cars must be less than 3.4 metres long and 1.48 metres wide. This is shorter than a new Mini, and not as wide as a Toyota Echo hatchback. Their engines are also regulated to be less than 660cc with no more than 64 horsepower. By comparison, a Canadian Smartcar has 42 horsepower, a 1976 VW Bus- 32. The K-Car is very popular in Japan. The key to this popularity hasn’t been just the tax breaks; it’s the fuel economy. These cars have souped-up motorcycle engines with some of the most sophisticated turbo, superchargers, and dual overhead cams but they skimp at the pumps. Although the Kei-car regulations have changed over the years, Japanese manufacturers have had more than 50 years to learn how to get the most of every regulated square millimeter. Time to take advantage of it.

Can Americans buy a Japan import car? Some good news, some very bad news. The bad news. Most of these cars cannot be registered in the United States of America. Unless you can produce a letter from the manufacturer of the vehicle - or the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) crash tests the vehicle, it must be 25 years old or older to obtain a Vehicle Identification Number, which enables it to drive on the road. Laws are different in every state, and there maybe be some strange loophole in Iowa or something; but overall our cars are not welcome. Do some research in your own state, lobby the government, run for governor and change the law to 10 years. Imagine the gas savings at 56mpg! Maybe GM will decide to sell their small Wuling Sunshine vans in North America...Who wouldn’t want one?!


Magazine Online at www.asiatrendmagazine.com

3

Of course this just means that you can’t drive it on public roads. There are many ways to enjoy a Japanoid otherwise - buy an Acty Pick-up for the farm, the golf course, or hunting. The Honda Beat makes for a great track racer. Suzuki Works Turbo 4WD is the ultimate rally car. There’s a tour company in New Zealand that uses Mitsubishi Delicas to tour Middle Earth. As a beautiful collectors item, the Figaro could just be worshiped in a garage and carried to car shows. The Good news. Soon we’ll have some diesel vans that can and have been registered in the USA. They are great on highways and sip the diesel like we’re runnin’ out fast.

What about Right Hand Drive? You might think it’s a big deal here’s why it’s not: Many cars are so narrow you can drive on whatever side of the lane you want. Going to a drive-through is a slight hassle, but the left side window is easy to reach. Besides, just how often do you go to a drive-through? There are many benefits of being on the right side as well, like parking and pressing crosswalk buttons. 4

Are these Cars Safe?

Put that rag-top and rear window down, slip back into the white leather and experience your own retro-deco-domo Kesuke Miyagi bliss. Three point seatbelts for all passengers, fire resistant materials, and side door beams will help you not get creamed.

2/ Mitsubishi Minica Toppo

Seriously, just look at it. Put some mags on it, kit it up, go out and race Fieros or something. This car rules. Seats four.

Cho Thuê Xe Hỏi và Xe Tải — Rẽ Nhất Trong Vūng

全城至平貨車租賃

Cargo Van - Pick-Up Truck

Trucks w/10’ - 15’ - 20’ - 24’ - 26’ w/ Rampa & Lift-Gate Local Rental - Starting at

$19.95 + mileage

(407) 381-1055 7700 East Colonial Dr - Orlando/FL Open 7 Days

GET 20% OFF 20% off any car and truck rental on the first day rental at regular rates price

To make your reservation call

Text & Photos courtesy www.japanoid.com

Eric Clapton has one of these. A rock & roll legend with wealth beyond imagine went totally out of his way to aquire this. It’s a really cool car still. Only 20,000 of them were made - quite a collectors item.

39

www.go-bargain.com

Yes! In order to obtain a VIN all our cars go thorough Provincial Safety Inspections. Additionally, the Japanese government requires that they go through an inspection prior to export. Good enough for two governments - good enough for you? I’d rather be driving one of these cars than many cars on the road. Many of the cars come with air bags, side impact beams, disk brakes and of course super agilities.

