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THE

2021

InBUSINESS InB CONNECTING IRISH BUSINESS

YEARBOOK

CHAMBERS IRELAND: A Year in Review

CHAMBER DIRECTORY: Full Network Listing

InBUSINESS YEARBOOK 2020

CHAMBER MEMBERSHIP: Why Your Business Should Join

Growing

@ChambersIreland

000 InBUSINESS YB 2021_Cover_V1.indd 1

THE HEAD OF BUSINESS BANKING AT PERMANENT TSB AND CHAMBERS IRELAND PRESIDENT ON HELPING BUSINESSES REACH A BETTER TOMORROW

2.70

Future into the

MAGS BRENNAN

05/03/2021 10:05


Support local to lift us all

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Contents Editor: Adam Hyland Art Director: Alan McArthur

Editorial Contributors: Emma Kerins James Kiernan Shane Conneely Michaela Reilly Kiah Townsend (Chambers Ireland) Design Assistant: James Moore Production Manager: Jane Matthews Production Executive: Claire Kiernan Managing Director: Gerry Tynan Sales Director/Chairman: Diarmaid Lennon

Published by: Ashville Media Group, Old Stone Building, Blackhall Green, Dublin 7 Tel: +353 1 432 2200 Email: info@ashville.com Web: www.ashville.com On behalf of: Chambers Ireland, 11 St. Stephen’s Green, Dublin 2, D02 FY84 Tel: +353 1 400 4300 Email: info@chambers.ie Web: www.chambers.ie All articles © Ashville Media Group 2021. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means without written permission from the publisher. Opinion and comments expressed herein are not necessarily those of Ashville Media or Chambers Ireland. ISSN 20093934

Mags Brennan, Head of Business Banking at permanent tsb, outlines how they are helping businesses through challenging times and into a better tomorrow.

Growing

ONE OF THE KEY THINGS FOR US IS TO BUILD THAT TRUST WITH OUR CUSTOMERS BY DOING WHAT WE SAY WE WILL DO.”

Future into the

The

34

Mags Brennan, Head of Business Banking, permanent tsb and President of Chambers Ireland

InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2021

34

Chamber Membership

InBUSINESS talks to Head of Business Banking at permanent tsb and Chambers Ireland President Mags Brennan about helping businesses reach a better tomorrow CHAMBERS IRELAND 2021

CHAMBERS IRELAND 2021

FOREWORD

FOREWORD

While there are vaccines on the horizon and we can now look to the future with optimism, the severe economic challenges of the coming months should not be underestimated. Sustained financial support for impacted businesses will need to be continued for most of the coming year. Without this support, large cohorts of the domestic economy may face mounting debt burdens, leading to more job losses, and potential insolvencies. While there is light at the end of the tunnel, we will be continuing to lobby Government so that impacted sectors receive the right financial aid, and that this aid is not ended abruptly when re-opening begins. While the threat of the COVID-19 pandemic will be a factor this year - there is one difference to the year gone by, in that we know what is ahead of us. Twelve months ago, the coming challenges would have been impossible to imagine. Knowing more about what we face means will be better able to support businesses.

Year

A

I

n drafting this same foreword over a year ago, our minds were focused on what we felt then would be a disruptive year - the UK had left the EU and was now in the transition period and negotiating a trade deal, we were looking to our own General Election, and we were becoming increasingly concerned about the “two economies”, and the impact of this on balanced regional development. A year on, it is difficult to process just how much disruption and hardship the business community has had to face, not to mention the loss of life that we are continuing to see throughout society due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The events of December and January bring home the reality of what living alongside the

Like No Other

virus will mean in the months to come. The challenge for Government is an unenviable one, where they must support the economic wellbeing of people, but also the health of the nation. This is no easy task, as is being demonstrated in countries throughout the world.

COVID-19 It is difficult to put into words the sense of hope, but also the prevailing sense of uncertainty, that our members feel at the start of this new year. The pandemic has posed tremendous challenges for the business community, particularly those who operate in the tourism, retail and hospitality sectors, many of whom have seen their operation shut, or severely restricted, for significant parts of 2020.

4

04

InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2021

CHAMBERS FOREWORD:

A Year Like No Other

Disruption to business was unprecedented in 2020, but the focus is now on recovery for a brighter future, writes Chief Executive Ian Talbot InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2021

001 InBUSINESS YB 2021_Contents_V1_REV2.indd 1

14

Adapting to Online Goals for Sustainable Business

Plan, the review of the National Development Plan and the promised, and much awaited, Town Centre First Strategy. The theme of “Place” was central to our work throughout 2020 and will continue to be over the coming year. Reopening the economy and supporting the recovery will be the priority focus in the immediate future. The challenge will be to ensure that we deliver these objectives in such a way that it supports the sustainable and balanced regional development of our towns, cities, and regions. We look forward to working with our member Chambers in pursuit of this vision, and into a brighter 2022.

InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2021

Policy Update

21

Ian Talbot, Chief Executive, Chambers Ireland

Places Matter The immediate crises of COVID-19 and Brexit aside, our longer terms priorities continue to relate to the sustainable, balanced development of local economies throughout the country. The Irish economy, even before the pandemic, was not without its challenges. While job creation was at an all-time high, this resulting prosperity was not being felt in all parts of the country. Under-investment in infrastructure, particularly housing, was felt keenly across society, becoming a significant threat to our competitiveness and the sustainability of our economic recovery. These challenges did not disappear following the outbreak of COVID-19, and in many ways, instead have been exacerbated. If we are to achieve

12

Chambers Ireland: A Year of Engagements

a sustainable recovery, Government will need to move away from planning policies that encourage sprawl and do more to integrate our strategies on land management, planning, and public transport so that we create urban spaces which benefit everyone. We must also ensure substantial investment in the low-carbon economy. Our collective inaction over the past decade to tackle climate change through decarbonisation means that we not only risk breaching our 2030 climate targets, but we risk seriously undermining our attractiveness as a place to invest and do business in the longer term. At the heart of these priorities is our enduring commitment to the Sustainable Development Goals. We will be working with Government as they publish and deliver the National Economic

The UK Relationship Twinned with the ongoing impact of COVID-19, we’re also living with the reality of the UK’s departure from the EU, with the new EU-UK Trade and Co-operation Agreement, taking effect from the 1st of January. The fall-out from this new relationship will make itself known throughout the rest of the year, with the immediate impact manifesting, as expected, in delays and reduced trade flows. The UK, as our nearest neighbour, is and will continue to be, a crucial trading partner, and so Chambers Ireland will be continuing to work with neighbouring Chambers to identify trade obstacles and to support businesses to adapt to the new environment.

About Chambers Ireland

10

Growing into the Future

A

Message from the President

35

InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2021

COVER STORY:

Disruption to business was unprecedented in 2020, but the focus is now on recovery for a brighter future.

07 09

last year has seen significant challenges for businesses of all sizes across Ireland, with many sectors facing an almost complete shutdown of operations, and companies of all kinds struggling to retain their staff and continue to do business. In this time of great uncertainty, the need for support – both financial and advisory - from a financial institution has never been greater. permanent tsb has more than risen to the occasion to solidify themselves as a very viable alternative in the Irish business banking sector. It is perhaps fitting that Mags Brennan, Head of Business Banking at permanent tsb and President of Chambers Ireland, stepped into the role just as the first lockdown began. “I joined on March 4th, 2020, and then COVID-19 happened, so you can imagine what that was like,” she tells me. “It’s interesting to join an organisation like this and then nine days later have to start working remotely, but it was actually a great way to understand the organisation and figure out how you can best support your customers at a time of great need.” Supporting business customers is something that Mags says is “in my DNA, because I have been dealing with them for so long” and so she was a perfect fit for permanent tsb. Having worked in senior business roles with AIB in Dublin, Cork and New York, Mags became Head of Business Banking, Cork City & County, with them in 2012 before taking on responsibility for National SME Sectoral Strategy and Specialism. The chance to work with businesses again brought her back to permanent tsb, when she saw opportunities appearing in a changing market. This coincided with her recent appointment as President of Chambers Ireland. She became involved with Chambers when she moved to Cork in 2011 as part of her AIB role, before being asked to join the Chambers Ireland Board representing Cork Chamber when she returned to Dublin. “It is important to have an organisation like Chambers Ireland representing businesses collectively to ensure we are pushing for supports from and involvement with Government,

Finbarr O’Rourke

Editorial Assistant: Kiah Townsend (Chambers Ireland)

[CHAMBERS NEWS]

COVER STORY

5

62

Chambers Awards 2020

109 Chambers Ireland Directory

1

24/03/2021 15:11


Available in SMALL,

MEDIUM and

LARGE

THE

2021

InBUSINESS InB CONNECTING IRISH BUSINESS

YEARBOOK

THE

2021

InBUSINESS InB

CHAMBERS IRELAND: A Year in Review

CONNECTING IRISH BUSINESS

YEARBOOK

CHAMBER DIRECTORY: Full Network Listing

CHAMBERS IRELAND: A Year in Review

CHAMBER DIRECTORY: Full Network Listing

CHAMBER MEMBERSHIP: Why Your Business Should Join

CHAMBER MEMBERSHIP: Why Your Business Should Join

Growing

Growing

MAGS BRENNAN THE HEAD OF BUSINESS BANKING AT PERMANENT TSB AND CHAMBERS IRELAND PRESIDENT ON HELPING BUSINESSES REACH A BETTER TOMORROW

MAGS BRENNAN THE HEAD OF BUSINESS BANKING AT PERMANENT TSB AND CHAMBERS IRELAND PRESIDENT ON HELPING BUSINESSES REACH A BETTER TOMORROW

a2.70

Future into the

a2.70

Future into the

THE

2021

InBUSINESS InB CONNECTING IRISH BUSINESS

YEARBOOK

CHAMBERS IRELAND: A Year in Review

CHAMBER DIRECTORY: Full Network Listing

CHAMBER MEMBERSHIP: Why Your Business Should Join

Growing

THE HEAD OF BUSINESS BANKING AT PERMANENT TSB AND CHAMBERS IRELAND PRESIDENT ON HELPING BUSINESSES REACH A BETTER TOMORROW

a2.70

Future into the

MAGS BRENNAN

Ashville Media’s online digital publications are now available to view our website

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Contents

THE

2021

InBUSINESS InB CONNECTING IRISH BUSINESS

YEARBOOK

CHAMBERS IRELAND: A Year in Review

CHAMBER DIRECTORY: Full Network Listing

CHAMBER MEMBERSHIP: Why Your Business Should Join

Growing

MAGS BRENNAN THE HEAD OF BUSINESS BANKING AT PERMANENT TSB AND CHAMBERS IRELAND PRESIDENT ON HELPING BUSINESSES REACH A BETTER TOMORROW

a2.70

Future into the

24

Go to chambers.ie for the online edition

Eurochambres

Chambers Ireland continues to advocate for a more business-friendly Europe through its partnership with EUROCHAMBRES

26

The Year In Pictures

Looking back over the last 12 months of Chambers Ireland’s work in representing members both nationally and internationally

50

[ Local Government InBUSINESS ] Page

80

82

Page

84

86

Mayo leisure complex wins National Quality Standard Award, while Sligo makes bid for UNESCO World Heritage Site and Leitrim gets 135k funding for outdoor recreational amenities

ULSTER

Limerick looks to a positive future for energy and a new Greenway in 2021, while Cork receives highest funding nationally in Outdoor Recreation Infrastructure Scheme

Page

CONNACHT

LEINSTER

MUNSTER

Dublin Lord Mayor announces Integration Strategy, South Dublin County Council creates Ireland’s first publicly owned energy company, and Green Kilometre Scheme comes to Meath

Page

Donegal County Council launches Letterkenny 2040, Monaghan Biodiversity and Heritage Strategic Plan 2020-2025 is announced, and Belfast businesses get free support

84

WORLD HERITAGE SITE BID FOR SLIGO PASSAGE TOMB LANDSCAPES

CMYK: 83 / 0 / 8 / 0

CMYK: CMYK: 49 / 0 / 100 / 0 0 / 0 / 0 / 100

HEX: 40B3DF

HEX: A8CB17

HEX: 1f1e21

RGB: 64/179/223

RGB: 168/203/23

RGB: 31/30/33

Font:

• Din Medium • Din Regular

81

SDCC ENERGY SOLUTIONS

82

LIMERICK GREENWAY

86

BELFAST SUPPORT PLAN

Recognising Local Contributions

The 2020 Excellence in Local Government Award Winners

26

50

In Association with

InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2021

79

Our Local Government InBUSINESS Supplement continues to look at the important role played by local authorities in Irish enterprise

In Association with

InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2021

001 InBUSINESS YB 2021_Contents_V1_REV2.indd 3

57

Making an Impact

The 2020 Sustainable Business Impact Awards honoured companies that have shown excellence in sustainability over the course of the year

57

3

24/03/2021 15:20


CHAMBERS IRELAND 2021 FOREWORD

A

Disruption to business was unprecedented in 2020, but the focus is now on recovery for a brighter future.

Year

A

I

n drafting this same foreword over a year ago, our minds were focused on what we felt then would be a disruptive year - the UK had left the EU and was now in the transition period and negotiating a trade deal, we were looking to our own General Election, and we were becoming increasingly concerned about the “two economies”, and the impact of this on balanced regional development. A year on, it is difficult to process just how much disruption and hardship the business community has had to face, not to mention the loss of life that we are continuing to see throughout society due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The events of December and January bring home the reality of what living alongside the

4

004 InBUSINESS YB 2021_Foreword_V2.indd 4

Like No Other

virus will mean in the months to come. The challenge for Government is an unenviable one, where they must support the economic wellbeing of people, but also the health of the nation. This is no easy task, as is being demonstrated in countries around the world.

COVID-19

It is difficult to put into words the sense of hope, but also the prevailing sense of uncertainty, that our members feel at the start of this new year. The pandemic has posed tremendous challenges for the business community, particularly those who operate in the tourism, retail and hospitality sectors, many of whom have seen their operation shut, or severely restricted, for significant parts of 2020.

InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2021

05/03/2021 09:57


CHAMBERS IRELAND 2021 FOREWORD

While there are vaccines on the horizon and we can now look to the future with optimism, the severe economic challenges of the coming months should not be underestimated. Sustained financial support for impacted businesses will need to be continued for most of the coming year. Without this support, large cohorts of the domestic economy may face mounting debt burdens, leading to more job losses, and potential insolvencies. While there is light at the end of the tunnel, we will be continuing to lobby Government so that impacted sectors receive the right financial aid, and that this aid is not ended abruptly when re-opening begins. While the threat of the COVID-19 pandemic will be a factor this year - there is one difference to the year gone by, in that we know what is ahead of us. Twelve months ago, the coming challenges would have been impossible to imagine. Knowing more about what we face means will be better able to support businesses.

a sustainable recovery, Government will need to move away from planning policies that encourage sprawl and do more to integrate our strategies on land management, planning, and public transport so that we create urban spaces which benefit everyone. We must also ensure substantial investment in the low-carbon economy. Our collective inaction over the past decade to tackle climate change through decarbonisation means that we not only risk breaching our 2030 climate targets, but we risk seriously undermining our attractiveness as a place to invest and do business in the longer term. At the heart of these priorities is our enduring commitment to the Sustainable Development Goals. We will be working with Government as they publish and deliver the National Economic

The UK Relationship

Twinned with the ongoing impact of COVID-19, we’re also living with the reality of the UK’s departure from the EU, with the new EU-UK Trade and Co-operation Agreement, taking effect from the 1st of January. The fall-out from this new relationship will make itself known throughout the rest of the year, with the immediate impact manifesting, as expected, in delays and reduced trade flows. The UK, as our nearest neighbour, is and will continue to be, a crucial trading partner, and so Chambers Ireland will be continuing to work with neighbouring Chambers to identify trade obstacles and to support businesses to adapt to the new environment.

Ian Talbot, Chief Executive, Chambers Ireland

Places Matter

The immediate crises of COVID-19 and Brexit aside, our longer terms priorities continue to relate to the sustainable, balanced development of local economies throughout the country. The Irish economy, even before the pandemic, was not without its challenges. While job creation was at an all-time high, this resulting prosperity was not being felt in all parts of the country. Under-investment in infrastructure, particularly housing, was felt keenly across society, becoming a significant threat to our competitiveness and the sustainability of our economic recovery. These challenges did not disappear following the outbreak of COVID-19, and in many ways, instead have been exacerbated. If we are to achieve

InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2021

004 InBUSINESS YB 2021_Foreword_V2.indd 5

Plan, the review of the National Development Plan and the promised, and much awaited, Town Centre First Strategy. The theme of “Place” was central to our work throughout 2020 and will continue to be over the coming year. Reopening the economy and supporting the recovery will be the priority focus in the immediate future. The challenge will be to ensure that we deliver these objectives in such a way that it supports the sustainable and balanced regional development of our towns, cities, and regions. We look forward to working with our member Chambers in pursuit of this vision, and into a brighter 2022.

5

05/03/2021 09:57


CHAMBERS IRELAND 2021 AFFILIATED CHAMBER LOCATIONS

the

Chamber

Network etwork

Letterkenny etterkenny

Northern Ireland Chamber of Commerce and Industry Sligo Ballina CarrickCarrick On-Shannon Westport

Ballyhaunis

Cootehill Dundalk

Cavan

Drogheda & District

County Meath

Longford ongford Mullingar A Athlone

Galway

Tullamore & District Laois

Dublin South Dublin n County Kildare

Ennis Shannon

County Carlow

Thurles

Fingal Dublin Dún Laoghaire - Rathdown R Bray & District

Arklow & District

Kilkenny

Limerick County Tipperary Tralee

Waterford d Mallow

Enniscorthy & District Count County W Wexford

Dungarvan & West Waterford W

Cork Bantry

41 Affiliated Chambers

6

006 InBUSINESS YB 2021_Chamber Map_V2.indd 6

Cobh & Harbour

8,000

83%

business members represented across the country

increase in lobbying returns submitted by our network in 2020 than year previous

Further details of each affiliated Chamber can be found between pages 98 to 99 InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2021

05/03/2021 10:06


CHAMBERS IRELAND 2021 PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

Just over a decade

on from a generationdefining economic downturn, the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic has stalled the growth that the Irish economy had started to become accustomed to. Coupled with the UK’s impending exit from the EU, this past year brought about many challenges for businesses across the country and saw sectors such as retail and hospitality impacted more than others. Nonetheless, the resilience of Irish companies has meant that Ireland remains one of the top-ranking countries globally in which to do business. Accounting for more than 90% of total employment, Ireland’s SMEs and entrepreneurs operate in what is broadly regarded by the OECD as a favourable business environment. SMEs in Ireland can avail of a comprehensive set of programmes targeted to continuously improve the sector. However, we can’t ignore the fact that sustained supports for entrepreneurs and SMEs are required throughout the coming year. Ireland is well placed to face into the turbulent economic headwinds of 2021. The Budget for this year made provision for a Contingency Fund to support businesses in dealing with Brexit and the impacts of COVID-19. With the endof-year Exchequer Returns in a better position than expected, bolstered by the availability of low-interest finance through the ECB, it is imperative that Government continues to support Irish business to trade through the worst impacts of the twin crises we face. The greatest risk is that we under-react, not over-react, to the scale of these challenges. Although the pandemic has stalled development in some of these key areas, and external factors such as Brexit has meant seismic changes to the way we do business, our goals remain the same. We must be extremely ambitious in areas such as innovation, technology and investment. We must also ensure that this investment contributes to more sustainable cities and communities across Ireland. With this is mind, Ireland must ensure that it embraces the European Green Deal and the funding opportunities for renewable energy and infrastructure. However, this level of ambition must also to be met with a capability in terms of delivery. This means ensuring that communities are engaged, and that we have the social acceptance and public support that we need to advance the National Development Plan and the Climate Action Plan. Our member Chambers are at the heart of their communities and will play their part to ensure these key projects are delivered. Chambers Ireland is ready to represent the needs of the Chamber network and broaden our reach both at home and abroad. It is our mission to deliver on our commitments to the SDGs and ensure that we maintain our position as a sustainable, competitive and open economy. As President of Chambers Ireland, I look forward to engaging with and advocating for our Network in the coming year as we build a more ambitious, resilient and sustainable economy.

A Message

Mags Brennan, President, Chambers Ireland

“CHAMBERS IRELAND IS READY TO REPRESENT THE NEEDS OF THE CHAMBER NETWORK AND

BROADEN OUR REACH BOTH AT HOME AND ABROAD. IT IS OUR MISSION TO

DELIVER ON OUR COMMITMENTS AND ENSURE WE

MAINTAIN OUR POSITION AS A SUSTAINABLE, COMPETITIVE, AND OPEN ECONOMY”

from the

President InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2021

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05/03/2021 10:11


CHAMBERS IRELAND 2021 SPONSORS

SPONSORS Chambers Ireland wishes to thank its sponsors for their continued support.

8

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InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2021

05/03/2021 10:14


CHAMBERS IRELAND 2021 ABOUT CHAMBERS IRELAND

Who : we are

Chambers Ireland works to advance Irish businesses at home and abroad by empowering, lobbying, representing, growing and delivering for our network.

THE WORK OF CHAMBERS IRELAND A glance at Chambers Ireland’s main areas of activity:

REPRESENTING IRISH BUSINESS INTERESTS As a lobbying organisation, we represent Irish business interests at local, regional and national level to the Irish Government, while also exerting influence through our presence on key policymaking boards and councils.

SUPPORTING BUSINESS AND STRENGTHENING THE NETWORK Chambers Ireland supports SMEs and larger businesses in Ireland through the Chamber Network. We provide information and advice to businesses on a range of topics and issues.

INTERNATIONAL INFLUENCE Chambers Ireland is an active member of both EUROCHAMBRES and the International Chamber of Commerce, which represents businesses at EU, panEuropean and international level. Chambers Ireland engagement on these important business platforms ensures greater visibility and competitiveness for Irish business on a global stage.

As Ireland’s largest business organisation, our primary aim is to advance business competitiveness across the country through developing the best environment to do business at all levels, while facilitating the growth of our Chamber Network. Our Network consists of local and regional affiliated Chambers, for which Chambers Ireland acts as one voice at national level on behalf of this Network. By engaging with business members through our Chamber Network and by encouraging better business practices for long-term development at local, regional and national level, Chambers Ireland works to advance Irish businesses both at home and abroad. Chambers Ireland monitors the relevant policy issues that businesses care about and are affected by, and represents the views of our business members to Government. Through research, lobbying and representation on influential policy-making boards and councils of importance to the Irish Government – including the National Competitiveness Council, the National Corporate Social Responsibility Stakeholder Forum and the Retail Forum – Chambers Ireland is a respected voice in the business community. Our membership and participation on these fora is strengthened by our engagement with Chambers Ireland’s own policy taskforces, our Public Affairs forum and Chief Executives forum. INTERNATIONAL PROFILE In addition to these various levels of domestic influence, Chambers Ireland also engages at a European and international level, as a member of the Paris-based International Chamber of Commerce (ICC), the largest business representative organisation worldwide, and as a member of EUROCHAMBRES, the association of European Chambers of Commerce and Industry. As a member of the ICC, Chambers Ireland acts as the Irish national committee of the ICC, which allows us to advocate the interests of our members to the intergovernmental organisations that legislate on international trade. The work of the ICC includes promoting the importance for open trade, business self-regulation, fighting corruption, dispute resolution and more. Chambers Ireland is also one of the national Chambers of commerce members of EUROCHAMBRES, the voice of the business community at EU level, representing over 20 million businesses across Europe. EUROCHAMBRES aims to improve the conditions of the Single Market to facilitate trade within and beyond the EU, through engagement with the EU institutions and coordinating projects to benefit businesses across all countries of the European Union.

InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2021

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05/03/2021 10:16


CHAMBERS IRELAND 2021 CHAMBER MEMBERSHIP

THERE ARE A NUMBER OF KEY AREAS WHERE CHAMBER MEMBERSHIP CAN BENEFIT YOUR BUSINESS: NATIONAL REPRESENTATION AND LOBBYING

Chambers:

The Value of Membership By joining your local Chamber, you will receive member-only benefits, exclusive advertising, networking opportunities and increased publicity for your business, along with representation at a national level through Chambers Ireland.

With 41

accredited Chambers across Ireland and Northern Ireland, Chambers Ireland is Ireland’s largest business representative organisation, working to enhance economic and social development in our towns, cities, and communities in order to make them better places to work, live and do business. Local economic development is one of the Chamber Network’s core policy priorities. Our Chambers work to remedy the challenges that face businesses in their localities and strengthen the local economy, which is vital for the success of any business. Chambers work closely with Local Authorities and organisations to encourage and promote local economic development for their communities and deliver significant results for their members.

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Our Chambers represent their members locally and on a national level with the support of Chambers Ireland. Chambers Ireland lobbies the Government on national issues that affect businesses across the country. Chambers Ireland is also an active member of EUROCHAMBRES and the International Chamber of Commerce. Through these organisations, the Chamber Network is represented at both a European and international level.

SUPPORT Chambers provide their members with support in a variety of ways. This includes, but is not limited to, business development and access to knowledge, skills and training on a wide range of topics. Chambers can also act as an advisor to businesses in their network, whether they are early-stage start-ups or established enterprises.

EVENTS Members are invited to the many events that their local Chamber organises throughout the year. Chambers host a wide variety of successful events, including workshops, informative seminars, award ceremonies and more.

InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2021

05/03/2021 10:18


CHAMBERS IRELAND 2021 CHAMBER MEMBERSHIP

NETWORKING Members of Chambers are invited to many networking events. This provides opportunities for members to do business with other companies in their Chamber’s Network. It has been recorded that 60% of members do business at Chamber events through meeting with other members and their contacts. You can connect and engage with a broader audience and expand your network through your local Chamber.

LEARNING Gain a competitive edge over non-members with exclusive training on current issues. Chambers organise professional training opportunities across a variety of topics to support businesses in their Network.

FIND NEW SALES TARGETS Chambers believe that people do business with people they know. By joining your local Chamber, you are making new business connections with contacts you can trust.

VISIBILITY Stand out and generate awareness within your local community. Being a member makes you part of an active business group within your locality.

InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2021

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PROMOTION AND REFERRALS Chambers are a vital source of information for businesses in their area, whether a member or non-member. Chambers will always recommend their members to businesses who are seeking specific services or can meet the requirements.

PRODUCTS AND SERVICES Chambers offer several different products and services. Exclusive services that they provide to their members include discounted business services from member-to-member and access to a membership directory.

SOCIAL NETWORKING Chamber members can participate in members-only groups for updates and reach wider audiences through online promotional opportunities via their Chambers’ social media platforms.

CREDIBILITY Enhance your reputation and increase awareness through membership. Chamber members have the benefit of the Chamber President, CEO, Board and staff promoting their business. At networking events, Chamber personnel always keep their members in mind when they are speaking to other business owners, whether they are national or international companies.

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05/03/2021 10:18


CHAMBERS IRELAND 2021 POLICY

A Future

W rking TOGETHER

With Brexit and COVID-19 dominating the political and policy worlds throughout 2020, Shane Conneely, Head of Research at Chambers Ireland, looks towards the future, and what the next 12 months have in store.

12

012 InBUSINESS YB 2021_Policy_V2_REV.indd 12

E

ntering 2021, both Brexit and COVID-19 have transformed into different forms of challenges. The Brexit deal has finally been signed and our logistics chains are adapting to the trade frictions, while our vaccine roll-out is now underway, making COVID-19 a matter of logistics too. Our population will be immunised in 2021 - the question has become when, not if. Moving from crisis mode will allow us to return to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the longer-term issues they help us face. Chief among them is Climate Action (SDG 13). The crises of Brexit and the pandemic should be considered as trial runs for how we will deal with the even larger problem of climate change. These three crises share common features; while each has a broad effect on the economy, some groups and areas of activity are disproportionately impacted, all require behavioural changes from all of us, and it is only through concerted collective action that we can tackle these problems. We all need to collaborate to mitigate the worst effects of COVID-19. At the EU member state level, working with our peer nations strengthened our hand on both Northern Ireland and our terms of trade with Britain. While globally, only concerted effort, at the European scale, can make an impact on global warming. In addressing the social and economic consequences of these three crises, we have the assistance of three ongoing, related, and reinforcing processes:

 rbanisation U Decarbonisation Workplace Transformation Our economy will need support over the coming years: The damage that Brexit will do will require us to stimulate our domestic economy, COVID-19 has both undermined the retail sectors of our cities and towns, and accelerated the flexible/remote working agenda by years. Meanwhile, the decade of the 2020s will see us drastically reduce our carbon dioxide emissions through electrifying our heat and transport while shifting our electricity supply to renewables. Shifting our national housing policies towards investing in the urban cores of our towns and cities, increasing investment in the electrification of our transport networks, while pursuing and exceeding our green energy targets, together, offer us an engine for growth that will power Ireland through to 2050. 2021 will see a review of the National Development Plan (NDP), which must improve on its ambitions if we are to accommodate the aims of the Climate Action Plan, and the carbon reduction objectives of the EU’s 2030 Climate Target Plan, as well as secure the financial resources the EU Green deal is making available to us. It is critical that the projects of the updated NDP advance the National Planning Framework’s (NPF) densification targets, operate within the confines of our carbon budget, and offer value for money.

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CHAMBERS IRELAND 2021 POLICY

URBAN LIVING Furthering the goal of Sustainable Cities and Communities (SDG 11) will require reinforcing the NPF’s City Regions model if Ireland is to succeed in the 21st Century. Our cities and towns need to become more attractive places to live and work. Even before COVID-19, our towns were scarred by both a housing emergency, and an epidemic of vacancies. The coming year will also see the Land Development Agency (LDA) put on a legislative footing. Our Chambers will continue to argue for the LDA to engage in active land management to remedy the structural deficiencies that are so damaging to our cities, our society and our local economies. Complementing this work will be our activities to support and enhance the government’s Town Centre First plan which will be a key element of the National Economic Plan. It is vital that this programme transforms the built environment of our urban spaces through creating the integrated active transport networks that make our towns and cities liveable and people-friendly so that we can thrive to meet our maximum potential. As champions of their cities and towns, our chamber members are uniquely able to understand and promote the interests of their areas to ensure that ours is an economy where every place matters. Overarching these efforts, Chambers Ireland will continue to advocate for the businesses that secure our collective prosperity and quality of life.

NEW FLEXIBLE WORKING MODELS Both Decent Work and Economic Growth (SDG 8) and Gender Equality (SDG 5) experienced advances, and challenges, over 2020. The pandemic brought significant transformation to our lives, with large cohorts of the workforce switching to remote work and as a result of repeated travel restrictions, our local areas have never been more important to us. Before COVID-19, increasing the digitisation of business and reimagining how we work was already a strategic necessity and the crisis has fast-tracked this. We will continue monitoring the impact of the pandemic on work-life balance, advocating for more family-friendly workplaces and investment in childcare.

SUPPORTING VULNERABLE SECTORS The next 12 months will be a struggle for many firms. Supports will need to continue for Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure (SDG 9). Brexit’s effects on trade are likely to damage a set of businesses that were less vulnerable to the pandemic but are now under serious threat. These external factors threaten the continuity of many viable businesses. Meanwhile, employers will be faced with further legislative change including the proposed introduction of statutory sick pay and increased parental leave.

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CHAMBERS IRELAND 2021 CHAMBERS IRELAND: A YEAR OF ENGAGEMENTS

CHAMBERS IRELAND:

The Year of

Engagements Taking a look back at some of the Chambers Ireland events and engagements throughout 2020.

