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20/12/2016 15:41


Editor: Joseph O’Connor

Commercial Editor: Conor Forrest Art Director: Alan McArthur Editorial Contributors: Tiernan Cannon Orla Connolly Conor Forrest Declan Groves Valerie Jordan Fiona Kelly Olive Keogh Rachel Murray Front Cover Photography: Jason Clarke Stylist: Rachel Murray Production Manager: Mary Connaughton Production Executive: Nicole Ennis Sales Director: Paul Clemenson Managing Director: Gerry Tynan Chairman: Diarmaid Lennon

Published by: Ashville Media Group, Old Stone Building, Blackhall Green, Dublin 7 Tel: +353 1 432 2200 Email: info@ashville.com Web: www.ashville.com On behalf of: Chambers Ireland, 3rd Floor, Newmount House, 22 - 24 Lower Mount Street, Dublin 2 Tel: +353 1 400 4300 Email: info@chambers.ie Web: www.chambers.ie All articles © Ashville Media Group 2016. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means without written permission from the publisher. Opinion and comments expressed herein are not necessarily those of Ashville Media or Chambers Ireland. ISSN 20093934

16

COVER STORY

Entrepreneur

GLOBAL GROWTH

Ciara Clancy, founder of Beats Medical, on her passion for improving healthcare through technology

24

Business of Sport

The Irish market for sports memorabilia has been going from strength to strength Words: Conor Forrest

26

IF THERE IS ONE POSITIVE FROM THE BREXIT FALLOUT AND THE PRESSURE ON IRISH EXPORTS TO THE UK AS A RESULT OF THE FALL IN THE VALUE OF STERLING, IT’S THE GROWING REALISATION FROM IRISH SMES THAT THEY NEED TO DIVERSIFY TO NEW MARKETS.”

InBUSINESS spoke with Janet Cox, Head of Field Sales at DHL Express Ireland, to find out how businesses can maximise their growth potential by developing a strong e-Commerce strategy, and why it rings true for an SME just as much as for a large corporation. s Head of Field Sales at DHL Express Ireland, Janet Cox knows a thing or two about market growth. Based at DHL’s head office near Dublin Airport, Cox oversees the strategic development of the DHL sales team to strengthen and grow their market share across the country. “We have a very strong infrastructure and operational footprint across Ireland – much more so than any of our competitors,” says Cox. “This certainly helps when selling our services into the business community.” With more than 500 staff and a ground fleet of more than 200 vehicles you could say that DHL’s local presence is unmatched. “When you factor in that we are the only international express carrier with a locally based customer services centre, it’s certainly a compelling proposition,” she adds. A self-confessed champion for small businesses, Cox taps into her 20+ years of industry experience at DHL in carrying out her role. A high-energy, passionate individual, her commitment is driven by her

vision of an export-led recovery in Ireland that brings new and growing SMEs to the international stage. “If there is one positive from the Brexit fallout and the pressure on Irish exports to the UK as a result of the fall in the value of sterling, it’s the growing realisation from Irish SMEs that they need to diversify to new markets,” she advises. “It’s certainly the silver lining to the ‘Brexit cloud’ and in the longer run I believe we’ll have a stronger SME exporting sector as a result.” Cox’s general view on exports as the main driver of future economic growth, and market diversification in particular as the route to future export success, resonates at a broader industry level, where DHL has forged ties with like-minded industry organisations as well as major companies such as AIB. “We share a common objective to support new and developing SMEs on their export journey. Add in Enterprise Ireland, and in particular the support to SMEs available through their network of Local Enterprise Offices, and you have a broad range of support resources available to SME exporters nationwide.”

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InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

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InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

COVER STORY:

Path to Global Growth

We speak with Janet Cox, Head of Field Sales at DHL Express Ireland, about how businesses can grow by developing a strong e-Commerce strategy

Industry

Rapid developments in drone technology are having an impact on a wide range of industries Words: Orla Connolly

30

Life After Brexit

We meet three businesses tapping into markets outside the UK, showing that there’s life after Brexit Words: Fiona Kelly

35

Snapchat

Gillian Horan, CEO, The Pudding Brand Agency

38 MENTORS:

John Simpson The BBC’s John Simpson has been at the heart of breaking news across the globe for close to 50 years but just try telling him it’s time to stop

Jen Murphy

Editorial Assistant: Susan McDermott (Chambers Ireland)

Jason Clarke

Managing Editor: Mary Connaughton

Words: Joseph O’Connor

InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

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TRAVEL IN STYLE. TRAVEL WITH ATTITUDE.

The ŠKODA Superb. Imagine a car that blurs the line between beauty and functionality. Where style and spaciousness are in perfect harmony. Where there’s room for everything except compromise. We imagined such a car. We call it the ŠKODA Superb. The Superb has seen unprecedented demand throughout 2016. For 2017 order early to avoid disappointment. Starting from only €28,100 on the road or only €269 per month. Talk to your ŠKODA Dealer today. That’s Simply Clever. That’s ŠKODA.

Clever inside The most popular Superb model, the Ambition, is available with a host of standard features such as:

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Bi-Xenon Headlights with LED day time lights

Smartphone compatible with latest Infotainment Systems

Largest interior in its class

Typical Example: Superb 1.4 TSI 125bhp OTRP €28,100. Deposit €8,657.46. 36 Monthly payments of €269 including fixed price service plan of €13.99 per month. Optional final payment €11,000. Total Hire Purchase Price €29,988.04. €888.04 cost of credit. Minimum deposit 10%. ŠKODA Finance trading as Volkswagen Bank GmbH Branch Ireland is authorised by the Federal Financial Supervisory Authority in Germany and regulated by the Central Bank of Ireland for conduct of business rules. Lending criteria, fees and terms and conditions apply. Subject to lending criteria. Hire Purchase agreement. Available until 31/01/2017.


772009 393018

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Go to chambers.ie for the online edition

[SHOOT LOGISTICS] DHL Express Ireland’s distribution centre in north Dublin provided the backdrop for this issue’s cover shoot with Janet Cox. With plenty of bright colours and sharp angles photographer Jason Clarke put our subject through her paces and found a vibrant yellow staircase to use for our path to growth theme.

42

Safety First

The presence of trained first aid staff in the workplace provides colleagues with the confidence of knowing skilled support is available if an accident or injury occurs onsite

26

112

114 118

Words: Conor Forrest

44

Book Extract An extract from this year’s Financial Times and McKinsey Business Book of the Year, The Man Who Knew: The Life and Times of Alan Greenspan [LIFESTYLE] 108

MOTORING:

New offerings from Volvo and Volkswagen 112

INNOVATION:

Assistive tech for people with disabilities 114

TRAVEL: Taking on Tokyo 117

BOOKS:

Selling tacos in Africa 118

FASHION:

Spring-forward pieces to amp up your look

46

In Conversation

Founder and director of Space Technology Ireland, Prof Susan McKenna-Lawlor, on discovering her love of science and launching the first Irish spacecraft Words: Valerie Jordan [REGULARS]

36

Adventure travel is big business across the world and Irish company Earth’s Edge is marking its territory within the sector Our Local Government THE CORK InBUSINESS CONNECTION Supplement continues to look at the important role played by local authorities in Irish enterprise Page

Page

2

5 Business News 10 Movers & Shakers 13 Opportunity Ireland 14 Start-Up Central

3

Cork ambassadors honoured, Minister launches GlobalLimerick. ie and local authority appointment in the south-west.

4

New tourism strategy for Galway, Council honoured for road safety awareness and Castlerea food hub receives funding.

Page

5

CMYK: 83 / 0 / 8 / 0 HEX: 40B3DF

Tourism boost for Donegal, Monaghan firm deemed ‘star’ of agri-food sector and funding announced for LEOs.

RGB: 64/179/223 Font:

In Association with CMYK: CMYK: 49 / 0 / 100 / 0 0 / 0 / 0 / 100 HEX: A8CB17

HEX: 1f1e21

RGB: 168/203/23

RGB: 31/30/33

• Din Medium • Din Regular

Cork has spent 2016 establishing itself as a budding hub full of potential, both domestically and abroad.

CELEBRATING A CENTURY Page 15

120 The IB Index

Page

LEINSTER • MUNSTER • CONNAUGHT • ULSTER

Wicklow six-year plan launched, jobs announced for Fingal and new sports complex for Carlow.

2017 marks 100 years since the founding of Ford’s factory in Cork.

49 Chambers Catch Up

Small Business

InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

19

BREWING UP A LEGACY

In Association with

Operating from its historic site in Cork, HEINEKEN Ireland continues to excite consumers with premiums beer brands.

1

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He’s not doing his banking. We are.

You free up time for what really matters when you let someone else take care of things – especially when you know they’re experts. So why not do the same for your banking? From executing simple, day-to-day tasks to providing ongoing financial advice, we can help. Talk to AIB Private Banking today.

Call Dave McLaughlin, Head of AIB Private Banking, on 087 799 1112 or visit privatebanking.aib.ie Allied Irish Banks, p.l.c. is regulated by the Central Bank of Ireland. Typically our clients have an annual salary or income which exceeds €250,000.

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BUSINESS

BUSINESS NEWS

David Hyland, head of the FD Centre in Ireland

THE VALUE OF

PT FINANCE DIRECTORS The FD Centre, a global provider of part-time finance directors, is celebrating its first year in business in Ireland. Headed up by chartered accountant and experienced financial advisor, David Hyland, the company provides owner-managed businesses with high calibre part-time finance directors who work in regional teams to support clients. “A key part of our role is to help busy managing directors offload the worry and burden of the finance function and allow them to focus on growing their businesses,” says Hyland. “When you take on a full-time finance director, the business takes on a high cost and is limited to that person’s skills and experience. Taking on a part-time finance director with the FD Centre means your business has essential high level finance skills in the key areas of strategy, operations and business support needed for the business to succeed.”

PROFESSIONALS

EMBRACING PRESENTEEISM

I

rish professionals are faking the extent of their workloads to impress management, according to new research from global tech company, Ricoh. The study shows that some 80 per cent of Irish professionals have faked their workloads by staying late in the office beyond their contracted hours, while 37 per cent stay late regularly – solely to appear hard working. The findings are outlined in a new report, ‘Overhauling a culture of presenteeism at work’, which surveyed more than 1,000 adults in Ireland. While ‘presenteeism’ traditionally refers to those who turn up for work while unwell, this research reveals a growing trend of workers doing overtime in order to get ahead. Gary Hopwood, General Manager of Ricoh Ireland, said: “We were astonished to learn that 80 per cent of professionals have felt the need to fake their workload to get ahead in their careers. It seems that Irish professionals believe the key to impressing management is staying late in the office, rather than producing the best results.”

FINDINGS AT

A GLANCE

80%

of Irish professionals admit to staying late to fake workloads

63%

have called on the Irish Government to educate employers on the business benefits of flexible working

30%

feel that working away from the office will damage career progression

37%

believe that bosses favour staff that work longer than their contracted hours

35%

believe that the Irish Government should provide grants or funding for flexible work technology

Gary Hopwood, General Manager, Ricoh Ireland

For more details visit www.thefdcentre.ie. InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

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BUSINESS NEWS

SIMPSON REJECTED ‘LEPRECHAUN’ NOTIONS OF IRELAND Veteran BBC journalist John Simpson has revealed that he used to reject notions from some of his colleagues that Ireland was merely a place from which to source ‘light’ stories when he was stationed there as Dublin correspondent in the early ’70s. Simpson, who at 72 is World Affairs Editor of the British state broadcaster, told InBUSINESS that, on the contrary, Ireland served as the place where he learned the trade of political reporting. “At that stage there was still a lot of people in the BBC who just saw Ireland as a source for light items like potatoes, sightings of leprechauns and stuff like that,” he said. “I always rejected that very angrily. I took the line – and of course, it was a self-serving line – that this was a proper, serious, independent country which deserved proper, serious attention and, so, I always refused to do anything that was kind of light. I learned the realities of political reporting there, and I absolutely loved it.” For more from John Simpson go to our mentors section on page 38.

PICTURE THIS

Gabriel Byrne, who founded Fantasy Lights over 29 years ago and who has been responsible for providing Christmas lighting to thousands of families – and many of our most popular streets – throughout Ireland since then. Photo: Conor McCabe Photography

Business

BITES

FACEBOOK SEEKS NEW DUBLIN HQ Facebook is on the look out for a new location in Dublin that would house up to 1,000 new staff. The social media giant has appointed real estate agent DTZ to find a new 110,000 square foot building by 2017 or 2018.

NEW IRELAND BAGS PIBA AWARD

N

ew Ireland Assurance won the overall award at the annual PIBA awards ceremony held at the Intercontinental Hotel, Dublin on November 10th. The awards independently analyse the views of financial brokers of products and services provided by the insurance industry. New Ireland also topped the league table for investment and service excellence.

John Simpson, BBC World Affairs Editor

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Mick Sweeney, Interim MD of New Ireland Assurance pictured with Diarmuid Kelly, CEO and Róisín Clarke, Chairperson of Professional Insurance Brokers Association

InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

21/12/2016 10:38


Sebastian Mallaby, author of The Man Who Knew: The Life and Times of Alan Greenspan

THE MAN WHO KNEW WINS BUSINESS BOOK OF 2016 Sebastian Mallaby has been named as the winner of the 2016 Financial Times and McKinsey Business Book of the Year Award for The Man Who Knew: The Life and Times of Alan Greenspan, published by Bloomsbury and Penguin Press. According to the judges, the biography of one of the titans of recent financial history brilliantly shows the subtlety and complexity of Alan Greenspan’s legacy. The award recognises the book that provides the most compelling and enjoyable insight into modern business issues. It was presented on November 22nd to Mallaby at a ceremony at the National Gallery in London. Mallaby saw off strong competition from a shortlist of titles that ranged in theme from gender imbalance to the productivity gap, to win the £30,000 prize. You can read an exclusive extract from the winning book on page 44.

NEW DEAL TO PROVIDE €100M IN LENDING TO SMES

TWITTER NAMES NEW IRISH MD

The European Investment Fund and the Strategic Banking Corporation of Ireland have signed a new deal aimed at supporting a100m of lending to SMEs. The new deal will enable the SBCI to offer risk-sharing on its loans for the first time.

Twitter has named Sinéad McSweeney as the Managing Director of its Irish operations. McSweeney will take on the position in addition to her current role as Vice President of Public Policy and Communications EMEA.

DALATA COMPLETES TAKEOVER OF THE DOUBLETREE Ireland’s largest hotel Group, Dalata, has announced that it will now manage operations of the iconic Dublin landmark hotel on Burlington Road, Ballsbridge. The hotel will operate under the Clayton Hotel brand and will be known as Clayton Hotel Burlington Road. This landmark hotel, which is still remembered by many as ‘The Burlington’ has more recently been operated by Hilton under

its DoubleTree brand. Speaking about the announcement, Pat McCann, CEO of Dalata Hotel Group, said: “We are excited that Clayton Hotel Burlington Road becomes part of our portfolio from today and look forward to fully integrating this fine property to the Dalata family. This hotel will be integral to our efforts to grow and strengthen our Clayton brand.”

DUBLIN DISTILLERY ON EXPANSION TRAIL Teeling Whiskey has announced details of a major recruitment drive as it expands on both sides of the Atlantic. The distillery is hiring 10 staff for its visitor centre in the Liberties and recruiting a team of six brand ambassadors in the US.

COVER STORY

P20

“I’m a firm believer that Irish SMEs need to fully embrace the international e-Commerce opportunity.” Janet Cox, Head of Field Sales, DHL Express Ireland

InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

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THE BURNING QUESTION

?

What attributes do you believe a great business leader should possess? SUSAN MCKENNALAWLOR Space Technology Ireland The personal profile of a leader should encompass the capability of innovative thinking while exercising sound commercial judgement.

WORLD’S MOST EXPENSIVE RETAIL STREETS RANKED

A

new report from Cushman & Wakefield shows that Dublin’s Grafton Street ranks 13th in rental positioning by country internationally. New York’s Upper 5th Avenue remains the world’s most expensive retail street, narrowly ahead of Hong Kong’s Causeway Bay, but rental values have decreased in both as brands balance the demands of physical and online presences. The annual Main Streets Across the World report tracks 462 of the top retail streets around the globe, ranking them by their prime rental value utilising Cushman & Wakefield’s proprietary data. Now in its 28th edition, the report also includes a ranking of the 71 most expensive streets – the top one per country. This year’s report showed that 36 per cent of all streets analysed saw rental gains.

TOP 10 MOST EXPENSIVE STREETS BY COUNTRY RANK

2016

1

Beats Medical Founding a business can mean long hours and many ups and downs. When you’re passionate about what you’re trying to achieve very little can hold you back.

JAMES MCMANUS Earth’s Edge Great companies have great leaders who have a clear vision for their business. Strong communication skills and emotional intelligence are essential in helping staff to realise the company’s vision.

JANET COX DHL Express Ireland Resilience is a key attribute. We’re all stars when the sun is shining and our results are positive. But a great leader demonstrates his or her true value during difficult times.

1

New York, Upper 5th Avenue RANK

CIARA CLANCY

RANK

2015

2016

2

RANK

2015

2

Hong Kong, Causeway Bay RANK

2016

3

RANK

2015

3

Paris, Avenue des Champs Élysées RANK

2016

4

RANK

2015

4

London, New Bond Street RANK

2016

5

RANK

2015

8

Tokyo, Ginza

RANK

2016

6

RANK

2015

5

Milan, Via Montenapoleone RANK

2016

7

RANK

2015

6

Sydney, Pitt Street Mall RANK

2016

8

RANK

2015

9

Seoul, Myeongdong RANK

2016

9

RANK

2015

7

Zurich, Bahnhofstrasse RANK

2016

10

RANK

2015

10

Vienna, Kohlmarkt

VODAFONE WINS INBUSINESS COMPANY OF THE YEAR December 5th 2016. Responding Vodafone Ireland was named to the award win, Anne O’Leary, Company of the Year at this CEO of Vodafone Ireland, year’s InBUSINESS Recognition said: “I am proud of Awards. Now in their everyone who works fifth year, the for Vodafone awards recognise Ireland as this and honour achievement exceptional is very much a business testament to a achievement workforce that and innovation continues to bring in Irish business. Anne O’Leary, CEO, Vodafone Ireland their best to work Hosted by Newstalk’s every day.” Business Editor Vincent Wall and comprising For more on the awards and a full 22 categories, the awards took list of winners go to page 77. place in the Conrad Dublin on

8 InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

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MOVERS & SHAKERS

MOVERS SHAKERS FERGAL O’SULLIVAN

MELANIE EVANS

CIAN CONNAUGHTON

ALISON BELL

NEW TITLE: CEO EMPLOYER: Coeliac Society of Ireland PREVIOUS ROLE: Partnership Development Manager, Social Justice Ireland

NEW TITLE: Senior Associate EMPLOYER: FitzGerald Solicitors PREVIOUS ROLE: Solicitor

NEW TITLE: President EMPLOYER: Public Relations Institute of Ireland OTHER ROLE: Client Director, MKC Communications

NEW TITLE: Vice-President of Strategic Sales EMPLOYER: Datalex PREVIOUS ROLE: Regional Director Sales, Europe, Mobile Travel Technologies

The Public Relations Institute of Ireland, the professional body for those working in communications, has elected Cian Connaughton as its new president. Elected for a two-year term, Connaughton will be driving the continued development of the institute.

Datalex has appointed Alison Bell as Vice-President of Strategic Sales. Bell’s experience is in technology and business consulting for the airline, hospitality and travel agency sector. Most recently, she drove business development opportunities at Mobile Travel Technologies where she advised on mobile strategies for travel retailers.

The Coeliac Society of Ireland has announced the appointment of Fergal O’Sullivan as Chief Executive Officer. O’Sullivan has worked in a number of senior management roles in the charity sector, including the Make-A-Wish Foundation, NCBI, Boardmatch Ireland and most recently, Social Justice Ireland.

FitzGerald Solicitors has announced the appointment of solicitor Melanie Evans as Senior Associate to its firm. Evans, who specialises and practices in residential conveyancing, commercial conveyancing, wills probate and estates, and employment law (advisory and contentious), has been working with FitzGerald Solicitors, Lapps Quay, Cork for over five years.

TOP CAREER TIPS 10

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Gráinne Dwyer is CEO of the Ludgate Hub, a state of the art tech co-working space in Skibbereen, Co Cork with a 1GB connection. Dwyer was listed as one of the Irish Independent’s 30 Under 30 shaping Ireland’s future in 2016 and represented Ireland at the EU Digital Assembly in Bratislava in 2016. The project is also shortlisted as Europe’s Best 1GB project by the European Commission. Dwyer is co-organiser of National Digital Week which ran November 10-12th 2016.

InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

21/12/2016 10:41


MOVERS & SHAKERS

NEW APPOINTMENTS IN THE BUSINESS COMMUNITY NATIONWIDE

ROBERT NOONE

VICTORIA KEOGH

OLIVIA MCEVOY

GINA LONDON

NEW TITLE: Vice-President of Strategic Sales EMPLOYER: Datalex PREVIOUS ROLE: Sales Manager, Mullingar Opel

NEW TITLE: Senior Account Director EMPLOYER: Notorious PSG PREVIOUS ROLE: Account Director, Heneghan PR

NEW TITLE: Director of Diversity & Inclusion Advisory Service EMPLOYER: EY PREVIOUS ROLE: Independent Consultant, Cnag ar an Doras

NEW TITLE: Director of Strategic Communications EMPLOYER: Fuzion PREVIOUS ROLE: Founder and President, Gina London

Robert Noone has been appointed Sales Manager at Traction Finance in Celbridge, Co Kildare. Noone is an experienced motor industry professional with almost 20 years’ experience, dealing with both individuals and corporate clients across a wide range of industries. He is also fully accredited by the Institute of Bankers to give advice on and to sell financial products.

Notorious PSG, the consumer brand communications agency within communications group PSG, has announced the appointment of Victoria Keogh as Senior Account Director and Operations Director. Keogh has over 14 years’ experience working in both in-house and agency communications roles across London and Dublin.

EY has announced the appointment of Olivia McEvoy as Director of EY’s Diversity & Inclusion Advisory Service. Before joining EY, McEvoy provided independent consultancy to Government Departments, State agencies as well as the community and voluntary sector in the area of stakeholder engagement and inclusive participative practice for over ten years.

Communications firm Fuzion has announced it has joined forces with Gina London, an Emmy award-winning veteran CNN anchor and correspondent and internationally acclaimed thought-leader in strategic communications. The new alliance allows London and Fuzion to combine resources, expertise and personnel.

1.

Don’t make a five-year plan – instead seek opportunities that may come your way. Doors will always open for you.

InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

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2.

Always show gratitude – after a business meeting, or if someone does you a favour, send a quick email or text of gratitude. It goes a long way.

3.

Act now and seek forgiveness later – done is often better than perfect!

11

21/12/2016 10:41


Abbey CurrencyFair Machinery sawwanted tothe sellmarket. worldwide. We Wehelped helpedmake themthem a global capture name it. in their field. CurrencyFair ordinary Abbey Machineryhad hadthe theambition ambitiontotogive be one of and businesses access to the preferential the customers world’s leading manufacturers of agricultural exchange rates normally reserved for banks. machinery. Partnering with Enterprise Ireland gave Partnering Enterprise Ireland gave and them the them access towith buyers in Europe, Australia support to scale and become Newexpertise Zealand,and enabling them to sellquickly their highlya global equipment player in the fintech sector. specialised toconsumer international markets. If your business ambition, If your business hashas the the ambition, we’ll it global. we’ll helphelp youyou taketake it global. to ambition.enterprise-ireland.com Go Go to ambition.enterprise-ireland.com #GlobalAmbition #GlobalAmbition

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08/11/2016 15:43 15:58 20/12/2016


JOB CREATION COMPANY: SECTOR: LOCATION: Irish Pet Manufacturing Mayo Foods ANNOUNCEMENT: The company which manufactures dry dog and cat food plans to increase its number of employees to 15 within two years at its Westport base.

COMPANY: Aldi SECTOR: Retail LOCATION: Meath, Clare, Kildare

COMPANY: Becton, Dickinson and Company SECTOR: Medtech LOCATION: Limerick

ANNOUNCEMENT: The retail giant has announced a major expansion, with plans to open 20 new stores in the next three years. Three new branches in Trim, Leixlip, and Ennistymon will open in early 2017.

ANNOUNCEMENT: The medtech company is to open a new R&D Centre of Excellence in Limerick, which will be focused on product and software development, clinical research instrumentation and prototype development.

Opportunity IRELAND InBUSINESS highlights some of the companies that are expanding operations and generating new employment opportunities around the country.

COMPANY: EY SECTOR: Professional services

COMPANY: MDO Management Company SECTOR: Financial services

LOCATION: Limerick

LOCATION: Dublin

ANNOUNCEMENT: The professional services firm has announced the opening of its new expanded office space in Limerick city and plans to create 100 new jobs in the next three years.

Brexit: Ireland and UK in numbers InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

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COMPANY: Takeda

SECTOR: Pharma

ANNOUNCEMENT: The fund management company plans to create 30 roles in risk management, compliance, business development and administration over the next few years.

LOCATION: Dublin

ANNOUNCEMENT: The pharma company will create 40 jobs at a new facility at Grangegorman, in west Dublin, as part of a a40m investment.

A new resource from the Central Statistics Office details the relationship between Ireland and UK. Here’s a glance at some of the findings, which can be found at www.cso.ie. GOODS

MIGRATION

FDI

SERVICES

POPULATION

Exports: a15.6bn of goods to the UK

Immigrants from UK in 2016: 13,800 persons

Total from Ireland into the UK: a89bn

Exports: a18bn of services to the UK

Imports: a18bn of goods from the UK

Emigrants to the UK in 2016: 16,600

Total into Ireland from the UK: a37bn

Imports: a11.4bn of services from the UK

112,259 persons: number of UK nationals in the State, 2011 4,525,281 persons: total persons in the State, 2011

13

21/12/2016 10:42


START-UPS

START-UP CENTRAL NEWS, VIEWS AND PROFILES ON THE LATEST START-UPS IN IRELAND

HOW IT ALL STARTED

PASCHAL NAYLOR

Co-founder & CEO, Arkphire How did you fund your business initially? Arkphire was created from a management buyout in 2011, following the decision by the original German parent company to sell as part of its overall European exit strategy. The CTO and I, with a number of outside investors, funded the purchase, with the support of our employees, banks and suppliers. What’s the best advice you were given? Follow and support your customers. For myself personally and for Arkphire, this has really served us well. What was the most important lesson you learned starting out? Finding and engaging with the right people and partners was critical for Arkphire, which has supported a 400 per cent growth in revenues since 2011. Your biggest make or break moment? In 2015 Arkphire commenced negotiations with Bootstrap, one of the leading Irish IT networking companies and Cisco gold partner, resulting in an acquisition in June 2016. This extends the IT services portfolio and our offer to the market and our customers. Would you change anything in hindsight? Very little. We were given a wonderful opportunity with the business at the time of the management buyout and with the help of our stakeholders, good timing and an exceptional customer base, we have not looked back. Company: Location: Product: Staff: Website:

Arkphire Dublin and London IT services 70 www.arkphire.com

14

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Launch of Bank of Ireland’s Workbench facility outside the O’Connell Street branch in Limerick

WORKBENCH FACILITY OPENS IN LIMERICK Bank of Ireland has launched a new Workbench facility, designed to support start-up companies and entrepreneurs, in Limerick city. The new Workbench, located at Bank of Ireland’s O’Connell Street branch, will provide start-ups with a free space in which to work, hold events and meetings, and network and collaborate with other entrepreneurs. The launch of Workbench coincided with Bank of Ireland’s 15th National Enterprise Week.

ALIBABA INVESTS IN IRISH START-UP Chinese technology giant Alibaba has made its first investment in Ireland, with a a1.2 million investment in Dublin-based software start-up Showtime Analytics. The start-up – founded by Richie Power, Joe Spurling and Paul Lynch – provides data analytics products and services to the global cinema industry. Since its inception in 2014, it has grown to 30 employees. The investment, made through Alibaba’s film production company Alibaba Pictures, will see the Dublin firm develop software analytics products for the Chinese cinema industry.

NEW INVESTMENT GIVES START-UP THE EDGE In some celebrity start-up news, pioneering biotechnology start-up Nuritas has revealed that U2’s Bono and The Edge have come aboard as investors in the company. The start-up has also announced it will triple its workforce in Ireland to over 60 in 2017 as part of a major expansion of its Irish operations.

InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

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START-UPS

URBANVOLT MAKING WAVES IN EUROPE Irish energy start-up UrbanVolt has been named as a finalist in this year’s prestigious Startup Europe Awards. Supported by the European Commission, the awards recognise firms that are transforming the business landscape across Europe. Earlier this year UrbanVolt announced that it had signed a a30 million funding arrangement with SUSI Energy Efficiency Fund and last year it signed a deal with Bord Gáis Energy to become the preferred lighting supplier to its 30,000 commercial customers. The overall winner of the Startup Europe Awards will be announced in early 2017.

Oli Cavanagh, Jeremy Davies and Kristjan Koik of Flender

FINTECH START-UP RAISES A485K Flender, a Dublin-based peer-to-peer lending start-up, has raised a485,000 in a crowdfunding campaign on Seedrs. The Flender platform, which goes live in the UK and Ireland in early 2017, is the brainchild of technology entrepreneurs Kristjan Koik, Oli Cavanagh and Jeremy Davies. On day one of the crowdfunding campaign, 20 investors from five countries bought into the Flender peer-topeer proposition, investing an average of a20,000 each. Flender is working towards a a593,000 target.

Conor Wilson, co-founder of Sproose

NE TO WATCH: SPROOSE

The amount of funding won by Ireland from the EU Programme for Research and Innovation up to the end of September 2016.

Sproose is a laundry and dry cleaning app which allows users to schedule a specific time for their dirty clothes to be collected and returned to them, washed or dry cleaned. The company operates seven days a week, collecting customers’ washing from a set location within and around Dublin city centre and returning them within 48 hours. The company was set up in May 2015 and is currently run by cofounders Conor Wilson and Patrick McKenna. Wilson says the company was born from the realisation that a business can prove successful, not merely by being run by experts within a given field, but by the use of careful outsourcing. Sproose outsources the actual washing to various launderettes, allowing Wilson to focus on the tech aspects of the company. The Sproose Laundry App is available from the app store now. Find out more at www.sproose.ie

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ENTREPRENEUR

For this issue’s entrepreneur slot, InBUSINESS spoke to Ciara Clancy, founder and CEO of Beats Medical, who is flying the flag for Irish innovation.

C

iara Clancy was working as a physiotherapist when she first became aware of the impact that a treatment called auditory cueing could have for people with Parkinson’s Disease. It was a clinically proven treatment shown to reduce the walking symptoms experienced by sufferers such as shortened shuffling steps and freezing on the spot. The problem was that this treatment needed to be tailored daily and as a result was only available at hospitals. Clancy believed that if the treatment could be provided in the home, it would give people with Parkinson’s disease the tools to take control. In 2012, at the tender age of 22, Clancy founded Beats Medical, which provides this individually tailored treatment for Parkinson’s sufferers using smartphone technology. We caught up with the Dubliner to discover more about the success of her business and her passion for improving healthcare through technology. Q: Have you always had a business head on your shoulders? A: Absolutely not! Going into business was never a plan growing up. I was always interested in the caring profession and treating Parkinson’s Disease was one of the reasons I decided I wanted to become a

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physiotherapist in my teens. It was only while working as a therapist that I felt I still wasn’t doing enough, that there was more that could be done. As a therapist in a hospital you can treat maybe 15 people a day but with technology you can treat thousands across the world every day. That’s what motivated me to set up Beats Medical with the aim of creating global impact in a sustainable way. Q: How did you develop the initial prototype? A: Initially it was about exploring the research and identifying ways to individually prescribe this treatment on a daily basis. We worked directly with People with Parkinson’s to identify the components required for the product. Our new developments were all driven by the demand from our users to do more. Our aim is to empower people with Parkinson’s through self management by giving them easy and intuitive to use tools to take control. Q: Any interesting story you can share with us relating to getting the business off the ground? A: One of our very first users of the app achieved something incredible. John used the app in beta stage (meaning it was one of the first iterations of the app not yet ready for market). He was diagnosed with Parkinson’s at 47 and used our app when he walked from the bottom of the UK to the top, over 600 miles. John is still an avid user InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

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ENTREPRENEUR

Photo courtesy of Inspirefest and Conor McCabe Photography

“Sometimes you just have to go for it and not be afraid to fail. There is no blueprint for a start-up and you’ll learn along the way.”

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ENTREPRENEUR Q: Any company news or expansion plans you can share with us at this time? A: It’s an exciting time for Beats Medical at the moment. This past year we launched two new treatments for speech and hand dexterity symptoms experienced by Parkinson’s sufferers, meaning more people across the world can benefit from our technology. In 2017 we aim to support even more people with Parkinson’s across the world while launching new treatments to address other neurological conditions.

of the app and this year has joined walks from New York to Toronto and from the west to east coast of the UK with the app in his pocket.

WHAT IS PARKINSON’S? Parkinson’s disease is a neurological disorder, which is variable in its progression. While it cannot be cured, its symptoms can be effectively controlled with medication for many years. Parkinson’s results from a shortage of dopamine, a chemical that helps instructions from the brain to cross from one nerve cell to another, which in turn controls movement. We all lose some of this chemical as we get older, however, it is only when we have lost about 80 per cent of our dopamine that we start to have symptoms. In essence, people with Parkinson’s have lost this chemical at a slightly faster rate than others. For more information visit parkinsons.ie

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Q: How would you describe the experience of seeing Parkinson’s sufferers overcome their symptoms by using your technology? A: It’s been great. The only thing I’ve had to get my head around is that we now have users in over 40 countries worldwide so I don’t get to meet everyone on the app anymore. That said, our users send us in home videos and emails which is brilliant; we love to keep up to date on their progress. It’s great to hear that they have achieved their goals and that the technology has played a small role in helping them achieve them. Q: It has been quite a hectic 12 to 18 months for you between being named Cartier Laureate for Europe last year and being a finalist in the 2016 EY Entrepreneur of the Year competition among other things. How has it been to take in? A: The recognition has been great but nothing has compared to what our users have achieved this year. Their achievements have really been the highlight and motivate the whole team and I to work harder for them. This year we launched new treatments to address speech and fine hand movement symptoms. This has enabled us to treat people for longer into their diagnosis and in 2016 we’ve had users finish marathons, adventure races, write their signature or poetry again, or communicate more clearly with their grandchildren. It’s their successes that make it all worthwhile.

