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THIS WEEK Issue 6302 | Volume 296 | No 2 ‘So which pedal car scored a £9154 sale?’

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NEWS New Ford Focus Fourth-gen family hatch explored A6 Avant Quattro inspires Audi’s sleek new estate Luton lives Vauxhall plant’s future secured Reborn Lotus New Esprit among upcoming models Ride tech Will Clearmotion leave them all behind? Genesis on tour Hyundai’s luxury brand targets UK

6 13 15 16 19 21

TESTED Aston Martin Vantage 503bhp, 505lb ft V8 rated Audi R8 RWS Maiden UK rear-wheel-drive voyage Jaguar E-Pace D180 SE ROAD TEST

26 33 34

FEATURES Genesis of a champion A Jim Clark heritage tour The future of Jeep Can the brand crack Europe? Pedal cars Why they’re now in fashion again Lister is back New owners have major ambitions Insight: Waymo Google-owned brand uncovered

42 52 56 58 62

NEW ASTON MARTIN VANTAGE: IS IT A PORSCHE 911 BEATER? 26

OUR CARS 66 Kia Stinger GT Performance Kia is much in demand 69 Ssangyong Rexton ‘Double mower’ test is passed 71

VW Golf GTI How does it stack up against a Golf R?

EVERY WEEK Steve Cropley What if JCB did road vehicles? Subscribe Join Subscriber Extra, get these perks Your views We’re really up the junction Matt Prior Kicking pavement parking to the kerb

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THE CARS THAT SHAPED JIM CLARK 42

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DEALS James Ruppert Time to grab an endangered species 72 Used buying guide Bag a Merc CLS320 for £2750 Spied in the classifieds We’re salivating over these Road test results Autocar’s data archive New cars A-Z Key car stats, from Abarth to Zenos Classifieds Cars, numberplates and services

HOW TO BUY A USED MERC CLS 74

74 76 78 80 89

ROAD TESTING THE JAGUAR E-PACE 34

WE’RE NOT THE ENEMY. WHAT WE’RE DOING a DOESN’T MEAN THE END OF DRIVING SO SAYS THE MAN LEADING GOOGLE’S SELF-DRIVING CHARGE (WHO ALSO OWNS A CATERHAM) 62

COVER STORY

RUNNING THE RULE OVER THE NEW FORD FOCUS 6 11 APRIL 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 3


COMMENT The original car magazine, published since 1895 ‘in the interests of the mechanically propelled road carriage’ EDITORIAL Tel +44 (0)20 8267 5900 Email autocar@haymarket.com Editor Mark Tisshaw Editorial director, Automotive Jim Holder Editor-in-chief Steve Cropley Executive editor Matt Burt Editor-at-large Matt Prior Digital editor James Attwood Road test editor Matt Saunders Road testers Simon Davis, Richard Lane Online reviews editor Tom Morgan News editor Rachel Burgess Senior staff writer Sam Sheehan Staff writer Jimi Beckwith Used cars editor Alex Robbins Used cars deputy editor Mark Pearson Used cars reporter Max Adams Chief sub-editor Sami Shah Group art editor Stephen Hopkins Art editor Sarah Ă–zgĂźl Junior designer Rebecca Stevens Chief photographer Stan Papior Photographer Luc Lacey Videographer Mitch McCabe Video apprentice Oli Kosbab SEO manager Jon Cook SEO executive Oliver Hayman Social media manager Louis Shaw Picture editor Ben Summerell-Youde Editorial assistant Sam Jenkins

BY PUTTING DRIVERS FIRST, FORD KNOWS WHERE ITS FOCUS MUST BE

EDITORIAL CONTRIBUTORS European editor Greg Kable Used car correspondent James Ruppert Senior contributing writer Andrew Frankel Contributing writer Dan Prosser Senior contributing editor Richard Bremner Contributing editor Mike Duff Senior consulting editor Tom Evans Special correspondents Mauro Calo, Jesse Crosse, John Evans, Hilton Holloway, Peter Liddiard, Julian Rendell, Richard Webber Special contributors Matt Bird, John Bradshaw, Nic Cackett, Kris Culmer, Ben Davies, Claire Evans, John Howell, Steve Huntingford, Maria Iu, Darren Moss, Allan Muir, Will Nightingale, Doug Revolta, Alan Taylor-Jones, Rory White, Will Williams, Neil Winn MEDIA ENQUIRIES Tel +44 (0)20 8541 3434 Contact Robert Etheridge (robert@performancecomms.com) SUBSCRIPTIONS Tel 0344 848 8816 Overseas +44 (0)1604 251450 Email help@autocar.themagazineshop.com Head of subscriptions Karen McCarthy Direct marketing executive Maria Fernandez SYNDICATION ENQUIRIES Tel +44 (0)1962 867705 Contact Simon Fox (syndication@autocar.co.uk) LICENSING ENQUIRIES Tel +44 (0)20 8267 5024 Contact Isla Friend (isla.friend@haymarket.com) BACK ISSUES Tel 0344 848 8816 Email help@autocar.themagazineshop.com ADVERTISING Classified +44 (0)20 8267 5733 Display +44 (0)20 8267 5574 Production +44 (0)20 8267 5814 Fax +44 (0)20 8267 5312 Key account director Richard Potton Agency group head Andrew Barclay Agency account manager Olivia Horner New business executive Helen Brown PRODUCTION Tel +44 (0)20 8267 5219 Production manager Anthony Davis Production controller Lee Brister

TROUBLE FINDING AUTOCAR? If you struggle to find a copy of Autocar in your local retailer or area, please send an email to Nicola. Packer@flgroup.co.uk who will investigate the problem for you.

NEWSTRADE MARKETING Head of newstrade marketing Richard Jefferies Newstrade marketing manager Nikki Packer MANAGEMENT Managing director Rachael Prasher Marketing director Darren Pitt Print and events marketing manager Charlene Harry Š 2018, Haymarket Media Group Ltd. Autocar, Motor, Autocar & Motor are registered trademarks. Circulation enquiries: Frontline Ltd, 1st Floor, Stuart House, St John’s Street, Peterborough PE1 5DD (01733 555161). Repro by Haymarket Pre-Press. Printed by William Gibbons, Wolverhampton. Registered as a newspaper with the Royal Mail. Member of the ABC. ISSN 1355-8293. No part of this magazine may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form except by permission. The publisher makes every effort to ensure contents are correct but cannot accept responsibility for errors or omissions. Unsolicited material is submitted to Autocar entirely at the owner’s risk; the publisher accepts no responsibility for loss or damage. With regret, competitions and promotional offers, unless otherwise stated, are not available to readers outside the UK and Eire. North America: Autocar, ISSN number 135589X, is published weekly by Haymarket Media Group, Bridge House, 69 London Road, Twickenham TW1 3SP, United Kingdom. Air freight and mailing in the USA by agent named Air Business Ltd, c/o Worldnet Shipping Inc, 156-15, 146th Avenue, 2nd Floor, Jamaica, NY 11434, USA. Periodicals postage paid at Jamaica, NY 11431. Subscription records are maintained at Haymarket Media Group, Bridge House, 69 London Road, Twickenham TW1 3SP. Air Business Ltd is acting as our mailing agent.

Autocar is published by Haymarket Automotive, Bridge House, 69 London Road, Twickenham, Middlesex, TW1 3SP, UK haymarketgroup.com Tel +44 (0)20 8267 5900 Autocar magazine is also published in China, Greece, India, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Philippines and Thailand. Autocar is a member of the Independent Press Standards Organisation (IPSO). We abide by the Editors’ Code of Practice and are committed to upholding the highest standards of journalism. If you think we haven’t met those standards and want to make a complaint, contact autocar@haymarket.com. For more information, contact IPSO on 0300 123 2220 or visit www.ipso.co.uk

THE ARRIVAL OF a new Focus has traditionally brought with it a new, more prosperous era for the Blue Oval itself. The 1998 original was the catalyst for Ford returning to making great everyday driver’s cars, a policy it still lives by today, while the outgoing model marked a turning point in the ďŹ rm’s journey from avoiding bankruptcy protection to becoming a hugely successful and truly global car maker. The all-new Focus (p6) is of no less signiďŹ cance. It brings with it a new platform that will in time underpin some 3.5 million Fords per year across dozens of models. It is exible enough to respond to changing demand and tastes for diferent body styles, as well as being futureproofed for electriďŹ cation and connectivity options that will become ubiquitous during the car’s likely seven-year life. Most pleasingly, as with the original Focus, it’s an architecture that’s been created ďŹ rst and foremost with the enthusiast driver in mind. This is why the humble Focus is so admired and respected: whichever version it may be, it’s just a darn good car to drive and to live with.      A strong Focus is the sign of a strong Ford. A renewed push on driver appeal for the agship model can only be a good thing.

                    



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JIM CLARK REMEMBERED

TUNING THE SEARCH ENGINE

Find out why the E-Pace is no match for the compact SUV class best, p34

We pay tribute to one of the greats with an epic road trip by Lotus, p42

Meet John Krafcik, the man who’s bringing Google to the road, p62

11 APRIL 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 5


N E WS G O T A S T O RY ?

Email our news editor rachel.burgess@haymarket.com

EXCLUSIVE PICTURES

Driver appeal still key for ‘most advanced’ Focus Two bodystyles and four distinct trim variations for lighter, roomier and tech-laden fourth-gen Focus; Ford says agility, engagement and ‘fun-to-drive’ feeling remain 6 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 11 APRIL 2018


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The Focus will be offered in two bodystyles and four distinct trim levels a

ord said it has retained driving engagement as a key priority for the new Focus, the fourthgeneration version of the small family hatchback that redefined the company’s attitude to dynamic ability when it was launched in 1998. The new Focus, due on sale in July, will come in two bodystyles in the UK: fivedoor hatchback and estate. A saloon will remain on sale on the Continent. There will be four trim variations and Ford said a raft of new technology

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will make the Focus the most advanced car it sells in Europe. Beyond that, however, the agility that has made the Focus so popular to date will remain. Joe Bakaj, Ford of Europe’s vice president for product development, said: “Driving quality in itself isn’t enough to sell cars. If you’re not up to scratch [in infotainment], you’re not even considered. But owners will still get that fun-to-drive feel that people have loved about the Focus for the past 20 years.” The hatchback will be

offered in ST-Line trim, which has suspension that is 10mm lower than the standard car’s, and as an Active-badged nearcrossover variant, which sits 30mm higher than standard. Ford’s upmarket Vignale specification will also be offered, along with the regular Titanium trim level. Aside from otherwise consistent interior architecture, the Active version will feature some harder-wearing materials, Vignale cars will receive more upmarket trim with more satin

materials and ST-Line models will be more sporty. Regular Titanium versions will sit somewhere between them. Ford hasn’t yet announced pricing, but a small percentage increase is expected over the current model, which suggests a car that will sell from £20,500 through to around £28,000. A hot ST version will follow and although there has been no official confirmation of a high-performance RS model, Autocar understands there will be one with a 400bhp, 425lb ft

mild-hybrid powertrain (see separate story, page 11). The latest Focus is built on a highly adaptable new Ford platform, called C2, which will underpin dozens of mediumsized forthcoming models, including the next-generation Kuga SUV. By 2021, Ford expects C-segment SUV and crossover sales to outstrip those of regular models. Ford estimates that by the middle of the next decade, the European markets for midsized SUVs and cars will be roughly 3.5 million units ◊

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∆ apiece. The enduring popularity of C-segment cars, which currently make up 19% of all cars sold in Europe, is one reason why Ford – unlike GM, which dispensed with its European Vauxhall/Opel arm – remains committed here. “We’d find it daft to exit a big market like Europe,” said Bakaj. “Seventeen million cars a year are sold here. And it’s a net contributor to the business in terms of engineering and development.” The Focus and its C2 platform have largely been developed in Europe. The new model is a crucial part of the successful ‘One Ford’ plan that means Fords built on the same platform are sold in multiple regions: Europe’s Mondeo is the US Fusion and the Mk3 Focus RS was sold globally. The Focus’s new platform is said to liberate interior room in a package little bigger than today’s model. The wheelbase is 53mm longer, at 2701mm, while the overall length is only 18mm longer (now 4378mm, pretty normal for the class). The width is about the same, at 1820mm, and the new car is 15mm lower than before. It’s also lighter than today’s Focus. Ford hasn’t confirmed kerb weights yet because final homologation hasn’t been completed, but it says the new car is up to 88kg lighter, like-for-like, than today’s Focus. Some 33kg of that comes from the chassis, which uses a greater proportion of

high-strength steel and a few aluminium elements in the front crash structure. Overall, body rigidity is up by 20%, but this increases by as much as 50% around the suspension elements, which, Ford says, allows it much more flexibility in suspension tuning. The body panels are 25kg lighter than those of the previous Focus, the interior loses 17kg and the powertrain and electrical systems each lose up to 6kg and 7kg respectively. At launch there will be a line-up of pure diesel and petrol engines, with a mild hybrid to follow next year (see separate story, opposite). Initially, petrol engines are familiar three-cylinder Ecoboost units, adapted for improved economy. The 1.0-litre triple has a new turbocharger and cylinder head, a higher compression ratio (now 10.5:1) and increased injection pressure (250bar), and it has a petrol particulate filter. It comes with power outputs of 84bhp, 99bhp and 124bhp, each with estimated CO2 emissions of 108g/km. A development of the Fiesta ST’s three-cylinder 1.5-litre petrol will also be offered with the Focus. It includes cylinder deactivation and will come in 148bhp and 179bhp forms, offering CO2 outputs of 120g/km or thereabouts. There will be two Ecobluebadged four-cylinder diesels. The 1.5 comes in 94bhp and 118bhp forms and produces

W H Y DR I V ER A PPE A L M AT T ER S M AT T P R I O R

How does the new Focus look? It’s not striking in the same way as Toyota’s new Auris, but there’s enough modernity to keep the Focus looking fresh at the start of what will be the next seven or eight years on sale. Design aside, things move on as you’d expect: continually downsized engines, more weight taken out of the body-in-white and a car that will likely just improve the breed as new cars tend to do. If

from 94g/km of CO2 , while the 2.0-litre makes 148bhp and emits about 110g/km. All will drive through a sixspeed manual transmission or, optionally on the highestpowered petrol of each size, the top-spec 1.5-litre diesel and the 2.0-litre diesel, an eight-speed automatic. It’s a conventional torque-converter auto rather than a dual-clutch unit, following an industry trend towards smoother conventional auto gearboxes. Ford now expects the 1.0-litre petrol to be the biggest-selling variant, taking over from the 1.5-litre diesel. Unusually for a Focus, the chassis set-up will depend on which engine is specified. The 1.0 petrol and 1.5 diesel will

there’s a disappointment, for me it’s that there’s no part-electrification of the powertrains from the very start, but it’s coming. If there’s something to savour, it’s that Ford knows how seriously its customers take the fact that its cars are engaging and fun to drive. So while talk of new tech and it being the most advanced car in the class is great, the thing I’m most looking forward to is finding out what it’s like from behind the wheel.

get a twist beam rear axle. Bakaj believes this will give driving characteristics “just as good as today’s Focus”, which has a fully independent rear end. The current Focus has been the benchmark for the new car’s twist beam: Bakaj says potholes thump a bit more with the torsion beam, but otherwise you’d be hard-pressed to notice the difference between the two. Higher-spec Focuses will get an independent rear end, in the form of a rear double-wishbone set-up that is meant to further improve comfort. But it’s standard only on 1.5 petrol or 2.0-litre diesel models, on the Active crossover, on the estate and on Vignale versions. The ST-Line, with its lower ◊

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Ford expects the 1.0-litre petrol to be the biggest-selling variant HISTORY OF THE FOCUS

ST-Line trim lowers the car by 15mm and adds a more sporty look

Focus Mk1 1998 The Escort replacement was a game changer when it was launched. Its polarising ‘New Edge’ styling took the entire concept of a family hatch in a new direction.

8 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 11 APRIL 2018

Focus goes rallying 1999 The Focus became the basis of Ford’s World Rally Championship attack. Various iterations of the car won 44 events up until 2010, when the Fiesta WRC took over.

New tech will make the Focus Ford’s most advanced car in Europe

Hydrogen-powered Focus 2001 An experimental hydrogenelectric Focus was shown at Geneva and 30 were built. The project was canned in the mid-2000s due to financial and packaging issues.

Focus ST170 2002 The sporty ST170 got a 168bhp Cosworth-tuned 2.0-litre four-pot and a sixspeed manual gearbox, but it was too heavy to handle like a proper hot hatch.

a

First Focus RS 2002 Ford wanted a Focus worthy of the RS badge. The three-door hatchback used a 209bhp 2.0-litre four-cylinder engine. Production ended in 2003, but a cult following grew.


NEWS

Instrument panel has 50% fewer buttons; multimedia is all new

MILD-HYBRID FOCUS HERE NEXT YEAR Although it’s disappointing that a hybrid variant of the Focus Mk4 hasn’t been announced at launch, Ford has at least confirmed that a mild hybrid is on its way. Next year, a 1.0-litre Ecoboost engine will be mated to an electric motor, via a 48V electrical system, which is becoming the norm for adding boost and reducing emissions,

Focus SVT 2002 An American Ford oddity: instead of the RS, customers in the US got the Focus SVT, with a 168bhp engine. The SVT badge is also used on hot versions of the F-150 pick-up.

but it doesn’t offer prolonged fuel-free running or plug-in charging. Instead, a lowercapacity battery than that of a true hybrid stores energy, generated under deceleration via a starter/generator, to help power the car in town, or fill a low-end torque gap. It’s natural to assume that the Focus mild hybrid’s chief rival will not be Volkswagen’s

Focus C-Max 2003 The Focus became an MPV with a family-friendly cabin and a new platform that would later underpin the second-gen Focus. ‘Focus’ was dropped from the C-Max name in 2007.

Golf GTE, which has a 101bhp electric motor combined with a 148bhp 1.4-litre petrol engine, but instead a mildhybrid version, which has yet to join the Golf range. Ford’s Joe Bakaj said the Focus’s 1.0/48V system will have a similar CO2 output to that of the high-powered diesel with an auto gearbox, so around 110g/km, then.

The complexity of making a clean modern diesel, plus the slowly reducing battery costs for hybrids, means that a mild hybrid is VW’s Golf GTE is a full plug-in “starting to get to hybrid the same cost” as a economy. “It’d be a real diesel, said Bakaj. shame if society turns away But the two offer different and we can’t sell diesels,” things, and a diesel still can’t Bakaj added. be touched for long-distance

Europe’s second-gen Focus 2004 The second-generation Focus retained the suspension layout of its predecessor, but was stiffer, larger and heavier. The model underwent a facelift in 2007.

Focus Vignale concept 2004 Ford rekindled ties with its cabriolet heritage with this folding hard-top concept. It was recognisable as one of the second-gen Focus family but added futuristic design cues.

Focus ST 2005 The ST badge returned with a 219bhp turbo five-pot. “There’s an honest charm to the ST that will make it a rewarding but very easy car to live with,” Autocar wrote at the time.

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Owners will still get that fun-to-drive feel people love about the Focus a

New C2 platform adds 53mm to the wheelbase and boosts cabin space

bushes (on double-wishbone versions) is “the car that delivers on the Focus promise more than any other”, in the words of Bakaj. That promise includes a turning centre that feels like it’s adjacent to the driver, to give one of the most agile feelings in the class, and a rear end that ‘tucks’ on turn-in with a lift of the throttle. All Focuses get three driving modes, which will affect the steering weight, automatic gearbox operation (if fitted) and throttle map. The modes will also adjust the adaptive

dampers that are offered as an option on cars with doublewishbone suspension. The estate’s suspension uses lower and wider dampers to increase the luggage volume to the extent that there’s a width of 1.14m between the wheelhouses – 12cm more than any rival car, according to Ford. The overall load length is up by 134mm, to 1700mm with the rear seats folded. With the seats in place, the load area can be covered by a tonneau that can be operated one-handed. There’s additional storage space beneath the boot floor.

Thanks to the wheelbase extension, the Focus’s interior dimensions are said to be vastly improved despite the only modest increase in external girth. Rear knee room is up 56mm, front shoulder room is said to be class-leading and, thanks to a reprofiling of the rear doors, rear passengers’ heads are now adjacent to glass rather than metal, so they can see out more easily. Structural changes aside, some of the Focus’s extra interior space has been created by making the windscreen more upright. That reduces the

Electric Focus 2009 Ford showed off a Focus with an electric powertrain at the Frankfurt motor show. It took elements from the US-market hybrid Fusion and offered an 80-mile driving range.

Focus RS Mk2 2009 The second RS was front-drive but ditched the Mk1’s turbo four-pot in favour of a 296bhp five-cylinder turbo. Clever RevoKnuckle suspension helped to tame torque steer.

Focus RS500 2010 This even faster evolution of the RS Mk2 made 340bhp from its uprated engine. Ford limited production to 500 examples worldwide; 101 of those came to the UK.

∆ suspension and stiffer

The Focus is up to 88kg lighter than it was but 20% stiffer overall

Focus Coupé-Cabriolet 2006 The first drop-top Focus arrived at the Geneva motor show. The model came as the segment boomed: Volkswagen, Renault, Peugeot, Vauxhall and Volvo each sold a coupé-cabriolet.

10 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 11 APRIL 2018

America’s second-gen Focus 2007 The US didn’t get the secondgeneration Focus in 2005, instead having to wait until 2007 to get a local-market version with a pared-down range of derivatives.


NEWS

Hot ST to pack 250bhp; RS could top 400bhp FORD IS, REASSURINGLY, one of those companies that you can guarantee would like to build exciting, fast variants of its cars whenever it can, and a Focus ST is already set into the model programme. Autocar understands that, like the current ST, it will use a four-cylinder turbo engine of 2.0 litres, which is what you need for a power output getting on for the 250bhp

now expected in the class. The new Fiesta ST uses a 1.5-litre three-cylinder engine, because a cylinder size of 500cc gives thermal efficiency advantages, but despite the Focus’s reduced kerb weight – which extends to steering knuckles that are 3.6kg lighter than those of the current Focus – this is surely a car that’s too big to be powered by a three-pot

motor. Instead, expect a kerb weight, power output and price on par with those of the Volkswagen Golf GTI. The RS is a different story. The new C2 platform has been developed with the next Kuga in mind, so the RS could have the four-wheel drive that big power outputs demand. The car has yet to be signed off by Ford’s board but, as exclusively revealed in our

scoop in the 21 February issue, the car is expected to adopt a mild-hybrid powertrain with about 400bhp, making it faster and more efficient than the current RS. It will also be more expensive, at £40,000. Despite the challenges of making an RS that returns a profit, Ford hasn’t yet failed to make an RS version of the Focus. It’s hardly likely it will drop the ball now.

said: “We bought into Argo AI [a start-up that’s developing autonomous driving tech]. There’s the potential to sell on the technology later. By 2021, there’ll be a level four autonomous system that will have been geomapped in some cities. It’s about moving people and moving goods. Internet package delivery is growing by 7-8% a year,

and delivery firms find it hard to recruit and retain staff. Automation can be 25% more efficient than a driven van.”

Four-wheel drive wouldn’t be an issue for a Mk4 Focus RS

depth of the instrument panel, which has 50% fewer buttons owing to a complete redesign of the multimedia systems. Ford says the Focus will be the most advanced car it sells in Europe. It will have radaroperated cruise control and lane-keep assist to level two autonomous standards, emergency auto braking, park assist, rear cross-traffic alert and, significantly for passengers, a wi-fi network that will connect to up to 10 devices and work up to 15m away from the car. MATT PRIOR

Third-gen Focus 2010 Bankruptcy averted, Ford sought to reunite the US and European Focuses. The third-gen Focus line-up included a five-door hatch, a saloon and an estate.

FORD’S FUTURE IN URBAN MOBILITY Aside from the roll-out of new cars, Ford is well into the ‘mobility’ theme. “Our aspiration is to be the world’s leading mobility provider,” Ford of Europe CEO Steve Armstrong has said. Ford has been talking to city councils to develop its mobility products. Which means what? Anything from self-driving cars to ride sharing and hooking up systems within cars and a

Focus ST Mk2 2010 Ford wasted no time turning the third-gen Focus into a Golf GTI-rival and a fast estate. It blended day-to-day comfort and practicality with 249bhp from a turbocharged four-pot.

city’s infrastructure, all to make getting around easier and cleaner than it is today. Councils are apparently receptive to Ford’s advances. “They have the ability to address environmental and congestion concerns,” says Armstrong. “And if they’re into new ideas to keep people moving in a cleaner environment, Ford wants to be part of it.” Ford of Europe’s Joe Bakaj

Electric Focus, take two 2011 Power for the first productionready electric Focus came from a 100kWh battery with a 100mile range. Data from JATO Dynamics shows 61 examples were sold in Europe in 2016.

Ford is working hard on self-driving tech

Focus RS Mk3 2015 “The most fun you can have in a hot hatchback on road or track,” said Autocar. The latest RS used all-wheel drive for the first time and the new Drift Mode was a major talking point.

Heritage Edition RS 2018 The RS Mk3 signed off with a limited-edition car developed for the UK. It has a Quaife mechanical locking diff and an engine upgrade to 365bhp. Only 50 examples will be built.

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NEWS The A6 Avant is 12mm longer than before and has a longer wheelbase

Launch engines will be V6 petrols and diesels

OFFICIAL PICTURES

‘Dramatic’ look for new A6 Avant Audi’s E-Class Estate rival adopts sleek sloping roofline without sacrificing practicality

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he new Audi A6 Avant’s aggressively sloping bootline has been achieved without compromising load space and negates the need for the company to produce a shooting brake version of the car “like some of our competitors”, according to its head of exterior design, Helmut Jung. The remark – likely referring to Mercedes – highlights Audi’s confidence that it has produced a car that will appeal to buyers both for its practicality and its looks. “This is a car that delivers on both fronts,” said

Jung. “Usually such a dramatic line as the slope we have from the roof to the boot brings compromises but, because of the extended length of the car and some clever design work, we have exactly the same boot space as before.” The A6 Avant’s boot volume extends from 515 litres to 1680 litres depending on whether the rear seats are up or down. Further practicality is added by functions that allow the seats to be laid almost flat at the push of a button and an optional feature that enables the boot to be opened by the

key holder waving their foot under the rear bumper. The boot capacity has also benefited from the car being 12mm longer than before. Additional packaging gains mean the boot length is 27mm longer, and cabin space is also enlarged in the front and rear as a result of a longer wheelbase. The cabin gains are said to particularly benefit elbow room throughout and rear knee room, which was criticised in the previousgeneration model. As with the saloon version of the A6, Jung highlighted the

inspiration of the Audi Quattro in the styling, particularly for the blistered wheel arches. He also noted a personal goal of giving the car the visual impact of the 100 Avant. “The goal was a sporty, clean, progressive look,” said Jung. “It had to invoke the spirit of Quattro but also look timeless – we are in the business of creating cars that will look good in 10 years’ time, not just in this moment.” Elsewhere, the A6 Avant follows the themes set by the saloon, such as its interior look and technology, including Audi’s new MMI and voice

control systems. An allwheel steering system is also available, to boost stability at speed and reduce the near five-metre-long car’s turning circle to 11.1 metres – one metre less than that of the outgoing car. The A6 Avant will likely launch in the UK with the V6 pairing of the 286ps 50 TDI diesel and 340ps 55 TFSI petrol, both linked to an eightspeed automatic gearbox and mild hybrid system. Four-cylinder options will be launched at a later date. JIM HOLDER

Q & A H E L M U T J U N G , A U D I A 6 AVA N T E X T E R I O R D E S I G N E R What were the inspirations for the car? “The Quattro is clear to see – especially on the wheel blisters, and across every

new car we launch. It is our reference point now. For ‘wow’ factor I looked at the 100 Avant. Then we had the prologue concept, which really pointed us in this direction. The goal was really to make a little bit of the drama of an RS model available for everyone.” Were there areas where your designs needed reining in? “This is a more expressive car. The goal was to ensure that it looks good for ever more; not

just capture the imagination now and age badly over time. We are a progressive brand, not a brash one.”

of them. We opted to make a theme out of it rather than try to tuck it away.”

Why are the sensors so prominent at the front of the car? “We wanted them to be that way, to emphasise the technology available on the car. We had two choices: to try to hide them, which would not have been entirely possible, or to make a feature

Audi still has a familiar family look, though… “It does, and it always The Quattro is still inspiring Audi designers will. There is increasingly appreciate that one of our more differentiation cars is part of the Audi family, between models, but every even when some of the car has its own interpretation themes – such as the details of the Quattro themes, and around the grille, or the shape in details such as the grille of the vents – are different.” you will always be able to

NEW CAR SALES HIT BY DIESEL SLUMP

TVR TO RACE AT THE LE MANS 24 HOURS

Sales of new diesel cars tumbled 37.2% in March and accounted for just 32.4% of the new car market. Overall, new car sales fell 15.7%. Demand for petrol cars was up by 0.5% and sales of alternatively fuelled vehicles rose by 5.7%.

TVR will return to top-level endurance racing this year via a partnership with the Rebellion Racing team. Rebellion Racing TVR will run two Oreca R13 LMP prototypes and compete in the Le Mans 24 Hours and FIA World Endurance Championship.

11 APRIL 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 13


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NEWS

Vauxhall plant safe until 2029 Luton factory has been awarded the contract to build Vauxhall, Citroën and Peugeot vans

Luton factory will make 100,000 vans a year from 2020 he future of Vauxhall’s Luton plant has been secured for the next decade, with the PSA Group confirming that its next generation of vans will be built there. Since the PSA Group – which also owns Citroën, DS and Peugeot – bought Vauxhall and Opel from General Motors last year, there have been questions surrounding the future of Vauxhall’s Luton and Ellesmere Port plants in the UK, which build the Vivaro and Astra respectively. This decision safeguards the

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PSA Group boss Carlos Tavares

future of the Luton plant. PSA boss Carlos Tavares said the decision was “due to an urgent need to increase capacity for light commercial vehicles to meet growing demand”. The Luton plant produced 60,000 Vivaros last year. By the end of 2020, annual production will rise to 100,000 units, which will consist of Vauxhall, Peugeot Expert and Citroën Dispatch vans. The new Vivaro will move on to PSA’s EMP2 platform, which is already used by the Expert and Dispatch. As a result, the Luton plant, which is getting £9 million investment from the UK government, will become one of two hubs for vans based on the EMP2 platform. The other is in Hordain, France. The Expert and Dispatch vans, on which the new Vivaro is based, went on sale three

GOOD NEWS BUT MUST DO BETTER R ACH E L B U RG ESS

Vauxhall’s Luton factory reduced manufacturing costs by 17% in 2017 compared with 2016, but Carlos Tavares says it needs to slash them by another 20% to be on a par with plants in continental Europe. So although this is positive news for Vauxhall, the industry and the UK economy, the car maker’s UK management team need to rise to the challenge. They

have won this round – which is largely down to an urgency to increase van capacity – but to be in it for the long haul, there’s plenty to be tackled yet. Tavares’s unwillingness to commit to new jobs, instead focusing on what needs to be done first, shows just how competitive the plant needs to be in order to meet his targets and, in turn, help salvage the brand.