BRUSSELS TRIP JANUARY 2020

In January, we led a delegation from our Network of 40 Chambers to Brussels, meeting with EU officials from the European Commission, the Parliament, IREO, the Irish Permanent Representation to the EU and EUROCHAMBRES to set out the priorities of Irish business during the new legislative term under President Von der Leyen.

SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS IMPACT AWARDS LAUNCH MARCH 2020

In March, before social distancing changed our world, we unveiled the new name for our ‘Corporate Social Responsibility Awards’. The Awards, which have been running for over 16 years were rebranded the ‘Sustainable Business Impact Awards’ to reflect our pledge to uphold the SDGs and encouraging companies of all sizes across Ireland to showcase how they are supporting the SDGs within their business.

MANIFESTO LAUNCH JANUARY 2020

Ahead of the General Election 2020, we launched our manifesto calling for “Place Making” to be at the heart of a new Programme for Government. We incorporated the five UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) which our Network are supporting as a framework for our manifesto, highlighting their importance as we look to the future.

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CICERO/AMO COMMUNICATIONS TRAINING FOR CHAMBERS MARCH & APRIL 2020

To assist our Chamber Network to adapt to the demand for information and clear communication at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, we arranged training with top communications firm Cicero/ AMO. The training was delivered virtually by Cicero/AMO’s Ireland Director, Aideen Ginnell, and their Strategic Advisor, Joey Jones, who offered practical advice on how to deliver effective communications during a crisis.

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CHAMBERS IRELAND 2021 CHAMBERS IRELAND: A YEAR OF ENGAGEMENTS

GOVERNANCE IN A SURREAL WORLD WITH DAVID DUFFY 3 JUNE 2020

REBOOT YOUR BUSINESS WITH GRIFFITH COLLEGE MAY 2020 COVID-19 UPDATES & HR ADVICE WEBINARS WITH PENINSULA FROM APRIL 2020

Our patron, Peninsula Ireland, have provided a vital service for our members this year, regularly hosting webinars addressing the constant changes facing businesses during the pandemic. Their webinars – hosted by HR professionals – offered clarification on employer/ employee rights during the pandemic, changes to financial supports, updates on HR practices and the ever-changing Government guidelines and restrictions since March.

In May 2020, we partnered with Griffith College and Skillnet Ireland to offer hundreds of business managers support as they looked to re-launch and reboot their business post-pandemic. This online programme was supported by a series of webinars and masterclasses guiding business owners and managers through the challenges they faced and facilitating them to create business development plans. The course was open to members nationwide and all classes and resources were made available online to access at any time.

MEETING WITH MINISTER DONOHOE 5 JUNE 2020

SDG WEBINAR SERIES JUNE & JULY 2020

In June and July, in partnership with members of our Sustainable Business Council, we hosted a weekly webinar series highlighting each of the five SDGs that Chambers Ireland have pledged to support – Goals 5, 8, 9, 11 & 13. We were joined by a fantastic line up of speakers for each webinar which you can read more about on page 21.

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We welcomed Minister for Finance, Paschal Donohoe, to a digital briefing with Chief Executives in our Network on June 5th. The Minister spent the time outlining the economic decisions taken so far by the Government to protect incomes and to protect employers, as well as answering questions posed to him by Chamber representatives.

In June, we ran a webinar for our members on governance, hosted by David W. Duffy, founder of The Governance Company. The webinar offered business owners and managers advice on Board leadership, how to support CEO and staff, financial management and advice on successfully hosting virtual Board meetings. CHAMBERS AWARDS 2020 24 JUNE – 2 JULY 2020

This year we could not host the annual Chamber Awards in person. Working with the restrictions in place at the time, we announced each of the category winners on Twitter over a week, with Cork Chamber crowned Chamber of the Year 2020 on July 2nd. They were presented with their Award on the day by Ian Talbot in a socially-distant ceremony in Cork Chamber offices, with the presentation livestreamed to our Network.

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MEETING WITH INTERNATIONAL CHAMBERS 8 JULY 2020

In July, CEOs in our Network met with three international Chamber representatives - Bob Rohrlack, Tampa Bay Chamber; Jesper JuulJensen, Danish Chamber of Commerce; and Val Russell, Ayrshire Chamber of Commerce – to discuss how Chambers outside of Ireland are adapting to the changes that COVID-19 has brought about and to facilitate knowledge and idea sharing around the pandemic and how they have supported their members and localities.

BUDGET 2021 SUBMISSION LAUNCH SEPTEMBER 2020

WEBINAR WITH STRATEGIC BANKING CORPORATION OF IRELAND 29 JULY 2020

We hosted a webinar for Chamber members with John Madigan, Head of Marketing and Research with the SBCI, to detail the many COVID-19 supports provided by the SBCI which have been available to businesses this year and offer guidance on how to apply for them. A second webinar detailing the Credit Guarantee Scheme was hosted alongside AIB on 29th October.

SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS IMPACT AWARDS CEREMONY 24 SEPTEMBER 2020

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The theme of our Budget submission in September was “Place” and through it we called on Government to help businesses to trade through the pandemic by supporting liquidity, local economies and the long-term investment needs of the whole economy. We hosted meetings between the Chamber Network and the Finance spokespeople from Fianna Fáil, Fine Gael, Labour and the Social Democrats.

2020 was the first year of our newly rebranded Sustainable Business Impact Awards. The Awards took place via a live online ceremony due to COVID-19 restrictions, with hundreds tuning in from across the country to find out the winners. Read more about these Awards and winning projects on page 57.

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CHAMBERS IRELAND 2021 CHAMBERS IRELAND: A YEAR OF ENGAGEMENTS

NATIONAL SKILLS BULLETIN LAUNCH WITH SOLAS 20 OCTOBER 2020

AIB: PLANNING FOR EXIT & SUCCESSION WEBINAR 30 SEPTEMBER 2020

We hosted a webinar with AIB in September – Planning for Exit and Succession – which saw a panel of experts providing key insights on exit and succession planning for business owners and the importance of planning for the future. Speakers Catherine Moroney, Alan Mahon and Michael Cosgrave of AIB outlined the steps required for financial preparations, and Shaun O’Shea of Beauchamps offered legal advice on the subject and answered attendees’ queries.

Moderated by our immediate pastPresident Siobhan Kinsella, we partnered with SOLAS to host the launch of the National Skills Bulletin in October.

EU TRADE POLICY WEBINAR 2 NOVEMBER 2020

EUROCHAMBRES REBOOTING EUROPE SERIES 12-14 OCTOBER 2020

Our Chief Executive, Ian Talbot, joined Stephanie Leupold and Bernd Lange at the EUROCHAMBRES ‘Rebooting Europe’ series about how an ambitious EU Trade policy can support the EU post-pandemic recovery.

Following the submission to the EU’s Trade and Investment Policy review, we hosted a webinar with Elena Bryan from the German Marshall Fund, MEP Barry Andrews and Jonathan Claridge from the European Commission Representation in Ireland, who discussed the importance of SME inclusion in future trade agreements and the need to align these to the SDGs.

ZURICH TACKLE YOUR FEELINGS WEBINAR 4 NOVEMBER 2020

In November, Zurich helped us to highlight the importance of taking care of our mental health and wellbeing in what has been a particularly difficult year. During the webinar we heard from Dr. Hannah McCormack, Tackle Your Feelings Campaign Manager and Irish and Connacht rugby player, Finlay Bealham, who discussed tips on navigating difficult days and managing stress.

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CHAMBERS IRELAND 2021 CHAMBERS IRELAND: A YEAR OF ENGAGEMENTS

PLACES MATTER LAUNCH 11 NOVEMBER 2020 WORK EQUAL SOLUTIONS SERIES 9 NOVEMBER 2020

Our Head of Policy and Public Affairs, Emma Kerins, took part in the Equal Pay Day webinar which called for the narrowing of the gender pay gap in workplaces across Ireland. This webinar was part of the ‘Work Equal Solutions Series’ hosted by Dress for Success Dublin.

DUBLIN INTERNATIONAL ARBITRATION DAY 20 NOVEMBER 2020

In November, ICC Ireland was a sponsor of the Dublin International Arbitration Day run by Arbitration Ireland. This is an extremely prestigious event in the global arbitration calendar and is an important part of our support for Alternative Dispute Resolution being more widely used for effective, timely and cost-efficient management of conflicts.

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In November, we published ‘Places Matter’ – a Chamber Guide to Best Practice in Collaboration and Local Economic Development. Supported by An Post, the ‘Places Matter’ guide contains best practice examples of collaboration from across the Chamber Network with Local Authorities and their agencies, and showcases the diverse initiatives to support economic growth and development that are driven by Chambers in their community.

GET BREXIT READY WITH AIB 18 NOVEMBER 2020

Ian Talbot spoke at the ‘Get Brexit Ready with AIB’ webinar in November, underlining the need for all businesses to urgently assess their supply chains and prepare for any disruptions that may occur

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CHAMBERS IRELAND 2021 CHAMBERS IRELAND: A YEAR OF ENGAGEMENTS

EXCELLENCE IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT AWARDS 26 NOVEMBER 2020

We hosted the annual Excellence in Local Government Awards online, in a virtual ceremony, which was viewed by Local Authority staff and stakeholders nationwide. Mayo County Council was crowned the Local Authority of the Year 2020, and you can read about all the projects on page 50.

SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS IMPACT AWARDS - WINNERS WEBINAR SERIES FROM NOVEMBER 2020

Following the success of our Sustainable Business Impact Awards in September, we decided to utilise online platforms to set up video calls with each of this year’s Award category winners and find out how they came up with the ideas for their initiatives and successfully implemented them across their business. Read more on page 23. You can watch each episode in this webinar series here: https://www.chambers.ie/events/sustainablebusiness-impact-awards/winners-webinar-series/

CHAMBERS IRELAND & THE GREEN DEAL WEBINARS 2 – 4 DECEMBER 2020

We hosted a series of webinars on the European Green Deal at the beginning of December, with experts from across industry and political spheres who discussed the plan to make the EU’s economy sustainable. The central question around what this will mean for the Irish economy, for jobs and for regional development formed the core of the conversations.

PUTTING TOWN CENTRES FIRST PODCAST 3 DECEMBER 2020

Ian Talbot, Chambers Ireland Chief Executive, spoke to Ali Harvey of the Heritage Council on ‘Putting Town Centres First’. His interview included calls for creative thinking around town centres and the post-pandemic recovery.

IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN WATCHING BACK ANY OF THE ONE-OFF WEBINARS OR OUR WEBINAR SERIES, YOU CAN FIND THEM IN OUR WEBINAR LIBRARY: HTTPS://WWW.CHAMBERS.IE/EVENTS/WEBINAR-LIBRARY/

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CHAMBER FEATURE INTERNATIONAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

On a

Global Stage T

In 2021 ICC Ireland, supported by Chambers Ireland, will continue its work in helping to further the goals of the International Chamber of Commerce.

he International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) is a global organisation based in Paris that provides a forum for businesses and other organisations to examine and better comprehend the nature and significance of the major shifts taking place in the world economy. From making trade work for people and planet, to making action on climate everyone’s business, our purpose is to enable business to secure peace, prosperity and opportunity for all. Drawing on the expertise and experience of its global network to achieve real change at scale, the ICC delivers tangible results in three key areas encompassing international engagement and advocacy, rules and standards for the 21st Century, and on the ground solutions and implementation. Throughout the past year, the ICC has been actively engaged in the fight against COVID-19. It has produced a range of publications to help businesses to combat the challenges the pandemic has posed, including its very successful ‘COVID-19 Business Continuity Guide’. The ICC has developed a work programme to support this mission, outlining key workstreams and deliverables under its five key campaigns aimed at driving real-world action and solutions: Make trade work for people and planet Make climate action everyone’s business Stop the global rise in inequality Make technology work for all Lead for the long term.

Chambers Ireland acts as the Irish National Committee of the ICC, or ICC Ireland, and continues to support the ICC in achieving these aims. ICC CELEBRATES 5TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE PARIS AGREEMENT

H

aving played a central role in the delivery of the Paris Agreement and in shaping the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals SDGs, ICC is committed to advocating for coherent policy frameworks in line with the latest science. As the institutional representative of 45 million companies worldwide, ICC recognises the urgent need to keep the rise in global temperature to 1.5°C and achieve net-zero emissions by 2050. To mark the 5th anniversary of the signing of the Paris Agreement, the ICC launched its SME Climate Hub during the 2020 New York Climate Week to act as a one-stop shop, providing SMEs with tools and resources to curb emissions and gain a competitive advantage. By signing up to the hub, businesses pledge to make the SME Climate Commitment and start taking immediate action to tackle climate change using the tools they have curated with the University of Oxford.

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CHAMBERS IRELAND 2021 SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS

Adapting to

Online

Goals Chambers Ireland continues to focus on sustainability through regular webinars that educate and inspire writes Kiah Townsend, Relationship Development Coordinator.

T

hrough all the changes and challenges that 2020 threw at us, it has not deflected from our commitment to supporting the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), educating our Network on their importance, and introducing members to all the different steps that they can take to incorporate the SDGs into their own businesses. These Goals cannot be forgotten amongst the noise of elections and pandemics as they are the key to building a better future for our businesses, communities and livelihoods across the globe, which is why we made sure that the Chambers Ireland platform continued to promote the SDGs throughout 2020. CHAMPIONING THE SDGS Adapting to the restrictions, we moved our events to online platforms and embraced the opportunity to reach a nationwide audience in the space of an hour to continue the conversation on the SDGs and share information. In June and July, we ran a 5-week webinar series on the Sustainable Development Goals with the support of our Sustainable Business Council. Members of the Council hosted each week’s webinar, focusing on one of the five SDGs which Chambers Ireland have pledged to uphold. Each week was an opportunity for industry experts to share their insights with a nationwide audience.

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CHAMBERS IRELAND 2021 SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS

WEEK 1 | SDG 8 - DECENT WORK AND ECONOMIC GROWTH Colm Bergin, Bank of Ireland, hosted the first webinar in this series, which heard from three speakers: Shane Quinlan, Bank of Ireland; Jeanne McDonagh, Open Doors Initiative and Brian Kelly, MindaClient. Each of these speakers discussed different aspects of Goal 8 and how the world of work can adapt and embrace change to benefit their employees and overall business practices – the importance of being financially stable, how to offer employees a better work-life balance, and the benefits of hiring a more diverse workforce. WEEK 2 | SDG 9 - INDUSTRY, INNOVATION AND INFRASTRUCTURE Sinead Hickey, Sisk Ireland (formerly of Abbott), was joined by Kenny Deery from Galway Chamber and Joe Gallagher, Department of Communications, Climate Action and Environment for our second webinar. During the session they discussed the importance of providing the right infrastructure and environments to create and nurture innovation, such as start-up hubs like PorterShed in Galway. Joe Gallagher impressed upon the necessity of documenting and publishing the changes that businesses are making which align with the SDGs, so that the Government and the Central Statistics Office are aware of businesses’ commitment to the Goals which will lead to improved investment in innovation and industry, and the implementation of necessary infrastructure across the country to support this ambition. WEEK 3 | SDG 13 – CLIMATE ACTION In week three, Mia Fahey McCarthy, SSE Ireland, spoke with Noel Regan from the Department of Communications, Climate Action and Environment, and Fergus Sharkey of SEAI, about the goals that Ireland has to reach, as set out in the Climate Action Plan. Noel detailed what we need to do and where we need to improve in order to achieve these ambitious targets, while Fergus Sharkey offered up advice to businesses on where they can begin to make savings and become more energy efficient, and the grants available through SEAI to take these steps. WEEK 4 | SDG 11 – SUSTAINABLE CITIES AND COMMUNITIES In our fourth week, the webinar focused on how we can develop our towns and cities into people-friendly, thriving hubs to build businesses and foster strong communities. Our host, Bernadette Phelan, BITC Ireland, led the conversation and oversaw presentations from Ken Tobin, Tralee Chamber Alliance; Giulia Vallone, Cork County Council and Andrew Walker, LGiU, which highlighted the untapped opportunities that can help us to support and transform town centres across the country. WEEK 5 | SDG 5 – GENDER EQUALITY Our final webinar in the series was run by Karina Howley, KPMG, and heard about the pioneering ideas adopted by An Post and Diageo to support their businesses to be more inclusive of women and to champion diversity. David McRedmond of An Post, and Sandra Caffrey, Diageo, spoke about the commitment and steps undertaken to ensure that their companies become more inclusive, reducing gender wage gaps and introducing 6-months paid parental leave, respectively, in order to adapt to the changes that we are both seeing and experiencing in the world of work. Both speakers impressed upon the importance of businesses to implement forward-thinking initiatives to support their staff and and retain talent. They called upon businesses across Ireland to consider the opportunity that they have to incorporate these changes into their own company policies.

YOU CAN WATCH EACH OF THE WEBINARS IN THIS SERIES BACK IN FULL BY VISITING OUR WEBINAR LIBRARY: WWW.CHAMBERS.IE/EVENTS/WEBINAR-LIBRARY

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CHAMBERS IRELAND 2021 SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS

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n October – following on from the first year of our Sustainable Business Impact Awards – we began a second webinar series which encompassed the SDGs, highlighting the winning projects and partnerships from this year’s Awards. The Sustainable Business Impact Awards – Winners Webinar Series is a collection of conversations with the winners of each category from this year’s Awards. The webinars focus on how the ideas for each project or partnership were born and the steps taken to bring these concepts to successful fruition. Each winning entry embodied at least one of the Sustainable Development Goals and the webinar series focuses on elements of these Goals while taking a look at how the winning organisations run and grow their initiatives. These webinars are a source of information to all businesses, offering guidance and ideas on how companies

- whether an SME or a corporate – can begin to set up a similar project or collaboration within their organisation. Each week’s speakers have highlighted the importance of communication in creating strong partnerships and the need for support and buy-in at all levels of the business. They also encourage businesses to focus on their community – both inhouse and externally – and the benefits which this can bring to a company’s staff and their workplace as a whole. This webinar series is still ongoing in 2021, with each session recorded and available to watch back in your own time. If you are interested in setting up a workplace choir, finding the right charity partner for your business or implementing company-wide initiatives, you can hear from winners AIB, A&L Goodbody, Lidl, SOLAS and more in these 30-minute videos which will guide you to taking the first steps.

TO WATCH THIS SERIES, VISIT: WWW.CHAMBERS.IE/EVENTS/SUSTAINABLE-BUSINESS-IMPACT-AWARDS/WINNERSWEBINAR-SERIES/

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CHAMBER FEATURE EUROCHAMBRES / EU ENGAGEMENT 2020

Chambers for EUROPE C Chambers Ireland continues to advocate for a more businessfriendly Europe through its partnership with EUROCHAMBRES.

hambers Ireland has continued to work and lobby for a more stable pro-trade, business-friendly Europe. In doing so, we engage closely with our partners in the European Association of Chambers of Commerce and Industry, also known as EUROCHAMBRES, to advance EU trading relationships and the interests of Irish business. EUROCHAMBRES represents the interests of more than 20 million member enterprises across 45 European countries through a network of 1,700 national, regional and local chambers. Engaging across several policy portfolios, Chambers Ireland have representatives on several EUROCHAMBRES policy committees including the SME and Economic Policy Committee; Skills and Entrepreneurship Committee; Sustainable Europe Committee; Global Europe Committee; and the Single Market Committee. Ian Talbot, Chief Executive of Chambers Ireland, is the Co-Chairperson of the Global Europe Committee and also acts as the Deputy President of the organisation since his re-election by Plenary Assembly in October, 2019. OUR WORK IN 2020 In the last decade, the EU was tasked with addressing the impacts of the financial crisis. The next ten years pose a very different set of challenges, where we must decarbonise the economy and invest in our cities and regions so that they are adapted to a net-zero carbon

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CHAMBER FEATURE EUROCHAMBRES / EU ENGAGEMENT 2020

future. Despite the challenges that COVID-19 posed, we continued to advocate the need to press ahead with important reforms in the EU on behalf of our members. In doing so, we made several strong representations nationally and at the EU-level to reinforce the necessity of trade and investment. We reinforced the need to improve the internationalisation of SMEs, which is critical if we are to improve productivity and innovation, in addition to sustainable supply chains. Ireland’s ability to benefit from the huge negotiating strength and resources of the EU’s trade and investment infrastructure continues to lead to ever greater export opportunities across the globe, providing new markets to counter the uncertainties prevailing in some of our traditional markets. Trade and investment were hugely important throughout 2020, especially as DG Trade looked to re-imagine these policy areas into the future. A business-friendly framework for a sustainable economy, in line with the Commission’s pioneering Green Deal, was another area of huge significance for the network. Some of Chambers Ireland’s work in this space included a series of ‘Green Deal’ webinars which tackled pertinent issues such as ‘A Just Transition for the Regions’, ‘Skills and Jobs for the Net Zero Transition’ and ‘Innovation, Infrastructure and the Net Zero Transition’ with a range of experts from ESB, Ervia, EirGrid, DG Energy, NWRA, NESC, IWEA. CHAMBERS IN BRUSSELS As part of our work to advocate for a more business-friendly Europe, a delegation from the Irish Chamber Network, led by Chambers Ireland, visited Brussels in January 2020, and met with key officials across the European Commission to discuss matters of importance to the Irish business community.

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During the visit, the delegation met with representatives from the Taskforce for Relations with the UK, DG Trade, DG Clima, and DG ECFIN. The delegation also attended a breakfast briefing at the European Parliament, hosted by Seán Kelly MEP and his team, where Ireland’s MEPs briefed the delegation on their current policy briefs and the work of their committees. Also attending the breakfast were MEPs Mairéad McGuinness, Frances Fitzgerald, and Billy Kelleher. The continued uncertainty of Brexit, the proposed global taxation regime, the Commission’s new Green Deal, the future of regions and cities, and the anticipated role of Ireland in the EU (particularly post-Brexit) were among the topics dissected during these meetings. It was also consistently highlighted that there are many opportunities for Irish business through proactive engagement with the EU, but Brussels legislators must also be cognisant of the impact that wide-reaching regulation can have, not only on small enterprises, but small economies. The delegation was also fortunate to meet with top officials in thenTrade Commissioner Phil Hogan’s cabinet, Tom Tynan and Dermot Ryan, who discussed resetting the relationship with Washington, putting China as a key priority on the trade agenda, and the collapse of the WTO appellate body and how best to tackle this going forward. The Irish Permanent Representation to the EU hosted a briefing which delved into the more technical side of the next EU Multiannual Financial Framework (2021-2027) and the likelihood of Ireland’s increasing contribution following Brexit. Climate change was high on the agenda, as was the need for Ireland, as members of the Hansa Alliance, to continue to form alliances with smaller economies in order to have greater negotiating power at the Council of Ministers and European Council meetings table.

INTO 2021 The European Commission, headed up by Ursula von der Leyen, has an ambitious European Green Deal agenda for making the EU’s economy sustainable by transforming climate and environmental challenges into opportunities across all policy areas, aiming to make the transition just and inclusive for all. While the COVID-19 pandemic has meant that some of the Commission’s attention has needed to switch to more pressing recovery plans, these have largely been agreed with the overarching green agenda at their core. Chambers Ireland welcomes this move and will work towards these policy goals in 2021, as part of its commitment to the UN SDGs. The long-awaited EU-UK FTA agreement, known as the ‘EU-UK Trade and Cooperation Agreement’, is a significant relief to the many businesses who will continue to trade with the UK. While this is good for relations and reduces some costs involved, this FTA is fundamentally different to the freedoms enjoyed when the UK was a member of the EU and the Single Market. Chambers Ireland will continue to ensure that its members are aware of all tools available to mitigate disruptions to their operations and will continue to engage with our UK and EU counterparts to minimise interruptions to trade and supply chains. Beyond this, Chambers Ireland will continue to engage with the ongoing debate surrounding the future of Europe, and Ireland’s place in it, with a view to ensuring that the EU continues to be a stable pro-trade, business-friendly and sustainable environment.

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CHAMBERS IRELAND 2021 CHAMBERS IRELAND: THE YEAR IN PICTURES

CHAMBERS IRELAND: The Year in PICTURES

InBUSINESS looks back over the last 12 months with some snapshots of Chambers Ireland’s work in representing members both nationally and internationally.

BRAY & DISTRICT CHAMBER Bray Chamber presented an award to Ciaran Flanagan of Tansey & Co. during the Bray Endeavour Awards 2020 recognising the business’ 100 years of trading in the town.

Mary Doherty, Bank of Ireland Community Enterprise Manager Mayo; Michael Costello, Bank of Ireland County Manager; Cllr Seamus Weir, Cathaoirleach Ballina MD; Mags Downey Martin, Manager Ballina Chamber & Anne Marie Flynn, Mayo North Promotions Office pictured when Ballina won the Bank of Ireland ‘Begin Together Award’, as the town topped the 7,000-14,000 category, spearheaded by the Bank of Ireland.

BALLINA CHAMBER

CAVAN CHAMBER

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When businesses began to open back up after lockdown in September 2020, Cavan Chamber had window stickers printed up for their ‘Love Cavan’ campaign.

COUNTY CARLOW CHAMBER

County Carlow Chamber of Commerce welcomed Mr. Sandeep Kumar, Ambassador of India to Ireland, as part of the Chamber Trade Connection Series in July 2020. Pictured: Colin Duggan, President of County Carlow Chamber; Noel Doyle, Equinox Educational Services; Mohammed Hussain, Curry Garden Carlow; Mr. Sandeep Kumar, Ambassador of India to Ireland and Brian O’Farrell, CEO, County Carlow Chamber of Commerce

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CHAMBERS IRELAND 2021 CHAMBERS IRELAND: THE YEAR IN PICTURES

DUBLIN CHAMBER

DÚN LAOGHAIRE-RATHDOWN CHAMBER Minister Catherine Martin T.D. with Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown Chamber President, Brian Kirwan and CEO, Gabby Mallon in Airfield Estate, Dundrum for the 2020 DLR County Business Awards.

Cork Chamber hosted a hustings event with Cork candidates in January 2020 ahead of Election 2020. Pictured: Daniel McConnell, Political Editor with the Irish Examiner; Donnchadh O’Laoghaire, TD Sinn Fein; Michael McGrath, TD Fianna Fail; Sinead Halpin, Social Democrats; Conor Healy, CEO, Cork Chamber; Paula Cogan, President, Cork Chamber; Senator Jerry Buttimer, Fine Gael; Cllr. John Maher, Labour; Tom Fitzpatrick, Editor, Irish Examiner and Cllr Oliver Moran, Green Party.

BANTRY CHAMBER Bantry Chamber’s new Remote Working hub opened on 31 July 2020.

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Dublin Chamber’s AGM Dinner, February 2020, sponsored by EY in The Convention Centre, Dublin. Photographed: Frank O’ Keeffe, Managing Partner, EY; Catherine Moroney, President, Dublin Chamber; Mary Rose Burke, CEO, Dublin Chamber; Dr. David Dempsey, Country Leader and General Manager, Salesforce Ireland

CORK CHAMBER

DROGHEDA CHAMBER Drogheda & District Chamber partnered with the team at Tapit in July 2020 to bring real cashback benefits when they shop with local businesses. Photographed: Chamber President, Robert Murray; Tapit Co-Founders, Garrett Gunn & Gavin Duffy; with local business owners and members of the Drogheda & District Chamber 

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CHAMBERS IRELAND 2021 CHAMBERS IRELAND: THE YEAR IN PICTURES

DUNGARVAN & WEST WATERFORD CHAMBER DUNDALK CHAMBER Dundalk Chamber hosted a Brexit Conference in early March 2020, “Building the Cross Border Economy- Post Brexit”.

In July 2020, Dungarvan & West Waterford Chamber got involved with a colourful street stencilling initiative in Dungarvan town promoting positive ‘Shop Local’ messages.

GALWAY CHAMBER December 2020 saw the launch of the Galway Chamber Business Awards 2020. Pictured: Flortia Dolly, Tax Director PwC; Mayor Mike Cubbard; Noreen Conway, Acting Manager Galway Technology Centre; John Brennan, CEO WestBic; Paraic Waters, Tax Partner EY; Kenny Deery, CEO Galway Chamber; JP Gilmartin, President Galway Chamber; Gerry Dillon, Head of Operations & Development Shannon Group plc and Evin Cusack, Head of AIB Galway & Mayo.

COUNTY KILDARE CHAMBER KILKENNY CHAMBER President Colin Ahern, General Manager, Kilkenny Ormonde Hotel receives the Chain of Office from outgoing President Marion Acreman.

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In September 2020, County Kildare Chamber introduced their allnew interactive app for Apple & Android devices. Features include a Chamber news feed, a members’ news feed, an upcoming events feed, push notifications for special offers and news releases as well as all the latest information about the Chamber.

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CHAMBERS IRELAND 2021 CHAMBERS IRELAND: THE YEAR IN PICTURES

COBH & HARBOUR CHAMBER In November 2020 Johanna Murphy was announced as the new President of Cobh & Harbour Chamber, pictured with incoming Vice President, John Gately.

LETTERKENNY CHAMBER Members of Letterkenny Chamber gather at the iconic Polestar sculpture as a sign of hope and community as they re-opened the local economy.

In February 2020 Laois Chamber hosted their inaugural Laois Jobs Fair, offering over 400 jobs and with 3,000 job seekers in attendance. The event was sponsored by Laois LEO, Laois County Council, Laois Partnership, Glanbia Cheese, LOETB, Novo Recruitment and Laois Chamber.

LAOIS CHAMBER

In February 2020, South Dublin Chamber met with Election Candidates. Pictured are Brian Buckley, Greyhound Recycling & Recovery Limited; Cliodhna O’Byrne, Chamber Programme Manager, South Dublin Chamber; Candidate Emer Higgins, Fine Gael and Peter Byrne, CEO South Dublin Chamber.

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SOUTH DUBLIN CHAMBER

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CHAMBERS IRELAND 2021 CHAMBERS IRELAND: THE YEAR IN PICTURES

COUNTY WEXFORD CHAMBER SHANNON CHAMBER In February 2020 Shannon Chamber hosted a seminar on data protection in conjunction with Holmes O’Malley Sexton solicitors and the Data Protection Commission and sponsored by Ei Electronics. Pictured at the seminar are Helen Downes, CEO, Shannon Chamber; Michael Murphy, Holmes O’Malley Sexton; Garrett O’Neill, Data Protection Commission and Peter Murphy, Ei Electronics.

In October 2020, the County Wexford Chamber Golf Classic was hosted at the New Ross Golf Club and sponsored by Zurich. The Chamber’s chosen charity partner was Meals on Wheels in New Ross, who worked throughout the pandemic providing daily hot meals for the most vulnerable.

Feb 2020 saw the Meath Apprenticeship Expo. Photographed are Elaine Peters, INTREO; Paula McCaul, Meath Chamber; Siobhan Keogh, Regional Skills Mid East; Bill Sweeney, County Meath Chamber; and John V. Farrelly, President, County Meath Chamber.

COUNTY MEATH CHAMBER

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CHAMBERS IRELAND 2021 CHAMBERS IRELAND: THE YEAR IN PICTURES

WESTPORT CHAMBER

TRALEE CHAMBER ALLIANCE July 2020 saw Tralee Chamber launch ‘MyTralee’, an online platform to support local businesses.

In June 2020, the Westport Chamber Committee with the help of Mayo Footballer Lee Keegan, launched the ‘This is Westport’ campaign to let people know that Westport is open for business after the first lockdown. The aim of the campaign was to encourage people to shop local and support local businesses. Pictured: Oliver Whyte; Laura Staunton, Chamber Vice President; Danny McLaughlin; James O’Doherty; Lee Keegan and Helen Gavin, Chamber President.