1/ The Nissan Figaro

ASIA TREND

3/ The Nissan S-Cargo

Maybe the first car likely inspired by a joke, the S-Cargo is one of the strangest cars on Japanese roads. Quite narrow and rounded, we wonder if this car was designed to be used by even the most unskilled drivers. Designed by Pike but built by Nissan, the SCargo is considered a van with only two seats. But the great sunroof and the ?port window? option more than make up for it.

4/ The Nissan Pao

Also Designed by Pike Factory is the Nissan Pao. One of the slickest of cars this baby keeps everything simple and that’s very good. Talk about minimalism. Super unique style sutable for someone with similar character.

BARGAIN CAR & TRUCK RENTAL (407) 381-1055 www.go-bargain.com Expired: 10/30/06


40

CL ASSIFIEDS

Sheraton Suites Orlando Airport Revenue/ Reservations Supervisor- Great entry level opportunity for a Reservations Supervisor or someone looking for the next step. The right candidate would enjoy analyzing and strategically coordinating the revenue management process.

Accounts Receivable/Income Audit - Excellent opportunity for highly motivated and organized individual seeking a career in accounting. Front Desk Agent - Work at a beautifully appointed hotel with a friendly atmosphere. Send Resume to 7550 August National Dr, Orlando, FL 32822, Attention: Yadira Delgado, HR Director Income For Life Opportunity Learn how people worldwide are earning $1,000’s per month from their web site. Portia Pasigna says, “I love the business,” Philippines 17-Feb2006. To find out more, call 1-800693-6897 or Intl. call 1-760-602-3030. Watch our video: www.freedom.ws enter code: smiceo

Unique Home-based business expanding globally into the Asian Market and Communities worldwide. Great opportunities for college bound students looking to earn extra money. Earn money helping people save money and business gain more loyal customer base. Sign up FREE at www.gtsexpress.com/international.html

Server & Hostess China Garden Restaurant at Winter Park needs a full-time server and hostess. Candidate must be fluent in English and good to have experience in restaurant industry. Good manner and communication skills. Interested, please call Anne Tsoi at 407-671-2120. Sales Representative Global Media is looking for self-motivated individuals in Orlando, Tampa and St. Petersburg area to be the regional sales representa­tive. Interested, please send resume to info@globalmediafl.com World Ving Tsun Athletic Association Learn authentic Ving Tsun (Wing Chun) kung fu in Orlando. Lineage holder - 3rd generation Yip Man. 2603 E. South St. Orlando, FL. 32803 407-496-0113 VingTsun.cc

Place your classified ad here for $25/month (50 words maximum). Anything over that is charged 20 cents per word. Mail the check payable to Global Media LLC, with your classified ad wordings to the following address: PO Box 5352, Winter Park, FL 32793. Deadline: check and wordings must be received by the 1st of each month.

ASIAN ASSOCIATIONS Asian American Chamber of Commerce Contact Rina Brothers at 321-239-3525 or email rbrothers@bellsouth.net www.asianamericanchamber.org Asian American Heritage Council — “Together we accomplish more!” www.aahc-cfl.org

Asian American Women Association

Contact Becky Szymanski at beckymszy@yahoo.com ATAYAL Nurturing the spirit and culture of the indigenous tribes of Taiwan and providing economic and cultural development initiatives in the United States. Contact Tony Coolidge 321-206-8040. www.atayal.org Ch’an Buddhism Orlando Chapter www.ddmba.org Tel: (407) 538-6491 chihho2004@yahoo.com Chinese American Association of Central Florida (CAACF) 中佛州中美協會 www.orlandochinese.com