THE PSA DEAL

The Expert and Dispatch will join the Vivaro on the production line years ago. Vans have a longer life cycle than cars, meaning the Luton plant is likely to be in business until at least 2029. Currently, 1400 employees work at the Luton plant and one source has suggested another 350 jobs could be added. However, Tavares said: “There is an opportunity to increase the number of staff. But staff is always the positive outcome of a well-done job. “Let’s start by doing the job we need to do. Let’s make sure the plant is efficient in terms of energy, using the workforce, quality, making

sure we don’t waste our money on useless logistics.” He added: “There is no commitment on new jobs. The commitment is on the competitiveness of the plant.” The change means that the new Vivaro will no longer share a platform with the Renault Trafic as part of a joint venture. Tavares is understood to be keen to cut ties with PSA’s rival French car maker. Renault will continue to produce the Vauxhall/Opel Movano, a sibling to the Renault Master, at its Batilly plant in France. RACHEL BURGESS

W H AT A BOUT ELLESMER E PORT ? Carlos Tavares says that a decision on the future of the Ellesmere Port plant will be made in 2020. He said: “The current Astra launched in 2016 and a typical life cycle is seven years so it ends in 2023. The decision [on Ellesmere Port] needs to be made three years ahead of a new model, which is 2020. “We are lucky because we have a few years to catch up on all the productivity that was not

done in the past 20 years [at the plant]. While everybody is waiting for Brexit, we are trying to rebuild productivity of the plant by 2020. At that time, we’ll have the answer – and it will be a good time, because we will know the outcome of Brexit.”

March 2017 News breaks of a possible PSA Group purchase of Vauxhall/Opel from General Motors just before the Geneva motor show, and it is only a matter of days before the rumours are confirmed. August 2017 PSA closes the deal, making it the second largest European car group by market share after the Volkswagen Group. The buyout is valued at £2bn and includes GM’s European financial arm. November 2017 PSA unveils its strategy to make Vauxhall/Opel profitable by 2020. Plans include electrified versions of all models by 2024, a reduction in the number of platforms and powertrains, and entry into more than 20 new export markets by 2022, including China and the Middle East. April 2018 PSA confirms the future of Vauxhall’s Luton plant (see main story). 2020 A decision will be made on the future of Vauxhall’s Ellesmere Port factory, which employs 1100 staff.

11 APRIL 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 15


Lotus Esprit to be reborn Modern-day Esprit is being readied for 2020 alongside another new Lotus sports car

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otus boss Jean-Marc Gales has revealed that two new sports cars are in the pipeline as investment begins to materialise from the company’s new owner, Chinese automotive giant Geely. The two cars will include a new star model, due in 2020, that will sit above the Evora – essentially placing it as a modern-day version of the Esprit. It follows recent news that Lotus is currently finalising the design of its first crossover, which is expected to make use of Geely-owned Volvo’s SPA architecture. The Norfolk-based company currently employs two platform families: one underpins the flagship Evora,

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New Esprit will be light, aerodynamic, efficient and agile 16 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 11 APRIL 2018

Evora GT430 is almost 150kg lighter than the original Evora S which is available as a 2+2 and a 2+0, and the other sits beneath the Elise, Exige and hardcore 3-Eleven two-seaters. Both use an extruded, bonded and riveted aluminium chassis with either aluminium or composite front and steel rear subframes. The new star model

will make use of the same chassis formula. Following a programme of weight reduction during Gales’s four years at the helm, the lightest Evora – the GT430 Sport – has shed almost 150kg compared with the original supercharged Evora S, while

Elise (pictured), Exige and 3-Eleven all use the same platform power has risen from 276bhp for the early naturally aspirated car to a peak of 430bhp in today’s GT430 models. The nonSport GT430 also generates up to 250kg of downforce. But Gales has said the new model will be a significant development, sitting “in an

upper segment, above the Evora”, and it will “take the Evora a step further” and will be lighter. He reiterated his commitment to Lotus’s key tenets of “lightweight, aerodynamic and handling” and insisted the new car will satisfy all three.


NEWS The GT430 already features carbonfibre front and rear bumpers, front access panel, roof panel, tailgate and rear wing. A more focused model could replace more of the remaining GRP bodywork with further carbonfibre or lightweight composites. The Evora GT430 is more a competitor to the Porsche 911 GT3 than to the GT3 RS, but a completely new model could go a step further. Gales would not be drawn on power outputs or with which cars the new Lotus is likely to compete, but he said he wants the new car to achieve class-leading status via “efficiency, aerodynamics, agility and braking working together in balance”. Although he predicted that Lotus will begin to embrace powertrains from other divisions within Geely (see separate story, right), Gales said Lotus cars will continue to employ Toyota engines in the immediate future. The current line-up consists of 1.6- and 1.8-litre four-pots in the Elise

and a 3.5-litre V6 in other models, all of which are of alloy construction and supercharged, ranging in power from 217bhp to 430bhp. Fewer details are available on the second new sports car, but it is likely to be a twoseater. Whether it will directly succeed the Elise or evolve that model’s format is unclear, but Gales acknowledged that “the market is now moving a bit more upmarket”. The significant cost of developing a new model would be offset by pitching it at a higher price point than the current Elise, which starts at £32,300. Should this upward progression materialise, such a model could bridge the power gap between the most potent Elise, the 250bhp Cup 260, and the entry-level Exige, the 345bhp Sport 350. Lotus’s modernisation under its new owner could also include the use of Geely-sourced ancillaries. Gales cited a modern electrical architecture and TFT instrument panels as examples of the synergies that could be achieved via Geely. RICHARD WEBBER

L O T U S C O U L D S W I T C H T O V O LV O P O W E R T R A I N S Jean-Marc Gales expects Lotus will still be using Toyota engines in the immediate future, but the Lotus boss is keen to embrace the powertrain options available from other Geely-owned brands. Such co-operation is most likely to make use of resources developed by Volvo, whose technology is also being used by fellow Geely brands Polestar and Lynk&Co. Volvo’s petrol range now consists of a 152bhp 1.5-litre three-cylinder turbo and several variations of a 2.0-litre turbo four-pot making between 187bhp and 306bhp, the latter additionally aided by supercharging. It is expected that Lotus would use in-house expertise to boost performance from any Geely-sourced engines, as it does with the current Toyota units, but it seems unlikely that an unassisted 2.0-litre four-cylinder

engine would provide the power required for Hethel’s top-performing sports cars. Opportunities to tackle this are provided by electrified versions of the same three- and fourcylinder petrol engines. Currently, that means Volvo’s 401bhp T8 hybrid. But other variants – such as the threepot hybrid expected in the Volvo XC40 and Lynk&Co 01 SUVs and the 592bhp four-cylinder hybrid of the Polestar 1 coupé – aren’t far away, with all-electric models also in the pipeline. Talking about powertrain options for the higher-

riding Lotus that’s due within four years, Gales said: “Crossovers can be hybrid or full electric.” As for future propulsion choices in Lotus’s more familiar segments, Gales did not rule out electrification, saying: “There are some years left for combustion engines in sports cars, but maybe a mild hybrid would work.” Gales is also open to using full-electric systems in that sector as the technology evolves. “The pace of development in electric drive is incredible and batteries are also moving fast,” he said.

Hybrid or full electric are options for Lotus’s new SUV

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MIND YOUR BACK, MCLAREN M A R K T I S S H AW

So Lotus is going to make a new car in an “upper segment above the Evora”, one that doesn’t compete with anything wearing a ‘911’ badge. The next place to go, then, is into the world of entry-level mid-engined supercars like the McLaren 570S and Audi R8. Even if Lotus won’t say it, we will for them: they’re making a new Esprit. And they’re doing so with the

wind in their sails: the Evora has quietly (and quite brilliantly) crept up from a £47,500 car at launch in 2008 to one with a £112,500 price in GT430 guise. It’s a price tag the Evora actually wears rather well, albeit at the limit without encroaching into McLaren territory. There’s only one thing to do, then, and they’re going to do it: the Esprit is coming back.

Mid-engined Esprit supercar was built from 1976 to 2004

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The new star Lotus will sit in an upper segment, above the Evora, and take the Evora a step further a 11 APRIL 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 17


       

   

       

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NEWS Clearmotion-tech 5 Series stays level, unlike a standard car

‘World’s stillest ride’ due in 2019 US firm’s new ride technology is claimed to be the “fastest proactive system” around

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roundbreaking proactive suspension technology, which can essentially stop all car body movement caused by rough surfaces and cornering, will make its road car debut next year. Developed by US engineering firm Clearmotion, the so-called ‘digital chassis system’ is said to be significantly more proactive than technology currently featured on even the market’s most luxurious cars, including air-sprung models such as the latest Mercedes-Benz S-Class and Bentley Continental GT. “Our technology is the fastest proactive ride system that exists today,” Clearmotion CEO Shak Avadhany told Autocar in an exclusive interview. “It really delivers an almost instantaneous level of isolation that’s so noticeable you’d feel the difference in the first 10 feet of driving.”

Avadhany said the technology, which benefits from control software acquired from a 30-year skunkworks project at Bose called Project Sound, works by turning a car’s dampers into actuators. This allows them to actively, Avadhany: Clearmotion CEO rather than passively, move in response to the surface in 2019 before reaching the beneath them. Avadhany said mass market in 2020 and it’s drawn the attention of five demonstrators have shown major manufacturers but he refrained from revealing which. it’s already at an extremely advanced stage. Recently “In our system, we equip released footage of a the damper with an active modified BMW 5 Series with valve that allows the fluid Clearmotion’s tech shows it inside to pass in and out,” driving over speed humps and said Avadhany. “We have bumpy roads with no visible real-time accelerometers body movement. The wheels that are reading the road move freely within the arches and reacting instantly, with to soak up all surface changes. motors providing the car with The standard car, meanwhile, unparalleled ride quality.” The set-up is being developed jiggles and leans throughout. Despite the system’s for introduction on apparent complexity, it’s being a low-volume developed with price in vehicle Clearmotion’s mind, said Avadhany, one system requires of three Massachusetts one small pod equipped Institute of Technology with an active valve to students who founded be added to each damper. Clearmotion in 2008. It makes the damper As a result, he doesn’t offer a continuously expect a drastic increase variable amount of in cost for future models resistance. that use the system. Avadhany revealed that much of the development has taken place in the UK because of its challenging road surfaces and a “highly skilled engineering workforce”. SAM SHEEHAN

AU TONOMOUS CA RS A R E A K E Y TA RGE T movement of an impact, Although luxury cars may from the road surface seem the most relevant through to the human.” recipient of Clearmotion’s The focus now for new damper technology, CEO Shak Avadhany believes Clearmotion is to establish itself among the world’s its future business will biggest car makers to ensure be dominated by selfits system can be integrated driving cars. into as many vehicles as “Autonomous cars will possible. Although the need to ride like magic technology currently has carpets if they are to no major rivals, Avadhany become the mobile offices believes the rise of many consumers hope they autonomous cars will quickly will,” said Avadhany. “But if see competition heat up. we use current suspension “Once the excitement of technology, passengers will an autonomous car wears quickly realise that motion off and safety and pick-up sickness will become a real times are acceptable, you’re problem.” going to see the focus of Clearmotion therefore consumers change,” he said. hopes to tap into the “They’ll begin to choose autonomous car market which car they use based early with its technology, on how productive they can which, it says, can reduce be in a car. This is where the the symptoms of motion race for manufacturers will sickness by 68%, based be: to produce the car that’s on an internal test with easiest to be productive in.” 14 people. “We are also working on active seats that can respond to the road surface as well,” said Avadhany. “Combine these with our dampers and then we can cars control the entire Ride quality will be crucial on self-driving

11 APRIL 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 19




                                  

                                                            


NEWS Fitzgerald said Essentia GT is likely to arrive by 2022

CONFIDENTIAL GOSSIP | RUMOURS | TRENDS

UK is key target for Genesis Hyundai’s luxury brand will hit Britain in 2020 with saloons and SUVs

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he UK will be the main target of Genesis when the marque is launched in Europe in 2020, according to brand boss Manfred Fitzgerald. Hyundai’s luxury arm launched as a brand in its own right in 2016, focusing on US and Asian markets but with the expectation that it would eventually arrive in Europe. However, until now, it has been unclear if and when right-handdrive models would be offered. A model called the Hyundai Genesis was previously sold in the UK. However, the large Audi A6-rivalling saloon (which has since morphed into the G80 saloon elsewhere) sold only 50 units in two years and was axed in 2017. That has left a clear path for the Genesis brand to enter the UK. Former Lamborghini brand and design boss Fitzgerald said: “We’ll be entering the European market in the next couple of years. That said, in that market,

we’ll be focusing on the UK. We’re definitely building righthand-drive cars for 2020.” Genesis’s line-up is currently spearheaded by three saloons, but two SUVs – a BMW X5 rival called the GV80 and a Jaguar E-Pace competitor named the GV70 – will arrive in 2020. Given the still-growing demand for SUVs, the GV80 and GV70 will be crucial in making a dent in the European market, but Fitzgerald said it will launch its entire range here. “To launch the brand, you come with your entire product portfolio,” he said. “It’s not about volume. If it were, then you would go for a specific body type. Instead, it’s a brandbuilding exercise.” Genesis will launch its first electric model by 2021 but it will not be a production version of the recently revealed electric Essentia GT concept. Although Fitzgerald said the Essentia GT is likely to make production in 2021 or 2022, it is not yet

confirmed. The first zeroemissions Genesis is instead expected to be the G80, the launch of the next-generation saloon set to coincide with that of an electric variant. Despite reports of plugin hybrid versions of the GV70 and GV80, Fitzgerald

is unconvinced by such technology. “I’m not so sold on plug-in hybrid,” he said. “They have a lot of issues and we’re still looking at all options. Internal combustion engines or pure electric are our favourite options.” RACHEL BURGESS

CAN GENESIS SUCCEED IN THE UK? R ACH E L B U RG ESS

Not easily. As a case in point, Nissan-owned Infiniti is still struggling to make ground a decade after being launched here, with expensive cars inferior to premium German rivals. It sold 3515 cars in the UK in 2017 compared with BMW’s 175,101. Lexus, Toyota’s luxury brand, has fared a little better, making an early niche for itself with its hybrid offerings. Even so, Lexus sold only 12,670

cars last year in the UK. On Genesis’s side is a strong line-up of experienced execs – Manfred Fitzgerald from Lamborghini, Luc Donckerwolke from Bentley, Audi and Lamborghini, and Albert Biermann from BMW M – all of whom will know what’s required to succeed here: a strong brand, respectable driving dynamics and a competitive price.

WHAT THE GENESIS LINE-UP WILL LOOK LIKE BY 2022

G90 The MercedesBenz S-Class rival is Genesis’s flagship model. A facelifted version is due next year before an all-new model arrives in 2022.

G80 Once upon a time called the Hyundai Genesis, this BMW 5 Series rival is the brand’s top-seller and expected to be the first Genesis to get an electric variant in 2021.

G70 Revealed late last year, the G70 is the newest model in the line-up. The Jaguar XE rival will be crucial to growing sales for Genesis as the cheapest car in the range.

GV80 Due in 2020, it was previewed as a concept last year. A future foe of the BMW X5, it will be offered in petrol and diesel guises but with scope for electrified variants.

GV70 Also due in 2020, Genesis’s smaller SUV has the potential to become its bestseller worldwide. The BMW X3 adversary echoes the GV80’s powertrain line-up.

Essentia A production version of the electric Essentia GT could arrive by 2022 and be a halo model as Genesis looks to establish itself as a credible luxury brand.

MCLAREN CONTINUES to scoff at speculation that it will follow the lead of its performance car rivals by building an SUV. During a recent media event, and with tongue firmly in cheek, McLaren officials flashed up a US publication’s rendering of a prospective McLarenbadged SUV on a screen. “I’m not the first person to point out that sports utility vehicles are neither sporty nor utilitarian,” said McLaren’s engineering design boss, Dan ParryWilliams. “In terms of our philosophy of ‘everything for a reason’, I don’t get it.” CACTUS IS A model, not a range of cars, according to Citroën boss Linda Jackson. When the C4 Cactus was first shown in 2014, it prompted speculation that Citroën may make Cactus versions of all its models. “Cactus is a model,” Jackson said. “It might have inspired us, but it’s definitely a model. There’s only one brand: Citroën.”

THE AMOUNT OF testing required to fully develop an autonomous car will be about 50 million kilometres, which is 10 times the amount done for the latest 5 Series, according to BMW development boss Klaus Fröhlich. THE MERCEDES BOARD has freed up its designers to take more risks in terms of styling, according to the firm’s interior design chief, Hartmut Sinkwitz. He said that approach was allowing Mercedes to make more ‘emotional’ interiors than rivals: “The Mercedes board trusts us to get things right and be bolder, which allows us to go for a more expressive design.”

11 APRIL 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 21


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NEWS

Steve Cropley MY WEEK IN CARS

JCB’s new electric digger offers many critical advantages

Battle of the £32k SUVs: Skoda Kodiaq vs Ssangyong Rexton

MONDAY An impromptu comparison this week: ultracompetent Skoda Kodiaq SUV versus less well-known and riskier Ssangyong Rexton. Both cost about £32k; both turned up at my place in the Cotswolds during a week’s home holiday. You’ll have heard Autocar on the Skoda: it’s one of the most logical choices you can make for comfortable, economical, affordable and swift motoring. The Rexton, meanwhile, is as big as a Range Rover and bristles with enough equipment (audio, driver assist gadgets, quilted leather, surround cameras and more) to outclass the Skoda and send a similarly equipped Range Rover spinning into six figures. And although the Rexton’s 2.2-litre diesel doesn’t enthral, it’s quiet, torquey and enables a decent turn of speed. The flaw is the ride. It’s as if no one from Ssangyong ever drove one on British roads. It’s just about tolerable on smooth motorways but grim on any pockmarked surface. You hardly ever encounter a modern car with such extremes of strength and weakness. All the expensive decisions about design and equipment have been conscientiously made by Ssangyong, while simple stuff like choice of suspension rates has been botched. But if the Koreans were to get it right, which strikes me as easy, this Rexton would be big trouble for other civilised 4x4s.

TUESDAY One of the better-known news websites is asking car users to say what would encourage them to choose an electric car next time – beyond usual stuff like lowering prices, increasing ranges and reassuring people about quick charging on a journey. If I ruled the auto world, I’d set immediately about disentangling electric cars from the subject of autonomy, always mentioned

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Get it right and Rexton would be big trouble for other 4x4s a

in the same breath. Whereas electric cars are progressive and exciting for their refined performance and promise of revolutionary design brought by different packaging, true driverless cars will not be properly dependable for decades. And was there, by the way, ever a less evocative automotive adjective than ‘autonomous’? Sure, we might come to utilise self-driving on motorways as a sort of super cruise control, or self-driving urban cars like a faceless, short-haul Uber. But to me the subject contains far less interest than knowing about a new-tech car’s design, capability and the intentions of its creators.

WEDNESDAY Put your faith in deeds, not words, my applecheeked old granny used to say. If you agree,

AND ANOTHER THING… While scanning classifieds, I allowed myself to get into a proper lather over this magnificent 1938 Ford V8 coupé, on sale at a paltry £36k. Much of the classic car market seems fearfully overheated to me, but post-vintage Americans like this look staggering value.

you’ll have been reassured about the UK’s vehiclemaking prospects from a variety of car bosses in past weeks: PSA’s decision to invest in the Vauxhall plant in Luton and to give the Ellesmere Astra plant more time to build profitability, BMW’s new plan to make electric Minis here, and Toyota’s to keep investing at Burnaston. Plus, of course, all the energy currently radiating from Bentley, Rolls-Royce, Aston Martin and now Geely-owned Lotus. But what puts the cap on it for me is the recent, quietly announced decision by Jaguar Land Rover’s admirable CEO, Ralf Speth, to take British citizenship. If that’s not a declaration of good intentions, I don’t know what is.

THURSDAY JCB, the earth-moving company that is proudly British and progressive with it, has just unveiled a zero-emissions electric digger, capable of working indoors, underground, after hours and close to people in urban areas. Company chairman Lord Anthony Bamford notes the rapid emergence of a new zero-emissions sector and cites it as “the reason we have put ourselves at the forefront of alternative power technologies”. I’m sure I’m not alone in wishing Lord B and his band would build some kind of vehicle for the road.

GET IN TOUCH

steve.cropley@haymarket.com

@StvCr

11 APRIL 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 23


   

                                       

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TESTED 28.3.18, PORTUGAL ON SALE NOW PRICE £120,900

ASTON MARTIN

VANTAGE Mighty twin-turbo V8 up front, two seats in the middle – and the back? You can make the back do whatever you want

11 APRIL 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 27


s it better than the Porsche 911?” That’s the question Aston Martin boss Andy Palmer asks his engineers and it’s not an unreasonable one for you to ask too. And the answer is? Well, as they’ll tell him and I’ll tell you over the next 1500 words or thereabouts, it’s not that simple, guv. In some ways, yes, it is better; in many ways, no, it isn’t; but, for the most part, it’s just different. And that’s fine. Where are we, then? Two models into the ‘second century plan’ that’ll see a new Aston Martin launched every year until 2022, when the cycle begins again. It’ll be a range of sports cars under constant reinvention, with profits from the first providing the investment to develop the next. Like a normal car company. “It’s not rocket science,” says Palmer. First, then, was the DB11, the big, comfy grand tourer, at one end of the sports car scale, and now there’s the

28 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 11 APRIL 2018

Vantage, which sits at the other end, but using a fair degree of DB11 parts. It’s a strict two-seater, with a Mercedes-AMG 4.0-litre twinturbocharged V8 engine sourced from Aston’s partner (and partowner) in the front, and power going from there to the back via an eightspeed transaxle torque-converter gearbox and an electronically controlled limited-slip differential. To see beneath the new Vantage’s skin is to see the advances Aston has made since the old VH architecture died and the new, still all-aluminium structure arrived. Only 33% of the structure is shared with a DB11, which, at 4465mm, the Vantage is 274mm shorter than but, at 1942mm across the body (2153mm to the mirror ends), 2mm wider than. A 911 is a thumb’s width longer but, at 1808mm, rather a lot narrower. Which could be important. There are more pressings and

castings than extrusions in an Aston’s make-up these days. They’re more expensive but more space efficient for a given strength, so the Vantage seats two big people very comfortably and the boot, underneath a hatch tailgate, is big enough for two golf bags. The skin is a mix of aluminium and plastic composites, and dry weight is quoted at 1530kg including the lightest options. A 911 GTS is less than that even full of fluids and with a statutory 75kg added to it to represent driver and fuel. Like for like, the Vantage could be 10% heavier than a 911. That could be important too. For the first time in a generation, the Vantage is wilfully different from other Astons outside (do you like it? I do on three sides and the front I’m getting used to) and inside too. I like most of the inside as well: the finish is good, the plastic on the air vents

grates a bit less in a sports car than a grand tourer and you can, apparently, have a round steering wheel. It all works most nicely with the racier Alcantara trim, to my eyes. The leather looks a bit stretched around some seams and stitches but, well, I suppose it’s a sports car. Shouldn’t things be pulled tight? A bit racy? Mechanically, it sounds like they are. In the V8 DB11, which shares this engine and its 503bhp tune, the engine’s note – so raucous and voluble in its AMG applications – has been turned right back. Here, they’ve let it rather loose again. A few years ago, you could have chosen any of several different Astons for the same job. This one, you’re in no doubt, is the loud one. That extends to the drive modes, which, of course, it has. Ultimately, these policies mean more to Aston than us, but whereby the DB11 ◊


FIRST DRIVES

` It has been engineered by people who believe cars should handle properly beyond the limit

a

Beneath its distinctive new skin, the Vantage shares much with the softer, longer DB11 11 APRIL 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 29


New Vantage is virtually the same length as a Porsche 911 but it’s wider and heavier ∆ has GT, Sport and Sport+ chassis settings, the Vantage’s dampers are shifted along an imaginary scale to Sport, Sport+ and Track, all intended to be tighter, firmer, to the point that Track is arguably too stiff for bumpier race tracks. It’s good on those, though, Aston says. In fact, they say, it slides quite easily. Aston Martin is good at understatement. Remember a few things: yes, the Vantage is heavier than a 911, but the 1630kg or so it’ll weigh is competitive among the other company the Aston will keep. Its mechanical layout (the entire block sits behind the front axle line) means

that the weight distribution is 50/50 front to rear. Only one tyre option, a bespoke Pirelli P Zero, is offered. It has all been engineered by people who believe that cars should handle properly beyond the limit. And off means off on the three-stage stability control. Goody gumdrops. On a circuit, then, the Vantage is terrific. The engine note is as raucous and hard as you’d want it to be, the (optional) carbon-ceramic brakes stop it brilliantly and hold out in warm temperatures, and the tyres resist wear better than 505lb ft from 2000rpm has any right to allow. Body control is good, even in the slackest of suspension modes, and

there’s a great sense of agility because it feels like the car pivots around its centre – where you’re seated. The front goes where you point it and there’s a terrific level of control and precision over the rear. The rear subframe is rigidly, rather than squishily, mounted to the chassis and that apparently gives excellent lateral stiffness, so the car’s back axle does what the engine and e-differential (which can be fully locked or fully open, depending on what’s being asked of it) wants it to do. Under power, on a track, what it wants to do is lock up to precisely your amount of bidding, making the cornering line entirely your choice.

TESTER’S NOTE Mercedes-based comms system is as good as most things in this class. Instruments are not. But ergonomically, the Vantage is sound. MP

Steering is quick, smooth and sufficiently communicative on the road and the car rides with good composure 30 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 11 APRIL 2018


FIRST DRIVES

` There’s a great sense of agility because it feels like the car pivots around its centre

a

Front end turns in precisely and obediently, from where you can make your progress fast and neutral or loud and lairy It’s not unlike a Ferrari 488 GTB in that fashion – only, because the engine is mounted low and at the front, the beyond-limit balance is even better, to the extent that I’m not sure there’s another current production car this docile on a circuit. You can drive it in a racier fashion too, where it’s still balanced and beautifully neutral but less incisive than a 911. So they do different things better. The 911: nuanced steering precision. The Aston: antics. Anyway, that’s all jolly, but this is a road car, after all. It’s one whose ride is composed and fluid, especially in Sport mode, but Sport+ doesn’t usually throw it out of kilter. The engine and transmission go through various stages of angry as

you turn those up, but the moderate one is good for the road – grumbly and growly and plenty responsive enough – while the big, easy paddles, fixed to the steering column so they’re always where you left them, are some of the easiest to use in the business. Pulling one puts you in manual mode, an extended pull of the upshift puts you back in D. All shifters should be like this, especially when mated to a gearbox that’s as smooth as the ZF eight-speeder. (It sometimes hesitates to give you downshifts on a circuit, though, which is a Mercedes-ish thing to do, so is perhaps down to the engine, not the gearbox.) The steering? On track, it is full of feel, which, at lower cornering forces,

naturally it doesn’t quite replicate on the road – a 911, which has a lightly loaded front end and less need of assistance, is, I think, more talkative – but that’s fine. It is smooth and fast, centres as it should and says as much as you’d hope. The balance and poise are still there too, albeit with the caveat that this is still a wide car, and from inside, you can see none of the exterior bodywork. So it’s just as well it is poised, responsive and predictable, because you’re relying on it to do the shrinking around you. To an extent, it does: with the aural and tactile cues this car gives you, it’s thoroughly enjoyable. And here’s the thing: I’m considering the Vantage against consistently the best sports car in

WILL IT GET THE T W I N -T U R B O V 12 ? The inevitable question goes like this: are you going to put a V12 engine in it, then? It’s a question they bat away with great patience, and the official line is that there are currently no published plans to do so. That they haven’t decided to do so. I think they probably have, to be honest. The first thing to know is that the 5.2-litre, twin-turbocharged engine does fit in the Vantage body, by dint of the fact that a fair degree of it is derived from the DB11. And Aston’s designers themselves think the front end could look a bit more striking. I suspect it’ll get so at a midlife refresh, but some big vents to cool a bigger powertrain wouldn’t hurt, would it? What there definitely are no plans for, mind, is to fit MercedesAMG’s new 3.0-litre straight six, as dropped into the CLS 53. It makes a decent amount of power, is incredibly smooth and is turbocharged, electricsupercharged and electrically assisted, so could usefully lower the range’s CO2 output too. It’ll probably remain not part of the plan but, still, what a thought.

the business here, and it goes toe to toe with it. The others at the lofty £120,900 the Vantage demands? Some offer different things, better in one or two areas, but I’m pretty confident none is overall as complete and enjoyable as the Aston. So is the Vantage better than a 911 GTS? Perhaps not. But it’s different enough, and good enough in enough ways, to be a genuine, desirable alternative. To be considered different rather than worse. And to do quite a lot of things better. When you consider the respective sizes, budgets and facilities of Aston and Porsche, that in itself is a spectacular achievement. MATT PRIOR

@matty_prior

ASTON MARTIN VANTAGE Raucous engine and riotous handling make the Vantage different from, rather than better than, a Porsche 911

AAAAB £120,900 V8, 3982cc, twin-turbo, petrol Power 503bhp at 6000rpm Torque 505lb ft at 2000-5000rpm Gearbox 8-spd automatic Kerb weight 1630kg (est) Top speed 195mph 0-60mph 3.5sec Fuel economy 26.8mpg CO2, tax band 245g/km, 37% RIVALS Jaguar F-Type SVR, Porsche 911 GTS Price Engine

It looks like someone in a hat and glasses poking his tongue out but it all works well. A circular steering wheel is also available

11 APRIL 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 31


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FIRST DRIVES TESTED 1.4.18, SOUTH DOWNS ON SALE NOW PRICE £112,450

AUDI R8 RWS How does Audi’s rear-drive supercar cope with the UK’s roads? VOLKSWAGEN GOLF ESTATE 1.5 EVO 130PS SE NAV Price £22,490 On sale Now What’s new? Revised 1.5-litre petrol engine that uses active cylinder management to save fuel

IF THIS GOLF Estate derivative was a curry, it’d likely be a chicken korma. There’s nothing inherently wrong with it, and many will find it suits their tastes, but next to the likes of a vindaloo (which is obviously the curry equivalent of the Golf R Estate), it’s just a bit bland. Still, the new 128bhp 1.5-litre Evo engine is frugal and refined – it averaged around 50mpg during our time with it – and the ride is generally compliant and comfortable. Build quality is sound, and with that larger, 605-litre boot, it’s even more practical and only £230 more expensive than the equivalent five-door hatch. Not bad at all. SD

AAAAC or the first time in its 12-year history, Audi’s mid-engined supercar is available with rear-wheel drive. The R8 RWS (for Rear Wheel Series) junks the standard model’s front driveshafts, centre differential and propshaft, saving 50kg. The suspension geometry has been tweaked and a beefier front-anti roll bar fitted to add some safety understeer to the car’s balance. Despite 533bhp now being deployed by the rear axle alone, the RWS – tested here in the UK following our European drive in February – still has bundles of traction, thanks to wide rear tyres and the weight of that mid-mounted V10 pressing them hard into the road. What’s changed for the better

F

is the steering, which is purer, less corrupted and much easier to read. Four-wheel-drive R8s only really come alive when you remove your brain and light the fuse, but the RWS is absorbing and fun at all speeds. On passive dampers, the ride is very well judged. It’s tense at low speeds, but with pace, the suspension smothers a bumpy road surface and absorbs heavy compressions, all the while keeping the body under tight but not stubbornly iron-fisted control. Compared with a standard R8 fitted with adaptive dampers and dynamic steering (neither of which can be specified on this variant), the RWS is brilliantly pure and simple. It leaves you to get on with the driving yourself, rather than assuming it can do it all so much better.