WATERFORD CHAMBER Mayor of Waterford City & County, Cllr John Pratt, launching ‘Chamber Netwalk’, an initiative by Waterford Chamber to encourage businesspeople to get active on their lunchbreaks during January and February. Pictured with former Waterford hurler Shane O’Sullivan of Inspiring Excellence and Waterford Chamber President, Jonathan Earl.

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COUNTY TIPPERARY CHAMBER

County Tipperary Skillnet & Chamber hosted a highly informative event for International Women’s Day which was attended by women from County Tipperary. Guests were welcomed by County Tipperary Skillnet manager, Karen Walters and heard from guest speaker, Emma Lacy, Horan Automation.

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CHAMBER SPOTLIGHT CORK CHAMBER

Building

Economic CORK CHAMBER, THE CHAMBER OF THE YEAR FOR 2020, OUTLINE THEIR SUSTAINABLE CORK PROGRAMME.

2020: THE YEAR LIKE NO OTHER Networking, knowledge sharing and events have long been one of the better-known aspects of Chamber activity. In 2020, Cork Chamber, like so many others, changed how they connect with members overnight, hosting more than 100 virtual events with 6000+ registrations. Members’ will to connect, grow and network is as strong, if not stronger than ever.

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Resilience

I

n May, 2020, Cork Chamber initiated the Sustainable Cork Programme to look to the recovery over the short to medium term, though also with a longer-term view as we navigated through the pandemic. Unfortunately, the contextual challenges that pre-dated COVID-19 were also all too real: Namely, climate change and the need for urgent and committed climate action, moving from words to deeds, as the well-known Cork Nagle family motto says so well. Added to that were the challenges of Brexit and the persisting uncertainties accompanying this. The Sustainable Cork Programme was started to design a vision for a more sustainable and resilient Cork, framed through the powerful lens of the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and energised with a thriving business community. There are 17 Sustainable Development Goals in total, adopted in 2015 by the United Nations General Assembly and developed as a blueprint for achieving a better and more sustainable future for all by 2030. Cork Chamber, and the national Chamber network, are championing five of the SDGs, and while there are crossovers between the goals, homing in on these five has been beneficial at the outset. A common enough mistake is that the SDGs are focused on the environment and climate solely. Though these are critical areas within the goals, they are not the sole focus. Instead, the SDGs cover a range of areas from poverty eradication to reducing inequality, economic growth to access to education services, and environmental protection, though all SDGs are interlinked. For example, quality of life, environmental health, and business competitiveness are all connected and fundamentally woven together. In starting the Sustainable Cork Programme at an incredibly challenging time for businesses, for everyone right across society, we wanted to explore how to build back better, to lay those foundations of resilience and sustainability for generations to come.

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CHAMBER SPOTLIGHT CORK CHAMBER

As part of this we organised ten virtual discussions across the Cork business community. We had more than 100 representatives from a huge variety of businesses types and sizes join these discussions. The focus was on exploring the challenges and the opportunities for a strong recovery, in parallel with a discussion on the vision for Cork. Our Sustainable Cork Programme Report consulted almost 1,000 people and consistent themes emerged time and time again: Sustained support through the recovery and post COVID-19 Climate action Government policy certainty and support for climate innovation Enhanced public and sustainable transport infrastructure The delivery of Project Ireland 2040, Government’s long-term strategy to make Ireland a better country for all The quickened rollout of the National Broadband Plan More people living in the heart of our city and towns Flexible working Support to transition business skills, activities, production models and materials to support climate ambitions and a thriving low carbon economy Enhancement and protection of ecology, from the planting of trees to wildflower verges Real equality for people of any gender, race or background Childcare Competitiveness and talent attraction Support for cluster and innovation hubs to support emerging businesses, skills and synergies in our culture and arts sector, and climate innovation. The research paints a very clear picture of Cork, with business and community sharing common goals and ideals. A Cork that people want to live in, work in and enjoy, a place where we want to be, and how our future could look. While 2020 is hard to look on fondly, there has been a reframing of priorities, a reigniting of community spirit and ‘meitheal’,

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President Paula Cogan and CEO Conor Healy receive their Chamber of the Year Award 2020 from Chambers Ireland Chief Executive Ian Talbot

a reconnection with our surroundings and nature. Quality of life, when challenged with such restrictions and the increasing difficulties experienced by so many in our health services, the vulnerable, our older community, has resurged as the greatest priority of all. An equilibrium that supports connection, family, community and our environment supported by clear leadership and a thriving business community are constituent parts of a tapestry that embeds resilience, shifts behaviours, champions green and clean, and sets us all on a future pathway that is sustainable, inclusive and healthier for all. Cork Chamber is progressing the Sustainable Cork Programme through 2021 with the continuation of a successful series of webinars and training, all pinned on one common goal: To build greater economic resilience. These sessions attract a fresh and disparate range of attendees, all keen to explore how, together, we ensure that our region develops and grows sustainably.

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05/03/2021 10:42


COVER STORY Mags Brennan, Head of Business Banking at permanent tsb, outlines how they are helping businesses through challenging times and into a better tomorrow.

Growing

Future into the

The

last year has seen significant challenges for businesses of all sizes across Ireland, with many sectors facing an almost complete shutdown of operations, and companies of all kinds struggling to retain their staff and continue to do business. In this time of great uncertainty, the need for support – both financial and advisory - from a financial institution has never been greater. permanent tsb has more than risen to the occasion to solidify themselves as a very viable alternative in the Irish business banking sector. It is perhaps fitting that Mags Brennan, Head of Business Banking at permanent tsb and President of Chambers Ireland, stepped into the role just as the first lockdown began. “I joined on March 4th, 2020, and then COVID-19 happened, so you can imagine what that was like,” she tells me. “It’s interesting to join an organisation like this and then nine days later have to start working remotely, but it was actually a great way to understand the organisation and figure out how you can best support your customers at a time of great need.” Supporting business customers is something that Mags says is “in my DNA, because I have been dealing with them for so long” and so she was a perfect fit for permanent tsb. Having worked in senior business roles with AIB in Dublin, Cork and New York, Mags became Head of Business Banking, Cork City & County, with them in 2012 before taking on responsibility for National SME Sectoral Strategy and Specialism. The chance to work with businesses again brought her back to permanent tsb, when she saw opportunities appearing in a changing market. This coincided with her recent appointment as President of Chambers Ireland. She became involved with Chambers when she moved to Cork in 2011 as part of her AIB role, before being asked to join the Chambers Ireland Board representing Cork Chamber when she returned to Dublin. “It is important to have an organisation like Chambers Ireland representing businesses collectively to ensure we are pushing for supports from and involvement with Government, 34

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Mags Brennan, Head of Business Banking, permanent tsb and President of Chambers Ireland

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Finbarr O’Rourke

ONE OF THE KEY THINGS FOR US IS TO BUILD THAT TRUST WITH OUR CUSTOMERS BY DOING WHAT WE SAY WE WILL DO.”

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and I am delighted to have been voted in as President last in September,” she tells me. A CHANGING APPROACH The opportunity for change is something that drew Mags back into the business banking sector after a short time away. “I recognised that we needed another business bank in the market, and we needed to be thinking about business customers in a different way. I wasn’t sure a bigger bank would be able to change as quickly as a smaller bank, and a lot of change is required for business customers in the market – banks need to be more agile about decisionmaking and getting money to the customer when they need it. “There is an opening in the market for a bank to deal differently with business customers, and I thought that if somebody could figure out the ‘secret sauce’ as to how to stand out, that would be a great opportunity. “While permanent tsb has been supporting business customers for the last five years, the bank was not prioritising the business market historically. However, Business Customers are now a key priority, with massive support from new CEO, Eamonn Crowley, his management team, the Board and the rest of the organisation. We want to become the best personal and small business bank in the market.” That ‘secret sauce’ is a more personalised approach that engages with each individual business customer to discover what they need and how that support can be provided. “I was looking at the supports and details of how to get payment breaks, for example, to our customers as soon as possible,” Mags tells me, “and I saw that while permanent tsb had 25,000 SME customers, we have a smaller number of borrowing customers, so it was easy for us to deal with our business customers one-to-one, ensuring they could get the supports they needed, or even just reaching out to them to find out how we could help.” 36

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Mags Brennan, Head of Business Banking, permanent tsb and President of Chambers Ireland

CHALLENGES & SOLUTIONS The biggest challenge businesses faced at the start of the pandemic, and even now, is uncertainty, according to Mags, followed by the need to adapt, become digital and facilitate remote working. While that digital transformation happened quickly, uncertainty remains. We don’t yet know when we will return to a ‘new normal’ and companies and their staff face uncertainties about the long-term viability of their business and their employment. “For the retail and hospitality sectors, there have been many issues regarding whether they would be able to remain open, when they could reopen, if they could keep their staff employed,” Mags says. “And if you think about the uncertainty they faced at the start of the pandemic, what they are going through now is ten times worse because while we can see a vaccine coming, we don’t have a definite timeline on vaccinations, so it is difficult for those sectors to know how long they need to hold on for, and what supports they need to be able to hang on until the economy returns to normal.” “On the other hand,” Mags continues, “other sectors are doing well – manufacturing, transport & logistics, technology, agri – they have been impacted slightly by Brexit, but they are able to operate very well, even during the pandemic.” For business customers looking to survive, and those looking to strive, permanent tsb’s range of products mean they can help companies in every circumstance, with their personalised support allowing them to take a proactive approach to their future. “We can talk face to face, even if virtually, with every one of our business customers who is impacted by Brexit, or COVID-19, or both, and have a meaningful discussion,” Mags tells me. “For example, when COVID-19 hit last March, we rang all of our customers, regardless of whether they are borrowing with us or not, starting with those in hospitality and retail because they were the most immediately affected sectors. “We continued to do this throughout the pandemic because some customers InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2021

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Finbarr O’Rourke

THE BANK THAT GIVES A ‘YES’ QUICKLY OR SAYS ‘NO, I CAN’T DO THAT BUT I CAN DO THIS INSTEAD’ IS THE ONE THAT WILL SEE SUCCESS.”

could tell you that they were ok, but two months later they might not be – they may have thought COVID-19 would be over sooner – so it is all about keeping in touch and listening to their needs.” PARTNERSHIP Another new departure for permanent tsb was its partnership with the Strategic Banking Corporation of Ireland (SBCI) to provide access to their Future Growth Loan Scheme, and this has proven to be a success. “permanent tsb had never done anything with the SBCI before, but to become relevant in this market, we needed to engage and start partnering with them to ensure that we were bringing particular funds at reduced pricing to our business customers,” Mags tells me. “It was one of the key products I focused on initially to set up. It has been hugely successful, and we have been inundated with applications, not just from our own customers but from non-permanent tsb customers too, which shows the InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2021

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need for another bank in the sector. We launched this in November of 2020 and it is likely that the total funds we were allocated through this partnership will be gone very soon. “The interesting thing about that fund,” Mags continues, “is that it is not a scheme for businesses impacted by COVID-19, it is a scheme for growing businesses, so its popularity shows there is room for optimism when it comes to businesses in Ireland getting through the pandemic and coming out strong on the other side. “We are seeing strong demand from all types and sizes of businesses, including start-ups with good business models with contracts in place with customers that will support cash flow. Demand has picked up in Q4 of 2020 and is continuing this year.” Restrictions on business and movement meant customers couldn’t meet with permanent tsb staff to apply for the funds, but this was overcome when they partnered with a Fintech to map out a digital customer journey that allows customers to apply and upload documents online through the permanent tsb website. CONTINUED SUPPORT For those companies who are starting out during these difficult times, or who have found it difficult to stay afloat, permanent tsb is continuing to provide payment breaks on a customer-by-customer basis, as well as additional working capital support. “If a business customer comes to us and says they are continuing to struggle, we can put supports in place for them to take them through a six or nine-month period when they otherwise wouldn’t be able to generate cash flow,” Mags tells me, “and again, we are able to do this because we are a smaller organisation who can get to all of our customers.” Having met with success in 2020, permanent tsb aims to significantly increase lending this year. “We are looking to grow in 2021 and

onwards,” Mags tells me. “The SBCI was our first partnership, but we will see further partnerships in the first half of 2021 to support products we don’t currently have in place.” The big differentiator, according to Mags, is not just understanding what a business customer needs, but being able to provide a solution quickly. “Banks have lost a lot of trust from customers over the years, so one of the key things for us is to build that trust by doing what we say we will do,” she says. “That means fast decisions, whether it’s yes or no, and getting money to our customers quickly. “I have seen the frustration in business customers when dealing with banks, generally around waiting a long time for a decision. I think the bank that gives a ‘yes’ quickly or says ‘no, I can’t do that but I can do this instead’ is the one that will see success. Businesses also complain that they are waiting six months to get the money into their account, so the bank that can support faster loan draw down will stand out in the market.” GROWTH The growth of permanent tsb’s business banking is intrinsically tied with the growth of the companies it supports. “We want to grow our business in conjunction with our customers,” says Mags, who believes the message to businesses is clear. “We will see a recovery, we just have to get out of the current situation first. From a market perspective I see a lot of change with new entrants, and there are great opportunities for a bank like permanent tsb. We’ve been around for 200 years, and our long legacy within the community, combined with our approach to personalised banking, places us very well to be the best small business bank in Ireland. “From a permanent tsb perspective, I’d like to say to businesses – here is another bank, another choice, come and talk to us. We have the expertise, we have the money to lend, we want to listen and we want to help businesses, firstly come out of COVID-19, and secondly, grow into the future.” 37

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PARTNER PROFILE PENINSULA

A Shift in

Focus The Key Role of HR Has Been Highlighted by COVID-19 Challenges.

2020

was a challenging year right across Irish society. From our position as business consultants, we saw the challenges that a year of lockdowns presented for the business sector. Since the initial announcement in March, Peninsula’s focus shifted almost overnight from helping our clients grow their operations to helping them manage restrictions. Some of our clients had to pull down the shutters temporarily, while others needed help with queries around allowing staff to work from home. Pre-COVID-19, our advice typically focused on managing day-to-day HR operations and strategic HR planning issues like recruitment and retention. Last year, the nature of our advice concentrated on crisis management, health & safety management and business continuity. It is also clear that the role of HR has significantly broadened to one that needs to be resilient, flexible and skilled. Below we take a look at some of the many challenges HR professionals have faced throughout the past year. BUSINESS CONTINUITY As the restrictions shut down large sections of the economy, staff working in HR functions needed to react quickly to

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assess the eligibility of their business for state income supports. We assisted clients in determining their eligibility for the Temporary Wage Subsidy Scheme, then the Employment Wage Subsidy Scheme. Likewise, many employers needed help deciding how to handle temporary lay-offs and informing staff about their entitlements to unemployment or illness benefit payments. We see this business continuity focus continuing in the short-term until the stop/start nature of the restrictions ends and more certainty returns. HR will then play a fundamental role in the transition towards fully opening back up the business sector.

REMOTE WORK Throughout the first lockdown, we closed our offices and staff worked remotely. To keep communication channels open with both clients and staff, we relied heavily on video calls, screen sharing, and online collaboration tools. Our own experience of the sudden move to remote working put us in a strong position to advise our clients. As the Government has recently launched the National Remote Work Strategy, we expect to see a big increase in the number of queries around handling requests for remote work. Legislation introducing an employee right to request remote work is expected to be in place by the end of September and we will be monitoring this area closely. The last year has been a large-scale experiment in remote working. Many businesses have invested in IT InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2021

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PARTNER PROFILE PENINSULA

upgrades and shown impressive adaptability to put remote working arrangements in place. We expect to provide a lot of advice around both the productivity and health & safety aspects of managing a remote workforce in 2021. We see our BrightHR software, which incorporates both HR and health & safety tools, playing a key role in helping clients manage their teams remotely. HEALTH & SAFETY The pandemic has also aligned a business’s HR function more closely with health & safety. Last May, the Government published a range of mandatory workplace protocols in the Work Safely Protocol document. This document outlines measures to reduce the risk of COVID-19 transmission in the workplace. From an employer’s perspective, it also adds another layer of health & safety compliance. To support our clients, we created a full suite of software to support employers in line with changing health & safety government guidance. Our BrightHR software includes a Back-toWork Navigator that helps ensure employers remain compliant with return-to-work protocols. It also helps employers with every element of bringing staff back to work safely, including a rota planner to easily set up staggered shifts in-line with Government guidance, and unlimited cloud-based storage for risk assessments and other compliance documents. The availability of the vaccine also means employers will need to update their risk assessment, and the latest BrightHR tool Vacctrak will help employers manage vaccine rollout. MENTAL HEALTH Some employers may overlook the requirement in the Work Safely Protocol to put measures in place to help staff deal with anxiety or stress. Staff returning to work may be dealing with traumatic events like the death or serious illness of a loved one. Many will be worried about finances and vulnerable employees may be worried about the risk of infection at work. With a large portion of staff working remotely, or facing a different workload, it is essential that organisations keep the mental wellbeing of their workforce in mind. We have received more queries this past year about the benefits of providing staff with access to our Employee Assistance Programme which offers a confidential, ongoing advice and support service to staff. InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2021

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“OUR

ROUTINES HAVE BEEN TURNED UPSIDE DOWN AND HR PERSONNEL

SHOULD BE MORE INVOLVED IN ORGANISATIONWIDE DECISIONS BECAUSE, ON A HUMAN LEVEL AS WELL AS ON AN ORGANISATIONAL LEVEL, THE

RETURN TO WORK WILL BE CHALLENGING.“

THE YEAR AHEAD While it is difficult to make predictions, the focus should shift from crisis management to handling the transition from lockdown later this year. HR personnel will likely be more involved in organisational decisions as both productivity and employee relations look set to be managed more remotely. Our routines have been turned upside down and HR personnel should be more involved in organisation-wide decisions because, on a human level as well as on an organisational level, the return to work will be challenging. We think HR will continue to play a wider role in the strategic development of business. The COVID-19 crisis has highlighted that the contribution HR personnel make to a business is critical to their success.

COVID-19 HR CHECKLIST Is your workplace compliant with the Work Safely Protocol? Have you considered how the rollout of the vaccine will impact your workforce and health & safety management? Have you updated your Employment Contract and Employee Handbook to incorporate workplace developments around COVID-19related topics like remote working/health & safety updates/staff mental health? Employees will soon have a right to request remote working arrangements. Have you considered how this will impact your workplace and the health & safety requirements of home workstations? Are you investing in HR technology or software to manage remote workers? Managing productivity and maintaining positive employee relations will be two of the biggest challenges. If you’re relying on Government income supports like the Employment Wage Subsidy Scheme, are you prepared for the time when these schemes wind down? Is there adequate experience/expertise within the business to handle a restructure if needed? Have you taken steps to promote positive employee health and wellbeing?

Peninsula’s HR and Health & Safety experts would like to offer a complimentary phone consultation to any Chambers Ireland member who needs assistance with HR, employment law or health & safety issues. To claim your free advice, simply call the dedicated Chambers Ireland line on 1890 253 104 or visit peninsula-ie.com. 39

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PARTNER PROFILE ESB

A

Brighter Future

ESB’s Smart Energy Services is helping businesses save money and reduce their carbon footprint.

Ciaran Gallagher, head of ESB’s Smart Energy Services

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I

f the current climate has taught business owners anything, it is that they are not just working for the present, they’re investing in the future too. Whether that’s pandemic-proofing their organisation, or developing climate action plans, business owners are recognising the benefits of investing now to safeguard their future. ESB is helping large-scale Irish businesses to not only reduce their carbon footprint, but bank savings with the recent announcement of its a75m energy fund. ESB’s Smart Energy Services team provide businesses with up-front capital for energy infrastructural projects that, in turn, reduce emissions and save money. Companies that partner with ESB in this programme can save up to 60% in energy costs over a five-year period, according to the leading energy organisation. HOW DOES IT WORK? The a75m energy fund is open to large businesses with an overall energy bill of more than a200,000 per year and is used to finance large-scale energy projects such as heating, lighting, electric vehicle charging, renewables and batteries. “Energy is one of the most significant costs faced by businesses and even small savings can yield healthy bottom-line benefits,” says Ciaran Gallagher (pictured), head of ESB’s Smart Energy Services. “With energy savings of up to 60% achievable and no upfront capital costs, this is an opportune time for businesses to go green with the help of ESB expertise and funding. The programme is balance sheet-neutral, and we produce an initial analysis of energy saving potential at no cost to the client. There has never been a better time to plan for a low carbon future.”  InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2021

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PARTNER PROFILE ESB

LOW-CARBON FUTURE It is estimated that these energy projects, based on a mix of technologies, is equivalent to taking two million tonnes of CO2 out of the atmosphere over the next 15 years. This is also equivalent to taking 63,000 cars off the road permanently, planting 11 million trees or cancelling out the emissions of approximately 35,000 family homes (the residential use of a city such as Limerick or Galway) in the same timeframe. Providing such support to business customers is a key element of ESB’s Brighter Future strategy in leading the transition to a low-carbon future. Projects can vary, including cooling and heating, lighting, battery storage, roof-top solar, ground or air source heat pumps, Combined Heat and Power (CHP) systems or electric vehicle charging. Once the initial capital expenditure cost – provided by ESB – is repaid, the business will enjoy 100% of the savings. Almost 300 large-scale energy users, including Tesco and DAA, are already working with ESB to avail of this innovative fund. BRIGHTER FUTURE The electrification of transport is another key element of ESB’s Brighter Future strategy, with organisations also seeing the benefits of investing in electric vehicles (EVs) and charging infrastructure. ESB’s Smart Energy Services is working with decision-makers across a variety of sectors, creating bespoke solutions to satisfy the charging requirements of EV drivers. For instance, in 2020, the Crowne Plaza Hotel at Dublin Airport put Ireland’s first electric bus on the road. The fully electric Volvo bus and its EV charging solution were delivered by ESB. Using high-power ultrafast 150kW plug-in charging means the bus requires only 90 minutes charging each day, allowing it to be integrated smoothly into the daily hotel schedule. ESB’s Smart Energy Services recently completed the installation of 47 EV charge points at Tesco car parks across the country. In addition to this, Tesco Ireland also work with ESB’s Smart Energy Services Energy Management Hub. The Hub is a team of engineers and analysts who remotely monitor Tesco’s 151 stores to analyse energy consumption, heat, refrigeration and light through extensive submetering.  ESB’s Smart Energy Services uses InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2021

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Marguerite Sayers, Director of Customer Solutions, ESB Ireland (left) with Kari Daniels, CEO, Tesco Ireland

“ENERGY IS ONE OF THE MOST SIGNIFICANT COSTS FACED BY BUSINESSES AND EVEN

SMALL SAVINGS CAN YIELD HEALTHY BOTTOM-LINE BENEFITS.“

sophisticated analytics to assess if equipment is faulty or not running optimally, and tickets are raised for Tesco maintenance and partners to perform immediate corrective action. As part of this service, heating and light schedules are centrally maintained by ESB, and new schedules are downloaded remotely in response to changes in store opening hours. This ensures that energy management in Tesco stores is optimised. ESB’s Smart Energy Services also partnered with Aer Arann on a lighting upgrade, one of several critical measures which ensures the airline service continues to offer quality and price efficiency. Jarlath Conneely, CEO of Aer Arann, says: “The Aer Arann premises and environs have been transformed with a new lighting project by ESB’s Smart Energy Services. Our passenger lounges at the four airports are brighter, more cheerful and a safer experience for our customers.” “All the indications are that the implementation of the upgraded lighting throughout our business will meet all our objectives of improved safety, sustainability, productivity and reduced costs”, continues Jarlath. To save on your business’s energy bills and reduce its carbon footprint, find out more about ESB’s new €75m fund at esb.ie/smartenergy 41

05/03/2021 11:05


PARTNER PROFILE WESTERN DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION

Opportunity Tomás Ó Síocháin, CEO of the Western Development Commission, insists now is the time for the west of Ireland to renew itself.

T

OUT OF ADVERSITY

he Western Development Commission (WDC) has undergone immense change in the last year and a half, a change that has been massively accelerated by the effects of the pandemic. Tomás Ó Síocháin, CEO of the Western Development Commission (pictured), says: “This is a very difficult time for business based in the west of Ireland, and indeed businesses right across the world. Some sectors have borne the brunt of the global pandemic and have shown remarkable resilience.The WDC is analysing the impact and planning for the future. That means supporting business in growth areas, building the capacity for remote work and, more importantly remote careers, and bringing the story of Ireland’s unique Atlantic Coast to the world. Our team, while working almost completely remotely since last March have been busier than ever.”

Sligo company Overstock, featured in the WDC Image Bank

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Lough Gill Brewery in Sligo, one of the companies featured in the WDC Image Bank

REGIONAL PROMOTION In August of last year, the WDC launched a new brand identity with the aim of showcasing the work the organisation has been doing in promoting the economic and social development of Galway, Donegal, Sligo, Roscommon, Mayo, Clare, and Leitrim. This was soon followed by the launch of their ‘More To Life’ campaign, emphasising the opportunity the west has to renew itself by attracting thousands of young professionals and families to make new lives in the region. The WDC also supports businesses to tell their story, and in December of 2020, the organisation launched a new ‘Image Bank’ which hosts a collection of images showcasing businesses based along the western counties. The images are freely available for use by stakeholders who aim to promote social and economic developments in the west. Sligo was chosen as the initial pilot for the project, with Donegal and Leitrim set to launch in early 2021 and the remaining counties to follow.  InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2021

05/03/2021 11:08


PARTNER PROFILE WESTERN DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION

PULSE OF THE WEST In a bid to further support businesses in the west, the WDC also launched the podcast series, ‘Pulse of the West’ which provides a platform for organisations to give others a chance to hear their story and showcase the region as a place for leadership in professional innovation and development. The series has already covered a range of topics including remote working, business investment and the effect of climate change. ‘Pulse of the West’ will continue to delve into important topics affecting those in the region with expert insights across a range of issues over the coming months. TALENT TOOL Another ambitious project the team have been developing is a ‘Talent Tool’ called Westernjobs.ie. The platform will act as a one-stop shop for jobseekers looking to find a role and for companies to recruit key talent in the west of Ireland. Uniquely, the platform also offers stakeholders the ability to generate reports, giving them a view of talent and skills in the region, which has previously been unavailable. This function will better equip agencies seeking to provide useful skills data to employers and for potential FDI investors. REGIONAL LEADERSHIP      The WDC has been at the forefront of Regional Leadership in relation to flexible working conditions for almost 20 years. With the sudden and seismic shift to remote working caused by the pandemic, much of their work in this area had to be fast-tracked. More than 16 months before COVID-19, the WDC had begun investigating the opportunities to develop remote working along the Atlantic Economic Corridor. It set out to map every hub/coworking space  in operation or in planning and research found that there are more than 100 hubs already in operation. The Atlantic Economic Corridor Hubs Project was created to establish a community network between these hubs, identify their challenges, provide support, and drive footfall to the hubs in every rural town and village across the west. This project is now ready to help support the hub community by launching a new strategy, a suite of online ICT systems, including a state-of-theart booking system and a brand-new marketing campaign to reach the diverse audience. The project will be trialled in early 2021 across the AEC and will then be rolled out nationally later this year, as part of the Government’s National Remote Working Strategy.   InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2021

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In May, 2020, the Policy team working alongside the Whitaker Institute at NUI Galway published summary data from two phases of a National Remote Working Survey. The survey gathered responses from more than 14,000 employees who were already working fully remotely or doing a mix of onsite and remote working. In January of this year, the Department of Enterprise, Trade and Employment released their National Remote Work Strategy, heavily influenced by this research.  In August of last year, the Policy Tomás Ó Síocháin, team also led a national conversation about CEO, WDC Low Carbon and Environment when they published new analysis of the challenges for rural areas in a report titled ‘Making the Transition to a Low Carbon Society in the Western Region — Key issues for rural dwellers’. The report looked at three key areas: Transport and Travel, Homes in the Western Region, and Electricity Demand/Supply, which provided valuable research and insights into the challenges faced by rural communities and offered suggestions on how to tackle the main issues they face.   SUSTAINABLE ENTERPRISE    The first half of 2020 saw a record high in investment activity across the region for the Western Investment Fund, with a7.6 million of investment approved. Despite the challenges that COVID-19 has brought on, investments continued up until the end of the year and into the first quarter of 2021. Recent investments include Venari Medical, an innovative medical device company based in Galway, transport data company CitySwift, and Neurent Medical. 2020 saw the appointment of a New Head of Sustainable Enterprise for the organisation and this team is now working closely with the Investment Fund to identify new sectors where the west of Ireland can compete globally. This will also help to ensure that investment is spread more evenly across the region and has already contributed to flagship projects such as the Future Mobility Campus in Shannon. Going forward, the focus of their work will contribute to Ireland’s battle against climate change and help position the west of Ireland at the forefront of a sustainable digital revolution that helps every community. Finally, the funding received by the WDC for the total EU projects in calendar year 2020 amounted to just under a400k, allowing the organisation to support 66 SMEs directly and engage with a further 192 across the region. As the west of Ireland adapts to a changing world, the work of the WDC will always aim to stimulate conversation and encourage growth in the western counties. They will continue to promote the region as a place to not only foster an enriching way of life, but to develop meaningful careers and invest in businesses. As CEO Ó Síocháin, puts it: “The phrase ‘More to Life’ has never been more true, and now is the time for the west of Ireland, one of Europe’s great regions, to write a bold new chapter. Out of adversity comes opportunity, and the west of Ireland has a big opportunity to renew and reinvigorate itself.” Visit www.westerndevelopment.ie for more. 43

05/03/2021 11:09


PARTNER PROFILE AIB

Vital

Support FOR VITAL BUSINESSES

At AIB, our purpose is to back our customers to achieve their dreams and ambitions. We asked a long-time customer of AIB to share their story of the family business and how it has evolved and grown over the years.