Q: Where do you see Beats Medical in five years’ time? A: Parkinson’s is one of the most complex neurological conditions in that it varies from day to day, hour to hour. When we developed the process to individually prescribe treatments it opened the doors to treating other neurological conditions. In five years’ time we would like to see more people with Parkinson’s around the globe impacted by our technology, but we also aim to do for other conditions what we have done for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. We hope to one day be the number one provider of non intrusive solutions for neurological conditions. Q: What are your thoughts on entrepreneurship in Ireland and the types of start-ups emerging in recent years? A: I think we have an incredible ecosystem in Ireland and I believe that there is no better place to found a tech business. It’s really exciting to see many Irish start-ups now selling across the world but keeping their headquarters in Ireland. We also have a great business network in Ireland and a culture of generosity. When starting a business young you really value expertise and experience. In Ireland we have numerous successful entrepreneurs who have 20 plus years’ experience in founding and scaling multinationals and they are willing to advise and help growing businesses such as ours become the next multinationals. Q: Any advice for budding entrepreneurs hoping to get a business off the ground? A: If it’s something you are passionate about I would say ‘just go for it’. I don’t believe you will ever have enough experience or knowledge or that there will ever be the perfect time to start. Sometimes you just have to go for it and not be afraid to fail. There is no blueprint for a startup and you’ll learn along the way. For more on assistive tech for people with disabilities, go to the Innovation Nation slot on page 112. InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

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THERE’S MORE BEHIND THE STAR

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COVER STORY

GLOBAL GROWTH InBUSINESS spoke with Janet Cox, Head of Field Sales at DHL Express Ireland, to find out how businesses can maximise their growth potential by developing a strong e-Commerce strategy, and why it rings true for an SME just as much as for a large corporation. s Head of Field Sales at DHL Express Ireland, Janet Cox knows a thing or two about market growth. Based at DHL’s head office near Dublin Airport, Cox oversees the strategic development of the DHL sales team to strengthen and grow their market share across the country. “We have a very strong infrastructure and operational footprint across Ireland – much more so than any of our competitors,” says Cox. “This certainly helps when selling our services into the business community.” With more than 500 staff and a ground fleet of more than 200 vehicles you could say that DHL’s local presence is unmatched. “When you factor in that we are the only international express carrier with a locally based customer services centre, it’s certainly a compelling proposition,” she adds. A self-confessed champion for small businesses, Cox taps into her 20+ years of industry experience at DHL in carrying out her role. A high-energy, passionate individual, her commitment is driven by her 20

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vision of an export-led recovery in Ireland that brings new and growing SMEs to the international stage. “If there is one positive from the Brexit fallout and the pressure on Irish exports to the UK as a result of the fall in the value of sterling, it’s the growing realisation from Irish SMEs that they need to diversify to new markets,” she advises. “It’s certainly the silver lining to the ‘Brexit cloud’ and in the longer run I believe we’ll have a stronger SME exporting sector as a result.” Cox’s general view on exports as the main driver of future economic growth, and market diversification in particular as the route to future export success, resonates at a broader industry level, where DHL has forged ties with like-minded industry organisations as well as major companies such as AIB. “We share a common objective to support new and developing SMEs on their export journey. Add in Enterprise Ireland, and in particular the support to SMEs available through their network of Local Enterprise Offices, and you have a broad range of support resources available to SME exporters nationwide.” InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

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Jason Clarke

IF THERE IS ONE POSITIVE FROM THE BREXIT FALLOUT AND THE PRESSURE ON IRISH EXPORTS TO THE UK AS A RESULT OF THE FALL IN THE VALUE OF STERLING, IT’S THE GROWING REALISATION FROM IRISH SMES THAT THEY NEED TO DIVERSIFY TO NEW MARKETS.”

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Jason Clarke

AN INDUSTRY SHIFT During her time in DHL, Cox has seen the nature of the logistics industry change significantly. “Traditionally we would have seen our main growth in the ICT sectors, with some high-end manufacturing in there as well,” she says. “In more recent times things have moved on and the growth has more typically emerged from the likes of the pharmaceutical, life sciences and medical device sectors. There’s still activity in ICT and higher-end manufacturing, but proportionally it’s not as significant as in previous years.” The shift Cox has been witnessing over the last number of years has also involved a massive move in the market towards e-Commerce. And the stats back up this growing trend. According to a Virgin Media report, the value of Ireland’s internet economy is forecast to grow from its current level of a8.4 billion per annum to an estimated a21.1bn by 2020, with consumer spending contributing to 60 per cent (almost a13bn) of this amount. “Lots of Irish companies are seeking to maximise their sales and service through their online activities,” explains Cox. “Whether it’s as simple as ensuring a customer can easily find their location, or seeking to promote their product online, each company requires a strong e-Commerce strategy to maximise growth potential. This is just as true for an SME as it is for a multinational organisation. Irish companies are well positioned to sell internationally through the e-Commerce channel. ‘Brand Ireland’ is very well received across the world and Irish retailers are valued for their unique, high quality and competitively priced product offering as well as their strong understanding of international business, so the opportunity is clearly there.” According to Cox, the shift to e-Commerce within the logistics

CV: Janet Cox

sector is a fundamental one. “When I first joined DHL we were 90 per cent+ a business to business company,” she says. “Today more than 50 per cent of our deliveries go to consumers at a residential address.” This change undoubtedly creates challenges in terms of the ‘last mile’ delivery – an industry term used to describe the movement of goods from a hub to a final destination in the home – as clearly it is more difficult to ensure someone is at home to sign for a delivery. DHL’s answer to such demands is an online solution called On-Demand Delivery, which allows consumers to choose a delivery time and location to suit them. This year the company also introduced the DHL Swipbox, a standalone secure locker unit located in various retail outlets around the country which allows customers to collect their shipments at their own convenience. “We have had to be innovative and stay abreast of what customers want,” says Cox. “If our business didn’t change, we would quickly get left behind. Our aim is to keep our customers up to date and

ROLE: Head of Field Sales, DHL Express Ireland LIVES: Dublin FAMILY: Married to Stephen for 17 years with three children CURRENTLY READING: The Battle by Paul O’Connell FAVOURITE FILM: My Fair Lady (1964) HOBBIES: Big sports fan, in particular GAA

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to have live tracking information available which enables our customer to receive or collect their delivery at a time that suits them.” THE NEED TO EMBRACE So while e-Commerce has tremendous growth potential for Irish businesses in general – and exporters in particular – the simple reality is that right now around 25 per cent of Irish businesses do not have a website, let alone the ability to conduct transactions online. Many of these companies are missing out on the potential opportunity that the growth in online activity represents. Indeed, there is a belief among some SMEs that the costs associated with the development of digital tools to support an e-Commerce strategy are simply too high. However, this need not be the case and the investment costs associated with some well-targeted e-Commerce activity can be recouped quite quickly through increased sales. “I’m a firm believer that Irish SMEs need to fully embrace the international e-Commerce opportunity,” stresses Cox. “Online sales generated through e-Commerce give companies an opportunity to dip their toes into other international markets with very limited risk. For a start there’s no payment risk. Furthermore, some good website analytics may indeed demonstrate that there may already be interest in your product from countries you may not have even considered as a potential market. DHL has already seen this to be the case with many customers and we have worked closely with these customers to help take their business international in this way.” For DHL, the growth in e-Commerce has revolutionised how the company operates but the work doesn’t stop there. According to Cox, DHL must continuously adapt its logistics solutions to meet the changing needs of the market. Together with its SME customers, the company is focused on developing InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

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JANET’S

digital solutions to support a number of key service areas such as time delivery, an efficient returns programme, customs and integrated computer systems. A CHALLENGE WORTH TAKING ON While e-Commerce represents a huge opportunity for SMEs to grow, it also represents a challenge to develop the logistics and supply chain solutions to support online sales. Many progressive Irish companies have demonstrated that it is a challenge worth taking on, as the growth opportunity is significant. Still, to effectively grow your business with online retail channels there’s a lot you need to consider. It’s not just about choosing the best online retail platform for your business and selecting the right pricing model – you also need to know how to reach customers in your target markets and understand the regulations and restrictions around exporting. Customers want to be able to rely on their logistics partner as an extension of their business. They need a professional, wellestablished organisation that can offer a high standard of service and choice to their end-users. According to Cox, DHL Express achieves this high level of customer service by consciously choosing not to outsource any of its business that is customer-facing. “We have a local sales team, a local e-Commerce team, a local finance team and an awardwinning centre of excellence customer service team all located in Dublin,” she says. “We have seen the benefits of this for our customers. They want to talk to someone who understands their business. All 100,000 of our global staff undergo rigorous certified international specialist training and this investment in our staff has paid off. We have seen that motivated staff create loyal customers and it has been a key factor in our ability to grow market share.”

TOP TIPS Cox says SMEs should consider the following when developing their e-Commerce strategy:

1

Understand your customers and their online behaviours.

2

Research the different components of a digital landscape and prioritise what to focus on first, e.g. website, microsite, mobile apps, a social media presence etc.

3

Take small steps and review what works well – don’t try to do everything at once!

4

Clearly tell your customers you ship internationally on your home page and offer a range of shipping options.

5

Select a business partner to work with who can give you confidence. Typically they should have delivered successful e-Commerce tools already.

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BUSINESS OF SPORT

HURLS The Irish market for sports memorabilia has been going from strength to strength, with GAA artefacts proving the most popular among Irish buyers. CONOR FORREST spoke with auctioneer George Fonsie Mealy Jnr to discover more about a thriving market.

S

ports fans are among some of the most passionate people in the world – the most ardent supporters will follow their team halfway around the country or the globe, fork out for pricey replica jerseys and lapse into a moody silence whenever a result doesn’t go their way. There are also some, though perhaps not as many, who wouldn’t think twice about spending four or five figures on a GAA player’s medal collection from the 1940s, or a battered and bruised hurl which helped secure an All-Ireland victory. Fonsie Mealys Auctioneers in Castlecomer, Co Kilkenny tends to attract the latter individual. At the helm is George Fonsie Mealy Jnr, who explains that the market for sports memorabilia in Ireland has become much more vibrant in recent years, gathering momentum

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World Cup Winner

since 2003-2004. “We, as specialists, began doing specialist sales in 2006 of GAA and other Irish sports memorabilia. GAA programmes – you could pick them up for five, ten, twenty euro 15 years ago, some of the rarer ones, but now you are looking at having to pay three, four, five hundred euro,” he explains. “It’s a very strong and vibrant collectors market, and there are constantly new people coming into it.” Iconic items of GAA memorabilia are generally among the high tickets sales – jerseys worn by legendary players, hurls used in classic matches – perhaps unsurprising given Ireland’s close association with the GAA. Fonsie Mealy recalls a hurl used by one of the greatest hurlers the game has seen – Nicky Rackard – in the 1955 All-Ireland final that saw Wexford secure their first title since 1910. When it went under the

English footballer Geoff Hurst is the only footballer to score a hat-trick in a World Cup final, following his heroics against West Germany in 1966. The shirt he wore that day was auctioned in 2000 for an impressive £91,750, but achieved an incredible £2.3 million when it was put on sale again in 2012.

On the Ball

Baseball star Mark McGwire made sporting history in 1998 when he beat the record for the most home runs in a single season, clocking up an impressive 70 home runs. Though the record was broken three seasons later by Barry Bonds, the ball that brought McGwire’s 70th home run was bought by Canadian artist and entrepreneur Todd McFarlane for an eye-watering $3m.

“YOU WOULDN’T SELL AN ALL-IRELAND MEDAL IN NEW YORK CITY AS YOU WOULDN’T SELL BABE RUTH [MEMORABILIA] IN DUBLIN. IT’S ALL ABOUT THE

GEOGRAPHICAL POSITIONING OF WHERE YOU SELL THE ITEMS.”

Sting like a bee

Muhammad Ali was not a man you wanted to get on the wrong side of – his ability to float like a butterfly and sting like a bee saw the celebrated boxer win 56 out of 61 fights – 37 by knockout. Gloves worn by Ali during his 1971 fight against Joe Frazier, billed as the Fight of the Century, sold at auction earlier this year for $606,375.

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BUSINESS OF SPORT

hammer it sold for a2,000. Rackard’s medal from the same year fetched the sum of a17,500 when it was sold at Mealys two years beforehand. Medals seem to attract the most fervent (or wealthy) collectors – Fonsie Mealy explains that the medal collection of Tipperary hurling great Phil Shanahan was sold for a20,000, while the extensive collection of Kerry footballer Joe Barrett recently fetched an impressive a40,000. “The market is strong in the GAA section, which are our major sports; a bit like it would be for baseball or American football in the United States,” Fonsie Mealy explains. “You wouldn’t sell an All-Ireland medal in New York City as you wouldn’t sell Babe Ruth [memorabilia] in Dublin. It’s all about the geographical positioning of where you sell the items.” InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

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BEYOND CROKE PARK Sports like cricket and soccer tend to be under represented at auction when compared to the GAA – while hurls might fetch several thousand, cricket bats have a much smaller audience, though Fonsie Mealy notes that a signed Don Bradman (an Australian cricketer considered to be one of the all-time great batsmen) bat recently sold for a1,000. Some items of interest do crop up on occasion. Take, for example, a Kilkenny Castle cricket score book, which was snapped up by Kilkenny County Board, who saw the value in a document which recounts the active clubs in Kilkenny between 1890 and 1914, prior to the outbreak of World War I. Items of interest to football fans also raise their head occasionally. A Swiss watch from the Real Madrid

souvenir store was among the items on auction at one of Mealys’ regular sales in 2012, though this one had a more interesting background than its compatriots – previously owned by Shay Brennan, an Irish footballer who played for Manchester United during the 1960s and the first Irish international to qualify for the team under the so-called ‘granny rule’. As the story goes, Brennan lent a different timepiece to the legendary George Best, who duly left it behind in a hotel in Madrid when United played Real in the semi-final of the 1968 European Cup. Best paid a visit to the club’s souvenir shop to pick up a doppelganger, and Brennan was presumably none the wiser. Sometimes these stories give an item an added depth – a winner’s medal from Kildare’s All-Ireland football triumph in 1905 is valuable in its own right, but even more so when you know that, as there was a train strike at the time, several footballers commandeered a Crossley Tender from the nearby British barracks in Newbridge, drove to Thurles, and won the All-Ireland. “The story behind it is quite important – it’s the historical value sometimes [that is important], more so than the intrinsic value. People do buy into the story as well, there’s no doubt,” says Fonsie Mealy. Clearly the market for Irish sports memorabilia, particularly that which pertains to the GAA, is going strong – perhaps aided by a cautious economic recovery over the past year or so. For some, however, the lure of owning an artefact of sporting significance would be too much to resist no matter what the price. “I’m a Kilkenny man, you can’t escape it. Everyone associates Mícheál Ó Muircheartaigh on a Sunday night in the background in the kitchen,” says Fonsie Mealy. “It is part of our DNA. I suppose that’s why people buy into it, why a lot of these original artefacts achieve high prices, and why there is a market for it in Ireland.” 25

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INDUSTRY FEATURE

The availability of drones on the wider public market has transformed the technology from an elusive piece of high tech equipment to last year’s must have Christmas gift. But who exactly is taking to the skies with drones and where is the industry headed? ORLA CONNOLLY went on a mission to find out.

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INDUSTRY FEATURE

T

he basic understanding of drone technology is an unmanned aerial device, controlled remotely by a pilot or flown autonomously through the use of software. These aircraft are also known as Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS) or Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV). For the majority of the public, drones are not commonplace in everyday life. While we’ve watched them in futuristic films, until recently they were generally considered to be imaginings of a distant future. Yet, in the last number of years, demand for drones in Ireland has increased significantly and now numerous public and private industries are getting in on the act, adopting the technology to refine their methods of data detection and transfer. Until recently, a corporation wanting to avail of drone technology would be required to design and construct their own craft, which is not only time consuming, but comes with a staggering price tag attached. However, continued advancements in drone technology and increased interest in hobby drones from the public means they have become more widely available at inexpensive prices. Currently, any drone enthusiast can purchase an above average hobby drone online at surprisingly moderate costs. “You can buy a drone for a50 now and if you can fly a small basic drone, you can fly a big drone,” says Ian Kiely of Sky Drones Ireland and cofounder of the Drone Expo. This widespread availability has translated to the corporate world, meaning more enterprises are now researching how drone technology can help their business succeed. TAKING TO THE SKIES Availability is not the only factor that has driven the popularity of drone use for business. While a variety of sectors are recognising the value of high powered commercial drones for revolutionising data gathering methods, the technology has plenty of other assets. One sector which has fully embraced drones is agriculture. Farmers have begun to use the technology as a method of increasing security, herding livestock and spraying vast areas of land that were previously thought too difficult to access. “In InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

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the last couple of months we have done a lot of work with the agricultural industry and we found that farmers are really getting into them, using them for videography, mapping and inspections on equipment like turbines, that kind of thing,” Kiely explains. Along with agriculture, the engineering sector has shown a strong interest in the latest aerial technology. By employing camera and sensor equipment, combined with drone technology, engineering companies have been able to safely carry out high risk inspections of dilapidated buildings in need of remedial repair without endangering workers. As drone technology develops at a rapid pace, builton equipment like sensors and cameras are becoming more advanced too, making the devices more adaptable to the needs of a given industry. “It’s not just standard high definition photography or videography, it’s special sensors like ground penetrating radar or lidar systems and hyperspectral camera systems. There are very specialist cameras and sensors that you don’t get on your normal small drones,” says Óisín Green, CEO of Green Aviation, an Irish commercial drone company. Another example of a sector adopting drone technology is the emergency services. Here, the use of drones is concentrated in areas of public safety, search and rescue and with impressive results already garnered from drone training, the trend within the industry looks set to continue. “This morning we were teaching the fire service how to use thermal imaging cameras,” says Kiely. “So depending on what image we use, we can look at a fire and show where it started based on the heat source.” This gives firefighters a significant advantage when entering a building to fight a blaze. Additionally, drone technology achieves impressive results in reducing search and rescue times. By using drones with sensor technology attached, firefighters can spend significantly less time searching within an outbreak and reduce the risk of not making it out. “When a firefighter goes into a building they can’t actually see in front of them and they spend a lot of time searching, whereas we’re trying to reduce that search time,” says Kiely. “Particularly with a gorse fire, we can fly a drone up and we can look down and we can tell them where the fire begins and ends and, if guys are going to be trapped, we can give them the information in advance rather than finding out when there’s a wall of flame in front of them.”

SKY’S THE LIMIT Five Irish companies using drone technology

SKYVIDPRO

SkyVidPro is a drone filming company which produces video footage that can be used by the film and TV industry, for sporting events and weddings, or for promotional purposes for hotels or property developers. www.skyvidpro.com

GREEN AVIATION

Originally established in 2007 to provide pilots to the airline industry, Green Aviation now focuses on opportunities in the commercial UAV space. The company plans to scale back the data collection and monitoring currently carried out by piloted helicopters. www.greenaviationuav.com

MOVIDIUS

The Irish firm, which was this year acquired by US computer giant Intel in a deal thought to be worth at least a300m, has partnered with Dajiang Innovation (DJI), a Hong-Kong based firm which was estimated to account for 70 per cent of the commercial drone market in 2015. www.movidius.com

AERPAS

Featured as a start-up to watch in InBUSINESS earlier this year, Dublin-based Aerpas specialises in aerial photography, aerial filming and survey support. Its clients include broadcasters, video production companies and construction firms. www.aerpas.ie

DONEGAL MOUNTAIN RESCUE

New drone software has been developed as part of a joint venture between Donegal Mountain Rescue and DJI, following test exercises this year. DroneSAR, the four-person company involved, has developed an app based on digital mapping of areas in which people have gone missing. www.donegalmrt.ie

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INDUSTRY FEATURE

Ulick McEvaddy, Director, Green Aviation; Ger Aherne, Chairman, Green Aviation; Óisín Green, CEO, Green Aviation; Emmanuel Previnaire, CEO, Flying-Cam at a flight demonstration inspecting wind turbines in Offaly in July 2015

RESTRICTIONS AND REGULATIONS The relatively new nature of Ian Kiely, Sky Drones Ireland this technology means that some restrictions on drone use are only beginning to emerge. While previously there was little monitoring of drone activity, in late 2015 new regulations came into force introducing a number of new restrictions, including one stating that any craft over the weight of 1kg must be registered with the Irish Aviation Authority. For many commercial users of drones, the clarity these regulations brought with them was a welcomed relief. “It gave a good guideline for everyone to adhere to, a level playing field, no matter who you are,” says Green. “If you’re an individual who is starting off a new aerial photography or aerial filming company, you abide by the same regulations as the big companies. Everyone knows what they have to do in terms of having your certifications in place and your training in place with your operators. So I think, for everyone, it gave clarity above anything else.” Along with the new weight guidelines, an individual is now 28

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“IRELAND

IS IN A GREAT POSITION

BETWEEN THE US AND MAINLAND EUROPE. THERE’S NO REASON WHY JUMBO JETS WON’T BE FLYING AUTONOMOUSLY FROM NEW YORK TO SHANNON BY NEXT YEAR.”

prevented from flying a drone over 400ft, farther than 300m or out of their direct line of sight, over an assembly of people or in restricted airspace, like Dublin city. For Kiely, the biggest challenge facing the drone industry is the lack of public understanding regarding the need for these restrictions and the danger drones pose when used recklessly. “We’re trying to teach people to please use them sensibly because they are very powerful machines. With the older drones and the cheaper ones they can actually lose contact with the control station and if the drone is on a trajectory of going up they will continue once it loses contact until it runs out of battery. It may not collide with an aircraft but when the battery ends, it’ll drop out of the sky, hit terminal velocity and hit the ground very hard. It’ll go through the roof of your house!” While Kiely feels that Ireland’s contribution to drone development has been overlooked somewhat, he does believe that a future with autonomous drones carrying out daily tasks is closer to becoming a reality than the public realises. “Ireland is in a great position between the US and mainland Europe,” he notes. “There’s no reason why jumbo jets won’t be flying autonomously from New York to Shannon by next year. The laws don’t currently allow for it but the capabilities are already there.” Green agrees that fully autonomous devices are the future of drone technology, leading to the eventuality that one day a single piece of software will control the combined functions of several drones. However, he raises concerns about the prohibitive regulations currently in place against full automation and notes that, in order for this advancement to become a reality, aviation regulators and drone operators will have to cooperate to build common restrictions and allowances for the technology. That said, Green feels that regulators, realising the need for the technology, will be open to this cooperation when the time comes. “I think the regulators know what’s going to happen and they’re probably preparing themselves,” he says. “In fairness, they’re engaging very positively with industry. It will certainly be full automation whereby you won’t have somebody standing there with a controller in their hand, it will all just be an app on your phone or an app on a tablet or computer and off goes maybe five or ten drones to complete various functions.” InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

21/12/2016 10:47


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20/12/2016 15:44


FEATURE

LIFE AFTER

Almost six months on from the Brexit vote, state agencies have been busy promoting markets where they see untapped potential amid fears that the UK’s formal exit from the EU could have serious knock-on effects for many domestic firms. FIONA KELLY spoke with three Irish businesses already tapping that potential.

TAPPING INTO THE MIDDLE EAST

THE JELLY BEAN FACTORY

“T

he Middle East is a particularly appealing market for us because they don’t have the alcohol vice, they like their treats, they like confectionery, chocolate and sugar, and, at certain times of the year, particularly after Ramadam, those kind of products fly off the shelf,” explains Richard Cullen of The Jelly Bean Factory. In the context of Brexit, Cullen remembers how, ironically, it was actually as a result of his concern that the company was overly reliant on the UK market a few years ago that they first partnered with the Swedish confectionery company, Cloetta, to expand into other markets in Europe, particularly Scandanavia. That partnership resulted in Richard Cullen and his father Peter, who cofounded The Jelly Bean Factory with him in 1998, selling their majority stake in the company to Cloetta in 2014. The company, which had its origins in Clara Candy, a firm sold to the German sweet manufacturer Haribo in the same year that The Jelly Bean Factory was set up, continues to 30

030 InBusiness Q4 2016_Brexit.indd 30

manufacture all of its jelly beans in Blanchardstown in Dublin despite 99 per cent of its product being for export. Although the UK still accounts for a substantial percentage of sales, The Jelly Bean Factory has grown other markets in recent years, most notably the Middle East. With an office in Bahrain, Saudi Arabia is the company’s biggest market in the region, followed by Dubai and Kuwait. Cullen also identifies Iran as a market for potential growth. The advice he gives to companies interested in exporting to the Middle East is that they need to be committed to the market. “If your product is suitable, in that its shelf life isn’t going to be out-of-date by the time you get there, I would really recommend it, but you need to invest in a good rep who speaks the local language and you need to have a good understanding of the culture and the market,” Cullen advises. He elaborates on some of the cultural nuances he has encountered: “Dubai

is very westernised but if you travel to Saudi, it can really take people by surprise. It is not uncommon for someone to stand up and leave a meeting without any kind of warning or apology, most likely because they have to go and pray. You need to be particularly sensitive to the culture of the place, particularly if you are there around Ramadam.” Another factor that Cullen warns companies to be prepared for if doing business in the Middle East is the amount of extra paperwork required by the authorities in the region. The company benefited from being the first jelly bean manufacturer to enter the Middle East. “Our competitors thought it was going to be too difficult to get into the market there, but now that we have proven that there is a demand for the product, they have followed us,” Cullen comments, adding “the good thing, though, is that we had time to establish ourselves before they arrived.” InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

21/12/2016 13:53


FEATURE

TAPPING INTO THE US

FRAGRANCES OF IRELAND

W

hen Fragrances of Ireland launched its first perfume back in 1983, its founder, Brian Cox, had to receive permission from the estate of WB Yeats to name its perfume ‘Innisfree’ after the Sligo scribe’s iconic poem ‘The Lake Isle of Innisfree’. Having traded successfully for more than two decades, using a brand name that conjured up such a poetic image of Ireland, during the depths of the recent recession, the company’s current managing director, David Cox, decided that the company needed to rethink its image. This resulted in a shift away from such a strong association with all things Irish towards the ‘Inis’ brand’s linkage with “the energy of the sea”. The re-positioning strategy has paid off and the company has since enjoyed significant growth. The US market accounts for 70 per cent of Fragrances of Ireland’s sales. A glance at the store finder section on the company’s website clearly indicates that sales in the US are at their strongest in coastal states, with Florida as its best selling region. “We are also seeing growth in the inland states but our strategy was to initially target the coast and then to move inland,” Cox explains. Although the UK is a smaller market for the company,

InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

030 InBusiness Q4 2016_Brexit.indd 31

Cox says that he is already feeling the impact of Brexit: “We are getting 15 per cent less for anything we do there now. We were in the early days of following the same strategy that we had used in the US, initially targeting coastal counties, but now we are faced with the dilemma of whether we should put too much effort into the British market. If we put our prices up by 15 per cent, my instinct is that we will kill the product dead.” Cox also expresses some concern about the potential impact of Donald Trump’s presidency, particularly the possibility that he may introduce import duties. The company, which is based in Kilmacanogue, Co Wicklow, and employs a staff of 25, ships its product to its central distribution warehouse in North Carolina. Sales are handled by a number of independent agencies around the country and are also generated by the company’s presence at between 10 and 20 trade shows a year. The company’s strategy has been to target small independent gift shops rather than to take on the might of companies like L’Oréal, Proctor and Gamble and Estée Lauder in department stores and perfumery chains. “We have competed in that business in the past and it isn’t easy. No sooner is your product on the shelf but another three products come along that have much bigger marketing budgets behind them and you get bumped down a shelf until you’re on the bottom shelf and, pretty soon, you find that you’ve fallen off the shelf completely. We’re anxious to work with retailers who we’ll still be working with in five years time,” Cox remarks, adding “we are a family business, our perfumes are soft and gentle so we have tried to incorporate that into our image and not take on the bling of the latest perfume that has just been launched on the back of a big-budget celebrity endorsement.”

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21/12/2016 10:48


FEATURE

GLOBAL AMBITIONS

As part of Enterprise Ireland’s efforts to help client companies to diversify and win new business in markets outside of the UK such as Northern Europe, USA/Canada and high growth markets, the agency increased the number of planned ministerial-led missions to 26, from July to December 2016. This represents an increase of 16 ministerial-led trade missions and events on the first half of 2016.

EI TRADE MISSION AND EVENTS IN Q3 AND Q4 2016 OUTSIDE THE UK

North America

11

Northern Europe

10

Asia Pacific

9

Southern Europe, Middle East & Africa

6

Central and Eastern Europe, Commonwealth of Independent States and Russia

1

Latin America

1

For more details visit www.enterpriseireland.com

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030 InBusiness Q4 2016_Brexit.indd 32

TAPPING INTO EUROPE

THE RYE RIVER BREWING COMPANY

W

ith approximately 100 microbreweries competing for the estimated 2 per cent share of the beer market that craft beer sales are thought to account for in Ireland, Tom Cronin, export director and one of the founders of the Rye River Brewing Company in Celbridge, Co Kildare, remarks that, “depending on the scale of your ambition, if you really want to make a go of it, of course you’re going to look to the export market. “Quite early on, we decided not to engage with the craft beer market in the UK and focus on Europe. Obviously I’m very glad now that we did that,” Cronin remarks. The company, which was first dreamt up by Cronin and his two friends and co-founders, Alan Wolfe and Niall Phelan, on a “beer-fuelled night out” back in 2013 now employs eight brewers and produces 26 different beers. Although ‘McGargles’ is their best known brand in Ireland, they also produce a range of own-brand beers for both Lidl and Dunnes Stores. The Lidl contract means that the Celbridge-brewed ‘Crafty Brewing Company’ beers are now on sale in seven of the store’s European markets. The biggest market for the company, to date, has been Italy: “The Italians don’t like the very hoppy American beers so one of our milder English-style pale ales has been a big hit over there,” Cronin explains. The

week I spoke to him, he had also just won a tender to supply the Systembolaget chain of 400 government-owned liquor stores in Sweden. “We’re hoping that will really open up the Nordic market for us,” Cronin comments. Germany is another market in which the company is currently enjoying some success although it required considerable investment to establish a foothold there, largely to comply with the legislation which insists on returnable bottles. Cronin says he doesn’t expect to see a return on that investment until 2017: “It takes a lot of time and energy to get into a new market, you have to allow about a year and a half to establish yourself. Germany is a great market for us to get into but it is basically the home of beer. The craft market is in its infancy there but there are a lot of retailers and there is a lot of diversity there so it’s not easy to break into.” As part of their strategy to establish themselves in Germany, Rye River partnered with the Hamburg Beer Company. They also won a gold medal at the prestigious Meninger Craft Beer awards – on top of another 28 medals that their beers have won in the past year: “Those two factors have given us a very convincing story to tell to our German consumers,” according to Cronin. Although the company has enjoyed considerable success in just three years in business, Cronin is keen to stress that it has been far from easy: “We have been lucky in that we have a good investor who has come onboard because it would be impossible for us to get to where we’re at with bank funding alone.”

InBUSINESS InB USINESS | Q4 2016

21/12/2016 10:48


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20/12/2016 15:48


FEATURE

SNAP

CHAT Gillian Horan, CEO, The Pudding Brand Agency

We practice what we preach. We love what we do and invest a lot of time ensuring that we are at the cutting edge of branding developments.

Your company’s brand is everything; your people, products and services, your strategy, identity, marketing and culture. That’s according to Gillian Horan, CEO of The Pudding Brand Agency.

If reviewed annually, you can make the necessary changes to your brand quickly and often more effectively and efficiently. For a major brand audit, I would recommend doing one every three years.

Digital marketing can be low cost or no cost but remember, time is money. Use these great tools but make sure they feed into your strategy and hit the right target audience.

We now have offices in Dublin and Limerick and are currently looking overseas for new opportunities. InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

035 InBusiness Q4 2016_Snap Chat.indd 35

The most negative use of branding is when a company communicates core values such as authenticity or transparency but when it interacts or delivers its services to customers the experience is not authentic or transparent. It’s essential that brands live up to what they promise.

Brands are not only about products and services. Brands are about locations, experiences and events. I love what the Ploughing Championship has done over the last few years. It hit record numbers again this year, which tells us that this brand is only growing in strength.

The proof is in the pudding!

It is about the impact. We get under the skin of brands.

Small companies typically invest in business cards, websites and ad-hoc campaigns. It is important that they really think about these investments no matter how small. The best advice I can give is to plan.

We help companies live and breathe their brand every day. We have case studies showing that our work has led to a 500 per cent increase in turnover.

35

21/12/2016 10:49


travel SMALL BUSINESS FEATURE

At the Cutting Edge of

IB: Could you give us a brief background on where the idea for Earth’s Edge came from? JMcM: From a very early

age I was exploring the rivers and mountains of Ireland with my parents so I have always been involved in the outdoors. Once I got into my late teens I was travelling the world regularly on various expeditions with friends. From 2000 I started working as a guide overseas in places like Uganda, Zambia, India and California. In 2007, at 24, I decided to start the company as I wanted to share the experiences I had with other people. In hindsight part of me might have waited until I was a little older as travelling the world as a guide was the dream job and without doubt a lot less complex than running a small business! 36

036 InBusiness Q4 2016_Small Business.indd 36

IB: As the only fully licensed adventure travel company in Ireland how has it been trying to lure consumers away from the companies overseas? JMcM: It’s been great,

Irish people are very loyal and tend to buy Irish whenever they can. Although we use being Irish as a marketing tool we have the stated ambition to be the best adventure travel company in the world. Recently we won a big contract with a private school and the client told me we got it because we were Irish. That annoyed me a little as I wanted to win it because we were better than the British competition. There’s a stigma in Ireland that things are done better in the UK but it’s really not the case, especially in travel.

Adventure travel is big business across the world and one Irish SME is marking its territory within the sector. InBUSINESS chatted to James McManus, founder and MD of Earth’s Edge, to find out more about the company.

IB: Who would your typical clients be? JMcM: We don’t really

have a typical client, last year we had a group of 20 people on Kilimanjaro with an age range between 18 and 72 and they all made the top! We get people who are super fit and those who are less fit, we have trips to suit all abilities. IB: What sets Earth’s Edge apart from other businesses operating in the adventure travel space? JMcM: The obvious

differentiators are that we send an experienced Irish guide on all expeditions to ensure everything stays on track in what can be very dynamic environments. We also send an Irish doctor on all expeditions allowing us to provide unrivalled levels of medical cover for our clients. Additionally,

all my office staff travel on an expedition each year, which makes a huge difference especially for my sales staff as you need to know the product in order to sell it. IB: What industry trends are you currently seeing? JMcM: Our most

popular trips are Kilimanjaro, Machu Picchu and Everest Base Camp. Coming up to our 10th birthday we now have a huge number of loyal customers who have travelled with us before. I don’t know if it’s a trend but we are planning on offering them more remote expeditions in wilder parts of the globe, and we’re confident they will love these trips. IB: Tell us about one of your most memorable travel experiences? InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

21/12/2016 13:42


SMALL BUSINESS FEATURE

JMcM: I have been lucky enough to have so many over the years. A recent experience was in China this July. My wife, some friends and I completed a first Irish ascent on a 7,500m peak called Muztagh Ata. Next year I’m planning on climbing an 8,000m peak without supplementary oxygen. I’m just trying to figure out when I can take 45 days off in a row to do it! IB: What are the biggest challenges you face as a small business? JMcM: The biggest challenge in small business is the one you don’t see around the corner. I don’t really worry about challenges and I see things like Brexit as an opportunity and I think people – especially the media – should not be so pessimistic about it. This year Earth’s Edge grew by 65 per cent, which is a massive jump, and we have had the potential to really stress quality controls and ultimately client’s experiences on our trips. IB: What more could the Government be doing to help businesses like yours? JMcM: Without looking at what other countries are doing I think our Government is doing an excellent job. There is so much funding and support available from the LEOs and Enterprise Ireland. I think businesses that complain about not getting funding could do with looking in the mirror and realising they are not viable for funding! Employers’ PRSI is a very negative tax and an obvious barrier to creating jobs. However, I’m also realistic and I accept InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

036 InBusiness Q4 2016_Small Business.indd 37

the Government needs to balance the books. IB: Could you tell us about your Kilimanjaro equipment-lending programme, which was shortlisted for a Chambers Ireland CSR Award? JMcM: The programme was set up to help the porters who work on Kilimanjaro. At 5,896m, climbing Kilimanjaro is a serious challenge for all climbers especially the porters who have the additional task of carrying heavy loads on the mountain. To add to that many of the porters are poorly clothed for the job so we reach out to our clients and wider network for donations of second hand clothing. We are constantly looking for more equipment so if any readers have unwanted outdoor

clothing it would be great if they could get in touch. CSR is really important to us and a central part of our business. A wide-reaching CSR policy benefits your team, the environment, the community and your corporate image, which has a direct impact on business growth. Any business owner with an ounce of social responsibility should have CSR policy in place. IB: Earth’s Edge will be 10 years’ old next year. Where do you see the business going in the next five years? JMcM: I really want to grow the business and I’m full of ideas. I would love to offer trips and adventure events in Ireland but the smart money is in scaling what we currently do. Luckily I have a great team and wife who are all well

able to give me a good slap when I lose focus on what we are doing! We have been offered significant funding to expand into the UK, which would result in rapid growth. It sounds great, but with that growth brings lots of growing pains. As a business owner its important to define what you want from your life and then direct your business to deliver that. Our plan in the next five years is to grow between 20-30 per cent per annum and run more epic trips that no other operators in the world offer. The challenge is to find the people crazy enough to come with us!