All that’s missing is a manual gearbox. The dual-clutch unit is at least ferociously quick and responsive, though. The 5.2-litre naturally aspirated V10 is a masterpiece, too, revving high and hard but with an underlying silky smoothness. It’s worth saying the RWS uses the tamer of Audi’s pair of V10s, the one that develops 533bhp rather than the 603bhp version. You would feel shortchanged only if you’d sampled both motors back to back. At £112,450, the RWS coupé is the cheapest R8 you can buy. It’s also the sweetest and most enjoyable to drive. It’s limited to 999 units worldwide across coupé and Spyder body styles, though, so you’ll have to move quickly. DAN PROSSER

@thedanprosser

AUDI R8 RWS By removing the four-wheel-drive system, Audi has created the sweetest and most compelling R8 yet

AAAAB Price Engine  Power  Torque  Gearbox  Kerb weight  Top speed 0-62mph  Economy CO2, tax band RIVALS

Ergonomics are good and there’s a reassuring sense of solidity

£112,450 V10, 5204cc, petrol 533bhp at 7800rpm 398lb ft at 6500rpm 7-spd dual-clutch automatic 1590kg 199mph 3.7sec 22.8mpg 283g/km, 37% McLaren 540C, Porsche 911 Carrera GTS

LAND ROVER DISCOVERY Si6 HSE LUXURY Price £68,595 On sale Now What’s new? Butter-smooth petrol V6 makes for a startlingly quick Discovery

IN THE ABSENCE of an SVR model (heaven forefend), this Si6 is the most potent of the Discovery variants. It’s bit of an oddity, though, and expensive at this lavish trim level. Its petrol-fed 3.0-litre V6 develops 335bhp and 332lb ft. That’s enough to make short work of the car’s 2223kg, but only if you’re prepared to work for it. Peak torque doesn’t arrive until 3500rpm, with peak power following at 6500rpm – commendable heights in a sports car but fundamentally unsuitable for an otherwise capable off-roader. Given that this driveline struggles to exceed 23mpg in normal driving, there’s simply no reason to choose it over the commendably cultured, more tractable and efficient V6 diesel. RL

AAABC R E AD MOR E ONLINE

autocar.co.uk 11 APRIL 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 33


ROAD TEST No 5366

JAGUAR E-PACE Can Jaguar’s compact SUV bring flair and dynamic polish to a fast-growing class? MODEL TESTED D180 AWD SE

PHOTOGRAPHY WILL WILLIAMS

Price £39,715 Power 178bhp Torque 317lb ft 0-60mph 9.9sec Fuel economy 36.0mpg CO2 emissions 147g/km 70-0mph 60.4m 30-70mph in fourth 12.1sec

34 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 11 APRIL 2018


ROAD TEST or an idea of the scale of ambition embodied in the new Jaguar E-Pace, consider that 80% of those who choose to buy one over, say, an Audi Q3 or BMW X1 will be new to Jaguar showrooms. ‘Conquest customers’, as they’re dispassionately known within the industry. That’s a mighty statistic even for a car expected to supplant the F-Pace as the brand’s best-selling model, although it is one bolstered by the fact that quite a few will be built specifically for the Chinese market in a state-of-the-art plant in Changshu. To grease manufacturing wheels

F

and meet anticipated demand in Europe, every other E-Pace will be assembled in Austria by Magna Steyr, the firm that has built the G-Class for Mercedes since 1979 and is currently configuring its lines for Jaguar’s new electric I-Pace. If all goes to plan, the E-Pace will be something of a breakthrough car for Jaguar, and one, it is hoped, that will push annual global sales past the quarter-million mark. Predictably, we’re talking about a compact SUV here, one that slots into the range beneath the F-Pace, although mechanically it has more in common with a Land Rover Discovery Sport. Entry-level models will be frontdriven, but the majority – our test car included – will benefit from an on-demand clutch-based four-wheeldrive system capable of channelling drive to both axles. And to capture that rear-driven Jaguar feel, the most powerful variants also get a GKN Driveline ‘twinster’ torque-vectoring rear differential related to the one you’ll find on the current Ford Focus RS. It only distributes up to half of available engine torque between the rear wheels, mind, rather than the 70% you get in the Ford. Of some concern to its maker will be that the E-Pace arrives almost concurrently with our class leader of the moment, the Volvo XC40, which is competent, desirable and likeable in equally formidable measures. With parallel values, this downsized Jaguar SUV is in some respects a British-designed and engineered XC40, so does it have what it takes to mount a convincing challenge?

DESIGN AND ENGINEERING

AAACC Jaguar’s design team deserves credit for going further than simply scaling down the look of the F-Pace SUV for this car. It is, after all, a depressingly familiar tactic in this class. The E-Pace instead takes inspiration from the F-Type sports coupé, and before you dismiss that as a marketing contrivance, just look at the details. The ovoid headlights, wrap-around tail-lights, pronounced haunches and wheels pushed as close to the car’s extremities as can reasonably be expected all draw strong parallels. While the overall effect is perhaps a touch cutesy, the E-Pace does possess a stance rare among its peers. Acres of honeycomb plastic at the front underline the sporty message, although there is something about the car’s proportions that make it seem curiously tall in the metal. Less encouraging to some may be the fact that this new model ◊

WE LIKE

Handsome, if not exactly elegant z Refined at speed, with a calming ambience z Rock-solid residual values WE DON’T LIKE

Lacklustre, slow-shifting powertrain z Little of Jaguar’s traditional handling polish z Expensive compared to more accomplished rivals

z Jaguar’s design boss Ian Callum may have preferred our test car to wear bigger wheels, but these 19s make for a reasonably well-resolved ride, and the chunky spokes elicit a utilitarian charm.

z Slim tail-light cluster sits just below the pronounced haunches and features the usual Jaguar ‘chicane line’ on the light graphic. The lights wrap around the bodywork in an elegant fashion.

z Side vents in polished chrome aren’t actually functional vents at all, but they add a touch of bling. They come finished in satin chrome on the well-appointed R-Dynamic models.

z Two exhaust tips are tightly ensconced within the black plastic of the rear bumper. Overkill on a 2.0-litre diesel? Some would say yes, but we think they look good nonetheless.

z SE models get LED headlights with Jaguar’s signature ‘J-blade’ daytime running lights. You’ll find the motif on everything from this car to the F-Type sports car and the new electric I-Pace.

z Grille-mounted camera provides info for various safety technologies from which owners can benefit, including adaptive headlights, which adjust the beam pattern to avoid dazzling others.

z Three-piece rear spoiler is prominent, but we can’t help thinking Jaguar might have been better off mimicking the smooth fastback tail of the F-Type.

z A transversely mounted engine isn’t what we’re used to seeing in a Jaguar, but positioning the 2.0-litre diesel this way makes for greater interior space.

F-Type lends styling cues to the E-Pace 11 APRIL 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 35


z Our test car wasn’t fitted with adaptive dampers, but if it had been, this drive-mode toggle is where they would be firmed up for more committed driving.

z Climate-control dials are neat and simple to operate. Press the outer dials to heat or cool the electrically adjustable front seats.

M U LT I M E D I A S YS T E M

+++CC Jaguar’s Touch Pro infotainment, which is standard across the range, uses a 10in touchscreen neatly integrated into the dashboard (rather than sitting atop it in the manner of so many rivals’ systems). That means there’s no click-wheel — a device we find currently offers the best balance of control and usability. Latency is usefully improved over slightly older Jaguar models, even if some of the icons along the

36 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 11 APRIL 2018

bottom of the screen are inconveniently small. The screen’s matt finish can make it difficult to read in sunlight. Conspicuous by its absence is any potential for smartphone mirroring, either with Apple CarPlay or Android Auto, although Jaguar does have its own in-house software called InControl. This connects your phone to the car’s system and allows the use of certain apps, including Spotify.

z Leather, metal effect material and high-quality plastics help to create the desired ambience but don’t always stand up to closer scrutiny.


ROAD TEST ∆ uses a platform sourced from the Land Rover Discovery Sport and Range Rover Evoque, albeit with a unique wheelbase owing to an altered mounting for a stiffer front suspension subframe that is said to improve steering feel. It means that while you’ll find magnesium in the dashboard crossmember and aluminium used for the bonnet, tailgate and front wings, the E-Pace is heavier than the F-Pace. The latter’s monocoque is far richer in lighter, more expensive aluminium. The resulting 1768kg kerb weight makes the E-Pace almost 40kg heavier than the equivalent Volvo XC40 and more than 180kg heavier than the BMW X1. This is also, of course, the first transverse-engined Jaguar since the X-Type, with all of the compromises on weight distribution that brings. The fight against bulk is led by JLR’s 2.0-litre Ingenium diesel engine, offered in three states of tune. Our test car is the mid-ranking D180, which makes 178bhp and, rather more encouragingly, 317lb ft from a lowly 1750rpm. Claimed combined economy is 55.4mpg – matching the Volvo XC40 D4 – with CO2 emissions of 147g/km. There are two petrol options, including a flagship 296bhp four-cylinder which is shared with the F-Type and can fire the E-Pace to 60mph in 5.9sec.

INTERIOR

AAABC Whether you find its particular hue fetching or not, the quilted ‘Siena Tan Windsor’ leather of our test car holds your attention immediately. And perhaps that’s just as well, because the clean architecture of the E-Pace’s interior is so conservative as to be just a little sterile, and it therefore relies on the quality and colour of its materials to bring it to life. The E-Pace is a mixed bag in this respect, because while its cabin is a pleasant enough place in which to while away miles, closer inspection is hardly likely to endear it to owners. Plastic – matt finished, and of fairly high quality, admittedly – features no more heavily than in many of the car’s premium rivals, but you perceive it more acutely because there’s not much in the way of switchgear to break up its expanse. A smattering of chrome finish helps matters, although, somewhat curiously, that of the air-vent surrounds is more lustrous and cooler to the touch than the large piece found on the transmission tunnel. The driving environment – strongly demarcated by the central passenger grab handle first seen in the F-Type – is hard to fault ergonomically, but the steering wheel buttons feel cheap. ◊

z E-Pace sits its front-seat passengers higher than some rivals do, with a good view of not only the road ahead but also the refreshingly uncluttered dash.

990m

x

m

ma

a mm

Kerb weight: 1768kg 2681mm

882mm

Typical leg room 720mm

72

0m

0m 110

1647mm

5771234 litres

x

0.33

m

1030m m max

HOW BIG IS IT?

832mm

4411mm

VISIBILITY Steeply raked A-pillars don’t overly impede forward vision, but rearwards visibility isn’t the best.

HEADLIGHTS

z Leg room in the back is adequate, as is head room, even with the £970 panoramic roof. There’s slightly more space for adult passengers here than in a Volvo XC40.

All E-Pace models get LED headlights; SE specification brings DRLs and automatic high beams. The latter were not tested in this instance.

circle: 11.4m Turning 1625mm

30mm 155mm

Width 980-1300mm Height 490-700mm Centre

1624mm

1984mm 2088mm

Length 820-1600mm

W H E E L A N D P E DA L ALIGNMENT Steering wheel is central to driver and has reasonable adjustment for reach and rake, although the driving position feels slightly perched.

z Boot aperture is usefully squared off and without a pronounced loading lip. There’s also a useful little storage cubby under the floor.

11 APRIL 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 37


The underlying sentiment is that the cabin has been assembled to meet a less-generous budget than you might expect of a £40,000 car, and that’s a problem when Audi, Volvo and BMW set such high standards. The E-Pace does provide well for families on long journeys, however. You can have up to four 12V charging points and five USB connections that cater for front and rear passengers. The car’s own 4G wi-fi hotspot can also provide for up to eight devices, and most people will find there’s more than adequate rear head and leg room – in fact, the Jaguar surpasses the Volvo XC40 in this regard, although Volkswagen’s Tiguan possesses comfortably more rear-seat leg room than either. Boot space isn’t so generous, though, but that’s the price you pay for that sloping roofline.

PERFORMANCE

AAACC Nine may seem like an excessive number of gear ratios for a mid-range 2.0-litre diesel SUV, although we all know enough about lab-certified

emissions and economy tests to know why Jaguar has opted for so many here. However, the firm’s decision to use the transmission is made even more mysterious on acquaintance, when you observe that this ZF-built unit tends to cling to each ratio a little too long under acceleration before executing a fairly leisurely – albeit suitably smooth – shift. Were the car’s Ingenium diesel engine a smoother one at high revs, or had it a greater operating range, perhaps it wouldn’t seem such a problem, but the motor possesses neither of those attributes and feels a little bit laboured for much of the time. The upshot for the D180 is that progress never feels as energetic as you might hope for from a Jaguar, and that’s confirmed by a 0-60mph time that dips under 10 seconds by only the slimmest of margins. By comparison, the similarly equipped and only marginally more potent Volvo XC40 D4 laid down an 8.5sec run in damp conditions, and was quicker by an equivalent proportion in dispatching the 30-70mph rolling sprint that’s important for overtaking. Quite

simply, we’d expect better from a car whose marketing taglines seek to place it among the more vigorous and exciting models in its class. However, one benefit of having so very many ratios is that the D180 E-Pace registers barely more than 1800rpm at 70mph (although with 45.8mph per 1000rpm in ninth, any kind of in-gear acceleration in ‘top’ is very slow). And so, even though the Ingenium diesel is being squeezed into a particularly compact space here and is also an engine we’ve pulled up for a shortage of refinement in other applications, the E-Pace can progress along motorways in a surprisingly serene fashion. Additionally, our test car’s touring economy of 49.2mpg – commendably close to the official claim of 55.4mpg – endows it with a theoretical range in excess of 600 miles. Those are encouraging figures for anybody who drives mega-mileages, but they don’t fully make amends for the bland performance, which is served up in a faintly coarse and hollow manner on those occasions when you do ask for everything.

RIDE AND HANDLING

AAABC The E-Pace conducts itself in a capable, inoffensive and broadly class-competitive way. But if you’re going to come away from a drive in one – certainly in an example from the more humble end of the line-up, as represented here – without at least a bit of disappointment, some management of your expectations of ‘Jaguarness’ is in order. Jaguar says its new entry-level model has the rear-driven character of more expensive range-mates, not least the F-Pace, but the supporting evidence for that is largely nonexistent. Even if you’ve mustered enough commitment to enlist the rear driveshafts of the Haldex fourwheel drive system, the sensation given when handling bends is perpetually one of being pulled rather than pushed. Handling adjustability and liveliness, as well as driver engagement, are all fairly average for a compact SUV, which is also to report, of course, that they’re in relatively short supply for a Jaguar.

T R AC K N O T E S Running on winter tyres, our test E-Pace’s on-limit cornering poise was inevitably compromised. We can believe that on regular rubber the car would have handled Millbrook’s Hill Route with greater dynamic distinction. Our D180 model was nevertheless keener to roll on the tortuous elevation changes than we would have liked, although that is perhaps something the optional sports suspension would help to remedy. It’s unlikely any specification changes would inject more adjustability in the chassis, however. Unlike the larger F-Pace, the E-Pace can never shake the feeling that it is being pulled rather than pushed when it’s loaded during cornering — and you get the impression that there’s nothing you can do to mitigate that. Particularly tiresome also was that the car’s powertrain isn’t given to revving as smoothly or as keenly as other four-pot diesels, and its automatic gearbox feels slow-witted at times.

z ESC seems pretty well calibrated through T4, a medium-speed hairpin, but there’s little joy in hustling the chassis to that degree.

z Cresting right-hander at T3 shows up an inability to cope with additional inputs once the suspension is already loaded.

T2

T4 T3

T6 T1

z Chassis grips well given the winter tyres it’s wearing, although the experience is dominated by what the front axle is doing rather than what the rear is up to. T7

T5

FINISH START

AC C E L E R AT I O N Jaguar E-Pace D180 SE (6deg C, dry) Standing quarter mile 17.5sec at 80.1mph, standing km 32.1sec at 101.3mph, 30-70mph 10.5sec, 30-70mph in fourth 12.1sec 30mph

40mph

50mph

60mph

3.1s

5.0s

7.3s

9.9s

0

70mph

80mph

13.6s

90mph

17.7s

100mph

30.9s

23.1s

10s

20s

30s

Volvo XC40 D4 AWD First Edition (2018, 5deg C, damp) Standing quarter mile 16.6sec at 84.1mph, standing km 30.3sec at 107.3mph, 30-70mph 8.5sec, 30-70mph in fourth 9.7sec 30mph

40mph

50mph

60mph

2.9s

4.4s

6.2s

8.5s

0

70mph

80mph

11.4s

90mph

15.0s

100mph

24.8s

19.2s

10s

20s

BRAKING

60-0mph: 3.56ec Jaguar E-Pace D180 SE (6deg C, dry) 30mph-0

50mph-0

11.0m 0

10m

70mph-0

30.6m 20m

30m

60.4m 40m

50m

Volvo XC40 D4 AWD First Edition (2018, 5deg C, damp) 30mph-0

50mph-0

9.6m 0

70mph-0

26.0m 10m

38 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 11 APRIL 2018

20m

50.6m 30m

40m

50m

60m


ROAD TEST

The crisp steering weights` up with a progression that is the most pleasurable element of the driving experience

a

That’s unlikely to induce too much angst among the customer base, because the E-Pace does just enough elsewhere to convince that it’s worth the premium billing. The high-speed ride is particularly well conceived. It settles nicely on motorways, and as long as you don’t ask an unreasonable amount from the chassis, body movements are not only respectably slight but also effectively cushioned. It means the E-Pace, despite being on the portly side, is tenacious enough to tolerate being hustled if the need arises. The steering is unusually crisp off centre, too, and weights up with a progression that is probably the most pleasurable element of the entire driving experience. However, the ride is doubtless necessarily a touch firmer than Jaguar would have liked. The E-Pace has a low-speed ride capable of unearthing hidden road imperfections in a manner that can be downright sleuthy. It’s no deal-breaker, but there’s a hint of brittleness at odds with the luxury brief. It at once betrays a platform less cultured than Jaguar’s more aluminium-rich offerings while also coming without the tautness of body control, and surfeit of grip, you’d want in a keen driver’s default pick. And that’s the nub of it. Given the hardware on offer, the chassis engineers responsible have probably done as a good a job as could reasonably be expected in balancing athleticism with comfort. The results are acceptable for the segment but

unremarkable by the standards of Jaguar itself, and must rank as an opportunity missed.

BUYING AND OWNING

AAABC You can buy an E-Pace for £28,500, but it will have front-wheel drive, come with a six-speed manual gearbox and muster only 148bhp from its 2.0-litre diesel engine. At that price you also forgo leather seats and make do with 17in wheels, although a decent array of safety and infotainment technology is included. Most buyers will spend rather a lot more. Depending on which engine and gearbox combination you elect for, above the basic specifications you have a choice of S, SE and HSE trims. The changes are mainly cosmetic, but before that you’ll also need to decide whether to go for the more aggressive R-Dynamic body style, too. Once the dust has settled from your box-ticking, don’t be surprised if you’re met with a car costing more than £40,000, particularly if you want one of the more powerful engines. The E-Pace, then, is substantially more expensive than the class-leading Volvo XC40 once you correct for equipment level. Its residuals are forecast to be nothing short of spectacular, though, so you can expect to recoup some of that expenditure down the line. Our sources suggest the D180 AWD SE model tested will be worth close to 60% of its original value after three years and 36,000 miles. ◊

z Its ride is controlled and the steering is sweet, but despite its all-wheel-drive setup, the E-Pace never feels like its drive is anything other than front-wheel biased.

11 APRIL 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 39


DATA L O G JAG UA R E - PAC E D 1 8 0 AW D S E £39,715 £47,610 £22,750 £509.76 £0.60 29/£790

55.7 litres

EQUIPMENT CHECKLIST LED headlights with DRLs 17in 10-spoke alloy wheels Powered tailgate Meridian sound system Drive Pack with adaptive cruise control and blind-spot assist 10in Touch Pro infotainment system with DAB and Bluetooth Special paint, Caesium Blue Tan leather seats 19in ‘5049’ alloy wheels Privacy glass Fixed panoramic roof Surround camera system 18-way heated seats Heated steering wheel Options in bold fitted to test car = Standard na = not available

£615 £1735 £620 £335 £970 £310 £615 £190

TRANSMISSIONS 9-spd automatic

Front, transverse, four-wheel drive Type 4 cyls, 1999cc, turbocharged, diesel Made of Aluminium block and head Bore/stroke 83.0/92.4mm Compression ratio 15.5:1 Valve gear 4 per cyl Power 178bhp at 4000rpm Torque 317lb ft at 1750rpm Red line 4250rpm Power to weight 97bhp per tonne Torque to weight 172lb ft per tonne Specific output 89bhp per litre

Construction

400

317lb ft at 1750-2500rpm

300

250

250

178bhp at 4000rpm

200

Track Touring Average

CLAIMED

Urban 43.5mpg Extra-urban 55.4mpg Combined 50.4mpg Tank size Test range

23.3mpg 49.2mpg 36.0mpg

55.7 litres 441 miles

150

100

100

50

50

Engine (rpm) 2000 4000

TRANSMISSION Type 9-spd automatic Ratios/mph per 1000rpm 1st 4.71/4.7 2nd 2.84/7.7 3rd 1.91/11.5 4th 1.38/15.9 5th 1.00/22.0 6th 0.81/27.2 7th 0.70/31.5 8th 0.58/37.9 9th 0.48/45.8 Final drive ratio 3.944:1

BRAKES

SAFET Y

Front MacPherson strut, coil springs, adaptive dampers, anti-roll bar Rear Multi-link, coil springs, adaptive dampers, anti-roll bar

Front Rear Anti-lock

DSC, RSC, ETC, TSA, HSA, ABS, EBL, EBA, CBC Euro NCAP crash rating Five stars

325mm ventilated discs 300mm solid discs Standard, with brake assist

E M I S S I O N S & TA X CABIN NOISE

STEERING

Idle 45dB Max rpm in 3rd gear 73dB 30mph 60dB 50mph 64dB 70mph 68dB

Type Electromechanical, rack and pinion Turns lock to lock 2.3 Turning circle 11.5m

AC C E L E R AT I O N I N G E A R

MPH 0-30 0-40 0-50 0-60 0-70 0-80 0-90 0-100 0-110 0-120 0-130 0-140 0-150 0-160

mph 20-40 30-50 40-60 50-70 60-80 70-90 80-100 90-110 100-120 110-130 120-140 130-150 140-160

3rd 3.1 3.7 -

4th 4.6 4.1 4.8 6.2 -

5th 5.9 5.6 6.3 7.2 9.5 -

6th 7.3 7.5 8.3 10.1 -

7th 10.1 9.0 9.9 11.4 -

8th 14.0 13.2 -

9th 22.8 -

MAX SPEEDS IN GEAR

CO2 emissions Tax at 20/40% pcm

147g/km £204/407

R E S I D UA L S 45

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

20mph 4250rpm 33mph 4250rpm 49mph 4250rpm 68mph 4250rpm 94mph 4250rpm 116mph 4250rpm 127mph 4035rpm 127mph 3348rpm 127mph* 2771rpm * claimed

RPM in 9th at 70/80mph = 1845/2109 THE SMALL PRINT Power-to-weight and torque-to-weight figures are calculated using manufacturer’s claimed kerb weight. © 2018, Haymarket Media Group Ltd. Test results may not be reproduced without editor’s written permission. For information on the Jaguar E-Pace, contact Jaguar, Abbey Road, Whitley,CV3 4LF (0345 303 2303 , jaguar.co.uk ). Cost-per-mile figures calculated over three years/36,000 miles, including depreciation and maintenance but not insurance; Lex Autolease (0800 389 3690). Insurance quote covers 35-year-old professional male with clean licence and full no-claims bonus living in Swindon; quote from Liverpool Victoria (0800 066 5161, lv.com). Contract hire figure based on a three-year lease/36,000-mile contract including maintenance; Wessex Fleet Solutions (01722 322888).

40 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 11 APRIL 2018

0

6000

Spare

SUSPENSION

AC C E L E R AT I O N TIME (sec) 3.1 5.0 7.3 9.9 13.6 17.7 23.1 30.9 -

200

150

0

TEST

Weight/as tested Drag coefficient Wheels Tyres

350

300

0

ECONOMY

Steel and aluminium monocoque 1768kg/na 0.33 8.0Jx19in 235/55 ZR 19, Pirelli Scorpion Zero All Season Mobility kit

400

350

Power output (bhp)

FROM £28,545 £30,105 £35,190 £41,180 £45,660

C H A S S I S & B O DY

POWER & TORQUE

Installation

Torque (lb ft)

POWER 148bhp 178bhp 247bhp 237bhp 296bhp

The E-Pace is the first Jaguar to mount its engine sideways since the X-Type saloon of 2001, and it mates it to a nine-speed automatic gearbox supplied by ZF. The platform is shared with Land Rover — specifically the Discovery Sport and Evoque — and it supports a monocoque with some aluminium in it but mostly made of steel. Our test car is all-wheel drive, although Jaguar also builds a front-drive E-Pace.

ENGINE

R A N G E AT A G L A N C E ENGINES 2.0 D150 FWD 2.0 D180 AWD 2.0 P250 AWD 2.0 D240 AWD S 2.0 P300 AWD SE

T E C H N I C A L L AYO U T

40

Volvo XC40 2.0 D4

35

Jaguar E-Pace D180 SE

30 Value (£1000s)

On-the-road price Price as tested Value after 3yrs/36k miles Contract hire pcm Cost per mile Insurance/typical quote

25 20 15 10

Audi Q3 2.0 TDI Quattro Sport

5 0 New

1 year

2 years

3 years

4 years

z Residuals are set to be exceptional, bettering those of diesel rivals such as the Volvo XC40 and Audi Q3.

R OA D T E S T N o 53 6 6

Read all of our road tests autocar.co.uk


ROAD TEST

VERDICT TESTERS’ N O T E S

JAGUAR E-PACE Misses the mark for keen drivers but a desirable SUV nevertheless

AAABC ith the F-Pace being such a hit, it was inevitable that Jaguar would follow it with a smaller, more accessible compact SUV – one that could propel global sales figures beyond 250,000 for the first time. The result is a car that hits a few highs, chiefly in its exterior design, but mostly leaves you disappointed at the missed opportunity to set a new benchmark in a class short on handling dynamism. The E-Pace is hamstrung by its heavy underpinnings and, in D180 guise, has particularly lacklustre performance. Neither moderately enticing steering nor a fairly keen front axle can quell our regret that the car doesn’t handle with more of the alacrity, fluency and balance we now expect of Gaydon’s sportier brand, and nor can the fact that this is a comfortable long-distance cruiser with good fuel economy. Even so, the E-Pace will find buyers because it espouses traditional luxury values better than rivals and stands out as a car of style and desirability in a sea of anonymity. It’s good enough for the segment but not quite good enough for Jaguar.

W

R OA D T E S T R I VA L S

1

2

3

4

RICHARD LANE I was appalled to discover that a £40,000 SUV didn’t have any cupholders. Until, that is, I found them hidden under a plain plastic tray ahead of the central armrest. MATT SAUNDERS Jaguar is caught between a rock and a hard place: if the E-Pace didn’t ride well we’d hammer them for it, but we also expect the brand’s famous handling. Still, Jaguar has missed the mark here.

S P E C A DV I C E The Interactive Driver Display digital instrument binnacle is usefully slick and £510 well spent. But the £310 Activity Key is an expensive gimmick unless you enjoy ‘lifestyle activities’ conducted without pockets.

5 JOBS FOR T H E FAC E L I F T

VOLVO XC40 D4 AWD FIRST EDITION £39,905 The most premium compact SUV of the moment is characterful and refined.

MAZDA CX-5 2.2D 175 SPORT NAV AUTO £33,395 The Mazda offers keen handling and a practical, if not terribly visually appealing, interior.

VOLKSWAGEN TIGUAN 2.0 TDI 190 R-LINE 4MOTION DSG £37,100 Not particularly exciting to drive but a classy and hugely capable all-rounder.

BMW X1 XDRIVE20D M SPORT £36,255 Plenty of badge appeal but not as refined as you might expect given the maker and price.

JAGUAR E-PACE D180 AWD SE £39,715 Handsome and long-legged but lacks the dynamism you would expect of it.

++++B

++++B

++++C

++++C

+++BC

V E R D I C T S O N E V E RY N E W C A R , P 8 0

z Make sure the small cabin details live up to the high expectations set by the first impression on opening the door. z Bring the brake bitepoint up a little to give more confidence early on. z The nine-speed ’box proves more isn’t always better. Sharpen it up.