R

esearch from the DCU National Centre for Family Business, of which AIB is a Partner sponsor, tells us that Family Businesses account for 64% of all businesses in Ireland (more than 80% when you include the farming community). These businesses are at the heart of the Irish economy and are recognised for their significant contribution to the communities in which they operate. Oxygen Care Ltd. is a family business that has been providing medical device solutions to the Irish Healthcare sector for almost 50 years. Our equipment can be seen in a range of hospital areas including Theatre and Recovery for anaesthetic and monitoring equipment, ICUs with ventilators and Neonatal Units for incubators for sick babies. Our defibrillators and chest compression systems are also used outside hospitals. Innovation

L to R: Karl Goulding, Maurice Moran, Etáin Moran

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PARTNER PROFILE AIB

in the area of Emergency Care is enabling uninterrupted care for the patient from the incident site all the way to the hospital. The company started off as a home office in Dundrum by my father David Moran and my grandfather Paddy Moran. They specialised in the area of Maternity Care with neonatal incubators, which led to product installs at the Rotunda Hospital. Breaking into the market at Crumlin Children’s Hospital led to nationwide access. The company evolved over decades and there is now a team of more than 60 people in the business, with offices in Wicklow and Belfast. Product support has remained a key focus of Oxygen Care from the outset. The company traded successfully for the first 21 years as a team of engineers before the first salesperson role was advertised! I joined the company in its 32nd year of trading, having held previous marketing roles in Ireland and abroad. My brother Maurice, who is in his final year of a Masters in Leadership and Management Practice in Smurfit Business School, joined a few years later after earning his BA in European Business and Languages and spending some time travelling. He is responsible for Business Development and heads up the Respiratory Therapy Division of the company. In 2009, we moved to Kilmacanogue, Co. Wicklow to a premises that would be adaptable to our needs and plans for future-proofing. These plans included an organisational re-structure that saw David stepping back as M.D. to the role of Chairman. The MD role was taken up by Karl Goulding, our then General Manager who has been in the business for almost 40 years. My brother and I became Directors and the wheels were put in motion regarding succession planning. We both took up opportunities to upskill and network and I am very grateful to AIB for putting me in touch with the DCU National Centre for Family Business. When COVID-19 hit our shores in early 2020, we found ourselves grateful for the strong business partnerships that had been built up over decades. This allowed for very direct and efficient supplier conversations, bearing in mind every country in the world was looking for the same lifesaving equipment as Ireland. Our trusted customer relationships are very important to us, and we did everything we could to keep these intact. We were in a fortunate positon to secure necessary products that were urgently required to alleviate some of the pressures on our Health Service. InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2021

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“ENSURING SAFETY OF OUR OWN STAFF WAS KEY TO US. WE ARE SO

PROUD THAT EACH AND EVERY ONE OF OUR

TEAM

PLAYED A

CRUCIAL ROLE IN ENSURING HIGH LEVELS OF CONTINUED SUPPORT TO OUR CUSTOMERS.“

Understandably, COVID-19 presented a range of unprecedented challenges such as conducting our day-to-day business whilst social distancing, and getting these products shipped into Ireland. Ensuring safety of our own staff was key to us. We are so proud that each and every one of our team played a crucial role in ensuring high levels of continued support to our customers. As our Head of Sales Linda Ryan said: “Our mission became not only about supporting our clinicians but providing lifesaving equipment for the patients of Ireland.” We were also on the lookout for other opportunities that could help with the impact of COVID-19 and other products that would fit in with our portfolio and ethos. Our senior management team quickly became acutely aware of the need to look to the future, given some products such as ventilators will, in all likelihood, not be purchased for some time. We were approached by a supplier called Aerobiotix to consider a partnership to distribute their Illuvia® HUAIRS air decontamination unit. We were already aware of an increasing need for a premium high-quality product in the area of Ultraclean air to lower the risk of viral transmission in healthcare settings and surgical site infections. We were immediately impressed by the technology of the unit, which is strongly supported by strong clinical evidence. Emerging evidence then highlighted the risk of COVID-19 transmitting via air particles. With the Illuvia, we had a mobile solution that can help keep frontline workers and patients safe in the hospital environment, particularly where there were aerosol generating procedures taking place. As the family business evolves, I often wonder what my grandfather would think of the networking and learning resources such as the DCU National Centre for Family Business that are available to us nowadays. We feel privileged and proud to be working in the dynamic healthcare sector at the forefront of innovation where products and technologies make such a difference to patients and healthcare providers. This article was written by Etáin Moran, Director, Oxygen Care Ltd. Etáin was an AIB Women in Enterprise Strategic Growth Finalist 2019. Further information on how AIB is supporting its customers can be found at www.aib.ie. 45

05/03/2021 11:11


PARTNER PROFILE GAS NETWORKS IRELAND

Powering The gas network is Ireland’s ready-made decarbonisation solution.

SUSTAINABILITY

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he national gas network is the cornerstone of Ireland’s energy system, powering 30% of Ireland’s primary energy needs, 40% of the country’s heating, and 50% of its electricity generation. Emitting significantly less CO2 than coal and oil, natural gas has played an important role in reducing Ireland’s energy emissions since the 1970s, and the ever-reliable power behind Ireland’s electricity generation will continue to play an integral role in the country’s transition to a low carbon economy. In 2020, gas demand for electricity generation ranged between 25% and 85%. When the wind didn’t blow and the sun didn’t shine, the national gas network was there to ensure the lights stayed on and our devices were powered. At times, wind and solar generated as little as 1% of the country’s electricity, meaning essential services and health facilities relied on the security of gas-generated electricity. Gas is also particularly important for many Irish industries, delivering the high intensity heat that many processes require. Businesses know they can depend on the gas network’s reliability and flexibility. Our latest available figures indicate that Ireland’s a2.7bn gas network contributes an estimated a400m to Ireland’s economy annually. In addition, for every a1 Gas Networks Ireland spent in 2017, an estimated a1.25 in GDP was generated in the Irish economy.

However, while natural gas is the cleanest conventional fuel, Ireland must transition to more sustainable alternatives to meet its climate action targets. With over 705,000 customers and growing, Gas Networks Ireland’s ambition is for a net-zero carbon gas network by 2050 and to support emissions reductions across every sector of the Irish economy, in the least cost, least disruptive, safe and secure manner. New technologies such as renewable gas, compressed natural gas (CNG) and hydrogen can all play a part in helping decarbonise Ireland’s economy, and Gas Networks Ireland is working to make this possible. RENEWABLE GAS: GOOD FOR THE ECONOMY AND ENVIRONMENT In 2019, Ireland began its journey to a net-zero carbon gas network, with the introduction of domestically produced renewable gas onto the national network. Renewable gas is largely identical to natural gas, meaning that it can seamlessly replace gas in appliances, heating systems, transport and power generation. Renewable gas, also referred to as biomethane, is made from farm and food waste through a process known as anaerobic digestion, which the EU Green Deal has identified as a vital tool in decarbonising European agriculture. Leading companies in Ireland are now pioneering projects to push forward with the development of sustainable circular economies by purchasing renewable gas made from their own waste to power their operations. As well as helping ensure security of supply, establishing a renewable gas industry in Ireland will deliver jobs and income in local communities. Gas Networks Ireland was recently granted planning permission for a second renewable gas injection point near Mitchelstown in Co. Cork. The new facility will receive renewable gas from up to 20 local producers and has the potential to heat up to 64,000 homes, while also supporting the decarbonisation of local agriculture. IRELAND’S ROAD TO NET-ZERO TRANSPORT Heavy Goods Vehicles (HGVs) and buses account for only 4% of vehicles on Irish roads but generate 30% of Ireland’s transport emissions. With emissions savings realised

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PARTNER PROFILE GAS NETWORKS IRELAND

by switching from diesel to natural gas, compressed natural gas (CNG) is helping to decarbonise the Irish transport sector. With the introduction of renewable gas, vehicles refuelling from the gas network will further reduce their carbon footprint and help drive more sustainable supply chains for businesses. Ireland’s CNG vehicle numbers grew more than 50% in 2020 as the number worldwide surpassed 28 million. Gas Networks Ireland is developing a CNG refuelling network in partnership with Ireland’s forecourt operators and hauliers. CNG is proven, affordable and publicly available in Ireland and throughout the UK and EU. There are CNG refuelling stations located at Circle K’s forecourts in Dublin Port and Cashel, with two more set to open in early 2021 in Dublin and Limerick, and a further 11 in planning and development. Three private CNG stations are also in operation. PREPARING TO WELCOME HYDROGEN BACK TO THE NETWORK Ireland’s gas network has carried hydrogen in the past – in the town gas that preceded natural gas – and must carry it again to meet Ireland’s long-term climate change ambitions. Hydrogen is a carbon-free gas that can be produced from renewable electricity and stored indefinitely, making it an attractive option to decarbonise energy systems and a strong example of how greater cohesion between our gas and electricity systems can drive a cleaner energy future for Ireland. Governments and energy industry leaders across Europe are increasingly looking to hydrogen as the energy source that will decarbonise heating, transport and even power generation. To ensure that hydrogen can be transported safely to homes and businesses around the country, Gas Networks Ireland recently opened a Hydrogen Innovation Centre in Dublin and is testing how best to re-introduce hydrogen for use in Irish homes, businesses and transport. POWERING IRELAND SUSTAINABLY As guardians of the gas network, Gas Networks Ireland aims to deliver its services in a sustainable manner, contributing to the protection of the environment while supporting the social and economic development of the communities it operates in, as well as the wider economy. InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2021

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The Gas Networks Ireland Pipeline Map

The organisation’s sustainability strategy is aligned with the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals and has three pillars – environmental impact, social impact and economic impact. It is a member of Business in the Community’s Leaders Group on Sustainability and has committed to the Low Carbon Pledge to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 50% by 2030. Gas Networks Ireland’s efforts were recognised with the Sustainable Energy Achievement Award and the Green Large Organisation of the Year Award at the Green Awards 2020. Gas Networks Ireland also achieved the best maiden score of any Irish energy company in the globally recognised Carbon Disclosure Project rankings. CLEANER ENERGY FUTURE Transitioning to a clean energy economy by 2050 requires a balance between sustainability, security and affordability. Leveraging existing energy assets and capabilities will enable Ireland to reach its targets effectively. The national gas network is ready to play its role in delivering a cleaner energy future. 47

05/03/2021 11:14


PARTNER PROFILE NATIONAL LOTTERY

A GOOD

Cause The National Lottery raises vital funds for groups and organisations that make a difference.

S

ince its creation in 1986, the National Lottery has been renowned for making dreams come true in the form of life-changing lottery wins which has seen more than 800 new millionaires created in Ireland in the past 34 years. While the champagne-popping winners may feature in all of the newspaper headlines and TV news bulletins, the National Lottery has a much wider impact on local communities across Ireland. In fact, the primary purpose of the National Lottery is to raise money for Good Causes groups and organisations. Almost 30 cent of every euro goes to the Good Causes, and approximately 91% of all revenue generated by the National Lottery goes back into the community through prizes, Good Causes funding and retailer funding. Almost 1.4 million adults play National Lottery games and draws each week, and by doing so raise an average of a4 million for the Good Causes fund each week. This money is transferred to the Exchequer and used to part-fund, on average, 4,000 projects, groups and voluntary organisations each year. The funding is made available through a range of Government departments and public bodies. More details can be found at www.lottery.ie/news/ good-causes 48

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The past 12 months have been incredibly challenging for everyone, not least for those involved in the retail trade. The National Lottery’s network of 5,500 retail partners have worked extraordinarily hard to serve their local communities, and it is in no small part thanks to their effort that a254m was transferred to the Exchequer from the National Lottery fund in December. This is the highest amount transferred since Premier Lotteries Ireland (PLI) took over the running of the National Lottery in 2014. The Good Causes groups and organisations are involved in a range of activities including Sports, Arts, Heritage, Irish language, Health, Community, Youth, and the Natural Environment. Individually, and collectively, they make a huge difference in their local areas. The National Lottery helps to recognise some of these fantastic organisations and the impact they have through the annual Good Causes Awards. A previous award winner, and worthy beneficiary of Good Causes funding, is Liquid Therapy (pictured), an organisation based in Donegal which provides ocean, surf, and water therapy for young people with physical, emotional and intellectual needs. Thanks in part to National Lottery funding, Liquid Therapy was able to continue its mission to provide one-to-one support for young people who want to experience surfing but are unable to participate in mainstream opportunities due to various physical, emotional, behavioural or intellectual barriers. 

“ALMOST

30 CENT OF EVERY EURO GOES TO

THE GOOD CAUSES, AND APPROXIMATELY

91% OF ALL REVENUE

GENERATED BY THE NATIONAL LOTTERY GOES

BACK INTO THE COMMUNITY THROUGH

PRIZES, GOOD CAUSES FUNDING AND RETAILER FUNDING.”

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05/03/2021 11:15


PARTNER PROFILE HOUSE OF WATERFORD CRYSTAL

Experience

Crystal heaven Waterford Crystal masters a craft unchanged for centuries.

W

hen you hold an exquisite piece of Waterford Crystal in your hands, it’s not simply a dazzling work of craftsmanship. The story of Waterford Crystal dates back over 235 years, while inspirations for designs reach back even further: to castles, Vikings, and 5,000 years of history grown in the lush green landscapes of Ireland’s Ancient East. Skills have passed from master to apprentice. Fresh ideas have reinvigorated iconic sparkling cuts in contemporary ways. A luxury collection of the finest crystal continues to be made by skilled craftsmen at the House of Waterford Crystal factory, situated in the heart of Waterford City.

GUIDED FACTORY TOUR From the heat, noise, and fire of the blowing room to the exquisite skills of cutting and engraving, a guided tour immerses you in the time-honoured processes behind the creation of each sparkling piece of crystal. On the tour, visitors witness mould making – a technique at Waterford that has remained unchanged throughout the centuries. Visitors enter the blowing department, watching glowing balls of crystal transformed into majestic shapes as they are put through the 1400-degree furnace. While getting this behind-the-scenes sneak peek of this highly-skilled method of crystal manufacturing, visitors see the high standards that the House of Waterford Crystal has for each piece that leaves the factory. Visitors next witness the cutting department. Master Cutters rely on their skill to judge the amount of pressure required to hold the crystal to the wheel; too much pressure will cause a cut through to the other side. Each of our craftsmen has trained for a minimum of eight years to master their craft. The final stages of the tour are the engraving and sculpting departments. Master Sculptors work three-dimensionally, using their skill to sculpt the desired piece from solid blocks of crystal. Days, weeks, and even months can pass before a sculpted piece is completed. The type of copper wheel engraving InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2021

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used at Waterford Crystal is called ‘Intaglio’, which means reverse. It can take from hours to days to complete the engraving on many of our international sporting trophies and limited-edition inspiration pieces. RETAIL STORE, BRAND EXPERIENCE & CAFÉ Visitors experience 12,000 square feet of crystal heaven in the largest retail and showcase of Waterford Crystal in the world. The retail store represents everything we make in crystal, including a showcase on golf and sport, which is a major part of our international business. Our café serves sumptuous food, indulgent homemade treats, and afternoon tea, using the best locally sourced seasonal produce supporting as many Irish suppliers as possible. CORPORATE & SPORTS Our corporate and gift solutions cater to rewarding your employees or clients. We can customise a piece from our core range, which will allow you to create your unique message or logo on an item. Our worldwide shipping service allows the flexibility to deliver within 24/48 hours to Ireland, UK, or USA. Our dedicated Sales Manager Tom Walsh can be contacted at tom.walsh@fiskars.com or 087 120 9143.

CONTACT For more information contact: waterfordvisitorcentre.com houseofwaterfordcrystal@fiskars.com Tel: + 353 (0)51 317000

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LOCAL GOVERNMENT AWARDS

Local

WINNERS 2020

RECOGNISING

CONTRIBUTIONS Mayo County Council claims top spot at the 2020 Excellence in Local Government Awards.

I

n November, Mayo County Council was named Local Authority of the Year at the Chambers Ireland Excellence in Local Government Awards. The 17th annual Awards ceremony was held online and is organised in association with the Department of Housing, Local Government and Heritage. It showcases and celebrates the best of Local Government in Ireland.

Speaking about the Awards, Chambers Ireland Chief Executive, Ian Talbot, said: “As ever, it is an honour to host the Excellence in Local Government Awards. Our aim is to shine a spotlight on the valuable work of local authorities and profile the excellent projects and initiatives undertaken by teams in local government right around the country. “Congratulations to all those shortlisted, specifically each person who worked tirelessly on these excellent projects. Congratulations to all this year’s winners, each of whom set an example of what excellence in local government should look like. “Finally, congratulations to the 2020 Local Authority of the Year, Mayo County Council. We commend their commitment to excellence and the commitment they have shown across their work to ensure the sustainable development of the localities they represent, raising their county’s profile nationally.”

Minister of Housing, Local Government and Heritage, Darragh O’Brien T.D., also commented on the Awards, and said: “Local Authorities have achieved the highest standards of performance, despite this year of great uncertainty. These standards are evident in all of the applications that were both entered and featured as the category prize winners in these awards. “Having local government structures working to such a high level has helped to maintain an important sense of community in these difficult times and an inclusive, caring society for all. “I thank Chambers Ireland for providing this platform to showcase the highly-skilled, innovative and committed people who make up our local authorities, and I express my gratitude to the local authorities themselves for the vital contribution they make in communities across the country.” There were 16 awards presented, plus the overall award for Local Authority of the Year. Individual awards were sponsored by European Recycling Platform (ERP), TEKenable, Healthy Ireland, LGiU Ireland, Fáilte Ireland and EirGrid. Specially commissioned crystal awards designed by Waterford Crystal will be presented to the winners when restrictions allow.

Applications for the Excellence in Local Government Awards 2021 will open on 1 April 2021 and close on 7 May 2021. If you wish to receive updates on the ELG Awards, please email carly.mooney@chambers.ie

THE WINNERS Local Authority of the Year

Mayo County Council

Supporting Sustainable Communities

Fingal County Council - Shop Local Website

Best Practice in Community Engagement

Cork City Council - Social Distance Park Rangers Programme Health & Wellbeing

Mayo County Council - Making Positive Choices Supporting Tourism

Tipperary County Council - Suir Blueway Tipperary Promoting Economic Development

Cork City Council - ‘Re-imagining the City’ Local Authority Innovation

Mayo County Council - Weather Impact Register App (WIRE) Sustainable Environment

Wicklow County Council - Relove Fashion Competition Best Library Service

Clare County Council - Connections: Stories by Syrian Families in County Clare Sustaining the Arts

Offaly County Council - Music Generation Offaly/ Westmeath Disability Services Provision

Wexford County Council - Min Ryan Park Communication Board Festival of the Year

Mayo County Council - Virtual Mayo Day 2020 Initiatives through the Municipal District

Longford County Council - Embracing Remote Working Technology to Support Community and Voluntary Groups Enhancing the Urban Environment

Limerick City and County Council - Living Georgian City Programme Heritage and Built Environment

Donegal County Council - Thatch Repair Grant Scheme Commemorations and Centenaries

Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council - Divine Illumination - Oratory of the Sacred Heart Age Friendly Initiative

Limerick City and County Council - Putting Your House in Order

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LOCAL GOVERNMENT AWARDS WINNERS 2020 SUPPORTING SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITIES FINGAL COUNTY COUNCIL Shop Local Website

Fingal’s Shop Local website was developed during the COVID-19 pandemic in response to a demand in local communities for information on what businesses and shops were open during the lockdown within a 2km radius, and who could provide online/telephone ordering facilities, delivery and pick-up services. The initiative allowed local businesses who had begun to provide ordering and delivery services a means by which to advertise them and promote local awareness of the facilities. The initiative provided local communities, in particular those cocooning or minimising their social interactions during the lockdown, with reassurance and certainty regarding the accessibility and availability of goods and services in the local community. Furthermore, the initiative provided a platform for small and medium local businesses to market their new online/telephone ordering systems and their delivery/pick-up services.

BEST PRACTICE IN COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT CORK CITY COUNCIL

HEALTH & WELLBEING MAYO COUNTY COUNCIL

Social Distancing Park Rangers Programme

Making Positive Choices

Cork City Council’s ‘Social Distancing Park Ranger Programme’ involved Cork City parks and amenities being kept open and available to local citizens, with Social Distancing Park Ranger staff maintaining their presence on the ground. Operating in more than 20 Parks and with more than 150 staff, the Park Ranger Programme contributed to the physical and mental wellbeing of Cork City’s population during the height of the COVID-19 lockdown. In response to the pandemic, Cork City Council proved itself to be capable of developing an extremely constructive community engagement process. As the intrinsic benefits of the programme became apparent, the Council explored the potential to involve community groups in an even greater way in the daily operation of the programme.

This community-based scheme addressed road safety issues on the Mayo Islands – nine inhabited islands off the coast of County Mayo where poor physical infrastructure is a common concern. The ‘Community Futures’ plan for both Clare Island and Inishturk highlighted road surfaces and road safety as pressing concerns for these communities. Concerns deepened in August 2018 after a young person from Clare Island tragically lost his life in a road incident. This project emphasised to young people the importance of making positive choices and provided them with the tools and knowledge to prevent collisions and road-traffic incidents into the future. The partners involved in the ‘Making Positive Choices’ project worked together to deliver this road safety programme, which took place on the 18th and 25th of April 2019, and used a restorative justice approach to address local road safety concerns.

SUPPORTING TOURISM TIPPERARY COUNTY COUNCIL Suir Blueway Tipperary

Suir Blueway Tipperary is Tipperary’s newest recreational visitor experience, developed in collaboration with multiple stakeholders, local communities and businesses. As a result, refurbished pathways and multiple new access points have reconnected visitors and communities to the river Suir. Visitors can experience engaging tours of the world-renowned Cahir Castle before strolling down to the Swiss Cottage as paddle boarders and canoeists pass by on their way along 53km of river trails, passing through picturesque villages and towns as they follow the meandering river to the historic town of Clonmel and onwards to Carrick-on-Suir. Walkers and cyclists can also enjoy beautiful scenery as they follow the river for 21km along the refurbished historic towpath from Clonmel to Carrick-on-Suir. Accomplished paddlers can take on the challenge of the 300-metre white-water Canoe Slalom Course in Clonmel, while the culturally curious can enjoy the Butler Trail, the Main Guard in Clonmel, and Ormond Castle in Carrick-on-Suir.

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LOCAL GOVERNMENT AWARDS WINNERS 2020

PROMOTING ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORK CITY COUNCIL Re-imagining the City

An inspiring and imaginative initiative by Cork City Council called ‘Reimagining the City’ was a direct response to the arrival of the pandemic and its disastrous effects on social, economic and community life in Cork City Centre. An initiative spearheaded by local businesses and Cork City Council on city streets, starting with Princes Street, will ensure safe social distancing measures can be adhered to. Moreover, this will ensure local businesses can continue to operate at a level which will safeguard their viability. According to Brian Geaney, Cork City Council: “The future of the physical city is dependent on how we live in it, how we congregate in it and carry out our leisure activities. It must be good inside, at the heart. Cork needs to remain compact, be light on its feet, be a big personality and be one of the best if it is to thrive.”

LOCAL AUTHORITY INNOVATION MAYO COUNTY COUNCIL

Weather Impact Register App – WIRE

The WIRE app provides a simple tool for local authorities to record and collate the actual impacts and some of the associated costs of climate change in their areas. The GIS-based dataset, together with the dashboard and filters developed alongside the app, will provide a spatial distribution of risks and vulnerability and help identify the increasing severity and frequency of events that will inform climate adaptation planning. So far, the recorded data has highlighted areas of repeated flooding events, which has enabled the council to prioritise these areas for action. The dataset will increase in capacity over time and will support evidence-based and cost-effective solutions. Climate Ireland, the OPW and other State agencies are also looking to access the app and the datasets that it will produce to support cross-sectoral climate adaptation planning.

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LOCAL GOVERNMENT AWARDS WINNERS 2020

SUSTAINABLE ENVIRONMENT WICKLOW COUNTY COUNCIL Relove Fashion Competition

Wicklow County Council developed a waste prevention initiative, a competition called Relove Fashion, focused on the repurposing of textiles to create new outfits. Local authorities from Dublin City, Meath, Westmeath and Wicklow worked with the Rediscovery Centre to deliver the competition for secondary schools. The competition involved students taking an old outfit or item of fabric and using their skills in repair, needlework and design to create a new piece. The competition was designed to complement the Home Economics curriculum, incorporating resource efficiency. Students responded with enthusiasm, creating unique outfits which demonstrated their skill in working with fabrics to create a modern look from older clothes. The project showcases the role fashion can play in delivering a circular economy under Ireland’s National Waste Prevention Programme, and the lead local authorities aim to stimulate interest in waste prevention. The competition will expand to involve more local authorities and schools for 2021.

BEST LIBRARY SERVICE CLARE COUNTY COUNCIL

Connections: Stories by Syrian Families in County Clare

Connections: Stories by Syrian Families in County Clare was a collaborative literacy project initiated by Clare County Library in 2019. Engaging with a group of 15 Syrians, a series of workshops led by an award-winning Irish author and an acclaimed artist resulted in an original and enlightening publication. While the participants’ literacy improved week on week, the group cohesion at every session was further evidence of their increasing community involvement since their arrival in Ireland in 2016 as part of the United Nation’s Resettlement Scheme. Because of varying literacy levels amongst the group, the book publication is a major success. Providing a unique approach, offering a space away from school and a literacy platform for families to connect was a wonderful opportunity for children and parents to work with a real author and illustrator in a collaborative project linking school, home, the library and the wider community.

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LOCAL GOVERNMENT AWARDS WINNERS 2020 SUSTAINING THE ARTS OFFALY COUNTY COUNCIL

Music Generation Offaly/Westmeath

Music Generation Offaly/Westmeath (MGOW) is a regional music service established by Offaly/Westmeath Music Education Partnership, comprising Offaly County Council (Lead Partner), Westmeath County Council, Laois-Offaly and Longford-Westmeath Education and Training Boards. MGOW’s primary goal is to create access to inclusive, locally based music tuition for children and young people across the region, guided by the values of equality, partnership, quality of experience, creativity and sustainability. It aims to make music part of children and young people’s lives; to give children and young people life-enhancing skills through learning to create, play and perform; to generate opportunities for children and young people to experience making music with others; and to contribute to the development of their personal and social identity. MGOW is achieving this by delivering a range of musicianled music education programmes in partnership with local schools, youth and community organisations.

DISABILITY SERVICES PROVISION WEXFORD COUNTY COUNCIL

Min Ryan Park Communication Board

The ability to communicate is a necessity and to be understood is essential. Most things we do daily involve some form of communication – the way we express ourselves, show emotions and develop relationships. However, for someone who is nonverbal or has additional communication needs, communication with a person who uses spoken language can be a challenge. In acknowledging this, Wexford County Council developed an interactive communication board at the new Min Ryan Park, in Killeens, Wexford. The installation of the communication board in the playground of the new Min Ryan Park has several objectives, including the development of an inclusive park and playground, as well as allowing the use of the playground for users who are non-verbal or who have additional communication needs, thus providing a means of communication and interaction for anyone.

FESTIVAL OF THE YEAR MAYO COUNTY COUNCIL Virtual Mayo Day 2020

Mayo Day, the day that is unique to the county, had its first virtual Mayo Day on Saturday, 2nd of May last year. Mayo Day is always special, but this year was even more special given the unique situation in which we found ourselves. Over the last six years, the Mayo people have flown the green and red flag with pride, showcasing their pride in county, in people, in place and in heritage. In the extraordinary year of 2020, the people of Mayo got together again, virtually this time, with pride and with hope. They reached out to their communities and their diaspora across the world to unite our people at a time of global crisis. Mayo Day 2020 was an opportunity to link up and support each other and mark that incredible Mayo Spirit.

INITIATIVES THROUGH THE MUNICIPAL DISTRICT LONGFORD COUNTY COUNCIL

Embracing Remote Working Technology to Support Community and Voluntary Groups

During the COVID-19 lockdown, the elected members of Longford County Council quickly embraced remote working technology to ensure continued financial support to the community and voluntary community in Longford. This initiative ensured the members could meet remotely to consider and prioritise applications for funding in each Municipal District. The elected members enthusiastically supported the ethos of smarter working and quickly adopted the technology to make collaboration possible. Longford County Council was the first local authority to use remote working technology to conduct Municipal District meetings, which guarantee business continuity during a time of crisis. Local communities were at the centre of this initiative. This new way of working ensured transparency within local government was upheld and demonstrated how technology can be used to strengthen local democracy, leadership and accountability in keeping with a commitment to e-democracy and e-governance.

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LOCAL GOVERNMENT AWARDS WINNERS 2020

ENHANCING THE URBAN ENVIRONMENT LIMERICK CITY AND COUNTY COUNCIL Living Georgian City Programme

The Living Georgian City (LGC) programme aims to reactivate the Georgian core of Limerick City in an environmentally and physically sustainable way. The Georgian District is a key piece of national architectural and cultural heritage but has suffered from high levels of vacancy and under-investment in recent years. This programme aims to bring positive, innovative and transformational change to Newtown Pery, the heart of Limerick City’s outstanding Georgian architectural heritage. The Urban Innovation Department has been established by Limerick City and County Council, based in the heart of the Georgian Neighbourhood in Cecil Street to spearhead a number of innovative complementary projects including the Living Georgian City programme, the +CityxChange programme, Living City Initiative Limerick and Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR). The programme’s long-term impact will be to address the ‘hollowing out’ of the city’s core residential and commercial activities by reducing vacancy and increasing population density and diversity.

HERITAGE AND BUILT ENVIRONMENT DONEGAL COUNTY COUNCIL Thatch Repair Grant Scheme

County Donegal is home to one of the largest surviving concentrations of thatched structures in Ireland. Donegal County Council’s Heritage Office and Conservation Office initiated a Thatch Repair Grant Scheme in 2019. Its aims were to provide specialist advice to owners on the conservation of their thatched structures; allocate funding for small-scale thatch repairs; facilitate homeowners to undertake thatch repairs under conservation supervision; support the retention, practice and employment of thatchers and, in doing so, help to conserve remaining examples of County Donegal’s vernacular built heritage. This initiative generated strong community engagement and supported repairs to 12 thatched structures. The scheme is grounded in best conservation practice, draws upon local knowledge, demonstrates an appreciation for living under thatch, fosters the expertise and experience of local thatchers, and serves to illustrate that the continued sustainable use of these ‘homes of character, comfort and beauty’ can be adapted to serve modern requirements.

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LOCAL GOVERNMENT AWARDS WINNERS 2020

COMMEMORATIONS AND CENTENARIES DÚN LAOGHAIRE-RATHDOWN COUNTY COUNCIL Divine Illumination – Oratory of the Sacred Heart

This initiative highlighted the Oratory, not just for the local community but for a national and international audience, promoting the work of the artist Sr Concepta (Lily) Lynch, whose stunning work in the Oratory is a highly regarded example of the Gaelic Revival style, and emphasises peace and hope during a troubled period of the Decade of Centenaries in Ireland. These aims and objectives were achieved through the publication of Divine Illumination, a centenary book specially commissioned by New Island Books, new exhibitions at dlr LexIcon and at the Oratory, a series of talks, a seminar, workshops and tours. This initiative was to promote a unique building and a priceless work of art in the heart of the Dún Laoghaire community - a distinctive memorial to peace. This collaborative project spoke to the ethos of commemoration being inclusive, appropriate and sensitive.

AGE FRIENDLY INITIATIVE LIMERICK CITY AND COUNTY COUNCIL   Putting Your House in Order

What happens if a loved one becomes incapacitated? What happens when a loved one dies? Do they have special requests? What happens with their estate? Do they have a will? These are all very important questions that need to be discussed. To help answer these questions, Age Friendly Limerick, in collaboration with the Irish Hospice Foundation, hosted a series of events over February 2020 called “Putting Your House in Order”. The series of information sessions were held in each of the municipal districts of Limerick City and County. The aim was to give advice on a range of topics under four main headings: ‘Care Preferences’, ‘Legal’, ‘Financial’ and ‘When I Die’. The sessions were delivered in two parts, with the first part covering wills, enduring power of attorney and other legal issues. The second part of the event focused on the other three headings, ‘Care Preferences’, ‘Financial’ and ‘When I Die’.