Chinese School of CAACF 中佛州中華學校 www.orlandochineseschool.org

Chinese School of Tomorrow 明曰中文學校 http://www.ocst.org

The Evergreen Club 長青社

2250 Principal Row, Orlando. Meets every Thursday. Email Janet Nguyen at janet35255@earthlink.net

Guang Ming Temple School 佛州光明寺光明學院

2250 Principal Row, Orlando, FL 32837 Tel: (407) 240-9009

Han Foundation

www.hanwaves.org

J.Club— Japan oriented organization

provides exposure to the unique culture and fascinating experiences of Japan Contact Terri Mitchell at teri_mitchell@hotmail.com

Organization of Chinese Americans – South Florida Chapter 美華協會 Winnie Tang PO Box 56-2124, Miami, FL 33256 305-753-8791

Orlando Chinese Professionals Association (OCPA) 奧蘭多中國專業人仕協會 www.ocpa-usa.org

Taiwanese Chamber of Commerce of Greater Orlando 大 奧 蘭 多 台 灣 商 會 Contact Paul Liau at 407-566-9478

UCF Asian Student Association www.ucfasa.org

UCF Vietnamese American Student Association http://vasa.ucf.edu vasa_ucf@hotmail.com

USF Vietnamese Student Association www.usfvsa.org

United Chinese Association of FL 佛州華人聯合協會

Johnson Ng, Executive Director P O Box 669086, Miami, FL 33166 305-345-8489 UCAF@bellsouth.net www.MiamiDragonBoat.com

Vietnamese Professionals Association (VPA) The mission is to lend a helping hand to both the Vietnamese youth that will follow us and to those who lead us here so many years ago. Contact Nhan T. Lee at 407.488.1225 or nlee@ntllaw.com

Wat Florida Dhammaram

2421 Old Vineland Rd. Kissimmee, FL 34746 407-397-9552 www.watflorida.org

World Ving Tsun Athletic Association 世界詠春拳會

Learn authentic Ving Tsun (Wing Chun) kung fu in Orlando. Lineage holder - 3rd generation Yip Man. 2603 E. South St. Orlando, FL. 32803 407-496-0113 VingTsun.cc


Magazine Online at www.asiatrendmagazine.com

We Need You!! Asia Trend Magazine is now available in Tampa and St. Petersburg.

COMMUNITY NEWS

41

Now available in Tampa and St. Petersburg

Pick up your issue at one of the following locations. Interested in distributing the magazine, please email us at info@asiatrendmagazine.com or call us at 407-808-0497.

Exotic Asian & Classical Chinese Cuisine Traditional & Innovative Sushi & Sashimi Authentic Dim Sum Daily


42

ASIA CULTURE

Public and Private Schools with Chinese language programs

Why Learn Chinese?

學 習 中 文 Traditional Chinese culture has an enormous influence

As the most enduring world civilization, China has a major international cultural presence, in literature and cuisine, in music and film, dance and art, religion and philosophy, drawing on its tremendous heritage to enrich our present. Business Advantages Most widely spoken language

C

hinese is the most widely spoken first language in the world. It is the national language of the more than 1.3 billion inhabitants of China and millions more ethnic Chinese around the world including Taiwan, Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand, Brunei and Vietnam. Chinese will top English as the most-used language on the Internet by 2007, according to forecasts by the World Intellectual Property Organization. Experience a different culture

Unlike most languages, Chinese has a unique ideographic writing system, which provides visual comprehensibility. The grammatical structure of Chinese is not only logical, but also pragmatic, related to the particular way of Chinese thinking. Knowledge of the written language opens up the culture of one of the world’s oldest civilizations.