11 APRIL 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 41


POWER OF SCOTLAND Jim Clark was arguably the top driver during a golden era for Formula 1. To mark 50 years since his passing, Richard Webber takes a Lotus Evora to Scotland to trace the formative years of the world’s fastest farmer PHOTOGRAPHY LUC LACEY


JIM CLARK PILGRIMAGE DRIVE

David Annand’s sculpture of Clark in his birthplace Kilmany


Clark went to Loretto school in Musselburgh

Wester Kilmany farm, home to a baby and infant Jim Clark here’s an archetypal personality in the Scottish Borders, the verdant wedge of rolling lowland abutting England’s northernmost reaches. Innocent of motorways and barely skirted by rail, the region preserves an identity shaped not only by agriculture but also centuries of cross-border conflict. It’s an archetype that’s modest but steely, cautious of strangers and reluctant with an audience but boisterous among friends. I grew up surrounded by it. You’ll find it from Burnmouth to Buccleuch. Nothing unusual, then, about James Clark, Jnr, the young farmer from Chirnside. Except that he was the greatest racing driver in the world. Clark was Formula 1 world champion in 1963 and in 1965, when he paused from winning six consecutive grands prix to triumph at Indianapolis. He narrowly missed three more F1 titles, was twice runner-up at the Brickyard and claimed the 1964 British Saloon Car Championship. On 7 April 1968, Clark was killed when his Formula 2 Lotus-Cosworth crashed in the woods at Hockenheim. In the subsequent issue of Autocar, the accident’s cause eluded editor Peter Garnier, as it eludes today. Garnier’s eulogy concluded: “Though most of us will see him in memory, garlanded and waving after some great victory,

T

It’s said to be an uncanny like

44 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 11 APRIL 2018

ness

it is perhaps the thought of his less glamorous, simpler background in his native land that endeared him to us all so much.” That is why we’re making a pilgrimage to see the places, meet the people and drive the cars that helped shape a champion, when motorsport for Clark was still a local, amateur affair. We’re armed with a Lotus Evora GT410 Sport, the latest machine from the marque that carried Clark to his greatest triumphs, liveried in dark green with yellow calipers in tribute. We’ll be guided by my father’s 1965 copy of Clark’s autobiography, At the Wheel – the book that inspired Webber the Elder growing up in Hawick as it did a teenage Steve Cropley kicking up dust in the Australian Outback. Such was the global appeal of this local hero; the man the French christened ‘Superjim’ and the Italians ‘Clarkissimo’. Our first call is not Chirnside but Kilmany, the Fife village where Clark was born in 1936 and spent his first six years. There we visit the commemorative statue by local sculptor David Annand. Set on a peaceful lane next to the babbling Motray Water, it shows the distinctive 5ft 7in frame in racing overalls, mid purposeful stride. It’s a beautiful piece and, I’m told, an uncanny likeness. A chance meeting with Rob and Susan Whiteford, current owners of the farm at Wester Kilmany, lets us Loretto school marks Clark’s achieveme draw the Evora in front of nts Clark’s sturdy but homely birthplace. (Long before Indy, his first victory milk was taken behind the upper right-hand window, that helps mine 410bhp from the mid-mounted, Toyota-sourced if you’re interested.) Rob’s father acquired the tenancy from the Clarks 3.5-litre V6. But as an ensuing dualcarriageway sprint shows, it can tour when they moved south in 1942. too. The ride is slightly animated The Evora’s ‘GT’ prefix points but far from uncomfortable and the towards a racing-inspired spec, steering settled, while impressive including lightness-adding tractability lets us engage sixth and carbonfibre panels, Eibach springs, leave it there. Even the dual-mode Bilstein dampers, four-piston AP exhaust becomes unexpectedly civil. calipers and Michelin Pilot Sport Which is just as well because an Cup 2s, not to mention the chargeart exam is happening as we simmer cooled Edelbrock supercharger

`

Senna paid homage to a plaque in a chapel at Clark’s old school

a

Loretto dorm room is named after Clark between the ochre-walled buildings at Clark’s alma mater, Loretto in Musselburgh. The 191-year-old school has added wings, girls and day pupils since Clark’s time as a boarder between 1949 and 1952, but its courtyard – and the red-blazered, tieless throng milling through it – has changed little. On one side sits the chapel, which houses a plaque marking Clark’s achievements ◊


JIM CLARK PILGRIMAGE DRIVE

A nocost Touring Pack is available on this Evora to include gentler Bilstein dampers and Michelin Pilot Sport 4S tyres

Kilmmany, Fife

Looreretto Sc Scho hoolol, Mu Muss sselburgh

Edinburghh Charterhall, ha l, Duns Dun uns

WHERE OUR P I L G R I M AG E TOOK US Our 300-mile route took in Clark’s JiJimm Clark Museum, Duns birthplace in Fife, then his school near Edinburgh before looping around the Scottish Borders and finishing up at Bo’ness on the Firth of Forth.

Edington gton Mains,, CChirnsisidide

Webber stretches the Evora’s legs on an engaging road

0

20

40 miles

Stobs Camp, Hawick

11 APRIL 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 45

PETER LIDDIARD

Perth


The GT410 Sport creates 96kg of downforce at its top speed of 190mph – twice as much as the 410 Sport it replaces

Memorial was designed by Ian Scott-Watson Bob Smith maintained Clark’s Sunbeam ∆ in racing. Ayrton Senna paid homage in 1991. “I couldn’t see what use Latin would be for a farmer,” wrote Clark. He frequented the library for other reasons: “I read the three books on motor racing in the school library from cover to cover several times, and remember those special mornings when it was time to collect my weekly motoring magazines.” Today, books about Clark inspire the students. A coast-hugging cruise down the A1 leads into the Borders and Chirnside, where there’s a memorial to Clark designed by Ian ScottWatson, the friend who started Clark in racing and managed him through the early years. We’ll meet him tomorrow. For now, we’ve a short drive to the family farm that Clark left school at 16 to manage. Similarly traditional to Wester Kilmany, the house at Edington Mains is larger, and the acreage only a little diminished from when Clark tended crops and livestock here. Current owners Dave and Tanya Runciman relay that a young Clark would jump from his first-floor bedroom onto his father’s truck before tearing off in whatever vehicle he could lay hands on. The first of these illicit forays was in an Austin 7, when he was aged just nine. It was from here that Clark and pals pedalled six miles to the disused military airfield at Winfield – briefly a motor-racing Mecca for 50,000 spectators, now just gravel and tall grass – to peek through the hedges at the Ecurie Ecosse team in testing. The spectacle stayed with him. Aside from late, fiscally motivated stints in Paris and Bermuda (income

tax hit 91.25% in 1967), this remained Clark’s home and it’s where he wrote the book I’m carrying. The house became filled with trophies, although it remained simply furnished, the occasional rogue sofa spring known to keep visitors alert. Such antithesis to the glamour and danger of professional racing weighed heavy on Clark: “There is a constant tug between the sport and attractions of returning to life on the farm, not to mention allaying the constant and understandable anxiety of my parents.” We break towards Hawick. On the quiet, narrow, helter-skelter back roads, the Evora comes alive. Sport mode sharpens the throttle and opens the exhaust valve wide, smothering the supercharger’s hum with a full, racy yowl, the engine doing tremendous work between 3750rpm and the 7000rpm redline. The aluminium gearknob shifts neatly, crisp throttle response abets heel-and-toe and the brakes give that delightful, sandpapery racing feel under duress. The Evora never feels like grounding out or springing skyward, its suspension and aero relentlessly forcing the lightweight alloy wheels and Cup 2s into the gritseasoned surface. It’s near freezing, but only the ◊ Dave and Tanya Runciman, owners of Edington Mains

` A young Clark would jump from his first-floor bedroom and tear of in any vehicle he could find

a

Lotus Evora GT410 Sport has lightweight alloy wheels

Edington Mains was Clark’s home after Wester Kilmany 46 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 11 APRIL 2018

Supercharged 3.5-litre V6 makes 410bhp in the Evora


JIM CLARK PILGRIMAGE DRIVE

Clark raced a Sunbeam like this, which was originally his dad’s Clark won his class at Stobs Camp (pictured) in a Sunbeam Mk3

W H AT W E S A I D I N 19 6 8 Innes Ireland was a fellow Scottish F1 driver and a team-mate of Clark’s at Lotus before becoming Autocar’s sports editor. This is part of his obituary of Clark, which we published on 11 April 1968. “He had a great love for his heritage, which was the basically simple, rustic life of farming; but his dedication to motor racing was even greater, for he forced himself to leave all this behind to concentrate on his chosen profession. It is in this light that we must regard him, for he died as he lived, giving his all in a racing car.”

11 APRIL 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 47


`

The gung-ho Border Reivers team indoctrinated Clark into serious racing

FRANK HOPKINS

a

∆ standing water and tractordragged mud give cause for pause. Otherwise, both ends are tacked down, the Evora’s nose obedient to the swift and transparent hydraulic steering. On this road, a young Clark came face to face with Ecurie Ecosse’s three dark blue Jaguar C-Types, line astern and squirming into a hairpin: “I remember thinking what a shower of madmen they were. But at the same time, I felt a twinge of envy.” We strafe on past Kelso, where years later a typically flat-capped, betweeded Clark attended the ram sale five days after winning the 1963 title. Although Clark had earlier runs in rallies, gymkhanas and autocrosses, the opening entry in Scott-Watson’s detailed record of his friend’s achievements is a sprint meeting at Stobs Camp, near Hawick, on 3 June 1956. The 0.8-mile hillside circuit surrounds half of what was once a military training facility turned POW camp. Up to 5000 Germans were detained here in WW1. D-Day

48 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 11 APRIL 2018

preparations took place during WW2. The family of owners Nicky and Sandra Ewart returned it to farming in 1960. The now gravelly perimeter road that once traced the barbed wire was still neat tarmac when Clark arrived to compete in the Clark harries an Elite round Bo’ness Hill Climb Sunbeam Mk3 passed down by his father. That the almost identical Sunbeam-Talbot 90 that Kevan Younger of Coldstream Classic Cars has brought along is now hired for weddings tells you how unsuitable it seems for motorsport – yet a Mk3 won the Monte Carlo Rally the year before, and Clark raced his successfully. It almost didn’t happen, though, as Graham Gauld noted in his 1968 biography, Portrait of a Great Driver. Following practice, the stewards “felt sure that if he ran in the event he would have the world’s biggest accident”. Perhaps the narrow, twisty track, cursed with mad cambers and edged by trees and ditches, explains why Clark was the only finisher in

Elite has a sweet 72bhp 1.2-litre four

Times change but the same values link these two Lotuses


JIM CLARK PILGRIMAGE DRIVE Q & A I A N S C O T T- WAT S O N We chat with the man who set Jim Clark on the path to world domination

victory at Charterhall Clark drove his Elite to

Clark watched his first race at this Charterhall circuit class – and therefore the winner. Gauld reported: “His driving was at times heart-stopping, the car clearing the ground completely on the downhill stretch.” Having edged around the crumbling circuit in a 4x4, slithered the Evora up the soundest stretch and then tried Younger’s car – which he barely dares take above 40mph on the road – I can confirm that prospect is frightening. With Younger is Bob Smith, who serviced the Sunbeam for Clark (until he wrote it off, that is). The young farmer’s speed was locally infamous by then. Smith tells of Clark giving his terrified shepherd a lift back from a livestock sale. “How many sheep did you count?” asked Clark as they pulled into Edington Mains. “Sheep?” said the shepherd. “I could barely count the fields!” On to Charterhall, another wartime airfield turned circuit. Clark watched his first race here, in 1952, back when this remote, two-mile track – now desolate save for the resurfaced main straight – attracted

international stars. Racers that day included 1950 world champion Giuseppe Farina in the Thin Wall Ferrari, Prince Bira and Stirling Moss. The names were glamorous, but the facilities were not: a doubledecker for the timekeepers and longdrops for loos. Still, thousands came, and Clark himself soon become a draw. In autumn 1959, he raced Scott-Watson’s Elite here, fresh from 10th place at Le Mans – a remarkable result for a group of holidaymaking farmers who’d collected only a partially prepared car from Lotus mere days before. This was the gung-ho Border Reivers team that indoctrinated Clark into serious racing, including third at Le Mans in 1960 in an Aston Martin DBR1. Two years earlier, the team’s Jaguar D-Type had thrown Clark in at the deep end during testing at Charterhall, providing one of the many pushes he needed en route to greatness: “I thought they were daft asking me to drive it. All I did was take it up and down the straight, and it scared me to death.” The team was named for the area’s plunderous, mounted gangs of the Middle Ages, and marked by the badge you see on the delicious blue Elite that joins us on that very straight. It belongs to Doug Niven, cousin of Clark and a successful racer himself. Its fizzy little fire-pumpderived Coventry Climax 1.2-litre straight four makes just 72bhp but moves the GRP-bodied Elite along smartly, its exhaust rasping away. There’s a tiny shifter for the ZF four-speed, yet an enormous steering wheel. The suspension is soft, but nimbleness comes from a mere half-tonne kerb weight. Petite, unconventionally engineered and lightweight, it’s pure Colin Chapman. We stop by the Jim Clark Museum in Duns, a compact but rich collection of trophies and mementos, from Charterhall’s tiny silver cups to the cache of trophies and trinkets from Indianapolis. The Jim Clark Trust works to maintain Clark’s ◊

He had talked about retiring young. Do you think he would have raced much longer? “I think he would most probably have been champion in 1968, and possibly beyond, but could well have retired then. I think he would have deemed it a good idea to retire at the top. Although he loved living on the farm, I think he would have wanted some other challenge first. He enjoyed flying and I believe he and Colin [Chapman] had been considering developing composite planes.”

What made Clark a great driver? “Jim had an extraordinary natural talent, quite remarkable vision and incredibly rapid reactions. He was a brilliant shot and had played hockey and cricket for Borders teams. His ability to overcome problems with the car he was driving was legendary. To start, I had great trouble in getting him to believe in his own ability. Chatting at Goodwood after his first stint in the 1959 Tourist Trophy, he asked: ‘Why is everyone going so slowly?’ I replied: ‘It’s not that. It is that you are so quick!’ I noticed a change in him then. I think that was the first occasion when he really began to believe that perhaps he actually was that much Ian Scott-Watson, Innes Ireland andJim Clark quicker than his peers.” Are there similarities between Clark and other drivers? “While I am sure Jim would have considered Jenson Button a worthy competitor, I doubt whether he would have felt the same about Mansell, Senna, Schumacher, Vettel and Hamilton. He always seemed to like Bruce McLaren and Dan Gurney, who shared his parameters.”

Webber eyes a model of Scott-Watson’s Elite that Clark drove

LAT

Jim Clark Museum in Duns is a treasure trove

What made Clark different from modern Formula 1 champions? “Firstly, the ever-present risk of death: Sid Watkins’ successful measures to minimise danger did not exist in Jim’s day. He used to be pretty upset when his competitors were killed and by the number of race widows, although he seemed to switch that fear off in the cockpit. Also, Jim never really appeared to worry about the lack of money he was earning compared with today’s drivers. He raced for the love of the sport. Finally, he was essentially a gentleman, and behaving in the way some more recent drivers have would just never occur to him. He would have worried about the risk of causing fatal accidents.”

11 APRIL 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 49


Evora and Whittley’s 356 take a run up Bo’ness Hill Climb

Bo’ness Hill Climb is Scotland’s first purpose-built track

LAT, FRANK HOPKINS

Local snapper Eric Bryce took photos of Clark for a decade ∆ legacy and recently raised funds to expand the museum to house cars as well as artefacts as of next spring. The trust marked Clark’s passing with a range of local events on 7 and 8 April. Then we visit Scott-Watson, who warmly and generously shares stories of ‘Jimmy’ and ‘Mossy’, Chapman and more. He invested huge amounts of faith, encouragement and, indeed, personal funds to get Clark racing. Read excerpts from our chat with him on the previous page. Before leaving the Borders, we call on Eric Bryce, a local lensman who photographed his friend Clark over a decade. By the fire, we pore over countless images, from his first photograph of the Sunbeam at Charterhall to post-win celebrations at the 1967 British Grand Prix, Clark garlanded as Garnier described.

50 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 11 APRIL 2018

Clark pushes his 356 to the limit at Bo’n

“That was the final picture I took of Jimmy,” says Bryce, thoughtfully. “It was the last negative on the roll of film.” Our final leg leads west of Edinburgh to the only one of our three Clark venues still hosting competition. Created in 1932, Bo’ness Hill Climb was Scotland’s first purpose-built track and nowadays hosts the Bo’ness Revival – a classic car show combined with historic motorsport each September. At 0.35 miles, the course is shorter than before but retains its charming feel, climbing among thick woodland and then snaking through a pretty courtyard. It’s a delightful place to enjoy old cars. Clark competed in three Border Reivers cars here in 1959, including the highly successful white Porsche 356A 1600S he’d recently bought

ess

Clark after his 1959 Snetterton 3hr win from Scott-Watson for both racing and daily driving. We’re lucky to be joined by Simon Whittley and his 356, identical in all but colour. From within that bulbous yet graceful form, its perky, responsive, rear-mounted four-pot boxer warbles beautifully. Its steering is keen, its gearshift long but silky, and the brakes work too. I can see how the 356 helped Clark earn his stripes. Within a year, Clark was racing

for Lotus in F1. A 1961 entry at Charterhall was his final race in Scotland, and for the Border Reivers. But in his introduction for At the Wheel, Clark’s next patron, Chapman, recognised the “trait of Scottish character” that helped Clark become a champion, calling it “a certain dourness and a very strong determination to succeed”. Chapman went on: “There are other racing drivers who have to generally attract attention to themselves to make up for lack of ability; but Jimmy has not had to do any of that, and if he left racing tomorrow, he would leave it with an example which others would find hard to follow.” I think that’s just as true 50 years after the fact. L


JIM CLARK PILGRIMAGE DRIVE

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The 356 helped Clark earn his stripes. Within a year, he was racing for Lotus in F1

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W H Y D O E S S C O T L A N D P R O D U C E S O M A N Y R AC E AC E S? Alongside the likes of Flockhart, Ireland, Stewart, McRae, Cleland, Coulthard and Franchitti, Jim Clark is one of a plenitude of worldclass drivers to emerge from Scotland. So why does the country punch above its weight when it comes to producing racers? We quiz two of them to find out. ALLAN MCNISH Hailing from Dumfries, McNish competed in 17 F1 races and had a successful career in endurance racing, topping the podium at Le Mans three times,

including twice for Audi, for which he is now Formula E team principal. “I don’t believe it is just driving talent, good luck or the roads, but also inspiration, determination and support. It takes a lot of commitment just to reach an event, never mind

compete, so when you get the chance, you give it your all. Sitting in the back of a van for seven hours after a kart race is a much happier ‘debrief’ if you have won a trophy, so you do everything to achieve that. “We also support each other: Jim supported Jackie, Jackie supported, guided and pushed me, David Coulthard and Dario Franchitti, and we try to do the same for the next generation, be it a word in the ear of someone that matters or supporting programmes such as Scottish Motor Sports. We

are proud of our heritage, but also know the future does not happen by luck.” GORDON SHEDDEN Born in Edinburgh, Shedden followed in Clark’s footsteps by winning the national touring car title, taking top BTCC honours three times. He’s now an Audi Sport driver in the new World Touring Car Cup. “Living in Scotland certainly has plenty of challenges. The location inevitably means that anyone who wants to succeed in motorsport either has to move

down south or be prepared to cover plenty of motorway miles. Either way, it takes dedication, commitment and sheer doggedness when the cards are stacked against you. Growing up in Scotland also means you can see four seasons in a day, so racing and learning in nasty conditions is part of life. It makes the nice days a breeze in comparison.”

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HOW TO FIX

52 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 11 APRIL 2018


JEEP’S PROSPECTS INSIGHT

JEEP

It’s two and a half times the size of Land Rover but tiny in Europe. As SUVs get ever more popular, what future for Jeep? Julian Rendell asks pundits and its CEO very Easter, thousands of Jeep enthusiasts converge on Moab, Utah, to thread their cars across, through and over challenging off-road desert trails. Still organised – as it originally was in 1967 – as an enthusiast event, the Easter Jeep Safari (EJS) has nevertheless become such a significant gathering that Jeep showcases new design ideas and this year revealed seven EJS concepts, five based on the new ‘JL’ Wrangler, the range icon launched last year. Jeep won’t commit to production of any of the concepts, but they provide a creative entrée into a busy year for the brand, which will winch up another level on 1 June when Jeep’s owner, Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (FCA), announces its next five-year business plan out to 2023. Jeep and its CEO, Michael Manley, are on a roll right now. Manley, born in Edenbridge, Kent, joined DaimlerChrysler in 2000 as dealer development head and, 18 years on, he runs the two jewels in FCA’s crown – Jeep and RAM – making him one of the most senior Brits in the global car industry. Manley took the reins at Jeep in 2009, when sales were nudging 400,000 units, and he has shepherded it through an unprecedented period of growth. Last year, sales were 1.41 million units, more than three times 2009 levels, and today one in three of all cars sold by FCA wears a Jeep badge. As a result, Jeep has five models in the top six of FCA’s bestsellers – each model selling more than 200,000 units. And the RAM pick-up – also Manley’s responsibility – is number one. But last year, Jeep’s growth stalled and sales dropped by 100,000 units, a decline attributed to fewer US fleet rental sales. Then at the Geneva motor show this March, FCA boss Sergio Marchionne dropped the ‘L-Bomb’, describing European sales as “lousy”. Manley – who, it is reasonable to

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assume, is used to such outbursts from FCA’s capo dei capi – remains unruffled by his boss’s candour. “The main number we recognise is 1.9m for this year. That was the global number we put in the 2018 business plan five years ago. That, from a global point of view, is the number that we are really, really focused on,” he says. Jeep has a hugely busy couple of years ahead of it, not only because of a daunting 500,000 extra sales required in 2018. Five new models are on their way in the next three years, and Jeep will replace its premium flagship, the Grand Cherokee, in 2020. New models will drive Jeep’s growth and the new Compass, just on sale in the UK, is its most important launch since the Renegade arrived four years ago. The Compass takes Jeep into the heart of the fast-growing global C-segment of SUVs against the Ford Kuga and Nissan Qashqai and forecasts from industry analysts IHS Markit suggest the Compass might hit 400,000 sales by the year’s end, making it easily Jeep’s bestseller. “In Europe, we’ve never had a really competitive SUV in the volume C-segment. Renegade has already really made big strides for us in the B-segment. And now Compass is building on Renegade,” says Manley. Later this year, the new Wrangler will arrive in the UK backed up by a greater supply of cars, which up to now has been limited by production bottlenecks in the US. “We will increase annual Wrangler production,” says Manley, “with more available for all markets – not just the UK, because we have many, many thousands of excess orders, even in the US. But we still haven’t broken the constraint, by the look of forward orders.” New for the Wrangler – and confirmed for Europe – will be a crew-cab pick-up variant. “There are two very distinct UK pick-up markets – one focused on low-cost utility. But there’s a part of the market that’s moved into ◊

` Today, one in three of all cars sold New Wrangler has suffered supply issues in the US

by FCA wears a Jeep badge

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British-born Manley has been Jeep’s CEO since 2009

` I want my vehicles to be competitive against crossovers

a to stay compliant in diesel in Europe is substantial, so the cost gap between that and some form of hybridisation ry histo is closing,” says Manley. Old-tech 4x4s like the Liberty are now “More and more degrees of hybridisation between 48V ∆ lifestyle and that will be where the mild hybrid and plug-in will give a Jeep pick-up plays,” says Manley. viable alternative to diesel.” He also raises the prospect of a Given that the lugging power range-topping Wrangler pick-up of diesel engines is a significant version: “In our range, we have element in Jeep’s off-road traditionally had a ‘profile’ vehicle performance, isn’t that a concern? that’s raised the vehicle from its “Hybridisation can give you all of standard condition and added that torque application that’s popular additional off-road ability that acts with 4x4 drivers,” says Manley, “and as a halo model. The pick-up truck although it adds weight, you’re going will have one.” to see improvements over time as Like every car maker in Europe, battery energy density improves.” Jeep is facing up to the challenge of Manley is proud of the engineering diesel’s sales slide, and new hybrid advances that Jeep has made and models are on the way. The Wrangler, says powertrain refinement will for example, will feature a 2.0-litre improve as new petrol-based hybrids petrol with 48V mild hybrid. come to market. He points out that “The investment that’s required since models like the Liberty (sold

from 2002 to 2012) have been phased out, Jeep has focused on higher-tech all-wheel-drive systems, unibody structure design and car-like suspensions. “What we’ve done is try to have car-like ride and drive. That’s important,” Manley says. “The Liberty, for example, was an oldgeneration SUV. It was significantly compromised and only maybe 15% of the buyers appreciated the capability. That limited its appeal.” But with a new army of customers attracted onto Jeep’s territory of high-riding cars with better visibility, practical interiors and a tougher look than a hatchback, won’t they demand an even more car-like driving feel than, say, the Renegade can deliver? “I don’t want my vehicles to be crossovers. I want my vehicles to be competitive against crossovers,” counters Manley firmly. “You and I are going to have to differ on your

opinion. We are on the cusp of our new, next generation of engines. Our new generation of nine-speed transmission today is phenomenal. So all of the things you are talking about is a continuing work-inprogress and we continue to invest to do our own part in bar raising.” Not one to stand still, Manley is planning a further range extension – a B-segment SUV to slot beneath the Renegade. Details are sketchy at the moment, but it looks like a simple spin-off of the Fiat Panda 4x4 with perhaps an extra 125,000 units within its grasp. Of course, it wouldn’t be a surprise if the B-segment SUV gets a mention at June’s high-profile FCA business plan announcement alongside more investment, more models and more ambitious sales targets, because the iconic US brand is heading onwards and upwards. And don’t forget there’s a Brit in charge. L

T I M E TA B L E F O R J E E P ’ S N E W M O D E L S

Compass RHD

Wrangler RHD

Wrangler pick-up

Grand Wagoneer

New Grand Cherokee

E A R LY 2 0 1 8

M I D -2018

L AT E 2 0 1 8

2 02 0

2 02 0

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Wagoneer 2 02 1

New small Jeep 2 02 1


JEEP’S PROSPECTS INSIGHT W H AT T H E E X P E R T S S AY

Compass is tipped to sell as many as 400k units this year

New Wrangler was launched in 2017. UK gets it this year

The general agreement is that Jeep has come a long way fast but also faces several significant challenges in the future. The most pressing is the hugely ambitious 1.9 million sales target for this year. In fact, IHS Markit, which supplies detailed sales forecasts to the main players in the car industry, predicts a much more conservative increase in sales of just 125k in 2018, rather than the 500k Jeep expects. “We don’t see such an optimistic year,” says IHS consultant Colin Couchman. “Jeep has had a big global target for some time. But the sheer scale of growth in SUVs might mean Jeep gets crowded out by rivals, especially in China.” IHS believes Jeep won’t hit its 1.9m target until 2023 – in other words, at the end of the next fiveyear plan from Jeep parent Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (FCA). And it predicts a brief lull in sales in 2019 and 2020 of around 1.55-1.56m units, until

sales in Europe, China and Latin America lift again in 2021 and boost the total to 1.68m – when the new small B-segment Jeep is launched. Peter Wells, who leads Cardiff University’s Centre for Automotive Industry Research, believes Jeep faces some major strategic challenges. Wells says: “It comes down to investment and strategic partners. Can FCA find a partner to make the kind of cost savings that the Renault-Nissan Alliance has?” Wells says that alliance is saving around $5 billion a year, from an annual purchasing bill of about $100bn – cash that it can invest in electrified powertrains, new platforms and production capacity. Wells says: “I think Jeep will struggle to hit the volumes they’re talking about. And I think they’ve got to do more to build the brand around the world. Land Rover has been brilliant at that.”

H O W FA R U P M A R K E T W I L L J E E P G O? As a graphic illustration of how far Jeep has come, the $86,000 Grand Cherokee Trackhawk is the ultimate example. Seventy-five years ago, the Jeep was a utility vehicle clogged up to its axles in WW2 battlefields. Today, the Trackhawk is a 697bhp, 3.5sec-to62mph luxury beast that snarls like a Nascar racer and is trimmed in fancy leather yet rolls with indecent comfort. Given that Jeep is eyeing up new territory above the Grand Cherokee for the Wagoneer and Grand Wagoneer models, the pricey Trackhawk is surely paving the way, isn’t it? “To answer your question simply: yes,” says Jeep CEO Michael Manley. However, Jeep is not generally heading towards some stratospheric price positioning, like too many Land Rover and Range Rover models. And that’s great for car buyers, especially in the US, where Jeep is synonymous with the great outdoors and the freedom to roam. But it might not be so great in a pure business sense. That’s because bigger list prices equal bigger margins and happier chief executives.

Last year, an ambitious plan to make the next Wagoneer family on a new unibody chassis was quietly shelved and, with it, ambitions to take on Range Rover, Mercedes-Benz and BMW. Fiat Chrysler Automobiles’ Alfa Romeo and Maserati brands can be positioned to do that. Instead, the Wagoneer will be based

on a low-cost body-on-frame platform, possibly a variant of the RAM pick-up, since production is slated for the Warren plant in Detroit, home to the RAM 1500. Jeep can deploy the Wagoneer and Grand Wagoneer as two different

Trackhawk paves the way for bigger, pricier Jeeps trim levels on a full-sized SUV to take on bestselling models like the Chevrolet Tahoe and its platform twin, the Cadillac Escalade. The Wagoneer can be priced against the Tahoe at around $55k while the Grand Wagoneer shoots high at the $80k Escalade. So while premium manufacturers slug it out with aluminium spaceframe chassis and super-luxury interiors, Jeep looks content to feed its loyal customers rugged, honest SUVs that drive much better than they once did and offer touches of luxury but are not pretentious or over-priced.

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PEDAL PUSHERS Posh pedal cars for rich kids have become desirable collectibles. Richard Bremner attends the auction of one amazing collection PHOTOGRAPHY WILL WILLIAMS nostalgic spin and drift around the park with the radiocontrolled Tamiya Porsche 959 you built as a teenager? Irresistible. Beers, pizza and a riotous evening with your mates and a Scalextric set usually dormant in your loft? Ditto. A 20-minute, leg-pumping workout as you shave tenths off your lap time around the garden in your childhood pedal car? Possibly not, unless you’re bashless enough not to mind appearing in A&E with a small metal motor vehicle wrapped irremovably around your legs. Pedal cars: once a hugely desirable toy for the small and incompletely formed, these four-foot-long, pumpaction motors were quite often a pastiche of the car dad drove – or something he was never likely to drive at all, such as a Jaguar E-Type or an F1 racer. Pedal cars have taken many forms, some surprising and

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56 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 11 APRIL 2018

some surprisingly detailed. But the trouble with them is that, unlike the simple finger twitching required to control a radio-controlled car or slot racer, it’s unlikely you’ll be able to relive the pleasure of pre-teen automotive pedal power because you are now too big. None of which has stopped these machines from becoming collectible. Neither has the inconvenience of their size, which is considerably greater than that of almost every other kind of toy car. For proof, you only have to look at the collection of 156 pedal cars sold at auction last month, the most expensive of which attracted an £8200 winning bid (£9154 with fees), while the cheapest was a deeply tired £50 machine that had lost its bonnet. Until 21 March these toys all belonged to Jaguar Land Rover – surely among the odder items the company has owned. The company acquired them in 2014 as part of the

543-strong James Hull car collection, which included a large number of highly desirable Jaguars. On the same day as the pedal car auction, 110 ex-James Hull JLR cars and camper vans, mostly duplicates, were also sold (see ‘Chrome’s Under the Hammer’, 28 March), with JLR’s Heritage division planning to keep quite a number of other-brand models in its now sizeable collection. So which pedal car scored a £9154 sale? That was a beautiful replica of a 1930s Blower Bentley, complete with model supercharger beneath its mesh-protected headlights. This is a pedal car you wouldn’t want to let a child anywhere near, despite the provision of leather flying helmet and an electric motor. The same applies to many of these cars, including a petrol-engined AC Cobra of impressive quality (it went for £5712 with fees), some beautiful pre-war sports cars and grand prix racers and a couple of restored DS Citroëns.

Most of the cars were more mainstream, the vast majority relying on junior feet for propulsion. That sounds like a simple method of travelling from dad’s armchair to the bathroom, except that for a small child it’s a sizeable test of co-ordination. The child must consistently pump their legs while navigating domestic furnishings, walls, doors, dogs and adult shins if they are to avoid both a Carpet Traffic Accident and the irritation of relatives. Despite these minor drawbacks, though, pedal cars are almost as old as the car itself. The first appeared in the 1890s and were doubtless considerably more reliable than the full-size cars on which they were modelled. Many were fabricated from pressed steel and featured plenty of detail, making them the rich child’s plaything. The heyday of the metal pedal car lasted half a century, from the 1920s through to the end of the 1960s.


PEDAL CARS INSIGHT

The growing popularity of pedal cars paused during the two world wars while the demand for metal precluded their manufacture.