37

21/12/2016 10:50


MENTORS

FROM OUR CORRESPONDENT John Simpson has been at the heart of breaking news across the globe for close to 50 years. “I actually tend to get a bit nasty at the BBC with anyone who suggests it might be time to stop,” he tells JOSEPH O’CONNOR.

W

hen it comes to careers, John Simpson has had a good innings. At 72 he is one of the BBC’s most distinguished journalists having worked for the British broadcaster since he was 25, joining as a sub-editor in the radio newsroom. Lancashire-born Simpson made a name for himself early on as a political reporter and got his first foreign posting in 1972 when he was sent to Dublin. That’s where he cut his teeth as a foreign correspondent and Ireland is a place for which he has held much affinity ever since. “I had my honeymoon from my first marriage in Ireland, in Co Cork, and that really was just by chance,” he says. “Ireland was always in my consciousness. My grandfather lived there for a while, my grandmother was born there, which is how I was able to obtain Irish citizenship.” His Irish citizenship has stood him in good stead. On numerous occasions 38

038 InBusiness Q4 2016_Mentors.indd 38

throughout his career, his Éire passport helped him gain entry into some of the trickier destinations – ones where a British passport wasn’t welcome – such as Myanmar at the height of its military dictatorship. Ireland was also a place not too far from home where he could ply his trade. “It was my first foot on the ladder as a foreign correspondent so I have a lot of affection for it, in every way,” he says. Simpson has taken up residency here on and off for the last 25 years and has a house in Dalkey, Co Dublin. For his most recent visit in October he was the guest speaker at the Dublin Chamber annual dinner. Simpson’s career is glittered with success having picked up numerous awards and distinctions along the way. He has written two novels and at least 12 works of non-fiction. Some of his more notorious assignments saw him interview titans of global politics such as Aung San Suu Kyi, Saddam Hussein InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

09/01/2017 11:21


Jen Murphy

MENTORS

InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

038 InBusiness Q4 2016_Mentors.indd 39

39

21/12/2016 11:12


MENTORS

and Muammar Gaddafi, and one where he became the first journalist to enter the liberated Afghan capital Kabul in 2001. He was commended, more recently, for his work reporting on the extremist Islamist movement Boko Haram in Nigeria and the story of 276 schoolgirls abducted by the militant group. Much of this reporting is documented in his new book, We Chose to Speak of War and Strife, a memoir of his own role as a foreign correspondent as well as a reflection on other distinguished names who have reported overseas in the last century. A DYING TRADE? Reading Simpson’s book about him and other foreign journalists on assignment in far-flung places conjures up images of a bygone era. Scenes where reporters sip on G&Ts at ambassadors’ residences are like something straight out of a Graham Greene novel. But a whole lot has changed in recent years around the way the media reports its international news, particularly with the emergence of social media. Then there’s the widespread budget cuts across major news corporations, leading to the near-demise of Western foreign correspondents being posted abroad. In their place, local nationals who were born and raised in the country often report on the story – such as the ‘citizen journalism’ we see coming out of Syria right now. Or there’s the freelancer, hungry for adventure, striving to break a story from the frontline, but who too often struggles to turn it into a living. More worryingly, many media agencies now simply rely on the news wires to report on international affairs, which are not always the most informed and reliable source. So is the foreign correspondent an endangered species in the current news industry? And if Simpson was starting out again would he pursue the same career? “I don’t know that I would,” he declares. “I mean, if I was starting out now, I wouldn’t be certain that the job of a foreign correpsondent, perhaps even the job of a television or radio journalist, would continue for much longer. Newspaper journalists, the same. We’ve reached a moment – I never thought this would happen – when the very future of our industry is in question.” This is made all the more concerning, according to Simpson, during a year when the Oxford Dictionary’s word of 2016 went to ‘post-truth’ – an adjective defined as ‘relating to or denoting circumstances in which objective facts are less influential in shaping public opinion than appeals to emotion and personal belief ’. “When the politicians tell lies just as a matter of course, when you get all these mad stories entering the national conciousness – as happened both in Britain during Brexit, and in the US during the [presidential] election – any number of myths, lies and falsehoods put forward, then, of course, you can say the job of the journalist – the good journalist – becomes more important, but I’m afraid you can also say these things are in danger of taking over altogether, and we’ve got to watch out for it,” he says. Some do, however, see the new landscape for foreign reporting as more of an opportunity than a threat; a chance to renew the relationship between the eyewitness reporter and the consumer of news. The foreign correspondent might no longer be the sole voice in a fully connected world, but they can still break through the noise and be viewed as the most trusted one. Simpson does 40

038 InBusiness Q4 2016_Mentors.indd 40

JOHN SIMPSON ON... THE WORK HE IS MOST PROUD OF I’d be fairly self-critical so there’s not very much that I’ve done that I don’t think I could have done better, more intelligently or more courageously. I can always see gaps, holes in what I did, but I’m proud of some of the work. I’m just kind of grateful that I got away with it. And that’s still pretty much the case! A WORLD WITH TRUMP AS US PRESIDENT It’s impossible to know at the moment. Friends of his, with whom I’ve talked to, say that somewhere in there is a really sensible, thoughtful bloke. Absurdly vain, childishly silly about many things, but nevertheless, he’s got real ideas, and he’s moderately sensible. I’m afraid we haven’t been seeing that side of him. If it’s true, maybe we will. HOW HE WOULD LIKE TO BE REMEMBERED I’m an adventurer I suppose. I like serious journalism, I like to think seriously about the news, but also, like quite a few of my colleagues, I can’t resist that lurch into the unknown, heading off into the wide blue yonder. Something that described me in those ways wouldn’t be inaccurate. Of course I’d like to be reported with kindness and pleasantness, but if people can’t be pleasant, you’d hope that at least they can be accurate.

InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

21/12/2016 11:13


MENTORS

John Simpson pictured at this year’s Dublin Chamber annual dinner at the Convention Centre

“TO BE

SERIOUS ABOUT IT,

make some suggestions in his book as to how we can address the problem of funding foreign corespondents, one being through a government licence fee, like the one that funds the BBC in the UK or RTÉ in Ireland. Undoubtedly, it’s a wider debate that will rage on. RAT-LIKE CUNNING For the ones still determined to carve out a career in foreign reporting within an evermore challenging environment, there are some obvious attributes needed in order to make it in the field. When asked what they are, Simpson uses his new book as a reference point and quotes Nicholas Tomalin, a journalist who was tragically killed in 1973 while in Israel covering the Yom Kippur War for the Sunday Times. “The only qualities essential for real success in journalism are rat-like cunning, a plausible manner and a little literary ability.” “There’s some with more literary ability than others and there’s some with InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

038 InBusiness Q4 2016_Mentors.indd 41

YOU’VE GOT TO UNDERSTAND, FIRST OF ALL, YOU DON’T

MAKE MONEY NOWADAYS IN THIS KIND OF JOB. IT’S ALSO REALLY

HARD TO KEEP A STABLE RELATIONSHIP GOING

WHEN YOU’RE TRAVELLING AROUND, AND GOING TO DIFFICULT PLACES.”

more rat-like cunning than others,” advises Simpson, “but you need every one of those three qualities in order to get on.” His advice for anyone considering the move: don’t expect big bucks and don’t presume personal relationships will survive! “To be serious about it, you’ve got to understand, first of all, you don’t make money nowadays in this kind of job. It’s also really hard to keep a stable relationship going when you’re travelling around, and going to difficult places, so you’ve got to understand those things first of all; it’s not comfortable and it’s not very sociable, but there are still plenty of people who would want to do the job, just as I did. You’ve just got to really press on with it, get as close to the action as you possibly can. Much closer than it seems safe or sensible to do, that’s the key. You’ve got to get in there, stay in there, and not get out when everybody gets out, but stay on. If you don’t want an easy family life, if the money doesn’t worry you too much, then you can still have a really good career.” Simpson points to two of his contemporaries who he believes are role models in the profession: Patrick Cockburn and Kim Sengupta, both of The Independent, a newspaper that ceased publishing in print form earlier this year as it was deemed to be no longer commercially viable. “Their work is extraordinarily respected, especially by their colleagues – people like me, people who know the dangers and difficulties of what they do,” says Simpson. ”They of course are among the great ornaments of the profession, so it is possible to do these jobs, but it’s not a normal job where you can retire at 65 on a really nice pension and have a nice big house, enjoy your family life – a lot of those things you have to sacrifice.” On the subject of pensions, does the BBC World Affairs Editor have retirement in his sights? “I actually tend to get a bit nasty at the BBC with anyone who suggests it might be time to stop,” Simpson warns. “Somebody asked me in an interview yesterday was I thinking about it and I got quite cross because I don’t want anybody even thinking about this. While I can move around easily and without pain and I’m healthy, which I am, then I’ll carry on for as long as I possibly can because it’s much too nice to give up. Much too nice.” We Chose to Speak of War and Strife by John Simpson is published by Bloomsbury, hardback, a35. 41

21/12/2016 11:13


FEATURE

SAFETY FIRST

The presence of trained first aid staff in the workplace provides colleagues with the confidence of knowing skilled support is available if an accident or injury occurs on site. CONOR FORREST recently took part in an Occupational First Aid (OFA) course at Dublin Fire Brigade’s O’Brien Training Institute, learning more than he had expected.

I

t’s not an entirely uncommon scenario. An ordinary member of the public is out walking through the city when they see a man collapsing to the ground, complaining of chest pain and discomfort along with shortness of breath. They might panic, unsure of what to do, though they may call the emergency services. Or, if they have been instructed in how to give first aid, they could make the difference between life and death, stabilising the patient before the ambulance arrives. Having been encouraged by a number of people over the past few months to undertake a first aid course, in the event anything might happen at InBUSINESS HQ, I arrived bright and early at Dublin Fire Brigade’s training centre, the O’Brien Training Institute (OBI), on a sunny morning last June alongside six other trainees, all of whom seemed to work in one of the city’s public libraries. My first introduction to this new and nervousness-inducing world was courtesy of our instructor for the day, Hugh Keeley, who joined Dublin Fire Brigade in 1997 and currently serves on C watch in Donnybrook. Despite having studied biology to the Leaving Cert (not by choice), I wondered how I would manage to take in the amount of technical terms and medical information that I was sure would be fired my way throughout the day. I needn’t have worried. Comprising a mix of practical and easily digestible information on the intricacies of patient assessment, respiratory emergencies and cardiac first response, the course was broken down in a manner that us ordinary folk on the street could understand without much difficulty. Keeley was full of interesting information and anecdotes throughout the day, including the possibility of using a crisp bag to stop air sucking in and to allow blood to drain out following a stab wound to the ribs or lungs, albeit in the absence of a more conventional medical solution. First up was an introduction to the world of the first aider, 42

042 InBusiness Q4 2016_First Aid.indd 42

from the responsibility of the first aider to regulations and legislation, and we were warned about acting negligently and the need to secure a scene before you begin your work, a lesson which is undoubtedly part and parcel of everyday life in DFB, but may be less than second nature to us civilians. Next was what we had all been waiting for, the practical demonstrations – checking for a response, carrying out primary and secondary surveys, hauling our makeshift patients into the recovery positions, and best practice when dealing with a patient suffering from spinal injuries, among others. SOBERING LESSONS Perhaps one of the more striking lessons learned that day was about fibrillation, and the actual use of the defibrillator. From the point of view of the general public, it’s probably fair to say that the defibrillator is seen as a tool to fix all manner of problems. One of the attendees was particularly shocked by the revelation that the heart itself is not InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

21/12/2016 11:46


FEATURE

BENEFITS TO YOUR BUSINESS First aid training gives your team the confidence and ability to react straightaway to a workplace incident, injury or illness.

restarted by the defibrillator; the defibrillator stops ventricular fibrillation which is a useless quivering of the heart that results in no output – blame Hollywood for that misconception. Speaking to me afterwards, Keeley was very vocal on the need for people on the street or within a business to learn first aid skills. “They are vital. They are the first three links in the chain of survival, and what we do adds to what they have done already. If they’ve got stuck in and they know first aid and they’re able to do as much as they can for the sick, ill or injured person before we arrive, it makes a massive difference to the outcome of the health and wellbeing of the patient. If nobody does anything for the patient or if they’re just left lying on the ground, when we arrive we have a hard job to make things right again,” he states. “The first aider is vital and it’s very important that [they are] in the workplace, in schools and community centres etc. And that they have the equipment – ideally, if the budget will run to it, if there’s a defibrillator in the centre or the school or the workplace, the InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

042 InBusiness Q4 2016_First Aid.indd 43

first aider can start using that long before we even get there, and it might make the difference between life or death.” As for the course itself, Keeley notes that anybody can do it, with just a few simple prerequisites. “You don’t need anything apart from an enthusiasm and a willingness to learn,” he adds. “So long as you come with the right attitude then we can show you all of the skills over the three days, and you’ll learn a lot.” While the librarians continued their studies for another two days, my first day was also unfortunately my last. However, it’s fair to say that in that day I learned more about first aid and life-saving techniques than I have in my entire life, from the correct way to do CPR to the use of aspirin in cardiac cases. I hope to return some day in the not so distant future to complete the full three-day course and receive my certificate as a qualified first aider – from what I’ve seen and learned, it could be worth its weight in gold.

It can reduce the number of workplace accidents in the future, as workers who have undertaken training are generally more safety conscious and spot risks and potential incidents before they happen. It can build clarity and confidence and reduce the chance of becoming overwhelmed by fear and confusion during an emergency. It educates staff about the exact content of the first aid kit and are able to enable them to maintain and use supplies effectively during an emergency. It offers the chance to team with colleagues, to build rapport and team building skills which are helpful across a wide range of situations.

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21/12/2016 11:46


BOOK EXTRACT

“IT WAS AN UNUSUAL

DINNER-PARTY ICEBREAKER.” In this year’s Financial Times and McKinsey Business Book of the Year, The Man Who Knew: The Life and Times of Alan Greenspan, Sebastian Mallaby presents a nuanced assessment of one of the most influential economic statesmen of the 20th century. In this extract, the author details Greenspan’s first encounter with one very significant newcomer to the world stage.

n a Monday evening in September 1975, an improbable, schoolmarm-like figure appeared upon the stage at the St. Regis-Sheraton in New York. Speaking with an accent, she lectured her audience that the pursuit of equality was a mirage – it was far more important to create wealth than to distribute it. The drive for so-called fairness was the product of ignoble sentiments: the envy of the underclass on the one hand, the guilt of the wealthy on the other. “Let our children grow tall,” 44

044 InBusiness Q4 2016_Book Extract.indd 44

the lecturer declared, “and some taller than others if they have the ability to do so.” The speaker might have been Ayn Rand, but the accent was British rather than Russian; and the bracing woman at the podium was the recently elevated leader of Britain’s opposition Conservative Party, Mrs. Margaret Thatcher. New York was not sure what to make of this newcomer to the world stage, with her startling political philosophy and her baby blond hair. “The most operative word is lady – old-fashioned, proper, traditional lady,” said a woman who heard Thatcher at a private luncheon, “she is a flower among the thorns.” “She was prettier than I expected, softer, younger,” agreed Barbara Walters, the rising queen of television news, who interviewed Thatcher on NBC’s Today show. But the Conservative leader was not all soft. She carried a treatise by Hayek in her handbag.

She was fond of tough quotes attributed to Abraham Lincoln: “You cannot strengthen the weak by weakening the strong.” And she bristled impatiently at unserious small talk. When Barbara Walters warned her, during a brief chat before their interview, that she might have to digress from political topics to the question of how it felt to be a woman in such a high post, Thatcher shook her head and sighed, “Isn’t it too bad that there aren’t more women around who feel as we do.” After doing the rounds in New York, the Conservative leader flew to Washington to meet the president and his entourage. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger had instructed Ford earlier that Thatcher was “a great gal,” but “not experienced at all in foreign policy.” Ford and his national security aide, Brent Scowcroft, formed a similar impression. “She was very warm, very friendly, very composed,” Scowcroft remembered. “We didn’t see her as a heavyweight who was going to change the course of anything.” Katharine Graham, the publisher of the Washington Post, was not impressed by this grocer’s daughter with intellectual pretensions: “I think she’s just a vulgar fishwife,” she confided (or so InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

21/12/2016 11:17


BOOK EXTRACT

she thought) to the wife of a British newspaper owner. But on her third evening in Washington, Thatcher appeared at a British embassy dinner in a black velvet evening suit and spoke from the heart about free markets and liberty. To a certain type of listener, she was more rousing by far than any British leader since Churchill. One such listener was sitting right beside her. As the senior member of the Ford administration at the British embassy dinner, the chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers had been placed next to Thatcher, and she wasted no time in getting to the point with him. “Tell me, Chairman Greenspan,” she asked, “why is it that we in Britain cannot calculate M3?” It was an unusual dinner-party icebreaker. M3 was a broad measure of the money supply that counted deposits at S&Ls as well as bank deposits and cash; and quite apart from its arcane nature, the timing of this question was remarkable. Central banks had only just begun to publish monetary measures, and the Fed would not commit itself firmly to a money-supply target for another four years; to know about M3 in the fall of 1975 was to belong to a rarefied club of hard-money believers. But, however unlikely her question, Thatcher had unlocked her shy neighbour. For the rest of the evening, the two got along famously. After the dinner, Greenspan made the short trip from Embassy Row on Massachusetts Avenue to his apartment at the Watergate. Kaye Pullen had let herself in and was waiting for him in the bare living room – Alan had done nothing to make the place feel like home, though by now this had less to do with the fiction that he might resign his job than with his serene indifference to interior decoration. Kaye was used to this routine by now, getting together with Alan after an evening spent separately; although they had been dating for eight months, they were not officially a couple in the eyes of InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

044 InBusiness Q4 2016_Book Extract.indd 45

“IT SOON

BECAME CLEAR WHY ALAN WAS

AGITATED. IT WAS NOT WHAT HE

HAD DRUNK; IT WAS WHOM HE HAD SAT

NEXT TO. IMAGINE, MARGARET THATCHER

This is an extract taken from The Man Who Knew: The Life and Times of Alan Greenspan, reprinted with permission from Bloomsbury.

Washington. But on this particular evening, she could tell that something out of the ordinary had happened. Alan was acting oddly, and for a moment she wondered whether the ambassador’s butler had slipped him an extra gin and tonic. On further reflection, she realised that this theory was implausible: Alan’s relationship with alcohol was as proper and controlled as his relationship with people. In all their months together, there had been just one occasion when Alan had ordered so much as a single drink at lunch – they had been eating at the White House mess, and Alan had broken with habit by asking for a beer to go with the Mexican food on that day’s menu. But even this not terribly wild impulse had soon been squashed. Seeing Arthur Burns take a seat nearby, Alan had summoned the waiter back to his table and quietly told him that there would be no beer after all. Alan and Kaye talked – it was the usual evening debriefing – and it soon became clear why Alan was

HAD ASKED ABOUT M3!”

agitated. It was not what he had drunk; it was whom he had sat next to. Imagine, Margaret Thatcher had asked about M3! An obscure measure of the money supply embraced by followers of Milton Friedman! Which American leader would have heard of such a thing, let alone admit to an interest in the midst of a grand dinner party? After that get-to-know-you opener, Mrs. Thatcher had engaged Alan in a debate about market economics and the problems of the West: she talked like Ayn Rand, but she was likely to become the next prime minister of Britain. Forced to choose between his libertarian principles and his urge to be at the center, Greenspan was capable of tempering his views, as his advice on Ford’s tax rebate had demonstrated. But in his ideal world, Greenspan would be both a faithful libertarian and an influential power player – and sitting next to Thatcher had allowed him to dream that this combination might be possible. Kaye had seldom seen Alan so excited. 45

21/12/2016 11:17


IN CONVERSATION:

WATCH

THIS SPACE Founder and director of Space Technology Ireland, Prof Susan McKenna-Lawlor, talks to VALERIE JORDAN about discovering her love of science, exploiting the business opportunities presented by space and launching the first Irish spacecraft.

Instantly, she says, she was so bewitched by the beauty of science that she never returned to music, something for which the science world must be hugely grateful. On completing her MSc, McKennaLawlor was offered a scholarship for the Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies. She was trained by Prof Mervyn Ellison, the then World Reporter in Solar Activity for the International Geophysical Year, studying how the earth responds to solar disturbances – a discipline now known as space weather. Thereafter, she went to the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor to work for 46

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Photo courtesy of Inspirefest and Conor McCabe Photography

usan McKenna-Lawlor, Ireland’s leading astrophysicist, professor emerita at NUI Maynooth and director of Space Technology Ireland Ltd., almost went down a very different non-scientific path. She hadn’t studied science at school and intended on pursuing music at UCD. However, when leafing through the course brochures she realised her education so far had been unbalanced and decided to “even things up” by studying experimental physics.

Prof Susan McKenna-Lawlor speaking at Inspirefest in 2015

InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

21/12/2016 11:45


IN CONVERSATION

a PhD in Solar Physics. At that time the Americans had just gained the capability to send humans to the moon and, as Ann Arbor was an important national centre for studying the sun, NASA’s trainee astronauts were sent there to learn about the risks posed to crewed spaceflight by solar activity. McKenna-Lawlor’s training in Dublin was very relevant to this. “I found myself lecturing to these trainee astronauts with special emphasis on the hazards posed to crewed missions by the unpredictability of energetic solar particle emissions. Little by little, I was drawn into participation in several NASA-related missions so that when I returned to Dublin, I had enough experience to be appointed Principal Investigator (PI) for Ireland’s first experiment aboard a European Space Agency spacecraft.” This was the ‘Giotto Mission’ which flew through the head of Halley’s comet at 68km/second in 1986. As PI, McKenna-Lawlor was responsible for the scientific, technical and administrative aspects of Ireland’s experiment, EPONA. During the lead-up to the launch of Giotto, she and certain other members of the Irish EPONA team underwent advanced training in constructing and testing space-destined hardware at the Max Planck institute in Lindau, Germany. “This experience indicated to me that, if my group was to advance in space-related business and involve further young Irish scientists and engineers in this exciting activity, it would be necessary to set up a commercial company to build spacequalified hardware.” In 1985, McKenna-Lawlor received sponsorship to set up and staff Space Technology Ireland (STIL), an independent entity located on the campus of Maynooth University. McKenna-Lawlor has acted as director of STIL since its foundation and overseen the design and construction of hardware (with embedded software) for missions launched or to be launched by six major international space agencies, namely NASA, ESA and the space agencies of China, India, Japan and Russia. InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

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While McKenna-Lawlor would not rank the importance of instruments built at STIL over the years since all of them were for ‘flagship missions’, the one that became most renowned was the Electrical Support System/ESS which was designed and built for ESA’s Rosetta/Philae Lander Mission, one of the most ambitious space adventures of recent years, which chased, orbited and deployed a lander onto the surface of comet 67P. “The ESS handled the transmission of commands from the Rosetta spacecraft to the lander during both the cruise phase to, and while at, comet 67P,” says McKenna-Lawlor. “It further received and formatted the precious scientific data recorded on the comet’s nucleus by the lander experiments. Without the nominal performance of the ESS there would have been no scientific results from Philae, which cost the European states in excess of 220 million to construct and land on the comet. The true value of what was achieved by Philae comprises the pioneering results from its individual experiments that continue to illuminate our human knowledge of solar system formation and pre-biotic chemistry.” CONFLUENCE Currently McKenna-Lawlor is developing plans for the construction, launch and operation of an Irish spacecraft. She calls this project Cumar, which is an Irish word for confluence, since it is envisioned to bring together science, technology and the humanities. She is excited not only about this pioneering activity but also about what the availability of a spacecraft could mean for the Irish space industry. “At the present time several Irish companies are developing products for space applications, for example, solar cells and various kinds of coatings,” she says. “These products must be space qualified, ideally aboard a national spacecraft. Further, the availability of Cumar and followup missions would enable the space community to expand to exploit the many commercial niches that currently provide lucrative business

The prototype electronic box designed and constructed by STIL for the PICAM (Planetary Ion Camera) experiment which will shortly be launched aboard the European Space Agency’s BepiColombo mission to planet Mercury

opportunities for suitably qualified operatives. The hands-on opportunities foreseen to become available for Irish engineers and scientists to participate in spacecraft construction and operations, in association with the development of Cumar, can provide an important forward step in building up required national expertise in space engineering.” In 2016, it could be expected that most female leaders will have some comments on the issues facing women in areas like science, but McKenna-Lawlor doesn’t dwell on this. “I do not think of myself as a woman in a male-dominated industry; I consider myself to be a scientist cum engineer participating in state-of-the-art experiments carried out in challenging environments in space. No one will ask me if the instrument delivered for a particular task has been brought by a male or female hand. What is relevant is: does it work as expected and is it in time?” And the next frontier for the global space industry? “In recent years it has come to be realised that the age-old dream to establish a sustained human presence on the moon, Mars and beyond is not something that any one nation has the resources to realise alone. This is something that requires cooperation on a global scale and I am excited to see how plans in that regard are presently developing internationally.” 47

21/12/2016 11:45


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cushmanwakefield.ie 20/12/2016 15:48


CHAMBERS NEWS

A ROUND UP OF ALL THE NEWS AND EVENTS FROM THE CHAMBER NETWORK NATIONWIDE

CHAMBERS

CATCH UP LEADERS DEBATE IN SHANNON THREE DYNAMIC LEADERS FROM THE WORLDS OF BUSINESS AND SPORT took to the stage at Shannon Chamber’s President’s Lunch in Dromoland Castle Hotel on December 9th to be quizzed by broadcaster Seamus Hennessy on all things leadership.Tipperary hurling manager Michael Ryan joined GECAS general manager Sean Flannery and Julie Dickerson, president of Shannon Chamber and managing director of Shannon Engine Support, to offer open and frank opinions on a range of issues concerning leadership such as: whether it’s innate or learnt; traits lacking in leaders today, driving success in a business or for a team, leadership styles, promoting leaders from within, and maintaining motivation and inspiration when faced with obstacles or disappointment. Shannon Chamber CEO Helen Downes described all three speakers as truly inspirational and the moderator, Seamus Hennessy, as excellent in drawing the best out of the panel.

CHAMBER COMMENT “The ongoing viability of IoTs will be to a large extent dependent on how effectively they can meet learner and industry needs in a rapidly evolving economy.” Mark O’Mahoney, Director of Policy and Communications, Chamber Ireland, responds to findings of a report by the Higher Education Authority which highlighted serious challenges to the viability of many of Ireland’s Institutes of Technology.

DUNDALK VOUCHER SCHEME A ‘RESOUNDING SUCCESS’

Sean Flannery, Executive Vice-President Technical, GECAS; Julie Dickerson, President, Shannon Chamber; Michael Ryan, Tipperary hurling manager; and Helen Downes, CEO, Shannon Chamber

InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

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Michael Gaynor, President of Dundalk Chamber, announced in early December that sales of the Shop Local gift vouchers had hit a record of a400,000 since their launch in 2015. Now with over 220 local shops and businesses redeeming Shop Local gift vouchers, they are clearly a welcome addition to retailers in the town. “They have been a resounding success,” said Gaynor. “The Chamber hopes to hit sales of a500,000 and is asking the people of Dundalk to get behind this initiative.”

49

21/12/2016 11:18


CHAMBERS NEWS

KILKENNY BUSINESS AWARDS

KILDARE COMPANIES HONOURED

Ned Nolan, owner of Hermitage Genetics, Overall Business of the Year, with his wife Anne

K

ilkenny Chamber of Commerce and main sponsor, Glanbia, unveiled the winners of the Kilkenny Business Awards 2016 on November 19th at Lyrath Estate Hotel. From over 250 nominations, 46 local enterprises were selected as finalists, and Kilkenny based animal genetics company, Hermitage Genetics was named overall Business of the Year for 2016. Speaking at the event, John Hurley, CEO of Kilkenny Chamber of Commerce, said: “We are delighted to see so many new faces among the finalists, a real indication that business in Kilkenny is thriving. To finalise in these awards is a significant achievement and congratulations is due to each of the businesses and individuals represented here tonight.” Go to www.kilkennychamber.ie to see the full list of winners and learn about their fantastic success stories. For more from John Hurley and Kilkenny Chamber go to our Q&A slot on page 53.

NAVAN NAMED FRIENDLIEST TOWN IN IRELAND Meath’s county town of Navan has been named Ireland’s friendliest town, having won the prestigious title at the Retail Excellence Ireland Awards. The sell-out event was attended by more than 500 Irish retail industry executives. The Mayor of Navan, Cllr Francis Deane, said he felt very proud that the town had been recognised as the friendliest place to shop and thanked Meath County Council for making the original submission to Retail Excellence Ireland, in particular Caroline Power of the Meath Economic and Enterprise team, Kevin Stewart, Director of Services at Navan Municipal District, and Navan Chamber of Commerce for their support.

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Alison Redmond and Jennifer Forster of North Kildare Chamber attending the Kildare Business Awards

Over 300 business leaders turned out for another successful Kildare Business Awards, held on November 18th at The K Club. The event recognises the entrepreneurialism, innovation, diversity and talent of businesses across all sectors of the county. The recipient of the Outstanding Contribution to Business Award for 2016 was Stan McCarthy, CEO of the Kerry Group. In accepting the award to a standing ovation, McCarthy thanked the Chamber and the business community in Kildare for the welcome the Kerry Group has received since it opened its doors in Millennium Park in 2013. Other award winners on the night included Finlay Motor Group (Business of the Year), Intel (Corporate Social Responsibility Award) and Finlay Motor Group (SME of the Year).

InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

21/12/2016 13:44


CHAMBERS NEWS

APPOINTMENT Dún Laoghaire Rathdown Chamber has announced the appointment of Andrew Mernagh as its Marketing & Communications Manager. Mernagh is an accomplished communications professional with 15 years’ experience in notfor-profit and healthcare communications. Prior to the DLR Chamber, he was Communications Manager for the National Association of General Practitioners.

CHAMBER CAPTION Pictured at the Dún Laoghaire Rathdown Chamber President’s Lunch on December 2nd were Mark Fitzpatrick from Fitzpatrick Castle Hotel, Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation, Mary Mitchell O’Connor TD and Pat Neill, President of Dún Laoghaire Rathdown Chamber, holding charity fundraiser collectable PJ the Penguin for the Peter McVerry Trust. Picture: Conor McCabe Photography

PIETA HOUSE FOUNDER ADDRESSES WATERFORD EVENT

CHAMBER COMMENT “The figures released today remind us of the impact strikes have on businesses and households as 14,270 days were lost to industrial disputes in the third quarter alone.” Chambers Ireland CEO Ian Talbot responding to CSO figures on Q3 2016 industrial disputes released on November 17th.

InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

049 InBusiness Q4 2016_CS_Chamber News.indd 51

Maria Clifford, Liberty Blue Estate Agents; Laurent Borla, Chamber President; Senator Joan Freeman; Mayor of the City and County of Waterford, Cllr Adam Wyse; Regina Mangan, Liberty Blue Estate Agents

O

ver 250 members of the Waterford business community gathered at the Tower Hotel on November 11th for a successful Waterford Chamber Annual Dinner. Guest speaker at the event, founder of Pieta House Joan Freeman, told the audience that the people of Waterford are an example of a community coming together.

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21/12/2016 11:19


CHAMBERS NEWS SPOTLIGHTS

Employees in

THE SPOTLIGHT One4all has announced the winners of the 2016 Spotlights.

O

ne4all, in partnership with Chambers Ireland, has announced the winners of the annual One4all Spotlights. The awards, set up to celebrate and reward employee excellence nationwide, were judged by an independent panel, who named three winners and three runners-up in the provinces of Leinster, Munster and Connaught. The overall winner of the Spotlights was Justyna Sledzik of Maypark House Nursing Home in Waterford. Justyna was commended for her commitment to ensuring that residents of the nursing home are kept in high spirits, even coming in on her days off to help entertain. The judges were very impressed with her contribution to her workplace and she was chosen as the clear winner of the 2016 Overall Spotlight Award. The judges were also pleased to note that a winner of a 2015 Spotlight Award, Ollie Stapleton, also works at Maypark Nursing Home, highlighting the excellence of the home in terms of employee performance and recognition. Additional winners of the 2016 Spotlights included Dara O’Callaghan of Q-Park Ireland, named as the winner in the Connaught province, and Lar Murphy of Byrdan Limited, named as the winner in the Leinster province. Both entrants stood out for their hard work and initiative. The Spotlight runners-up were Declan O’Connor in Co Mayo, Patrick Jenkins in Co Dublin and Lorraine Flanagan in Co Kerry.

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Commenting on the winners, Michael Dawson, CEO of One4all, said: “The quality of entrants to this year’s Spotlights has been exceptional. It is heartwarming to see employers and co-workers alike recognising the contributions of their peers, and we are delighted to reward these employees – and at no expense to the companies. At One4all, we believe that employees are at Justyna Sledzik of Maypark House the heart of every Nursing Home, business, and we the overall winner are proud to help of the 2016 SMEs in Ireland Spotlights shine a light on the great work being done daily. We believe this is a brilliant way to deepen relationships and to encourage employee loyalty, particularly coming into the expensive holiday season.” In a One4all survey carried out earlier this year, 58 per cent of workers said feeling valued by an employer is what keeps them most engaged in their jobs. More than half – 52 per cent – said that when choosing an employer in their field, a reputation for treating staff well was the most important factor. The Spotlights recognise those employees

who have made an outstanding contribution in the workplace over the past 12 months, while also recognising that employers within the SME sector may not be in a position to offer financial rewards to staff. One4all Rewards help businesses of all sizes recognise and reward their employees. Businesses can reward their staff up to a500 in One4all gift cards completely tax-free through the Government’s Benefit in Kind scheme. Call One4all Rewards on 01 870 8181 to order, or order online at www.one4allrewards.ie.

InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

21/12/2016 11:19


CHAMBER Q&A JOHN HURLEY

From Local

to National Recently appointed to the board of Chambers Ireland, John Hurley, CEO of Kilkenny Chamber, tells InBUSINESS how a busy man gets things done. Q: You have been CEO of Kilkenny Chamber for almost three years now. How is Chamber life?

A: Challenging, exciting, dynamic and satisfying are the words I would use. There is really no end to what one can get involved in under the Chamber banner. The issues and initiatives that we engage with are wide and varied and rarely have an easy or obvious solution. A busy and proactive Chamber can make such a difference and a hugely positive contribution to the business dynamic in an area and this is certainly true of the Kilkenny Chamber.

new housebuilding plans in the coming years. This is a burning issue for Kilkenny right now and Kilkenny Chamber, together with the local authority, continues to lobby Government to address this matter.

Q: In terms of leading the Chamber, where do you draw your inspiration from?

Q: What are the burning

A: I have held a variety of leadership and management positions throughout my career and that wealth of experience helps inform my decisions in the Chamber on a daily basis. I am also fortunate to be able to align myself with the many successful people on the board and their support and direction is very important.

issues currently facing businesses in Kilkenny?

Q: What accomplishments

A: There are many positive stories unfolding in Kilkenny at the moment. The 14-acre former Smithwick’s brewery site in the city centre presents fantastic development opportunities and is attracting great interest from potential investors. However, we have an inadequate supply of houses and insufficient

InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

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are you most proud of to date?

A: The recent period of recession was a huge challenge for many businesses and Kilkenny Chamber was severely impacted in those years. My job has been to rebuild the Chamber both financially and in terms of its reputation and perceived relevance to the

business community. I am proud to say that we have experienced consistent double digit growth yearon-year both in terms of revenues and membership numbers since I took over the role as CEO and we are now at the point where we are being proactively approached by businesses asking can they join our membership.

Q: What is the most valuable advice you’ve been given?

A: “If you want something done, ask a busy man!” I have always found that the busier I am, the more I can achieve and it was in this context that I accepted the privilege of Chairmanship of the South East Region Chambers Co earlier this year. More recently, I was invited on to the Board of Chambers Ireland and I am looking forward to working with commitment in this new role. Through all of these engagements, the remit of the Kilkenny Chamber of Commerce has extended from local to regional, and ultimately, to a national level. For its size, Kilkenny Chamber certainly boxes above its weight!