The People’s Republic of China currently boasts the fastest growing economy in the world and is widely regarded as the potentially biggest global market in the twentyfirst century. Proficient speakers of Chinese will find jobs in various fields such as business, government, international relations, information technology, tourism, education, translation. Of all foreign languages at American universities and colleges, Chinese shows the highest proportional increase in enrollment. Couple Challenges

One of the problems is that few credentialed teachers are available in U.S. Department of Education is making plans to develop teaching partnerships with the Chinese Government. Besides, Chinese is definitely not an easy language to learn if you are not using it everyday. My advices are “start the learning as early as possible” and “make as many Chinese friends as you can.  By Shally Wong

Atlantic High School Palm Beach County 561-243-1500 Berkeley Preparatory School Tampa, FL - contact: Lisa Podbilski Coral Glades High School Broward County 754-322-1250 Evangelical Christian School Fort Myers, FL - contact: Rhonda Berg Lake Highland Preparatory School Orlando, FL - contact: Yinfang Wang Lawton Chiles Middle School Dade County 305-816-9248 Leadership Academy West Palm Beach County 561-227-1576 Data provided by Department of Education Weekend Chinese School organized by Local Organization

Central Florida The Chinese School of CAACF www.orlandochineseschool.org Chinese School of Tomorrow www.ocst.org West Florida Clearwater Chinese School 727-328-1625 Tampa Chinese School 813-949-7615 USF Chinese School 813-855-6820 South Florida Coral Springs Chinese Language School www.cscca.us Miami Chinese Language School 305-971-2618 or 305-740-7025 Boca Raton Chinese School 561-445-0608 or 561-883-0079 Photo taken at the Chinese School of CAACF at Orlando


Magazine Online at www.asiatrendmagazine.com

COMMINITY NEWS

43

Asian Pacific Islander Americans: GET OUT THE VOTE THIS FALL This fall, issues facing our great nation are up for debate and discussion. It is our responsibility and duty as American citizens to participate in this national discussion and to participate in the political process, thereby voicing ourselves in hopes of bettering our society. According to statistics, Asian Pacific Islander Americans are the least likely of any racial group in the United States to vote in elections. Why is this happening when so many of our community believe so strongly in the American dream? If we truly believe in the ideals of America, of freedom and democracy, we must participate 100 percent in American society and vote. From healthcare to education to social security to taxes to immigration, to local issues like more public parks and better public transportation, all of these are issues that we as a society must address. By voting for elected officials, we cast a vote not only for that person but also for the views that you wish that person will fight for, for you, your family and community and to keep that person accountable for their promises. If we do not participate in voting, and the elected official decides to act this way and that, we have no room to complain if we did not voice ourselves in the first place. There are various reasons given about why Asian Americans sometimes do not vote in elections. Some include language barrier, lack of understanding of issues, lack of outreach by politicians to the community among some. Also culturally, in some Asian countries there is a proverb that “the nail that sticks out, gets hammered down.” But as responsible citizens it is our duty to voice ourselves and vote. Asian Pacific Americans make up over 2 percent of the Florida population but do not make up even 1 percent of elected officials. There are 0 elected state officials in the state of Florida who are of Asian American descent. If we are to be accurately represented, if our country is truly made of by the people and for the people there would be equal representation in our government. Asian Americans are the fastest growing minority group in the United States, and as a community with growing social and political problems, it is increasingly important that Asian Americans play a more active role in American politics and government. Asians Americans

must actively participate in the political process or be left out of the conversation and forgotten. A lot of times, we forget about the midterm elections because the Presidential elections every four years are covered by the media a lot more. However, the way in which our nation votes in this year 2006 will ultimately affect the outcome of the 2008 Presidential elections. This fall 2006, hundreds of public offices are up for election, including the Governor of Florida, the mayor of Orange county, county commissioners, school board officials, and many more. These are the officials who directly affect your every day life the most. It is even more crucial for our community to vote this fall. Senator Mee Moua, the first Asian American senator in the state of Minnesota once said “When I speak, I must speak loudly and clearly, for when I speak, I speak for the thousands of people who are not heard every day.” We must voice ourselves now and speak up or else continue the trend of silence in our society. According to the Florida Supervisor of Elections Office, to register and vote, you must be 18 years of age, a citizen of the United States of America and a legal resident of Florida and of the county where you intend to vote. A person who is otherwise qualified may pre-register on or after that person’s 17th birthday and may vote in any election held on or after that person’s 18th birthday.