In the 1970s they were increasingly made out of plastic (as with so many things of the time), somewhat diminishing the appeal to collectors, many of whom were present for this bonanza of pedalpowered automobilia. “Pedal cars have a huge following and they always go very well,” says Toby Service of Brightwells auctioneers. “It’s extraordinary to see so many in one place. I’ve only seen one collection bigger than this in my 17 years”. Also extraordinary was a collection of model planes, many of them radio-controlled and large enough to need the hangar space of a domestic garage. Most spectacular was a huge Hercules bomber, a bargain at £896. Still, all lots found homes, underlining the appeal of machines that their collectors can neither drive nor fly. L

TRI U M PH TR3

M O RGAN 3 WH E E LE R

£1064 This impressive Triumph is almost big enough for an adult to enter, although battery life (it’s electric) would then be further curtailed by the extra weight.

£1568 A miniature of the real thing and it’s made by Morgan. This beauty is electric powered and the body is crafted from lightweight aluminium.

FERRARI-STYLE SPORTS CAR

ARM OU RE D SCOUT CAR

£5824 Another electric car rather than a pedal-powered one and really beautifully finished despite not being a scale replica of a specific Ferrari.

£418 A home-made pedal car of dramatic silhouette, and almost of a scale to be considered a threat. Based on a ride-on lawnmower, presumably bladeless.

AVRO L AN CASTE R B . I I I

BUGAT TI -A- LI KE

£2016 This magnificent monster, modelled on an aircraft from the ‘Dambusters’ squadron, is radio controlled. Not surprisingly you need official clearance to fly it, what with its 204in wingspan.

£448 Possibly the oldest pedaller present, and wonderfully patinated with it. It even has brakes, in contrast to real period Bugattis, which fell infamously short in this department.

All 156 lots came via the James Hull collection owned by JLR Heritage 11 APRIL 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 57


A revived Lister will be producing a run of 99 Thunders

DAYS OF THUNDER A riotous exhaust and a brutish bodykit mean the new, Jaguar F-Type R-based Lister Thunder is anything but subtle. Richard Lane drives it PHOTOGRAPHY LUC LACEY

58 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 11 APRIL 2018


LISTER THUNDER DRIVE e’ve not made it 50 yards when photographer Luc suggests that this is the most feralsounding thing the sensible side of a Ferrari 812 Superfast. He is probably correct too. Lacey isn’t a man prone to hyperbole, which is funny in itself because the car we’re driving trades committedly in the stuff: it’s an inky menace with acid-green highlights, enormous wheels satiating their arches with barely a toothpick’s width to spare and bodywork draped to the asphalt like a studded-leather ballgown. It sounds like a Nascar escapee, for pity’s sake. Welcome, then, to the Lister Thunder. While this development car is recognisably F-Type, any vestigial elegance of Jaguar’s coupé is buried beneath a truly gothic disposition. At heart it’s an F-Type R, only with new supercharger pulleys, an upgraded intercooler, improved induction and a tickled ECU that boosts the 542bhp 5.0-litre V8 to 666bhp. A 0-60mph time of 3.2sec and a top speed of 208mph put its performance in the realm of supercars. Four-wheel drive and an eight-speed torque-converter gearbox from ZF are carried over from the donor car, while a new exhaust supplied by Quicksilver not only saves 10kg but also delivers the chased-by-a-Spitfire soundtrack through carbonfibre-wrapped tips of a riotous bore. Even the crackles on the overrun don’t relent until you’ve picked up the throttle once again, meaning unrelenting noise of a murderous timbre is omnipresent. What the name Lister means to you will almost certainly depend on your age. For a millennial such as your correspondent, it’s the Storm: a 7.0-litre wedge that raced in various GT series in the late 1990s and was homologated with four £450,000 road cars. For Lister CEO Lawrence Whittaker (slightly older), it’s most likely the Le Mans, which was a modified Jaguar XJS whose pulverising 600bhp was exceeded only by the blunt visual trauma of its bodykit. For Whittaker’s father, Andrew, with whom Lawrence bought the rights to the Lister name for a six-figure sum in 2013, it’s the legendary Knobbly sports car. And, in fact, the Thunder we’re driving today might never have existed were it not for a Knobbly of questionable provenance and a stash of forgotten parts in Cambridge. It was the disappointment of learning that their ‘1958’ Knobbly used a chassis dating from the 1980s and a body from the 2000s that led the Whittakers to George Lister Engineering in Cambridge. The place is genesis for Lister’s original racers and it was here the pair discovered forgotten blueprints and parts and even an original chassis jig. Naturally, at this point the mission brief shifted from restoring a solitary Knobbly to purchasing ◊

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∆ Lister in its entirety and building a run of 10 recreation cars. Wealth acquired from another business – Warrantywise – proved handy in this regard, and with FIA certification for historic racing, even at £250,000 apiece the box-fresh Knobblys promptly sold out. Fast-forward just five years and the company is preparing for June deliveries of the car before you here, which represents Lister’s return to the road. Some car it is too. And yet, if the prospect of driving a 666bhp F-Type on damp roads flanked by dry stone walls patiently waiting to tear into that bodywork sounds intimidating, the reality is different. The Thunder is spectacularly quick in a straight line, but the supercharged delivery is so superbly linear that you’re never taken unawares by the distance-compressing hops in a way you might be in some similarly formidable turbocharged rivals. Moreover, and as you’d hope to find in an aspiring GT car, the Thunder allows to you establish a rhythm through and between corners. With seemingly bottomless reserves of torque, you’re also permitted to set the tempo as you please. There’s traction too, and in circumstances like these we’re grateful for the driveshafts in the front axle. Without them you’d need to be exceedingly confident in your abilities to use even two-thirds of what this powertrain can deliver.

Thunder’s all-wheel drive is a relief with 666bhp on wet roads 60 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 11 APRIL 2018

A H I S T O RY O F L I S T E R The Lister story began in the 1950s, when a tiny outfit, led by eponymous founder Brian Lister, humbled on numerous occasions the thoroughbred likes of Ferrari, Aston Martin and Maserati in sports car racing. It’s from this era that the Cambridgeshire firm’s most famous creation, the Knobbly, originates. The Knobbly’s curvaceous body was memorably but not exclusively powered by Jaguar’s twin-cam straight six, and 200mph was achievable with the right gearing. The death of driver Archie Scott Brown – a rare talent despite having the full use of only one arm – expedited Brian Lister’s withdrawal from motorsport, and it wasn’t until 1986 that the company reappeared under the custodianship of engineer Laurence Pearce. A run of thuggish Jaguar XJS-based specials tuned to 600bhp

Lister-Jaguar XJSs produced 600bhp followed, along with a return to sports car racing using a new and fully bespoke coupé: the Lister Storm. With long-term dormancy beckoning, a 2012 outing to source parts for a Knobbly project resulted in Lawrence Whittaker and father Andrew unexpectedly purchasing the company from Pearce, with the intention of reviving it. Continuation models will be a fundamental part of the business, as will road cars such as the Thunder.

` It is spectacularly quick but the delivery is superbly linear a

As it is – and absurdly so, given the numbers involved – you’re encouraged to chase the throttle right from the moment that greenlipsticked nose is turned in and the body settled on its outside springs. A hot-rod? Not exactly, which just goes to show how deceptive appearances can be. If a valve big enough to tame that exhaust note could be found, the Thunder is comfortable enough to make a formidable tourer. Certainly the interior is pleasing enough in an old-school manner. The black leather is from Bridge of Weir and broken up by green stitching almost everywhere you look. Jaguar logos on the air vents and steering wheel give the game away, and the digital displays are yet to be reskinned on-brand, but taken as a whole it feels adequately bespoke. Acting as a metaphor for the entire car, the faintly aged feel of the architecture and switchgear is countered by a cosseting, focused ambience brought about by a low-slung driving position and a high scuttle. If nothing else, the place is rich in character. Push on and it’s apparent this chassis still needs some fine-tuning before the keys are in customers’ hands. Those 21in wheels give the Thunder the stance of something that drove straight off the pages of Ian Callum’s sketchbook but they mean tyre occasionally meets archliner with a ‘pzizz’ that cuts through


LISTER THUNDER DRIVE the exhaust blare. Despite using KW springs stiffer than those found on an F-Type R (the adaptive dampers remain factory specification), the suspension is still a little slow to mop up road surface corrugations, particularly when loaded up. On these Lancashire roads, it can precipitate a faint skittishness that’s as welcome as cold hotpot, although it never threatens to incurably disrupt the balance of the underlying Jaguar chassis. Indeed, one of the Lister’s strengths is that its sheer drivability belies the ludicrousness of the noise and firepower at hand. Snagging that carbonfibre splitter in town is going to be your greatest concern. The price is £141,155, which puts the Thunder squarely in the crosshairs of Aston’s V8-engined DB11, while the additional £14,850 for which Lister asks to fit a carbonfibre bonnet brings the new Bentley Continental GT into play. Anyone considering buying a Lister would be mad not to sample alternatives of this calibre before putting pen to paper, and yet we’d understand the person for whom the Thunder’s rarity and sheer eccentricity ultimately win out. There is work to be done here, not least with the finer chassis tuning, but encouraging first impressions suggest one of Britain’s best-loved marques is properly back, and with a deafening bang. L

THE NEXT CHAPTER There are all sorts of risks involved in acquiring such a storied marque as Lister, and Lawrence Whittaker – as a young man in the context of his position – must have been relieved when orders totalling £3.1 million rolled in only 24 hours after announcing the Thunder. He and father Andrew had already orchestrated a successful run of continuation examples of the Knobbly, but this was proof there was also a hearty appetite for road cars. Those road-going Listers will be built at a new facility in Milton Keynes. Up to six cars can be worked on concurrently, with a three-month lead-time for the conversion. Whittaker’s medium-term ambition is to develop his company into a tuning outfit with intimate links to Jaguar. He cites Alpina’s relationship with BMW as an appealing model that would afford Lister early access to future cars and economise the modification process both in terms of expenditure and time. As it stands, a Thunder begins life as a complete F-Type R, with Lister having no use for many of the parts it strips from the donor car. Jaguar – and particularly design director Ian Callum – has given short shrift to third-party tuners in the past, although the company has already been in touch to offer help

Whittaker’s longterm plans include SUVs and a hypercar

with sourcing cars for modification. Where this will eventually lead is anybody’s guess, but it’s an encouraging start. Once the run of 99 Thunder models is completed, attention will turn to the recently announced F-Pace SVR, for which Lister has already made plans. As much as 670bhp is on the cards, with a larger production run of 250 cars reflecting current market tastes. Don’t be surprised to see a Lister-ised take on the Range Rover Sport,

either. The grand plan is to sell enough modified Jaguar Land Rover cars to build a bespoke Lister and revive the ‘Storm’ moniker. It would be an expensive project – a figure of £50m passes Whittaker’s lips – taking the form of a hypercar to rival the likes of Pagani and Koenigsegg. Annual production would be in single digits, with the asking price running to six. Before all that, however, there are the remaining Thunder build slots to fill.

LISTER THUNDER JAGUAR F-TYPE R VS PRICE

£141,155 666bhp 720lb ft 208mph 3.2sec 1730kg

£92,730 542bhp 502lb ft 186mph 3.7sec 1730kg

POWER

TORQUE

TOP SPEED

0 - 60MPH

KERB WEIGHT

G E A R B OX

8-spd auto 8-spd auto

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‘We are not the enemy’ The head of Google’s self-driving division, Waymo, tells Jim Holder why car enthusiasts shouldn’t be scared of the future he boss of the most powerful self-driving car technology company in the world has a Porsche 911 GT3 on order. And a Caterham in his garage. And two more Porsche 911s nestling alongside that: a 997-series C2 S and a 964-series Targa. Easy natured and always the evangelist, John Krafcik – CEO of Waymo, part of Google – breaks into a ready smile as he can see my brain computing that one. “We are not the enemy. Yes, you can have self-driving cars and enthusiasts’ cars,” he says, grinning. “What we’re doing at Waymo does not mean the end of driving. If you just want to get somewhere, we hope you’ll use one of our cars. Hail it on the app, get driven there autonomously, hop out. “But people will always want to own cars – and if you’re buying something, we want it to be special. I can see how we might disrupt the utilitarian market, because we can likely cover those needs in a cost-effective way, but the beauty for car enthusiasts is that every car that gets sold will have to be more interesting. It’ll have a purpose.” Krafcik, 56, and Waymo were thrust further into the spotlight last month when it was announced that the firm had committed to buy up to 20,000 Jaguar I-Paces, which it will offer to the public to use autonomously from 2020. To look at him, you’d think he’d spent his life in Silicon Valley – there’s the floppy hair, stubbly chin and jeans, for starters – but in fact he spent decades in the car industry, working his way through the ranks (see separate story, right) before answering the call from Google’s founders to head up Waymo in 2016. Ask him if the firm ever had plans – as long rumoured – to make cars as well as develop self-driving technology and he’s coy, saying only that “I’m not aware of it”. But when Waymo was launched at the tail end of 2016, those rumours were, for now at least, put firmly to bed. “We built our own test car, called Firefly, but that was really because we could take advantage of the so-called ‘golf cart regulations’ that were in place to test our technology,”

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Waymo-equipped Jag I-Pace. Below: Firefly; road trials

he says. “Up to 35mph, it could run in neighbourhoods without the need for a steering wheel, and it was our way of logging test miles. But building full cars is best left to the experts. They have their specialisms, we have ours.”

Those test miles are now Waymo’s answer to any concerns about the safety of the public testing of selfdriving cars. Given a chance, Krafcik will repeat like a mantra the dual facts that the firm has covered five

H O W K R A F C I K G O T W H E R E H E I S T O DAY His formative years “My boss [at New United Motor Manufacturing Inc] was a Yoda-like figure: very wise, but he talked in riddles. Early in my career, I was sent to a GM factory. It was impressive, but I did notice some cars being repaired off the line and some people sleeping in cardboard boxes on site. I got back, presented my report, said how impressed I was and so on – and then got sent to a Toyota plant in Japan. It was extraordinarily efficient. My boss had made his point: I recognised the standards to strive for.” Why he gave it all up to be an engineer “I wanted to design cars, so I asked Ford if I could. They offered me the chance to run some plants. I said no, persisted and eventually got a role as a product design engineer. It was

the best job I ever had. I learned the product development processes and a respect for how car makers engineer in so much quality and reliability.” Why he left Ford “At that time, it was the greatest collection of clever people who couldn’t work out how to get on. I couldn’t aspire to the next level of management there as I didn’t like how those people treated other people.” The route to Waymo “I joined Hyundai and had a blast. Then at the height of the recession, I was asked to run Hyundai USA. We had some great years and then I joined True Car, a website selling cars. And then the phone rang. It was Google founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin. I took the call!”

million autonomous test miles on public roads in the US and more than five billion miles in computer simulation. He’ll also state that Waymo’s proprietary lidar and radar systems, developed since 2008, are the best in the world, so much so that the firm plans to become the first to start public trials of autonomous cars without any ‘fail-safe’ humans behind a wheel over a 100-squaremile area of Arizona this year. “When we set the company up, we asked ourselves what our role should be, and the answer was to develop the world’s best driver,” he says. “The technology we have today can drive anything from a giant truck to a Prius. If it moves, we can find a way to drive it.” Given that studies suggest autonomous driving technology will be a £5 trillion a year business by the middle of this century, you’d think it was pretty easy to understand Google’s interests in getting involved. Krafcik counters that with a steeliness that suggests there may be a truth to his words: “You might think money was the primary motivation, but it can’t be. The goal is zero fatalities. That’s it. If there’s payback for that social benefit, then great.” On the subject of safety, Krafcik feels that the car industry had become complacent. “The word ‘accident’ was actually created to almost explain away what were, in reality, tragedies,” he says. “Everyone knew the facts, but there had become a level of acceptance that people would die because of cars. But 140 deaths an hour – that’s too much. “So we embrace the drive for zero fatalities. We want safety and mobility for all. Neither’s easy: the former is more of a goal, while the latter is a big challenge. Just in the US, there are 30 million people today who don’t have access to transport.” Waymo, of course, is one of many firms vying for supremacy in the field, including Jaguar Land Rover, which will continue to develop its own systems, but there’s no doubt that the benefit of Google’s brains trust, reputation and war chest has given it a head start. Self-driving may not be a nirvana for many car enthusiasts, but there’s no doubting that in Krafcik its future is being driven forward by one. L


JOHN KRAFCIK INTERVIEW

` Every car that gets sold will have to be more interesting a

Waymo CEO Krafcik says the goal is zero motoring fatalities 11 APRIL 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 63


YO U R V I E WS WRITE TO

autocar@haymarket.com Prima by name…

LETTER OF THE WEEK

Richard Dredge’s interesting history of diesel article (14 February) erroneously cited the Fiat Croma as the world’s first series production car powered by a direct-injection diesel engine. In fact, this honour goes to the Austin Maestro. The Prima DI engine saloon model was introduced in 1987. The van version had been introduced the year before (1986).

Geneva 2018 absentees included Mini your hand around to activate a function considered the answer?

Jim Mackay Medium car programme manager, Rover Cars (1985-1990)

Simon Astley Rickmansworth

Aston, we have a problem Geneva contention

Regarding your story on the ‘Lagonda from outer space’ (News, 7 March), the only ‘space’ it will be taking up will be on the hard shoulder of the motorway with a flat battery.

WIN

Colin List Via email

Junction dysfunction

Working till the cows come home

Iain Macauley (Your Views, 14 March) highlights an issue of possible lethal or disabling significance regarding signalling at junctions. Of those who don’t signal, a proportion refuse to do so because it’s ‘uncool’, or they are lazy, or are distracted, or are unable to, or are unaware (God help us), even if this actually means running into someone. As a regular pedestrian and cyclist, I know for a fact that there is a subclass of driver that wouldn’t lose a minute’s sleep if they hit you. They would see it as your fault for being in the way. This terrifies me. I could even tell you the makes and models of vehicle I am most wary of. Until or unless there is a concerted effort to isolate these people and, if necessary, ban them from further driving, do we need to wait patiently at danger spots until there is a safe gap? We could be waiting for hours! I know the solution, but it’s too draconian to be acceptable.

I enjoyed James Ruppert’s article on kit cars (14 March), having started my motoring slightly earlier, in the era of ‘specials’. In 1951, I bought a tatty pre-war Ford 8 van and converted it into what, from a distance, looked like a sports car. I was working on a farm at the time and was allowed use of a small calf shed to complete the job, which took me two years. I cannot remember the tax and third-party insurance costs, but they were infinitesimal compared with today, and of course there was no pestilential MOT to worry about. Performance? Exactly the same as a tatty Ford van. I knew nothing about tuning beyond the old trick of slackening the throttle spring to make a young blood think his car had been tuned, and anyway I suspect it would have been dangerous to make it any faster. Good fun at the time, but I was glad to be able to drive proper cars after that. Peter Taylor Via email

Peter’s Ford 8, restored in a calf shed 64 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 11 APRIL 2018

Letter of the week wins this ValetPRO exterior protection and maintenance kit worth £48

Richard Battle Via email

Postulating posteriors Is it me or does the rear of the new Toyota Auris look a lot like the rear of the last of the previous-generation Mazda 3s? Marvin Samuels Via email

What’s the solution, Siri? The letter from Allan Britton regarding voice control (Your views, 21 March) rang a bell. The IT world currently seems obsessed with voice control, but what if you can’t speak or have speech issues? Eighteen months ago, I was diagnosed with throat cancer and had my voicebox removed. I didn’t smoke but there was no alternative to the surgery. I spent eight months being

I made my annual trip to Geneva last month to see all that’s new and enjoyed the show. You remarked in your post-show issue that there appeared to be some empty spaces. Some of the names above the stands (Okcu, anyone?) did not seem to be for the long term, on the basis of the strange exhibits they had brought along. However, what struck me was not just the absence of Vauxhall/Opel this year but another absentee: why did BMW not see fit to bring Mini along to the show? Jonathan Diggines Via email

Since 2016 Mini has been present at fewer major motor shows. The brand prefers to put its marketing cash into alternative methods of promoting its latest models – MB

Mental arithmetic Impressive figures for the Jaguar I-Pace: 2.2 tonnes and £81,000! John Penfound Andover

mute, which my family and friends enjoyed (!), before having some form of speech restored: a valve. It’s not perfect, but much better than being mute. I prefer not to use the telephone, although I can. So while all these clever guys come up with ‘voice this’ and ‘voice that’ to improve our lives, I am quite happy to use my fingers to achieve what I want. In fact, I have to press the valve in the base of my throat to talk, so in terms of driving the car there is no difference in car control other than, I guess, averting my eyes to find the buttons. Having driven for nearly 50 years, this isn’t really a problem either. Are we getting ‘too clever’? Clearly not, as this sort of possibility seems to have been overlooked. Or is waving


LETTERS Left in the lurch I note that the government is hitting diesel drivers again. What I find quite extraordinary is that the increase in road tax is only being applied to vehicles purchased after 1 April, which in nearly all cases would be compliant with Euro 6 standards. Take two new cars, one petrol and one diesel, both in the 131-150g/km range – one will be charged £205 for the first year, the other £515. There are no plans to increase the tax on older diesel cars, which is strange in the extreme. And now we read that new rules are being announced at the end of May to restrict diesel drivers even more as part of the push to improve air quality. It would be helpful if these new regulations were available now. For many of us who live in hilly areas of the country north of Watford, a four-wheel-drive vehicle is essential for towing, recovery and getting around generally when the weather is inclement. I wonder what will happen to vans, lorries and buses.

G R E AT R E A S O N S T O B U Y

NEXT WEEK’S ISSUE ON SALE 18 APRIL

FIRST DRIVE

John Michels North Wales

Something nippy for the nipper I was looking forward to ordering one of the first ‘second edition’ Alpines that I had put money down for a while back. But recent happy news – involving a child-to-be – makes it so that an Alpine isn’t the best idea. So the question I put to you, dear Autocar and readers, is what is there out there for someone looking for a relatively affordable lightweight sports car that can have a little petrolhead in the back? The 2+2 options seem limited. As a Macan owner/driver at the moment, I want to stay away from Porsches, although the 911 doesn’t fall into my ‘relatively affordable’ category.

New Mercedes-Benz A-Class The third-generation A-Class was a smash hit for Mercedes. Does its successor measure up? Read our first verdict C O M PA R I S O N

F E AT U R E

Alfa Romeo vs Porsche

The A-Z of Chinese cars

Stelvio Quadrifoglio meets Macan Turbo in a battle of the super-SUVs

Know your ArcFox from your Qiantu? You will after reading this

Philippe Fabri Via email

Honda Civic Type R: perfect for an expectant father

EVERY WEEK R OA D T E S T

USED BUYING GUIDE

L O N G -T E R M T E S T

BMW M5

Vauxhall Astra VXR

Mercedes-Benz E-Class

It’s beaten its peers in a group test. Now the M5 faces our road testers

How to get Vauxhall’s bargain Focus RS rival in your garage

Our time with the AWD estate is up. Just how good an all-rounder is it?

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CONTENTS SUBJECT TO CHANGE

We’d suggest a used Lotus Evora 400 or new Toyota GT86/Subaru BRZ, but for an infant you’re going to need a rear-facing car seat and more space. To meld practicality and performance at a competitive price, how about a Honda Civic Type R? – MS


O U R CA RS F E AT U R E D T H I S W E E K

HONDA CIVIC TYPE R

KIA STINGER

LAND ROVER DISCOVERY

SSANGYONG REXTON

VAUXHALL INSIGNIA

VOLKSWAGEN GOLF GTI

VOLKSWAGEN GOLF GTI We’re big fans of both the Golf R and the GTI. Which is better? Only one way to find out MILEAGE 7302 WHY WE ’ R E RU N N I N G IT To see if, after 40 years, the Golf GTI is still the world’s best all-round hot hatch

eah, but a Golf R only costs a couple of grand more…’ is a line often trotted out in reference to the Golf GTI. Which is not actually true when you delve into the price lists: a three-door manual-gearboxequipped GTI costs from £28,465 (due to a small price increase since we took delivery of our car) and a threedoor manual R is £32,880. A similar gap exists between the GTI and the next petrol Golf below it in the range. The price gap narrows towards the anecdotal £2000 when you switch to the monthly payment option

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presented by PCP deals, the way so many new cars are now bought. Just £10 a month was the gap we found on one website between the two hot Golfs on PCP, and there have historically been some very juicy deals on Golf Rs in particular. So the original point remains: the Golf R really isn’t much of a financial leap up from the GTI. You would then, wouldn’t you? For that extra, you get significantly more power (306bhp plays 227bhp) as well as two extra driven wheels. And power is, of course, everything in the world of hot hatches these days. Although… it isn’t really, is it? On paper, the GTI gives away quite a lot of performance for that £4415 (or tenner a month) price difference but any comparison between them is more nuanced than that.

The GTI, remember, is the performance Golf, and indeed the hot hatch, that has endured longest of all, no matter how many different flavours of hot Golf have been above it in the range at various points. So, long-term test Golf GTI, meet Golf R. The R that has turned up for this exercise is a five-door, which also makes for an interesting initial comparison with our three-door GTI. Someone asked me the other day how I was getting on with the bigger, heavier doors of a three-door. To be honest, I hadn’t really noticed them, yet getting into the five-door R revealed a door that is much lighter in your hand and needs to be opened less wide for you to slip inside. The five-door hatch is definitely more suited to tighter spaces and has all the practical advantages. Looks

aside, I can see why the days of the three-door hatchback are numbered. Yet that’s far too practical a point on which to lead a comparison of two performance Golfs. Of greater intrigue to me initially is that this R has a six-speed manual gearbox, as does the GTI in our possession. In the first few miles, it struck me that I’ve never driven an R with a manual ’box before, only one with the seven-speed DSG dual-clutch gearbox, which is a £1270 option. I’ve always thought of an R as a car that’s very naturally suited to an automatic transmission. It feels in keeping with its brief as the kind of all-weather, everyday hot hatch that prides itself on usability equally as much as being a performance tool. I still think that now. A DSGequipped Golf R feels noticeably


Good news: just three doors to clean, not five…

L OV E I T

RIDE AND HANDLING BLEND Tisshaw once wanted to swap his GTI’s 18in wheels for 19s. Not any longer

The GTI is sweeter than the R in this regard. Brilliant low-speed ride, fun higher-speed handling.

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The Golf GTI is not as quick off the line as the Golf R but comes alive halfway up the rev range

STEERING WHEEL CONTROLS A solution to avoid using the touchscreen: ignore it completely and navigate menus with the wheel.

a

Golf R (on left) has 79bhp more and an extra driven axle

GTI’s more pliant ride is welcome on urban roads like this

quicker off the line than the manual, which is reflected in the 4.6sec 0-62mph time of the auto, which is a full half a second quicker than the manual. You can simply concentrate on braking later and getting on the power earlier in the DSG variant and revel in its rapid cross-country pace. You also instantly notice the extra grunt in the R over its more famous sibling, its peak torque of 280lb ft eclipsing the GTI’s 258lb ft. Yet it’s not just that extra grunt, but how it’s delivered: bury the accelerator in the R and it stays planted at almost any speed. It just keeps going, most devastatingly off the line. The GTI is not as quick from a standstill but comes alive halfway up the rev

range. It’s here where the GTI’s best work is done. It rewards you for getting it going and is actually quite unassuming to drive at low revs, whereas you feel like the R is constantly goading you to go faster. I was also surprised by the firmness of the Golf R’s ride and the noise of it from its 19in alloy wheels. The R is the most civilised of the 300bhpplus mega-hatch club and I’ve never thought of it as a firm car. And it isn’t; it’s just firmer than the GTI. The noisiness of the ride is more intriguing given that I’ve grumbled to myself about the slightly underwhelming look of the 18in alloys of my GTI and believed there was enough compliancy in the ride to move up to 19s without doing

anything untoward to the way it deals with bumps. On this evidence, I’ve suddenly grown fond of the 18s. In the handling stakes, GTI turns in to a corner better and feels more agile. What the R lacks in finesse, it makes up for in grip and traction. The GTI darts around a corner, whereas the R barges its way around. If a GTI is quicker on the way in, then the R is undoubtedly quicker on the way out of the corner. So R or GTI? Sheesh. Before spending this extended period of time with the GTI, the R was my favourite all-round hot hatch. Yet the GTI plays that all-rounder card even more effectively. Yes, there are more exciting hot hatches than the GTI, including the R, but there simply aren’t any better hatches than it, which is so crucial in deciding which car you’d rather live with over which car you’d rather have more fun with. There is one crucial thing the pair do have in common: they are both brilliant at being Golfs.

SPORTY DESIGN We remain sold on the visual charms of a three-door hatch over a five-door. It just looks racier.

L OAT H E I T

EXHAUST NOTE Simply not special enough. The Golf GTI just doesn’t sound like a hot hatchback.

MARK TISSHAW

TEST DATA V O L K S WAG E N G O L F G T I Price £28,320 Price as tested £32,520 Faults None Expenses None Economy 37.5mpg Last seen 4.4.18

OWN ONE? SHARE YOUR EXPERIENCE mark.tisshaw@haymarket.com

FUEL ECONOMY Considered in isolation, the GTI’s economy is decent, but the 306bhp 4WD R averaged just 2mpg worse.

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OUR CARS

KIA STINGER Every Autocar staffer is keen to learn what it’s really made of, which is good. Except… MILEAGE 3133 WHY WE ’ R E RU N N I N G IT To get fully familiar with the dynamic successes and foibles of an alluring driver’s car. And to see if the UK public can get the idea of a truly desirable Kia

ur Kia Stinger GT S may be becoming a victim of its own success. If it had met with a bit less praise when first introduced, it might not have this problem. But when fellow Autocar staffers get their first taste of the car, I’m getting the impression they’re giving it what we might politely describe as ‘a pretty thorough workout’. Makes sense, given that there are no predecessors from which to get a guide on exactly how good a driver’s car it might be. What else is there for a car reviewer to do but be sure to find out for himself? The grounds I have for this conclusion aren’t exactly indisputable, but the car’s fuel economy has certainly taken a slight turn for the worse. I’m also told, by the chap who’s spending a few days in the Stinger as these words are being written, that it might have a developing brake problem. It hasn’t been figured or track-tested, yet there

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LOVE IT BOOT ACCESS Liftback hatch means loading cases, buggies and bags right up to the seatbacks is easy.

LOATHE IT KIA’ S ‘ WE LCO M E ’ CH I M ES They make it sound like an old Windows laptop. Thankfully, I’ve found the off button.