John Hurley, CEO, Kilkenny Chamber

Q: Looking ahead to 2017, what are the key objectives of the Chamber?

A: Kilkenny has a great future ahead of it but nothing can be taken for granted. The Chamber has an important role to play in supporting business in this challenging environment. Through 2017 Kilkenny Chamber will continue to grow its membership and strengthen its connections with business decision makers to ensure that we can deliver the supports businesses need throughout the year.

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CHAMBERS NEWS

TRADING WITH TRUMP Emma Kerins, International Affairs Executive, Chambers Ireland, asks where to next for a ‘small open economy’ with Donald Trump as US President?

it has yet to be ratified by Congress, where Speaker Paul Ryan has said that any such ratification would not take place until after the inauguration of the next president.

CAMPAIGN CLAIMS

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n the hours following the election of Donald Trump as the next President of the United States of America, European Commissioner for Trade Cecelia Malmström was interviewed on Swedish radio about what she thought this development would mean for trade and specifically for the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP), the EU-US trade deal currently being negotiated. She replied that although TTIP flew under the radar throughout the course of the election campaigns, the President-elect’s campaign pledges seem to indicate a more closed America, with protectionist policies likely to be implemented. However she noted that “traditionally there’s a certain difference between an election campaign and what happens later in practice”. In the days and weeks that have followed the US presidential election, there has been much speculation on precisely what a Trump administration will mean both for US tax and trade policy, but also for the larger global economy. Central to the Obama administration’s policy priorities was to advance both the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), and TTIP with the European Union. Although the TPP was finalised and signed by all sides earlier this year,

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If we are to believe claims made throughout the Republican campaign, then it is likely that President Trump might take steps such as leaving the North Atlantic Free Trade Agreement, exiting the WTO, opposing the ratification of TPP, on the grounds

While it may not be possible to “Brexit-proof” (or indeed Trump-proof) the Irish economy, we can take some steps to protect business from the full impact of these risks.

that it is bad for business, punishing US companies that base their operations overseas and introducing heavy tariffs on Chinese goods entering the US. Yet, in the words of Cecelia Malmström, history teaches us that campaign pledges are not always realised once candidates take office. However, if we were to pay heed to the more protectionist polices espoused by the newly elected president, what would this mean for Ireland? Since negotiations for a trade deal between the United States and the European Union were announced in 2013, Chambers Ireland has advocated

for an ambitious trade agreement that would drive growth, increase investment and lead to the creation of jobs. Ireland, due to the strong trading relationship it currently enjoys with the US, would benefit more than double any other EU member state. Following on from the UK decision to leave the EU, Irish business will need to find alternative markets to the UK for their products. Should a trade deal be agreed, the US would have been an ideal replacement market, particularly for SMEs. While TTIP was not an election issue in the same way that the TPP was, it might be fair to make the assumption that if a Trump administration plans to abandon the TPP agreement, then it would not continue to negotiate for a deal with the European Union. Tax was also a big feature of the US election campaign, where Trump advisors suggested that they may look at reforming the US tax code and cut US corporate tax rates to as low as 15 per cent. If this were to happen, it might discourage American companies from continuing to invest in Ireland. Although, tax reform has long been promised in the US, the Republicans now control the White House, Congress and the Senate. So, should the political will exist to change American tax policy, then it is more likely to take place within the coming two years than it has been over the past number of decades.

THE PROTECTIONIST THREAT Any US shift in trade and tax policy could have a major impact on small economies like Ireland. Protectionism,

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CHAMBERS NEWS

which drives market turbulence, will impact the global economy and will hurt exporters. While it’s possible that Donald Trump may be a very different president to the one he pledged to be during the campaign, talk of increased protectionism does not inspire confidence amongst the business community. Speaking following the election results on November 9th, Chambers Ireland Chief Executive Ian Talbot noted: “The result is very disappointing from the perspective that President-elect Trump in particular espoused protectionist policies which, if followed through, will severely harm any ambitions the EU has of finalising the TTIP trade agreement. “That being said, TTIP wasn’t referenced in the campaign in the same way that President Obama’s TPP was, therefore we would remain optimistic that President-elect Trump and his administration will keep an

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open mind once he takes office. To turn our backs on this agreement now would be a terrible waste of enormous effort expended by both negotiating teams in the last two years.” The risks posed to the Irish (and global economy) following the election of the new American president are part of a broader trend where countries are beginning to look increasingly inwards and abandon efforts to build new trading partnerships. With opposition to the Comprehensive Economic Trade Agreement (CETA) with Canada growing across Europe and with the UK committing itself to a “hard” Brexit, which may result in them leaving the Single Market and the Customs Unions, this leaves economies like Ireland severely exposed, with access to new markets curtailed and the prospect of new investment likely to be much more limited in the future. In the face of such risks, what can Irish business do to prepare for and mitigate against these threats? While it

may not be possible to “Brexit-proof” (or indeed Trump-proof) the Irish economy, we can take some steps to protect business from the full impact of these risks. For example, Government should prioritise maintaining the competitiveness of our economy by rapidly investing in infrastructure. Government can also support business by introducing financial supports for exporting SMEs, like an export working capital scheme, which provides additional trade finance to SMEs wanting to process new orders or service new clients. Last of all, our elected representatives must continue to support the European Commission’s trade strategy. Access to new markets will be absolutely necessary for both our indigenous and multinational companies in the years to come. For more information on our work to promote trade and investment on behalf of Irish business, please visit our website at www.chambers.ie.

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CHAMBERS NEWS EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT OF ENTERPRISES

INSIDE EUROPE The recent European Parliament of Enterprises gave representatives of the Chamber Network a unique insight into how one of the most powerful bodies in Europe goes about its business.

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n October 13th, Chambers Ireland and a delegation of representatives from the Irish business community participated in the European Parliament of Enterprises (EPE) in Brussels. The EPE is organised by Eurochambres, with the support of the European Parliament, once every two years with the objective of bridging the gap between the EU institutions and entrepreneurs. The event allows business people from all over Europe to become Members of the European Parliament of Enterprises (MEPEs) for one day, giving them a unique insight into how one of the most powerful bodies in Europe goes about its decision making process. The delegation of representatives from the Irish

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business community participated in the debates and votes held on issues including trade, the Single Market, sustainability and skills. In his opening address to the Parliament of Enterprises, Chairman of Eurochambres, Richard Weber, said: “The time has come for businesses to reiterate their capacity and willingness to provide solutions to the challenges of today: globalisation, unemployment, unfair competition, migration and climate change.” Members of the Irish delegation were invited to address the Parliament on two matters of interest to Irish business. Representing South Dublin Chamber, Andrea Carroll spoke during the debate on sustainability and how this principle did not just apply to environmental issues. “Sustainability

is not just about green issues but applies to all businesses, who need to consider the economic, social and environmental sustainability of their business,” she said. “The EU must acknowledge that there are limits to growth in our society and use initiatives such as the circular economy package to lead on this issue without creating a significant regulatory or administrative burden for SMEs.” Replying to her intervention, Director General for Environment Daniel Calleja Crespo said her words were “music to his ears and that sustainability must become a bigger part of business models for the future”. Following on from that, president of the Wexford Chamber of Commerce, Karl Fitzpatrick, spoke to the Parliament on the subject of skills and cited the need to bring the teaching of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) to the forefront of education curricula as it is anticipated that 50 per cent of all jobs in the EU will be in these fields in the future. Embellishing on this point, Fitzpatrick identified the integration of educational play based activities, at each tier of the education system, as being pivotal in developing the STEM skillset necessary to fill these positions. Additionally, he spoke on the need to introduce more apprenticeships, stating that “the creation and rollout of enhanced apprenticeship programmes will be

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CHAMBERS NEWS EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT OF ENTERPRISES

The time has come for businesses to reiterate their capacity and willingness to provide solutions to the challenges of today: globalisation, unemployment, unfair competition, migration and climate change.

one of the key solutions to alleviating the youth unemployment problem, which is so prevalent across Europe. By creating a better balance between the theoretical and practical based element of education programmes, learning would be greatly enhanced.” Speaking after the event, Ian Talbot, Chief Executive of Chambers Ireland, highlighted how the EPE has given Irish entrepreneurs a chance to see for themselves how policy decisions are influenced, while also giving them the opportunity to express their concerns about where they feel the EU can better support business, particularly when it comes to issues like trade, skills and competitiveness. “It is clear from the results of the votes that trade matters for ordinary business across the EU, with 94 per cent of MEPEs voting in support of an effective EU trade policy and 95 per cent believing SMEs should have a stronger say in such trade policy,” he said. “These results show

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CHAMBER COMMENTS

just how important trade is to business and agreements such as TTIP and CETA are vital for Europe to remain competitive globally. It is particularly worrying that two thirds of the entrepreneurs in attendance from across Europe expressed concern that Brexit would harm their business. It is important in this period of uncertainty that the EU listens to the voice of business and works to create a more businessfriendly policy environment.”

Speaking after the event, Wexford entrepreneur and director of Wexford Chamber of Commerce, Graham Scallon, said: “The EPE gave a very good insight into how the EU Parliament operates, where we met with MEPs, entrepreneurs and policy leaders, giving us first hand information of how the EU is governed. We now plan on sharing this information with local businesses so they can prepare, plan and adapt to help their businesses thrive over the coming years.” Irish businessman Eoin Barry, ARV Excellence and MEPE representing Galway Chamber, said: “It’s great to have been a part of the Irish delegation to the EPE 2016. The EU, specifically, the Single Market, is a great place to do business and the people in it are intent on making it better. The Chambers of Commerce play an important role in informing that positive change and Chambers Ireland is really playing its part.”

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CHAMBERS NEWS EES

A European OUTLOOK Findings from the Eurochambres Economic Survey 2017 show that Ireland stands alone in its concern about the potential impact of Brexit

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n a recent survey of European business, Irish firms identified labour costs and Brexit as two of the biggest challenges they face in 2017. The findings of the Eurochambres Economic Survey (EES) show that across Europe there has been a slight drop in general business confidence on previous years but that businesses expect a minor upturn in their prospects for 2017. Eurochambres attributes the drop

in business confidence to moderate economic growth rates across the continent and increasing geopolitical concerns which unsurprisingly influence entrepreneurs’ perception of the business environment. Despite such challenges, within Europe, Ireland is one of the countries most optimistic about business confidence for 2017 along with Portugal and Serbia. Business confidence is lowest across Europe in Greece and Hungary where pessimism likely coincides with difficult economic circumstances facing the two countries. The EES is an annual qualitative survey of business expectations across Europe. The survey, now in its 24th year, is implemented by the network of Chambers of Commerce and Industry and co-ordinated by Eurochambres. The harmonised questionnaire was sent to business owner-managers from EU member states, as well as to EU candidate countries, Serbia, Turkey and Montenegro. The questionnaire focuses on five economic indicators; business confidence, domestic sales, exports, employment and investment, as well as challenges for the year ahead. In autumn 2016, over 50,500 businesses across Europe responded to EES 2017.

CHALLENGES The participating companies across Europe have defined the behaviour of the domestic demand, the lack of skilled workers, and economic policy conditions as the three most significant economic challenges facing their business in 2017.

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In Ireland, businesses continue to be concerned by the threat of increasing labour costs with 43 per cent of businesses citing it as their biggest challenge in 2017. For the first time, the survey included the option ‘impact of the UK referendum to leave the EU’ as a potential challenge facing business. It is not surprising that Irish businesses identified this as the second biggest challenge in 2017 (38 per cent of respondents) due to the importance of Ireland’s trading relationship with the UK and our proximity, including a land border, to Northern Ireland. Many Irish businesses have already been impacted by currency volatility and the economic climate has been impacted by the uncertainty about how long the negotiation process will take, what the British exit will mean, and how our future trading relationship with the UK will function. It is somewhat alarming for Ireland that European businesses do not share this concern, with only 9.6 per cent identifying Brexit as a challenge for 2017. As the second largest economy in the EU, the potential exit of the UK from the single market could have a significant impact on trade and the economy of the European Union. European countries are facing their own political and economic challenges from the migration crisis, climate change, long-term youth unemployment, but the implications and impact of Brexit also pose a threat. There is a role to play for Ireland’s business community to help our counterparts

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CHAMBERS NEWS EES

CHALLENGES FOR 2017 #1 Domestic Demand

44.5% #2 Economic Conditions

35% #3 Labour Costs

34.5% #4 Lack of Skilled Workers

32.1% #5 Foreign Demand

30.4% #6 Financing Conditions

23.8% #7 Prices of Energy and Materials

20.5% #8 Impact of Brexit

9.6% #9 Exchange Rates

8.7%

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in Europe understand the potential implications of the UK’s withdrawal from the EU and to convey that unless a practical approach to Brexit negotiations is adopted, we all stand to lose out in terms of reduced economic growth, investment and jobs. Despite the divergence on Brexit there are many areas where concerns for business are common throughout Europe. Skills mismatches and the challenge of finding skilled workers is one such area. The challenge presented by the lack of skilled workers saw the biggest increase from the previous EES results, highlighting that this is a growing concern for European business. In Ireland, 30 per cent of respondents identified skills as a challenge for the coming year. This mismatch between the needs of companies and the skills offered in the labour market was also one of the central topics of discussion for European businesses in attendance at the European Parliament of Enterprises in October. This further highlights the need at Irish and European level to devise educational policy and programmes that can

better address current and future skills needs. Increased apprenticeship style training and work-based learning programmes can play a role as part of helping employers address skills needs. The results of the EES show that the outlook of European business for 2017 has changed only slightly compared to 2016 and, in fact, maintains a trend over several years of moderate growth predictions. Despite a slight decrease in business confidence for 2017, expectations for domestic sales, export sales and investment have improved for 2017. It is hoped that this positive outlook can translate into a strong year for Irish and European business in 2017 and that Irish Government and European policy makers can work to address the challenges identified through appropriate policy measures and investment. For Ireland and the wider European business community, it is important that we focus on enhancing the competitiveness of our economies through investment in transport infrastructure, housing, education and skills as a priority. Full results of the EES 2017 survey can be downloaded at www.eurochambres.eu.

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CHAMBERS NEWS IRISH CHAMBER NETWORK

CHAMBER BUSINESS

in Brussels

In October 2016, a delegation from across the Irish Chamber Network travelled to Brussels to meet with Irish diplomats and key officials from the European Commission.

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s part of the work of Chambers Ireland to represent the interests of Irish business, we work with a network of European Chambers of Commerce to ensure that the voice of the Irish business is represented at European level. A core part of this work is to monitor and influence legislation debated and agreed at European level so that we can ensure that Irish business can provide input on any regulatory changes that may impact them in the future. In the post-Brexit climate, it is now more important than ever for Irish business to engage with the European Union. Our specific areas of interest are in completing the Single Market, ensuring smarter regulation, helping SMEs to trade internationally and, last but not least, promoting the need for an ambitious EU trade and investment strategy. As part of this work, a delegation from across the Irish Chamber Network travelled to Brussels on October 12th to meet with Irish diplomats and key officials from the European Commission. The Chambers of Commerce represented included Cork Chamber, Fingal Dublin Chamber, Galway Chamber, North Kildare Chamber, Shannon Chamber, South Dublin Chamber, Waterford Chamber and Wexford Chamber. As part of the day’s itinerary, the Irish Chamber Network delegation met with the Irish Ambassador to the European Union,

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representatives from the Irish Regions Office and representatives from DG Trade, DG Growth and the Executive Agency for SMEs (EASME). The Chamber Network visit to Brussels informed our delegation of the necessity of trade deals like TTIP and CETA progressing if European business is to remain competitive and the importance of the Irish business community clearly communicating to stakeholders that Ireland will remain a strong partner in Europe. Irish business leaders from across the Chamber Network have forged stronger relationships with colleagues in the European Commission, the Irish Regions Office, the Permanent Representation of Ireland to the European Union, our elected representatives and business leaders from across Europe. These relationships will be instrumental to ensuring that the priorities for Irish business are advanced at EU level. Speaking in Brussels, Chambers

Ireland Chief Executive Ian Talbot noted: “Following on from the UK’s decision to leave the European Union, it is now more important than ever for the voice of Irish business to be heard in Brussels. While we are steadfast in our belief that Ireland’s economic future can only be secured if it remains at the heart of a strong Europe, we also believe that the EU must evolve and adapt in these changing times. The voice of business must be listened to.” Following the Irish Chamber Network’s visit to Brussels, Chambers Ireland will be continuing to focus on a number of key priorities into 2017, including the necessity of maintaining our competitiveness and preparing for the exit of the UK from the European Union. For more information on our work at EU level, please visit our website at www.chambers.ie or follow us on Twitter @ChambersIreland.

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21/12/2016 11:23


CHAMBERS NEWS HR

Inclusivity MATTERS Through sharing information and advice, the Employers Disability Information Service is giving employers the confidence and competence to employ and retain staff with disabilities.

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he Employer Disability Information Service provides a free service to employers seeking advice or information on all aspects of hiring, managing or retaining an employee with a disability. The website offers a wealth of information for employers on supports and funding available, best practice and practical advice and information on employer rights and responsibilities. Employers can also ring the helpline number to get peerto-peer advice on issues relating to disability in the workplace. Through sharing information and advice, the Employers Disability Information Service aims to enhance the confidence and competence of individual employers to employ and retain staff with disabilities. The ultimate goal is to promote increased employment of people with disabilities. Sharing positive inclusive employment stories is an important part of enhancing the confidence of both the employer and employee.

CASE STUDY Gavin Ward is one of the Galwaybased developers behind new mobile game Frankenfarm. Having faced

The 9th Impact team

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many real-life challenges living with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), he now spends his days designing virtual challenges for mobile game players in his role as designer and quality assurance engineer with game development company 9th Impact. Ward was introduced to his current role through EmployAbility Galway, who assist people with disabilities, mental health difficulties or people in recovery from illness or injury to obtain and sustain suitable employment. EmployAbility Galway’s first step is to undertake detailed need assessments with clients and identify their skills, interests and employment needs. Ward had recently qualified with a Computer Science degree from Galway-Mayo Institute of Technology and had a strong interest in game development, so EmployAbility Galway Job Coach, Róisín McDonagh, made contact with local game development studio 9th Impact. “Through initial discussions it seemed there was a potential fit between the needs of the employer and my client,” says McDonagh. “Gavin was already familiar with some of the tools used by the company and

could show through his college work, an ability to learn and master new technologies. The atmosphere in the company was energetic and creative but the work processes were well structured with clear objectives.” It was agreed that a short work experience programme would be arranged. “Sometimes an outcome is that our client undertakes work experience so they can gain specific skills and insights into a particular workplace and we fund this,” says McDonagh. During the two weeks of work experience Ward learned how the game development process worked at 9th Impact and received training in the development toolset used at the company. These two weeks gave Ward an ideal opportunity to showcase his capabilities and talent. “Immediately after the work experience programme we offered Gavin a full-time role at the company,” says Finn Krewer, Head of Development at 9th Impact. “Gavin has become a valuable member of the team and takes on critical roles in level design and quality assurance in our development pipeline. He has designed many of the levels and puzzles in our games, including in our well-known Biker Mice from Mars series of games.” Gavin’s latest work, Frankenfarm, is available to play on Android and Apple now. If you are an employer with any questions regarding hiring or retaining someone with a disability you can contact the Employer Disability Information helpline on 01 6762014 or consult the website www. employerdisabilityinfo.ie.

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PARTNER PROFILE RTÉ

A Very

SPECIAL YEAR 2016 proved to be a significant twelve months for Ireland’s national broadcaster.

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s Ireland’s public service media organisation, RTÉ plays a unique role at the centre of life in Ireland, unearthing and telling the stories that touch, move, inform and engage people, stories which reflect the rich diversity and vitality of life in Ireland, past and present, to audiences at home and abroad across our television, radio, online and mobile platforms. 2016 has been a very significant and special year for RTÉ. Not only did we mark Ireland’s centenary by developing RTÉ 1916, the single biggest programme of content and events ever undertaken by the organisation, we also delivered our biggest ever General Election

RTÉ 1916 commemoration coverage

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coverage across television, radio, online and mobile, we brought the country on an exciting journey with the boys in green through a successful Euro 2016 campaign and we delivered our biggest ever Olympic Games coverage from an eventful Rio 2016, followed by our most comprehensive Paralympics ever from the same city a month later. In all of this, we committed our talent and resources like never before to bringing the nation the stories they cared about, around the clock and across multiple platforms. We collaborated with so many people and organisations across the country and beyond to bring you news, drama, factual, sport and entertainment content. It has been encouraging to see so many people react so positively, so often throughout the year:

• Over one million people turned to RTÉ’s extensive Election 2016 coverage across all platforms over the election weekend. • The RTÉ 1916 series of events and programming engaged huge numbers of the Irish public in the run up to and during Easter weekend with over three million viewers tuning in to RTÉ television from Friday evening’s Late Late Show to Monday night’s Centenary, reaching 75 per cent of the viewing population. Hundreds of thousands of people flocked to the capital city on Easter Monday to experience RTÉ Reflecting the Rising in partnership with Ireland 2016, as the city was transformed by the biggest public history and cultural event ever staged in Ireland. We are proud that RTÉ’s coverage of the official state ceremonies was carried by broadcasters at home and abroad, ensuring that they could be enjoyed by the widest possible audience and showcasing our country from the US to China. • Traffic to RTÉ’s online and mobile services (RTÉ.ie, RTÉ News Now app and RTÉ Player) for RTÉ Sport’s Olympics coverage was the strongest on record. Over the course of the games, RTÉ Sport’s Olympic coverage on RTÉ.ie and RTÉ News Now app attracted almost 15 million page impressions and almost two million unique browsers; double the site traffic for Euro 2016. RTÉ Player served over 1.4 million streams for RTÉ Sport’s Olympic coverage, with over 78 per cent of the streams airing live.

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21/12/2016 11:25


PARTNER PROFILE RTÉ

• RTÉ Sport and RTÉ News coverage of Michael Conlan and Katie Taylor’s controversial defeats, Annalise Murphy and the O’Donovan brothers’ silver medal wins and the ensuing controversies concerning Pat Hickey and the OCI ticketing scandal, resulted in the highest surges in traffic across RTÉ’s online and mobile services. The O’Donovan brothers also proved to be the viral hit of RTÉ Sport’s Olympic coverage, with RTÉ’s post-win interviews with Gary and Paul O’Donovan attracting over 10 million social media views. • RTÉ returned to Rio for the Paralympics 2016 with significantly increased coverage across television, radio, online and mobile, representing a seven-fold increase on our coverage of London 2012. Coverage included a live television show on RTÉ2 during prime time every night, sponsored by Allianz Ireland, along with four concurrent live streams on a dedicated Paralympics site on RTÉ. ie throughout the games. However, it is also RTÉ’s role to shine a light on the darkness and the RTÉ Investigations Unit has done an incredible and important job in asking tough questions to unearth injustices over the past year, including a significant and high profile investigation into the suicide charity, Console. We are encouraged that the output created by our in-house programme makers and our partners in the independent sector received such widespread recognition in 2016, with over 40 awards being presented to RTÉ programmes across a breadth of platforms, genres and categories in one weekend alone last October when the IFTAs, the PPI Radio Awards and the Net Visionary Awards all coincided. Of particular note were PPI and international Rose D’Or Awards for RTÉ Radio 1’s Dawn Chorus, the

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RTÉ presenters in 1916 costume

brainchild of Derek Mooney, and a PPI Outstanding Achievement Award for Scott Williams (IBI) and RTÉ’s JP Coakley for their work on the Irish Radioplayer. RTÉ Radio 1’s Documentary on One: The Case That Never Was was honoured with numerous awards throughout 2016 including the top prize in the radio investigative category at the 2016 Association of International Broadcasters (AIB) awards in London in November at which it was described

as “a very clear winner; excellent in all aspects and a story told in a very engaging and revealing way. An example of the craft of radio journalism at the highest level.” Within that breadth lies something of the innate value of public service media: from factual to Irish language, from news to drama, from sport to comedy to special events, RTÉ is privileged and challenged to provide a unique diversity of content to audiences in Ireland and beyond.

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PARTNER PROFILE ZURICH

THE RIGHT

PROTECTION Zurich Insurance has the experience and products to help businesses protect their directors and professionals from potentially crippling losses.

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t Zurich, we continuously strive to better understand our customers, to enhance and tailor products to meet their changing needs, and ensure that the very best protection is made available. Two areas experiencing significant growth is Directors & Officers (D&O) and Professional Indemnity (PI) insurance, designed to protect companies and their professional employees against risks that might not have been commonplace in the past. A recent survey carried out at a global level by Zurich Insurance Group showed that companies in Ireland, in particular SMEs, are now increasingly conscious of the risks posed by legal and fiscal problems, with nearly twice as many identifying the issue as a priority than did just one year ago. The increased awareness around this consideration can only be taken as a positive thing, as any company

While businesses are becoming more conscious of the issue, many are still unaware that, at any time, even years after work has been completed for a client, you could still be at risk for a claim for what might be deemed inadequate advice or service.

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which provides professional services or advice to clients is at risk of being liable for a potentially damaging claim. And while businesses are becoming more conscious of the issue, many are still unaware that, at any time, even years after work has been completed for a client, you could still be at risk for a claim for what might be deemed inadequate advice or service. This kind of claim could result in having to pay a significant court award and absorb the costs of a potentially protracted law suit.

EUROPEAN TRENDS The risk of legal and fiscal problems, according to the survey, is now seen as a greater threat in Ireland, than in almost every other European country, with the exception of Spain. While some high profile international companies have recently been held up as examples, it’s clear that any business, big or small, can feel the impact of a claim of this nature. Whether a director or officer of a company, it is increasingly clear that directors need to shield themselves from claims and legal costs with the right D&O cover, protecting against claims arising from the decisions you make while running the company. The right kind of PI cover protects professionals against the cost of compensating clients for loss or damage arising from either negligent

services or bad advice. If you’re a professional providing advice, such as an accountant or surveyor, you need the financial protection that PI cover provides.

IT’S PERSONAL A common misunderstanding amongst directors is that the corporate structures surrounding them will provide all the protection needed in the event of a lawsuit. This false sense of security, however, is in many circumstances shattered, when a business may not pay a director’s legal costs or be prohibited from paying under companies legislation. For example, when there are cases of unpaid corporate taxes or criminal charges. The end result can see a director being left personally liable, with a financially crushing impact on them, their personal assets and their families. A recent example involved an incident in which a building company employee died after falling through a roof at work. Following an investigation by the Health and Safety Authority, one of the company directors was charged with gross negligence manslaughter and convicted. The defence costs in this case totalled a175,000. D&O insurance will cover the legal costs of defending a director from a claim, and Zurich’s market leading cover can also be extended to include a company’s losses resulting from a charge of corporate manslaughter, where the company is sued alongside a director.

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PARTNER PROFILE ZURICH

Zurich’s Centre of Excellence in Wexford

ABOUT ZURICH

COVERING ALL BASES

FOLLOWING TRENDS

As a leading global expert in insurance for directors and professionals, Zurich offers both best in class cover, and tailor made solutions to fit all businesses. Ensuring the right policy is purchased, however, is only part of the challenge. Making a claim can be a tedious and stressful process if the right resources aren’t available. Zurich’s long-standing presence and understanding of structures in Ireland, ensures that our local claims handling service, based in our centre of excellence in Wexford, is as swift as it is easy.

Zurich has a range of policies tailored to meet the needs of a wide variety of businesses; however our experts also have an eye on emerging risks, with several new products in the pipeline to ensure we offer protection against new threats that could affect businesses in the future.

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To find out more about Zurich’s liability protection insurance and to receive a free risk assessment, please contact Scott Diamond and his expert team on 01 609 1319. Alternatively, speak to your broker to arrange a consultation with Zurich’s team of experts.

Zurich is one of Ireland’s leading insurance companies providing a wide range of general insurance and life insurance products and services. The company employs over 1,000 people across its locations in Dublin and Wexford. Zurich in Ireland is part of Zurich Insurance Group, a leading multiline insurer that serves its customers in global and local markets. With about 55,000 employees, the group’s customers include individuals, small businesses, and mid-sized and large companies, including multinational corporations, in more than 170 countries. The group is headquartered in Zurich, Switzerland, where it was founded in 1872.

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Accelerating research and innovation for a sustainable ocean economy marine.ie

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PARTNER PROFILE WATERFORD CRYSTAL

The Perfect Gift

THIS SEASON The House of Waterford Crystal has the largest collection of Waterford Crystal products in the world to provide the ideal gift for someone special.

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t this time of the year individuals and companies start considering the ideal gifts for family, friends and best customers within their business. The House of Waterford Crystal has the largest collection of Waterford Crystal products in the world to provide the perfect gift this season. At its factory and brand experience in Waterford it has many collections to suit any occasion, your preferred customer or even an employee award.

OUR LISMORE POPS Waterford’s Lismore is the most endearing crystal-cut pattern in its history. Its beauty and elegance has made it Waterford’s most popular and loved collection. It graces the tables of presidents, Hollywood stars and royalty. Lismore will add grace and beauty to any home. Its new collection, Lismore Pops, introduces fresh and bright colours, which bring a chic and contemporary edge to the classic Lismore pattern. The colour really adds a new dimension to these beautiful products. The range includes champagne glasses in five striking colours; purple, emerald, aqua, orange and hot pink. They are priced at a165 per pair.

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THE PERFECT GIFT ASSORTMENT The beauty of giftology lies in its ease and convenience. Waterford has a wide choice of products that are ideal gifts to say thank you to a friend or customer. Giftology’s signature cylindrical tubes – in eye popping colours with gold accents and the prominent Waterford logo – make for elegant gifts, ones which are ready for immediate presentation and instant delight. The collection includes a clock, vase, butterfly, shot glasses, tumblers, votive and other timeless items. The ideal gift for any occasion, they are available from a45.

MAKE IT PERSONAL There is nothing better than receiving the gift of Waterford with your name, the occasion or company logo etched onto the crystal. At Waterford they take great pride in providing that individual touch for your gifts.

AT YOU SERVICE Why not take advantage of Waterford’s gift card, wrapping and global shipping service. Many clients enjoy the service that Tom Walsh and his team can provide to corporate clients and consumers at Waterford.

HOW TO GET IN TOUCH Contact Tom as follows: Office: +353 51 317043 Mobile: +353 87 1209143 Email: tom.walsh@fiskars.com Web: www.waterfordvisitorcentre.com Facebook: House of Waterford Crystal Twitter: @WaterfordCrystl Instagram: waterfordcrystalfactory

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PARTNER PROFILE BOOTS IRELAND

A Better Business

THROUGH CSR When it comes to corporate social responsibility, Boots Ireland has dedicated the past two decades to putting people before products.

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s Boots Ireland approaches its 20th anniversary it is ensuring that its Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) agenda for 2017 reflects its continued commitment to providing care, support and knowledge to its local community. “For us, to be able to give something back to those communities we serve helps us do better business,” says Martha Ryan, Head of HR, Boots Ireland. When it comes to CSR, Boots Ireland has been focusing its attention on improving the wellbeing of those suffering from cancer. With this goal in mind, the company partnered with the Irish Cancer Society to explore how together they could use their resources to most effectively contribute to the care and wellbeing of cancer sufferers and their families. “When we partnered with the Irish Cancer Society initially back in 2012 our main objective was to fundraise for the Night Nursing service,” explains Ryan. This service provides up to 10 nights free end of life care to cancer patients across the country, allowing them to remain in their homes. Night nurses offer invaluable support to both patients and their families but as a nongovernment funded organisation they rely on donations or CSR programmes – like the one Boots Ireland provides – to keep their service open. By the end of 2016, Ryan hopes that Boots Ireland will have reached the a1 million fundraising mark for its work with the Irish Cancer Society Night Nursing

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service. “The feedback has been really positive from the pharmacists and the advisors themselves. But also, because cancer touches everybody one way or another, all of our colleagues are fully behind the programme,” says Ryan. As a pharmacy, Boots Ireland already possessed a valuable resource: its skilled workforce. One branch of the company’s work with the Irish Cancer Society involves providing additional training to its community

The feedback has been really positive from the pharmacists and the advisors themselves. But also, because cancer touches everybody one way or another, all of our colleagues are fully behind the programme. pharmacists so that they have an understanding of the health issues and concerns associated with cancer and to have the ability to handle these concerns with confidence and ease. “What we wanted to do was expand our existing skills to generate a bigger impact,” says Ryan. “We partnered with the Irish Cancer Society in providing training to our pharmacists who are known as Boots Irish Cancer Society Information Pharmacists. The Cancer Pharmacist is accessible

to patients, families and carers, who are able to call into a Boots store to speak to them in private about a range of issues relating to cancer. Issues can range from discussing patient medication to the recommendation of a relevant cancer support service in the locality. Providing access to vital information about the support services available within the Irish Cancer Society is an integral part of the Boots ICS Information Pharmacist role.” This service helps Boots Ireland to reinforce the important role played by pharmacists in local communities. Ryan notes that the Boots Cancer Beauty Advisors also play a crucial role in helping the company achieve its CSR goals. Informing customers about all things cosmetic at a time when their body confidence may be at an all time low, the cancer beauty advisors enable customers to build self-esteem during their process to recovery. Ryan explains: “They come into our advisors to seek information on what products to use. One of the side effects of chemotherapy or radiotherapy means that products they’ve been using all of the time are no longer suitable for them so our advisors try to help with alternatives.” The Cancer Beauty Advisors also receive training in relation to cancer and its side effects and, as well as being able to advise on skincare or cosmetics, they are also skilled in practical aspects such as recreating eyebrows and will often share this expertise with local cancer support groups. “It’s not about selling products, it’s more about being that voice in the community,” says Ryan. She notes that the core aim of the cancer beauty advisor role is to give

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PARTNER PROFILE BOOTS IRELAND

Martha Ryan, Head of HR, Boots Ireland, pictured on the right, at the launch of the sale of the Boots Ireland Honour Tags. Earlier this year, customers could purchase a tag in honour of someone who had passed away from or survived cancer, with the tags being brought on one of the 30 x 5km walks, which took place across the country over a two-week period. Also pictured is Louise McSharry, the ambassador for Boots Night Walks for Night Nurses, and Mark Mellett, Head of Fundraising, Irish Cancer Society.

customers the confidence to feel like themselves again.

GRASSROOTS From a more local perspective, Boots Ireland staff are always striving to make their efforts felt by the people on the ground. This commitment might come through a partnership with the local club, a school in the area or by supporting the locally unemployed. “We have partnerships with groups like Dress for Success where we support women who are going back into the workplace after a certain amount of time and we help in upskilling through CV writing, interview skills, online applications and free beauty consultations, all helping to build confidence,” says Ryan, who notes that this genuine interest in community wellbeing has created a valuable insight

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into consumer needs. “The best way to serve your community is to know and understand them. So we obviously get a lot of customer engagement from that perspective, which is a benefit to us from a business perspective, but also

It’s not about selling products, it’s more about being that voice in the community. from showing that we care about the communities that we serve.” Above all, one of the most impressive aspects of Boots Ireland’s CSR work has been the volume of voluntary staff participation. “Our staff have fully engaged, we didn’t make it mandatory that our pharmacists take this course but they all took it,” says Ryan. She

credits this continued commitment from employees to not only the fact that employees are involved in the direction of the CSR agenda, but also to the hard work of in-store CSR Champions who drive volunteer initiatives within their store. “Every single store and our support offices have CSR Champions who meet regularly and help us in planning and strategising what we want to achieve in the CSR arena,” says Ryan. For Ryan and the extended Boots Ireland team, the current CSR programme has instilled a determination to be a source of support for each of the communities they serve. “It’s really just about being a responsible employer and a responsible business within the community that you serve. We’re lucky we have 86 shops at the moment, so that’s quite a few communities to give back to.”

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LOCAL

LEADERS RECOGNISED

Fingal County Council scooped the top accolade at the 2016 Excellence in Local Government Awards. Fingal County Council was named Local Authority of the Year at the Chambers Ireland Excellence in Local Government Awards, which took place on November 24th 2016. Now in its 13th year, the awards ceremony was held in association with the Department of Housing, Planning, Community and Local Government and showcased and celebrated the best of Local Government in Ireland.