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Making an Impact

B

y demonstrating CSR practices of the highest standard, while at the same time committing to implementing more sustainable business practices, AIB were the winners of the Outstanding Achievement Award at the Chambers Ireland Sustainable Business Impact Awards (formerly the CSR Awards). Held in September 2020, the virtual ceremony took place online, with participants able to watch it live, and honoured those companies that have shown excellence in sustainability over the course of the year. Speaking at the Awards ceremony, Ian Talbot, Chief Executive of Chambers Ireland said: “Congratulations to AIB and the winners of the 14 Sustainable Business Impact Award categories, whom we recognise for their achievements. Against the incredibly challenging circumstances we are all collectively adapting to, businesses continue to push the boundaries of what can be achieved in sustainable practices. “Thanks also to everyone tuning in online to view this year’s virtual ceremony, which we held as a precaution to ensure everyone’s health and safety at this time. We hope that this year’s first iteration of the Sustainable Business Impact Awards will be a launchpad for encouraging much wider recognition and active engagement with the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals. “The Awards coincide with the fifth anniversary of the launch of the SDGs, which aim for deep, wide-ranging change to address inequality and build more sustainable communities worldwide. They are naturally ambitious, however it is through collective action and widespread cooperation across different sectors of business and society that we can strive to meet these targets over time.” This first Awards ceremony of the Sustainable Business Impact Awards was run in association with the Department of Rural and Community Development, partnered with Business in the Community Ireland and kindly sponsored by BAM Ireland. One4all sponsored the Excellence in Workplace Awards. Each winner was presented with a specially commissioned trophy designed by Waterford Crystal.

AIB Win the Outstanding Achievement in Sustainable Business Impact Award

Joe O’Brien T.D., Minister of State for Community Development and Charities, said: “I’m very pleased to support Chambers Ireland’s Sustainable Business Impact Awards 2020. These awards highlight and celebrate best practice Corporate Social Responsibility in businesses. I am delighted to see so many businesses continuing to integrate Corporate Social Responsibility into their operations. “We are fortunate in having a strong history of community involvement in Ireland and these projects demonstrate the commitment of our businesses to our communities. The principles of Corporate Social Responsibility reinforce those of my Department and improve the power of collaboration between business and community.” Theo Cullinane, BAM Ireland Chief Executive also commented on the awards, saying: “Congratulations to AIB and everyone involved in the 2020 Sustainable Business Impact Awards. It is inspiring that the awards are championing the UN Sustainable Development Goals. These enhanced awards recognise and celebrate the innovative initiatives undertaken by Irish businesses, large and small, for a sustainable future and BAM are delighted to be involved once again.” Tomás Sercovich, CEO, Business in the Community Ireland, added:

AIB’s Colin Hunt, Chief Executive Officer, Sarah Dempsey, Head of Sustainability Communications & Partnerships, and Yvonne Holmes, Chief Sustainability Officer, receive their award at AIB Corporate Headquarters

“The global pandemic has exposed the vulnerabilities of our society and environment and is challenging the resilience of business. As we look to build new systems, it is critical that sustainability, inclusion and transparency remain as key elements of the business models of businesses. Sustainability in 2020 has moved to the mainstream and we must all work together to ensure an inclusive and low carbon Ireland.”

Applications for the Sustainable Business Impact Awards 2021 will open online on 10 March, 2021. The deadline for submissions is 28 April, 2021. To join our mailing list for the Awards, email carly.mooney@chambers.ie.

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SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS IMPACT AWARDS 2020 CATEGORY WINNERS: OVERALL WINNER: Outstanding Achievement in Sustainable Business Impact

■ AIB

Lidl More for Youth - Jigsaw/Lidl Listen Campaign

Excellence in Community – Partnership with Charity – LIC

■ A&L Goodbody Supporting life after torture with Spirasi

Excellence in Community – Partnership with Charity – MNC

■ KBC Bank

Skills - Sharing for Impact

Excellence in Community – Volunteering – LIC

■ A&L Goodbody

Supporting housing rights and homelessness through free legal assistance

Excellence in Community – Volunteering – MNC

■ IBM Ireland and Cisco Ireland ICU FamilyLink

Excellence in Community – Community Programme – LIC

■ An Post

Address Point

Excellence in Community – Community Programme – MNC

LIDL IRELAND

Lidl More for Youth - Jigsaw/Lidl Listen Campaign

Excellence in Environment – LIC

■ AIB

AIB’s Energy and Environmental Plan to enable Sustainable Communities

Excellence in CSR Communication

■ Lidl Ireland

EXCELLENCE IN CSR COMMUNICATION

Excellence in Environment – MNC

■ Tesco Ireland

Reducing our carbon footprint at Tesco

Excellence in Workplace – LIC

■ SOLAS

SOLAS Workplace Choir

Since 2018, through their ‘A Better Tomorrow’ initiative, Lidl has partnered with Jigsaw – the National Centre for Youth Mental Health – and pledged to fundraise €1million while building awareness for youth mental health nationwide. Previous campaigns have shown how great an appetite there is for information on youth mental health, so Lidl decided to utilise their communication platforms in 2020 to reflect on what both Lidl and Jigsaw had to offer. Lidl gave Jigsaw access to their nationwide audience over a full week by forgoing their own marketing campaigns and instead they gave Jigsaw a platform to promote their message on the power of ‘Listening’.

Excellence in Workplace – MNC

■ Diageo Ireland

Six months paid parental leave for all Irish employees

Excellence in Marketplace

EXCELLENCE IN COMMUNITY – PARTNERSHIP WITH CHARITY – LIC A&L GOODBODY - Supporting life after torture with Spirasi

■ Tesco Ireland

Project Unwrapped: Working with our suppliers to reduce plastic packaging

Excellence in CSR by an SME

■ Tico Mail Works Tico Mail Works Sustainable CSR Program

Excellence in Diversity & Inclusion

■ VMware Ireland VMinclusion Resilience and Disability Program

A&L Goodbody (ALG) are partnered with Spirasi – the Centre of Care for Survivors of Torture – to undertake legal reviews of legal medical reports. The medical reports are prepared by doctors working with Spirasi who assess and identify the infliction of torture. The reports are submitted as part of a person’s application for international protection. This partnership has brought together professionals from medical, legal and charitable sectors and has resulted in a greater understanding of the importance and use of medical legal reports. ALG solicitors have supported 179 legal medical report reviews to date, and it has allowed for building a consensus on best practice when producing medical reports.

■ Microsoft Ireland DreamSpace

*LIC: Large Indigenous Company | *MNC: Multinational Company

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EXCELLENCE IN COMMUNITY – PARTNERSHIP WITH CHARITY – MNC KBC BANK - Skills - Sharing for Impact

In early 2019, KBC and the Alzheimer Society of Ireland (ASI) formed a partnership, identifying areas where they could learn from one and another while helping to grow and expand their operations. For KBC, this was a focus on service delivery and supporting vulnerable customers, and for ASI, this was about growing awareness on social media and reaching a wider audience. The two organisations worked together to develop a skillssharing programme to upskill staff in both organisations. Customer-facing staff in KBC attended Dementia Friendly training delivered by the ASI. Similarly, the ASI team members attended social media training delivered by KBC. This partnership has benefited both organisations, sharing skills which will serve them well into the future.

EXCELLENCE IN COMMUNITY – VOLUNTEERING – MNC

IBM IRELAND AND CISCO IRELAND ICU FamilyLink

Patients in University Hospital Galway’s ICU are using specially adapted video conferencing technology, known as ICU FamilyLink, to communicate with family and clinical teams due to visiting restrictions brought about by COVID-19. The technology and equipment was donated by Cisco in Oranmore, and a team of IBM volunteers are on call to provide technical support to families using the service. Through collaboration between IBM, Cisco and NUI Galway, a secure system – designed for easy setup by nontechnical people – was developed based on Cisco WebEx. Close family members are invited by the hospital staff looking after the patient to see and speak to their loved ones and allows clinicians and nurses to discuss treatment and medical issues with family members

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EXCELLENCE IN COMMUNITY – VOLUNTEERING – LIC A&L GOODBODY - Supporting housing rights and homelessness through free legal assistance

One of Ireland’s biggest and most pressing social issue is access to affordable and sustainable housing. Partnered with Mercy Law Resource Centre and Focus Ireland, A&L Goodbody lawyers attend an outreach clinic every Wednesday afternoon to support individuals and families experiencing homelessness or who are at risk of becoming homeless. Unlike other models, which are limited to advice and information, the firm provides end-to-end casework to support an individual or family out of homelessness where necessary. Currently, 153 ALG solicitors are on the volunteer roster for the clinic. In 2020, as COVID-19 required everyone to switch to remote working, the firm adapted and the clinic remained fully operational.

EXCELLENCE IN COMMUNITY – COMMUNITY PROGRAMME – LIC AN POST - Address Point

The cruel irony of homelessness in Ireland is that to get help, you need an address. An Post saw that addressing this issue was an opportunity to tackle one of the UN Sustainable Development Goals, Goal 1 – End poverty, in all its forms, everywhere by improving access to basic services and breaking the cycle of homelessness, helping people out of poverty. To help, An Post created ‘Address Point’ – a free, anonymous nationwide service that provides a fixed address to those without a fixed home. It enables the homeless community of Ireland to receive regular post, be identifiable via an address, and access essential services by creating a fixed proxy address at local post offices.

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EXCELLENCE IN COMMUNITY – COMMUNITY PROGRAMME – MNC MICROSOFT IRELAND - DreamSpace

As technology permeates every aspect of our lives, it is critical that the next generation has the skills for the jobs of the future. With this in mind, Microsoft developed its innovative digital skills experience – DreamSpace – through which the company aims to provide 100,000 primary and secondary schools students and teachers with the opportunity to interact with technology. In response to the closure of schools, Microsoft quickly transitioned the experience online with the creation of the DreamSpace HomeSpace series, which gives every student, parent and teacher the opportunity to learn new skills from home, and provides guidance and tools to equip parents and teachers with the skills to support their children and students in today’s remote learning environment.

EXCELLENCE IN ENVIRONMENT – LIC AIB - AIB’s Energy and Environmental Plan to enable Sustainable Communities

AIB strives to be an industry leader in sustainability and reduce its environmental footprint with ongoing energy and environmental plans of actions to reduce their operational carbon emissions and create a welldefined sustainable strategy to mitigate climate risks and to help transition Ireland to a low-carbon economy. These changes have resulted in AIB being recognised as a global leader for corporate action on climate change.

EXCELLENCE IN ENVIRONMENT – MNC

EXCELLENCE IN WORKPLACE – LIC

Reducing our carbon footprint at Tesco

SOLAS Workplace Choir

TESCO IRELAND

Tesco has a long-standing commitment to tackling climate change and an ambition to become a zerocarbon business by 2050. In 2017, Tesco announced science-based climate change targets covering its operations and supply chain. It became the first business globally to set climate change ambitions for its operations, in line with the 1.5-degree trajectory recommended in The Paris Agreement. Tesco’s supply chain targets are in line with a 2-degree trajectory – an ambitious target for food and agricultural supply chains. Their work to date has resulted in a 24% reduction in energy use in Ireland over five years and a 31% reduction in carbon emissions, supporting the company to become more sustainable.

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SOLAS

SOLAS Workplace Choir was established in 2018 with the aim of improving employee wellbeing and to offer staff members an alternative form of mindfulness. Since then, it has formed a partnership with Mountjoy Prison’s ‘Inhouse Voices’ choir. The two choirs came together to perform at #TEDxMountjoyPrison. This performance started a relationship which resulted in the release of a Christmas album, raising over €15,000 for Dublin Simon Community. In 2019, the SOLAS Workplace Choir also participated in Aidlink for Turkana, performing in the National Stadium with some of Ireland’s best-loved musicians. The choir has brought wellbeing benefits to both organisations and their people. It provides a vehicle for communities to work together to make positive change in society.

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EXCELLENCE IN WORKPLACE – MNC

DIAGEO IRELAND

Six months paid parental leave for all Irish employees

In 2019, Diageo introduced 26-weeks paid parental leave for new parents, becoming the first employer in Ireland to do so. The policy applies regardless of gender, sexual orientation or whether employees become parents biologically, via adoption or surrogacy. The policy is part of Diageo’s ongoing work to support gender equality and to create a fully inclusive and diverse workforce, where barriers to career progression are removed. If true gender equality is to be achieved in the working world, policies and cultural norms need to be re-thought. All employees should be able to experience the joy of raising a family, while continuing to thrive at work. Progressive family leave policies create happier, more loyal and more productive workforces.

EXCELLENCE IN MARKETPLACE TESCO IRELAND - Project Unwrapped: Working with our suppliers to reduce plastic packaging

Tesco is one of the largest private sector employers in Ireland, with over 13,000 colleagues working in 151 stores, head office and distribution centres nationwide. Tesco has been working hard to reduce the use of plastics through working with suppliers to minimise packaging on its own label products. The company has also made key commitments, including making all their packaging fully recyclable by 2025, ensuring all paper and cardboard used will be 100% sustainable by 2025 and halving their packaging weight by 2025. The actions undertaken by Tesco throughout this time have resulted in the removal of 10 tonnes of plastic shrink-wrap on multipack products and the introduction of infrared detectable pigment to black trays, making them recyclable, among other achievements.

EXCELLENCE IN CSR BY AN SME

EXCELLENCE IN DIVERSITY & INCLUSION

Tico Mail Works Sustainable CSR Program

VMinclusion - Resilience and Disability Program

TICO MAIL WORKS

Tico Mail Works ‘RenewableElectricity Electric Car to Work’ scheme provides a mechanism for all Tico Mail Works staff to own an electric vehicle and drive it using renewable energy. The scheme is cos- free to the company. It benefits the company as it reduces its carbon footprint, helps towards the UN Sustainable Development Goals, supports employee retention and improves the company’s image. To date, 11 cars which used fossil fuels have been replaced by 11 EVs under this scheme, which will result in reducing the annual carbon footprint of more than 40 metric tons of CO2 per annum, or a reduction of over 50% in Tico Mail Works’ carbon footprint for transport in a year.

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VMWARE IRELAND

Through VMware’s Resilience and Disability Programme in Ireland, the company works to actively attract, engage and celebrate people from a wide variety of dynamic backgrounds, abilities, experiences and perspectives. VMware pride themselves on their values and they serve to drive behaviours which foster a truly inclusive organisation. Their Resilience and Disability programme seeks to build resilience among their workforce and to create an accessible, supportive and open environment where their employees can bring their authentic selves to work and have that diversity celebrated and supported.

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CHAMBERS AWARDS WINNERS 2020

Cork Chamber Named Chamber of the Year The Chamber Awards seek to recognise the outstanding work of Chambers around the country.

C

ork Chamber was awarded the title of ‘Chamber of the Year’ at the Chambers Ireland annual Chamber Awards, sponsored by Zurich, which took place in July 2020. The Awards seek to recognise the outstanding work of Chambers throughout the country while providing a national platform for Chambers to share and promote how they continue to be active and excel in developing initiatives, events, campaigns and further activities that contribute to their Chamber locality and wider geographic region. Speaking at the online ceremony, Siobhan Kinsella, then President of Chambers Ireland said: “It is brilliant that we have this opportunity to celebrate the winners of this year’s Chamber Awards. I am delighted to be able to congratulate Cork Chamber for winning the Award of ‘Chamber of the Year’. “The Chamber Awards are a celebration of the work of local Chambers and putting the local businesses that they represent at the heart of their communities. They share a perspective on the work and active engagement that each Chamber puts in with their local communities, amidst ongoing challenges and highlights the standards of excellence the Chamber network establishes as a whole in supporting local business nationwide. “As well as the Award win for Cork Chamber, I’d like to commend all of the winners of this year’s Chamber Awards for their efforts. Congratulations once again to Cork Chamber on being awarded the accolade of ‘Chamber of the Year’.” Upon receiving the award, Conor Healy, CEO of Cork Chamber, stated: “I am truly delighted and proud to accept this award on behalf of all at Cork Chamber. The Chamber membership, committees, board and President all contribute hugely to the overall success of the organisation and that synergy of volunteerism with our

Category Descriptions

professional team is essential. “2019 was a milestone for the Chamber, celebrating 200 years of Championing Cork and 2020 is an exceptional year for us all for very different reasons, but the spirit of Cork Chamber members has empowered a steadfast ambition for the region.” Mr Healy highlighted that: “Through both positive and challenging circumstances my colleagues at Cork Chamber have proven to be exemplary professionals, with a dedication to our members and the organisation that goes above and beyond. They should rightly be proud to have their achievements lauded here. Paula Cogan, President of Cork Chamber, also commented, saying: “It is a great honour for Cork Chamber to receive this national award and recognition from Chambers Ireland and sponsors Zurich for the work we do. We thank our members and many stakeholder partners, whose vibrancy, energy and drive has built the excellent reputation of our region, and we are committed to building a sustainable and resilient economic future for all. “I would like to recognise the work of my board colleagues and the excellent team at the Chamber led by CEO Conor Healy for their outstanding contribution, duly recognised with this award.” Congratulating Cork Chamber, Colm Blake, Head of Insurance Marketing at Zurich Ireland said: “Zurich is delighted to continue our support for the annual Chamber Awards. These awards showcase the important work the Chamber network is doing to support businesses of all sizes and sectors across the country. They celebrate the innovation, ingenuity and resilience shown by Chambers and their members, attributes needed in business more than ever.”

Applications for the Chamber Awards 2021 open on March 4. The deadline for submissions is midday on April 1.

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Best Membership Initiative This category looks at best practice and originality within the area of membership recruitment, celebrating the Chambers in our network whose creative ideas have resulted in increased membership for their Chamber. Event of the Year Chambers run a variety of interesting and informative events throughout the year. As providing members with the opportunity to network is a core function of the Chamber, running successful events is a must. Most Innovative Project Chambers, as leaders of their business community, need to be innovative in the projects they work on. In order to get sufficient stakeholder support and membership buy in, projects that the Chamber works on must catch the imagination of all. Most Successful Policy Campaign The policy and public affairs activities of Chambers are an important representative function Chambers are active in on behalf of their members. Running a successful campaign is not easy but the benefits of a successful campaign can bring real positive change to business. Local Authority Collaboration Having a successful collaboration with your local authority is a key relationship for a Chamber. There are many unique ways a Chamber can work with its local authority for the betterment of the area. Best Chamber Marketing Campaign Making the business community aware and appreciate the work of the Chamber is important in maintaining success. Campaigns aimed at highlighting the work of the Chamber generally or specifically on individual projects is vitally important.

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CHAMBERS AWARDS WINNERS 2020

EVENT OF THE YEAR NORTHERN IRELAND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND INDUSTRY NI Chamber Annual Networking and Business Showcase 2019

Northern Ireland Chamber’s ‘Networking Conference and Business Showcase’ took place in St. George’s Market, Belfast, on 18 September 2019, and was the largest conference of its kind in NI, providing local businesses with a platform to promote their products/services. The event brought together 900+ attendees and 120 exhibiting businesses across all sectors from NI and ROI. The key objectives of the event were to enable businesses to promote and sell to a wide audience, make new connections, develop skills, retain customers and increase their knowledge on key issues. The conference featured breakout areas including a college pavilion and health and wellness zone as well as interactive areas throughout. Delegates had the opportunity to hear from high profile business leaders and to attend panel sessions and workshops from companies such as Google, Hostelworld and more.

MOST SUCCESSFUL POLICY CAMPAIGN GALWAY CHAMBER Get Galway Moving

John Concannon, Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, Mary Buckley, Executive Director of the IDA, Mike Beary, Country Manager at Amazon Web Services and Niall Gibbons, President of Dublin Chamber.

LOCAL AUTHORITY COLLABORATION DUBLIN CHAMBER Dublin’s Global Reputation

Dublin Chamber set out to identify what the international community thought about Dublin as a place to live, work, study, do business and visit. An extensive research project was carried out to measure Dublin’s global reputation to enhance understanding of the city’s assets and its challenges from a different perspective. Dublin Chamber partnered with the Reputation Institute and surveyed several countries on their perception of Dublin using their City RepTrak® model. The results of this study produced a multi-layered view of the strengths and weaknesses of the city. From that, Dublin Chamber then developed a series of recommendations to help improve the city’s reputation. Following this, they engaged in an extensive campaign to communicate the survey’s results and work closely with stakeholders to deliver these recommendations. The Chamber hopes that this unique study will provide insights and provocation for others to join them in working towards creating a more well-rounded city.

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‘Get Galway Moving’ was a campaign established in response to the immense frustration within the business community on the lack of development and lack of investment in infrastructure in Galway, particularly with regards to transport. Galway Chamber developed the campaign to create an understanding and improve communications on proposals for local developments and infrastructure projects between the business community, stakeholders and the Local Authorities; to analyse the economic and resource impact of the present challenges and to create a vision of what a future would look like with delivery of these critical projects. The Get Galway Moving policy and communications campaign launched in September 2019 in Leinster House to address these concerns. Galway Chamber worked across agency and industry to articulate solutions, develop further resolutions and engage with the voices across industry and community in Galway to discuss their visions for the future of the city. Galway Chamber have promoted the campaign’s message across media and online in order to inform, build support and change attitudes.

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CHAMBERS AWARDS WINNERS 2020

LOCAL AUTHORITY COLLABORATION COUNTY CARLOW CHAMBER

Chamber Trade Connections Export to Netherlands Programme

The ‘Chamber Trade Connections Export to the Netherlands Programme’ was established and funded by Carlow County Council and County Carlow Chamber of Commerce. This programme, centred around SME owners and managers in Carlow, was developed with the aim of meeting new and existing trade partners to explore further business export opportunities in the Netherlands. During the programme, all participants received oneon-one mentoring support and attended workshops which were tailored to assist them in gearing up to export. This was followed by a three-day trade prospecting mission to the Netherlands. While in the Netherlands, all participants had a bespoke schedule of meetings to attend with potential clients/partners in their sector. The feedback from all participants showed that the programme was a success, reporting that the advice offered and connections made during the programme had helped them to gain a greater understanding of the market and build new networks. In the short-term, potential sales opportunities of approximately 1 million were identified through the connections made from the trip.

BEST MEMBERSHIP INITIATIVE DROGHEDA & DISTRICT CHAMBER Drogheda Chamber ‘Fit-Biz’

Drogheda Chamber’s ‘FitBiz’ campaign combined business with health and wellbeing, offering a networking opportunity to their members with this two-month initiative. FitBiz gave members the chance to connect with one another away from the traditional events or boardroom settings, with the added benefit of improving their health and fitness levels. Drogheda Chamber partnered with a local member gym who specialised in weekly group sessions to combine networking and fitness. A marketing campaign was launched, and Chamber ambassadors appointed, to encourage both member and non-member sign up. Participants were asked to share their weekly exercise schedules and link up with their FitBiz buddy to attend classes together. Each participant could promote their own businesses with personalised FitBiz t-shirts complete with their company logo, and every participant had the opportunity to avail of discounts on health and fitness goods offered by local retailers. At the end of the two months, participants reported seeing improvements to their health and wellbeing, as well as having benefited from establishing new business contacts.

BEST CHAMBER MARKETING CAMPAIGN CORK CHAMBER Cork Chamber’s Bicentenary Celebrations

Cork Chamber celebrated its bicentenary in 2019. To recognise this significant anniversary, the Chamber launched a 12-month marketing campaign, which focused on a number of key events and initiatives that were designed to reflect on the past, present and future of Cork Chamber. The campaign also showcased the business community across Cork and the business-leaders responsible for its development over the previous 200 years. The campaign was designed to bring an increased awareness of the Chamber and its role, not only to their members and prospects, but also to the wider community of Cork. Through print and online media, exhibitions and events, the Chamber used their bicentenary anniversary celebrations to raise the profile of the organisation both locally and nationally. Their message engaged groups and individuals across business, politics, schools, the arts, heritage and community networks, with metrics which demonstrated a wide reach and impactful engagement.

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IB PARTNER PROFILE

about social distancing across, thus ensuring that residents could enjoy their local amenities in a safe environment, in line with Government and NPHET directives and guidelines.

Staff were redeployed from the City Council to participate in the initiative

Constructive Community Engagement Cork City Council’s Social Distance Ranger Programme kept vital amenities safely available to the population during lockdown.

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he lockdown measures introduced at the end of March 2020 in response to the Covid-19 pandemic severely limited the movement and avenues for daily exercise for the 210,000 citizens of Cork City. Cork City Council’s Social Distance Ranger Programme was developed to ensure that the general public continued to benefit from the many parks, recreation areas and amenity walkways of Cork City in a safe and enjoyable manner. The initiative ensured the safe provision of outdoor spaces for the exercise and activity that is so necessary to physical and mental health and wellbeing. Cork City Council was the

only local authority in the country to undertake a programme of this nature and to keep its Parks supervised and open during the lockdown. Staff were redeployed from across the entire City Council workforce to participate in this initiative. Professional, technical, administrative, craft and outdoor grades were integrated into operational teams to deliver the programme and to get the message

THE SOCIAL DISTANCING RANGER PROGRAMME HAS SUCCESSFULLY CONTRIBUTED TO THE PHYSICAL AND MENTAL WELL-BEING OF THE POPULATION OF CORK CITY

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COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT The message was relayed not only on the ground, but also across print media, radio and social media, as well as on Cork City Council’s website, including on its emergency banner. The City Council also engaged directly with Community Associations, Sports Clubs and other stakeholders. This measure saw a major increase in the numbers of people using parks and amenity areas for exercise and as an avenue for socialising outside of their own domestic environment. Off peak times for availing of these facilities were specifically allocated to the elderly, disabled and more vulnerable in our society.  Where depots or pavilions were not available, temporary mobile units were put in place as a base for the Rangers. They were also provided with high-vis social distancing jackets, sanitisers, wipes, sun-cream and glasses, as well as bicycles for staff patrolling the amenity walks. Operating over 20 parks, with an overall staffing level of more than 150, the Social Distancing Ranger Programme has successfully contributed to the physical and mental wellbeing of the population of Cork City. The initiative has shown that a model of this type can be very successfully deployed in the future either in the event of an emergency situation arising again or as a structured partnership with the community sector to positively promote community development projects. The Council proved itself very capable of turning a hazardous pandemic with little or no advance warning into an extremely constructive community engagement process. 

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what’s on your

You’re not alone when it ComeS to CopinG www.turn2me.org

Forums, Group Support, 1to1 Counselling, iphone enabled

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InBUSINESS RECOGNITION AWARDS 2020

Celebrating tenacity and drive Acknowledging and celebrating achievements in business has never been more important, as this year’s winners of the InBUSINESS Recognition Awards 2020 showed perseverance and resilience in an uncertain world.

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he annual InBUSINESS Recognition Awards recognise and reward exceptional business achievement and innovation and aim to acknowledge the contributions of individuals to grow business in this country. Winners of the InBUSINESS Recognition Awards this year were chosen across 20 categories based on broad criteria including growth, profile of business, range of services and customer care. Drive for success and achievement is embedded in these companies’ DNA. All are very worthy of this recognition and set the standard for business in Ireland today. Over the year we have just lived through, we’ve dealt with all manner of unprecedented business challenges. Companies tackled the move to remote working. Looking after staff ’s mental health became a crucial topic, along with how to maintain that sense of company culture when employees are dispersed, and only meeting virtually. For smaller businesses, and essential workers, other, more pragmatic issues have been pressing—how to reopen after closures, how to refinance, accessing government stimulus packages and how to reorganise workspaces for optimum safety. Business has persevered, and the tenacious entrepreneurs and business leaders in Ireland are keeping their focus on recovery and growth. Many of the Recognition Awards winners this year are those who have shown these qualities of perseverance and tenacity in the face of the challenges 2020 presented. These qualities, along with flexibility, agility, innovation and creativity, are what will see them through the crisis. Business and government agencies are doing their utmost to make it feasible for those that have been impacted to not only survive, but to thrive again. Chambers Ireland, Ireland’s largest business organisation with a network of Chambers of Commerce in every major town and region in the country— actively engages in research and lobbying activities on a range of public policy issues of interest to our members. By drawing upon the expertise of our member chambers and the businesses they represent, we are in a unique position to understand the concerns of all sectors of business from all regions of Ireland, and are acutely aware of the different types of challenges the last year has presented. Supporting SMEs, facilitating trade (particularly in light of Brexit issues), and strengthening the Chamber Network to provide support at local level, all remain top priorities for us over the coming year, as businesses continue to embrace new ways of working.

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WINNERS  INANCE PROVIDER TO MICRO F BUSINESSES AND START-UPS Microfinance Ireland  OCAL AUTHORITY OF THE YEAR L Fingal County Council  OST GRADUATE AND MBA P PROGRAMMES TU Dublin B USINESS BROADBAND PROVIDER Virgin Media Business  ENSIONS & LIFE COMPANY P Zurich Life Assurance  OURISM - IRELAND’S HIDDEN T HEARTLANDS Fáilte Ireland  ECURITY COMPANY IN IRELAND S Netwatch Ireland Ltd I RISH BRAND GoMo  OVERNMENT BODY FOR BUSINESS G Credit Review  REEN ENERGY PROVIDER G TO BUSINESS SSE Airtricity R ETAIL EXCELLENCE Lloyds Pharmacy Ireland  OREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT F Wuxi Biologics C YBER SECURITY AND COMPLIANCE Sysnet Global Solutions  XECUTIVE EDUCATION E UCD Smurfit Executive Development A GENCY SUPPORT TO BUSINESS Skillnet Ireland  XECUTIVE RECRUITMENT E Principal Connections F INANCIAL SERVICES COMPANY Capitalflow B USINESS WOMAN OF THE YEAR Claire Tolan, Irish Distillers  USINESS MAN OF THE YEAR B Harry Hughes, Portwest  OMPANY OF THE YEAR C DHL Express

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MICRO FINANCE IRELAND

Garrett Stokes, CEO of Microfinance Ireland, the InBUSINESS Recognition Award winner for Finance Provider to Micro Businesses and Start-Ups, on optimism for the economy reopening.

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s we speak, nearing the end of the first quarter of 2021, Garrett Stokes, CEO of Microfinance Ireland, admits he has not seen the upsurge of Brexit-related demand from small businesses that he had predicted would occur this year. The current lockdown has meant that many of those small businesses simply have not yet begun trading again this year. “What we thought would happen in January or February, with people needing money to restock, will probably now happen in Q2,” Stokes surmises. It is a topic he has been discussing in some depth with Local Enterprise Offices, in the hopes that small businesses will access the necessary information to prepare themselves. “A lot of our customers will not be exporters, they tend to be importers, and because they aren’t trading currently, they haven’t experienced the fallout of the new supply chain. It’s something we are asking people to really seriously look at. The full implications of Brexit haven’t been introduced yet.” REOPENING AND REBOOTING However Stokes is optimistic for the future once restrictions lift and people begin to spend money again. In contrast to this time last year, when the shock and unpredictability temporarily froze action, people are now adopting a ‘life goes on’ approach to the changed world we live in. “We are still seeing a very good volume of people looking to start up businesses and to expand,” states Stokes. “Some of those may be people who lost their job because of COVID-19 and are looking

FINANCE PROVIDER TO MICRO BUSINESSES AND START-UPS

Micro But Mighty

Garrett Stokes, CEO Microfinance Ireland

WE ARE STILL SEEING A VERY GOOD VOLUME OF PEOPLE LOOKING TO START UP BUSINESSES AND TO EXPAND. for new ways to support themselves and their families by going the selfemployment route. “What we need is to kickstart the economy, and if people are coming along with new ideas and starting up new businesses, that can only be good. If it works in recession times or in a lockdown, it will work in the good times. “When we do get back to a working economy it could actually kick off really quickly, because there are huge volumes of money on deposit. People

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who have managed to hold on to their jobs haven’t been spending money, they’ve been saving. I think the economy could move very quickly. It’s not like the last recession where there was a lack of liquidity in the market; that was a very different scenario. “The cost of reopening; that’s where I think our next big demand will come from.” He points to restaurants or shops whose stock is obsolete, and asserts, “It will almost be like opening a new venture for them if stock has to be replaced.”