To register to vote, you must fill out a voter registration application. Voter registration applications are available at your local supervisor of elections’ office, the Division of Elections (also see our web site at http:// election.dos.state.fl.us/RegToVote/regform. shtml), driver’s license offices, state agencies that provide public assistance, state agencies that serve persons with disabilities, public libraries and many other public locations. Additionally, you will be offered the opportunity to apply to register to vote or change your voter registration when you obtain your driver’s license, when you apply for public assistance at state agencies, or when you apply for services at state agencies that serve persons with disabilities. To find our more about issues, visit the Orlando Sentinels Voter Guide Toolkit at http://www.vgt2004.org/a-orlandosentinel06/get-started.do or visit the Orange County Supervisor of Elections office at www.ocfelections.com Election date: Tuesday November 7th

2006 7am - 7pm

Registration Deadline: Tuesday Octo-

ber 10th 2006

Additional Resources:

Florida Voter Education Guide 2006 http://election.dos.state.fl.us/publications/ pdf/2006VoterGuide.pdf Florida Supervisor of Elections Office http://election.dos.state.fl.us APIA VOTE http://www.apiavote.org  By Ricky Ly


44 This information is brought to you by Orange County Health Department - Marketing Department

5 to 9 A Day for Better Health The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are making strides to further improve the health of Americans. We all know it, but it has become increasingly important that Americans add fruits and vegetables to their diet. Research shows that fruits and vegetables are powerful defenders against chronic ailments like cancer, high blood pressure and heart disease just to name a few. Fruits and vegetables are no longer considered a snack to be taken during the course of your day; rather they should be the foundation of your dailydiet. The initiative set forth by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the Produce for Better Health Foundation urges Americans to increase their consumption of fruits and vegetables between five to nine servings per day. The campaign is heavily

targeting men and African Americans because they are more prone to the above mentioned diseases. Men are two times more likely to die of lung cancer than women are. Also men are 1 ½ times more likely to die of cardiovascular disease than women are. More importantly, men in Florida are dying at faster rates, than the national average due to high blood pressure. To combat these startling numbers, it is suggested that men eat nine servings of fruits and vegetables a day for healthy living. Unfortunately, 96% of men have no idea that they should eat this much and those who do eat fruits, most only have 4 ½ servings per day. According to the National Cancer Institute, African Americans have a much higher risk of dying from almost all diet-related

illnesses, compared to their White counterparts. African Americans eat fewer fruits and vegetables than any other ethnic group. Studies indicate that more than two-thirds of Black women are overweight. For women, the NCI recommends that they eat seven servings of fruit and vegetables a day. Women’s daily lives tend to be very hectic. Just imagine adding seven servings of fruits and vegetables to it can do for their busy schedule. Healthy eating provides extra energy to get them through the day, and provide nutrients to fight off diet-forming diseases. The numbers sound daunting, but you maybe consuming close to five servings in your daily routine. In the morning, a banana constitutes one serving and ¾ cup of orange juice counts as another. Already you have eliminated two of the five servings. During the day, rather than reaching for a bag of your favorite chips you should reach for a medium-size apple, which counts as one serving.


LOCAL EVENTS AND ACTIVITIES

45

REGULAR

SPECIAL

Orlando Badminton Club— Every Wednesday (6:30-10pm), Friday (6:30-9pm) and Sunday(12:30-4pm) at Orlando Fitness & Racquet Club, 825 Courtland St (by Lee Rd and I-4). Contact Krishna Balwalli at 407-361-4735 or email kbalwalli@hotmail.com.