THE WINNERS Local Authority of the Year Fingal County Council Supporting Active Communities sponsored by Eirgrid Limerick City & County Council – Team Limerick Clean Up (TLC) Best Practice in Citizen Engagement Award sponsored by AIB Mayo County Council – Mayo Day Health & Wellbeing Award sponsored by Healthy Ireland South Dublin County Council – HI South Dublin Healthy County

The Fingal County Council team who won Local Authority of the Year

SPECIAL AWARD A Special Commendation in Commemorations and Centenaries was given to Monaghan County Council for From a Whisper to a Roar: Exploring the Untold Story of Monaghan.

Supporting Tourism Award sponsored by Fáilte Ireland Clare County Council – Ennis Book Club Festival Promoting Economic Development Award sponsored by Eirgrid Limerick City & County Council – Innovate Limerick Local Authority Innovation Award sponsored by SIRO Cork City Council – Cork City’s Litter Fine System Sustainable Environment Award sponsored by ERP Dún Laoghaire- Rathdown County Council – Biodiversity in Action

The Monaghan County Council team

Best Library Service Award sponsored by CBRE Offaly County Council – My Open Library

Sustaining the Arts Award sponsored by Ervia Kildare County Council – 1916 Sackville Street Art Project Joint Local Authority Initiative Award sponsored by Waterford Crystal Donegal County Council – North West of the island of Ireland: A Strategic Model for Regional Development Growth Festival of the Year Award sponsored by Fáilte Ireland Cork County Council – A Taste of West Cork Food Festival Outstanding Customer Service Award sponsored by An Post Tipperary County Council – Integrated Customer Services Centre Enhancing the Urban Environment Award sponsored by Healthy Ireland Meath County Council – Ashbourne Main Street Refurbishment Scheme Heritage and Built Environment Award sponsored by Zurich Fingal County Council – Swords Castle: Digging History Disability Services Provision Award sponsored by Shell E&P Ireland Wexford County Council – Wexford County Council Beach Wheelchair Initiative Commemorations and Centenaries Award sponsored by ESB Dublin City Council – Dublin Remembers 19162016: Is Cuimhin Linn

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LOCAL GOVERNMENT AWARDS 2015

SUPPORTING BEST PRACTICE ACTIVE IN CITIZEN COMMUNITIES ENGAGEMENT: LIMERICK CITY & WATERFORD COUNTY COUNCIL Ian Talbot, Chief Executive, Chambers Ireland; Derval O’Brien, CSR Programme Manager, EirGrid; Sinéad McDonell, Environment Awareness Officer, Limerick City and County; Cllr Noel Gleeson, Deputy Mayor, Limerick City and County Council; Damien English, Minister of State for Housing and Urban Renewal

BEST PRACTICE IN CITIZEN ENGAGEMENT AWARD MAYO COUNTY COUNCIL Ian Talbot, Chief Executive, Chambers Ireland; Cllr Gerry Coyle; Joanne Grehan, Director of Services – Planning, Mayo County Council; Damien English, Minister of State for Housing and Urban Renewal; Martina Hughes, Head of Communications, Planning, Economic & Community Development, Mayo County Council; Ray Alcock, Head of AIB Dublin North; Cllr Michael Kilcoyne

HEALTH & BEST PRACTICE WELLBEING IN CITIZEN AWARD SOUTH DUBLIN ENGAGEMENT: COUNTY COUNCIL WATERFORD COUNTY COUNCIL Ian Talbot, Chief Executive, Chambers Ireland; Kate O’Flaherty, Director of Health & Wellbeing Programme, Healthy Ireland; Cllr Guss O’Connell, Mayor, South Dublin County Council; Damien English, Minister of State for Housing and Urban Renewal; Cathy Purdy, RAPID Coordinator, South Dublin County Council

SUPPORTING TOURISM AWARD CLARE COUNTY COUNCIL

Ian Talbot, Chief Executive, Chambers Ireland; Liam Conneally, Director of Services, Clare County Council; Emer O’Connell, Chairperson, Ennis Book Club Festival; Damien English, Minister of State for Housing and Urban Renewal; Cllr Bill Chambers, Cathaoirleach, Clare County Council; Michael Fitzsimons, Project Officer, Fáilte Ireland; Helen Walsh, County Librarian, Clare County Council

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LOCAL GOVERNMENT AWARDS 2016

PROMOTING BEST PRACTICE ECONOMIC IN CITIZEN DEVELOPMENT ENGAGEMENT:AWARD LIMERICK CITY & WATERFORD COUNTY COUNTYCOUNCIL COUNCIL Ian Talbot, Chief Executive, Chambers Ireland; Derval O’Brien, CSR Programme Manager, EirGrid; Mike Cantwell, CEO, Innovate Limerick; Damien English, Minister of State for Housing and Urban Renewal; Melissa Buckley, Research & Planning Executive, Limerick City & County Council; Cllr Noel Gleeson, Deputy Mayor, Limerick City and County Council

LOCAL AUTHORITY INNOVATION AWARD CORK CITY COUNCIL

Ian Talbot, Chief Executive, Chambers Ireland; Al Devine, ICT and Business Services Department, Cork City Council; Damien English, Minister of State for Housing and Urban Renewal; Sean Atkinson, Chief Executive Officer, SIRO; Ruth Buckley, Deputy Chief Executive, Cork City Council; Cllr PJ Hourican, Deputy Lord Mayor, Cork City Council; David Joyce, Director of Environment Services, Cork City Council

BEST PRACTICE SUSTAINABLE IN CITIZEN AWARD ENVIRONMENT ENGAGEMENT: DÚN LAOGHAIREWATERFORD RATHDOWN COUNTY COUNTY COUNCIL COUNCIL Ian Talbot, Chief Executive, Chambers Ireland; Damien English, Minister of State for Housing and Urban Renewal; Dean Eaton, Environmental Awareness Officer, Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council; Martin Tobin, CEO, European Recycling Platform (ERP); Cllr Ossian Smyth, Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council

BEST LIBRARY SERVICE AWARD OFFALY COUNTY COUNCIL

Ian Talbot, Chief Executive, Chambers Ireland; Cllr Sinead Dooley, Offaly County Council; Sandra Turner, Executive Librarian, Offaly County Council; Mary Stuart, County Librarian, Offaly County Library; Damien English, Minister of State for Housing and Urban Renewal; Frank Heslin, Director of Services, Offaly County Council

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LOCAL GOVERNMENT AWARDS 2016

BEST PRACTICE SUSTAINING THE IN CITIZEN ARTS AWARD ENGAGEMENT: KILDARE COUNTY WATERFORD COUNCIL COUNTY COUNCIL Peter Minnock, Director Of Services - Planning, Community and Culture, Kildare County Council; Damien English, Minister of State for Housing and Urban Renewal; Lucina Russell, Kildare County Arts Officer; David Kelly, Group Head of Customer Operations, Ervia; Marian Higgins, Kildare County Librarian; Bridget Loughlin, Heritage Officer, Kildare County Council; Ian Talbot, Chief Executive, Chambers Ireland

JOINT LOCAL AUTHORITY INITIATIVE AWARD DONEGAL COUNTY COUNCIL Ian Talbot, Chief Executive, Chambers Ireland; Liam Ward, Director of Service, Community, Enterprise and Planning Control; Ger Grant, Letterkenny Chamber; Damien English, Minister of State for Housing and Urban Renewal; An Cathaoirleach Cllr Terence Slowey; David McCoy, Waterford Crystal; Seamus Neely, Chief Executive, Donegal County Council; Joe Peoples, Director of Service, Housing, Corporate & Cultural Services

BEST PRACTICE FESTIVAL OF IN CITIZEN THE YEAR AWARD ENGAGEMENT: CORK COUNTY WATERFORD COUNCIL COUNTY COUNCIL Ian Talbot, Chief Executive, Chambers Ireland; Tim Lucey, Chief Executive, Cork County Council; Damien English, Minister of State for Housing and Urban Renewal; Marie Healy, Fรกilte Ireland; Helen Collins, Festival Chairwoman; Cllr Seamus McGrath, Cork County Mayor; Fiona Field, Manager, Taste of West Cork Food Festival; Cllr Declan Hurley, Cork County Council

OUTSTANDING CUSTOMER SERVICE AWARD TIPPERARY COUNTY COUNCIL Ian Talbot, Chief Executive, Chambers Ireland; Siobhรกn King, Clerical Officer, Tipperary County Council; Angus Laverty, An Post; Cathaoirleach Cllr Siobhรกn Ambrose; Damien English, Minister of State for Housing and Urban Renewal; Patsy Brislane, Staff Officer, Customer Service Desk; Pat Slattery, Director of Services

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LOCAL GOVERNMENT AWARDS 2016

ENHANCING BEST PRACTICE THE URBAN IN CITIZEN ENVIRONMENT ENGAGEMENT:AWARD MEATH COUNTY WATERFORD COUNCIL COUNTY COUNCIL Ian Talbot, Chief Executive, Chambers Ireland; Cllr Darren O’Rourke; Damien English, Minister of State for Housing and Urban Renewal; Kate O’Flaherty, Healthy Ireland; Cllr Alan Tobin, Ashbourne District, Meath County Council; Dara McGowan, Senior Executive Officer at Meath County Council; Cllr Maria Murphy, Meath County Council; Cllr Sean Smith, Meath County Council

HERITAGE AND BUILT ENVIRONMENT AWARD FINGAL COUNTY COUNCIL Ian Talbot, Chief Executive, Chambers Ireland; Ann-Marie Farrelly, Director of Planning and Strategic Infrastructure Department; Christine Baker, Fingal Community Archaeologist; Dr Gerry Clabby, Heritage Officer, Fingal County Council; Damien English, Minister of State for Housing and Urban Renewal; Cllr Darragh Butler, Mayor of Fingal

DISABILITY BEST PRACTICE SERVICES IN CITIZEN PROVISION AWARD ENGAGEMENT: WEXFORD COUNTY WATERFORD COUNCILCOUNCIL COUNTY Ian Talbot, Chief Executive, Chambers Ireland; John Carley, Director of Services, Wexford County Council; Cllr Frank Staples, Mayor of Wexford; Damien English, Minister of State for Housing and Urban Renewal; Caroline Horan, Access Officer; Cllr Paddy Kavanagh, Wexford County Council; Cllr George Lawlor, Chairman, Wexford County Council

COMMEMORATIONS AND CENTENARIES AWARD DUBLIN CITY COUNCIL

Ian Talbot, Chief Executive, Chambers Ireland; Damien English, Minister of State for Housing and Urban Renewal; Anne-Marie Kelly, Divisional Librarian, Dublin City Public Libraries; Brian Montayne, Business Development Manager, ESB; Tara Doyle, Senior Librarian, Dublin City 1916 Programme; Brendan Teeling, Deputy City Librarian and Dublin City 1916 Co-ordinator

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20/12/2016 06/09/2016 15:51 16:29


InBUSINESS RECOGNITION AWARDS 2O16

This year’s InBUSINESS Recognition Awards once again honoured exceptional achievement in Irish business.

THE WINNERS LIFE AND PENSIONS Zurich Life

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rish companies and individuals were honoured at the InBUSINESS Recognition Awards on December 5th at the Conrad Dublin. Now in their fifth year, the awards recognise and honour exceptional achievement and innovation in Irish business. Hosted by Newstalk’s Business Editor Vincent Wall and comprising 22 categories, the awards were kindly sponsored by ŠKODA Ireland. Among the winners was Vodafone Ireland which was named Company of the Year. Julie Sinnamon, CEO of Enterprise Ireland, was named Businesswoman of the Year, while Joe Barrett of Applegreen picked up the Businessman of the Year award.

TOURISM Dublin Port ACCOUNTANCY Russell Brennan Keane e-COMMERCE Paypal EXPORTING CLdN BANKING AIB Private Banking BUSINESS SCHOOL Kemmy Business School ENERGY Bord Gáis Energy LAW Eversheds EXECUTIVE CAR Volvo S90 FINANCIAL SERVICES New Ireland Assurance COUNTY COUNCIL FOR FDI Mayo County Council STATE BODY NSAI NEWCOMER Admailer.ie MARKETING INITIATIVE AIB Start-up Academy SUPPORT TO SMES Credit Review Office SPECIAL MERIT AWARD Bank Of Ireland Group for CSR BRAND Shannon Group BUSINESS BROADBAND Virgin Media BUSINESSMAN OF THE YEAR Joe Barrett, Applegreen BUSINESSWOMAN OF THE YEAR Julie Sinnamon, Enterprise Ireland COMPANY OF THE YEAR Vodafone Ireland

Awards host Vincent Wall IN ASSOCIATION WITH

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InBUSINESS RECOGNITION AWARDS 2O16

Ian Talbot, CEO, Chambers Ireland, John Donegan, Brand Director, ŠKODA Ireland, Joe Creegan, Head of Corporate Life & Pensions, Zurich Life, Tracey Carney, Event Director, Ashville Media Group

LIFE AND PENSIONS ZURICH LIFE

Pat Ward, Head of Corporate Services, Dublin Port

TOURISM DUBLIN PORT

“IT’S A GREAT HONOUR AND IT REALLY MEANS A LOT TO US, PARTICULARLY TO OUR TALENTED TEAM THAT WORKS SO HARD TO PROVIDE A FIRST-CLASS SERVICE.” DAVID GLEESON, MANAGING PARTNER, RUSSELL BRENNAN KEANE ACCOUNTANCY RUSSELL BRENNAN KEANE

Tracey Carney, Event Director, Ashville Media Group, John Donegan, Brand Director, ŠKODA Ireland, David Gleeson, Managing Partner, Russell Brennan Keane, Ian Talbot, CEO, Chambers Ireland

Maeve Dorman, Head of Global Operations, EMEA, PayPal

e-COMMERCE PAYPAL

IN ASSOCIATION WITH

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InBUSINESS RECOGNITION AWARDS 2O16

John Donegan, Brand Director, ŠKODA Ireland, Koen Vanhentenrijk, Commercial Route Manager, CLdN, Tracey Carney, Event Director, Ashville Media Group, Ian Talbot, CEO, Chambers Ireland

EXPORTING CLDN

Dave McLaughlin, Head of Private Banking at AIB

BANKING AIB PRIVATE BANKING

Tracey Carney, Event Director, Ashville Media Group, John Donegan, Brand Director, ŠKODA Ireland, Professor Sheila Killian, Assistant Dean, Research at Kemmy Business School, Ian Talbot, CEO, Chambers Ireland

BUSINESS SCHOOL KEMMY BUSINESS SCHOOL

ENERGY BORD GÁIS ENERGY

“THE NEXT FEW YEARS WILL BE ONES THAT SEE US ENGAGING WITH BUSINESSES AND BUSINESS ISSUES IN AN INCREASINGLY GLOBAL CONTEXT.” PHILIP O’REGAN, DEAN, KEMMY BUSINESS SCHOOL

Ken O’Byrne, SME Category Manager, Bord Gáis Energy IN ASSOCIATION WITH

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InBUSINESS RECOGNITION AWARDS 2O16

LAW EVERSHEDS

Alan Murphy, Managing Partner, Eversheds

EXECUTIVE CAR VOLVO S90

“WINNING EXECUTIVE CAR IS A FANTASTIC ACHIEVEMENT FOR US AND REALLY MAKES A STATEMENT ABOUT HOW THE CAR HAS BEEN RECEIVED BY OUR CUSTOMERS.” STEPHEN TEAP, CORPORATE SALES MANAGER,VOLVO CAR IRELAND

Ian Talbot, CEO, Chambers Ireland, Stephen Teap, Corporate Sales Manager, Volvo Car Ireland, Tracey Carney, Event Director, Ashville Media Group

FINANCIAL SERVICES NEW IRELAND ASSURANCE

Michael Gordon, Head of Marketing, New Ireland Assurance

John Donegan, ŠKODA Ireland, Cllr Al McDonnell, Joanne Grehan and Peter Hynes of Mayo County Council, Tracey Carney, Event Director, Ashville Media Group, Ian Talbot, CEO, Chambers Ireland

COUNTY COUNCIL FOR FDI MAYO COUNTY COUNCIL IN ASSOCIATION WITH

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InBUSINESS RECOGNITION AWARDS 2O16

John Donegan, Brand Director, ŠKODA Ireland, Maurice Buckley, Chairman, NSAI, Tracey Carney, Event Director, Ashville Media Group, Ian Talbot, CEO, Chambers Ireland

STATE BODY NSAI

Fiona Heffernan, Head of Post Media

MARKETING INITIATIVE AIB START-UP ACADEMY

NEWCOMER ADMAILER.IE

John Donegan, Brand Director, ŠKODA Ireland, Alice Grant, AIB Start-Up Academy, Tracey Carney, Event Director, Ashville Media Group, Ian Talbot, CEO, Chambers Ireland

SUPPORT TO SMES CREDIT REVIEW OFFICE START

John Trethowan, Head of the Credit Review Office

“WE ARE DELIGHTED THAT THE CREDIT REVIEW OFFICE IS BEING RECOGNISED FOR OUR CORE MISSION OF HELPING AS MANY SMES AS POSSIBLE TO OBTAIN THE CREDIT THEY NEED TO ACHIEVE THEIR OBJECTIVES.” JOHN TRETHOWAN, HEAD OF THE CREDIT REVIEW OFFICE

IN ASSOCIATION WITH

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InBUSINESS RECOGNITION AWARDS 2O16

“THROUGHOUT THE BANK’S HISTORY, OUR COLLEAGUES HAVE ALWAYS SHOWN INCREDIBLE SUPPORT FOR GOOD CAUSES, THROUGH VARIOUS FUNDRAISING INITIATIVES AND VOLUNTEERING OPPORTUNITIES.” AUDREY NOLAN, HEAD OF CSR AT BANK OF IRELAND

SPECIAL MERIT AWARD BANK OF IRELAND GROUP FOR CSR

Audrey Nolan, Head of CSR at Bank of Ireland

“THIS AWARD IS A TRIBUTE TO THE WORK OF OUR STAFF WHO IMMERSE THEMSELVES IN OUR COMMUNITY AND CONTINUALLY STRIVE TO PROVIDE EXCELLENCE IN CUSTOMER SERVICE.” MATTHEW THOMAS, CHIEF EXECUTIVE, SHANNON GROUP

BRAND SHANNON GROUP

Matthew Thomas, Chief Executive, Shannon Group

BUSINESS BROADBAND VIRGIN MEDIA

“WE ARE COMMITTED TO CONTINUING TO PROVIDE OUR CUSTOMERS WITH THE FASTEST BROADBAND NETWORK. WE’RE ALSO LOOKING FORWARD TO EXPANDING OUR NETWORK REACH IN TOWNS AND CITIES ACROSS IRELAND.” AIDAN D’ARCY, HEAD OF BUSINESS DIVISION, VIRGIN MEDIA IRELAND

Aidan D’Arcy, Head of Business Division, Virgin Media Ireland

IN ASSOCIATION WITH

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InBUSINESS RECOGNITION AWARDS 2O16

“WITH OVER 20 YEARS’ EXPERIENCE IN THE FMCG INDUSTRY IT IS AN HONOUR TO BE RECOGNISED AS BUSINESSMAN OF THE YEAR, AND I CONTINUE TO INVOLVE MYSELF IN RETAIL GROUPS AND RELEVANT CAUSES TO PAVE THE WAY FOR MANY MORE YEARS IN THE RETAIL INDUSTRY BOTH IN IRELAND AND ABROAD.” JOE BARRETT, APPLEGREEN

BUSINESSMAN OF THE YEAR JOE BARRETT, APPLEGREEN

Joe Barrett, Applegreen

BUSINESSWOMAN OF THE YEAR JULIE SINNAMON, ENTERPRISE IRELAND

Julie Sinnamon, Enterprise Ireland

“I AM PROUD OF EVERYONE WHO WORKS FOR VODAFONE IRELAND AS THIS ACHIEVEMENT IS VERY MUCH A TESTAMENT TO A WORKFORCE THAT CONTINUES TO BRING THEIR BEST TO WORK EVERY DAY.” ANNE O’LEARY, CEO, VODAFONE IRELAND

“WE ARE FINALISING OUR CORPORATE STRATEGY 2017-2020 WHICH WILL BE FOCUSED ON SCALING AND INCREASING THE GLOBAL FOOTPRINT OF IRISH BUSINESS. WE ARE ALSO FINALISING OUR TRADE MISSION SCHEDULE, INWARD BUYER VISITS AND TRADE EVENTS FOR 2017.” JULIE SINNAMON, ENTERPRISE IRELAND

COMPANY OF THE YEAR VODAFONE IRELAND

Anne O’Leary, CEO, Vodafone Ireland

IN ASSOCIATION WITH

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IB SURVEY KEMMY BUSINESS SCHOOL

Building Blocks FOR SUCCESS Dr Philip O’Regan, Dean, Kemmy Business School (KBS), reflects on a positive year.

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his year has represented a very positive period for Kemmy Business School (KBS) – CAO points have increased dramatically alongside an increase in student intake, and revenue has also grown significantly as a result, allowing KBS to expand into new areas. One issue that has been particularly important to KBS is its student employment rate and this has grown substantially, much higher than the national average for the other universities, which boosts the school’s

credentials and entices more students to come and study in Limerick. “In KBS an increasingly important measure of progress is the level of international accreditation we’ve been securing. In the last few years we’ve secured AMBA, which is a major endorsement of our MBA programme, while at the same time progressing towards AACSB, which is the major business school accreditation available. The reputational benefits of these are huge and are reflected in a big increase

in the number of international students we have here now,” explains Philip O’Regan, Dean at KBS. The school’s employability record is also very important – the fact that classes are diverse and international, and programmes are very market-friendly, means that KBS students emerge ready to join the market and are very attractive to potential employers. “We make a point of working with employers to design programmes that are attractive to the market, including new online offerings. And of course the fact that our undergraduate students all graduate having had work experience as part

The school’s employability record is also very important – the fact that classes are diverse and international, and programmes are very market-friendly, means that KBS students emerge ready to join the market and are very attractive to potential employers

Philip O’Regan, Dean, Kemmy Business School

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of their programmes gives them a huge advantage,” O’Regan adds. As the University of Limerick (UL) is a relatively new institution, and because student employability is key, the university maintains a close relationship with the business community. UL boasts a very strong internship cooperative education programme which is the largest in Ireland, and which means that all undergraduate students are placed with industry or professional practices as part of their programme. It also means that both UL and KBS are constantly interacting InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

21/12/2016 12:36


IB SURVEY KEMMY BUSINESS SCHOOL

with business and representative organisations to gauge the needs of the market. One of these businesses is Shannon Group, which recently appointed Matthew Thomas as its chief executive and has great plans to develop its offering and position within the market. “The Kemmy Business School and UL play a vital role in the Limerick and western region,” says Thomas. “Like many businesses here, we are keen to see the university grow and thrive and produce quality graduates who will raise the standard wherever they go, and attract more investment into the region.” Limerick Chamber is also a key partner for the institution. “We have a very strong relationship with Limerick Chamber. For instance we run a number of business breakfasts which are co-hosted with them,” O’Regan explains. “We also sponsor a number of scholarships for Limerick Chamber members on our MBA programme. And we work closely with the Chamber on a number of local initiatives such as those that reflect the important links that exist between UL and the city.” The current chief executive of Limerick Chamber, Dr James Ring, is a graduate of the Kemmy Business School, having undertaken an MBA there between 2013 and 2015. “As an MBA graduate of the KBS, the relationship is always going to be strong on a personal level between myself and the staff of the KBS. But from an organisational level it has always been firm and this year has seen that grow. KBS is working with us and Dell EMC on the new Regional Leaders Programme which

So the next few years will be ones that see us engaging with businesses and business issues in an increasingly global context. The achievements of KBS over recent years put us in a really strong position to achieve our ambitious plans. InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

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PAST STUDENTS Graduates from the Kemmy Business School have gone on to succeed in a variety of sectors over the years. Among those alumni is Ireland’s youngest person to summit Mount Everest, Robert Mortell, who is currently working as a senior corporate tax advisor in KPMG’s Dublin offices. “Having worked in KPMG for a number of years now, I’m confident that my time in the Kemmy Business School was well spent in preparing me for the challenges ahead and the broad curriculum helped me to develop the skills required to work in a fast-moving industry,” Mortell explains. “It was clear to me that the mindset of those involved in the Kemmy Business Robert Mortell School was always to focus on preparing us for future opportunities with an emphasis on ethical standards and also fostering excellent working relationships between students and staff. I consistently received strong support and encouragement for any initiatives I undertook during my time in the Kemmy Business School and this gave me the confidence to use the skills I had developed to move forward in seeking to fulfil my ambitions.” Former All-Ireland winning Cork camogie captain Anna Geary, meanwhile, undertook a business degree at KBS, UL, majoring in HR and resource management. Over the years her career has taken an interesting tangent – first moving into the marketing side with Dell before delving into media and broadcasting, featuring on The Anton Savage Show on Today FM, Ireland’s Fittest Family, and presenter of a six-part series on camogie for IRISH TV. “Even though I’m now in a different career to what I was when I first started out, the thing about undertaking the BBS degree is that it was so broad that it gave me an opportunity to explore areas of business I wouldn’t have thought of, and areas I wouldn’t necessarily have had a direct interest in,” she explains. “Ironically, even though I’m not directly working in the corporate business world, I’m probably using my business degree even more than I ever have. The one thing about KBS and UL was that it was very practical and everything was geared towards preparing you to work.” Anna Geary

has been extremely well received as we look to jointly develop the new generation of leaders for the Mid West and beyond,” explains Dr Ring. “It is always earmarked, especially by FDI, that the level of talent produced by the university is one of the selling points of the region. The entire third level sector has really developed its relationships with industry and is now an exemplar of how third level and industry should interact to ensure the correct supply of talent.” KBS is continually building on its successes. Take, for example, its focus on developing a strong alumni network, which includes an annual

UL awards ceremony and a recently launched KBS Alumni LinkedIn page in order to develop links with students in all parts of the world in tandem with the university’s own initiatives. “We have a new strategic plan that will bring us to 2020. This is focused on increasing our teaching and research impact and in doing so in an international context,” says O’Regan. “So the next few years will be ones that see us engaging with businesses and business issues in an increasingly global context. The achievements of KBS over recent years put us in a really strong position to achieve our ambitious plans.”

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BDO Limerick, the leading advisors to entrepreneurs & owner-managed businesses Value through excellent service

Congratulations from BDO Limerick to The Kemmy Business School on their celebrating 30 years within the University of Limerick Contact:

Denis Herlihy Managing Partner dherlihy@bdo.ie

Or on:

+353 61 414 455

Audit | Taxation | Outsourcing | Recruitment www.bdolimerick.ie BDO is authorised by the Institute of Chartered Accountants in Ireland to carry on investment business. BDO, a partnership established under Irish Law, is a member of BDO International Limited, a UK company limited by guarantee, and forms part of the international BDO network of independent members firms. BDO is the brand name for the BDO International network and for each of the BDO Member Firms.

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20/12/2016 15:51


IB SURVEY

The Entrepreneurial

BDO

EDGE We speak with several BDO Partners, who reflect on their experiences at the University of Limerick’s Kemmy Business School.

operative education programme gives UL graduates a significant advantage in deciding what area they would like to specialise in after graduation.”

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raduates from the University of Limerick and the Kemmy Business School (KBS) have found themselves working in a variety of careers, taking advantage of the preparation and well-rounded education provided by one of Ireland’s leading business schools. Chances are you could find at least one KBS graduate in most of Ireland’s top businesses, and BDO Ireland’s Limerick office is no different. Take Diarmuid Hendrick, for example. A Partner in BDO Limerick’s audit and business advisory department, Hendrick brings significant experience in auditing and advising both multinational and large owner-managed businesses to the table. With sectoral expertise including medical devices, manufacturing and technology, Hendrick works with a portfolio of clients in these sectors with turnovers ranging from 5 million to 500m. That impressive CV was kick-started by a BA in Law and Accounting at UL, which he describes as an excellent platform to start his career in BDO. “The course continues to be really well received by employers and it gave me a strong foundation for future qualifications in accountancy and tax,” Hendrick explains. “Each year BDO recruits a significant number of UL graduates as part of our graduate recruitment programmes in both Limerick and Dublin. We find that the careers office and the staff in Kemmy Business School are excellent in assisting students throughout the graduate recruitment process. The UL coInBUSINESS | Q4 2016

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Ken Kilmartin

Diarmuid Hendrick

The strength and impact of the cooperative placement is a sentiment with which his colleague and fellow Partner Ken Kilmartin agrees. “This looks great on a graduate’s CV and differentiates them from the competition in trying to secure employment after university,” he says. Kilmartin graduated with honours from UL having completed his business degree, majoring in accounting and finance. His role with BDO in Limerick revolves mainly around the provision of advice to owner-managed businesses in terms of audit and accounting, general taxation, succession, banking and restructuring, and business transfers and due diligence. “I had a fantastic experience in UL in the Kemmy Business School. This gave me the platform to have a career in business, which I am enjoying very much,” he says, noting that the depth and breadth of subjects and learning on offer at KBS provides its graduates with a competitive advantage. “The school’s main strengths are that it is focused on all strands of business, not just accounting. This includes marketing, HR, taxation etc., which gave me a broad understanding of business which has stood to me in my career.”

For tax partner Paul Nestor, who has been with BDO since 2005 and today advises multinationals and high net worth individuals on matters relating to cross border and domestic tax issues, his experience on the university’s BA in Law and Accounting has given him an excellent grounding for his post graduate qualifications in accounting and tax, ensuring his continued rise through the ranks of his chosen profession. Nestor provides an apt summation of the key strengths of both UL and the Kemmy Business School, tinged with the pride of a local. “As a Limerick man I am very proud that our city has a world class facility, both in terms of education and sport,” he says. “I made many friends in college and this has provided the opportunities for me to expand my business network.”

Paul Nestor

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IB SURVEY KPMG

CROSSING THE LINE Michael Daughton, Partner in Risk Consulting at KPMG in Ireland, considers the trade-offs at the heart of the digital economy.

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ompanies know more about their customers than ever before. Everything from the groceries we buy to how we got to work this morning is being monitored, measured and benchmarked to understand consumer behaviour more closely and create opportunities for business development. As consumers, we benefit from this closeness. The fitness apps that tracks our steps, the messaging apps we use to send pictures to loved ones at Christmas, or the telematics technology in our cars that lowers our insurance premiums – all work towards enhancing and enriching our everyday lives. When we use such technology there is often an assumed understanding: we’ll give you our information in exchange for the service or product that makes our lives easier, richer and sometimes cheaper. This is the trade-off at the heart of the data economy. But there are limits to this trade-off. People are increasingly aware that organisations are collecting, using, retaining and disclosing their information, including buying and selling it, and we know they are growing uneasy, begging the question: “when does ‘helpfully close’ cross the line to become ‘creepy and intrusive’? A recent survey by KPMG found that 55 per cent of consumers around the globe have decided against buying something online due to concerns over their personal privacy. The report highlights that while

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consumers are willing to embrace technology in order to improve their lives, many are becoming increasingly wary of organisations which collect and retain their information. Unsurprisingly, people draw the line in dramatically different places: one person’s ‘creepy’ is another person’s ‘cool’. Gender, age, wealth, nationality and education all intervene and often in surprising ways. Over half of the survey respondents are willing to share their gender, education or ethnicity online, for example, whereas less than 20 per cent are willing to share their income, location, medical records or address. Despite these concerns, 57 per cent of people fail to read, or only skim, privacy policies. In fact, Irish consumers read privacy policies most thoroughly when entering a website (27 per cent), followed by joining a mailing list or subscription (22 per cent) and submitting an online form (21 per cent). Research shows that Irish consumers pay less attention to privacy policies when downloading software such as a mobile app (18 per cent), setting up a social media profile (14 per cent) and making an online transaction (12 per cent). Asian countries such as India and Malaysia appear to be more receptive than Scandinavian countries to the idea of personalised advertisements. Japanese consumers seem to have a much lower level of trust in organisations handling personal data than consumers in India, but at the same time are the least likely to take precautions to protect their personal data. It is crucial that companies accurately assess whether they are handling customer information in a sound way. Failure to address this issue can seriously damage a business, as both customers and regulators

Michael Daughton, Partner in Risk Consulting at KPMG in Ireland

are paying an increasing amount of attention to how organisations collect, store and use personal data. Consumers will always value privacy over convenience so companies which seek to use personal data to personalise marketing, build brand loyalty and develop better products need to be acutely aware of this. Society has barely begun to address the moral and legal questions of what is private and what is public in the era of big data. This is not a philosophical debate that companies should ignore. Falling foul of regulations or misjudging consumer attitudes not only risks significant financial penalties in key markets, it also threatens a loss of trust and mass switch-offs from consumers who feel their privacy is being violated. Share prices, earnings and even the survival of some companies will likely rest on a more intelligent and sophisticated approach. Very few companies are asking themselves whether they are handling customer information in a morally and legally sound way. It is time they did. InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

21/12/2016 12:38


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20/12/2016 15:52 26/01/2016 09:04


TECHNOLOGY GATEWAY NETWORK ENTERPRISE IRELAND

FUELLING

INNOVATION The Technology Gateway Network is boosting Irish business and innovation.

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he Technology Gateway Network is an Enterprise Ireland funded programme which exists to enable industry to access the technology expertise of the Institutes of Technology (IoTs). The technology gateways provide the IoTs with dedicated resources who work with industry to articulate their problems in a manner that can be addressed by the institute’s research base. The individual gateways target industry sectors relevant to their core research capability. The current programme runs from 2013 to the end of 2017 with the expectation that the programme will be funded for an additional five year period from 2018-2022. The Technology Gateway Network

Technology gateways in brief • Deliver technology solutions for Irish industry close to their market needs. • Are open access points for industry of all sizes. • Act as local access points to the wider resources in the Irish research infrastructure. • Have a proven track record of delivering for industry. • Completed more than 1,650 industrial projects since 2013. • The total value of these projects is in excess of a16 million with 46 per cent of the total directly coming from industry.

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comprises 15 individual gateways, each centred around a proven area of expertise which serves an identified industry support base. The gateways are regionally based and provide open access to the IoTs for companies on a local, regional and national basis. The role of the gateway staff is to manage the interaction between the companies and the institute, help the companies source funding where necessary, and ensure projects are delivered successfully.

WiSAR Wireless Solutions Letterkenny IT

PEM Precision Engineering & Manufacturing

IT Sligo Command Connected Media APT Polymer Technologies

GMIT Galway

DIT

Athlone IT

IT Tallaght

MET Medical & Engineering Technologies

Shannon ABC Applied Biotechnology

IT Carlow

Limerick IT

CREST Coatings Innovations MiCRA Bio Diagnostics

Design + Applied Design

Waterford Institute of Technology IMaR Intelligent Mechatronics & RFID

IT Tralee

Cork Institute of Technology SEAM Engineered Materials

CAPPA Innovation Through Light TEC Embedded Systems

PMBRC Pharmaceutical & Healthcare MSTG Mobile Services

OPEN ACCESS Companies all over Ireland are using technology gateways to develop new or better products and services and smarter ways of doing things. Through the Technology Gateway Network, they are leveraging the expertise of over 300 industry-focused researchers, together with the specialist equipment and facilities of the Institutes of Technology, to access near-to-market innovation and solutions. Since 2008, over 850 companies have used the Technology Gateway Network to complete over 1,650 projects. Each technology gateway focuses on key technology areas aligned to industry needs. The focus areas of the gateway network includes materials, industrial design, precision engineering, biotechnology and pharmaceuticals, embedded solutions and wireless services. Within each gateway, a dedicated gateway manager and a team of specialised business development engineers act as the key contact points for industry and manage the successful delivery of projects on time and within budget.