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LLOYDS PHARMACY RETAIL EXCELLENCE

Delivering on Best in Retail Excellence Dervila McGarry, Head of Marketing at LloydsPharmacy, on how they deliver retail excellence to their customers

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loydsPharmacy won the Retail Excellence award at this year’s Chambers Ireland InBUSINESS Recognition Awards. This is the second time in three years that LloydsPharmacy has been recognised with this award, acknowledging the team’s relentless dedication and commitment to delivering excellent customer service and patient care throughout communities in Ireland. With new protocols in place, including PPE, social distancing and Perspex screens, they have made patients feel safe and supported at all times, throughout the Covid-19 crisis. As Ireland’s leading pharmacy chain, with 93 pharmacies located across the country, the focus is on offering patients and their families an extensive range of medications, products and advice for their health and wellbeing needs. EXPERT ADVICE “Our team’s number one priority is to provide expert patient care and excellence in customer service. This is what sets our pharmacies apart and why patients remain loyal,” states Dervila McGarry, Head of Marketing at LloydsPharmacy. “With extensive training each year, our pharmacy teams can offer advice on many health matters including pain management, vitamins, skincare and chronic illnesses such as diabetes, asthma, high cholesterol and blood pressure. The teams are accessible either by

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Skin Care Advisor carrying out a skin analysis on a customer

OUR PHARMACY TEAM’S NUMBER ONE PRIORITY IS TO PROVIDE EXPERT PATIENT CARE. THIS IS WHAT SETS OUR PHARMACIES APART AND WHY PATIENTS REMAIN LOYAL. phone or face-to-face in the privacy of our care rooms, to listen and offer support when it is most required.” SERVICES AND WELLNESS CLINICS LloydsPharmacy stores offer a range of services and wellness clinics including flu vaccination, medicine management packs, blood pressure checks, BMI monitoring, emergency contraception, skin analysis, express prescription

service, and smoking cessation. One-toone private consultations are available with pharmacists, highly-trained health coaches and skin consultants. “Sometimes patients have concerns and need the reassurance from the Pharmacist. For many patients, the pharmacist becomes their trusted health advisor,” says McGarry. “Being part of the local community, Lloyds Pharmacies play a pivotal role in providing health care support. All our pharmacies have a defibrillator and our teams have been trained in CPR. Recently two of our teams had to put this training to test and performed lifesaving CPR on patients. “Our charity partner is Aware and our Pharmacy teams have recently received training from their experts on

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LLOYDS PHARMACY RETAIL EXCELLENCE

Pharmacist providing flu vaccination how to support patients suffering from depression, and anxiety.” PRODUCT CHOICE AND VALUE LloydsPharmacy stands out in the market for their extensive range of products, in particular for three focus categories: Pain management, Vitamins and Skincare. “We have trained Pain advisors, Health coaches and Skin advisors in all pharmacies, and colleagues are trained on product knowledge as well as lifestyle advice to support customers select the right product tailored to suit their needs.” ADDED CONVENIENCE Many LloydsPharmacy branches offer free delivery of prescriptions which is greatly appreciated by the elderly and vulnerable. “This has proven to be an invaluable service during Covid-19,” McGarry notes. “Our pharmacies all have health mails which means GPs can email our pharmacies the patients prescription directly so it can be prepared and ready for collection. “We also offer a free SMS service for patients who are on repeat prescriptions, to let them know their prescription is ready for collection, saving time waiting.

WE ALSO OFFER A FREE SMS SERVICE FOR PATIENTS WHO ARE ON REPEAT PRESCRIPTIONS, TO LET THEM KNOW THEIR PRESCRIPTION IS READY FOR COLLECTION, SAVING TIME WAITING. “Making our customers lives easier and showing we care is paramount. Often it’s the simple things that make a difference, like a follow up phone call to a patient to check their new medication is agreeing with them, arranging for the prescription to be delivered, or taking orders over the phone for some essentials and having items ready for collection later that day.”

of information and advice about managing and preventing conditions and diseases. This content is available on the website, in our blogs and across our social media channels. We regularly host webinars on our social channels providing tips on a range of topics from boosting immunity, lowering Blood Pressure, how to quit smoking to skin care routines.”

ONLINE CHANNELS The omni channel experience is the new norm for retail. In October LloydsPharmacy launched a new website offering shoppers a muchenhanced, user-friendly and mobileoptimised experience including a speedy delivery service direct to their homes. “If shoppers create a new account, they can currently also enjoy a 15% discount off their first order. On orders over €40, we provide free delivery within Republic of Ireland. “We have developed the Online Health Hub which contains a wealth

UNDERSTANDING CUSTOMERS “The modern discerning shopper is extremely savvy and expects, not only the most comprehensive range of products and promotions, but a friendly service, a safe and welcoming environment and a pharmacy team they can trust,” McGarry concludes. “At LloydsPharmacy we pride ourselves on our highly trained, knowledgeable and trustworthy teams who are passionate about proactively managing health and wellbeing of their patients and inspiring positive lives.”

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TU DUBLIN POST GRADUATE AND MBA PROGRAMMES

Education and Impact TU Dublin’s Postgraduate Business Programmes shape impactful, socially responsible leaders says Colin Hughes, Head of the Graduate Business School.

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U Dublin has greatly enhanced its offering of postgraduate business programmes over the past few years, and moved with agility to rise to the challenges presented in 2020. Looking to the year ahead, Dr. Colin Hughes, Head of the Graduate Business School at TU Dublin, is excited to take the best of both worlds into the future - online and on-campus learning. “It has been a challenging year for students and Business Schools alike. At TU Dublin Graduate Business School we transitioned seamlessly to online learning and our students really appreciated that. While we had strong experience of teaching online programmes, there was a learning curve associated with moving to 100% online learning for all programmes.” The future of education may well be up for disruption, but he is keen to point out that while online learning offers incontestable accessibility, the human connection of the on-campus experience is still highly valued by many learners. “I think we need to leverage the best of online and the best of on-campus and to provide choices for people. Our students, although very happy with our online provision, simply miss the connection that happens in the classroom and over coffee on campus. However, some students might choose a fully online delivery option as they can access certain programmes or providers regardless of their location and their work or personal commitments. I think it is a matter of providing options for people.” A BLENDED APPROACH One key element of the learning experience, which Hughes rates as

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translating particularly well to online is the large lecture, and he predicts strong potential for more of these to be offered online permanently. “I also think it is important to distinguish between different types of learning experiences. For instance, at TU Dublin we have always focused on excellence in teaching and ensuring a strong student experience. We teach in smaller classes and our students get to engage deeply in discussion and peer learning. That simply doesn’t happen when there are large classes. I believe that a lot of these large classes will move to online delivery as there is already limited potential for engagement given the number of students and the fact that people are increasingly more comfortable with online learning. “It is also important to differentiate short online courses, which provide an introduction or update to a topic, from programmes which focus on a deeper level of learning, incorporating meaningful discussions, debates, peer learning and exciting projects which give people an opportunity to apply their learning to practice.” Real life interaction, peer-to-peer learning, and relevant workplace experience will remain a crucial part of a deeper and experiential form of students’ development. “At TU Dublin, we push our students to apply their learning to their own workplace or to real live company challenges which we design with our partners in industry. Our programmes are designed and delivered in partnership with experts from business and society to ensure we are shaping impactful business leaders who are aware of their responsibilities regarding society and the planet. Having strong external partnerships allows us to achieve this mission.”

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TU DUBLIN

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POST GRADUATE AND MBA PROGRAMMES

A NEW APPROACH While it has felt at times like the world is in limbo, waiting for economies and societies to restart and reboot, there has been much going on behind the scenes at TU Dublin. Hughes states, “Given the pace of change in business and society, it is really important that Business Schools are agile enough to respond to change. In the past 12 months we have redesigned a number of programmes in Strategy, Leadership and Product Management, with insights from our Faculty, Alumni and executive education partners. We have also designed exciting new programmes in Fintech, Global Sales and Creative Creative Communication (with a flexible carousel learning pathway and 50% industry lecturers). A new seminar series with expert speakers from all over the world focuses on topics such as emerging tech and innovation, sustainability, social entrepreneurship, cultural intelligence and doing business globally.” TU Dublin’s researchers and graduates will be shaping the future, and how businesses respond to it. “It is also crucial that our research is helping us to show leadership for organisations who are navigating change. TU Dublin researchers are producing fascinating research on a range of cutting edge topics which is driving real impact in practice. For instance, our research on remote leadership has been helping companies to navigate the challenges of remote working during Covid-19 and to plan for the future. We will be rolling out further workshops in this area in the coming months.”

Catherine Collins

Dr. Colin Hughes, Head of the Graduate Business School, TU Dublin

OUR RESEARCH ON REMOTE LEADERSHIP HAS BEEN HELPING COMPANIES TO NAVIGATE THE CHALLENGES OF REMOTE WORKING DURING COVID-19 AND TO PLAN FOR THE FUTURE. Find out more about Postgraduate courses at TU Dublin. See www.tudublin.ie/ pgbusiness for details of upcoming webinars.

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ZURICH LIFE ASSURANCE PENSIONS & LIFE COMPANY

Zurich Life Assurance: Expertise and Resilience Joe Creegan, Head of Corporate Life & Pensions, says the past year has allowed the company to rise to the challenge of volatile markets and show their fund managers’ expertise.

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learly 2020 has been a very difficult year for our staff and our customers alike and an unprecedented year of change,” says Joe Creegan, Head of Corporate Life & Pensions, Ireland, at Zurich Life Assurance. Creegan notes that Zurich was already in the process of rolling out the equipment and set-up needed for staff to work remotely, and were relatively well prepared for the transition. “As a business we had already embarked on a journey to digitise many of our products and processes and the Covid-19 pandemic has accelerated that journey, as we have moved more services online and moved over 90% of our staff to remote working. “Our business has been quite resilient, as everybody has got used to this way of working. It has become the new norm, and it’s hard to see us going back to where we were a year ago, perhaps ever. “Work has been democratised in a way; everybody has the same challenges working in a room at home.” He highlights their initiatives around mental wellness to deal with the stresses and anxieties of the past year as something that has had a net

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positive effect on the culture of the organisation. “We are also involved with Rugby Players Ireland and the mental wellbeing campaign around ‘Tackle Your Feelings’ and have run events which have been very well-received.” ACTIVE APPROACH “Resilient” is a word he applies not only to the employees, but also to the company, facing into the challenges of the market. “In a year of volatile investment markets our active approach to investment management has delivered significant added value to our existing customers and we also seen increased interest

WHEN THE MARKET IS GOING UP, IT’S HARD TO DIFFERENTIATE BETWEEN A GOOD FUND MANAGER AND A BAD FUND MANAGER, BUT WHEN YOU GET VOLATILITY IN THE MARKET, THAT’S WHEN YOU CAN ACTUALLY DEMONSTRATE YOUR EXPERTISE.

from companies and individuals looking to move away from passive investment management, which has underdelivered for many years now, but particularly during the volatility witnessed in 2020. “Unlike many of our competitors who adopt a passive approach to investment management under the mantra of lower costs, we have made fast decisions and moved quickly over the period to reposition our pension scheme portfolio, by selling out of certain assets classes or individual stocks and buying in to others, in order to deliver out performance for our customers. I believe our customers expect us to actively manage their money in return for the annual management charge incurred. “If you look at our performance versus some of our competitors over a 12-month period, we have delivered significant positive performance. When the market is going up, it’s hard to differentiate between a good fund manager and a bad fund manager, but when you get volatility in the market, that’s when you can actually demonstrate your expertise.” Creegan emphasises the importance of this Recognition

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24/03/2021 15:59


ZURICH LIFE ASSURANCE PENSIONS & LIFE COMPANY

Joe Creegan, Head of Corporate Life & Pensions, Zurich

AT ZURICH WE BELIEVE THAT PROPER GOVERNANCE OF PENSION SCHEMES DRIVES VALUE FOR MONEY AND WE ARE DELIGHTED TO SEE THE PENSION AUTHORITY’S ONGOING MOVE TO A RISK-BASED AND FORWARD-LOOKING APPROACH TO SUPERVISION Award from Chambers Ireland in that it really speaks to their customer base: “We’re known for insurance, but that’s a completely different side of the business and we see this as a recognition of the Zurich brand in the corporate pension space.” FUTURE CHALLENGES With the increasing cost of the State Pension in Ireland and the fact that only one-third of private sector workers contribute to a private or company-sponsored pension scheme, Creegan says, “This combination is building up challenges for future generations who will be forced to defer retirement or accept a lower income in retirement. We cannot

afford to lose time in addressing this future challenge and it is incumbent on all stakeholders to encourage younger people, in particular, to start funding for their retirement income as early as possible and ensure that they are saving enough and making the right investment decisions to achieve an adequate income in retirement.” As one of those stakeholders, Zurich have been providing group employee benefit solutions in Ireland for over 30 years and has vast experience providing Defined Contribution (DC) pension scheme solutions in the Irish market to medium and large employers, with better outcomes in retirement for employees of these companies.

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“At Zurich we believe that proper governance of pension schemes drives value for money and we are delighted to see the Pension Authority’s ongoing move to a risk-based and forward-looking approach to supervision,” says Creegan. “The recent report by the Pensions Authority into potential issues with the current Master Trust model provides plenty of food for thought for the Industry and equally Employers who opt for a Master Trust solution.” “As one of the world’s biggest insurance companies, Zurich is expert at risk management and best governance practices. The most important drivers of income in retirement will be having a good level of contribution from both employer and employee and choosing the right fund into which these contributions are invested. Therefore, a critical element of good governance is the appointment of the right investment manager.”

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IRISH DISTILLERS BUSINESS WOMAN OF THE YEAR

Distilled Genius With InBUSINESS Business Woman of the Year Claire Tolan at the helm of Irish Distillers, and a new female blender appointed in Midleton Distillery, diversity in the world of whiskey is well and truly in place.

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laire Tolan, Managing Director, island of Ireland, of Irish Distillers was awarded Business Woman of the Year in the InBUSINESS Recognition Awards 2020. Irish Distillers is Ireland’s leading supplier of spirits and wines, and producer of some of the world’s most well-known and successful Irish whiskeys, led by the flagship Jameson brand, the world’s best-selling whiskey. Tolan has managed through the uncertainty of the last year, with positive growth figures across

the brand portfolio of Irish Distillers announced in February with the half year results, for the six months ending 31 December 2020. Despite challenging conditions for in the on-trade business, there was an upsurge in demand in the offtrade outlets. “Despite challenging conditions for our partners in the on-trade, we have seen an upsurge in demand in the off-trade outlets. The trend of premiumisation is here to stay as consumers choose higher quality spirits helping us achieve healthy volume growth in Ireland last year across most of our brands including Jameson, Redbreast, Method and Madness, and Midleton Very Rare and across the wider Pernod Ricard portfolio of wines.” said Tolan.

DESPITE CHALLENGING CONDITIONS FOR OUR PARTNERS IN THE ON-TRADE, WE HAVE SEEN AN UPSURGE IN DEMAND IN THE OFF-TRADE OUTLETS Jameson proved its resilience, with sales growth of 3% globally. Jameson recorded volume growth in key markets including the UK (+12%), USA (+7%), Russia (+7%), and Ireland (+4%). Within the broader Jameson family, Jameson Black Barrel posted volume growth of 31% globally versus the same period last year, successfully capturing the growing consumer trend toward more premium brands. Conor McQuaid, Chairman and CEO of Irish Distillers, points to continued growth trends also coming from emerging markets including Nigeria, India, and Brazil. Irish Distillers brands are exported to over 130 markets.

Claire Tolan, Managing Director, Island of Ireland, of Irish Distillers

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CONTINUED INNOVATION Tolan points to innovation as one of the strengths that has been instrumental in

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IRISH DISTILLERS

BLENDING IN “Distilling is an artform and one steeped in tradition, but we continue to challenge the conventions of tradition and explore new and exciting innovations in the process and innovation remains a key driver of Irish Distillers’ growth,” states McQuaid. “Our team in Midleton continues to excite and delight whiskey fans around the world.” In what might traditionally have been considered a male-dominated side of the business, the company was recently delighted to announce the appointment of Deirdre O’Carroll as a Blender at its Midleton Distillery in Co Cork. In her new role, O’Carroll will work with Master Blender Billy Leighton in Midleton Distillery, and will be responsible for the development of new and existing blends, marrying together specific and intricate flavours

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BUSINESS WOMAN OF THE YEAR

a thriving business, not just in product innovation, but also in adaptability to changing circumstances. “There has been no doubt that, as an industry, the Covid-19 pandemic has challenged us immensely, but we have shown incredible resilience and sought ways to continue to support our customers and communities as best we could,” she says. “Our ability to work with, and listen to, our partners has been the standout quality that has allowed us to make a real difference in 2020.” New launches in products have also been warmly received. “Innovation remains at the heart of everything we do, and the team in Midleton Distillery continued to push the boundaries in 2020,” Tolan notes, pointing to the Midleton Very Rare Silent Distillery Collection as one of the highlights of 2020. The pilot launch of Jameson Cold Brew was another. “Jameson Cold Brew is an example of a recent innovation, which combines Jameson’s triple distilled Irish whiskey with cold brew coffee, that was piloted in Ireland initially and then officially launched in the US last January. Despite the impact of Covid-19, this new release has gotten off to a fast start with a fantastic consumer reaction.”

Catherine Collins

Deirdre O’Carroll, Blender Midleton Distillery in Co Cork

INNOVATION REMAINS AT THE HEART OF EVERYTHING WE DO, AND THE TEAM IN MIDLETON DISTILLERY CONTINUED TO PUSH THE BOUNDARIES IN 2020 and aromas, ultimately, creating a palette of tastes that make up Irish Distillers’ portfolio of Irish whiskeys. She will also be responsible for the management of stock, including cask profile and age profile, as well as laying down stock for future generations. O’Carroll alludes to the alchemy of blending, turning basic ingredients in to something very special and distinctive: “In simple terms, four simple ingredients can make an array of whiskeys; water, yeast, cereal and wooden casks. However, it is the sensory aspect, balancing the flavours, is what defines the taste. I look forward to channelling my knowledge and experience into my new role, while learning from Billy and the team.” With a degree in Food Science and Technology from University College Cork and a diploma in Distilling

from the Institute of Brewing and Distilling, O’Carroll had a solid background knowledge already built up when she joined Irish Distillers in 2012 as part of the first year of the Jameson Engineering Programme. During this two-year programme, participants gain a solid foundation in the whiskey-making process. Upon completion of the programme, O’Carroll was one of the first graduates to join as part of the Graduate Distiller Programme. Billy Leighton, Master Blender at Midleton Distillery, says: “The programme is designed to give graduates ownership of their career aspirations, supported by practical experience and training to help them succeed and Deirdre is a shining example of what success looks like.”

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Pat McDonagh, Owner Supermac’s, Trócaire Supporter.

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Mayo leisure complex wins National Quality Standard Award, while Sligo makes bid for UNESCO World Heritage Site and Leitrim gets 135k funding for outdoor recreational amenities

ULSTER

Limerick looks to a positive future for energy and a new Greenway in 2021, while Cork receives highest funding nationally in Outdoor Recreation Infrastructure Scheme

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MUNSTER

LEINSTER

Dublin Lord Mayor announces Integration Strategy, South Dublin County Council creates Ireland’s first publicly owned energy company, and Green Kilometre Scheme comes to Meath

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Donegal County Council launches Letterkenny 2040, Monaghan Biodiversity and Heritage Strategic Plan 2020-2025 is announced, and Belfast businesses get free support

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[ DUBLIN CITY ]

Dublin City Council announces Integration Strategy Pictured at the launch of the Athboy Age Friendly report, which documents a walkability audit in Athboy town and the changes the town is making to become more age-friendly, are (from left) Meath Age Friendly programme manager Áine Bird, Minister for Justice Helen McEntee, Chief Age Friendly Officer Catherine McGuigan, Meath County Council Chief Executive Jackie Maguire, Director of Services Barry Lynch, Cathaoirleach of Meath County Council Cllr David Gilroy, and National Age Friendly Programme Manager Emer Coveney. The project was led by the Meath Age Friendly Programme, in partnership with Age Friendly Ireland and Dementia: Understand Together, the HSE’s national dementia awareness campaign.

[ COUNTY MEATH ]

Meath County Council launches Green Kilometre Scheme In response to requests from numerous community groups and individuals throughout the county, Meath County Council created the Green Kilometre Scheme, which invites individuals and groups to choose a kilometre stretch of road in their area and commit to maintaining it over the course of the year. With over 3,600km of roads in the county, the scheme provides an opportunity for individuals to work together in a community on a project which benefits everyone. Meath County Council will support any group or individual who would like to get involved by supplying native trees, litter pickers, bags and gloves. Once restrictions allow, the Council can also arrange for an adviser to visit to give advice in relation to planting and taking care of heritage features. “There is a huge amount of goodwill out there – people who want to do something positive for themselves and for their community, and we believe this scheme will harness some of that; it will give people an opportunity to work in tandem with their neighbours and friends, even though they can’t work together,” says Bernadine Carry, Environmental Officer with Meath County Council. To get involved, visit meath.ie and download the Green Kilometre Participation form.

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ublin City Council announced it has taken the first step in the process of creating a new Dublin City Integration Strategy. The strategy will cover the period 20212025. An online webinar was held for almost 50 city stakeholders and social partners to discuss this initiative and was chaired by Lord Mayor of Dublin Hazel Chu. Addressing the opening of the webinar, the Lord Mayor said, “We live in an increasingly diverse, multicultural city and I recognise how today we are more challenged than ever before to better realise the future of our city as a welcoming, inclusive, dynamic, prosperous and indeed fair city to live in, work and play in. That’s why I am beginning a process of stakeholder engagement and public consultation towards the development of a new Integration Strategy for Dublin.” Dublin City’s Integration Strategy is being developed as part of the work of Dublin City’s Local and Community Development Committee in 2021.

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[ COUNTY DUBLIN ]

South Dublin County Council creates Ireland’s first publicly owned energy company

Mike Beary, Amazon Web Services, with County Architect Eddie Conroy and Chief Executive of South Dublin County Council Daniel McLoughlin

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outh Dublin County Council (SDCC) has established Ireland’s first publicly owned, not-for-profit energy company, to provide low carbon heat to local community buildings. Trading as Heatworks, the company will deliver the Tallaght District Heating Network, estimated when completed to reduce carbon dioxide emissions in the area by nearly 1,500 tonnes per year. The network will use excess heat from a customisation to Amazon Web Services’ (AWS) recently completed data centre to provide low carbon heat to public sector, residential and commercial customers. AWS will provide recycled heat free of charge to the scheme as part of its broader sustainability activities, and its continued assistance to Ireland in meeting its EU 2030 national heating and carbon-reduction targets. The district-heating company has contracted Fortum, a large Finnish energy supply company with extensive district-heating experience throughout Scandinavia and Eastern Europe, to carry out the design, installation, and operation of the Tallaght network. The system will initially heat 47,000m2 of public sector buildings, 3,000m2 of commercial space, and 135 affordable rental apartments. The supply of low-cost, low-carbon heat is expected to increase commercial competitiveness, attracting more innovative businesses and development to Tallaght town centre, facilitate educational programmes and start-up opportunities in renewable energy solutions, as well as helping to mitigate fuel poverty as the heat network expands over time.

€190,000 Town and Village Renewal Scheme funding for Fingal

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Fingal County Council welcomed €190,000 in new funding from the Town and Village Renewal Scheme (which helps communities respond to Covid-19 through outdoor amenities, enhancement of public spaces, and support for remote working) to support projects in St Margaret’s, Balrothery, Rolestown and Lusk, bringing the total awarded to 10 towns and villages in Fingal to over €422,000.

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[ COUNTY LIMERICK ]

[ COUNTY LIMERICK ]

Limerick Greenway set to launch in summer 2021

The leaders of the +CityxChange project in Limerick are running an open call to the public, looking for innovative ideas to improve how homes, businesses and residents use energy. The overall project is working to develop areas of “positive energy” in Limerick City, which produce more energy than they consume. Limerick is one of two EU “lighthouse” cities that is involved in a major climate change pilot programme that will give a lead to the rest of Europe on how to dramatically reduce the carbon footprint of urban areas. The EU +CityxChange Programme (Positive City Exchange) sees Limerick, along with Trondheim in Norway, chosen to roll out a project that has the potential to revolutionise how we produce and use energy in European cities and towns. The project is supported by the EU Horizon 2020 programme, and the project team includes Limerick City and County Council, University of Limerick, GKinetic, and ESB Networks, among others. This new open call, Take Control of Your Energy, is looking for projects that test ideas to reduce the amount of energy used in the city, and increase the energy generated from innovative sources.

I

Marie Keating

Call for innovative ideas to make Limerick City energy positive

n a boost to the tourism and hospitality sector, Limerick City and County Council announced the appointment of consultants to lead on the marketing and promotion of the newly upgraded Limerick Greenway, targeted for opening in summer 2021. The Council have also confirmed a programme to assist businesses benefitting from the project and that the name of the greenway will change from the current Great Southern Greenway to the Limerick Greenway. Springboard and Totem, the Munster-based firms appointed, have worked previously on the award-winning Waterford Greenway. They have been tasked with devising a suite of promotional material for the upgraded greenway and will assist the Council on stepping up marketing and promotion ahead of its official opening. With the hospitality and tourism sectors badly affected by the pandemic, the Council has also announced that a Greenway Destination Development Programme will be undertaken in 2021 in partnership with West Limerick Resources.

The future of one of Limerick’s most recognisable homes for cultural activities, Ormston House, has been secured with the announcement that Limerick City and County Council has purchased 9-10 Patrick Street, Limerick. The purchase comprises of the ground floor and basement and has been made possible with funding from Limerick City and County Council and the JP McManus Benevolent Fund. The building has been used as a focal point for arts and culture in the heart of Limerick City since 2011 and supports creative practices and provides the opportunity for artists to develop challenging and experimental works.

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Camden Fort, Crosshaven

€1.8M

fund for Cork community and voluntary groups Cork County Council announced over €1.8 million funding to support local communities in 2021. The Community Fund Scheme provides financial support to a range of groups and organisations across the county, is administered locally by the Council’s eight Municipal Districts and provides financial assistance to a wide variety of community, sporting and voluntary organisations.

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[ COUNTY CORK ]

Cork County awarded highest funding nationally in €3.2m Outdoor Recreation Infrastructure Scheme

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inister for Rural and Community Development Heather Humphreys TD announced almost a3.2 million in funding for 173 projects across Ireland under the Outdoor Recreation Infrastructure Scheme. A total of a250,636.20 is ringfenced for County Cork, of which a138,000 has been awarded to Cork County Council for a range of projects. The Outdoor Recreation Infrastructure Scheme supports the development, promotion and maintenance of outdoor amenities such as trails, walkways, cycleways, and blueways and has provided funding for the development of new amenities and the enhancement of existing facilities since 2016. This year’s total funding was increased by 20% on 2020. Cork County Council successfully secured the maximum funding available through the scheme to support the development or upgrade of the following seven projects: Walking Trail at Camden Fort in Crosshaven, trails and water access at White Bay in East Cork, entranceway and marketing of Moanbaun Woods in North Cork, a carpark and picnic area for Mount Hillary, North Cork, repairs to the Cliff Walk at The Warren, Rosscarberry, West Cork, redevelopment of walks, a sensory path and improved disability access to Island Wood in Newmarket, and improvement works on Belgooly Walkway in West Cork.

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Sligo Neolithic Landscapes group

[ COUNTY SLIGO ]

Bid for Sligo’s passage tomb landscapes to be named UNESCO World Heritage Site Queen Maeve’s Cairn atop Knocknarea is an iconic landscape feature of County Sligo and forms part of Sligo’s Neolithic passage tomb tradition. Along with the megalithic cemeteries of Carrowmore and Carrowkeel, these monuments have few counterparts in the world, in terms of their number, quality of preservation and their striking landscape contexts. For many years, concerns have been raised over increased visitor pressure and the deteriorating condition of these sites. Many of these world-class monuments are under threat and require long-term management and conservation for the benefit of all and future generations. In January 2019, the Minister for Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht opened applications for Ireland’s Tentative List of properties for potential future nomination to the World Heritage List 2020-2030. During 2020, the Sligo Neolithic Landscapes group sought the support of Sligo County Council to prepare and submit an application to Ireland’s Tentative List for The Passage Tomb Landscapes of County Sligo. Sligo County Council is currently working with this group and other key stakeholders to submit an application.

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[ COUNTY SLIGO ]

Funding announced for Sligo Outdoor Recreation Projects

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athaoirleach of Sligo County Council Cllr Dara Mulvey has welcomed the announcement of funding for projects under the Outdoor Recreation Infrastructure Scheme: “The Department of Rural and Community Development has confirmed funding for a range of projects in County Sligo, and this is a great boost for the many voluntary groups and local committees who are working tirelessly to enhance their communities. At this very challenging time for all our citizens, the development of our outdoor recreational facilities was never more important or more welcome. I would like to commend Sligo County Council’s Director of Services Dorothy Clarke and the staff of Sligo County Council and Leader for their professionalism in working with the various communities to prepare and submit the grant applications, and today’s announcement is due reward for their efforts.” Sligo Walks is a Sligo County Council initiative which has been highly proactive in the development and promotion of walking and hiking trails in Sligo. With information on over 50 walking trails now available on the SligoWalks.ie website, this funding will ensure that further enhancements can take place on walks all around the county. InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2021

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[COUNTY MAYO]

Leisure Complex at Lough Lannagh obtains highest level National Quality Standard Award

Sligo’s Western Distributor Road was opened to traffic on January 11th. A formal official opening will be made when public health restrictions allow. The road will link the N4 National Primary Road at the Caltragh interchange with the Roger Eames road Ballydoogan and to the R292 Strandhill Road, and consists of 1.9km of single urban distributor road between the existing N4 junction (Caltragh) and the existing Ballydoogan Road. “The Western Distributor Road is of major strategic importance to this region. It will provide quality access to the proposed new IDA Business Park at Oakfield and the existing IDA Finisklin Business Park,” says Cathaoirleach of Sligo County Council Cllr Dara Mulvey, pictured here with Mayor Councillor Rosaleen O’Grady.

€135K

funding for Leitrim outdoor recreational amenities

Minister for Rural and Community Development Heather Humphreys TD announced almost €3.2m in funding for 173 projects under the Outdoor Recreation Infrastructure Scheme. Eight projects in Leitrim received funding with a cumulative value of €155k, with Leitrim County Council being successful in seven applications and awarded funding of €134,930. The scheme provides funding for the development, promotion and maintenance of outdoor amenities such as trails, walkways, cycleways and blueways.

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Ireland Active, the National Health and Leisure Body, announced that the Leisure Complex at Lough Lannagh, Castlebar has been awarded a coveted National Quality Standard Award. The level of award bestowed – Outstanding Standard – is the highest possible standard achievable and is the result of a thorough audit process which was carried out by Ireland Active at the facility last year. The National Quality Standard Award is awarded to facilities that meet the operational standards for leisure and fitness facilities across 250 quality-based criteria. The standard is designed to encourage excellence and continuous improvement within the sector and recognise facilities for their remarkable standards in the areas of safety, hygiene, human resources and customer service. The auditor’s report complimented the professional management of the centre, its outstanding design and highlighted the extensive range of facilities for disabled users. The 11m Leisure Complex at Lough Lannagh was designed by Mayo County Council’s own Architects Team and opened to the public in April 2019. The facility contains the only 8 lane 25m swimming pool in the Connaught region, making it very attractive for holding national competitive events. The facility also boasts a modern gym, operated by local firm The Movement, with an extensive range of equipment including top-of-the-range cardio and resistance equipment for all users.