Engine is a dynamic asset but the gearbox has irksome foibles are signs that the front discs may be warped or need skimming. See what I mean? The Stinger’s clearly being put to good use right now. I’ll investigate when it returns to Autocar HQ next week. Meanwhile, I’ll take the chance to update you on what seem to be the detailed pros and cons of the car’s driving experience, which I’m now privy to, having, well… you know… given it more than one pretty thorough workout myself. A V6 engine that’s responsive, torquey and free-revving and a chassis that does rear-driven handling purity, fine cornering balance and a nicely fluent kind of body control still strike me as the Stinger’s chief dynamic assets. I think both are good enough to bear comparison with the various ‘performance’ BMWs, Audis and Jaguars available for north of £40,000. The outright authority of the car’s handling composure, meanwhile, and the weight, feel, positivity and self-centring of the steering – come to think of it, the whole textural and sensory richness

of its driving experience – aren’t quite at the same level. As a rule, when you ask the really probing questions of the Stinger, there’s a certain lack of attention to detail about its answers. The car has driving modes, but its close body control becomes a little bit recalcitrant at the very firmest, Sport+ end of the spectrum, and its steering picks up weight with little discernible improvement in feel. More frustrating, though, is the refusal of Kia’s in-house eight-speed gearbox to stay locked in manual paddle shift mode. If you select fifth gear, for example, and dig fairly fast and deep into the accelerator travel but make sure not to hit the pedal’s kickdown switch, the gearbox often still shifts down to fourth or third – just because it thinks that’s probably what you want it to do. It’s not what I want, though. I’ve been very clear about what I want: manual mode. The transmission also has no S mode. And when you flick a paddle to select a gear manually – usually the left one, since you’ll likely want

to change down – it typically takes two or three paddle squeezes to get to the ratio you’re after when surely the ECU could just give you the optimum ratio straight away. To blot its copy book still further, the ’box then reverts to automatic shifting in D unannounced and entirely of its own accord, and after what seems like only 15-20sec. That effectively means you have to swap cogs very frequently to keep the gearbox in the mode you want it in. It’s annoying, too, when you find that the Stinger’s electronic stability control system isn’t really fully off even when it tells you so. There are separate stages to negotiate to turn off both the traction control and the ESP, but even having achieved both, you’ll find there are braking and throttle interventions to contend with if the car decides you’re driving too aggressively. But it shouldn’t be deciding anything, should it? Grrr. So the Stinger gets most of the big-picture stuff right on the road but sells itself short on some finer points. And much as I’d never deny anyone the chance to find these things out first hand, I’ll be relieved when my colleagues have worked that out as I have – and the Stinger can look forward to a slightly easier time of it. MATT SAUNDERS

TEST DATA KIA STI N G E R GT S Price £40,495 Price as tested £40,495 Faults Potential warped brake disc Expenses None Economy 25.9mpg Last seen 28.3.18

OWN ONE? SHARE YOUR EXPERIENCE matt.saunders@haymarket.com 11 APRIL 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 69


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OUR CARS

Vauxhall Insignia MILEAGE 4016

SSANGYONG REXTON It’s proving an accommodating SUV in more ways than one MILEAGE 1931 WHY WE ’ R E RU N N I N G IT To find out whether a big, separatechassis, part-time all-wheel-drive SUV still has a place in the world

he Rexton’s seat heaters did much to blunt the chill of the recent Beast from the East. The luxury of this suffusing warmth, and the complementary heated steering wheel, also compensated (slightly) for the discovery that it’s all too easy to see the trip computer’s estimation of your fuel consumption dropping below 30mpg. I’d hoped that the running-in period – the Rexton arrived with just under 700 miles on the clock – might improve the 29.5mpg originally achieved. The Rexton has now done almost 2000 miles, and there has been a slight gain to 29.7mpg since, but I’m less optimistic now. Still, these figures are less surprising when you consider the sizeable frontage the Rexton presents to the wind and the fact that it weighs more than 2100kg. And you can keep an eye on the trip computer, and the econometer, from a seat of some comfort, despite its surprising lack of a lumbar adjuster. The Rexton is not an especially rapid machine (62mph

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LOVE IT E LE VATE D VANTAG E PO I NT The imperious seating position opens the world up, by letting you see over things.

LOATHE IT FL AT- LI N I N G ECO N O MY Fuel consumption of 29.7mpg doesn’t look like it will improve much now the Rexton is run-in.

Fuel economy remains under 30mpg arrives in a relatively leisurely 11.9sec) but that suits its demeanour, even if the aura of comfort can be rudely interrupted by the effects of a broken road surface. The suspension and separate chassis are sometimes jarring in their struggle to cope, and if the pothole is big and you’re aware of it, you’ll be circumnavigating the depression in question. The Rexton hasn’t done any towing yet, but it has already been used to cart two lawnmowers simultaneously – with the car’s rear seats still in place – and it also helped with the clear-out of a flat. Our Ultimate version comes with a twosection false floor that eliminates the step between the underfloor and the folded backrests, but you can significantly expand the space by removing the sections, and tipping the entire folded rear seat forwards again. This also has the advantage of providing a low bulkhead behind the front seats – highly desirable, noted the lawnmower repair man, when you are carrying large, bladed tools that might move during an emergency stop, or worse. Besides mowers and mattresses, the Rexton has also carried friends, all of them impressed with both the finish of its interior and its space.

None has yet commented on the sometimes jumpy ride, but perhaps they’re being polite. Their observations are usually easy to hear, because the Rexton’s drivetrain is pretty quiet. Its seven gears allow the diesel to spend most of its time spinning beneath 3000rpm, and to achieve a restfully subdued cruise on the motorway. Deploying kickdown briefly changes all that, the engine roaring with effort, but these moments are brief, unless you’re in a real hurry. The hurried will also discover that the Rexton can be annoyingly slow off the mark when you’re pulling out of a junction, prompting a deeper sinking of the throttle that can then provoke a gravelly scrabble from the inside rear wheel. So it’s not always restful, and certainly not speedy. You won’t be pushing it to the limit on back roads, either, although some experimentation on a gravel road induced an amusing little drift, curtailed by the stability control system. The Rexton runs in rearwheel drive, incidentally, unless you select all-wheel drive or low range. So there’s scope for more serious offroad work. For the moment, though, the Ssangyong is scoring points for its usefulness, cabin ambience and cruise-along character. RICHARD BREMNER

Land Rover Discovery MILEAGE 22,907

S S A N GYO N G R E X T O N 2 . 2 U LT I M AT E Price £37,995 Price as tested £40,150 Faults None Expenses None Economy 29.7mpg Last seen 28.3.18

OWN ONE? SHARE YOUR EXPERIENCE autocar@haymarket.com

LAST SEEN 28.3.18

The Land Rover remote app is a thing of novelty and, at times, usefulness. It lets you see last week’s journeys (so far useless), how much fuel your car has (handy) and if any of it needs servicing (ditto). You can even start it remotely to pre-warm the cabin. It also tells you where your car is parked, so if it gets nicked, you’ll know exactly where it has ended up. MP

Honda Civic Type R MILEAGE 5113

TEST DATA

LAST SEEN 28.3.18

A colleague once pronounced in these pages: the vanity mirror is dead! He feels a smartphone set to ‘selfie’ mode is now of sufficient quality to use as a mirror when applying his blusher in the passenger seat. My bowls partner and I disagree. She styles her lippy on the way to the mats and the brightness of the Insignia’s sun-visor lights, one either side of the mirror, is important. MM

LAST SEEN 28.3.18

A photo shoot at the HQ of Team Dynamics, which prepares the Civic Type Rs that race in the BTCC, offered a useful opportunity to compare our road-going car with its competition sibling. The race version is optimised for the track and to meet the rules but our car’s exterior design has as much performance intent as you’d want or need on the road. SP

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What to buy, where to buy it and how much to pay

USED CARS W H A T WS TE ALMO T B O U G HE E K T H IS W

FO R D PU MA Some may still mock this coupé as a Ford Fiesta with fancy body, but we admire it. The Puma has impeccable handling and a willing engine that encourages you to go a little bit faster. Rust nibbles away at the rear wheel arches but this can easily be remedied if you catch it early enough. Find a tidy one for buttons before there’s none left.

James Ruppert THE HIGH PRIEST OF BANGERNOMICS

A6 Avant can be a shrewd used buy if you pick carefully

REPEAT TO FADE Cars fade away. It’s an old, repeating cycle. So buy accordingly ust as a heads-up, I am slowly putting together a book that I am going to call a ‘Bangerpedia’. Right now, I am not at all sure when, or even if, I am going to finish it. The sheer volume of models offered to the UK car buyer in any given decade is absolutely overwhelming. What I want to do with the book is address the situation where an awful lot of people think that some old cars are all of a sudden quite cool and desirable. I found myself on the radio recently being asked to explain why certain models are dying out. Apparently, there are only two-anda-half Morris Itals left. Personally, I can’t see the downside, having briefly owned one. The people in radioland could not comprehend how Mk 1 Ford Mondeos are now in the minority. That is what happens. Ford Cortinas were everywhere when I was a nipper, but I haven’t seen one since 2012. I have written in previous issues about the many stages in the life of the car, but the point bears repeating: vehicles have their slot in time and space. Afterwards, they can become very dated and quite rubbish, before becoming an ironic classic. Mostly, though, they are great value, so I unearthed some of the less common used cars for sale online. The death of the estate car has been predicted, but it remains both cool and practical, especially when it is an Audi A6 Avant 2.7 TDI Le Mans.

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It has plenty of square footage and, in the Le Mans trim, all the necessary toys. I found a 2007 example with a reasonable 82,000 mileage and just the one previous owner for £6695. Estates – sorry, Avants – have never looked better. People carriers attract widespread condemnation, unless you have five children. Then again, you could be an artisan needing a van-sized vehicle to accommodate a tricky work/family

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Coupés are fading away. It’s like the early 1980s again a Diesel-powered 2.5 Grand Voyager from 2002 is up for £1490

life balance. In that case, a 2002 Chrysler Grand Voyager 2.5 CRD LX with 100,000 miles and a fresh MOT is just £1490. Reasonably stylish, with sliding side doors and plenty of space, it is a chintzy workhorse. Sadly, old-fashioned coupés such as the VW Scirocco are fading away. It’s like the early 1980s again: all you can get is hot hatches, which seem too big and silly for their own good. Old Peugeots are now unaffordable, and I think an MG ZR may be out of favour at the moment, but in a few years, everyone will miss them. A three-door 1.4 won’t set the world alight, but it still looks funky. So with 58,000 miles and priced at £990, it seems fun, especially in yellow like the example I found on the interweb. Almost every car becomes a banger. It is just a small matter of timing.


TA L E S F R O M R U P P E R T ’ S GA R AG E

READERS’ QUESTIONS

I’m looking for a Ford QUESTION Mondeo estate, preferably from 2016 onwards. Any tips on engine and specification? Marcus Adams, Shillingstone

MILE AGE 80,961

VOLKSWAGEN POLO Our Polo, also known as ‘the toy car’, won’t be around for too much longer. It’s better to sell it with a pretty long MOT and a clean bill of heath. We left it at a local garage for checks and they came back with the good news: all it needed was a couple of new rear tyres. We had spotted that those were on the way out. It also had a minor service and a replacement auxiliary belt (fan belt in the old days) and they changed a headlight bulb I had installed cack-handedly. The decade-old hatch is worth a surprising amount of money. I’ll let you know what will replace it.

Even allowing for all the concern surrounding diesel, petrol versions ANSWER are much harder to find, so I’d aim for a 2.0 TDCi 150 Titanium or Titanium X: lots of kit, plenty of choice and a gutsy, economical engine. AR

Is a Honda CR-Z QUESTION hybrid a good deal or are the batteries going to be a problem? Denise Trafford, Taunton CR-Zs are looking like terrific value at the moment and I’d strongly ANSWER recommend buying one while they’re this cheap. They’re fun to drive, look great and will surely become a cult classic. There’s no sign of any problems with the batteries yet. AR

READER’S RIDE

With a new BMW 8 QUESTION Series on its way, would the old one now be a good investment? Roger Byers, Nuneaton

Jaguar XK Nick Davies was prompted to write after we mentioned the Jaguar XK recently. “Towards the end of last year, I decided it was time to buy one,” he says. “I found a very clean one with a Jaguar specialist. It is a 2007 4.2 V8 XK with 76,000 miles and a Jaguar service history.

SEND YOUR USED CAR TALES TO

It has had only two previous owners and was £14,995 with an RAC warranty. “This car has convinced me of the sense of the Bangernomics idea that you can enjoy V8 power and Jaguar comfort for so little money compared with new.”

Their complexity and high running costs have kept 8 Series values ANSWER depressed a little in recent years but they’re creeping up now and the arrival of the new model will only spur that on. I’d say go for it, but keep in mind how expensive they can be to maintain. AR

james@bangernomics.com AND READERS' QUESTIONS TO autocar@haymarket.com 11 APRIL 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 73


W H Y YO U N E E D A U S E D

MERCEDES CLS I N YO U R L I FE

18.1 Average MPG of the CLS500 road tested by Autocar, 10 May 2005

THE ELEGANT IN THE ROOM The sleek and luxurious first-gen Mercedes CLS is as desirable now as it was when it was launched, but it’s not without its issues. John Evans finds out more ast month, Autocar published a first drive of the new Mercedes-AMG CLS53 – and what a creation it is, good enough to garner four stars no less. But the price? Around £70,000. Even the ‘basic’ 350d 4Matic AMG Line is £57,510, but worry ye not: we know of a CLS320 CDI for sale for just £2750. Granted, it’s a first-generation model registered in 2006, has done 102,000 miles and has ‘service history’ rather than ‘full service history’. But the seller confidently claims the engine and automatic gearbox operate ‘perfectly’ and that, save for a few ‘discreet’ scratches and light wheel kerbing, the body is ‘good’. So also, he says, is the interior. It sounds tempting, because

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74 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 11 APRIL 2018

the first-gen CLS is just so darned attractive and 100,000 miles is nothing for a car of this quality. At launch, its curvy, four-door coupé body was unlike anything else in Mercedes’ range; so, too, its interior that manages to be both sporty and elegant. The ‘S’ in the name suggested a relationship with the S-Class, but in fact the CLS was based on a stretched E-Class platform. It landed in UK showrooms in 2005. The big sellers were the CLS350, powered by a 268bhp 3.5-litre V6 petrol, and the 320 CDI, a 221bhp V6 diesel. Those with deeper pockets could avail themselves of the CLS500, powered by a 302bhp 5.0-litre V8, or the rangetopping, supercharged 5.4-litre V8 CLS55AMG with 469bhp.

Just a year later, the 5.0 V8 was replaced by a much more powerful 5.5-litre engine, while the 55 was superseded by the CLS63 AMG, which used a naturally aspirated 6.2-litre V8 with 507bhp. At the time of writing, a 2006 CLS63 AMG with 67,000 miles and full Mercedes service history was up for £15,495. All had rear-wheel drive and a seven-speed automatic gearbox. Air suspension was an option and standard equipment included partleather trim, electrically powered front seats, climate control, adaptive cruise control and parking sensors. The next big CLS milestone came with the 2008 facelift and its twinlouvre grille in place of the previous four-louvre version, LED tail-lights, a new three-spoke steering wheel and

the latest infotainment system. At the same time, the 268bhp 350 petrol morphed into the cleaner and more economical 288bhp 350 CGI. The following year the CLS320 CDI became the 350 CDI, but there were no changes to its power or economy. That said, a limited-run Grand Edition version featured a power upgrade to 272bhp, AMG alloys and active lighting. Not surprisingly, CLS55s and 63s are rare birds. They’re also expensive and cost a bomb to run. Instead, browse among the diesels and CLS350 petrols. There are loads for sale. As you’ll read opposite, the early petrols need careful buying but remain good if your mileage is low, while the diesels are among the classiest workhorses you can buy.


USED CARS H O W T O G E T O N E I N YO U R GA R AG E

The 2008 facelift included upgraded infotainment set-up

DID YOU KNOW? The first-gen CLS is based on the Vision CLS concept that turned heads at the 2003 Frankfurt show. Only details such as the door handles, wing mirrors and alloys were changed for production.

It’s rear-wheel drive and an auto ’box or nothing

M I K E M C C A R T H Y, S TA R MOTOR SERVICE “The CLS is very popular. It looks great and is really comfortable. The main issues are balancer shafts on early petrols, the gearbox speed sensor on petrols and diesels, and the diesel engines’ inlet port shut-off motors. These live under the turbo, so if there are other problems with the turbo it’s sensible to replace the shut-off motor regardless. I wouldn’t buy an early petrol without checking it had the uprated balancer shafts. I’d go for a 320 CDI. I have an E-Class with the same engine. It’s done 220,000 miles and is smooth and trouble-free.”

Buyer beware Q E N G I N E On early CLS350s, check the engine number for balancer shaft problems (see ‘Also worth knowing’) and check for an oil weep from the rubber bung on the back of the rocker cover (cheap to fix). On diesels check the operation of the inlet port shut-off motors that control the manifold swirl flaps (a sixhour job to replace) and check for oil leaks from the engine oil cooler seal. Q G E A R B OX The speed sensor can play up on the seven-speed auto used by petrols and diesels, causing the ’box to hold on to gears. If this occurs, the engine management light should come on. There’s a repair kit for later ’boxes but older ones may need a new valve body.

wheels. A sign of good servicing is that the rainwater drain holes are clear; blockages can let water into the cabin and disrupt the electrics and ECUs.

Also worth knowing At mercedesmedic.com you can find out if the M272 engine of the CLS350 you’re thinking of buying has a dodgy balancer shaft. There’s an explanation of the problem (soft gear teeth prone to wear), a copy of the technical service bulletin and advice on how to check the shaft’s condition. Engine numbers higher than 30 468993 are okay.

How much to spend £275 0 - £ 4 9 95 Early (2005-06) 350s and 320 CDIs, generally around 120,000 miles. £5 0 0 0 - £6 9 9 5 Lots of early cars, also some facelifted 08-plates. Mileages typically 80-100k. £70 0 0 - £ 8 4 9 5 Facelifted 09-plate 320s and 350s with 80k miles, plus the first 350 CDIs around 100k. A few early CLS500s. £ 8 5 0 0 - £9 9 9 5 Lots more 2009-10 350 CDIs with around 80k miles. £10,000 - £11, 495 Lower mileage 350 CDIs from 2010-11. £ 13 , 9 9 5 - £ 1 6 , 5 0 0 Small selection of CLS55 and 63 AMGs.

Q S U S P E N S I O N Put the car on a ramp and check the rear springs, which can break. On cars fitted with optional air suspension, check the condition of the air pump and the system for corrosion. Q E L E C T R I C S Check the wiring for the rear lights where it passes close to the boot hinge. It can get pinched and wear through.

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The CLS is so attractive and 100,000 miles is nothing for a car of this quality

Q I N T E R I O R Generally tough although the driver’s side seat bolster takes a hammering. Q B O DY W O R K Check for parking scrapes and kerbed

One we found M E R C E D E S C L S350 C G I AU T O, 20 0 6/0 6 , 77K M I L E S , £5 49 0 Stunning 20in alloys aside, it’s this car’s full Merc service history that shouts loudest. As with all early CLSs using the M272 3.5-litre petrol engine, check the engine number to avoid balancer shaft gear issues.

a 11 APRIL 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 75

With thanks to: James Marotto (calcotcars.co.uk), Mike McCarthy (starmotorservices.com)

An expert’s view


BUY THEM BEFORE WE DO

V12 BARGE WORTH A GAMBLE

BMW 750iL £6995 he other day Rory White, new cars editor of our sister title What Car?, became the proud owner of a 1993 BMW 730i, a car for which he’d paid a pittance. Apart from the odd spot of rust, some lacquer peel and the dire need of a thorough vacuum, the car impressed us all. However, if you are willing to splash a bit more cash, you could find yourself at the wheel of the top-dog

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E32-generation 7 Series, the 750iL, with its V12 petrol engine. You’d need to be a bit of a BMW geek to spot the differences between a regular 7 Series and a V12 one. There are the bigger kidney grilles and the squared-off exhaust pipes, but apart from that, there’s not much to tell them apart. The best way of finding out whether it’s the V12 car is to start it up, because it should sit at a beautifully smooth idle.

Mercedes-Benz 190E

STURDY EVERGREEN SALOON

£3750

Performance is best described as ‘brisk’ because the 5.0-litre V12 in this car is nothing like the ones you might find in, say, an Italian car with a cavallino rampante on its grille. It’s all about low-down grunt here, with the majority of its 332lb ft being available from 1000rpm. It’ll still do 0-60mph in 7.7sec, though, so has some credibility at the traffic lights. It will certainly be faster than any new car you can buy for the same

Mini Cooper S

SPIRITED RETRO-LOOK FUNSTER

£3499

The Mercedes 190E is a second-hand car you can use all year round. Use it, enjoy it and then treat it to a power wash to get the muck off and it’ll look as good as new. This 1987 example has covered 84,000 miles, comes with a full service history, four new tyres and even air-con.

WILD CARD

Ford Fiesta XR2 rally car £3500

Quick, stylish and desirable, the Mini Cooper S is an entertaining hot hatch, provided you don’t need a spacious boot. This 2006-registered example is from the first BMW-owned generation. It has racked up 69,000 miles and has a full service history. Prices for these could bottom out soon, so now’s the time to buy.

THINKING PERSON’S HATCH

Here’s proof that motorsport needn’t be expensive. It’s a 1984 Fiesta XR2 that’s road legal but has been used for rallying, hillclimbing and track days in the past. It needs some new racing seats and harnesses to be eligible for competition again, but has a tuned motorsport engine, roll cage and adjustable brake bias. For more like this, visit pistonheads.com/classifieds/used-cars

76 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 11 APRIL 2018

money, but the question will be whether or not buying one is a good idea. A luxury car that cost £54,000 in 1988 (nearly £140,000 in today’s money) will always have horrendous repair costs if anything serious goes wrong. But considering the careful ownership of the example we found for sale online and the stacks of service history, you might be all right with this one. And, best of all, there’s not a hint of rust on it.

Seat Leon 1.2 SE Technology £8999 The third-generation Seat Leon is something of a bargain considering the equivalent Volkswagen Golf is more expensive and the Ford Focus is slower and not as well equipped. This 2014 example is in SE Technology trim, so comes with LED headlights, sat-nav and DAB radio. An unsung hero of the used car market.


USED CARS AU C T I O N WAT C H

CLASH OF THE CLASSIFIEDS U S E D C A R D E S K D O E S B AT T L E BRIEF

Can you find the best tow car on sale within a budget of five grand?

ROVER 3500S V8 The Rover 2000 was the first car to win the European Car of the Year award in 1964 and this later 1972 3500S is a continuation of that winning formula. The P6 (as it was known internally) was made very intelligently, with all the outer body panels being completely unstressed. The rear axle is a de Dion tube set-up that keeps the rear wheels parallel to each other at all times, and the rear brakes are inboard to reduce unsprung weight. This car sold for £5088 at auction. That’s a little below the price of a P6 in top nick, but it’s still good for a usable example.

Range Rover Sport TDV6 £4150 If you need to tow, and you want to do it in style, there’s only one option: a Range Rover. This Sport is rather leggy, but the motorway miles are backed up with a comprehensive history. Besides, what’s to fear from a high-mileage Land Rover? Actually, don’t answer that. It’s a TDV6 HSE in black over black – a cracking spec, making it powerful, comfortable and beautifully appointed. It’ll tow up to 3500kg and is fitted with a detachable hitch. It’s the perfect £5000 tow car. ALEX ROBBINS

Subaru Outback 3.0 Rn £4296

GET IT WHILE YOU CAN Mercedes-Benz CLS350d AMG Line Shooting Brake Price new £52,145. Price now £38,900 The CLS has just been replaced, but the svelte Shooting Brake estate hasn’t. It isn’t the most commodious of load-haulers, but it’s certainly one of the coolest. This nearly new example, spotted in the classifieds on Pistonheads, is the best one to go for thanks to its flexible yet efficient V6 diesel engine, plenty of kit and, because it has the Premium Plus Pack, a powerful stereo. The asking price is £13,245 less than the list price, so it will be snapped up quickly.

The thought of towing anything fills me with infinite boredom, especially if it’s a caravan, but if you really must, then the best way to do it on so stifling a budget is in this Subaru Outback. Surely, its combination of precise build quality, dependable mechanicals, intelligent design and civilised driving experience makes this the only car we should consider. And don’t forget the wonderful 3.0-litre flat six engine – worth the purchase price alone. It’ll tow 2000kg and, unlike Alex’s dreadful Range Rover, it won’t break down or topple over… MARK PEARSON VERDICT

For its superior maximum towing weight, the ease of use of the factory-fitted tow bar and its big mirrors, it’s the Range Rover Sport. MAX ADAMS 11 APRIL 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 77


A L FA R O M E O Giulia 4dr saloon AAAAB Quadrifoglio 190 4.5 9.2 3.2 10.3 2.57 503 443 38.7 34/49 Stelvio 5dr SUV AAABC 2.2D 210 Milano 134 6.8 20.6 7.0 7.3 3.01 207 347 41.3 38/50 4C 2dr coupé/convertible AAACC Spider 160 5.1 12.4 4.0 5.8 2.97 237 258 29.6 32/44

1580 29.3.17 1659

3.1.18

940

27.1.16

ALPINA B3 Biturbo 4dr saloon AAAAB B3 Biturbo 155 4.7 10.3 3.8 6.8 2.9 404 443 41.5

27/35

1610 29.8.13

ARIEL Atom 0dr open AAAAB V8 170 3.0 5.7 1.9 3.7 2.55 475 268 16.4 21/37 Nomad 0dr open AAAAA Nomad 125 4.5 12.7 3.9 7.7 3.10 235 221 26.7 —/—

650

10.8.11

735

24.6.15

ASTON MARTIN V8 Vantage 2dr coupé AAAAC GT8 190 4.6 10.4 3.6 6.1 2.6 440 361 25.3 19/29 DB11 2dr coupé AAAAB Launch Edition 200 4.0 8.4 3.0 10.1 2.6 600 516 46.2 24/34 Rapide 4dr saloon AAAAC Rapide S 190 5.3 11.3 4.3 8.3 3.03 550 457 33.6 19/23

1530 12.10.16 1910

21.9.16

1990 20.3.13

AU D I A1 3dr hatch AAAAC 1.4 TFSI Sport 126 8.4 22.4 8.9 12.8 2.2 S1 155 5.9 14.4 5.2 5.4 2.6 A3 3dr/5dr hatch AAAAC 2.0 TDI Sport 134 8.9 25.9 11.4 10.8 2.7 S’back e-tron 138 7.9 20.9 6.6 8.5 3.0 RS3 Saloon 155 4.0 9.9 3.5 9.0 2.7 A4 4dr saloon/5dr estate AAAAC 2.0 TDI S line 147 8.4 22.2 7.3 11.2 3.1 RS4 Avant 155 4.0 9.6 3.5 11.0 3.0 A5 2dr coupé/convertible AAABC S5 155 4.9 11.7 4.4 9.7 3.0 A5 Sportback 4dr saloon AAABC 2.0 TFSI S line 155 5.7 15.1 5.3 17.2 2.5 A6 4dr saloon/5dr estate AAAAC 3.0 TDI SE 155 7.2 20.3 6.4 3.9 2.9 RS6 Avant 155 3.7 8.7 3.1 12.8 2.4 A7 Sportback 4dr saloon AAAAC 3.0 V6 TDI 155 6.7 18.7 6.5 *4.0 2.8 TT 2dr coupé/convertible AAAAC 2.0 TFSI S-line 155 6.6 14.5 5.0 6.5 2.5 RS 155 3.6 8.4 3.0 7.8 2.7 Q2 5dr SUV AAABC 1.4 TFSI Sport 132 8.1 23.9 8.2 9.8 2.7 Q3 5dr SUV AAABC 2.0 TDI SE 132 8.3 25.5 8.1 *11.5 2.7 RS 155 5.0 12.6 4.5 8.3 2.8 Q5 5dr SUV AAAAC 2.0 TDI S line 135 8.3 26.4 8.5 14.7 3.1 SQ5 quattro 155 5.5 13.7 5.0 11.1 2.6 Q7 5dr SUV AAAAC 3.0 TDI S line 145 6.2 17.6 6.2 *3.8 — SQ7 4.0 TDI 155 5.1 12.6 4.4 7.0 2.9 R8 2dr coupé AAAAC V10 Plus 205 3.1 6.7 2.6 5.7 2.8

1585 18.9.13 1585 9.7.14

42.2 40/52

1635 31.5.17

42.1

33/45

1840

2.11.11

50.2 40/54

1880

8.11.17

50.2 40/49

1795

11.11.15

1560

35.1

43/49

1625 14.10.15

41.2

37/49

1825

1895 27.8.14 2265 13.11.13 2350 13.5.15

1940 4.11.15 1790 14.2.18

Seven 2dr roadster AAAAC 160 100 8.4 — 8.7 7.6 4.8 80 79 16.7 620S 145 3.8 9.2 3.2 5.7 2.7 310 219 21.2

349 369 40.5 26/33

1615

241 369 42.9 31/40

1940

227 273 30.1 394 354 35.1

1305 26.11.14 1440 7.12.16

29/35 27/37

148 184 29.4 45/56

1265

8.3.17

9.2.11

9.11.16

175 280 35.8 33/46 306 310 32.4 32.4

1710 1655

16.11.11 1.1.14

187 295 42.0 37/43 349 369 45.2 26/32

1770 15.3.17 1870 21.6.17

268 443 47.6 32/36 429 664 47.6 24/38

2245 12.8.15 2330 26.10.16

602 413 26.8 15/23

1555 30.12.15

Continental GT 2dr coupé/convertible AAAAC GTC V8 187 4.5 10.8 3.9 *2.7 2.8 500 487 GT 198 4.6 10.9 4.2 *2.4 2.5 567 516 Flying Spur 4dr saloon AAABC W12 200 4.5 10.4 3.6 8.4 3.0 616 590 Mulsanne 4dr saloon AAAAC 6.75 V8 184 5.7 13.7 4.8 *2.8 2.6 505 752 Bentayga 5dr SUV AAAAA W12 187 4.9 11.6 4.4 8.7 3.0 600 664 Diesel 168 5.2 12.6 4.6 7.6 2.9 429 664

27.4 18/27 34.9 7/15

2470 2375

4.4.12 1.6.11

44.5 18/26

2475

7.8.13

44.8 18/21

2745

21.9.11

48.2 20/25 48.7 29/39

2440 18.5.16 2499 5.4.17

BMW 1 Series 3dr/5dr hatch AAABC 116d ED Plus 124 10.2 30.0 10.0 17.3 — 114 199 37.7 2 Series 3dr coupé/convertible AAAAB 220d SE 143 7.8 20.9 7.3 8.8 2.9 181 280 39.6 220d C’vble 140 8.5 24.7 8.4 9.0 2.1 187 295 34.5 M235i 155 6.3 14.7 5.7 5.4 2.7 322 332 28.1 M2 155 4.4 10.3 3.6 6.2 2.6 365 343 33.7 2 Series Active Tourer 5dr MPV AAAAC 218d Luxury 129 8.9 26.5 8.7 12.1 3.0 148 243 40.4 3 Series 4dr saloon/5dr estate/5dr hatch AAAAB