SMALL PROJECTS, BIG IMPACTS Technology gateways are used by companies of all sizes, the majority of which are small and medium enterprises. Typical projects focus on the development of a new product or service or the optimisation of a process. The average project lasts for 2-3 months and costs around a10,000. However projects can range from a1,500 to a1 million. While projects may be small, the impacts for the company and the Irish economy are far greater. The Technology Gateway Network website includes a number of case studies focusing on the benefits to the client companies. Gateway managers are always happy to discuss potential collaborations with industry, so for more information, read through this guide, visit www. technologygateway.ie, follow us on Twitter @EITechGateway or simply get in touch with your local gateway team. InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

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TECHNOLOGY GATEWAY NETWORK IT TALLAGHT

INTEGRATED

SOLUTIONS MiCRA Biodiagnostics, the Institute of Technology Tallaght’s technology gateway, is part of a nationwide network of 15 technology gateways, and carries out near-to-market R&D of next generation bio and electro-chemical sensor technologies.

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ver very recent times the bioanalytical industry has been shrinking the tools of analysis onto credit card sized and smaller biochips. A biochip is a miniature microfluidic chip, which contains networks of microscopic channels and reservoirs for processing and analysing samples. The goal is to use these tools to speed up and improve diagnostics and to build handheld or in-line biosensors. A decade ago, the Institute of Technology Tallaght established MiCRA Biodiagnostics with funding support from Enterprise Ireland under its Technology Gateway programme. Cofunding for the facility came from the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF). This was done to facilitate research collaboration with industry partners by making the Institute’s research expertise accessible, ultimately driving commercial and economic success in the Irish biotechnology sector. MiCRA Biodiagnostics is now at the forefront of chemical and biological sensor innovation, servicing many industrial sectors with its rapid testing technologies. “MiCRA’s innovation focus is aligned with the needs of the Irish industry and captures in vitro human and veterinary diagnostics, environment and water quality, agri-food, biologics, biotechnology and pharmaceutical sectors via successful enterprise engagement. A key target is to enable Irish industries in these sectors to increase their competitiveness by leveraging expertise in sensor technology and associated resources,” explains Jack McDonnell, Industrial Liaison Manager with IT Tallaght. InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

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‘BEEP’, one of MiCRA’s bacteria identification sensors

“MiCRA’s expertise in physical and materials science, nanotechnology, microfluidics and sensor design and fabrication enable detection systems and fluidic components to be engineered into miniature ‘labon-a-chip’ systems. The facility offers solutions for a range of companies nationally (start up, SMEs and multinationals) spanning these sectors.” These solutions can be used in a variety of scenarios. In vitro diagnostics may be deployed in point-of-care situations such as in hospitals, a doctor’s office or veterinarian surgeries, giving rapid diagnosis and prognostic information. Sensors for industrial or manufacturing use are being developed with in-line capabilities, providing continuous feedback on specific molecules or microorganisms to the plant control room, giving more control of the production process. MiCRA’s sensors can also be used as handheld screening tools in the manufacturing plant, giving faster results compared to traditional tests. “The investigators and scientists at MiCRA have collaborated and developed rapid bioanalytical sensors for both small and large manufacturing, medical and research communities across a broad range of sectors. In

MiCRA’s innovation focus is aligned with the needs of the Irish industry and captures in vitro human and veterinary diagnostics, environment and water quality, agri-food, biologics, biotechnology and pharmaceutical sectors via successful enterprise engagement. the food sector the team at MiCRA has developed sensors for the rapid detection of food-borne pathogens, food spoilage and hygiene indicator microorganisms in both processed products and in the manufacturing plant,” McDonnell adds. “The facility is currently working on projects to develop biosensors for the detection of allergens and contaminants in food with industry partners. In the diagnostics and medical sectors, in collaboration with IVD manufacturers MiCRA has advanced biochip technology for the detection of biomarkers of human and animal diseases for use in point-of-care settings.” MiCRA Biodiagnostics also engages with other Enterprise Ireland technology gateways by providing chemical and biological sensor technology knowledge and expertise to industry clients within inter-gateway collaborations. This work is encouraged by Enterprise Ireland; MiCRA’s niche and unique position supports the skills embedded within the communications and engineering gateways to offer integrated solutions for Irish companies. For more information phone 01 404 2084, email micrabio@ittdublin.ie, or visit www.micra.ie.

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TECHNOLOGY GATEWAY NETWORK CREST

New Opportunities

FOR GROWTH DIT’s Centre for Research in Engineering Surface Technology (CREST) is working with Irish industry to develop cutting edge solutions that can bring real economic benefits.

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REST (Centre for Research in Engineering Surface Technology) is an ISO 9001:2008 accredited industrial research unit based within Dublin Institute of Technology (DIT) and is a member of the Enterprise Ireland funded Technology Gateway network (www.technologygateway. ie), specialising in coatings and surfaces. In partnership with the other technology gateways, CREST provides technology solutions to Irish industry specialising in projects with short turnaround times. The network delivered over 650 projects in 2016, primarily working with SMEs and HPSUs. Initially formed in 2003 within Enterprise Ireland, CREST has a rich history dating back to the Institute for Industrial Research Standards (IIRS) established in 1946. Dr Annaik Genson is the Consultancy Manager and explains that CREST specialises in protective coatings, materials surface engineering, coatings for environmental applications, and biomedical devices. The team in CREST has significant experience in corrosion control, material surface characterisation and coating solutions for a diverse range of industries across eight sectors: aerospace, automotive, civil engineering, architectural, OEM engineering, electronics, medical devices and hygiene. These services are delivered through:

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• Physical performance evaluation (e.g. durability/weathering, hardness, abrasion, adhesion). • Chemical analysis (e.g. both elemental and electrochemical) and coatings. • Material characterisation (e.g. chemical fingerprinting, imaging) and surface treatments. • Biological testing (e.g. antibacterial activity, biocompatibility, toxicity tests). • Patent and literature analysis. • Training. CREST is a nationally approved laboratory that has been retained by many Irish government bodies (e.g. Dept. of Agriculture, Food and the Marine, NSAI, OPW, NRA, several city and county council bodies) to give advice on public and private funded projects. CREST has been involved in several notable public projects, including the Nostrada award-winning restoration of the Ha’penny Bridge and the Turner House in the Botanic Gardens. More recently CREST was involved with the restoration of the Garden of Remembrance as part of the 1916-2016 centenary showcase. Using state of the art technology, the CREST team in collaboration with Colourtrend in Celbridge combined to restore the railings and gates within the garden to their original finish.

PARTNERSHIP As well as providing services to industry, the CREST team are also involved in developing new coating technologies. A recent success story has been the collaboration of the CREST and C&F Automotive based in Westmeath. C&F Automotive is a recognised leader in trim parts for leading brands such as VW, Audi and Volvo. Since 2007 C&F and

CREST have been developing new automotive trim products through Enterprise Ireland funded projects. 2016 saw the culmination of this work, winning large contracts with Volvo and Daimler for C&F and securing 50-100 jobs for the next five years using CREST Dualion technology. As well as working with existing companies, CREST coatings have also led to new Irish businesses starting in Ireland. Kastus Technologies is a spin-out of CREST, specialising in the delivery of antimicrobial additives and coatings. The Kastus technology can turn almost any surface into a weapon against bacteria while being harmless to humans and the environment. Kastus recently secured over a1.5m in funding through Atlantic Bridge, Carragh Holdings and Enterprise Ireland. The technologies are currently undergoing commercial trials on glass, paint and plastic surfaces to help combat bugs such as MRSA and E. coli, which could kill 10 million people worldwide by 2050. Please visit our website www.crestdit.com for further information or contact CREST Consultancy Manager, Dr Annaik Genson, at annaik.genson@dit.ie. InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

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20/12/2016 15:53


IB SURVEY NEW IRELAND ASSURANCE

Protection For YOUR BUSINESS The impact of death or the suffering of a specified serious illness of a key business stakeholder can potentially lead to debts, loss of business and even shareholder conflict, writes Ed Rafferty of New Ireland Assurance.

T

he future success of a business is often dependent on a few key people. A key person is any ‘key’ employee, director or consultant on whom the business depends for its continued success or existence. They have contacts, a reputation and goodwill built up with clients. What impact would the death of a key person/shareholder have on the business? • A bank could call in any outstanding loans due to concerns about the business cash flow. • If a shareholder had made a director’s loan to the business and then subsequently died, if no repayments had been made against the loan by the business, the full amount would then be due and payable to the family of the deceased shareholder. The family may look for repayment of the loan to help meet financial difficulties. How would a business repay these loans? Life assurance for a key person/ shareholder can cater for the above situations by putting life cover (and/or specified serious illness cover) in place on the life of all key people/relevant shareholders, so that the business can continue successfully if the keyperson/shareholder dies or suffers a specified serious illness.

LIFE ASSURANCE FOR LIMITED COMPANIES Assume an active shareholder who InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

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Ed Rafferty, New Ireland Assurance

A key person is any ‘key’ employee, director or consultant on whom the business depends for its continued success or existence. has played a large part in building up a firm dies and their spouse inherits their share of the business. What impact could this have on the business and the existing shareholders? • If the spouse wishes to sell their share to the remaining shareholders to realise the market value of the shares in the business and stabilise their family’s financial position, the remaining

shareholders may not have the capital required to buy back these shares and may be forced to take out personal loans to retain ownership. • Alternatively, the spouse may want to play an active role in the business leading to a new shareholder dynamic of skills, opinions and experience, which can lead to conflict and loss of business. What are the advantages of putting a shareholder’s life assurance arrangement in place? Life assurance for a limited company can benefit both the remaining shareholders of the company and the deceased shareholder’s next of kin. The proceeds of the life assurance policy provide a capital lump sum enabling the remaining shareholders to buy back the share of the business from the deceased’s next of kin. It also puts a legal agreement in place to regulate the purchase of the share in the business from the deceased’s next of kin.

TAKING CARE OF BUSINESS The financial and legal impact on a business resulting from the absence or loss of a key business stakeholder can be managed by planning to protect your business with the help of a financial broker or advisor. Terms and conditions apply. A Government levy (currently 1 per cent) applies to premiums paid to a life assurance policy. Protection benefits are subject to underwriting and acceptance by New Ireland Assurance. New Ireland Assurance Company plc is regulated by the Central Bank of Ireland and a member of Bank of Ireland Group.

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LEINSTER • MUNSTER • CONNAUGHT • ULSTER Wicklow six-year plan launched, jobs announced for Fingal and new sports complex for Carlow.

Cork ambassadors honoured, Minister launches GlobalLimerick. ie and local authority appointment in the south-west.

New tourism strategy for Galway, Council honoured for road safety awareness and Castlerea food hub receives funding.

HEX: 40B3

Tourism boost for Donegal, Monaghan firm deemed ‘star’ of agri-food sector and funding announced for LEOs.

RGB: 64/17

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THE CORK CONNECTION Cork has spent 2016 establishing itself as a budding hub full of potential, both domestically and abroad.

CELEBRATING A CENTURY

2017 marks 100 years since the founding of Ford’s factory in Cork.

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InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

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BREWING UP A LEGACY

In Association with

Operating from its historic site in Cork, HEINEKEN Ireland continues to excite consumers with premiums beer brands.

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LOCAL GOVERNMENT IN BUSINESS CMYK: 83 / 0 / 8 / 0

CMYK: CMYK: 49 / 0 / 100 / 0 0 / 0 / 0 / 100

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WHAT’S ON IN LEINSTER

24TH JANUARY HR Seminar Crowne Plaza Dundalk, Co Louth

COUNTY LONGFORD

FUNDING APPROVED FOR LONGFORD ARTS CENTRE

24TH - 28TH JANUARY Bray One Act Festival Mermaid County Wicklow Arts Centre, Co Wicklow 16TH - 26TH FEBRUARY Audi Dublin International Film Festival Co Dublin 29TH MARCH Fan Engagement Conference Kilkenny Co Kilkenny

COUNTY WICKLOW

WICKLOW PLAN LAUNCHED Wicklow County Council has announced a six-year plan which seeks to promote and support economic growth and community development within the county. The plan represents a major collaborative initiative between local community development and local economic development, and it seeks to, amongst other things, develop infrastructure and measures that are positive and supportive to investment, enterprise, innovation and knowledge creation in strategic locations, and to sustain existing enterprise and develop quality employment and income opportunities for the wide range of employment needs in the county.

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Longford Town’s Backstage Theatre is to receive funding of around a154,000 following the announcement that the Arts Council is to invest a65.1 million across Ireland in 2017. The multi-disciplinary arts centre, established in 1995, will receive the funding as part of the Arts Council’s ‘Making Great Art Work’.

COUNTY DUBLIN

ABOUT MAKING GREAT ART WORK Making Great Art Work sets out the Arts Council plans to lead the development of the arts in the decade 2016–2025, prioritising the artist and public engagement, and outlining a range of actions which the agency will take to deliver on its vision.

COUNTY CARLOW

JOBS ANNOUNCED NEW SPORTS COMPLEX FOR IN FINGAL IT CARLOW Fingal County Council has welcomed the news that West Pharmaceutical Services is set to create 100 new jobs as a result of the expansion of its facility into the Dublin Enterprise Zone. Paul Reid, Chief Executive of Fingal County Council, said the investment “highlights the attractiveness of Fingal as a location for investment and growth”. The Dublin Enterprise Zone is located in Blanchardstown and has grown rapidly in recent years, now allowing access to 1.2 million consumers and numerous suppliers.

A proposed sports complex for IT Carlow has been given the go-ahead after a planning appeal to An Bord Pleanála was dropped. The project is expected to cost around a6 million and will include two GAA pitches, two rugby pitches, two soccer pitches, and a running track. IT Carlow’s vice-president of corporate affairs, Cormac O’Toole, has said that the IT hopes to go to tender within the next couple of months, with construction beginning in the New Year. InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

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LOCAL GOVERNMENT IN BUSINESS NEWS: MUNSTER COUNTY CORK

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MUNSTER

CORK AMBASSADORS HONOURED Winner of the Cork Convention Bureau’s Ultimate Ambassador Award, Derry Cronin of Cronin’s Coaches Ltd pictured with Evelyn O’Sullivan of CCB

Six Cork Ambassadors have been honoured at the third annual #CorkNeedsYou Conference Ambassadors Awards ceremony. The ceremony, which took place at the Cork International Hotel, awarded honorees for bringing international conferences and events to the region. The six category winners were honoured for securing in excess of a11 million for the local economy over the past 12 months and for their role in bringing more than 14,000 delegates to Cork in the past year. Chairman of the Cork Convention Bureau, Seamus Heaney, paid tribute to both Cork City Council and Cork County Council for their “overall support and for their vision in recognising the value of business tourism to the economy here in Cork.”

12TH JANUARY Munster GrowthCLUB Business Planning Workshop - The Brehon & Angsana Spa, Co Kerry 2ND - 4TH FEBRUARY Quarter Bloc Party Co Cork 12TH FEBRUARY Tipperariana Book Fair Fethard Ballroom, Co Tipperary 3RD - 5TH MARCH Ennis Book Club Festival Ennis, Co Clare

COUNTY LIMERICK

MINISTER LAUNCHES GLOBALLIMERICK.IE The Minister of State for Tourism and Sport, Patrick O’Donovan, has launched a new web platform which hopes to connect Limerick City and County with its diaspora all over the world. GlobalLimerick.ie is a new platform led by Limerick City & County Council which seeks to connect the Limerick people with the estimated 3.5 million people around the world of Limerick descent. O’Donovan, a Fine Gael representative for Limerick, commented that the platform was a “hugely important way for up to 3.5 million people of Limerick descent to keep in contact with what is happening in their city and county”.

AIMS OF GLOBAL LIMERICK • To locate and connect with the Limerick diaspora • To promote Limerick city and county • To listen, respond and connect with the Limerick diaspora • To enable the Limerick diaspora communicate with the home-place • To develop and build the Global Limerick brand • To record and develop Limerick’s experience in the field of diaspora engagement InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

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COUNTY CARLOW

COUNTY CORK/KERRY

APPOINTMENT Local authorities in the south-west region have appointed Alma Murnane as the Programme Manager to lead the implementation of the South West Action Plan for Jobs (SWAPJ), which is chaired by Bob Savage, General Manager, EMEA Centres of Excellence for Dell EMC. A highly experienced public policy professional and economic development strategist, Alma was most recently Director of Policy & External Relations at Cork Chamber.

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WHAT’S ON IN

CONNAUGHT 4TH - 5TH FEBRUARY Galway International Rally Co Galway 3RD - 11TH MARCH Roscommon Drama Festival Roscommon Arts Centre, Co Roscommon 5TH MARCH Bards in the Woods Hazelwood, Co Sligo 8TH MARCH Celebrating Creative Women in Leitrim The Dock, Co Leitrim

COUNTY GALWAY

COUNTY ROSCOMMON

NEW TOURISM FOOD HUB STRATEGY FOR GALWAY RECEIVES FUNDING Galway County Council has called for input from local individuals and organisations working within the tourism sector as part of its new tourism strategy for the county. The council has drawn up a survey seeking to gain unique perspectives and observations of people directly involved within the industry, with the ultimate goal of assisting the development of the sector. The strategy is based around three core action areas: reputation management and branding, capacity building and management, and experience (or product) development.

An Chistin, the Castlerea-based food hub, is to be allocated a100,000 in REDZ (Rural Economic Development Zone) funding. The hub serves as a training facility for would-be chefs, as well as a facility which allows entrepreneurs within the food industry to bring their products from the idea stage to the production stage. Independent Roscommon TD Denis Naughten has welcomed the funding, stating that “the development of a food hub in Castlerea is vitally important, not just to support local employment, but also to help local food companies and food entrepreneurs to convert good ideas into viable businesses.”

COUNTY LEITRIM

COUNTY MAYO

COUNCIL HONOURED FOR ROAD SAFETY AWARENES Mayo County Council has been named overall winner of the Road Safety Award 2016 in the Public Sector Awards Magazine. The council and the Mayo Road Safety Working Group accepted the award for their work in promoting road safety awareness. The award came just days after the council picked up an InBUSINESS Recognition Award for its work in the area of Foreign Direct Investment.

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ANGLING FACILITY FOR BALLINAMORE Leitrim County Council has awarded Ballinamore in Leitrim a grant of a100,000 as a result of a funding submission to assist in development of an angling facility at Garadice and Kiltybarden Lakes. The resource will include accessibility for wheelchair users and a special area dedicated to youth angling.

Angling Project Costs • Overall: a125,000 • a100,000 from Department of Arts, Heritage, Regional, Rural and Gaeltacht Affairs. • a21,200 from Inland Fisheries Ireland • a3,800 from Leitrim County Council

InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

21/12/2016 12:30


LOCAL GOVERNMENT IN BUSINESS NEWS: ULSTER COUNTY DONEGAL

EU FUNDING FOR DONEGAL Donegal tourism has received a major boost in the form of just under a15 million in EU funding for cross-border walking and cycling greenways. Donegal Mayor Cllr Terence Slowey has welcomed the news, stating: “This is going to make a massive difference to Donegal, especially the east of the county.” The news comes shortly after Donegal topped the National Geographic Traveller’s list of the 17 “coolest” places on earth to visit for 2017.

NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC TRAVELLER’S COOL LIST: 17 FOR 2017 1 Donegal 2 Santiago 3 Helsinki 4 Greenland 5 Peru 6 Aarhus 7 Canada 8 Portland, Oregon 9 India 10 South Africa 11 Iran 12 New Zealand 13 Seoul 14 Sudan 15 Düsseldorf 16 Sicily 17 USA

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13TH JANUARY Ulster Club All Stars Old Armagh Road, Co Monaghan 20TH - 30TH JANUARY Letterkenny Trad Week Letterkenny, Co Donegal 25TH FEBRUARY Mediation and Conflict Resolution (one-day course) Kildallan, Co Cavanl MARCH 24TH - 27TH Inishowen International Folk Song & Ballad Seminar 2017 Inishowen, Co Donegal

COUNTY MONAGHAN

MONAGHAN FIRM A ‘STAR’ OF AGRI-FOOD SECTOR Minister for Agriculture Michael Creed has described a north Monaghan company as being one of the “stars of Ireland’s growing agri-food sector”. Speaking at the opening of Silver Hill Foods’ new Centre of Excellence, Minister Creed praised the development of the company, which produces and exports duck products to 24 countries and which is currently planning to expand further into Asia. Silver Hill’s Managing Director, Michael Briody, spoke of the company’s plans for the coming years: “We will be targeting Hong Kong, Malaysia, Vietnam and Indonesia in export terms over the next five years, where the Silver Hill ducks are regarded as the ‘mother of all ducks’.”

COUNTY MONAGHAN

FUNDING BOOST FOR LACE GALLERY The Lace Gallery in Carrickmacross has been granted a100,000 in funding, which will go towards the development of a multi-purpose site, including a new Lace Gallery, and to develop enterprise sites. The funding is as a result of the REDZ programme, which has been introduced to encourage economic development in rural areas, with a particular focus on maximising the synergies between towns and their hinterlands and encouraging collaboration between local authorities on larger projects. InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

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COUNTY DONEGAL

LOCAL ENTERPRISE GETS A1M JOB CREATION BOOST Minister of State for Employment & Small Business Pat Breen has announced that an additional a1 million has been made available to the Local Enterprise Offices for local enterprise development in 2016. Speaking at the LEO Donegal offices at the Enterprise Fund Business Centre in Letterkenny on December 5th, Minister Breen said: “With this funding boost the LEOs can build on the strong performance to date and support new start-ups and micro businesses, against a backdrop of Brexit and other external challenges.”

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The Cork

CONNECTION Cork has spent 2016 establishing itself as a budding hub full of potential, both domestically and abroad.

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fter what many considered to be an extremely positive 2015 for Cork, a number of new developments have heightened the air of confidence rising through the place in recent years. Of particular focus was the

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growing start-up sector within the county, which received a further boost in 2016 following the announcement of a new a200,000 Enterprise Ireland Competitive Feasibility Fund for entrepreneurs and early-stage start-ups within the region. This fund can be seen as a part of a more global progression for Cork’s start-up sector. November saw the county host the fifth Startup Nations Summit, which brought together over 1,000 delegates from around the world to attend events and meetings across

the county. The Cork Innovates Partnership – a partnership between Cork stakeholders from local government, education, and business support organisations – was recognised at an awards ceremony during the summit, with Cork Chamber CEO Conor Healy praising the “collaborative approach” of the partnership, of which Cork Chamber is a member. “[The Cork Innovates Partnership] has a particular focus on developing a thriving start-up sector,” he said. “That involves having the appropriate incubation support centres and advisers in place.” Furthermore, on the international stage Cork has made significant progress in its relations with China. Members of Cork City Council travelled to Chongqing, in the southwest of the country, in order to receive the prestigious Friendship City Award for Exchanges and Cooperation with the Asian superpower at the China International Friendship Cities Conference 2016. The award has highlighted Cork’s growing international reputation, a sentiment echoed by the Lord Mayor of Cork, Cllr Des Cahill, who spoke at the ceremony. During his acceptance speech for the award, the Lord Mayor praised the increasing number of bilateral visits between the two cities, stating that these visits had led to “valuable exchanges in the areas of economy and trade, education, culture, local government and training, which, in turn, have contributed remarkably to the social and economic

InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

21/12/2016 12:15


CORK

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In the following pages we profile a number of companies, institutes and local bodies helping to heighten the air of confidence rising through Cork.

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University College Cork

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Cork Institute of Technology

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P.11 “CORK COUNTY COUNCIL IS READY TO PLAY A SIGNIFICANT LEADERSHIP ROLE, IN CONJUNCTION WITH OUR STAKEHOLDERS, TO MAXIMISE THE OPPORTUNITY FOR BUSINESS ACROSS ALL SECTORS IN CORK.” development of both cities.” The Friendship City Award, however, was not the only progression in Cork’s relations with China in 2016. In February, delegates from the Jiangsu Province travelled to the county in a visit which sought to encourage economic development and educational and cultural exchange opportunities between the two regions. To further build upon the progress made during this visit, Cork County Mayor Cllr John Paul O’Shea and the CEO of Cork County Council, Tim Lucey, are to lead a delegation to Jiangsu Province in May 2017. “This visit to Jiangsu Province, which has the largest GDP of all the Chinese provinces underlines, once again, the strong presence and exposure that Cork is receiving in China,”

InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

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Lucey stated. Cork is not only an attractive prospect for visitors from China however, and the recent announcement from Aer Lingus that there is to be a 1.1 million seat increase to and from Cork and a number of the airline’s most popular routes, including London, Amsterdam and Paris, is sure to boost tourism into the county. In addition to this news, US authorities have, after a three year delay, finally granted a permit to Norwegian Air International to allow the airline to run transatlantic flights between Cork Airport and the United States. Cork has a unique potential for tourism, situated as it is at the gateway of two of Ireland’s key tourism draws, The Wild Atlantic Way and Ireland’s Ancient East, and the new flight path – as well as Aer Lingus’ increase in seats – could prove to be a significant boost to the industry. “This presents a once-off opportunity that, when delivered, will need to be supported by Cork and the south of Ireland,” said Tim Lucey. “Cork County Council is ready to play a significant leadership role in conjunction with our stakeholders to maximise the opportunity for business across all sectors in Cork.”

Viatel

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Cushman & Wakefield

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The Montenotte Hotel

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TranslationLoft

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P.15 Ford

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P.17 Port of Cork

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McCarthy Insurance Group

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HEINEKEN Ireland

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Cork City Council

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Cork County Council

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The Perfect Partners IN LEARNING UCC’s role in providing multinationals with highly skilled graduates and as a research partner in generating knowledge sharing expertise is earning the institute plaudits in both education and industry.

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ver the past year, University College Cork’s (UCC) growing international reputation for research and innovation, a tradition of independent thinking, and the generation of research income totalling over a83 million has led to the university being recognised as the Sunday Times University of the Year for the second year running, and five times in total. “It is very gratifying to see the work we do across the teaching and research space recognised, being at the cutting edge in the generation of new knowledge at an international

level, as well as the work we undertake in collaboration with enterprise partners,” says Professor Anita R. Maguire, Vice President for Research and Innovation, who is actively engaged in research, STI policy, academic industry collaboration and strategic development of the pharmaceutical industry. “All of these activities have come together in a complex mix, and being named University of the Year for 2016 and 2017, and being recognised as one of Reuter’s top 100 universities in Europe for innovation earlier this year, is recognition of the successful delivery across all of those aspects.” UCC is quite fortunate to be located at the heart of a major cluster of multinational companies, and the university’s role in supplying these organisations with highly skilled graduates is of great importance. UCC’s role as a research partner is also a significant one, building relationships that have been extremely rewarding for all parties, generating knowledge and sharing expertise

which is vital to Irish multinationals that have moved from basic manufacturing sites into roles of greater strategic importance globally. As part of an initiative which began in 2013, UCC is a participant in 11 of the 12 research centres established by Science Foundation Ireland, the largest joint state/industry research investment in Irish history. State investment of a355m is matched by a contribution of some a190m from over 200 enterprise partners. The research centres led by UCC include: the Irish Photonic Integration Research Centre at Tyndall National Institute; the APC Microbiome Institute; Marine Renewable Energy Ireland – MaREI; and INFANT, the Irish Centre for Fetal and Neonatal Translational Research, in addition to co-leading Insight with three other universities. “Having this level of investment in UCC really underpins the excellence of our research activity,” says Professor Maguire. “The scope and the complexity of the research programmes and the industry interface – these are the elements that make it all so rewarding.” UCC researchers now collaborate with over 700 of the world’s top universities across 120 countries. Professor Maguire encapsulated the university’s success as a unique combination of world-leading researchers, internationally competitive research infrastructure, transdisciplinary activity and extensive industrial partnership. “This complex combination not only provides the bedrock for sustained success in the generation of non-exchequer income and the development of enterprise, but also provides the agility to respond rapidly to emerging areas of national and international strategic priority,” she concludes.

Researchers at UCC

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InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

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LOCAL GOVERNMENT IN BUSINESS BAM IRELAND

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BUILDING ON SUCCESS BAM Ireland went from strength to strength in 2016. Theo Cullinane, CEO of the company, reflects on the successes of the past year and looks forward to the next.

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he past 12 months has proven to be a strong period for BAM Ireland, one of the country’s largest construction businesses, with a number of high profile projects and award wins representing particular highlights. Over the past year, BAM completed one of Ireland’s flagship office developments at One Albert Quay and commenced works on the Capitol Cinema site, both of which are in Cork. Additionally, works have commenced on One Molesworth Street for Green REIT and significant progress has been made on the construction of a major office building for an international client in Sandyford. BAM Ireland also reached an agreement with international giant Global Student Accommodation for a 400 bed student accommodation project in Dublin city centre. BAM’s work on the Corrib on-shore gas pipeline, a key part of the a3.5 billion project, was named Engineering Project of the Year at the Engineers Ireland Excellence Awards. The 4.9 kilometre tunnel services the Corrib gas field, one

of the largest infrastructure projects in the history of the state. BAM’s public work portfolio also continued to thrive in 2016. The company completed phase B2 of the Ulster Hospital in a joint venture with Graham. The joint venture has also been appointed by the South Eastern Health and Social Care Trust to deliver Ulster Hospital’s new £95 million Acute Services Block – currently the largest live healthcare project in Ireland. BAM continues to make a significant lasting investment in the infrastructure of the country through Public Private Partnership (PPP) projects. These include Schools Bundle 4; Courts Bundle PPP; the a230 million N25 New Ross Bypass PPP; and the a350 million M11 Gorey to Enniscorthy PPP motorway project. Speaking about the range of successful projects in 2016, Theo Cullinane, BAM Ireland Chief Executive, said: “BAM’s success is driven by our excellent reputation and dedication to innovation and sustainability. At the 2016

The Corrib Gas Pipeline Tunnel lies under Sruwaddacon Bay

InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

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Green Awards, BAM won in the Green Construction Category, and internationally we have been recognised as a global leader in combating climate change. This year, Royal BAM Group was again named on the Climate A List by CDP, the international not-for-profit organisation that drives sustainable economies. This places us in the top 10 per cent of companies globally in the fight against climate change.” BAM is widely recognised in Ireland and overseas for its sustainable project delivery. This is driven by the company’s significant investment in technologies that reduce the environmental impact of construction activity. The company has led the way in the Irish market in pioneering building information modelling, which provides 3D computer models for efficient visualisation and analysis of proposed works to increase efficiency in the design and construction phases. This year, BAM became the first organisation in the country to achieve BSI Kitemark PAS 1192-2 – the international industry standard for the use of BIM processes. At the recent Irish CitA BIM Innovation Awards, the international judging panel commended BAM’s work on the School’s Bundle 4 PPP project in the operations and asset management category. Cullinane observes, “The recognition we are now receiving from the industry clearly demonstrates to our clients and greater supply chain that we have the capability and expertise to utilise the latest technologies to drive cost savings and environmental sustainability for projects right across the board. The industry has taken notice of this, and we’re now looking forward to building on our success in 2017.”

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COMMITMENT TO CORK Cork Institute of Technology has a key role to playing in supporting industry in the region, explains Brian McGrath, Head of the School of Business.

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his year has been very positive for the School of Business in Cork Institute of Technology (CIT), with increased demand for our courses confirming the confidence both the public and industry have in CIT. We have grown our international partnerships to facilitate the mobility of students and staff, and have launched a new MSc in Digital Marketing. This commitment and responsiveness to industry needs is further demonstrated by the recent delivery of another bespoke programme developed with a local company to upskill a section of their workforce. We also maintain close relationships

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with the business community – staff are active members of a number of business associations in Cork, including the Chamber of Commerce, the Marketing Institute, the Sales Institute, CIPD and the Accounting Bodies. We receive great support from Cork companies which is essential to the quality of our delivery. This includes businesses and organisations that agree to allow undergraduate and postgraduate students to undertake live projects for those organisations and provide them with practical and innovative solutions, while local companies also take our students for work placement. Our mission demands that we

provide our learners with the skills they need for their careers and tp give the industry the skilled graduates they require. We therefore consult industry extensively on the design and continuous review of our courses, and we regularly meet companies who are considering investing in Cork and have shown them that our graduates have the relevant skills they need. This has provided great reassurance to prospective investors and reminds us of the critical need to keep our courses relevant and at the cutting edge. We look forward to becoming a Technological University to more accurately reflect the quality of the work done here at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels. It will also ensure appropriate international recognition of the quality of our graduates.

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LOCAL GOVERNMENT IN BUSINESS VIATEL

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Down with Data IN CORK For Irish company Viatel, staying connected is key. Having established successful ties in the Cork region, the company has shown that it’s not going anywhere just yet.

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ata connectivity provider Viatel has established a strong customer base in the heart of Cork, providing medium to large companies and government sectors with innovative solutions in connectivity, data and voice services. “Viatel is a focused connectivity, data centre and voice supplier. We provide purely to corporate, government and wholesale customers here in Ireland.” says Damien McCann, Director of Sales and Marketing, Viatel. With both government and corporate clients including the Department of Education, HEAnet and the Department of Agriculture, alongside Voxpro, Abtran, Workday and Hubspot, Viatel has firmly cemented its position within the

local business landscape in Cork. Viatel has operations in the region to support corporations such as Voxpro, Abtran and RDJ, which McCann notes is a major advantage for the company. “We see it as a major growth zone and it’s a vital area for our business to be on the edge and work with these companies,” he says. Viatel has a strong relationship with Cork Chamber of Commerce, which McCann views as a mutually beneficial relationship that allows both parties to introduce investment and growth into the region. As he notes, “We’re very active with Cork Chamber, we attend their meetings and any opportunity to engage with the Chamber members is fantastic for ourselves. Our direct audience are our fellow members of the Chamber.

Damien McCann, Director of Sales and Marketing

InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

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That’s our type of customer base.” McCann also explains that the innovative work of the Cork Chamber is a strong factor in Viatel’s interest in the area. “They’re one of the hardest working Chambers nationally and they’re always progressive with events, innovative discussions and introductions, and I can see us only doing more with them in the future,” he adds. Moving into 2017, Viatel will invest further in the region by upgrading their existing fibre services, offering their customers speeds of up to 10Gbps. “We have a fibre network in Cork, so we’re investing over a1 million. This will facilitate the growth of our fibre network in terms of the speed capacity that we can offer to our corporate and public sector clients in the area,” McCann explains. The announcement of this upgrade has already garnered additional contracts for Viatel, allowing them to consider further investment in the region. Following on the heels of this announcement, McCann notes that the company hopes to introduce three new services in addition to their current connectivity options. These include new security resources for their corporate clients, offsite data backup and recovery, and hosted PBXs (Private Branch Exchange) for clients. As a result of this expansion, a strong increase in staff numbers is expected in 2017, with McCann predicting an estimated 40 new employees next year. “These three products, along with our existing organic growth, will generate further growth for the business,” he says. “It will be an exciting year in 2017, and we look forward to launching. It will certainly be a busy time for us.”

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Opportunity awaits

IN CORK Cork holds great potential for growth given the right levels of investment, writes Peter O’Flynn, Managing Director, Cushman & Wakefield.