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£2 MILLION community regeneration funding boostt

Four community projects in Belfast have received a funding boost, thanks to a partnership between Belfast City Council and the Department for Communities. A £2 million joint funding package will help deliver a range of community facilities including new and improved play parks, sports facilities, community buildings, park pathways and community walkways. 

[ COUNTY ANTRIM ]

New year brings new support for Belfast businesses

B

elfast businesses are urged to register for a new, free programme of business support in 2021. Belfast City Council has developed a new package of support for businesses to encourage growth, sustainability and resilience, enhance high growth potential and develop tendering and digital skills as part of its Belfast: Our Recovery plan. This project is part funded by Invest Northern Ireland and the European Regional Development Fund under the Investment for Growth & Jobs Northern Ireland (2014-2020) Programme. “We’ve listened carefully to Belfast businesses to make sure that we understand their main challenges and we’ve developed a range of support in response to those,” says Chair of Belfast City Council’s City Growth and Regeneration Committee, Councillor David Brooks. “We’re offering flexible, one-to-one specialist mentoring with experienced business advisors who will evaluate your business, listen to your needs, recommend and deliver the most valuable support for you. It’s all free, and due to current restrictions, all sessions are delivered online, in real time, when it’s convenient for you.”

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[ COUNTY MONAGHAN ]

[ COUNTY DONEGAL ]

Donegal County Council launches Letterkenny 2040

Monaghan County Council announces Monaghan Biodiversity and Heritage Strategic Plan 2020-2025 Monaghan County Council has an ambitious vision that by 2025, the role of heritage and biodiversity for climate change mitigation and adaptation, sustainable communities, functioning ecosystems, health and wellbeing is generally accepted in the county and embedded in the activities of the Council. The Monaghan Biodiversity and Heritage Strategic Plan 20202025 contains 13 strategic themes with action plans that will guide the work of the Monaghan County Council Heritage Office, and the County Monaghan Heritage Forum for the next five years: climate change mitigation and adaptation through heritage and biodiversity; Monaghan’s Wonderful Wetlands; hedgerows and native woodland; high nature value farmland; The Worm Ditch / The Black Pig’s Dyke; pre-historic archaeology / passage graves and cairns; protected structures; vernacular and traditional buildings; demesnes and estates; historic graveyards, holy wells and church ruins; indigenous knowledge and traditions; cross-border heritage; Irish and the vernacular English. InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2021

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Letterkenny 2040 is an exciting project funded by the Urban Regeneration and Development Fund (URDF), a flagship initiative of Project Ireland 2040 and led by Donegal County Council’s Regeneration and Development Team. The strategy will establish an ambitious vision for the future of the town as a competitive regional centre, attracting investment and identifying a series of projects to bring about a social, economic and environmental transformation of the town centre. “This project comes at a vital time for Letterkenny as we contend with the unprecedented challenges of the public health crisis, Brexit, and the climate emergency,” says Cllr Donal Coyle, Mayor of the Letterkenny-Milford Municipal District. “It presents a major opportunity for the town centre to be studied in detail in collaboration with the wider community.” In keeping with Project Ireland 2040, the strategy will seek to make Letterkenny a more attractive and vibrant place where people choose to live, work, invest and visit. This is likely to include a drive towards more people living and working in the town centre, while promoting sustainable forms of transport such as walking, cycling and public transport. It will also include actions to create better public spaces.

Living in Donegal

Donegal County Council’s Culture Division is delivering on three unique arts and heritage projects funded through the EU’s PEACE IV Programme managed by the Special EU Programmes Body (SEUPB). The projects – North West Border Stories: Tales of the Troubles, Living in Donegal, and Echoes of the Decade – form part of Donegal County Council’s 5.5m Local Authority Action Plan.

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Informing you about the work of local authorities in supporting the business needs of their community... To tell us what your local council is doing for business email sorcha.corcoran@ashvillemediagroup.com

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CLARE COUNTY COUNCIL A key driver and facilitator of economic development in County Clare www.clarecoco.ie

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LEO CLARE SUPPORTING YOUR BUSINESS THROUGH BREXIT

Brexit is here and it will affect small businesses in Clare. If the UK is part of your supply chain, you need to prepare. Local Enterprise Office Clare provides dedicated advice and a range of supports to help you manage your Brexit response:

Checkers & Checklists Use the checklists & think about how your business may be impacted.

Customs & Lean Training Prepare your Business for Customs, learn practical skills from expert consultants at various interactive workshops or participate in a LEAN Programme to deliver efficiencies in your business.

FREE Brexit Mentoring Clients work with an experienced mentor on a one-to-one basis to identify key areas of business exposure and develop strategies around Brexit.

Financial Assistance Businesses can avail of a range of grants including: • LEO Financial Grants • TAME Grant • Website Grant

Local Enterprise Clare can help you manage your Brexit response today! Visit www.localenterprise.ie/brexit or email localenterprise@leo.clarecoco.ie

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A Year of Challenge & Adaptation

Mark Nolan, MD, Dromoland Castle Hotel, Mary Considine, CEO, Shannon Group plc, Helen Downes, CEO, Shannon Chamber and Niall Gibbons, CEO, Tourism Ireland

Shannon Chamber CEO Helen Downes talks to Adam Hyland about a challenging but rewarding 2020, and looking forward to further success in 2021.

Eamon Ward

SHANNON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

“2020

can best be described as a year of challenge, adaptation and resilience, and for us and our members, it was certainly a year that will go down in history,” says Shannon Chamber CEO Helen Downes. “Whilst it has been challenging, during this time we have developed a resilience that will stand to us well into the future. Ironically perhaps, while it was one of the busiest years we have had, in some ways it was also one of the most rewarding. CHANGING RELATIONSHIPS Change was a constant last year, and for Shannon Chamber it was no different. “As a Chamber, it was, as usual, a year of high-level engagement and collaboration at local, regional and national levels,” CEO Downes tells me, “A typical pre-COVID-19 day would have been face-to-face meetings with people in and outside the county, but since March we have moved our meetings and training to the virtual space. The team has adapted very quickly, and we will continue to provide support to businesses in this way until the end of 2021, or until we are advised otherwise.”

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INFORMATION Added to this was the industry-led Shannon Chamber HR COVID-19 Hub, launched in July 2020, which continues to offer weekly information on items of interest or concern to companies working through the pandemic. This has established Shannon Chamber as a reliable conduit for the huge amount of information being shared by Government on the COVID-19 supports being introduced and adjusted. “So many questions remained unanswered about various supports that we felt it was a priority to address these and try to establish a central repository for that information, and to be able to share it with our members. “The amount of dialogue we were already having with companies, and the expertise we had in our own network led us to believe that the HUB was a solution, and a

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natural one-stop shop for information,” CEO Downes says. “We engaged with Adare HR Management and invited them to consider offering our members complimentary access to the online hub, where all the necessary information was housed. It has been a great benefit to companies researching issues such as the temporary wage subsidy scheme, health and safety initiatives, return to work policies etc., that the Government was launching - everything that would be of benefit to companies and their human resources teams. “As well as launching the HUB, we also sought clarity on other issues companies were struggling with. We felt it was important for us to understand the challenges our members faced during the year so that, if appropriate, we could lobby Government directly or through Chambers Ireland, to add such issues to the national agenda. “From the start, we participated in weekly meetings with Chambers Ireland, with more than 40 networks sharing their approach and opportunities, what they were doing to help support businesses, and that level of collaboration was great for me as a CEO. We find it helps to be able to look outside the box to see what CEOs in neighbouring counties or regions are dealing with and what they are doing to help. There has been a tremendous collaborative spirit among chambers and companies, all willing to help each other get through the many challenges COVID-19 has presented.

Helen Downes with Entrepreneur’s Organization founder Verne Harnish (right) and Patrick Jordan of Atlantic Aviation Group

All images were taken before social distancing measures were inacted

SUPPORT With a number of business forums already in place, Shannon Chamber was well positioned to provide the support needed in this new virtual world, and saw a huge uptake in engagement within these platforms throughout 2020. The CEO Forum for business owners operating across multinational and indigenous companies in every sector, and the HR Forum and Mid-West Lean Network, provide the means to bring like-minded people together to discuss their issues and solutions. “These programmes were very active in 2020,” CEO Downes tells me, “and will continue to be very active in 2021. We really stepped up our communications and had a lot of one-to-one meetings with companies to deal with their specific issues, with our objective always being to ensure we kept the lines of communication open. “Moving these meetings online has not detracted from their impact at all. In fact, for many busy executives, this has proved to be a very useful and time-saving way to attend all of the meetings as opposed to having to allocate travelling time.”

We have more than 300 member companies employing more than 10,000 people, so we need to be open for business, and we will continue to do that throughout 2021.

Eamon Ward

The clear message from Shannon Chamber is that they are focused on continuing to support companies in the region. “We have worked hard to remain connected to our membership, and we continue to operate in a very professional capacity to support our members who have been in a pressure tank for the last year,” CEO Downes says. “We have more than 300 member companies employing more than 10,000 people, so we need to be open for business, and we will continue to do that throughout 2021. “We have understood that since the onset of COVID-19 it is vital to listen, understand and take action where we are needed, to provide support to the businesses we work with who have been impacted by the pandemic.”

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We have understood that since the onset of COVID-19 it is vital to listen, understand and take action where we are needed, to provide support to the businesses we work with who have been impacted by the pandemic. “What was obvious from the start of this journey was that we were all in this together. No one person or business was going to be isolated from what was now a life-changing experience, so we engaged, listened, and represented members at national level in our capacity as a representative organisation to ensure that any issues they were facing were brought to Government’s attention and resolved.”

Eamon Ward

FUNDING As well as providing platforms to identify and deal with issues businesses face, Shannon Chamber was very successful last year in applying for and securing four additional Skillnet funding streams to support member companies in the region in training, upskilling and reskilling staff. In a new departure, they also secured funding for those companies that unfortunately had to make positions redundant or regrettably had to close down, or who needed to upskill their employees for new opportunities in the Mid-West. This, CEO Downes says, “will continue to be a key focus in 2021 and beyond.” Shannon Chamber also delivered just under 200 training programmes and 35 events including interactive webinars with guest speakers, attracting a high level of

EI Electronics founder Mick Guinee (2nd left) with Helen Downes and (from left) EI’s Paul Kilbridge, Nicky Mullen and Barry Loughnane

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interest and engagement. “I think we really challenged ourselves regarding what we could offer and the funding really gave us the opportunity to be able to do that,” CEO Downes says. “I have to give recognition to the Skillnet CEO, Paul Healy and his team, they did a tremendous job in increasing the amount of funding they could provide.” Other initiatives introduced last year include Shannon Chamber HR, a dedicated HR and Employment Law support service to provide members with access to leading experts at preferential rates, and a Display Screen Equipment training and ergonomics assessment solution to ensure members remain compliant with health and safety regulations while people are working from home. LOBBYING Another primary focus, and success, for Shannon Chamber, was to lobby for the supports and initiatives that would help businesses in the region come through the pandemic. The Chamber compiled and submitted comprehensive submissions on behalf of members to Government, Clare County Council and the National Transport Authority, on a wide range of issues and projects. These included being a partner contributor to Chamber’s Ireland’s PreBudget 2021 submission to Government and high-level involvement in the Shannon Town Masterplan, as well as submissions to the public consultation on the Clare County Development Plan, the Limerick Shannon Metropolitan Area Transport Strategy (LSMATS) and the N19 Shannon Airport Access Road Improvement Scheme. 2020 also saw Shannon Chamber proactively lobby Government and local elected representatives on diverse issues such as the delivery of Aviation Task Force requests; the temporary closure of Shannon Heritage sites in the region; issues relating to COVID-19 and its impact on SMEs; the extension of the COVID-19 ReStart programme to medium-sized enterprises not supported by State agencies;, statutory sick pay; the EU Community Recovery Fund allocated to the Mid-West region; the Wage Subsidy Scheme; rates waivers; and permits for overseas workers on temporary assignment. Shannon Chamber also lobbied regarding the financial losses incurred by hauliers having to return to Ireland with empty trucks during the pandemic, and support for a direct RoRo service between Rosslare Euro Port and Europe, post Brexit. All told, 2020 was an exceptionally busy year for Shannon Chamber, but 2021 is proving to be just as busy. “At the beginning of the year, we started engaging with member companies to again identify the pain points and challenges they are facing,” CEO Downes tells me. “Given the fact that COVID-19 will still be with us this year, we will again be lobbying to support businesses in every way we can and will continue to seek clarity and support for our members on all the issues they will face.”

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2021 The focus on other issues, however, will not be dimmed in 2021. “We are also looking to collectively lobby for a review of the National Aviation Policy with a number of other Chambers,” CEO Downes says, “There will also be continued engagement with the local authority on the Shannon Town Masterplan, to ensure that Shannon develops to its optimal potential. “We are currently working with our board on the submission we will be putting forward for the National Development Plan, which is a key focus in Q1 for us. This will see a particular emphasis on the development of enterprise in the region; adequately resourced transport networks; and the need to introduce measures to ensure the viability of regional airports. So, there will again be a lot of lobbying on local, regional and national issues that will continue throughout 2021. “We are especially concerned about the impact the pandemic has had on the travel, tourism and hospitality sectors, so we will continue to assess and comment on what is needed to regenerate activity at Shannon Airport – a critical infrastructural asset to the entire western seaboard, crucial to the economic development of our region. It is wider that just those sectors though – all of our businesses rely on international connectivity through our airport. “We will continue to support issues of concern to our membership. For example, commercial rates remain an ongoing concern for companies. Given that the pandemic continues with no immediate alleviation in sight, it promises to be yet another challenging year, so we will be addressing and initiating all the pain points that our members may face.” Also on the agenda for 2021 is the plan to work closely with Enterprise Ireland and the IDA to roll out a suite of workshops; the HR forum will provide regular industry-

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CEO Helen Downes with technology futurist Sophie Hackford and Adare HR Management MD Derek McKay led workshops to support HR practitioners and business owners; the CEO Network will have in-camera sessions with various speakers; there will be several public events with keynote speakers and; the breakfast and lunchtime seminars will continue apace, while the end of the year will see Shannon Chamber deliver a virtual annual conference, via the Mid-West Lean Network. This means that while working life for Shannon Chamber and its member companies is facing many changes and challenges, it is still very much business as usual, and for CEO Downes, the message for 2021 is clear. “We experienced a lot of change in 2020, and we are going to experience a lot of change in 2021,” she says. “So be compassionate, we are still in survival mode, and while some people have managed to maintain their jobs and businesses, there are others who have not. There are lessons to be learned, but there are also solutions, and these can be achieved through ongoing collaboration. “Speaking to a lot of companies, I would also say that it is ok to be vulnerable, and sharing that vulnerability is a positive. Utilise the Chamber, utilise whatever network you can avail of to open the doors of communication. We are one of more than 40 Chambers and we are here to support businesses. We lobby, we provide networking opportunities, we build relationships, and to anybody not involved, I would recommend reaching out to your local chamber, or any chamber. Shannon Chamber has been is business for over 20 years, and we continue to support companies who make the decision to join. “It’s gratifying to receive thanks from our members who have acknowledged the difference we are making to their individual services. We are a small Chamber with four employees. It is fair to say, we owe many of these positive outputs to them.”

All images were taken before social distancing measures were inacted

BREXIT This year also sees the effects of Brexit take their toll on Irish businesses, and Shannon Chamber is focused on helping businesses in the region deal with the problems that have begun to rise. Events discussing Brexit have already been held to ensure companies can participate, engage and ask questions about the ramifications of the Trade & Co-operation Agreement; the steps needed for Day 1 Readiness, experiences of the Logistics journey; how tariffs work; and hints and steps for the post-Brexit world. “Brexit has been on the agenda for many years now, but the reality is now having an impact and for us it is important that we support companies and raise issues to the appropriate political channels,” CEO Downes says. “Already we are witnessing issues being experienced by hauliers and freight forwarding companies, so we have called on Government to give this issue priority attention, because it is important to have clarity.”

Eamon Ward

SHANNON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

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Supporting Businesses to Achieve their Potential With the support of Local Enterprise Office Clare, local businesses can achieve their potential and work alongside the best of multinational partners.

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ocal Enterprise Office (LEO) Clare is proud to support local entrepreneurs to help them achieve their potential and become world class partners and suppliers to multinational businesses in the Shannon region. Padraic McElwee, Head of Enterprise at LEO Clare, says, “Over the past number of years, LEO Clare have worked in partnership with Shannon Chamber of Commerce to raise awareness among our microenterprises of the opportunities presented by developing relationships with the global companies located in Shannon. This involves running information sessions on procurement policies and facilitating networking opportunities. In the context of Brexit, this proactive collaboration with Shannon Chamber is a key component in developing a local supply chain to the mutual benefit of all concerned.” One such company that has benefitted from the support of LEO Clare is Indigo. Indigo creates whiteboard products to assist teams with collaboration by allowing them to work visually. “Indigo Visual Management products give a practical way of visually displaying realtime information that can be easily communicated, understood and reacted to within a team, which in turn allows for proactive

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engagement and continuous improvement,” explains company founder Claire Bannon. With a healthy multinational presence in the Shannon region, Bannon’s company had a readymade customer base in the area. “We supply some the of the major multinational companies in Ireland,” she says, “Providing quality products to these major

Claire Bannon, Managing Director, Indigo customers is a serious business and our customers need to see results from our products. We work closely with our clients to get to know their business, innovate around their needs, producing the best solution visually for their process.”

STRONG SUPPORT Brexit has changed the way the company purchases raw materials. “In preparing for Brexit, we stocked up on various items we use and have now sourced alternative suppliers for some others,” Bannon notes. “The relationships we have built up with our overseas customers will stand to us going forward and we will continue to work closely with them to ensure a seamless delivery of our service.” The support of LEO Clare has been invaluable to the business as they built up their manufacturing capabilities, purchasing machines which allow them to market a broad offering. “With CNC machines, laser machines and wide format printers we have the potential to create new ideas and manufacture them to suit our customers’ process. “Through mentoring and grant assistance LEO Clare has been a great supporter of our business. When we need direction or advice on how to move forward they are always there to listen and give us advice on who or what is available. We often sign up and attend training programmes to keep us informed and LEO Clare offer lots of up to date topics on various training programmes.”

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Specialist Services at a Local Level Vic Angley, recently appointed Tax Partner at Grant Thornton in Limerick, aims to grow the practice’s tax offering to offer a full suite of specialisms at a local level.

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ven as the pandemic brought much of the world to a slowdown in March, Grant Thornton continued its ongoing national growth trajectory with the appointment of highly experienced tax specialist Vic Angley as a Partner in its Limerick office. The company currently employs over 1,450 people in seven offices across Ireland, and Vic’s appointment illustrates the firm’s ongoing

Vic Angley, Tax Partner, Grant Thornton companies in the region with a multinational profile will grow as well, but our existing client base is primarily large local private clients at this point. When it comes to winning new business, Vic is sage about the time it will take for movement to start happening. “I expect some companies may be cautious about changing advisors in the middle of a pandemic. And that’s understandable because

OUR KEY FOCUS IS SERVING OUR EXISTING CLIENTS, IN ANY WAY THAT WE CAN. AND THERE ARE LOTS OF NEW WAYS THAT THEY NEED US, WITH THE VARIOUS NEW SUBSIDIES. commitment to developing its general presence, as well as its specific tax presence outside Dublin, notably in Munster. His plan is to double the size of the tax team in the Limerick office, growing it from 15 to 30 tax specialists. “We are a national firm, and we want to ensure our full suite of specialisms are available in all our locations” says Vic. As we grow what is already a strong team by adding a number of subject matter experts, our local experience base to support those

companies need advisors who know them intimately, and moving to a new advisor when you might need them most, in the middle of a pandemic may feel risky for some. “However, we’ve developed a number of really strong relationships with new companies by investing time and sharing new insights that have proved hugely valuable in these challenging times. This investment has, and will continue to crystallise into growth and new client wins, but our key focus is serving our existing clients in any way we can.”

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And there are lots of new ways that they need us, with the various new subsidies that the Government has introduced, with the Temporary Wage Subsidy Scheme, Covid Restrictions Support Scheme and Debt Warehousing facility being prime examples of these new initiatives SUCCESSION PLANNING Another phenomenon he has noticed is that the pandemic has brought about an increase in interest in succession planning with some older business owners feeling a little uneasy about being out in a business or on a shop floor which has accelerated their plans to retire. “There have also been some who said it was the right time to do it because the value of their business may have been negatively affected by the pandemic, which has made it more tax efficient for the next generation to whom business assets were being transferred.” Having outside advice can help with decisions that can be emotional in a family business. “It’s hard to see the wood from the trees when you’re so embedded, and I think that’s where advisors can really add a lot of value with more clinical, data-focused decision making. They can come in and look objectively at things.”

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Solving the World’s Energy Challenges Home-grown talent making a difference across the globe with Panametrics, a Baker Hughes business.

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aker Hughes, an energy technology and Fortune 500 company, has operations in more than 120 countries and a workforce of almost 60,000. For more than a century, the company has created technology that continues to revolutionise the energy industry. Panametrics, a global division of Baker Hughes, is situated on a major industrial estate on the outskirts of Shannon. Its state-of-the-art, 120,000 square foot site supports global operations from China to Germany and the US to the UK. It is home to more than 200 employees, including Panametrics’ Vice President, Diarmaid Mulholland. He explains that Panametrics is pivotal to Baker Hughes’ energy transition strategy, and outlines how homegrown talent is making a difference; reducing emissions and driving efficiency across a number of vital sectors. As an energy technology company, Baker Hughes is helping the oil and gas industry meet the challenges of the energy transition to a lower carbon future. Panametrics is a central cog in that strategy. PANAMETRICS’ CUSTOMER PROPOSITION “At Panametrics, we develop ground-breaking solutions that help oil and gas operators manage and reduce their emissions,” says Mr Mulholland. “Our cutting-edge moisture, oxygen, liquid and gas critical measurement technology enables customers from a wide range

Panametrics Vice President, Diarmaid Mulholland of sectors, including oil and gas, to drive efficiencies, reduce energy consumption and save costs. SHANNON TALENT PIPELINE “Panametrics’ success and our future strategy is aligned to attracting and developing the right talent. That’s one of the reasons Shannon continues to be a vital location for

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Baker Hughes: The talent pipeline is exceptional. “I know from experience, having lived and worked in 12 countries, how difficult it can be to recruit talented and committed people. Hailing from Limerick City, I’m extremely proud of the Irish work ethic, our flair for innovation, and Shannon’s links with academia. I believe that’s why many of my colleagues from Shannon have gone on to enjoy extremely successful careers across the globe with Baker Hughes. DEVELOPING TALENT “It’s no accident that we have top people. Baker Hughes and Panametrics invest in our colleagues. For anyone with talent and ambition, we provide all the building blocks and opportunities you could hope for to develop your career and achieve your potential. “Career development continues to be a driver for potential new Baker Hughes recruits. So too does the opportunity to work for a successful business with customers and opportunities in every corner of the globe. Panametrics colleagues also have the opportunity of making a difference. “Speaking to one of our engineering graduates recently, he mentioned how ‘proud’ he was to work for a ‘global energy technology company’ that was helping solve the world’s toughest energy challenges. He drew satisfaction from being able to make a difference. PANAMETRICS TECHNOLOGY MAKING THE DIFFERENCE IN CRITICAL INDUSTRIES “Our products support critical industries such as food and beverage,

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Panametrics critical measurement technology is driving efficiency plastics, chemicals, healthcare and industrial. Panametrics’ solutions help maintain oxygen levels in hospital Intensive Care Units; critical in the wake of the extra demand that COVID has generated. “Our technology helps water companies improve network efficiency by accurately tracking water flow, identifying leaks and processing raw water to make it safe for human consumption. Similarly, we help the water treatment plants release waste safely into our environment. “Our flowmeter solutions are measuring energy efficiency in large industrial facilities, military bases, university campuses, high-rises, ships, museums and swimming pools to combat rising energy prices and reduce waste.” A key element in Baker Hughes’ energy transition portfolio, Panametrics’ flare.IQ has a proven track record in optimising flare operations (the tall, thin structure you see on oil & gas installations with flames or steam coming out the top). Not only does the technology reduce methane emissions by up to 50% and steam usage by up to 90%, flare.IQ also helps customers manage flare assets remotely, which improves safety and reduces costs. “Products designed, engineered and manufactured right here in Shannon are supporting industry as it works to reduce emissions, save lives in hospitals and ensure that our water is safe and clean,” Mr Mulholland adds. “We’re making a difference.”

The company cause is to make energy safer, cleaner and more efficient for people and the planet

THE RIGHT CAUSE… He continues: “While providing

makes our business a very compelling proposition.”

our colleagues with opportunities to advance their careers is imperative, what we’re also seeing amongst Baker Hughes candidates is a desire to work for a cause, for a wider purpose. “Our purpose is clear, and our commitment is firm – we make energy safer, cleaner and more efficient for people and the planet. I believe that is a compelling proposition which appeals to those looking to start their careers at Baker Hughes. “At Panametrics, our emissions reduction and management capability, combined with our critical measurement technology driving efficiency and enabling energy consumption across many exciting and vital sectors, also

CONTINUING THE SUCCESS Mr Mulholland adds: “I am privileged to be leading such an exceptionally talented global team and continuing the adventure and successes from Shannon. Our future looks very optimistic: We’ll continue to lead through the energy transition deploying high efficiency, low carbon solutions to help our customers achieve their emissions reduction targets; we’ll continue to support Baker Hughes pursue net zero carbon emissions from our operations; we’ll continue to explore new markets and seize opportunities; and rest assured, we’ll continue to make a difference and extend Shannon’s successful footprint across the globe.”

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The Complete Package Brendan Ring of CUBE, Design, Print & Package on their commitment to exceeding expectations, offering a complete solution for world class manufacturing companies.

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imerick-based CUBE offers a full design, print and packaging service, specialising in the printing of Instructions for Use (IFU) booklets, Product Information Leaflets (PIL’s) and printed cartons for the medical device, pharmaceutical and technology markets. Complying with the exacting demands of such customers, the company’s consistent quality is a cornerstone of their business, and Current Good Manufacturing Practices (CGMP) and ISO 9001:2015 standards underline this in all their print and packaging processes. Founded in 1996, by Brendan Ring and Frank Fitzsimons (now retired), the business grew rapidly until 2009. After the financial crisis, a strategic pivot led them in a new direction. Brendan Ring, Managing Director, explains: “In 2009, the crash hit and with the downturn we lost probably 50% of our business. What we decided to do, rather than being heavily reliant on our commercial business, was to venture into the MedTech/Pharma space and working with manufacturing companies who have ongoing requirements for print and packaging day in and day out.”

Brendan Ring, Managing Director, CUBE Design Print Package

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Carton folding and glueing

This strategy has served them well and the firm now services a healthy mix of manufacturing business partners as well as their commercial print customers. CUBE operates from a bespoke facility of over 25,000 sq ft in Limerick, which houses its print, digital print, packaging, design and quality teams. They serve a national customer base with guaranteed deliveries through their own delivery fleet. EXACTING INDUSTRY One of CUBE’s long-standing clients is Cook Medical. It provides a perfect example of the quality which CUBE offers its customers— working to the zero defects standards with exacting time frames and very technical information, and compliance with the regulatory framework. CUBE’s precision and quality control saves their customers duplicate controls in-house. “Any new companies that we are introduced to, particularly in the MedTech space, can take up to two years by the time they would qualify us, from tendering to providing samples, to their quality audit process, before getting into production,” explains Ring. Their digital printing platform has proved useful in this process, allowing CUBE to do prototypes and provide physical samples. When a client onboards, Ring says, “They treat us very much as part of their team, we work hard on providing the support they need around file revision and documentation control as well as developing our quality inspection systems in line with theirs. This is what leads to long term sustainable relationships for the future.”

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TJ Ryan, Sales Director, CUBE Design Print Package

Die cutting at CUBE

Cube Design Print Package

SUPPLY CHAIN One of the key benefits of CUBE’s service is justin-time delivery with manufacturing companies receiving their print deliveries daily. “We build bespoke Supply Chain Solutions around their printing and packaging requirements to tie in with their manufacturing demands,” notes Ring. This is enabled by the relationships built with clients, allowing confidential information sharing of forecasting and manufacturing schedules with CUBE. CUBE provides the exact quantity of IFU’s and PIL’s required to be packaged for that day’s production. For CUBE’s customers, they are saving on warehousing space and potential obsolescence, which are all additional costs that can be eliminated. One of the company’s first major customers in the manufacturing space had been Dell; they were servicing their printed material requirements for on average 52,000 PC’s every day. “It required daily downloads of Dell’s forecasts and working closely with them to ensure that we delivered to them every single day. It was exactly that type of supply chain solution Dell needed to be efficient and competitive in their industry.” After building their experience in a competitive electronics industry, Ring says this knowledge around fulfilment margins and

ANY NEW COMPANIES THAT WE ARE INTRODUCED TO, PARTICULARLY IN THE MEDTECH SPACE, CAN TAKE UP TO TWO YEARS BY THE TIME THEY WOULD QUALIFY US, FROM TENDERING TO PROVIDING SAMPLES, TO THEIR QUALITY AUDIT PROCESS, BEFORE GETTING INTO PRODUCTION

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Kevin Downes, Sales Manager, Print and Packaging Divsion, CUBE Design Print Package

supply chain models has helped their clients to become successful in their markets. CUBE are proud to work with a lot of new industries such as Shannon-headquartered EI Electronics, a leading exporter of fire, smoke and monoxide alarms. They began providing EI Electronics with PIL’d and IFU booklets and have recently expanded the relationship to supply them with some of their product packaging. “We’re trying to get a message out to the procurement professionals about changes in the print and packaging supply chain model. We are trying to convince them to cease the importing of print and packaging from Europe and beyond in certain scenarios. We want to encourage a healthy debate around a cost analysis of purchasing in Ireland. Thankfully we have been successful in winning new business having shown it’s not always cheaper to import. “We are passionate about what we have to offer here at CUBE. Print and packaging needs to be seen as a tier one component of the supply chain in the manufacturing space. Our tag line is ‘Committed to Exceeding Expectations’ and that’s what we hopefully will continue to do… but we will leave our customers to be the judge of that!” For more info see www.CUBE.irish

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Empowering Industry with Work-Ready Skills Limerick and Clare Education and Training Board identifies and provides the training and skills needed by the region’s businesses.

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imerick and Clare Education and Training Board is the state education and training authority for the Limerick and Clare region. It is responsible for the delivery of Further Education and Training to more than 25,000 learners annually, through its 28 FET Colleges/Centres and almost 300 outreach locations. Its Enterprise Engagement Support Service accelerates dialogue with

employers, employees and skills fora (such as the Mid-West Regional Skills Forum) to respond to skills and training needs across the region. The service harnesses regional skills intelligence to enable skills development opportunities through apprenticeships, traineeships and other training. The ETB’s ongoing collaboration with the manufacturing and engineering sectors in Shannon has seen the co-development of the Original Equipment Manufacturing Engineer QQI Level 6 Apprenticeship; with apprentices recently joining from GEON Engineering and Dennehy Garden & Construction Machinery. The service also manages delivery of the national Skills to Advance employee development initiative. This scheme has

been developed to meet the challenges of technological advances and changing work environments. It offers upskilling and reskilling opportunities to employees and SMEs. In addition, Skills to Advance can assist SMEs in identifying their training needs and provide training to their workforce. Examples of courses delivered to companies in Shannon under this initiative include Lean Six Sigma, Project Management and Conflict Management. The service also worked with Ei Electronics on the delivery of a bespoke English for the Workplace course. Eimear Brophy, Further Education and Training Manager says: “We continue to advance engagement with enterprise across the region to develop employability skills and workforce development.”