Network Orlando – Expand your Business Opportunities. More than 50 tabletop displays by members of the: African American Chamber of Commerce, Asian American Chamber of Commerce, Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, Orlando/Orange County Convention & Visitors Bureau and Orlando Regional Chamber of Commerce. September 28, 2006 (Thurs) 5:00 – 7:30 pm. Royal Pacific Resort at Universal Orlando - 6300 Hollywood Way, Orlando, FL 32819. Cost: Members: $15 Pre-registration, $20 walk-in, NonMembers: $20 Pre-registration, $25 walk-in. Fee includes hors d’oeuvres and non-alcoholic beverages. For additional information, please call the Orlando CVB Events Dept. at 407-363-5894.

Linedance with style— At Casselberry Senior Center (at Secret Lake Park, 200 N. Triplet Lake Dr., Casselberry 32707): Every Monday (for beginners) from 7:30~9:30pm; and Thursday (for more advanced), 7~9:30pm. $5 per person. At L. Claudia Allen Senior Center (1840 Mable Butler Ave., Orlando 32805): Every Friday (for beginners), 1:30~3:00pm. Donation accepted. Contact Ivan and Cecilia Mao at 407-222-8747 or mao.ivan@gmail.com.

Qi Gong Practice— Come and learn every Sunday at 10am Lake Eola in Orlando, FL. Located on the east side of Lake near the gazebo. Call Mark at 407-235-5828 for details. www.falundafa.org Ch’an Buddhism Meditation—Dharma Drum Mountain Buddhism Association (DDMBA), meet every 1st & 3rd Saturday 10:00am-12:30pm at Southeast Branch Library (On Hoffner & 436), 5575 S. Semoran Blvd., Orlando, FL 32822, FREE, meditation & book study. 407-538-6491, email: chihho2004@yahoo.com Local Table Tennis Club— meets every Tuesday and Thursday Nights, 6-10pm at Winter Park Christian Church, 760 N. Lakemont Drive. All levels of players are welcome. We play for fun, and also offer Professional coaching and a Robot for training. $4 per person. Please call Adam at 407854-6301 or www.owpttc.org. Monday evening Asian Social —get together and get it started, meets at diverse location 6pm on Monday, Contact Mi Hoshino at 407-947-2031. Tai Chi with “Madame Wu”—Every Wednesday from 5:30-6:30pm at the Osceola County Council on Aging, 1099 Shady Lane, (minutes from the Turnpike entrance in St. Cloud). $1 donation. For more information, contact Madame Wu at 407-738-7001 or O.C.C.A. at 407-846-8532

Tour of Asia Cultural Showcase – September 23, 2006 (Saturday) at Pegasus Grand Ballroom, UCF - organized by The Asian Student Association. They are seeking sponsorship. More details, please contact Sishi Deng at 321-217-0852 or asa.pre@gmail.com

Kuh 25 Years Concert for the benefit of the Ministry to the Poor (MttP) organization. Kuh 25 Years features Kuh Ledesma, Basil Valdez, Isabella and Martin Nievera with a full live band. September 30, 2006 (Sat) Lakeland Center’s Youkey Theater 6:00 pm. Ticket Price: $40, $60, $80 and $95. Ticket Hotline: 407-376-0382 and 407-443-7355. MttP supports thousands of people in the Philippines by providing free medicines and groceries. We are presently building an orphanage in Batangas City that will provide food and shelter to our less fortunate brothers and sisters in our native country . Mid Autumn Festival Celebration by Chinese American Association of Central Florida, October 7, 2006 (Sat) – 4pm to 8pm. 528 Huntington Ave Winter Park. Games, Foods and Entertainments. Free admission. For more details, please contact Shally Wong at 407-808-0497 or shallywong@asiatrendmagazine.com

World Ving Tsun Athletic Association 世 界 詠 春 拳 會 Learn authentic Ving Tsun (Wing Chun) Kung Fu in Orlando. Lineage holder - 3rd generation Yip Man. 2603 E. South St. Orlando, FL. 32803 407-496-0113 VingTsun.cc

Mid Autumn Moon Festival TET TRUNG THU at UCF, October 8, 2006 (Sun). UCF Student Union, Pegasus Grand Ballroom. Food served at 5:30pm . Doors open at 7pm. Come experience a festival 3000 years in the making! Featuring: Dragon dances, Vietnamese culture, martial arts, traditional and modern dance, and more! EVERYONE IS WELCOMED ! Contact: Christina Ly, President 2006-2007 of VASA at UCF at Everyonelovesvasa@gmail.com or visit web site http://vasa.ucf.edu.