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n a year dominated by global political turmoil, 2016, which commenced with such optimism from an Irish perspective, ended up in a state of confusion and showed how Ireland is directly linked to global activity. The Irish and Cork property markets have been duly affected. Commercially, the office market has been the most active during 2016 with One Albert Quay completed and occupied by new and expanding FDI and indigenous companies. The key to attracting global occupiers is certainly not reliant on the well documented corporate tax structure, and although it is a feature, there are equally strong reasons around the quality of education and availability of graduates, the availability of fourth generation office stock, residential options to house employees and a vibrant city centre region. There is little doubt Cork can compete on the quality of lifestyle. However, we now need significant investment to increase Grade A office stock, provide city centre quality living environments and investment in our education at all levels, but mostly in third level, which will support a creaking system and take it to the next level, allowing Cork to become a designated university city. Over the last 15 years, average office take-up in Cork is over 30,000m2. This continued right through the recession years up to the two most recent schemes, One Albert Quay and The Capitol, which are now almost

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completely accounted for. We now have a supply issue with no new schemes under way; this will result in Cork having a shortage in Grade A office space. There are schemes in both the city centre and suburbs with planning, but many will be unlikely to commence unless they have pre-lets. This is directly related to the availability and cost of finance in the market. Experience tells us occupiers will come if quality office stock is available, but with a short shelf life around enquiries, if the space is not there they are more likely to go somewhere else. The speculation around Brexit is that there could be increased demand for Dublin offices, which could generate spin-off for the Cork market, however, we need the stock to be in place as the occupiers are unlikely to wait for a 12-18 month delivery time. If central government and the IDA provide the support, the overall dividend across all sectors will be significant. The key to any region is the strength of a vibrant city centre where people work and live in a planned city environment, supported by transport hubs that reduce the current reliance on the car. The North and South Docklands provide realistic and achievable ambitions for the growth of the city centre over the next 20 years, and needs the direction and investment to make this happen. Opportunities in the suburbs and extended urban regions are equally important and again, the big challenge here is the provision of the required infrastructure to allow growth occur. Cork Harbour remains our greatest asset and the completion of the Dunkettle Interchange and M28 is absolutely fundamental to allowing growth around all the sectors from commercial, tourism, development, pharmaceutical

Peter O’Flynn, Managing Director, Cushman & Wakefield, Cork

“THERE IS LITTLE DOUBT CORK CAN COMPETE ON THE QUALITY OF LIFESTYLE. HOWEVER, WE NOW NEED SIGNIFICANT INVESTMENT TO INCREASE GRADE A OFFICE STOCK.” and educational activity generally based all around the harbour, all of which are exhibiting strong growth potential. Ireland badly requires a high quality second tier European city and not necessarily one to compete with Dublin. Clearly, Cork is the only realistic alternative within Ireland. It will require a bold decisionmaking process at government level, supported by the required investment and working with all the local, public and private stakeholders. Investment in third level education, health and other public sector requirements, including housing, can be the catalyst for private sector investment in our city. The opportunity still exists in Cork – it is our duty to future generations to make it happen. InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

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LOCAL GOVERNMENT IN BUSINESS MONTENOTTE HOTEL

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Unique and BOUTIQUE InBUSINESS checked in to the newly refurbished Montenotte Hotel in Cork city and discovered a fabulous four-star hotel offering a remarkable service.

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tay unique’ is how the Montenotte Hotel in Cork describes its offering, and after spending a night at the centrally located boutique residence you’ll understand why. The hotel has a number of features that sets it apart from much of the competition, among them its panoramic restaurant and bar overlooking the city, and an exquisite view that can be enjoyed from many of the newly refurbished rooms. Even on a cold winter’s day, it’s worth making use of the balcony area as the staff will happily accommodate you with outdoor heating. In terms of the rooms, the hotel has a wide offering, from the standard double room to the fantastic executive room, which is perfect for those on business looking for extra space in which to work. Whatever the choice, they all exude luxury, and offer the mod cons and facilities you’ll need to relax and enjoy your stay. One of the standout features of the Montenotte Hotel is undoubtedly its skill in mastering the art of fine detail. It’s on full display in the executive room; whether it’s the coffee table books showcasing adventure travel destinations (perfect to graze over while sipping on a complimentary coffee), the fruit selection awaiting you on arrival, which includes strawberries dipped in milk chocolate, or a signed welcome note from the residence services

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Montenotte Hotel

Executive Room

manager – the personal touch leaves a lasting impression. Top of the range facilities are in plenty at the Montenotte too. The hotel boasts a 20-metre swimming pool, a sauna, a jacuzzi and gymnasium so there’s no excuse for not working off the calories gained from that delicious sticky toffee pudding consumed at the restaurant the evening before. The in-house Cameo cinema is a great place to wind down and to take in a Hollywood classic or a recent release, depending on the night’s theme. Perhaps the most remarkable feature of the Montenotte Hotel, however, is the service. At every turn, staff will go the extra mile to ensure your stay is a memorable one; they offer the kind of pampering and attention that will ensure you make a return visit or at least pass on the recommendation. The hotel is conveniently located just a 10-minute stroll from the city centre so there’s plenty of exploring and shopping to be done right on your doorstep. What’s not so convenient, however, is that with all that the Montenotte has to offer – from the restaurant with fresh, seasonal cuisine,

Panoramic view of Cork city

fabulous cocktails and local craft beer to the general warmth and glowing feel of the place – it’s a big ask to venture off the premises! For more details visit www.themontenottehotel.com.

CORK BUSINESS BRANDS UNITE The Montenotte Hotel has recently announced its lead sponsorship of the Cork Chamber Annual Dinner 2017. Almost 1,000 business people, along with global, national and regional dignitaries and VIPs, are expected to attend the event on Friday February 3rd 2017. Commenting on the announcement, Conor Healy, CEO, Cork Chamber, said: “It is really exciting to see an indigenous business brand, such as the Montenotte Hotel, sponsoring the most significant date in the Chamber corporate calendar. This sponsorship represents the opportunities that exist for both SMEs to large multinationals through Cork Chamber and we are delighted to work with the Montenotte Hotel and other sponsors on this flagship event.”

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Make the right first impression WITH GLOBAL CUSTOMERS TranslationLoft is a professional full-service translation agency, offering quality-driven translation solutions to companies seeking to internationalise their services or product offerings.

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a second chance to make a good first impression. This is why we only use professional translators who translate into their mother tongue and why all content is reviewed by a second senior professional translator, every time. We are also DIN EN 15038-certified, meaning we have best-in-class processes in place for every stage of the translation workflow, from recruitment of our translators right up to delivery of the final product. We combine professional translation with the very latest in software technology to help our customers meet the challenges

of effective multilingual communication with their international clients. Our most recent offering is a cloud-based website localisation platform, which takes the pain and complexity out of translating your website. All we need is your URL, and we manage the entire process from there – we take a copy of your existing site, translate and review it professionally, SEOoptimise the content, implement search engine indexing and geo targeting, and then host your mirrorimage language version on our own secure servers. At TranslationLoft, we listen to our customers’ requirements, we solve their problems, and we always go that extra mile to ensure the service they receive is second to none.

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LOCAL GOVERNMENT IN BUSINESS FORD IRELAND

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Celebrating 100 Years

IN IRELAND In 2017, Ford celebrates 100 years since the founding of its factory in Cork.

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n just a few months it will be exactly 100 years since Henry Ford established the Ford factory on the Marina in Cork city, and Ford Ireland plans to mark the centenary through a number of exciting initiatives in 2017. Beginning on January 1st, Ford will launch an eye-catching new marketing campaign based around the company’s Irish centenary and encouraging consumers to look at the brand differently. The campaign will feature the Irish-American actor Aidan Quinn in a range of video, print and online executions that will become familiar to Irish consumers over the next year. Commenting on the centenary, Ciarán McMahon, Chairman and Managing Director of Ford Ireland, said: “Ford has a unique heritage in Ireland, not only through the company’s close family links with Cork but also through the Cork Ford factory and of course many decades of muchloved Ford cars and vans on Irish roads. And we are still to the forefront in the automotive sector in Ireland with the widest network of dealers, providing employment, directly and indirectly, to some 1,000 people across the country”. The Ford Motor Company was established in Michigan by Henry Ford in 1903. Henry’s father William had emigrated from Co Cork in 1847 during the famine, settling in Michigan. By 1917 Ford’s purpose-built factory in Cork had been opened, and there is no doubt that Henry’s Cork roots played an important part in that decision. In his own words, he hoped that the new Ford plant would ‘start Ireland InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

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along the road to industry’ – the plant was Ireland’s first example of foreign direct investment, decades before the term was coined. The plant became the largest tractor factory in 1929 with the Fordson tractor, but also produced passenger cars including the iconic Model T – the last ever Model T produced rolled off the line in Cork in December 1928. Throughout the following decades the factory also produced all of the other main Ford vehicles sold in Europe from the 1930s right up to the 1970s and 80s, including the Model A, Model BF and Model Y, the Prefect, Anglia, Escort, Cortina and Sierra. “Ford vehicles were and still are an ubiquitous sight on the streets and roads of Ireland all through the 20th century and right up to the present day,” said McMahon. “The brand’s constant popularity meant that almost every Irish person grew up with a Ford

car in the family or had aunts, uncles and neighbours who drove a Ford.” The factory is sadly no more, having closed its doors in 1984, but Ford remains one of the best-selling brands in both the car and van market in Ireland. Several models including the Fiesta, Focus and Transit are segment leaders while the all new Mustang is in a class of its own, and the company has the widest network of dealers in the country with 52 dealerships. “The company is also looking to the future as we plan for the next century of business in Ireland,” said the Ford Ireland chief. “Ford is the company with the largest test fleet of autonomous driving vehicles in the world, and in 2017 we will start testing autonomous vehicles across Europe. The company is moving from traditional vehicle manufacture to being a smart mobility solutions provider as we tackle the global mobility challenges of the 21st century.”

Pictured at the Ford family memorial in Henry Ford’s ancestral village of Ballinascarthy, Co Cork, is Ford Ireland Chairman and Managing Director, Ciarán McMahon, with an original Model T and the new Ford Mustang, available for the first time in right-hand drive in Ireland in 2016

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Blarney Castle 30min

Fota Wildlife Park 10min

‘Small city, big welcome’

Jameson Distillery 10min

Cork City 20min

Corner Stone of Ireland’s Ancient East

Titanic Experience 5min

The Gateway to Ireland’s Wild Atlantic Way

Voted Second Best Cruise Destination in the British Isles & Western Europe

Port of Cork, Custom House St., Cork, Ireland T12 CY88 T: +353 21 4273 125 | E: info@portofcork.ie @portofcork portofcork.ie /portofcork WWW

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LOCAL GOVERNMENT IN BUSINESS PORT OF CORK

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Cobh Cruises TO THE TOP Cobh offers visitors a location of beauty, history and culture, resulting in its recognition as the second favoured destination among cruise ship travellers across Western Europe.

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he inaugural Cruise Critic Cruisers’ Choice Destination Awards have revealed travellers’ favourite cruise destinations across the British Isles and Western Europe, with Cobh claiming the second spot. The award was given in recognition of the superior level of service afforded to cruise passengers visiting the Cobh region. Amsterdam was revealed as the number one favoured destination for a cruise ship passenger, while Glasgow’s Greenock ranked third. Captain Michael McCarthy, Commercial Manager, Port of Cork said: “We are simply thrilled with the result for Cobh. Every year the Port of Cork puts a huge amount of effort into preparing and promoting the Cork region to the cruise companies and their passengers and this has really paid off.” McCarthy noted that Cobh’s success must be credited to a

collaborative team effort, stating that the enjoyable experience of passengers could not be achieved without an extremely dedicated group of people who believe in the Cobh destination. “Prior to the vessels’ arrival, the port company promotes the region’s attractions directly to cruise passengers on board the liners,” he explained. “Once the liner arrives, our port pilot steps on board and really this is the beginning of the welcome. From

“EVERY YEAR THE PORT OF CORK PUTS A HUGE AMOUNT OF EFFORT INTO PREPARING AND PROMOTING THE CORK REGION TO THE CRUISE COMPANIES AND THEIR PASSENGERS AND THIS HAS REALLY PAID OFF.”

The cruise berth in Cobh

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there, we offer tourism ambassadors on every liner, local entertainment and then as their visit ends, we have the Cobh brass band on the quayside as the liner departs. This award is about a port and a city working together to make the passenger experience entirely better.”

EXPERIENCE One of the most pivotal aspects of a cruise experience, along with the lavish quality of the ship and excellent standard of service shown by staff, is a fitting itinerary driven by local culture and unique locations. “Cruises enable travellers to explore a number of amazing destinations, offering culture, beauty and history,” explains Adam Coulter, UK editor, Cruise Critic. “With such a variety of unique destinations to choose from, these awards aim to highlight, and celebrate, those rated highly by travellers to offer inspiration and guidance to cruise planners.” One noticeable aspect of the Cruise Critic Awards is that they are based solely on passenger feedback, meaning there is no ambiguity concerning the selection of winners. As the sole judges of the locations, passengers had a strong voice in the awards. One passenger highlighted the need for ports and cities to work together to enhance the visitor experience, which has evidently been achieved in Cobh. “Beautiful city with very friendly locals. What more could we ask for?” they remarked. To date, 118,000 passengers and crew have visited the region of Cork via cruise ship, with a further seven liners presently scheduled to call to the port. Not only are these numbers expected to increase but, looking to 2017, the Cork cruise business hopes to expand even further, growing the number of cruise calls from 58 in 2016 to a total of 66 over the next year – full steam ahead.

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Insuring Excellence McCarthy Insurance Group continues to take the traditional approach to good business in Cork city.

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his year has witnessed a significant period of growth for Cork-based business McCarthy Insurance Group, having acquired three new brokerages based in Santry, Waterford and Charleville, and increased its workforce to a 200-strong team. Looking back on 2016, one prominent highlight for the group was being the recipient of not one, but three awards, including the Cork Business Association’s Best Medium Business 3rd Quarter Award. “These awards are going a long time and that was great recognition for us,” says Paul Kavanagh, Managing Director of

McCarthy Insurance Group. The McCarthy Insurance Group has extensive expertise in personal, life and health insurance yet it is the company’s commercial insurance offering that Kavanagh feels requires a more traditional approach. This is reflected in McCarthy Insurance Group’s decision to remain located within the city centre. “You can’t do commercial business online,” explains Kavanagh. “Commercial business is traditional face-to-face business. It’s you talking to me. We listen to the client, we find out their needs, we research 120 markets, we advise and recommend, but most

of all, we support them when they need us most! “People like doing business with us face-to-face, and we will be here as long as that is what our customers want. Our motto is ‘your trusted partner and advisor’ and our ‘treating consumers fairly’ approach continues to see an increase in customers coming to us from all over the 26 counties.” Looking ahead to 2017, the company hopes to expand its reach further in Dublin and Munster. Kavanagh says: “There’s a big upturn in the economy and insurance is a huge factor in that because our job, from a commercial point of view, is to protect clients should unforeseen circumstances occur.”

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Charles McCarthy Insurances Ltd t/a McCarthy Insurance Group is regulated by the Central Bank of Ireland

21/12/2016 12:52


LOCAL GOVERNMENT IN BUSINESS HEINEKEN IRELAND

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Brewing Up A LEGACY

Operating from its historic site in Cork, HEINEKEN Ireland continues to excite consumers with premium beer and cider brands.

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uilt upon a rich brewing heritage spanning over a century and a half, Cork’s Lady’s Well Brewery continues to go from strength to strength. The brewery celebrated its 160th anniversary in August 2016 by opening its gates to the public with a series of guided tours – a rare opportunity for members of the public to gain an insight into the running of one of Ireland’s most successful breweries. Founded as Murphy’s Brewery by the Murphy family in 1856, Lady’s Well has undergone many changes and transformations throughout the past 160 years. The site now serves as the headquarters and brewery of HEINEKEN Ireland and supports 1,000 local suppliers and injects over a100 million into the economy. Maggie Timoney, Managing Director, HEINEKEN Ireland, believes the brewery’s continued success lies in its ability to adapt to a constantly changing landscape. “Change is constant and that is a good thing as you need to stay on top of your game in the competitive Irish beer and cider market.” Perhaps one of the most significant changes in recent years occurred in 2009, with the merging of Beamish and Crawford with HEINEKEN Ireland. The merger has meant that HEINEKEN Ireland now produces an even wider portfolio of products, including Ireland’s most popular lager, Heineken®, two of the finest Irish stouts available in Beamish and Murphy’s, as well as the recently

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launched, award-winning cider Orchard Thieves. The impressive brewing capabilities within Lady’s Well Brewery have not gone unnoticed by HEINEKEN International, which in 2013 awarded HEINEKEN Ireland with the Bronze Award for continuous improvement. The award recognises brewing excellence, and acknowledges HEINEKEN Ireland as one of the most productive breweries within HEINEKEN international’s worldwide network. The company, however, is not merely dwelling on its past achievements. Progress is very much on the agenda, as the ‘Brewing a Better World’ programme illustrates. The programme, launched in 2010, sets ambitious sustainability targets for the Irish business to achieve by 2020. A report released at the

half-way point in the programme, in 2015, has shown that the company is well on the way to achieving its goals on time. According to the report, CO2 emissions in production have decreased by 10 per cent since 2010, while 100 per cent of HEINEKEN’s fridges are now ‘green’, resulting in an improvement of energy efficiency of 45 per cent. Also mentioned in the report was that HEINEKEN Ireland’s water consumption of 3.1 hectolitres per hectolitre of beer is one of the most efficient usage rates within the HEINEKEN global network. Maggie Timoney is proud of the changes being made within HEINEKEN Ireland, and looks forward to continuing these recent trends for the good of future communities. “We have being brewing here for 160 years now and we need to ensure the legacy we leave behind has us brewing on site for another 160 years. It’s vitally important that we look after the environment around us and support the communities that support us.”

HEINEKEN Ireland headquarters and brewery, Cork

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LOCAL GOVERNMENT IN BUSINESS CORK CITY COUNCIL

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CITY REGENERATION Through hard work and innovation, Cork City Council is extending the availability of quality and affordable accommodation in the city, writes Brian Geaney.

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ork City Council manages a significant portfolio of just under 9,000 social housing units in combination with its statutory role as enabler and facilitator of general housing within the present boundary. With this primary remit and changing inclusion, sustainability and affordability requirements, the Council views housing provision as not just a social issue with a key requirement to solve the problems of social and affordable housing needs, but also a strategic economic issue. The availability of quality affordable accommodation and neighbourhoods is vital to the competitiveness of Cork city and region. As in Dublin, there is a clear risk of the talent pool necessary for growing new businesses, such as financial services, pharma and tech sectors and others, not being in a position to find suitable accommodation in cities. Cork’s increasing housing demand is further augmented by the growing needs of two large and highly regarded third level educational institutions with thousands of students and related teaching hospitals, not to mention the InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

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increased requirements of tourism and business visitor numbers. The City Council has hit the ground running by approaching the delivery of its Social Housing Programme and the North West Quarter Regeneration Programme on several fronts. New housing provision has been mediocre in Cork since the collapse of the economy in 2008. Only recently is there an emerging glimmer of new housing start-ups in the private sector due to a collapsed construction industry and a home averse banking sector. Cork City Council has upped the pace of its housing response. It is directly purchasing housing accommodation, facilitating approved housing bodies to provide housing and has ramped up the return of vacant houses back into the system. Its immediate focus is to accelerate and restart the supply of social housing on its own landbanks and to collaborate with the private sector to unlock schemes and sites to provide housing solutions. While the first route is being delivered by traditional means, progress is being made by a more

aligned project management approach to these large projects. A total of 135 units are currently under construction in this category. The second route – collaboration with the private sector – is proving very successful to date on a wide range of projects evenly spread across the city, which should deliver hundreds of additional units within the next 18 months or so. With support from the newly created Department of Housing, Planning and Local Government, the City Council has embarked on an innovative integration of an EU Competitive Dialogue procurement procedure and a series of Part 8 applications. It is very pleased with progress to date on this front. The process involves facilitated dialogue with developers, landowners and other key stakeholders to deliver housing solutions in line with architectural, quality and sustainability requirements. While the process is resource and engagement heavy, the Council considers it well worth the effort for the results. It is not possible to cite details of the schemes due to the commercially sensitive nature of the on-going processes. Both delivery routes involve an enhanced key stakeholder engagement programme both internally amongst the supply chain, design teams and funders and externally with host communities and public representatives, which is imperative. Housing construction projects and their related stakeholder communities are very different and more complex to commercial and industrial projects due to their socio-economic nature. Stakeholder expectations need to be managed carefully if programmes are to be delivered to plan. Effective stakeholder engagement/community liaison must be budgeted for and incorporated into plans. It is going to be an interesting and a busy time ahead, but the team here in Cork is well up for the challenge.

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CORK COUNTY SUPPORTING BUSINESS, WELCOMING VISITORS

Cork County Council supports many initiatives and business partnerships to help maximise business opportunities such as the Cork Convention Bureau, the Beacon Retail Initiative and our Food Incubation units. We also allocate 1% of the collected rates income for Economic Development initiatives to provide financial and other supports to promote enterprise, economic activity and increase employment. Cork County is a centre of excellence in the Agri-food sector. This reputation is being enhanced by the development of

Ornuaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, the Irish Dairy Board, Centre of Excellence at Mitchelstown which will support the global development of the Kerrygold brand; offering a valuable outlet for our expanded milk output. The Wild Atlantic Way and Ireland's Ancient East starts, or finishes, in Cork County. So, whether youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a walker, a cyclist or an angler, a nature lover or a sightseer, a history buff or a foodie, a shopaholic or a culture vulture... or even if you just want to kick back and enjoy a relaxing break, County Cork has something for everyone.

FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE VISIT WWW.CORKCOCO.IE

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LOCAL GOVERNMENT IN BUSINESS CORK COUNTY COUNCIL

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A Double Victory for CORK COUNTY COUNCIL As 2016 draws to a close, Cork County Council is being celebrated as an organisation dedicated to culture and committed to energy efficiency.

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or Cork County Council, 2016 has been an award winning year. Not only has the Council secured the Chambers Ireland Excellence in Local Government Award for Festival of the Year thanks to the Taste of West Cork Food Festival, but it has also been the recipient of the Sustainable Energy Association of Ireland Public Sector Award 2016. Chief Executive of Cork County Council, Tim Lucey, feels that receiving a Chambers Ireland Excellence in Local Government Award is a sign of the organisation’s progress in an increasingly competitive environment. “This award is recognition of the evolving culture, we as an organisation, are operating and excelling in,” he explains. “It also demonstrates the incredible commitment of staff to innovation in service delivery, together with the skill set required to deliver ongoing modernisation and change.” Cork county Mayor, Cllr Seamus McGrath, also highlighted his enthusiasm for these substantial victories. “These awards select the very best of local authority projects,” he noted. “To have five projects from Cork selected is a wonderful achievement in the first instance. I was delighted to learn of the projects which were selected and am absolutely elated to see the award for A Taste of West Cork Food Festival presented in what are highly competitive categories with incredible InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

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Paul Finnerty, Facilities Manager; Brian Ahern, Energy Officer; Tim Lucey, Chief Executive; Mayor of the County of Cork Cllr Seamus McGrath; Alex Grassick, Energy Officer and Louis Duffy Director of Service Environment pictured at the Sustainable Energy Awards 2016

variety of worthy winners.” To add to this achievement, Cork County Council also received the Sustainable Energy Association of Ireland Public Sector Award 2016 which recognised the Council as the first local authority in Ireland to develop and implement an energy management system, fully certified to ISO 50001 standard. As of now, Cork County Council has provided a roadmap and template, allowing other local authorities to follow in their footsteps. Lucey noted that the Council’s focus on efficiency and financial saving throughout the previous two decades of energy management systems has both set a trend and lead to substantial savings for the Council. “Cork County Council has spent the last 20 years working toward efficient energy management. We were the first local authority to set up an energy agency in 1995 and established our energy management system in 2012,” he explains. “Considering we

have an average annual spend of a7 million on energy, any and all savings generated by such initiatives are savings that benefit our environment and enable us to redirect financial savings into other services.” Energy efficiency is clearly an important issue for the Council, which has successfully implemented 120 projects thus far, saving over 3 million kWh in energy and a substantial a630,000 for the Council. “We have introduced a new public lighting policy requiring any new schemes to have high efficiency bulbs (LEDs) and recently upgraded all our inhabited islands to LED lighting, saving on maintenance and energy costs,” Lucey adds. “We are now using energy efficient design in all our new projects, for example, our new swimming pool in Dunmanway is using the latest combined heat and power plant and solar thermal energy to heat the pool water. We are always seeking new and innovative ways to deliver on energy saving.”

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Informing you about the work of local authorities in supporting the business needs of their community... To tell us what your local council is doing for business email joseph.oconnor@ashvillemediagroup.com

In Association with

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21/12/2016 12:31


IB SURVEY STEPEX

Facilities Management Ireland – Products, People, Practices As the Facilities Management Ireland conference and exhibition approaches its ninth year, showcasing the top products, people and practices in facility management, they continue to prove that there’s always a better way.

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rom the 7th to the 8th of March 2017, the RDS Dublin will host the Facilities Management Ireland (FM Ireland) conference and exhibition aimed at those responsible for maintaining and managing commercial, industrial, retail, educational, government and large facilities and working environments. The FM Ireland event is free to attend and stands as an unmissable opportunity for office management teams to experience the latest products and services, thanks to the unique combination of conference content delivered adjacent to Ireland’s largest exhibition. The aim of these products and services is to allow these individuals to run their environment more efficiently and at less expense – maintaining the infrastructure of a business is estimated as the second highest expense for any organisation, after the cost of wages. As profit margins become increasingly strained, companies are looking for innovative new strategies to cut unnecessary expenses. Awareness of specialists in different fields, suitable products to use or knowing who to take on as a partner or contractor is absolutely essential. FM Ireland offers unique and easy access to this information, allowing management teams to make decisions that lead to greater efficiency, return on investment and value for money.

INDUSTRY EXPERTISE The conference programme, titled ‘Because Knowledge is InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

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King’, benefits from the active support and involvement of FM Ireland’s supporting organisations, who supply industry experts to deliver relevant and innovative papers and case studies. Key associations supporting FM Ireland include The Institution of Occupational Safety & Health, The British Institute of Facilities Management, The Society of Chartered Surveyors Ireland, The Irish Security Industry Association, The Association of Specialist Fire Protection, The Institution of Fire Engineers and The Institute of Refrigeration Ireland. The 2017 conference topics will

Now more than ever, companies need to be critical about how they invest both their time and money. include outsourcing, building services, security, energy and sustainability, health and safety, property management, hard FM and occupational health. Now more than ever, companies need to be critical about how they invest both their time and money. By localising all essential products, people and knowledge in one place, FM Ireland have ensured that facility management teams can get the most out of their time spent at this one of a kind, free to attend conference and exhibition. Visitors to FM Ireland will have access to leading suppliers and service providers showcasing the

latest in new ideas, technologies, products services and solutions that can improve productivity, the working environment, employee well-being and increase return on investment. Whilst attendance to FM Ireland is free of charge, it is still recommended that interested individuals register online at www.fmireland.com to notify organisers of attendance and stay apprised of the latest conference and exhibition information. Companies interested in exhibiting should contact the FM Ireland Team on +44 1892 518877 or email fmireland@stepex.com.

REASONS TO VISIT FM IRELAND 2017 • Free exhibition featuring the largest range of products and services assembled in one place in Ireland this year.

• Free conference content addressing your day-to-day concerns.

• The chance to talk to real people about real products, problems and practice.

• In-depth advice on products and services from the people who make and supply them.

• The greatest single gathering of your colleagues and people from related disciplines.

• Ideas, inspiration and answers, whatever your area of responsibility and working environment.

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21/12/2016 12:42


IB SURVEY MARINE INSTITUTE

OCEAN

INNOVATION Irish businesses innovating within the ocean environment must receive support and investment to realise their potential.

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he importance of the ocean to the economy cannot be underestimated. According to the Socio-Economic Marine Research Unit the Irish marine sector has an estimated turnover of a4.5 billion and supports over 30,000 direct and indirect jobs. But the significance and potential of the marine sector is far greater. The Government has set a target to double the value of our ocean wealth to 2.4 per cent GDP by 2030. In order to harness potential and grow our marine industries, continued investment in research and development is critical. Ireland has been gaining a reputation in Europe and internationally for its marine research and innovation, and driving collaboration in this area. This year Ireland has secured substantial EU Horizon 2020 funding wins and international recognition through a number of awards. In November, the Marine Institute and IMERC were presented with the International Maritime Partner award from San Diego-based non-profit industry association The Maritime Alliance (TMA), for their work in developing Ireland’s marine technology cluster. In September, Karmenu Vella, European Commissioner for Environment, Maritime Affairs and Fisheries, presented the Marine Institute with The Atlantic Project Award for International Co-operation for their work on the Horizon 2020 funded Atlantic Ocean Research Alliance Coordination and Support Action. A number of Irish businesses have also won EU research funding to develop novel marine technologies

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Peter Heffernan, CEO, Marine Institute

that will help achieve energy, food security and key societal challenges in the EU’s research and innovation programme Horizon 2020. “The success of these companies in winning EU funding shows the growth of Ireland’s marine research capacity, driven by a national focus through Harnessing Our Ocean Wealth, Ireland’s integrated marine plan,” says Dr Peter Heffernan, CEO of the Marine Institute, Ireland’s national agency for marine research, technology, development and innovation. “These Irish businesses are developing new technology that has the potential to be a game changer for how we source and harness our energy.” Recent research awards through the Horizon 2020 SME Instrument include Kerry-based

Brandon Products Ltd. for a blue biotechnology solution for bio oil production; Connemara-based EireComposites for a project to develop smart, efficient tidal-turbine blades and offshore wind-turbine blade structures at an affordable cost; and Dare Technology, based at the IMERC cluster in Cork, to develop portable renewable energy technology for use on commercial ships. OpenHydro Group Ltd will receive EU funding of a2.9m through the Fast Track to Innovation Scheme run under the Horizon 2020 programme. OpenHydro Group Ltd is leading a group of European researchers in a project called OCTTIC. Their project looks at wave energy and aims to find ways to make it as cheap as wind energy so that it is more practical to use in the electricity grid. EireComposites, in partnership with EnerOcean, has also secured a2.7m funding under the Fast Track to Innovation Scheme for their SEAMETEC project. Their project aims to increase the availability of secure, low-cost, low-carbon electricity from ocean and offshore energy by using a novel, but commercially proven and patented composites manufacturing process and adding sensor technology that reduces maintenance costs and improves reliability. Clearly the potential is there for these innovative businesses, with recognition now coming at a wider governmental level both in Ireland and in Europe. As Dr Heffernan notes, “it has become clear that marine research in Ireland has moved from being what was considered by some as a niche field, to a theme that is integral to the development of many sectors such as energy, transport, food, and biodiversity.” InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

21/12/2016 12:39


SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS GET SOLUTIONS

Business Solutions for Clondalkin Newsagent Get Solutions is helping businesses make significant savings on energy.

D

ay to Day News in Clondalkin has served its local community for more than 31 years. At the helm of the 2,000 square foot newsagent is Joe Mannion, owner and manager who employs ten people. Last year, Mannion engaged the energy conservation company Get Solutions to slash his overheads. “Ask any retailer, and they will tell you that costs are the most important factor,” he says. “If you cannot control costs then you simply won’t survive.” Get Solutions analysed the lighting in the store and was able to project significant savings from replacing existing lighting with LED solutions. The cost of the project was 10,000 but the savings achieved would cover the investment in just 16 months.

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Charlie Grendon, Managing Director, Get Solutions

Charlie Grendon, Managing Director of Get Solutions explains: “LED is not a simple swap out of bulbs. You need to buy quality products and use highly trained personnel. Get Solutions uses LED lighting that has a five-year warranty and covers 50,000 hours per bulb.” Grendon stresses the importance for businesses to use only

proven manufacturers. “Fly-by-night manufacturers cost more in the long term,” he says. Mannion is also looking forward to reaping the savings after just 16 months – estimated to be in the region of 7,000 per year. “As a businessman this project is a no brainer,” he says. “Working with Get Solutions has meant it is a smooth transfer.” In addition, Mannion has placed the responsibility of renewing his contract with his utility provider with Get Solutions. “It is easy to fall out of lease and suddenly find your costs have increased by more than a third. This way, Get Solutions has my back and I am secure in the knowledge that I will continue to source the best priced energy for my needs.”

09/01/2017 11:36


Opportunity Efficiency Resource Strategy

Risk

Competition

We think like you. Commercial. CORK

DUBLIN

241379_1C_Ronan Daly Jeremyn_Chambers 9.04.indd 1

GALWAY

LONDON

WWW.RDJ.IE

20/12/2016 15:54


IB SURVEY RONAN DALY JERMYN

A Legal Approach to

NEW TECHNOLOGY InBUSINESS spoke with Ronan Daly Jermyn managing partner Richard Martin about how Irish law firms are embracing technology to meet client needs faster and more efficiently.

litigation side, so lawyers can focus on more complex work.

Q: Can you tell me about Q: What are the main

Q: Do you think that

challenges faced by the legal sector in Ireland today?

law firms in Ireland are doing enough to embrace technology, or is there a reluctance for some?

A: Law firms, more than ever, need to innovate and embrace new technologies to meet client needs and expectations. Our clients want more services, they want those services delivered faster and they want them at a lower cost; these are our key challenges. This means that law firms must find different methods of delivering legal services, and in a way that reduces costs for clients. Technology will underpin all of these developments.

A: Big data continues to be a disruptor in the legal marketplace. Early adopters are applying technology to legal research and case preparation. While not replacing lawyers any time soon, artificial intelligence (AI) certainly has the potential to dramatically enhance the services we deliver to clients, providing us with the ability to automate routine legal tasks, both on the transactional and

Richard Martin, Ronan Daly Jermyn Managing Partner

InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

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your firmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s aim to position itself as a specialist for various sectors within the technology industry, such as cybersecurity?

A: The rate of cybercrime in Ireland has almost doubled since 2012 and is substantially higher than global averages. Ronan Daly Jermyn regularly advises clients in the area of data protection, data breaches, data subject access requests and transfers of data abroad. We use this working knowledge to help clients prevent attacks, monitor potential cyber risks, and respond to breaches. In October of this year, we hosted a cyber security event, attended by 100 CEO/CIO representatives from multinational corporates, indigenous large and medium sized Irish companies, and Government. We invited the executive director of the Center for Long-Term Cybersecurity in Berkeley, California to be a keynote speaker at the event and, through interactive sessions, helped our guests explore potential future cybersecurity scenarios and how best to plan and position ourselves for such possibilities.

Q: Has Ronan Daly Jermyn made any recent investments in technology, or is it planning to do so in the near future?

A: Earlier this year we hired a chief information officer who is responsible for the firmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s information strategy. He and our full team of seven IT professionals are committed to the delivery of cost-effective and innovative legal services to our clients. We are also examining a variety of products in the area of AI and secure access, ensuring our clients will have access to soft files relating to transactions that we are undertaking for them. Information security continues to be a top priority for the firm. We are currently working to achieve an ISO 27001 certification by mid 2017, considered by many as an industry gold standard. Q: To other law firms reading this piece, what is your main message concerning technology and its potential impact on the future of the sector?

A: Firms must adapt to a rapidly changing legal landscape. Those firms who successfully leverage new technologies are going to have a distinct advantage over those who donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t.

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21/12/2016 12:41


At the heart of business in Ireland

Š 2016 KPMG, an Irish partnership

Make use of our incredible public spaces, with beautiful panoramic views of the city.

The Montenotte Hotel, Middle Glanmire Road, Cork City Tel: 021 453 0050 Fax: 021 453 0060 Email: reservations@themontenottehotel.com www.themontenottehotel.com

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21/12/2016 13:37


IB SURVEY PAYPAL

CREATING

NEW MONEY PayPal is driving one of the most significant periods of innovation in money and commerce ever. InBUSINESS caught up with Maeve Dorman, PayPal’s new Head of Global Operations for Europe, the Middle East and Africa (EMEA), to find out more about life at the cutting edge of the global payments industry. Q: Tell us about your career

Q: How do you help

to date in PayPal?

people and businesses?

A: PayPal is a really

A: Put simply, we make

exciting company to work for. There are great opportunities to develop your career, and my own path is the perfect example of that. I joined PayPal ten years ago and since then I’ve moved up the ranks to Director, Senior Director and now Head of Global Operations for EMEA. I’m really lucky to lead a team of talented and committed teammates in our Dublin and Dundalk sites, and in our Berlin facility. They work day-in and day-out at the cutting edge of a fastpaced, innovative industry.

it easier for people and businesses to pay and get paid. Since our company was founded 18 years ago, we have had the same vision to make payments simpler, safer and more affordable. Now we have become the most trusted and widely used digital wallet in the world. Last year alone, we processed 4.9 billion payments around the world. For businesses, we help connect them with our 192 million active customer accounts in more than 200

markets. We provide Irish companies with a truly global payments platform to quickly and securely grow their customers and international sales. In Ireland, in particular, our Global Operations Centres are here to make sure our customers have the best possible experience of our service. Just last month, we were very proud to be named Contact Centre of the Year by the Customer Contact Management Association (CCMA) and that achievement is a testament to all our teammates who put our customers at the centre of everything they do.