54/60

1395 27.5.15

46/62 50/53 26/35 31/37

1450 19.3.14 1610 1.4.15 1530 23.4.14 1595 15.6.16

42/56

1450 24.12.14

34.0 26/31

1995

2.3.11

C AT E R H A M 39/45 25/29

490 20.11.13 610 9.3.16

CHEVROLET Camaro 2dr coupé AAAAC 6.2 V8 155 5.6 12.4 4.5 12.2 2.7 426 419 43.3 23/29 Corvette 2dr coupé AAAAC Stingray 181 4.4 9.4 3.3 11.7 2.3 460 465 48.4 22/33

TEST DATE

Weight (kg)

Mpg test/touring

Mph/1000rpm

Torque (lb ft)

Power (bhp)

Braking 60-0mph

50-70mph

30-70mph

0-100mph

i10 5dr hatch AAABC 1.0 SE 96 14.7 — 16.2 19.9 i20 5dr hatch AAAAC 1.4 SE 114 12.2 42.4 12.1 17.3 i30 5dr hatch/estate AAABC i30 N 155 6.4 14.8 5.6 6.1 1.4 Premium SE 129 9.5 28.9 9.7 10.9 i40 5dr estate AAABC 1.7 CRDi 118 12.2 41.4 12.5 12.3 Santa Fe 5dr SUV AAAAC 2.2 CRDi 118 9.0 27.6 9.2 *5.5

27

109 151

27.5 35/39

187 36.1

47/62

47/62

148 273 34.7 44/52

1175 20.6.12 1539 8.10.14

1050 28.12.16 1159

7.3.18

1225

16.7.14

1430 27.11.13

DACIA Sandero 5dr hatch AAACC 1.2 75 Access 97 15.3 — 17.6 23.0 3.0 74

79

20.3 32/38

941

27.2.13

DS 3 5dr hatch AAABC BlueHDi 120 118 9.9 32.2 9.4 11.1 3.1 118 4 Crossback 5dr hatch AAACC BlueHDi 120 117 12.0 48.8 12.3 18.0 2.9 118 5 5dr hatch AAABC 2.0 HDi 160 134 9.1 26.5 8.7 11.0 2.9 161

210 36.4 59/67

1150 23.3.16

221 36.7 49/50

1290

251 40.1

1660 18.4.12

42/55

6.1.16

FERRARI

1343 28.1.15 1599 4.5.16

258 39.5 44/46

1725 26.8.15

236 26.7 40/45

1785

6.8.14

258 38

1597

14.1.15

53/56

391 35.1

19/25

1720 24.2.16

151

39/48

1384

251 31.6

34/39

1707 13.3.13

332 37

36/39

1949 27.7.16

28

3.9.14

2.7 180 177 26.6 39/49

1357

2.8 316 295 25.4 29/43

1380 25.10.17

2.5 148 258 32.4 36/45

1806 24.10.12

2.9 174

221 na

221 34.4 56/57

118

51/72** 1872

2.7 573 476 35.8 25/32

1324

19.4.17

12.7.17 16.9.15

1725 5.10.16

2.9 65

70

20.0 44/51

925

29.1.14

3.0 99

99

21.8

1060

7.1.14

43/54

3.1 271 260 27.4 31/43 2.7 138 178 28.1 39/49

1478 27.12.17 1423 13.9.17

2.9 114

1555

7.9.11

1940

19.9.12

192 29.4 44/51

2.7 194 311

37.5 36/43

INFINITI 1436 17.2.16 1750

5.2.14

1896 25.2.15

JAG UAR F-Type 2dr convertible/3dr coupé AAAAB V8 S Convertible 186 4.0 9.4 3.4 8.0 2.8 488 460 V6 S Coupé 171 4.9 12.1 4.2 12.7 2.7 375 339 2.0 Coupé R-Dy 155 5.8 14.7 5.1 9.5 2.8 296 295 XF 4dr saloon AAAAB R-Sport 2.0 136 9.4 26.1 9.0 16.1 2.9 178 317 XE 4dr saloon AAAAB R-Sport 2.0 147 7.6 19.0 6.9 13.3 2.7 197 206 XJ 4dr saloon AAAAC 3.0d LWB 155 6.3 16.5 6.6 *3.6 2.7 271 443 E-Pace 5dr SUV AAABC D180 AWD SE 127 9.9 30.9 10.5 14 3.6 178 317 F-Pace 5dr SUV AAAAC 2.0d AWD 129 9.2 30.9 9.7 7.4 — 178 317

46.8 19/29 36.2 24/33 33.2 31/44

1655 12.6.13 1594 11.6.14 1640 22.11.17

44.1

1595 2.12.15

47/56

33.8 30/49

1530

1.7.15

43.5 28/36

1960

9.6.10

45.8 36/49

1843

11.4.18

41.3

1775

11.5.16

37/40

Renegade 5dr 4x4 AAABC 2.0 M’jet 4x4 L’d 113 10.8 37.6 11.2 10.0 3.5 138 258 34.0 41/53 Cherokee 5dr 4x4 AABCC 2.0 140 4x4 Ltd 117 12.3 43.4 13.0 13.8 2.7 138 258 34.7 39/43

1502 28.10.15 1846 24.6.14

KIA Carens 5dr MPV AAABC 1.7 CRDi 2 112 12.9 51.2 13.9 Rio 5dr hatch AAABC 1.0 T-GDI 3 Eco 115 10.0 37.0 10.5 Niro 5dr SUV AAABC 1.6 GDI DCT 2 101 9.7 30.0 9.5 Sportage 5dr SUV AAABC 1.7 CRDi ISG 2 109 12.1 46.4 13.1 Sorento 5dr 4x4 AAABC 2.2 CRDi KX-4 128 9.3 28.6 9.4

15.2 2.8 114

192 31.7

47/56

1581 29.5.13

12.3 3.2 99

127 27.1

40/50

1228

12.8 3.5 139 108/125 31.9 49/50 16.8 3.3 114 *5.7 —

1.3.17

1500 31.8.16

207 34.4 50/51

1500

2.3.16

197 325 35.2 35/39

1953

8.4.15

LAMBORGHINI Huracán 2dr coupé AAAAB Performante 201 2.9 5.9 2.0 4.9 3.0 630 442 24.5 17/22

1382 11.10.17

L AN D ROVE R

488 GTB 2dr coupé AAAAA 488 GTB 205 3.0 5.9 2.0 3.7 2.43 661 561 28.9 —/— F12 2dr coupé AAAAB F12 Berlinetta 211 3.0 6.5 2.3 5.4 2.2 731 509 29.7 13/18

1525 25.5.16 1630

6.11.13

F I AT Panda 5dr hatch AAAAB 1.2 Easy 102 14.6 — 15.3 19.9 3.0 68 4x4 Twinair 103 14.6 — 15.8 16.0 3.0 84 500 3dr hatch AAAAC Abarth 595 130 7.5 20.1 6.4 7.0 2.8 158 500 Twinair 108 11.7 — 13 15.3 3.3 84 Tipo 5dr hatch AABCC 1.6 M’jet Lounge 124 9.6 31.6 9.8 8.7 2.9 118 124 Spider 2dr roadster AAABC Lusso Plus 134 7.3 20.9 7.1 7.2 2.8 138 Abarth 124 Spider 2dr roadster AAAAC 124 Spider 144 6.8 18.6 6.5 6.5 2.8 168

199 33.1 59/63 325 27.3 28/37

JEEP

109 151

99

2.1.13 9.8.17

Q30 5dr hatch AAABC 1.6t Premium 124 9.4 26.4 9.1 15.5 2.85 120 148 31.6 35/39 Q50 4dr saloon AABCC 2.2 Premium 143 8.7 25.0 8.7 5.1* 3.0 168 295 42.5 49/59 Q70 4dr saloon AABCC 2.2 Pre’m Tech 137 9.6 28.6 9.6 15.8 3.2 168 295 40.8 39/45

CITROEN C3 5dr hatch AAABC P’tech 110 Flair 117 9.6 36.6 9.4 10.5 2.6 C3 Aircross 5dr hatch AAABC P’tech 110 Flair 115 11.5 36.4 10.7 12.3 3.5 C4 Cactus 5dr hatch AAACC 1.6 BlueHDi 100 114 11.8 41.2 11.7 7.2 2.9 C4 Grand Picasso 5dr MPV AAAAC 2.0 BlueHDi 130 10.1 30.1 9.6 12.5 2.9

1345 1147

HYU N DAI

2275 11.6.08

B U G AT T I 5.9 2.6 1183 1106 40.6 12/18

Civic 5dr hatch AAAAC 1.5 i-VTEC Turbo 126 7.8 19.3 7.0 8.7 Civic Type R 5dr hatch AAAAB 2.0 Type R GT 169 5.7 12.5 4.4 6.1 CR-V 5dr SUV AAABC 2.2 i-DTEC EX 118 9.7 31.3 9.9 5.9 Clarity FCV AAAAC Clarity FCV 104 9.0 29.2 8.3 *5.3 HR-V 5dr SUV AAABC 1.6 i-DTEC SE 119 10.5 34.9 10.4 11.2 NSX 2dr coupé AAAAB NSX 191 3.3 7.3 2.6 4.3

17.1.18

43.7 34/45

187 295 37.1 45/50 444 443 38.4 24/37

1535

17.9.14

40.5 28/34 42.3 21/26

Veyron 2dr coupé AAAAB Super Sport 268 2.6 5.0 1.7

1805 19.10.11 2010 3.7.13

294wh/m 1385 21.2.18

33.3 50/40

1355 26.9.12 1540 31.12.14 1515 6.9.17

249 273 42.2 30/41

TEST DATE

28.2 28/37 34.0 29/36

148 236 30 48/59 201 258 30.7 45/49 394 354 33.7 29/35

201 295 39.9 34/46 552 516 40.0 20/28

Weight (kg)

1535 22.2.12 1735 21.11.12 1660 4.10.17

147 23.6 35/41 125 29.3 42/52

H O N DA

36.2 41/57 45.2 43/54 40.8 40/47

1165 10.11.10 1390 28.5.14

11.1.17

Mpg test/touring

Mph/1000rpm

Torque (lb ft)

Power (bhp)

Braking 60-0mph

50-70mph

30-70mph

0-100mph

0-60mph

Top speed

320d Sport 146 7.7 20.9 7.6 9.7 2.6 181 280 330d Touring 155 5.5 14.2 5.1 8.8 2.6 255 413 330e M Sport 140 6.3 15.7 5.7 6.9 2.9 249 310 4 Series 2dr coupé AAAAC 435i M Sport 155 5.5 13.2 5.2 6.3 2.7 302 295 M4 155 4.1 8.8 3.2 6.1 2.4 425 406 New 5 Series 4dr saloon/5dr estate AAAAB 520d M Sport 146 7.4 21.3 7.4 14.3 2.7 188 295 6 Series 2dr coupé/convertible AAAAC 640d M Sport 155 5.3 13.1 4.6 *2.7 2.6 309 464 6 Series GT 5dr hatch AAABC 630d xDrv M Spt 155 5.9 15.7 5.4 7.6 2.8 261 457 7 Series 4dr saloon AAAAC 730Ld 153 6.4 17.1 6.0 8.2 3.1 261 457 i3 5dr hatch AAAAC 1.3S Range Ext 99 7.7 — 6.6 *4.0 3.0 181 199 i8 2dr coupé AAAAB i8 155 4.5 10.6 3.7 3.3 2.8 357 420 X1 5dr SUV AAAAC xDrive20d xLine 136 8.2 24.2 8.0 11.8 2.8 187 295 X3 5dr SUV AAAAC xDrive20d M Spt 132 8.3 26.6 8.6 17.5 3.3 188 295 X4 5dr SUV AAABC xDrive30d 145 5.9 16.9 5.8 11.1 2.6 255 416 X5 5dr SUV AAAAC xDrive M50d 155 5.7 15.3 5.2 9.5 2.9 376 546 M 155 4.2 9.8 3.5 10.2 2.8 567 553 X6 5dr SUV AAAAC xDrive35d 147 7.3 21.2 7.1 *4.1 2.6 282 428

120 148 30.2 34/43 228 273 25.6 30/39

BENTLEY

78 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 11 APRIL 2018

FORD B-Max 5dr MPV AAAAB 1.0T Ecoboost 117 11.6 39.0 11.1 11.0 2.8 118 Fiesta 3/5dr hatch AAAAC 1.0T Ecoboost 122 9.6 28.1 9.6 13.2 3.2 123 Focus 5dr hatch AAAAC 1.5 TDCi Zetec 121 10.9 36.3 10.9 10.3 3.35 118 RS 165 5.3 13.9 5.3 6.9 3.5 345 S-Max 5dr MPV AAAAC 2.0 TDCi T’ium 123 10.5 32.0 10.4 13.9 2.5 148 Grand Tourneo Connect 5dr MPV AAAAC 1.6 TDCi T’ium 103 13.2 — 13.9 19.1 2.9 114 Mondeo 4dr saloon/5dr/estate AAAAC 2.0 TDCi 130 10.0 28.8 9.4 12.7 3.1 148 Mustang 2dr coupé AAAAC 5.0 V8 GT F’back 155 5.2 11.6 4.2 9.4 2.7 410 Ecosport 5dr SUV AABCC 1.5 TDCi 99 14.3 — 15.2 14.4 2.7 89 Kuga 5dr SUV AAAAC 2.0 TDCi 122 10.9 44.2 11.8 7.4 2.6 161 Edge 5dr SUV AAABC 2.0 TDCi 131 9.7 27.6 9.2 5.6* 2.6 207

» 50 -70 M PH Recorded in top gear (*kickdown with an automatic) and demonstrates flexibility » FU E L ECO N O MY Prior to 7.1.15, figures are touring (recorded over a set road route) and test average. From 7.1.15 on, figures are average and extra-urban, to the What Car?/True MPG standard. **denotes mpkg (miles per kilogram) for hydrogen-powered fuel cell vehicles » B R AKI N G 60 - 0 M PH Recorded on a high-grip surface at a test track » M PH/1000 R PM Figure is the speed achieved in top gear Make and model

TEST DATE

Weight (kg)

Mpg test/touring

Mph/1000rpm

Torque (lb ft)

Power (bhp)

Braking 60-0mph

50-70mph

30-70mph

0-100mph

0-60mph

Top speed

Make and model

No one produces as thorough a judgement on a new car as Autocar. As well as acceleration, braking, fuel economy and noise tests, we carry out benchmark limit-handling tests, setting lap times if appropriate. But we don’t just drive at the track, essential as it is for finding the limits of performance; we also drive on a wide range of roads. Where we have tested more than one model in a range, the rating is for the range overall; where a model within the range meets our coveted five-star standard, it is highlighted in yellow. » 30 -70 M PH Indicates overtaking ability through the gears

0-60mph

Facts, figures, from the best road tests

Top speed

Make and model

ROAD TEST RESULTS

75 22.2 39/49 107 20.8 37/44

1020 25.4.12 1050 17.4.13

170 23.9 34/39 107 22.9 35/39

1035 26.2.14 1070 24.11.10

236 35.0 49/62

1295

177 24.9 34/38

1050 28.9.16

184 25.2 35/45

1060 22.3.17

2.11.16

Discovery Sport 5dr SUV AAAAB TD6 HSE Luxury 130 8.7 27.7 8.7 8.9 3.4 254 Range Rover 5dr SUV AAAAB 4.4 SDV8 135 7.0 19.0 6.7 *3.8 2.9 334 Range Rover Evoque 5dr SUV AAAAC 2.2 DS4 121 8.4 30.8 9.5 *5.7 3.1 187 Range Rover Velar 5dr SUV AAABC D240 HSE 135 9.3 27.4 9.0 15.7 3.8 237 Range Rover Sport 5dr SUV AAAAB 3.0 TDV6 130 7.8 22.5 7.5 12.2 3.1 255 SVR 162 4.4 10.3 3.8 12.6 2.6 542

443 37.1

26/34

2230 12.4.17

516 41.8

25/35

2625 12.12.12

310 37.3 30/36

1815

369 41.8

33/48

2089 30.8.17

13.7.11

442 43.1 502 41.8

33/42 22/19

2115 2.10.13 2335 15.4.15

LEXUS LC 2dr coupé AAAAC LC500 Sport+ 168 5.2 11.3 4.2 12.0 3.1 471 398 60.6 27/39 GS 4dr saloon AAABC GS250 144 9.2 26.0 9.0 16.2 2.9 207 187 34.4 26/32

1970 18.10.17 1695

1.8.12


920

29.6.16

1430 30.3.11 1176

3.4.13

M A S E R AT I Ghibli 4dr saloon AAABC Diesel 155 6.5 17.2 6.0 5.1 2.7 271 443 43.3 31/40 Levante 5dr SUV AAACC Diesel 143 6.8 19.9 6.9 4.3 3.4 271 443 46 26/42

1835 12.3.14 2205 30.11.16

MAZDA 2 5dr hatch AAAAC 1.5 Sky’v-G SE 114 10.4 38.0 7.0 20.2 3 5dr hatch AAAAC 2.2 SE-L 130 9.0 26.6 9.1 9.9 6 4dr saloon/5dr estate AAAAC 2.2 Sport Nav 139 7.9 21.2 7.1 7.9 MX-5 2dr roadster AAAAB 1.5 SE-L Nav 127 8.4 24.8 7.9 14.7 CX-3 5dr SUV AAABC 1.5D SE-L Nav 110 10.3 34.7 10.3 10.3 CX-5 5dr SUV AAAAC 2.2D Sport Nav 127 9.4 26.3 9.1 10.4

3.1 89

109 27.9 51/55

2.7 173 309 35 3.3 129 111

44/56

24.5 46/49

104 199 34.8 59/60

3.0 148 280 37.0 43/53

McLAREN 570S 2dr coupé AAAAA 3.8 V8 204 3.1 6.4 2.2 10.2 2.6 562 443 36.5 23/37 720S 2dr coupé AAAAA 4.0 V8 212 2.9 5.6 2.0 7.7 2.4 710 568 35.4 19/24 P1 2dr coupé AAAAA P1 217 2.8 5.2 2.2 6.0 2.3 903 664 36.0 19.6/—

MERCEDES-AMG C63 4dr saloon AAAAB C63 155 4.4 9.7 3.4 C63 S C’vertible 155 4.6 10.2 3.4 GT 2dr coupé AAAAC S 193 3.6 7.8 2.8 R 198 3.6 7.3 2.7 SLC 2dr convertible AAABC SLC43 155 5.5 12.3 4.2

7.5 2.7 469 479 38.1 19/25 7.1 2.7 503 516 35.6 21/27 5.5 2.5 503 479 34.7 20/29 4.6 2.4 577 516 30.7 19/23 12.7 3.0 362 384 40.4 27/33

MERCEDES-BENZ

1440 30.3.16

1150 25.12.13 1395 20.7.16

MINI 189 221 26.4 35/54 207 221 26.5 31/47

1235 2.4.14 1235 6.12.17

148 243 34.9 51/52

1320 25.11.15

134 162 31.0

1280

46/53

148 243 36.2 42/48 221 284 30.1 42/50

6.4.16

1480 22.2.17 1735 26.7.17

MITSUBISHI 2.8 148 221 29.6 49/57

1490

3.0 161

1455 14.3.18

184 30.9 34/45

3.07 147 265 34.7 38/45 3.0 200 245 — 44/38

21.7.10

1675 27.3.13 1810 16.4.14

MORGAN Plus 8 2dr roadster AAACC 4.8 V8 — 4.9 11.1 4.0 8.3 3.2 390 370 36.0 24/32 3 Wheeler 2dr roadster AAAAA 3 Wheeler 115 8.0 29.9 7.7 5.1 3.56 80 103 21.3 30/-

1230 22.8.12 520

6.6.12

NISSAN Micra 5dr hatch AAAAC 0.9 N-Connecta 109 12.1 44.7 11.7 15.6 2.8 89

103 24.3 45/57

1068 26.4.17

TEST DATE

Weight (kg)

Mpg test/touring

Mph/1000rpm

Torque (lb ft)

Power (bhp)

Braking 60-0mph

50-70mph

30-70mph

0-100mph

0-60mph

Top speed

Make and model

1230 3.11.10 1295 22.5.13

TEST DATE

12.7 3.0 115 117 19.5 36/46 7.2 2.5 197 184 23.8 31/39

Weight (kg)

1307 12.11.14

Torque (lb ft)

13.1 2.9 108 192 35.7 50/57

Power (bhp)

Mpg test/touring

Braking 60-0mph

1036 9.10.13

S S A N GYO N G

7.3 2.8 107 207 8.76

320Wh/m 1545 27.4.11

12.9 2.9 109 192 35.0 49/56

1365 19.2.14

11.2 3.0 128 236 32.8 42/48

1550 13.8.14

5.3 2.7 562 470 28.0 22/31

1752 16.11.16

M600 2dr coupé AAAAB M600 225 3.5 6.8 2.5 4.7 2.45 650 604 29.9 18/25

1305 14.10.09

Tivoli XLV AAACC ELX auto 107 12.0 44.5 12.6 7.9 3.1 113

221 33.2 45/58

XV 5dr SUV AAACC 2.0i SE L’tronic 120 10.1 27.7 9.0 Levorg 5dr estate AAACC GT 1.6i L’tronic 130 8.4 24.6 7.9 Forester 5dr SUV AAACC 2.0d XC 118 9.9 36.5 10.5 WRX 4dr saloon AAACC STi Type UK 159 5.4 13.3 5.1

27.0 3.4 154 145 41.5

31/39

1451 28.2.18

21.0 2.6 168 184 31.9

34/36

1537

13.1.16

11.0 2.9 145 258 33.0 41/49

1540

5.6.13

9.4 2.8 296 300 27.6 23/31

1534 25.6.14

SUZUKI Swift 5dr hatch AAABC 1.0 SZ5 121 10.5 33.0 10.3 11.8 Celerio 5dr hatch AAABC 1.0 SZ4 96 12.9 — 14.3 25.0 Baleno 5dr hatch AAABC 1.0T B’jet SZ5 124 9.8 29.5 9.7 11.2 SX4 S-Cross 5dr SUV AAABC 1.6 DDiS SZ4 111 10.0 32.6 10.1 8.9 Vitara 5dr SUV AAABC 1.6 SZ5 112 9.5 29.8 9.5 15.5

2.9 110

125 26.3 45/56

3.0 67

66

2.9 110

125 26.3 50/55

950

2.57 118

236 35.1

57/67

1290 30.10.13

115

24.3 49/47

1075 29.4.15

22.4 54/57

1080 1160

18.7.12 11.2.15

13.9 3.0 114

199 38.5 48/59

1395

15.1.14

5.8 2.57 161

255 32.3 32/46

11.8 3.2 114

199 32.7 49/59

13.2 3.2 118

221 34.6 42/53

Model S 4dr saloon AAAAB P90D 155 5.2 9.1 3.0 1.9 2.9 525 713 8.5 19.6.13 Model X 5dr SUV AAAAC 90D 155 4.7 13.1 2.8 2.5 2.7 416 487 8.5 1300 18.1.17

11.5 2.7 148 273 37.6 51/60

118

835 25.3.15 3.8.16

TESLA 420Wh/m 2200 20.4.16 611Wh/m 2508 15.2.17

T OYO TA

1490

1340

1.11.17 Yaris 3dr hatchback AAABC GRMN 143 6.4 15.4 5.4 GT86 2dr coupé AAAAA 2.0 manual 140 7.4 18.8 6.8 23.9.15 Prius 5dr hatch AAAAC Business E’tion 112 11.1 32.0 10.7 8.6.16 Mirai 4dr saloon AAAAC 111 10.1 36.5 10.2 10.8.16 Mirai C-HR 5dr SUV AAAAC 19.8.15 Excel 1.8 Hybrid 106 11.6 43.5 11.9

1335 1430

2.4 493 339 24.2 20/28

1495

2.9 414 369 36.4 27/31

1535 20.1.16

9.8 2.9 209 184 27.7 27/39

1135 28.3.18

10.6 2.6 197 151

23.5 30/45

1235

*6.4 3.1 121

1400 16.3.16

1740 22.10.14

53/63

4.7.12

*6.5 3.3 152 247 22.5 44/62** 1400 27.4.16 *7.3 2.7 121

49/60

1420

21.8

4.1.17

VA U X H A L L

Adam 3dr hatch AAACC 1.2 Jam Ecoflex 103 14.3 — 15.3 20.8 2.8 68 85 Viva 5dr hatch AAABC 106 13.0 — 14.1 19.0 — 74 70 3.0 416 627 50.7 32/43 2050 1.2.17 1.0 SE A/C Corsa 3/5dr hatch AAABC 2.4 394 406 35.7 22/31 2000 4.6.14 1.4T SRi VX-Line 115 11.7 45.1 12.1 15.3 2.9 99 148 VXR 143 7.2 18.3 6.4 7.8 2.4 202 181 RADICAL Crossland X 5dr SUV AAACC SR3 SL 2dr roadster AAAAC 1.2T 130 Elite 128 9.8 31.4 10.3 8.9 2.9 128 170 SR3 SL 161 3.4 8.4 3.7 4.8 2.7 245 265 24.9 14/765 30.11.11 Astra 5dr hatch/estate AAAAC 1.6 CDTi 136 SRi 127 8.8 25.7 8.8 8.6 2.6 134 236 R E N A U LT ST CDTi B’tbo SRi137 8.4 22.2 7.7 8.1 2.6 158 258 Twingo 5dr hatch AAABC Insignia Grand Sport 5dr hatch AAAAC Dynamique 94 17.6 — 19.1 29.4 2.9 69 67 20.8 42/52 865 29.10.14 2.0D SRi VX-Line140 8.7 23.8 7.9 8.9 2.7 168 295 Zoe 5dr hatch AAABC Zafira Tourer 5dr MPV AAABC Dynamique 84 12.3 — 13.9 9.1 2.9 87 162 7.8 250Wh/m 1468 31.7.13 2.0 CDTi 165 129 10.4 36.8 10.2 14.3 3.2 163 258 Clio 5dr hatch AAAAC Mokka 5dr SUV AAABC 0.9 TCE 113 13.4 — 13.9 19.1 2.8 89 100 23.8 38/47 1009 6.3.13 1.4T 118 10.0 30.6 9.4 13.7 3.0 138 148 RS 200 Turbo 143 7.4 20.9 6.9 9.1 2.8 197 177 20.8 32/37 1204 23.10.13 VXR8 4dr saloon AAAAC GTS-R 155 4.8 9.6 3.3 6.6 3.1 587 546 Mégane 3dr hatch AAAAB 26/33 1297 5.11.14 275 Trophy-R 158 6.4 14.0 5.0 6.4 3.1 271 266 27 V O L K S WA G E N New Mégane 5dr hatch AAACC 1.5 dCi Dyn. S Nav 116 11.1 35.2 11.1 13.2 2.8 108 192 33.9 47.2 1387 17.8.16 Up 3/5dr hatch AAAAC 1.0 High Up 106 13.8 — 14.7 18.6 2.8 74 70 Grand Scenic 5dr MPV AAABC dCi 130 Dyn. S Nav 118 11.4 35.8 11.3 10.2 3.4 129 236 32.1 47/61 1601 25.1.17 GTI 1.0 TSI 115 122 8.5 25.7 7.8 7.6 2.8 114 147 Polo 5dr hatch AAAAB Kad jar 5dr SUV AAAAC dCi 115 Dyn. S Nav 113 14.5 — 14.6 17.2 2.3 108 192 35.0 52/69 1380 21.10.15 1.0 TSI 95 SE 116 10.7 34.4 11.1 12.1 2.8 94 129 Koleos 5dr SUV AAACC Golf 3/5dr hatch AAAAB dCi 175 4WD Sig. 126 9.8 31.3 10.1 14.3 2.9 175 280 — 34/38 1747 20.8.17 GTI Perf. DSG 155 6.5 16.4 5.9 8.9 2.8 227 258 2.0 TDI 134 9.6 27.6 8.6 11.7 2.9 148 236 R O L L S - R OYC E GTE 138 7.7 18.2 6.1 7.7 2.5 201 258 Phantom 4dr saloon AAAAA 1.5 TSI R-line 134 8.8 22.7 8.1 9.9 2.1 148 184 Phantom 155 5.5 11.8 4.4 *2.5 2.8 563 664 51.2 8/28 2560 4.4.18 T-Roc 5dr SUV AAAAB Ghost 4dr saloon AAAAC 2.0 TSI SEL 4Mn 134 6.7 20.2 6.5 13.3 3.2 187 236 Ghost 155 4.9 10.6 3.9 *2.3 2.6 563 575 46.0 18/23 2450 7.7.10 Arteon 5dr hatch AAABC Wraith 2dr coupé AAAAB 2.0 BITDI 240 152 6.5 17.7 6.2 8.9 3.3 237 369 Wraith 155 4.6 10.0 4.5 *2.1 2.9 624 590 45.9 15/27 2435 21.5.14 Passat 4dr saloon/5dr estate AAAAC 2.0 TDI 190 GT 144 8.7 23.6 8.1 13.1 3.2 187 295 Dawn 2dr convertible AAAAC Dawn 155 5.2 11.6 4.2 *2.4 2.9 563 575 47.7 19/25 2560 1.6.16 GTE 140 7.6 19.0 6.1 7.8 3.3 215 295 Touran 5dr MPV AAAAC S E AT 2.0 TDI 150 SE 128 9.9 29.3 9.7 13.6 3.2 148 251 Ibiza 5dr hatch AAAAB Tiguan 5dr SUV AAAAB SE Tech’y 1.0 TSI 113 10.0 34.1 10.0 10.1 3.0 94 129 27.2 45/56 1047 19.7.17 2.0 TDI 150 SE 127 10.4 33 9.6 12.4 3.2 148 251 Leon 3/5dr hatch AAAAC Caravelle 5dr MPV AAAAC SC 2.0 TDI FR 142 8.0 22.1 7.5 9.6 2.9 181 280 35.6 47/54 1350 4.9.13 2.0 BITDI Exec. 126 11.6 36.1 11.7 10.2 3.2 201 332 Cupra SC 280 155 5.9 13.6 4.4 7.1 2.7 276 258 27.2 28/36 1441 26.3.14 V O LV O Alhambra 5dr MPV AAAAC 2.0 TDI 170 DSG 127 10.5 38.3 11.2 *7.0 3.0 168 258 30.5 35/40 1935 1.12.10 V40 5dr hatch AAABC Arona 5dr SUV AAAAC D3 SE Lux 130 8.9 26.6 8.7 10.2 2.8 148 258 SE Tech’y 1.0 TSI 107 10.5 — 10.6 11.9 3.1 94 129 26.2 37/41 1165 15.11.17 XC40 5dr SUV AAAAB Ateca 5dr SUV AAAAB D4 AWD First Ed. 130 8.5 24.8 8.5 13.7 3.0 188 295 1.6 TDI SE 114 10.5 35.6 9.3 14.0 2.9 114 184 36.4 50/62 1300 19.10.16 S60 4dr saloon AAAAC D4 SE Nav 143 7.6 20.4 6.9 9.2 3.0 179 295 SMART S90 4dr saloon AAAAC Forfour Electric Drive 5dr hatch AABCC D4 Momentum 140 8.2 22.1 7.9 11.1 2.6 187 295 Prime Premium 81 13.2 — 14.5 10.6 2.8 80 118 — 260Wh/m 1200 23.8.17 V60 5dr estate AAABC Polestar 155 5.3 13.1 4.6 9.0 2.6 345 369 S KO DA XC60 5dr SUV AAABC Fabia 5dr hatch AAAAC D4 AWD R-Des’n 127 8.9 26.2 8.8 14.2 2.8 188 295 1.2 TSI 90 SE-L 113 12.6 46 12.5 15.0 3.4 89 118 26.1 45/49 1109 21.1.15 XC90 5dr SUV AAAAC D5 Momentum 137 8.3 23.9 8.3 *5.0 — 222 347 New Octavia 4dr saloon/5dr estate AAAAC vRS 245 Estate 155 6.9 16.2 5.8 7.3 2.9 242 273 29.8 33/39 1392 16.8.17 WESTFIELD Rapid 4dr saloon AAABC 1.2 TSI 114 11.3 45.5 11.5 14.2 2.9 84 118 26.1 40/47 1175 5.12.12 Sport 0dr roadster AAAAC Sport 250 142 3.6 11.1 6.4 4.0 2.7 252 270 Superb 5dr hatch/estate AAAAB 2.0 TDI SE 135 8.8 24.9 8.2 11.2 2.8 148 251 37.2 47/54 1505 9.9.15 ZENOS Kodiaq 5dr SUV AAAAC 2.0 TDI Edition 121 9.5 34.7 10.1 12.2 2.8 148 251 33.5 37/48 1751 23.11.16 E10 0dr roadster AAAAB S 140 4.3 11.2 4.1 5.3 2.9 250 295 28/44