International Film Night organized by International Film Society at Full Sail. — Showing two Films in a month at Full Sail, 3000 University Blvd., Auditorium FS3B-106. For more info and direction, please contact Aldo Basuki at 407-346-9678 or aldobasuki@gmail.com

4th Annual South Florida Dragon Boat Festival, presented by The United Chinese Association of Florida. October 14 & 15, 2006 (Sat & Sun) 9 am - 6 pm. Haulover Park & Marina - 10800 Collins Ave, Miami Beach, FL 33154. A 2000-year-old traditional sport event comes alive in a spectacular and exciting Dragon Boat Racing.

SPECIAL Vietnamese Language for Beginners (18 AGE UP) CLASS: August 27, 2006 - May 20, 2007 TIME: Sunday 2:45 pm – 4:45 pm WHERE: St. Philip Phan Van Minh Catholic Church FEE: $60 per person OBJECTIVES: This class is designed for the students without knowledge of the Vietnamese language or with a very limited knowledge of the language. Students will learn how to speak, listen, read, and write. Please contact parish office for further information: 407-296-3261 Annual Orchid Auction, presented by the Central Florida Orchid Society www.cflorchidsociety.org. September 16, 2006 (Sat) at Leu Gardens 1920 N. Forest Ave., Orlando, FL , 9:00am – 3:00pm. Free admission to the auction only, free parking, free refreshments. Contact Roy Onyett 352-735-0585. VPA Scholarship Fundraising Dinner – to raise money for deserving local Vietnamese college bound students. September 21, 2006 (Thursday) 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm - Vietnam Town Restaurant – 1011 E Colonial Dr, Orlando, FL 32803. Guest speaker - Mayor Buddy Dyer. Cost: $50.00 per person and table for 10 sponsorships is available. Contact Nhan T. Lee at 407.488.1225 or nlee@ntllaw.com

Single listing is up to 40 words at no charge for non-profit organization E-mail the events/activities to info@AsiaTrendMagazine.com or fax the information to 407-273-9913 Submit the information by the 1st of each month for the same month publication.

ASIA TREND

C L U B Watch for details

coming up Next issue

Visit http://www.asiatrendmagazine.com/AT_events.html for Asia Trend Calendar of Events


46

Magazine Online at www.asiatrendmagazine.com

ASIA HEALTH

What is coronary artery bypass surgery?  Puxiao Cen, M.D.

Dr. Gary King Chiropractic Physician

金文德

醫師

 Auto accident  Back & Neck pain  Carpal Tunnel  Work injury  Disc problems  Numbness We accept most health insurance and automobile insurance Tel: 407-672-1115

We speak 中文,한국어,Tiềng Việt 1355 Orange Ave, Ste #2 Winter Park, FL 32789 (east of 17-92) www.kinghealthcenter.com