Maeve Dorman, PayPal’s Head of Global Operations for Europe, EMEA

InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

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Q: What are the latest innovations in PayPal

A: The integration of PayPal with Siri is very exciting. PayPal app users can now send and request money via voice command with Siri. All they need to do is say, ‘Hey Siri, send Maeve 50’ and voila! We did live demonstrations onsite in our office when it was launched last month and our teammates loved it. It is great to see their passion for our product offerings and our customers. Innovation is so important for us. Our teammates innovate every day and we recently organised a charity hackathon – called Opportunity Hack – in collaboration with Castleknock Hotel and the Fingal Chamber of Commerce. Fifteen of our teammates spent 24 hours working round the clock to develop technical solutions for five Irish charities. They built new websites, new database capabilities and a new auction site for these charities, saving them thousands of euros. PayPal employs 2,600 teammates at its operations centres in Dublin and Dundalk.

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Public consultation on preferred scheme for new water supply for the Eastern and Midlands Region Irish Water invites you to have your say November 8th marks the launch of the fourth public consultation phase on the Preferred Scheme for a New Water Supply for the Eastern and Midlands Region. Delivery of this New Water Supply will represent the first major upgrade of ‘new water source’ infrastructure in over 60 years and will deliver secure and sustainable water to over 40% of Ireland’s population in the long term. Irish Water has published the Final Options Appraisal Report (FOAR) and the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) Scoping Report for public consultation. The Final Options Appraisal Report (FOAR) confirms that the preferred scheme is: • Abstraction of water from the Lower Shannon at Parteen Basin • Water treatment nearby at Birdhill • Treated water piped to a termination point reservoir at Peamount in South County Dublin, with supplies of treated water available to Midland communities along the route. The EIS Scoping Report considers potential issues which may arise from the preferred scheme and describes how any impacts will be assessed.

Irish Water is now undertaking a 14 week period of non-statutory public consultation and invite submissions from the general public and key stakeholders. We would like your views on all aspects of the Project, and specifically on: • Is there any additional information that should be considered in the development of the Preferred Scheme? • Are there any additional environmental issues or alternative methodologies that should be taken into consideration in preparing the EIS? • How would you like Irish Water to communicate with you as the project progresses towards planning approval? This is a vital project for the future of this region. Feedback to the public consultation process will inform the proposal Irish Water puts forward for planning permission. Submissions to the consultation process can be sent either by email to watersupply@water.ie or by post to Water Supply Project, Merrion House, Merrion Road, Dublin 4. Closing dates for receipt of submissions is 14th February 2017.

Safeguarding your water for your future. For further information visit www.watersupplyproject.ie Alternatively, please contact the project team by: Email: watersupply@water.ie Telephone: LoCall 1890 252 848 The FOAR & EIS Scoping Report are available to view in County Libraries and at Planning Counters within the project study area and can be downloaded from our website www.watersupplyproject.ie

Trade and Investment Promotion Section Embassy of the Republic of Poland in Dublin 4 The Vicarage St. John’s Road Dublin 4 Ireland T: +353 1 269 1370 F: +353 1 269 7662 E: dublin@trade.gov.pl W: www.ireland.trade.gov.pl

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With the big domestic market, highly skilled and motivated workforce, an economy that is one of the fastest growing in the EU and the business friendly environment...

POLAND is just the place. Trade and Investment Promotion Section of the Embassy of the Republic of Poland in Dublin is a point of first contact for potential investors and companies looking for business partners in Poland. Use our free and comprehensive advice to learn more about Poland, business and investment opportunities, administrative regulations, macroeconomic factors, legal support and business incentives available for new companies setting up in Poland.

20/12/2016 15:55


IB SURVEY ŠKODA

ŠKODA unleashes THE KODIAQ The ŠKODA Kodiaq, a first for the brand, has attracted unprecedented demand ahead of its Irish arrival in March 2017.

I

n advance of the eagerly anticipated launch of the ŠKODA Kodiaq to the Irish market in March of next year, Irish journalists were given the the first opportunity to test drive this new large SUV on European roads in early December. The Kodiaq will be the first large seven seater SUV offered by ŠKODA and will transfer the brand’s new design language into the SUV segment. Based on the impressive VisionS concept shown at the 2016 Geneva Motor Show, the new Kodiaq offers an impressive combination of powerful design, generous space, great functionality, state-of-the art assistance systems and innovative connectivity solutions. The ŠKODA Kodiaq will present itself with all of the brand’s strengths: a design that is full of character, extraordinary interior space, practical intelligence and innovative technology. Inside, the Kodiaq offers a spacious interior and possesses the largest boot within its class with a volume of up to 2,065L. In addition, class-leading rear head and legroom will further enhance passenger comfort. Based on the renowned MQB platform, the Kodiaq stretches 4.7 metres in length and boasts the largest wheel base in its class which ensures optimal usage of the interior cabin space. The Kodiaq also offers over 30 Simply Clever features that offer practical and convenient assistance in everyday life, such as split folding and length adjustable rear seats as standard, an optional third row of seats, a crafty door edge protection system, electric child safety locks and the much loved InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

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SKODA KODIAQ: LOWDOWN

Superb model feature of ŠKODA umbrellas fitted to the front door pockets, from the mid-spec Ambition model on. “Before the Kodiaq has even landed on Irish shores we have seen unprecedented demand for this car, which is no surprise given the remarkable balance between style and practicality on offer,” says Cathal Kealey, PR Manager at ŠKODA Ireland. “This car also offers a new generation of connectivity and enhanced driver assistance systems such as ŠKODA Connect and our Smartlink smartphone integration system will be available as standard from the entry Active trim level. It’s no doubt that the Kodiaq will be top of many shopping lists in 2017.” The Kodiaq will be the new flagship model for the ŠKODA brand with brand new technologies available such as ŠKODA Connect mobile online services. ŠKODA Connect offers additional online infotainment services and navigation in real time, while also providing remote access for increased connectivity and driver assistance. One such driver assistance feature is the emergency call (eCall) function, which will automatically call the emergency services once an airbag

• Named for the Kodiak bear that lives on Kodiak Island off the southern coast of Alaska.

is activated to ensure • Based on the impressive occupant VisionS concept shown safety. at the 2016 Geneva Irish Motor Show. pricing and specification • Offers an impressive combination of powerful has yet to be design, generous space, confirmed, great functionality, however, it is state-of-the art. anticipated assistance systems and that the innovative connectivity new Kodiaq solutions. will feature • Arrives in Ireland in a host of March 2017. impressive standard specification such as 17-inch alloys and cruise control on the entry Active trim level; 18-inch alloys, front and rear parking sensors and 3-Zone Climatronic air-conditioning on the mid spec Ambition trim level, and 19” alloy wheels, LED headlights and leather upholstery available as standard on the Style trim level. An expected 1,000 new Kodiaq models will be sold here in Ireland in 2017, and with demand across Europe set to outweigh the available supply early in the New Year, early ordering is advised to avoid disappointment.

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21/12/2016 12:41


MOTORING PROFILE OCTAVIA VRS

A Hooligan

in Disguise

The Skoda Octavia vRS offers a fun, fresh drive in a practical guise. CONOR FORREST got behind the wheel.

T

here are a few cars that have made a lasting impression over my few years of motoring reviews. The Audi R8, for obvious reasons. The outlandish electric BMW i3 and the fantastic Toyota GT86. And now the Skoda Octavia vRS has joined that list. There is the possibility that I may be a little biased when it comes to the Octavia. My first car, the car in which I learned to drive, was a Mark I Octavia, which I quickly came to appreciate for its simplicity and its cavernous boot during my college years. And, the latest Octavia vRS is a great example of how much the

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brand has evolved. At first glance you might not notice too much different from a standard Octavia. But if you take a closer look there’s no mistaking that it’s a distinct beast. The spoiler might be the first indication. The styling is sharper and sportier, the extra sports pack (a965 adds anthracite alloys, scuff plates, black grille, black window surrounds and black exterior mirror housing) on my test car really boosting the vRS in the looks department. The real difference comes when you sit behind the wheel. Straight away you’ll realise that it’s a car designed to put a smile on your face,

even as you drop the kids to school. Driving is an absolute pleasure and you have the best of all worlds with the smooth DSG gearbox, and flappy paddles if you’re feeling particularly sporty. The automatic gearbox makes urban driving a doddle, while you can sit back and relax on the motorways There’s the faintest hint of lag when you put your foot to the floor, as if the vRS is taking a deep breath, and then milliseconds later you find yourself hurtling along, gripping the road no matter what the surface and only displaying a hint of body roll in the corners. Do yourself a favour if and when you get a vRS – take a trip to Glendalough and you won’t regret it. There’s even a proper handbrake (whatever you might use that for) and a lap timer for the competitive drivers, the latter as part of the optional RS Challenge sports pack. 4x4 capabilities offer a little extra comfort in challenging conditions – the vRS’ onboard computer, which constantly monitors traction, diverts power to individual wheels as required. Despite the plentiful power beneath the bonnet, courtesy of a

InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

21/12/2016 11:56


MOTORING PROFILE OCTAVIA VRS

SKODA OCTAVIA VRS 2.0L TDI 4X4 Power: 184bhp 0-100km/h: 7.6 seconds Top speed: 228km/h Combined fuel economy: 6.3l/100km (44.8mpg) CO2 emissions: 129g/100km Annual tax: a270 Price (as tested): a40,817, starting from a38,795

2.0L TDI producing 184bhp, the vRS can be quite economical when you put your mind to it. The multimedia centre includes a display of how much fuel the mirror heating and air con is consuming, and there’s a GreenScore which judges how efficiently you’re driving, though you can always switch off the screen. Over the course of a week of putting the vRS through its paces I averaged 6.3L/100km or 44.8mpg. The temptation to put your foot down, however, reigns supreme. It’s also quite a practical car, as befits a Skoda. There’s plenty of space, it’s easy to park, and the kids won’t be squished in the back. The vRS doesn’t InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

have quite the same premium feel as the Skoda Superb which I drove recently, and not as much storage either – the compartment between the seats is a lot smaller, though the door pockets offer some decent space. It’s also quite comfortable and spacious in the back. You can tell it’s a Skoda by the cavernous boot, with 590L of space to play with. The interior is much like the outside – sporty but in a more subtle way. Strips of carbon fibre line each door, there are very comfortable bucket seats in the front, and a small, innocuous button marked vRS in front of the gear lever changes the driving mode of the

car between Eco, Normal, Sport and an Individual mode that allows you to tailor the drive in terms of steering weight, throttle response and the engine growl. Onboard technology is also quite sensible – a media centre, rearview camera and sensors, rear parking sensors, cruise control and a tyre pressure monitoring system all come as standard. Sporty, fast and fun to drive, the Octavia vRS is a more practical alternative to the similarly priced Golf GTD (a38,580) – a hooligan in more sensible shoes. Take it for a spin and see for yourself. You won’t be disappointed.

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LIFESTYLE LIFESTYLE: motoring

Executive

CLASS OLIVE KEOGH TOOK THE NEW VOLVO S90 FOR A TEST DRIVE AND DISCOVERED A MODEL COMPETING WITH THE LUXURY GERMAN BRANDS.

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InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

21/12/2016 12:17


MODEL VOLVO S90 SALOON INSCRIPTION

V

olvo is at a high point in its model cycle. It can hardly keep up with demand for its large XC90 SUV, the revamp of the smaller XC60 has been very successful and its new S90 executive flagship is clearly determined to take the fight to the German luxury brands. The S90 is aimed at the same market segment as the BMW 5 series, Audi A6 and the Mercedes E-Class. This is premium prestige territory and the fact that Volvo has it in its sights lays out quite clearly where the company’s upwardly mobile aspirations lie. It has certainly taken on the best the Germans have to offer in the cabin and has added a nice sprinkling of Swedish style on top. Volvo may be owned by the Chinese, but its design integrity both inside and out remains fundamentally Scandinavian. Volvo president, Hakan Samuelsson, has said that “our vision is that by 2020 no one should be killed or seriously injured in a new Volvo car,” so not surprisingly the S90 comes with a heavy-duty safety specification. On board features include City Safety with pedestrian, cyclist and large animal detection, and front collision warning with auto brake, road edge detection, run-off road protection, driver alert control, lane keeping aid, multiple airbags, stability and

InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

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LIFESTYLE: motoring

PRICE €82,942 ENGINE 2.0 litre D5 diesel, automatic, AWD CO2 EMISSIONS (g/km) 127g/km CONSUMPTION 4.8l/100km combined cycle

traction control. A feature called Pilot Assist is standard and it uses the adaptive cruise control system to keep the vehicle at the chosen speed while also monitoring the speed of the vehicle ahead and responding automatically if it speeds up or slows down. There are two versions of Volvo’s four-cylinder diesel power units available; the D4 with 190bhp and the D5 with 235bhp. The test car had the refined and energetic D5 and it also comes with a feature

called Powerpulse, which counteracts turbo lag. There is an option to fit rear air suspension (€2,600) and this really smooths out poor road surfaces to give a very comfortable ride. The S90 runs the Germans very close on overall dynamics but the 5 Series still has the handling edge while the Mercedes offers a shade more cruising comfort. The S90 replaces the S80 in Volvo’s line up but there is really no comparison as the S80 was long serving and dated. The S90 is also a much larger car and is actually a little bigger all round than its German rivals. The legroom in the back is especially good and you get 500 litres of storage capacity making the boot roomy but not class leading. The S90 is built on Volvo’s latest Scalable Platform Architecture chassis and has broadly the same underpinnings as the XC90. The XC90 is laden with technology and safety and the S90 has benefited accordingly from the platform share. One thing that’s hard to miss is the hi-tech Sensus infotainment screen dominating the dashboard with a nine-inch portrait-layout display. It plays a central role in the car, controlling music and navigation, driving settings and ventilation. With so many controls now centralised in touchscreen units it’s imperative that the user interface works well, and it certainly does in the S90.

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MOTOR ING: LIFESTYLE: motoring

FRIEND

OF THE

FAMILY THE NEW TIGUAN FROM VOLKSWAGEN TICKS BOXES FOR SPACE, STORAGE, VISIBILITY, COMFORT, SPECIFICATION AND INTERIOR LAYOUT, WRITES OLIVE KEOGH.

T

he last thing a harassed parent needs is the sound of sibling turf wars in the back of the car over who is encroaching on whose space. Kids just don’t do so well packed together like sardines so choosing a car that can accommodate a growing family makes life easier for everyone. SUVs and crossovers are hugely popular with families. However it’s worth giving a few of them the once over before you buy as not all are the most spacious or

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practical when it comes to transporting youngsters and all of their gear. A good example of well thought out family motoring is the new Tiguan SUV from VW. Its styling is still quite low key, although a lot more assertive than that of its predecessor, but as soon as you move indoors it starts ticking boxes for space, storage, visibility, comfort, specification and interior layout. VW has given the latest version of the Tiguan a thorough work out and this has brought more muscular styling, a longer and wider body, a great deal more refinement

and a level of quality and finish that pushes it decidedly upmarket. The boot offers a decent 520 litres of space and if you slide the rear seats forward this increases to 615 litres. The extra width also means you can now seat three adults in comfort in the back while the rear headroom is also very good. The Tiguan comes with either front-wheel-drive or a 4X4 option and in a choice of specifications starting with Trendline, which provides 17-inch

alloys, Bluetooth, LED rear lights, air conditioning and lane departure warning among its standard features. The Comfortline specification adds features such as lumbar supported front seats, Park Pilot reversing sensors and a 6.5-inch media touchscreen. The range topping Highline’s specification includes LED headlights, hill descent control, active information display and a rearview camera. There are also upgrade packs available that add InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

21/12/2016 12:18


MODEL VW TIGUAN HIGHLINE BLUE MOTION TECHNOLOGY

LIFESTYLE: motoring

PRICE €37,645 ENGINE 2.0 (150bhp) TDI, manual CO2 EMISSIONS (g/km) 125g/km CONSUMPTION Combined cycle 4.7l/100km

features such as keyless entry and voice control. The Tiguan range starts from €29,085 for the 1.4-TSI petrol with 125bhp while a new 2.0 litre, 115bhp, entry-level diesel has recently been added to the line up at €29,985. Thereafter there are a number of 2.0 litre diesel engine options with outputs ranging from 115bhp right up to the Tiguan HL with 240bhp at €46,490. The Tiguan is pricier than some of the other models in its segment. However, as VW has its own bank it can offer pretty competitive finance rates and that can narrow the gap to models with cheaper price tags but more expensive finance. The Tiguan is an easy drive with a pleasantly raised driving position and solid, predictable handling. The performance is smooth and competent and pitched about right for the average family motorist. The Tiguan doesn’t tick the “fun” box (although the company is promising new variations on the Tiguan theme that might) but what it lacks in personality it makes up for in finish, practicality and sense of protection and that’s just about everything you could ask for from a family car. InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

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FORD RIDING THE GREEN WAVE Ford is currently testing technology that could make stopping at red traffic lights a thing of the past. Green Light Optimal Speed Advisory uses information from a roadside unit to tell the driver the best speed at which to travel to get a green light. If hitting a red light is unavoidable, the system displays how long it will be before the light turns green. Ford says enabling drivers to ‘ride the green wave’ means a continuous journey that helps improve traffic flow while also providing significant reductions in carbon dioxide emissions and fuel consumption. Ford is trying out the traffic lights technology as part of the UK’s largest self-driving and connected car trial. As part of the move toward autonomous driving, Ford will pilot other new assistance technologies in 2017.

LAND ROVER TACKLING TEDIOUS ASPECTS OF DRIVING Jaguar Land Rover is ramping up its research into connected and autonomous vehicle technologies with a fleet of 100 vehicles dedicated to developing and testing new systems over the next four years. The company’s vision is to make the autonomous car viable in the widest range of real life situations in on and off road driving environments and in all weather conditions. The company is developing both fully and semi-autonomous vehicle technologies that will help the driver with the most challenging and tedious aspects of driving, such as motorway travel. One of the systems currently being tested is Advanced Highway Assist. It allows automatic lane changing as well as a ‘stay in lane’ feature on motorways without the driver having to touch either the steering wheel or the pedals. Also being tested is Electronic Emergency Brake Light Assist. It warns drivers when a vehicle ahead brakes severely or unexpectedly.

BOSCH FORECASTS CONNECTED CAR REVOLUTION It may sound a bit far fetched, but a combination of connected car and the Internet of Things (IOT) is going to revolutionise daily living and turn your car into a personal assistant, according to automotive technology company, Bosch. Using the IOT your car will be able to connect you to other domains such as your home. At the moment when a family member gets locked out, they have to find someone with a spare key or wait outside. With the combined forces of connected car and the IOT, however, the driver will be able to open the door remotely. Another example is where a driver may live or work in an isolated or security risk area. As they drive on to the property their car can tap into the building’s security system/CCTV to ensure the premises is secure and that there are no undesirables hanging about. Meanwhile, it won’t be too long before we can start our cars with fingerprint recognition and this will also automatically retrieve personal settings, such as favoured seat position or ventilation settings from the car’s memory.

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LIFESTYLE: innovation

INNOVATION NATION InBUSINESS looks at the latest innovations and technologies that are shaping our future. In this issue: assistive tech for people with disabilities. DOT DOT WATCH The DOT Watch is a Braille smart watch, meaning that the visually impaired finally have a means of owning a product in the same vein as the Apple Watch. The DOT Watch’s face consists, not of a visual display, but rather of four cells of six active, moveable dots each. This allows for four Braille characters to be displayed at once – enabling users to read text from applications by touch. Users may also connect to other devices using Bluetooth and control apps through voice commands. Developed by a start-up in South Korea, the DOT Watch has already been endorsed by visually impaired personalities like athlete Henry Wanyoike and musician Stevie Wonder. You can pre-order the product now on the DOT website. Available at www.dotincorp.com

LIFTWARE ELECTRONIC HANDLES Liftware’s selection of products consist of electronic handles designed to help those with hand tremors or with limited hand and arm ability. The Liftware Steady electronically stabilises in response to a hand tremor – meaning that sufferers can enjoy a meal with less worry about spillages. The Liftware Level, on the other hand, recognises what position its user’s hand is in and adjusts in response to any unwanted movements. Available at www.liftware.com

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LIFESTYLE: innovation

Digital Digest Apple has released its new AirPods, the wireless earplugs it debuted in September, on the Apple Store. The new AirPods are available on Apple’s e-commerce store in Ireland for €179.

Google has agreed a deal with ETECSA, Cuba’s state telecoms company, to install a number of servers across the country to improve its internet speeds.

SPROUTEL JERRY THE BEAR It’s quite likely that Jerry the Bear is much smarter than the teddy bear most of us remember from our childhood. Conceived of as a means of helping diabetic children to better understand their condition, Jerry requires specific care from his companion which allows him to live with his diabetes. When Jerry’s blood sugar runs too low or too high, he speaks his symptoms, encouraging kids to recognise how they themselves feel, and the six “injection sites” on his body allow children to practice their insulin injections. Jerry not only provides the same comfort to a diabetic child as any cherished teddy bear, but he also teaches them how to live with their condition.

Skype has revealed that it is rolling out live translating for calls from PCs to mobiles and landlines. The technology allows people who speak two different languages to communicate with a digital assistant, which translates each other’s conversations on the fly.

Available at www.jerrythebear.com

BLITAB TACTILE TABLET BLITAB is being hailed as the world’s first ‘tactile tablet’ for blind and visually impaired people. It is the same concept as any tablet, except that instead of a visual screen display, it expresses its content in Braille using small, physical bubbles which are raised from the device, allowing visually impaired users to gain an overview of an entire document.

Social network giant Facebook has developed a Parents Portal to help tackle the spiralling issue of child safety online. The move comes after the ISPCC painted a damning picture of child safety online in 2016.

www.blitab.com

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LIFESTYLE: travel

Taking on

Tokyo NEW YORK MIGHT HAVE ITS GLORIOUS SKYLINE, LONDON ITS BUSTLING FINANCIAL CENTRE, AND BARCELONA ITS FINE CUISINE; BUT TOKYO TRULY HAS IT ALL, DISCOVERS DECLAN GROVES.

T

okyo – which literally translates as ‘Eastern Capital’ – is a city not easy to define. With an ever-increasing effort to attract foreign visitors in preparation for the upcoming 2020 Olympics, there has never been a better time to visit the neon metropolis which boasts the largest metropolitan economy in the world with a population of over 13 million. Tokyo has a unique cultural mix incorporating Japanese, Chinese, Korean, European and US influences. In the thriving heart of Japan, innovation and

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the inhabitants’ fascination with all things tech sits comfortably alongside traditional arts such as origami paper craft and the bizarre kabuki theatre.

Making Sense of the Metro The city itself comprises 47 districts, spread across 23 wards. Although each has its own personality, no one district has a single focus. At every street, and even within the same skyscraper, you can find an intriguing and wonderful mix of business, retail, residential and entertainment zones. It is not unusual to find traditional late-night ramen noodle bars, exotic owl cafés and 24-hour

karaoke venues (King Karaoke is one of the best-known chains) mixed among high-end retail stores and upmarket hotels, all impeccably presented in their own individual unique Tokyo style. Tokyo can be overwhelming to visitors at first, however the elaborate Tokyo Metro system – the busiest in the world – of 13 subway lines and an additional overground JR railway network provides efficient and excellent connections across the city. Trains may be occasionally crowded, particularly during rush hour, but they are always on time and stations have easy-to-read digital displays in English. A Suica card, Tokyo’s equivalent of the well-known London Oyster card, offers convenience to travellers staying longer than a few days and can be used on all public transport, but even in convenience stores InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

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LIFESTYLE: travel

WHERE TO MEET...

Toyko comprises 47 districts, spread across 23 wards. Each has its own personality, no one district has a single focus.

Park Hyatt Tokyo, Shinjuku This luxury hotel has large banqueting rooms, including one with an 80-inch built-in video wall, and two fully equipped boardrooms. After a long day of meetings, you can treat your guests to a delicious cocktail and spectacular views in its New York Bar on the 52nd floor, made famous by the movie Lost in Translation. www.tokyo.park.hyatt.com

EAT...

Declan Groves

Ginza Kojyu, Ginza One of the best places to experience a true kaiseki feast is at this small and minimally decorated restaurant behind the Nikko Hotel. Run by chef Toru Okuda and his wife it has been awarded three Michelin stars and serves up a seasonal set menu where presentation is as important as taste. Consult your hotel concierge as reservations are a must. www.kojyu.jp

SLEEP... and in many vending machines. When it comes to the latter, they are a ubiquitous sight in the city offering up the weird and the wonderful including apple-flavoured milk tea and piping hot coffee in a can.

The Lay of the Land The main business districts include Shibuya, a favourite for its high-end retail and the famous Shibuya crossing; Shinjuku, the hub of nightlife and entertainment; Shimbashi, home to the head offices of Fujitsu and Panasonic; Roppongi, frequented by ex-pats and those working in finance; InBUSINESS | Q4 2016

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GETTING THERE Haneda and Narita are the main airports in Japan. British Airways operate flights to Narita airport via Heathrow. It’s best to avoid over-priced taxis and prebook a shared limousine bus (approximately a40 return) for the 90-minute trip from Narita to central Tokyo. Alternative routes include flying via Helsinki (Finair) or Amsterdam (Lufthansa).

and Marunouchi, Tokyo’s largest business district and home of the Imperial Palace, which is well worth a visit. These areas also have the highest concentration of western-style hotels with compact, yet perfectly appointed guestrooms where not a single ounce of space is wasted. Our tip for a comfortable stay is the Hotel Gracery Shinjuku, next to Shinjuku railway station, convenient for those who wish to stay well connected and close to the action. For others looking for somewhere more refined, the Park Hotel in Shiodome offers stunning views of

Park Hotel, Shiodome Excellently located between the Shimabshi JR and Shiodome Metro stops, with superb English-speaking staff and great wifi, this hotel offers wellappointed rooms, business facilities and a choice of western and Japanese style breakfast buffets. Top tip is to ask for a room with a view of the nearby Tokyo Tower. www.en.parkhoteltokyo.com

SEE...

Meiji Shrine, Shibuya The Meiji Shrine, built to honour Emperor Meiji, offers a nice break from the hustle and bustle of the city’s streets. It includes enormous wooden tori gates, immaculately maintained woodlands with wild plum trees and a beautiful inner garden. This tranquil spot is best avoided around New Year’s when over three million visitors can be expected to pay their respects. www.meijijingu.or.jp/english

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LIFESTYLE: travel

BEFORE YOU GO

READ After Dark or anything written by Haruki Murakami provides a melancholic and sometimes surrealistic view of life in Tokyo. A Geek in Japan by Hector Garcia is a great guide on Japanese culture, including manga, anime and all things Zen, with insights that are sure to come in useful.

THE LANGUAGE Japanese people notoriously have one of the lowest proficiencies of English in Asia. However, most people under the age of 30 in Tokyo will have a few words. It’s best to learn some of the basics before travelling or invest in a good phrasebook.

Giant bowls of fried rice and udon noodles at Tsurutontan

Toyko Tower and modern conference suites. For gizmos, gadgets and glimpses of the latest electronics, technology professionals should head to Akihabara. The Yodobashi store famously offers six floors of electronic delights, including the largest selection of camera equipment anywhere in the world – although be warned, prices for products are often higher here than in Europe. If there’s time, other top sites include the beautiful Meiji Shrine, first built in the 1920s and located next to the colourful Harajuku shopping district; the Tsukiji fish market and world famous tuna auction for early risers; and the busy Senso-ji temple in the Asakusa district, where you can pass under the Thunder Gate’s massive paper lantern before purchasing souvenirs from shops that have been there for centuries.

A Feast for the Senses

DRESSING FOR BUSINESS Business people tend to dress modestly in Japan. Traditional business dress for men of a dark suit and tie, with a crisp white shirt, and similarly a dark skirt and white blouse for women, is still the norm. However, a slight splash of colour here and there can also be seen particularly amongst the younger generation.

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Tokyo loves its food, and it’s made all the more apparent by the overwhelming selection of eateries on offer. Restaurants and izakaya (Japanese gastropub) tend to specialise in a single type of cuisine with the focus always on freshness. Sushi, sashimi and bento are common lunchtime meals, frequently washed down with Japanese green tea. Katsudon (deep-fried pork cutlets with cabbage) and noodles (soba, udon or ramen) offer a heartier

Neon lights of Shinjuku

Declan Groves

KNOW

Meiji Shrine

option for dinner, with restaurants such as those of the Tsurutontan chain serving giant bowls of steaming hot curry udon noodles where slurping is expected. For the more discerning diner, treating your clients to Kaiseki, Japanese haute-cuisine is sure to impress. Often the best time to make a deal is outside the formality of the boardroom, which provides the perfect excuse to share a beer or sip on some sake while gorging on gyoza (delicious deep-fried dumplings). Be aware; pouring your own drink is considered rude, so be sure to pour for your guest before knocking glasses and saying “Kanpai!”.

Business Etiquette Business cards are a must for any meeting in Japan. The giving and receiving of cards is almost a ceremony itself – be sure to take the card offered to you

Wooden wishing panels at Meiji Shrine

with both hands, inspect it with interest, bow your head in appreciation before putting it in your wallet. As a Western visitor, a bending of the head is sufficient in most situations. When in doubt it’s best to follow the cues of those around you. Respect, along with etiquette, is ingrained in Japanese culture, so any effort you make to maintain customs will be appreciated. However, long gone are the stereotypes of stuffy business formalities, so don’t be overly concerned about making any faux-pas. Tokyo is a city far more westernised than many visitors will expect, offering everything any urban traveller could want. Despite the bustling streets, crowded pedestrian crossings and sensory overload, Tokyo is unbelievably safe, impossibly clean and, above all, a great place to do business. InBUSINESS InBusiness | Q4 Q2 2016 2014

21/12/2016 14:44


LIFESTYLE: books

BOOKS ON

ALIBABA: THE HOUSE THAT JACK MA BUILT

InBUSINESS looks at the latest business books offering great insights for executives, budding entrepreneurs, and other professionals seeking to acquire business skills and knowledge.

WHY SELL TACOS IN AFRICA? 16 life-changing business strategies you can use anywhere, from the man who turned $400 into $200 million

I

f you’re looking for a straight-up answer to the question posed by this title, then you’re out of luck. If, however, you’ve purchased Why Sell Tacos in Africa? in order to gain an insight into how to establish and sustain a business in an uncontested market from a man who has done exactly that, then Paul Oberschneider’s memoir/how-to guide may be the book for you. Oberschneider arrived in Estonia in 1992 with his last $400 in his wallet, and over the next 16 years, he navigated his way through some occasionally bizarre scenarios to create seven businesses, set up a bank and a mortgage company, become one of the largest property developers in Eastern Europe and employ over 850 people in a network spanning six countries. His book recalls these strange years of his life and presents 16 principles to the reader that allowed him to drive his colossal growth.

AUTHOR: Paul Oberschneider PUBLISHER: Blue Ocean Marketing Ltd RRP: a20.99 AVAILABLE: amazon.co.uk

YOUR TRAVEL COMPANION

Norwegian Wood AUTHOR: Haruki Murakami PUBLISHER: Kodansha AVAILABLE: easons.com

Originally published in 1987, Norwegian Wood is a novel in which its protagonist Toru Watanabe looks back at his days as a college student. The book details Toru’s relationship with two very different women, Naoko and Midori, and is set in the late 1960s in Tokyo.

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“What would Henry Ford do?”

AUTHOR: Paul Sloane PUBLISHER: FT PRESS AVAILABLE: amazon.co.uk

One of the books shortlisted for AUTHOR: the Financial Duncan Clarke Times and PUBLISHER: Harper Collins McKinsey RRP: Business Book of a24.49 the Year Award AVAILABLE: 2016, Duncan amazon.co.uk Clark’s Alibaba: The House That Jack Ma Built details the story behind an English teacher named Ma Yun, who eventually became known as Jack Ma, the business magnate and chairman of one of the world’s largest companies, Alibaba. Clark first met Ma in 1999 and thereafter gained a rare insight into his world and company. The book is written from its author’s unique standpoint, detailing Ma’s tale within the wider context China’s monumental economic and social changes of the past two decades. Featuring lessons from a mind-boggling array of cultural figures, Paul Sloane’s Think Like An Innovator sets out to sharpen its readers’ use of lateral thinking and creativity. The book details the challenges faced by 76 creative figures from popular history and the lessons we can learn from them. Featuring thoughts from people as diverse as Charles Darwin, William Shakespeare and Oprah Winfrey, Sloane somehow manages to piece together a coherent and insightful read.

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LIFESTYLE: style

E K A

STEP INTO THE NEW YEAR WITH SPRING FORWARD PIECES THAT AMP UP YOUR LOOK FOR 2017. STYLING BY RACHEL MURRAY

Gucci Fall/Winter 2016/17 While there was a strong representation of traditional autumnal navies, blacks and greys, the colour that really stood out on the catwalk was copper.

1 | Stone wool blend jumper, 629, Rick Owens @ Harvey Nichols

2 | Gloves, 45,

RJR John Rocha @ Debenhams

3 | Brown double breasted coat, 178, Marks & Spencer

4 | Striped wool blend beanie, 137, Moncler @ Harvey Nichols

5 | Kanye Caliedo driver shoes,

395, Gucci @ Brown Thomas

Stylist’s Pick... Multi stripe scarf, €78, House of Fraser

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Stylist ’s Pick...

LIFESTYLE: style

Print silver ring Be Mighty twig, €119, Chupi

Stylist ’s Pick...

Floral clutch, €49.99, Kenzo X @ H&M Isabel Maran Fall/Winter 2016-2017

1 | Grey pom beanie, 70, Bettina @ Brown Thomas 2 | Surita pyjama jacket, 82, Monsoon

Add a touch of vinyl to any of these looks for a rock star edge this winter.

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3 | Black pointed flat shoes, 24.99, H&M 4 | Navy printed cady jumpsuit, 1,774, Peter Pilotto @ Harvey Nichols

5 | Ink print scarf, 100, Jaeger

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THE InBUSINESS INDEX

GLOBAL CONNECTEDNESS

SEVENTH

GERMANY

75

In this issue, InBUSINESS explores data from the DHL Global Connectedness Index 2016.

2nd:

SINGAPORE

87

As well as being one of only two countries outside Europe to feature in the top ten, Singapore’s capital tops both of the index’s new city-level globalisation indexes: Globalisation Hotspots (cities with the most intense international flows) and Globalisation Giants (cities with the largest absolute international flows).

8TH

FIFTH

LUXEMBOURG

83

6TH

BELGIUM

81

UK

75

FOURTH

SWITZERLAND

83

TENTH

UAE

74 First:

NETHERLANDS

91

The Netherlands retains its top rank as the world’s most globally connected country. Considered a gateway to the continent, the country gives companies excellent access to the rest of Europe. From Amsterdam or the main port of Rotterdam, companies can reach 160 million consumers within 42 hours.

9TH

DENMARK

74

3rd:

IRELAND

84

Ireland moves up one place to third in the latest index, a positive move at a time when the country is seeking to mitigate the impact of Brexit and the more protectionist trade policies likely to be adopted by the incoming Trump administration in the US.

ABOUT THE DHL GLOBAL CONNECTEDNESS INDEX Now in its fourth edition, the DHL Global Connectedness Index (GCI) is a detailed analysis of the state of globalisation around the world. The 2016 report shows that global connectedness, measured by cross-border flows of trade, capital, information and people, surpassed its 2007 pre-crisis peak during 2014. In 2015, globalisation’s post-crisis expansion slowed, but the data indicates that it did not go into reverse. Currently available evidence suggests that the world was about 8 per cent more connected in 2015 than in 2005. For more information go to www.dhl.com/en/about_us/logistics_insights/studies_research.htm

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Continuing to build a better Ireland Building a brighter future for 60 years

www.bamireland.ie Contact: Mike Jones 087 6297738

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InBusiness Q4 2016