Employee Skills Development We offer targeted Further Education and Training to meet the requirements of employers across the region. Through several initiatives, we can provide your business with fully-funded training opportunities, which fit with your schedule. #FindTheBestInYou Provision is co-funded by the Government of Ireland and the European Union

Co-funded by the EUROPEAN UNION

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Get in touch Contact our Employability Skills Co-ordinator Patricia Haugh, to arrange a visit to discuss training opportunities for your business. enterprise@lcetb.ie 061 578 124 learningandskills.ie/enterprise

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World Class Fabricaction Passionate People Custom enclosure and hardware specialists. Bolgers remain a trusted partner to our OEM customer base, serving the Advanced Manufacturing sectors of: • • • •

Medical equipment Building and construction products Off Highway Power Generation/Distribution sectors, on a worldwide basis

We serve our customers with a commitment to “derisk” their supply chain, through a Competitive and flexible value proposition focusing on: • • • • •

Cost (Lowest cost at launch) Speed (Time to market) Responsiveness (Adapting to Customer changes) Improved Quality (Lean, BPI) Account Management (responding to dynamic customer requests) • Playing Straight (Honesty with the customer) Our Manufacturing Services Include: • Design: Latest CAD/CAM technology. • Validation: CMM Measuring, PPAP Capability, Extensive Testing solutions • Laser: Precision cutting of a wide range of materials up to 18mm in thickness. • Punch: Latest precision Trumpf Trumatic punching technology including auto loading and unloading. • Folding/Forming: Latest LVD Forming technology including bend measurement and crowning compensation technologies. • Welding/Fabrication: MIG / TIG / ARC / CO2 Welding Conditions. • Painting: Fully conveyorised Paint Plant with 5 stage Iron Phosphate pre-treatment system. On-line reciprocators with powder recovery and filtering system. Dryoff and curing ovens. • Metal Finishing: Wide range of metal finishing disciplines offered. • Assembly: Full Assembly Solutions available, incorporating “outflow prevention” techniques • Worldwide Logistic and supply solutions incl. local logistic hub and 3PL services

Site 2, Shannon Free Zone, Shannon, Co Clare V14 A449, info@bolgers.com | www.bolgers.com | +353 (0)61 362 123

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05/03/2021 14:06


WE DON’T WANT TO SAVE CHILDREN’S LIVES

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15/12/2020 14:19

A company thrives when it is an integral part of the

community, this is true for large corporates and SMEs alike. Humanli is here to make social impact possible. We’re in the business of doing good, connecting those who have, with those who have not. We have partnered with a number of wonderful organisations to work on exciting initiatives which need urgent support. These include Carebright, Clionas Foundation, Clare’s Wish, Limerick Suicide Watch, Limetree Theatre, Blue Box and Corpus Christi Primary School.

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16/02/2021 16:57

05/03/2021 12:18


IB PARTNER PROFILE

The Move to Subscription Models Rod McCarthy, MD of Exertis, on how ‘as a service’ offerings deliver value for businesses, freeing up cash flow by moving from capital expenditure to an operational expenditure model.

A

s a distributor for many of the world’s leading technology brands, Exertis Ireland provides a comprehensive choice of products and services, serving the reseller, retailer and network operator channels. As part of the DCC group, it has a leading edge, investing in driving innovation and adding value through it’s specialist services. According to Rod McCarthy, Managing Director of Exertis Ireland, the distribution landscape is evolving: “The concept of the ‘as a service’ (AAS) model is moving companies away from traditional capital expenditure, where they’re buying hardware or products at a cost to their business, and depreciating it over a defined period. What the AAS model does is turns it into a monthly subscription based predictable billing model to enable businesses to maximize their cash flow.” Exertis offers clients a one-stop shop to avail of the most up-todate technologies with specialist technical support, on a monthly subscription model. McCarthy points out the concept is growing across many sectors. “If we look at the markets, there has been an increasing move towards subscription. We all have experienced this in our personal lives where we have evolved from owning music or movie libraries

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to readily accepting streaming based subscription services.” PREMIUM SOLUTIONS While the concept has been around for a while, he says, “What’s happening now is businesses

Rod Mc Carthy, MD of Exertis

WHAT’S HAPPENING NOW IS BUSINESSES ARE LOOKING AT WAYS TO BETTER UTILISE THEIR CAPITAL. THERE ARE ARGUMENTS FOR AND AGAINST HAVING DEPRECIATING ASSETS ON YOUR BOOKS

are looking at ways to better utilise their capital. There are arguments for and against having depreciating assets on your balance sheet. What the AAS model does enable, is for businesses to avail of premium solutions at lower costs. More and more companies are using the AAS model for solutions which include blended technologies such as smartphones, laptops and tablets, all wrapped with our specialist, innovative Unified Endpoint Management (UEM) and security protection services. With certain technologies, we even offer a Residual Value (RV) , whereby we will guarantee the value of that item at the end of the term, resulting in lower subscription costs.” Exertis wipe the data securely, refurbish the item and re-purpose sustainably through the second life channel. “People can rest assured that all data has been completely removed, and is irretrievable, and we certify that for their peace of mind.” Next, Exertis is launching Apple as a Service (AaaS) in March 2021. “As the sole authorised distributor of Apple products in Ireland, we are excited to offer a range of products, including RV support and our specialist mobility UEM services to our Channel partners who can contact their Account Managers for more details.”

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IB PARTNER PROFILE

Connecting People and Improving Lives Company of the Year winners in the InBUSINESS Recognition Awards, DHL Express have made a difference in a year like no other.

2

020 stretched and challenged DHL Express Ireland like no other year, but our team has risen to this challenge. As an essential services provider, we have maintained our Express services into and out of Ireland throughout the pandemic, without interruption, bringing true meaning and relevance to our purpose, which is “Connecting People, Improving Lives”. This has been borne out in many different ways since the COVID crisis commenced. In the early weeks of the pandemic, DHL Express Ireland played a key role in bringing large quantities of PPE into Ireland from China and countries in South East Asia. When supplies of PPE were at their lowest, our services provided a critical supply line into Ireland. It is the same story regarding COVID testing kits, as DHL imported hundreds of thousands of these on our air express service at a time when supply was at its lowest. There are many similar examples of how DHL Express in Ireland played a key role in the fightback against the COVID crisis. When lab testing capacity was under pressure during the first wave, we transported hundreds of thousands of completed

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tests to labs in Europe to facilitate these samples being tested and results returned to Ireland within 24 hours. There are countless other cases where we have been providing express delivery services for Pharmaceutical, Life-Sciences and Medical Device products, critical to Ireland’s response to the COVID crisis. Indeed, we also played a significant role in supply chain activities supporting the clinical trials involved in vaccine development. However, there is another side to the role DHL Express has played during the pandemic. Clearly not every shipment has contained PPE, test-kits or critical pharma products, but for many businesses and individuals, DHL Express has provided an important connection to the outside world. We have seen significant increases in shipments exported by Irish business where online sales have become their lifeline. This online sales outlet – with Irish companies selling their products to the world – has helped maintain commercial viability for many businesses. Furthermore, when non-essential retail has been closed, the DHL Express network across more than 220 countries has enabled consumers in Ireland to shop internationally. Online shopping has boomed during the pandemic and the role of DHL Express in facilitating this massive growth is hugely significant. Whether it was a birthday or Christmas gift or just a treat for a loved-one, these deliveries brought joy and value to their recipients throughout this difficult period. As we settle into 2021, with Brexit now a reality, there is a new set of challenges for our industry. What’s clear is that the retail shift to online continues at speed and our volumes continue to grow exponentially. So, the immediate challenge is to build and extend our capacity to manage this growth, which will require significant infrastructural investment. Planning is already well advanced and we stand ready to make these investments, confident in the future positive development of our business.

InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2021

24/03/2021 13:01


IB PARTNER PROFILE

Insuring Oral Health DeCare Dental MD Maureen Walsh tells Adam Hyland why dental insurance is becoming increasingly important for businesses.

T

he estimated cost of dental healthcare in the EU is €80billion. In Ireland, 83% of dental costs are paid out of pocket and covered privately by the individual. To compound matters, costs throughout the COVID-19 pandemic have risen at dental practices. Apart from tooth loss and gum health, more than 120 diseases can be identified and diagnosed by markers present in the mouth, including coronary heart disease, diabetes and oral cancers, while loss of teeth can be linked to depression. This makes dental care a vital component of overall health and wellbeing. With this in mind, it is obvious that “it is very important to go to the dentist” as DeCare Dental MD Maureen Walsh says. As Ireland’s only dedicated dental insurer, the company that is now in its 21st year in Ireland, knows the value of good dental care, and about DeCare Dental MD, Maureen Walsh

60% OF OUR WAKING HOURS ARE SPENT AT WORK, AND COMPANIES HAVE RECOGNISED THE NEED TO PROVIDE PLANS AND SOLUTIONS THAT CATER TO THEIR MULTI-GENERATIONAL STAFF HEALTH NEEDS, AND ARE INCREASINGLY AWARE OF THE LINK BETWEEN ORAL CARE, OVERALL HEALTH, SELF-ESTEEM AND CONFIDENCE” the need for companies to have a dental insurance plan in place to ensure the health and wellbeing of their staff. “Dental care is expensive,” Maureen says, “the purpose of

dental insurance plans is to protect people from the financial burden of these expenses, enabling them to go to the dentist regularly for preventative care and providing cover for more extensive treatments

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such as orthodontic cover and oral cancer should they be required. Positively, people are retaining their teeth for longer and this creates a need for cover and education over a lifetime. “There is proven link between access to dental insurance and frequency of dental visits and this is leading more companies to offer a dental plan as part of their benefits package, which has led to the dental insurance market doubling in Ireland since 2014. “60% of our waking hours are spent at work, and companies have recognised the need to provide plans that cater to their multigenerational staff health needs, and are increasingly aware of the link between oral care, overall health, self-esteem and confidence,” Maureen tells me. “Employers are actively seeking complementary benefit structures that will offer better overall value for money and be positively received and utilised by the workforce.” With a mission to empower people to improve their oral and general health throughout their lives, DeCare not only provides the insurance cover that makes access to dental treatment possible, but also provide education and awareness through programmes designed and delivered by a team of experienced clinical experts. DeCare partners with more than 400 companies and close to 50,000 people throughout Ireland on their benefit requirements. “This will become even more important as the world adapts to a new way of working,” says Maureen. “COVID-19 has brought its own oral health challenges. Dietary habits while working remotely and stress has had impact on oral health globally and it is vital that throughout and beyond these times oral health remains a priority.” See decaredental.ie to find out more or to get a quote for your company.

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IB PARTNER PROFILE

Adapting to Change The Skills to Advance policy upskills and reskills employees to meet the changing demands of business

S

kills to Advance, a policy in Further Education and Training aimed at developing the skills of people in employment, was launched in 2018 by SOLAS and the Department of Education and Skills, working closely with Education and Training Boards (ETBs) around the country. It enables targeted skill development for vulnerable groups in the Irish workforce, particularly those with lower skills levels and those who need opportunities to advance in their working lives and careers. It focuses on upskilling to sustain employment, avoid displacement, or provide skills to avail of emerging job opportunities. The policy also supports small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) who need assistance to invest in and develop their workforce. It draws on a vision of the workplace in Ireland where upskilling during one’s working life is considered normal practice, and has a direct correlation with enhanced job security, higher earnings and autonomy at work for employees. Indigenous and multinational firms systematically invest in the development of their staff and

benefit through improved productivity and competitiveness for the business, and for the regional and national economy. Skills to Advance was developed in response to evolving skill needs and remains central to assisting those facing changes in their work due to technology advances, changing work practices and market diversification.

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Opportunities offered through Skills to Advance incorporate digital, socio-emotional and technical skills development to enhance employee skills and support increased productivity in Irish SMEs.

through change poses a challenge for many businesses. This programme was developed by SOLAS and the ETBs in collaboration with employers, IDA Ireland, Enterprise Ireland and the Regional Skills Fora. Critical skills covered include managing change, motivating staff, and digital and remote working, which will maximise a company’s ability to deal with emerging challenges and opportunities. Michael Briody, CEO of Silverhill Foods, Emyvale, Co. Monaghan, whose employees participated on the Leadership and Management course with Cavan and Monaghan ETB says: “One of the biggest differences we’ve seen with staff is increased motivation. Be it Brexit or COVID or whatever, challenges are hitting you and the more people you have on your team who are skilled in change management, who are able to communicate effectively and are able to motivate their staff and understand how all of these interlink into a company strategy, increases your chances of success.” Now more than ever, initiatives such as Skills to Advance are critical in allowing us to respond effectively to external challenges such as those arising from the COVID-19 pandemic and Brexit. The structure of our workforce has changed dramatically over the

NOW MORE THAN EVER, INITIATIVES SUCH AS SKILLS TO ADVANCE ARE CRITICAL IN ALLOWING US TO RESPOND EFFECTIVELY TO EXTERNAL CHALLENGES SUCH AS THOSE ARISING FROM THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC AND BREXIT The Leadership and Management programme is an example of a targeted regional initiative which aims to equip businesses with the right skills for their front-line management teams. Due to COVID-19, Brexit and other external challenges, the need for leadership in teams is crucial. Managing people now, while taking into consideration the challenges of working remotely, motivating teams to perform, and leading teams

past few months and will continue to evolve as the economy recovers and we progress to a new business environment – one that will require a workforce that is highly adaptable and flexible. To ensure that workers can achieve this agility, there is a real need for continuous upskilling and reskilling to not only perform their current tasks, but to take on additional ones to allow them to sustain and grow business.

InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2021

24/03/2021 13:13


45 MAGAZINE TITLES ▲ 10 EVENTS ▲ 3.6 MILLION REACH

DID YOU KNOW Ashville Media Group is Ireland’s largest publishing and events company. You’ve almost certainly read our magazines or attended our events.

Our mission is to connect your brand with the largest audience in Ireland.

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05/03/2021 16/02/2021 12:19 10:33


When a child loses their home, they lose their entire world. There are almost 4,000 children homeless in Ireland. Donate now.

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04/02/2020 16:09 05/03/2021 16/02/2021 12:20 10:22


109 MEMBERS DIRECTORY PAGE

112 CORPORATE PARTNERS PAGE

113 CORPORATE PATRONS

InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2021

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DIRECTORY

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MEMBERS DIRECTORY

ARKLOW & DISTRICT CHAMBER Office 9, Arklow Business Enterprise Centre, Arklow, Co. Wicklow, Y14 X803 Tel: +353 (0)402 26909 Email: chamber@arklow.ie Web: www.arklow.ie ATHLONE CHAMBER 7 Main Street, Athlone, Co. Westmeath, N37 X5K7 Tel: +353 (0)906 498838 Email: info@athlonechamber.ie Web: www.athlonechamber.ie BALLINA CHAMBER 44 Pearse Street, Ballina, Co. Mayo, F26 R62W Tel: +353 (0)96 72800 Email: chamber@ballina.ie Web: www.ballina.ie/ ballina-chamber-of-commerce-ireland BALLYHAUNIS CHAMBER Unit 1, The Enterprise Centre, Clare Road, Ballyhaunis, Co. Mayo, F35 HC66 Tel: +353 (0)94 963 0311 Email: ballyhaunischamber@gmail.com Web: www.ballyhaunischamber.ie BANTRY CHAMBER C/O Neill Clarke Auctioneers, Wolfe Tone Square, Bantry, Co. Cork, P75 TN96 Tel: +353 (0)27 52860 Email: neillbantry@gmail.com BRAY & DISTRICT CHAMBER 10 Prince of Wales Terrace, Bray, Co. Wicklow, A98 A4X0 Tel: +353 (0)1 282 8248 Email: info@braychamber.ie Web: www.braychamber.ie CARRICK-ON-SHANNON CHAMBER The Quays, Carrick-on-Shannon, Co. Leitrim, N41 PW31 Tel: +353 (0)71 962 2245 Email: info@carrickonshannon.ie Web: www.carrickonshannon.ie

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CAVAN CHAMBER 81 Church Street, Cavan, Co. Cavan, H12 XH48 Tel: +353 (0)49 437 8104 Email: info@cavanchamber.ie Web: www.cavanchamber.ie

COUNTY WEXFORD CHAMBER Chamber Offices, Hill Street, Wexford, Y35 WR99 Tel: +353 (0)53 912 2226 Email: info@wexfordchamber.ie Web: www.wexfordchamber.ie

COBH & HARBOUR CHAMBER Arch Building, Casement Square, Cobh, Co. Cork, P24 HP29 Tel: +353 (0)21 481 3612 Email: info@cobhharbourchamber.ie Web: www.cobhharbourchamber.ie

DROGHEDA & DISTRICT CHAMBER Broughton House, Dublin Road, Drogheda, Co. Louth, A92 CF57 Tel: +353 (0)41 983 3544 Email: enquiries@droghedachamber.com Web: www.droghedachamber.ie

COOTEHILL CHAMBER White Star Complex, Market Street, Cootehill, Co. Cavan, H16 X034 Tel: +353 (0)49 555 2306 Email: cootehillchamber64@gmail.com

DUBLIN CHAMBER 7 Clare Street, Dublin 2, D02 F902 Tel: +353 (0)1 644 7200 Email: info@dublinchamber.ie Web: www.dubchamber.ie

CORK CHAMBER Fitzgerald House, 20 Summerhill North, Co. Cork, T23 TD90 Tel: +353 (0)21 450 9044 Email: info@corkchamber.ie Web: www.corkchamber.ie COUNTY CARLOW CHAMBER Carlow Gateway Business Centre, Athy Road, Co. Carlow, R93 C7P6 Tel: +353 (0)59 913 2337 Email: ceo@carlowchamber.com Web: www.carlowchamber.com COUNTY KILDARE CHAMBER Sallins Road, Naas Town Centre, Naas, Co. Kildare, W91 KV4H Tel: +353 (0)45 894074 Email: info@countykildarechamber.ie Web: www.countykildarechamber.ie COUNTY MEATH CHAMBER Chambers Buildings, Church Hill, Navan, Co. Meath, C15 YKR4 Tel: +353 (0)46 904 6060 Email: info@countymeathchamber.ie Web: www.countymeathchamber.ie

DÚN LAOGHAIRE-RATHDOWN CHAMBER Avoca House, 8 Marine Road, Dún Laoghaire, Co. Dublin, A96 T8K1 Tel: +353 (0)1 284 5066 Email: info@dlrchamber.ie Web: www.dlrchamber.ie DUNDALK CHAMBER Unit 4, Partnership Court, Park Street, Dundalk, Co. Louth, A91 N8FY Tel: +353 (0)42 933 6343 Email: info@dundalk.ie Web: www.dundalk.ie DUNGARVAN & WEST WATERFORD CHAMBER Dungarvan Enterprise Centre, Main St., Dungarvan, Co. Waterford, X35 FX45 Tel: +353 (0)58 45054 Email: info@dungarvanchamber.ie Web: www.dungarvanchamber.ie

COUNTY TIPPERARY CHAMBER Questum Acceleration Centre, Ballingarrane Science & Technology Park, Clonmel, Co.Tipperary, E91 V239 Tel: +353 (0)52 612 6500 Email: marketing@countytipperarychamber.com Web: www.countytipperarychamber.com

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LIMERICK CHAMBER 96 O’Connell Street, Limerick City, Co. Limerick, V94 YYP6 Tel: +353 (0)61 415180 Email: info@limerickchamber.ie Web: www.limerickchamber.ie

ENNISCORTHY CHAMBER Portsmouth House, Templeshannon, Enniscorthy, Co. Wexford, Y21 A6K1 Tel: +353 (0)53 923 2006 Email: admin@enniscorthychamber.ie Web: www.enniscorthychamber.ie

LONGFORD CHAMBER Harbour House, Market Square, Longford, Co. Longford, N39 N2N2 Tel: +353 (0)87 6604010 Email: info@longfordchamber.ie Web: www.longfordchamber.ie

FINGAL CHAMBER Block 3, The Green, Dublin Airport Central, Swords, Co. Dublin, K67 X4X5 Tel: +353 (0)1 890 0977 Email: info@fingalchamber.ie Web: www.fingalchamber.ie

MALLOW CHAMBER C/O CoWork, Landscape Terrace, Mallow, Co. Cork, P51 T383 Tel: +353 (0)89 230 8828 Email: info@mallowchamber.ie Web: www.mallowchamber.ie

GALWAY CHAMBER Commerce House, Merchants Road, Galway City, Co. Galway, H91 C8K1 Tel: +353 (0)91 563536 Email: info@galwaychamber.com Web: www.galwaychamber.com

MULLINGAR CHAMBER Market House, Pearse Street, Mullingar, Co. Westmeath, N91 FD8C Tel: +353 (0)44 934 4044 Email: info@mullingarchamber.ie Web: www.mullingarchamber.ie

KILKENNY CHAMBER 11 Patrick Street, Kilkenny City, Co. Kilkenny, R95 VNP4 Tel: +353 (0)56 775 2767 Email: admin@kilkennychamber.ie Web: www.kilkennychamber.ie

NORTHERN IRELAND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND INDUSTRY 40 Linenhall Street, Belfast, Co. Antrim, BT2 8BA Tel: +44 (0)28 9024 4113 Email: mail@northernirelandchamber.com Web: www.northernirelandchamber.com

WATERFORD CHAMBER 2 Great George’s Street, Co. Waterford, X91 AH9K Tel: +353 (0)51 872639 Email: info@waterfordchamber.ie Web: www.waterfordchamber.com

SHANNON CHAMBER Suite 14, Shannon Airport House, Shannon Free Zone, Shannon, Co. Clare, V14 E370 Tel: +353 (0)61 475 854 Email: admin@shannonchamber.ie Web: www.shannonchamber.ie

WESTPORT CHAMBER The Leeson Enterprise Centre, Altamont Street, Westport, Co. Mayo, F28 ET85 Tel: +353 (0)98 27375 Email: info@westportireland.com Web: www.westportchamber.ie

LAOIS CHAMBER James Fintan Lalor Ave., Lyster Square, Portlaoise, Co. Laois, R32 EHP9 Tel: +353 (0)85 256 6522 Email: info@laoischamber.ie Web: www.laoischamber.ie LETTERKENNY CHAMBER Grand Central Complex, Canal Road, Letterkenny, Co. Donegal, F92 EK7Y Tel: +353 (0)74 912 4866 Email: info@letterkennychamber.com Web: www.letterkennychamber.com

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SLIGO CHAMBER 16 Quay Street, Sligo, F91 X923 Tel: +353 (0)71 916 1274 Email: info@sligochamber.ie Web: www.sligochamber.ie

SOUTH DUBLIN CHAMBER Tallaght Business Centre, Whitestown Business Park, Tallaght, D24 K59A Tel: +353 (0)1 462 2107 Email: business@sdchamber.ie Web: www.sdchamber.ie THURLES CHAMBER TCEC Building, LIT Campus, Thurles, Co. Tipperary, E41 T6K5 Tel: +353 (0)504 60061 Email: info@thurleschamber.ie Web: www.thurleschamber.ie

MEMBERS DIRECTORY

ENNIS CHAMBER 54 O’Connell Street, Ennis, Co. Clare, V95 V3KD Tel: +353 (0)65 684 2988 Email: info@ennischamber.ie Web: www.ennischamber.ie

TRALEE CHAMBER HQ2, Dominick St., Tralee, Co. Kerry, V92 C799 Tel: +353 (0)66 712 1472 Email: info@tralee.ie Web: www.tralee.ie TULLAMORE & DISTRICT CHAMBER Unit 2A, Second Level, Bridge Centre, Tullamore, Co. Offaly Tel: +353 (0)57 932 3698 Email: info@tullamorechamber.com Web: www.tullamorechamber.com

CHAMBERS IRELAND 11 St. Stephen’s Green, Dublin 2, D02 FY84 Tel: +353 (0)1 400 4300 Email : info@chambers.ie Web: www.chambers.ie

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CORPORATE PARTNERS

AN POST General Post Office, O’Connell Street Lower, North City, Dublin 1, D01 F5P2

Tel: +353 (0)1 705 7000 Email: customer.services @anpost.ie Web: www.anpost.ie

ESB Two Gateway, East Wall Rd., East Wall, Dublin 3, D03 A995

Tel: +353 (0)1 676 5831 Email: info@esb.ie Web: www.esb.ie

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AIB 10 Molesworth Street, Dublin 2, D02 R126

Tel: +353 (0)1 660 0311 Web: www.aib.ie

ERVIA Colvill House, 24-26 Talbot St, Dublin 1, D01 NP86

Tel: +353 (0)1 823 0300 www.ervia.ie

ZURICH Zurich House, Ballsbridge Park, Dublin 4, D04 E5N4 Tel: 1890 400 300

Email: customerhelp @zurich.ie Web: www.zurichinsurance.ie

InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2021

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CORPORATE PATRONS

ADVERTISING STANDARDS AUTHORITY FOR IRELAND Tel: (01) 613 7040 7 Herbert St, Email: standards@asai.ie Grand Canal Dock, Dublin 2, Web: www.asai.ie D02 K838

BANK OF IRELAND 40 Mespil Road, Dublin 4, D04 C2N4

Tel: + 353 1 661 5933 Web: www.bankofireland.com

BUSINESS IN THE COMMUNITY IRELAND 3rd Floor Phibsborough Tower, Phibsborough Road, Dublin 7, D07 XH2D

Tel: +353 (0)1 874 7232 Email: info@bitc.ie Web: www.bitc.ie

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ABBOTT IRELAND Block G, Cherrywood Business Park, Loughlinstown, Dublin 18, D18 T3Y1

Tel: +353 (0)1 469 1500 Web: www.abbott.ie

ARAB-IRISH CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 34 Fitzwilliam Place, Tel: (0)1 662 4451 Email: info@aicc.ie Dublin 2, D02 P620 Web: www.aicc.ie

BRITISH IRISH CHAMBER OF COMMERCE Tel: + 353 (0)1 634 3050 13 Merrion Square North Email: info@ Dublin 2 D02 HW89 britishirishchamber.com Web: www.britishirishchamber.com

CHARTERED INSTITUTE OF ARBITRATORS IRISH BRANCH Tel: +353 (0)1 707 9739 The Distillery Building, Email: info@ciarb.ie 145 - 151 Church Street, Web: www.arbitration.ie Dublin 7

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CORPORATE PATRONS

COASTLINE SOLUTIONS 8A Appian Way, Ranelagh, Dublin 6, D06 C9N3

DIAGEO IRELAND St. James’s Gate, Dublin 8, D08 AX97 Tel: +353 (0)1 453 6700

Email: consumerinfo @diageoirl-info.com Web: www.diageo.ie

DUBLIN AIRPORT AUTHORITY PLC Old Central Terminal Building, Tel: +353 (0)1 814 1111 Dublin Airport, Email: customerrelations Co. Dublin, @dublinairport.com K67 XY76 Web: www.daa.ie

EIRGRID The Oval, Shelbourne Road, Ballsbridge, Dublin 4, D04 FW28

Tel: +353 (0)1 677 1700 Email: info@eirgrid.com Web: www.eirgrid.com

ELI LILLY AND COMPANY (IRELAND) LTD. Tel: +353 (0) 1 661 4377 Saint Kevin’s, Dunderrow, Web: www.lilly.ie Co. Cork P17 NY71

EMBASSY OF BRAZIL Block 8 - Harcourt Centre, Charlotte Way, Dublin 2, D02 K580

ENTERPRISE IRELAND The Plaza, East Point Business Park, Dublin 3, D03 E5R6 Tel: +353 (0)1 727 2000

EUROPEAN MOVEMENT IRELAND Email: info@ 8 Lower Fitzwilliam Street, europeanmovement.ie Dublin 2, D02 W426 Web: europeanmovement.ie Tel: +353 (0)1 662 5815

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Tel: + 353 (0)1 235 2166 Email: info@coastlinesolutions.com Web: www.coastlinesolutions.com

Email: client.service @enterprise-ireland.com Web: www.enterprise-ireland. com

Tel: +353 1 4756000 E-mail: brasemb.dublin @itamaraty.gov.br Web: dublin.itamaraty.gov.br/en-us/

InBUSINESS | YEARBOOK 2021

15/03/2021 14:50


Tel: +353 (0)1 410 1000 Email: webmaster@kpmg.ie Web: www.kpmg.ie

NATIONAL LOTTERY National Lottery, Abbey Street Lower, Dublin 1, D01 Y1X2

Tel: +353 (0)1 836 4444 Email: info@lottery.ie Web: www.lottery.ie

PERMANENT TSB 56-59 St Stephen’s Green, Dublin 2, D02 H489

Tel: 1890 500 121 Web: www.permanenttsb.ie

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JOHN SISK & SON Wilton Works, Naas Road, Dublin 22

Tel: +353 (0)1 409 1500 Email: info@sisk.ie Web: www.johnsiskandson.com

CORPORATE PATRONS

KPMG 1 Stokes Place, St. Stephens Green, Dublin 2, D02 DE03

PENINSULA BUSINESS SERVICES Tel: 1890 252 923 East Point Business Park, Alfie Byrne Rd, East Wall Email: info@peninsula-ie.com Dublin 3, D03 Y564 Web: www.peninsula-ie.com

SEAI St Kevin’s, 3 Park Place, Hatch Street Upper, Dublin 2

Tel: +353 (0)1 808 2100 Email: info@seai.ie Web: www.seai.ie

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CORPORATE PATRONS

SOLAS THE FURTHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING AUTHORITY Tel: + 353 (01) 533 2500 Block 1, Castleforbes House, Email: info@solas.ie Castleforbes Road, Web: www.solas.ie D01 A8N0

THE BAR COUNCIL OF IRELAND Tel: +353 (0)1 817 5000 158-159 Church Street Email: thebarofireland Dublin 7, @lawlibrary.ie D07 YX89 Web: www.lawlibrary.ie

THOMAS MCDONOGH & SONS LTD Email: thomasmcdonogh@ Dockgate Building, mcdonogh.ie Dock Road, Web: www.mcdonogh.ie Galway, H91 V6RR Tel: +353 (0)91 560700

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SSE AIRTRICITY South County Business Park, Red Oak South, Leopardstown, Dublin 18, D18 W688

Tel: 1850 812 220 Email: customerservice @sseairtricity.com Web: www.sse.com/Ireland

THE LAW SOCIETY OF IRELAND Tel: + 353 (0)1 672 4800 Blackhall Place, Email: general@lawsociety.ie Stoneybatter, Dublin 7, Web: www.lawsociety.ie D07 VY24

WESTERN DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION Tel: +353 (0)94 986 1441 Dillon House Email: info@wdc.ie Ballaghaderreen Web: www. Co. Roscommon westerndevelopment.ie F45 WY26

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Chambers Ireland would like to thank all the companies who took park in the Sustainable Business Impact Awards 2020. Applications for the Sustainable Business Impact Awards 2021 will open in March 2021. For more information, please contact carly.mooney@chambers.ie

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“The course is tailored to the needs of our business”

Skills to Advance Highly subsidised Supervisory Management training ₀ To help team leaders and supervisors meet the business challenges of Covid-19 ₀ To upskill in people management, digital and remote working Contact your local Education and Training Board or visit skillstoadvance.ie

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Profile for Ashville Media Group

InBUSINESS Yearbook 2021  

InBUSINESS Yearbook 2021