Coronary arteries are blood vessels that carry oxygen and nutrients to the heart. Coronary artery bypass surgery is an operation to improve the flow of blood to the heart muscle when your coronary arteries are severely narrowed or blocked by plaque. Plaque is a buildup of fats, cholesterol, and other substances on the inside walls of the arteries. The operation involves taking blood vessels from other parts of your body and attaching them to the coronary arteries beyond the blockage. The blood is then able to flow around, or bypass, the blockages. If more than one artery is blocked, you may need more than one bypass. The location and degree of coronary artery blockages are mapped before surgery using a procedure called heart catheterization, or coronary angiogram. Coronary artery bypass surgery is performed by a team of surgeons. The operation takes 2 to 6 hours, depending on how many blood vessels need to be bypassed. Your surgeon will make a cut in your chest and divide your sternum (breastbone). He or she will connect you to a heart-lung machine that will take over the work of your heart and lungs during the operation. If a vein is used for the bypass, one end of it is sewn into the aorta (the main artery from the heart to the body). The other end is sewn into the area below the blockage in the coronary artery. If the mammary artery is used, the lower end of the mammary artery is cut and reattached to the coronary artery beyond the blockage. In either case, the blood then uses the new vessel as a detour to bypass the blockage. The doctor will then close the cut in your heart and restart your heart. He or she will take you off the heart lung machine and close the cut in your chest by wiring together your sternum (breastbone) and then close the skin with stitches. The doctor may leave some tubes in the cut to drain any blood or fluid. If the blocked coronary arteries are on the front side of the heart, it may be possible for the surgeon to do the bypass through a small incision in the upper chest. This approach does not require cutting the breastbone and makes recovery much easier, but it is not appropriate for most people. Check with your doctor to see if this approach will work for you. After surgery, you will go to the intensive care unit (ICU). You will stay in the ICU overnight or as long as you need for observation. A constant electrocardiogram (ECG) monitor will record the rhythm of your heart. You will have respiratory therapy to prevent any lung problems, such as a collapsed lung, infection, or pneumonia. A nurse or therapist will give you a breathing treatment every few hours. Ask for pain medicine if you need it. You will have physical therapy, which includes walking around the hospital and other strengthening activities. You will learn how to move your upper arms without hurting your breastbone. You will be told which foods to avoid when you get home, such as foods high in fat, cholesterol, and sodium.


47

Magazine Online at www.asiatrendmagazine.com

1613 North Mills Avenue Orlando, FL 32803 Tel: 407-894-4474

岑瀑嘯醫學博士

689 East Altamonte Drive Altamonte Springs, FL 32701 Tel: 407-767-7262

內科心血管專科

2984 Alafaya Trail, Suite 1000 Oviedo, FL 32765 Tel: 407-588-1585

Puxiao Cen, MD, FACC Diplomate, American Board of Internal Medicine and Cardiovascular Disease

www.fhg.org

Board Certified in Echocardiography and Nuclear Cardiology


EZ Banner Stand Call Today!

407.808.0497 www.globalmediafl.com for more details.

What is EZ Banner Stand 甚麼是宣傳易? EZ Banner Stand offers an effective portable display system which can be easily assembled in seconds for a stress free presentation. All our banner stands come with the highest quality printed graphics and a carry bag. It is widely apply to the indoor advertisement, sales promotion, conference presentation, and trade show exhibition. 宣傳易為新一代宣傳工具,最常見採用於大型展覽會場,宣 傳易採用鋁合金製,捲軸式設計,內藏六尺高乘二尺半闊的 彩色大型直立海報,只需拉出便可以安裝完成;宣傳易重量 約五磅,輕巧設計方便攜帶。此產品於大都會十分流行,由 於印製精美,展示公司或個人形象給客戶印象深刻,成為新 一代廣告宣傳不可或缺的工具。

Specs: 31.5” wide x 78.75” high, 450 gsm Ultra Smooth PVC Vinyl Banner Full Color printing. Aluminum casing, Flat end caps. Approx weight 4 Kg. Unbeatable Price

$188.00

each for self-uploaded image only, design is $80 extra additional shipping & handling charges applied to shipment outside Orlando 優惠價只限於自行提供數碼設計稿件, 如需設計另加$80, 奧蘭多以外 地區附加運費

Asia Trend Magazine - Sep-2006  

jeremy lin, linsanity, News, Culture, Cuisine, Business, Sport, Communities, Trend, Health, Professional, Advice, Tai Chi, Orlando, Chines...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you