17.5.17

1180

2.5 296 280 25.8 26/36 2.5 345 310 25.8 28/29

2.3 874 944 41.2

925

1680 25.5.11

PORSCHE 2.5 380 310 25.5 28/—

1425 14.9.16

SUBARU

9.1 2.9 81 87 21.2 41/45 6.7 2.9 205 221 25.6 41/42

Old Cayman 2dr coupé AAAAA 1420 24.5.17 GT4 183 4.6 10.0 3.5 6.0 718 2dr coupé/roadster AAAAB — 7.5.14 Boxster 171 5.4 12.2 4.3 5.2 Cayman S 177 4.8 10.5 3.9 4.8 911 2dr coupé AAAAB GT3 RS 193 3.4 7.8 2.8 6.9 1715 3.6.15 New 911 2dr coupé AAAAB 190 4.5 9.4 3.4 7.3 1850 8.2.17 Carrera S 918 Spyder 2dr coupé AAAAA 1715 29.7.15 4.6 V8 214 2.6 5.3 1.9 2.2 1555 10.5.17 Panamera 4dr saloon AAAAA 4S Diesel 177 4.1 10.3 3.8 — 1595 6.7.16 Macan 5dr SUV AAAAB Turbo 165 4.7 11.8 4.3 7.9

MG 3 5dr hatch AAABC 1.5 3Form Sp’t 108 11.4 41.5 11.6 19.6 2.8 105 101 22.2 37/41 GS 5dr SUV AAACC 1.5 TGI Excite 118 8.9 25.5 8.3 12.4 2.8 164 184 29.3 29/38

ASX 5dr SUV AAABC 1.8 DiD 3 124 10.0 28.8 10.1 8.6 Eclipse Cross 5dr SUV AAACC 1.5 First Ed 2WD 127 9.0 26.5 8.3 13.8 Outlander 5dr SUV AAABC 2.2 DiD GX5 118 10.2 32.9 10.1 11.1 PHEV GX4hs 106 10.0 30.5 9.5 6.2

42/54

81

NOBLE

1050 22.4.15 208 3/5dr hatch AAACC 1.2 VTI Active 109 14.2 — 14.5 1470 4.12.13 GTi 30th 143 6.5 16.1 5.8 308 3/5dr hatch AAAAC 1480 23.1.13 1.6 e-HDi 115 118 10.1 32.6 10.4 508 SW estate AAAAC 1050 2.9.15 2.0 HDi 163 138 9.6 28.6 9.7 2008 5dr SUV AAABC 1275 22.7.15 1.6 e-HDi 117 10.7 37.8 11.5 3008 5dr SUV AAABC 1594 28.6.17 1.6 Bl’HDi GT L’e 117 12.0 44.3 12.1 5008 5dr MPV AAABC 2.0 Bl’HDi GT L’e 129 10.8 28.8 9.7

A-Class 5dr hatch AAABC A200 CDI Sport 130 8.9 28.3 9.0 10.1 2.5 134 221 37.1 48/58 1475 7.11.12 A45 AMG 168 4.2 11.5 4.3 4.5 2.8 355 322 38.1 27/37 1555 14.8.13 B-Class 5dr MPV AAABC B200 CDI Sport 130 9.4 28.8 9.6 11.9 2.7 134 221 37.8 20/52 1495 29.2.12 C-Class 4dr saloon/5dr estate AAAAC C220 Bluetec 145 8.1 22.9 8.1 11.7 2.8 168 295 42.4 41/51 1700 23.7.14 CLA 4dr saloon/5dr estate AAABC 220 CDI Sport 143 8.3 23.1 8.0 4.8 2.9 168 258 37.3 44/54 1525 26.6.13 200 CDI S’t S’Brk 134 10.1 29.7 9.6 11.9 3.4 134 221 33.5 53/59 1555 18.11.15 E-Class 4dr saloon/5dr estate/2dr convertible/2dr coupé AAAAC E400 Coupé 155 5.6 13.4 4.9 14.8 2.9 328 354 46.7 30/39 1845 14.6.17 CLS 4dr saloon/5dr estate AAAAC 350 CDI S’Brake 155 7.0 18.5 6.4 *3.8 2.9 261 457 39.6 36/43 1980 9.1.13 S-Class 4dr saloon/2dr coupé AAAAA S350 Bluetec 155 7.3 19.0 6.8 *3.9 2.7 255 457 45.6 34/44 1975 16.10.13 S63 AMG Coupé 155 4.5 9.6 3.4 6.8 2.7 577 664 42.8 22/25 2070 3.12.14 GLA 5dr SUV AAABC GLA220 CDI SE 134 8.1 23.8 7.8 4.7 2.65 168 258 36.4 40/48 1535 14.5.14 GLC 5dr SUV AAAAC GLC250d 143 7.8 23.5 7.8 15.7 3.2 201 369 46.9 39/43 1845 10.2.16 GL 5dr SUV AAAAC GL350 AMG Sp’t 137 8.3 24.8 8.2 5.0* 2.6 255 457 37.7 28/33 2455 24.7.13 SL 2dr convertible AAAAC SL500 155 4.3 9.9 3.6 6.5 2.7 429 516 39.6 10/24 1815 8.8.12

Mini 3dr hatch AAAAB Cooper S 146 6.9 17.1 5.9 6.7 2.5 C’per S Wks 210 146 7.2 16.4 6.0 6.5 3.0 Clubman 5dr hatch AAABC Cooper D 132 8.6 25.9 8.2 10.0 2.9 Convertible 2dr convertible AAAAB Cooper 129 9.2 25.4 8.8 12.4 2.7 Countryman 5dr hatch AAABC Cooper D 129 9.0 26.4 8.4 11.5 2.8 Plug-in Hybrid 123 6.7 24.4 6.2 5.5 3.5

21.8

20.3 2.9 79

PEUGEOT

3.0 148 280 29.7 46/60

Mph/1000rpm

LOTUS Elise 2dr roadster AAABC Cup 250 154 4.7 11.9 4.5 7.2 2.5 243 184 24.7 27/32 Evora 2dr coupé AAAAC Evora S 2+0 172 4.5 11.3 4.0 6.8 2.4 345 295 34.8 21/26 Exige S 2dr coupé AAAAB Exige S 170 4.1 9.6 3.7 5.5 2.5 345 295 27 21/30

Note 5dr hatch AAAAC 1.2 Acenta Pr’m 106 12.6 — 13.4 Pulsar 5dr hatch AAACC 1.5 dCi N-tec 118 10.9 35.5 10.8 Juke 5dr SUV AAABC Acenta 1.6 111 10.3 41.6 9.9 Nismo 1.6 134 6.9 17.2 6.0 Leaf 5dr hatch AAABC Leaf 91 10.9 — 11.4 Qashqai 5dr SUV AAAAB 1.5 dCi 2WD 113 10.8 39.2 11.1 X-Trail 5dr SUV AAABC 1.6 dCi 2WD 117 11.2 39.7 11.7 GT-R 2dr coupé AAAAB Recaro 196 3.4 7.8 2.7

50-70mph

1765 18.2.15

30-70mph

24/28

0-100mph

1.10.14

0-60mph

1905

Top speed

TEST DATE

32/38

Make and model

Weight (kg)

NX 5dr SUV AAACC 300h 112 9.7 30.4 9.1 *5.6 2.7 194 na — RC F 2dr coupé AAACC RC F 168 4.8 10.7 3.9 12.9 2.9 471 391 39

Mpg test/touring

Mph/1000rpm

Torque (lb ft)

Power (bhp)

Braking 60-0mph

50-70mph

30-70mph

0-100mph

0-60mph

Top speed

Make and model

ROAD TEST RESULTS

39/45

1086

6.2.13

20.3 49/55

938

15.7.15

34.8 37/42 23.8 29/34

1176 19.11.14 1280 6.5.15

30.5 40/54

1199

33.4 55/58 33.7 57/59

1350 30.9.15 1435 13.4.16

36.1

1507

39/51

7.6.17

3.5.17

37.7 38/46

1805 15.2.12

26.1

1350 28.11.12

32/40

34.9 20/27

1858

10.1.18

20.5 44/59 24.7 39/54

945 7.12.11 1070 21.3.18

27.1

43/57

1145

34.4 37.4 7.6 28.0

32/38 44/56 44/45 40/52

1402 10.7.13 1390 16.1.13 1599 20.5.15 1324 2.8.17

31.1.18

35.6 31/37

1495 24.1.18

37.8 38/56

1828 27.9.17

37.9 45/52 32.3 38/43

1614 1722

4.2.15 7.9.16

37.0 54/60

1571

3.2.16

40

44/52

1683 22.6.16

22.7 38/45

2386 23.12.15

36.5 46/52

1545 15.8.12

39.8 38/44

1735

7.2.18

39.4 46/59

1580

5.3.14

40.1

1717

13.7.16

40/51

34.8 26/32

1834 15.10.14

38.9 40/49

1836

33.6 37/39

2009 17.6.15

22.7 32/42

665 29.11.17

33.9 21/23

725

5.7.17

7.10.15

11 APRIL 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 79


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ABARTH

2.0 Turbo Petrol 280 276 149 5.7 46.3 141 AAABC 2.2 Turbo Diesel 150 148 137 8.2 67.3 109 2.2 Turbo Diesel 180 177 143 7.1 67.3 109 2.9 BiTurbo Quadrifoglio 503 191 3.9 34.4 189 1.4 T-jet 145 143 130 7.8-8.0 47.1-48.7 134-139 1.4 T-jet 160 Trofeo 157 135 7.3 47.1 139 AAAAB Stelvio 5dr SUV £35,090–£45,390 1.4 T-jet 165 Turismo 162 135 7.3-7.4 47.1-48.7 134-139 Alfa’s first SUV is a solid effort. Choosing the petrol version gives it 1.4 T-jet Competizione 177 140 6.7-6.9 47.1-48.7 134-139 charisma. LxWxH 4687x1903x1671 Kerb weight 1604kg 2.2 Turbo D 180 177 130 7.6 60.1 124 695 3dr hatch/2dr open £20,360–£26,210 AAABC 2.2 Turbo D 180 Q4 AWD 177 130 7.6 58.9 127 A convincing track-day 500 with decent dynamic ability. Overly 2.0 Turbo D 210 Q4 AWD 207 134 6.6 58.9 127 firm ride spoils it, though. LxWxH 3657x1627x1485 Kerb weight NA 2.0 Turbo 200 Q4 AWD 197 134 7.2 40.4 161 1.4 T-jet XSR Yamaha 162 135 7.3-7.4 47.1-48.7 134-139 2.0 Turbo 280 Q4 AWD 276 143 5.7 40.4 161 1.4 T-jet 180 Rivale 177 140 6.7-6.9 47.1-48.7 134-139 1.4 T-jet 190 Biposto 187 143 5.9 45.9 145 4C 2dr coupé/spider £52,820–£59,820 AAABC

595 3dr hatch/2dr open £15,510–£21,960

The Fiat 500’s Abarth makeover makes it a true pocket rocket. LxWxH 3657x1627x1485 Kerb weight NA

124 Spider 2dr open £29,620–£31,920

It may be flawed but it’s rewarding to drive, if not the last word in AAAAB finesse. LxWxH 3989x1864x1183 Kerb weight 934kg 1.75 TBi 240 236 160 4.5 40.9-41.5 157-161

Only a mildly upgraded version of the standard car – but what a revelation it is. LxWxH 4054x1740x1233 Kerb weight 1060kg 1.4 T-jet 170

167

142-144 6.9

42.8-44.1 148-153

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The stunning replacement for the already seductive DB9 is tyreshreddingly good. LxWxH 4385x1865x1270 Kerb weight 1760kg 4.0 V8 5.2 V12

503 600

187 200

4.0 3.9

20.9 17.0

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A4 4dr saloon £27,810–£46,050

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High quality and competent but leaves the dynamic finesse to its rivals. LxWxH 4726x1842x1427 Kerb weight 1320kg

1.4 TFSI 150 148 130 2.0 TFSI 190 187 149 2.0 TFSI 252 quattro 248 155 Vanquish 2dr coupé £199,950–£223,995 AAAAC 3.0 V6 TFSI S4 quattro 349 155 Dazzlingly beautiful and expressive big Aston plays the long2.0 TDI 150 ultra 148 130 legged cruiser well. LxWxH 4692x1912x1294 Kerb weight 1739kg 2.0 TDI 150 148 136-137 6.0 V12 Vanquish S 595 201 3.5 21.6 302 2.0 TDI 190 ultra 187 130 6.0 Vanquish S Volante 595 201 3.7 21.6 302 2.0 TDI 190 187 147-149 2.0 TDI 190 quattro 187 146 Rapide S 4dr saloon £149,500–£152,000 AAAAC 3.0 V6 TDI 218 215 155 The Rapide is one of the most elegant four-door sports cars in the 3.0 V6 TDI 218 quattro 215 155 world. LxWxH 5019x1929x1360 Kerb weight 1990kg 3.0 V6 TDI 272 quattro 268 155 6.0 V12 552 203 4.4 21.9 300 A4 Avant 5dr estate £29,250–£72,175

A1 3dr hatch £15,560–£29,575

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50.4-53.3 52.3-55.4 43.5-47.9 37.7 68.9-74.3 65.7-70.6 67.3-72.4 62.8-67.3 61.4-64.2 62.8-67.3 58.9-61.4 54.3-57.6

126-131 122-129 116-122 170 99-107 101-111 102-109 111-118 114-121 109-117 119-127 129-137

AAAAC

Classy and demure estate lacks the dynamic sparkle of rivals. LxWxH 4725x1842x1434 Kerb weight 1370kg

Audi’s answer to the Mini is fun and refined.

ALPINA

1.4 TFSI 150 148 130 8.9-9.0 48.7-51.4 126-139 2.0 TFSI 190 187 149 7.5 50.4-53.3 121-128 2.0 TFSI 252 quattro 248 155 6.0 42.8 149-150 3.0 V6 TFSI S4 quattro 349 155 4.9 37.2 175 2.9 V6 TFSI RS4 quattro 443 155 4.1 32.1 199-200 2.0 TDI 150 ultra 148 130 9.0-9.2 67.3-70.6 104-110 1.4 78hp 76 103 13.0 50.4 130 B4 S 2dr coupé/open £63,000–£67,000 2.0 TDI 150 148 132-133 9.0-9.2 64.2-67.3 111-116 0.9 TB Twinair 105 103 114 11.4 67.3 99 A retuned version of the 4 Series that feels more at home on the 2.0 TDI 190 ultra 187 130 7.9 65.7-68.9 106-112 track than the road. LxWxH 4640x1825x1373 Kerb weight 1690kg A1 Sportback 5dr hatch £16,180–£30,195 1.4 TB Multiair 140 138 130 8.1 52.3 124 AAABC 2.0 TDI 190 187 143-146 7.9 61.4-65.7 113-121 1.4 TB Multiair 170 167 136 7.3 52.3 124 3.0 BiTurbo 433 189-190 4.2-4.3 34.0-35.8 180-190 Rear doors add convenience to an already attractive package. 2.0 TDI 190 quattro 187 143 7.4 60.1-62.8 116-123 LxWxH 3973x1746x1422 Kerb weight 1035kg 1.3 JTDM-2 95 93 112 12.5 83.1 89 3.0 V6 TDI 218 215 152 6.7 61.4-64.2 114-121 B5 4dr saloon/5dr touring £89,000–£91,000 93 116 11.1 62.8-67.3 97-103 3.0 V6 TDI 218 quattro 215 152 6.4 57.6-60.1 123-129 AAAAC 1.0 TFSI 95 Giulietta 5dr hatch £18,450–£28,330 123 127 8.9 54.3-57.6 112-123 3.0 V6 TDI 272 quattro 268 155 5.4 52.3-55.4 134-142 AAACC Is it the best alternative to an M5? Yes, at least from a practicality 1.4 TFSI 125 viewpoint. LxWxH 4956x1868x1466 Kerb weight 2015kg 1.4 TFSI 150 148 134 7.9 56.5-58.9 111-117 Long in the tooth but still seductive, shame it’s not rounded or lavish enough. LxWxH 4351x1798x1465 Kerb weight 1305kg 227 155 5.9 39.2-39.8 166-168 A4 Allroad 5dr estate £38,370–£44,400 4.4 V8 BiTurbo 599 200-205 3.5-3.7 26.2-26.9 240-247 2.0 TFSI S1 quattro AAAAC 1.6 TDI 116 114 124 9.5 70.6-74.3 99-106 Quality load-hauler gets a rugged makeover to make it even more 1.4 TB 120 118 121 9.4 45.6 144 capable. LxWxH 4750x1842x1493 Kerb weight 1580kg 1.4 TB Multiair 150 148 130 8.2 51.4 127 B6 2dr open £101,950 AAAAC A3 Sportback 5dr hatch £21,805–£44,725 1.4 TB Multiair 170 167 135 7.6 57.7 114 A ballistic coupé and convertible best suited to pounding the AAAAC 2.0 TFSI 252 quattro 148 153 6.1 41.5-43.5 148-154 autobahns. LxWxH 4894x1894x1375 Kerb weight 1945kg 1.75 TBi 240 236 152 6.0 41.5 157 All the above but with the added convenience of five doors and a 2.0 TDI 190 quattro 187 136 7.8 55.4-57.6 128-134 usefully larger boot. LxWxH 4313x1785x1426 Kerb weight 1180kg 3.0 V6 TDI 218 quattro 1.6 JTDM-2 120 118 121 10.0-10.2 74.3 99 4.4 V8 BiTurbo 591 203 4.2 29.4 224 215 143 6.6 53.3-55.4 137-143 2.0 JTDM-2 150 148 130 8.8 67.3 110 1.0 TFSI 116 114 128 9.9 60.1-62.8 104-108 3.0 V6 TDI 272 quattro 268 155 5.5 51.4-53.3 139-146 2.0 JTDM-2 175 167 136 7.8 65.7 113 B7 4dr saloon £115,000 AAAAC 1.4 TFSI 150 e-tron 148 138 7.6 156.9-166.2 38-40 A 7 Series with a power boost gives BMW a worthy challenger to 1.5 TFSI 150 148 136 8.2 54.3-58.9 110-118 A5 2dr coupé £33,840–£76,075 AAAAC Giulia 4dr saloon £29,875–£61,595 AAAAB the AMG S-Classes. LxWxH 5250x1902x1491 Kerb weight 2060kg 2.0 TFSI 190 187 151 6.8-6.9 48.7-50.4 129-130 Refreshed coupé gets a sharper look and a refreshed interior. Still Handsome and special dynamically but lacks finesse and only 4.4 V8 BiTurbo 599 205 4.2 29.4 222 2.0 TFSI 190 quattro 187 146 6.2 47.9-48.7 133-134 mundane to drive. LxWxH 4673x1846x1371 Kerb weight 1390kg comes as an auto. LxWxH 4643x1860x1436 Kerb weight 1429kg 2.0 TFSI S3 quattro 305 155 4.6-5.3 39.8-43.5 150-163 1.4 TFSI 150 148 130 8.9 50.4-53.3 122-127 2.0 Turbo Petrol 200 197 146 6.6 47.1 138 D3 4dr saloon/5dr touring £48,000–£50,000 AAAAC 2.5 TFSI RS3 quattro 394 155 4.1 33.6-34.0 189-192 2.0 TFSI 190 187 149 7.2-7.3 47.9-55.4 124-129 An intoxicating mix of performance and frugality makes the D3 a 1.6 TDI 116 114 125 10.4 67.3-72.4 103-109 2.0 TFSI 252 quattro 248 155 5.8 44.1-45.6 141-144 compelling choice. LxWxH 4632x1811x1428 Kerb weight 1660kg 2.0 TDI 150 148 135 8.1-8.6 62.8-67.3 109-116 3.0 V6 TFSI S5 quattro 349 155 4.7 38.2 170 3.0 BiTurbo 345 170-171 4.6 52.3-53.3 139-142 2.0 TDI 150 quattro 148 133 8.3 58.9 126-127 2.9 V6 TFSI RS5 quattro 443 155 3.9 32.5 197 S TA R R AT I N G S E X P L A I N E D 2.0 TDI 184 181 145 7.4 61.4-62.8 118-119 2.0 TDI 190 ultra 187 130 7.7 67.3-70.6 105-111 D4 2dr coupé/open £52,000–£56,000 AAAAC 2.0 TDI 184 quattro 181 143 6.8 56.5-57.6 129-130 2.0 TDI 190 187 148-149 7.7 62.8-67.3 111-118 CCCCC Inherently dangerous/unsafe. Tragically, Precise dynamics with added Alpina kudos and a great engine. 2.0 TDI 190 quattro 187 146 7.2 61.4-64.2 114-121 irredeemably flawed. LxWxH 4640x1825x1382 Kerb weight 1660kg A3 Saloon 4dr saloon £23,525–£45,675 AAAAC 3.0 V6 TDI 218 quattro 215 155 6.2 58.9-61.4 119-127 3.0 BiTurbo 345 171-173 4.6-5.0 47.9-53.3 139-155 Undercuts the case to own an A4. Upmarket interior and good to BCCCC Appalling. Massively significant failings. drive. LxWxH 4458x1796x1416 Kerb weight 1240kg A5 Sportback 5dr coupé £31,940–£48,850 AAAAC ACCCC Very poor. Fails to meet any accepted D5 S 4dr saloon £62,000 AAAAC 1.0 TFSI 116 114 128 9.9 60.1-62.8 106-107 Refined, good-looking four-door coupé is sadly short on charm and class boundaries. finesse. LxWxH 4733x1843x1386 Kerb weight 1425kg The excellent 5 Series receives some Alpina tweaking to make it a 1.5 TFSI 150 148 139 8.2 54.3-56.5 112-119 ABCCC Poor. Within acceptable class brilliant cruiser. LxWxH 4956x1868x1466 Kerb weight 1870kg 2.0 TFSI 190 187 155 6.8-6.9 48.7-50.4 128-131 1.4 TFSI 150 148 130 8.9 50.4-52.3 124-130 3.0 BiTurbo 345 171 4.9 46.3 161 2.0 TFSI 190 quattro 187 150 6.2 47.9-49.6 132-136 2.0 TFSI 252 quattro 248 155 6.0 43.5-44.1 144-148 boundaries in a few areas. Still not 2.0 TFSI S3 quattro 305 155 4.6-5.3 39.8-43.5 151-163 3.0 V6 TFSI S5 quattro 349 155 4.7 37.7 170 recommendable. ARIEL 2.5 TFSI RS3 quattro 394 155 4.1 33.6-34.0 188-191 2.0 TDI 150 148 135-136 8.9-9.0 65.7-67.3 109-114 AACCC Off the pace. Below average in nearly Atom 0dr open £30,572 AAAAB 1.6 TDI 116 114 127 10.4 68.9-70.6 105-108 2.0 TDI 190 ultra 187 130 7.9-8.0 65.7-68.9 106-113 all areas. Exhilarating, superbike-fast mentalist is less usable than some but 2.0 TDI 150 148 139 8.1-8.6 61.4-67.3 110-118 2.0 TDI 190 187 146-148 7.9 61.4-67.3 109-119 still marvellous. LxWxH 3410x1828x1195 Kerb weight 520kg 2.0 TDI 150 quattro 148 136 8.3 57.6-58.9 126-129 2.0 TDI 190 quattro 187 146 7.4 60.1-62.8 117-124 AABCC Acceptable. About average in key areas, 2.0 K20Z i-VTEC 245 145 3.1 NA NA 2.0 TDI 184 181 149 7.4 61.4-62.8 117-120 3.0 V6 TDI 218 quattro 215 152 6.4 58.9-61.4 119-125 but disappoints. 3.5R 350 NA NA NA NA 2.0 TDI 184 quattro 181 147 6.8 55.4-57.6 129-133 AAACC Competent. Above average in some A5 Cabriolet 2dr open £38,080–£52,510 AAAAC areas, average in others. Outstanding Nomad 0dr open £38,000 AAAAA A3 Cabriolet 2dr open £29,680–£42,080 AAAAC More practical than smaller options. Lower-powered, steel-sprung

B3 S 4dr saloon/5dr touring £62,000–£63,000

AAAAC LxWxH 3973x1740x1416 Kerb weight 1035kg 1.0 TFSI 95 93 116 11.1 1.4 TFSI 125 123 127 8.9 1.4 TFSI 150 148 134 7.9 2.0 TFSI S1 quattro 227 155 5.9 AAABC 1.6 TDI 116 114 124 9.5

Previously falling behind in the power stakes, but the recent Mito 3dr hatch £12,760–£20,300 AAACC facelift rectifies that. LxWxH 4632x1811x1431 Kerb weight 1705kg Likeable, good-looking hatch is practical, too, but dynamic flaws 3.0 BiTurbo 433 188-190 4.3 34.9-35.8 180-185 make it an also-ran. LxWxH 4063x1720x1446 Kerb weight 1080kg A L FA R O M E O

in none.

AAABC Good. Competitive in key areas. AAAAC Very good. Very competitive in key

areas, competitive in secondary respects. AAAAB Excellent. Near class-leading in key areas and in some ways outstanding. AAAAA Brilliant, unsurpassed. All but flawless.

Well inside the top 10 list of our favourite cars. A revelation and a riot to drive. LxWxH 3215x1850x1425 Kerb weight 670kg 2.4 K24 i-VTEC

235

125

3.4

NA

97-103 112-123 111-117 166-168 99-106

Compact, affordable, usable and refined. Strong performance, too. trim is best. LxWxH 4673x1846x1383 Kerb weight 1600kg LxWxH 4423x1793x1409 Kerb weight 1380kg 2.0 TFSI 190 187 147-148 7.9 46.3-50.4 127-139

1.5 TFSI 150 2.0 TFSI 190 2.0 TFSI 190 quattro Vantage 2dr coupé £120,900 AAAAC 2.0 TFSI S3 quattro It looks the part with slick styling but will it be as menacing as 1.6 TDI 116 before? LxWxH 4465x1942x1273 Kerb weight 1530kg 2.0 TDI 150 4.0 V8 496 195 3.6 NA NA 2.0 TDI 150 quattro 2.0 TDI 184 2.0 TDI 184 quattro ASTON MARTIN

NA

62.8-67.3 54.3-57.6 56.5-58.9 39.2-39.8 70.6-74.3

148 187 187 305 114 148 148 181 181

137 155 150 155 125 139 136 149 147

8.9 7.2-7.3 6.9 4.6-5.3 11.2 8.7-8.9 8.8 7.9 7.4

52.3-56.5 46.3-48.7 44.8-46.3 39.8-43.5 64.2-67.3 60.1-65.7 56.5-57.6 58.9-60.1 53.3-55.4

112-119 128-131 132-136 151-163 110-114 113-122 129-132 122-125 134-138

2.0 TFSI 252 quattro 3.0 V6 TFSI S5 quattro 2.0 TDI 190 2.0 TDI 190 quattro 3.0 V6 TDI 218 quattro

248 349 187 187 215

A6 4dr saloon £33,160–£59,565

149 155 144 144 149

6.3 5.1 8.3 7.8 6.8

42.2-42.8 36.2 60.1-62.8 57.6-60.1 54.3-57.6

149-152 177 118-124 122-128 128-137

AAAAC

Supremely well-constructed but a bit soulless to drive. A smart office on wheels. LxWxH 4932x1874x1455 Kerb weight 1570kg

What Car? New Car Buying


N E W CAR PR I CES P

1.8 TFSI 190 2.0 TFSI 252 quattro 2.0 TDI 190 ultra 2.0 TDI 190 quattro 3.0 V6 TDI 272 quattro 3.0 BiTDI 320 quattro 4.0 V8 TFSI S6 quattro

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C

(g/ O2

km

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130-138 153-158 109-119 128-133 133-138 159-164 214-218

A capable stress-buster. BiTDI engine is a giant killer; the RS6 is simply monstrous. LxWxH 4943x1874x1461 Kerb weight 1635kg 187 248 187 187 268 315 443 552 596

140 155 140 139 155 155 155 155 155

8.2 6.7 8.5-8.7 7.9 5.7 5.2 4.6 3.9 3.7

47.1-49.6 39.8-40.9 60.1-64.2 54.3-55.4 52.3-53.3 44.1-45.6 29.4-30.1 29.4 29.4

A6 Allroad 5dr estate £47,780–£57,900

134-142 157-163 114-124 132-138 138-144 164-169 219-224 223 223

215 268 315

143 155 155

7.1 6.2 5.5

49.6 50.4 43.5

149 149 172

155 155 155

4.6 3.9 3.7

A8 4dr saloon £69,100–£74,995 282 335 282 335

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7.3 7.0

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(g/ O2

km

532 532 601

198 198 205

3.7 3.5 3.2

22.8 22.4 21.1

R8 Spyder 2dr open £121,140–£149,820

283 287 306 AAAAC

Taking the roof off the R8 enhances the drama tenfold. LxWxH 4426x1940x1245 Kerb weight 1680kg 5.2 V10 FSI RWS 5.2 V10 FSI quattro 5.2 V10 FSI Plus quattro

532 532 601

197 197 204

3.8 3.6 3.3

22.4 22.1 20.8

286 290 309

BAC

Mono 0dr open £135,950

AAAAB

An F-22 Raptor for the road – only significantly better built. LxWxH 3952x1836x1110 Kerb weight 580kg 305

170

2.8

NA

NA

BENTLEY

Continental GT 2dr coupé £156,700

AAAAC

Refined and improved in every area, making the Conti a superb grand tourer. LxWxH 4850x1966x1405 Kerb weight 2244kg 626

207

3.6

23.2

29.7 29.7 29.7

220 221 221

155 155 155 155

5.9 5.6 5.9 5.7

Q2 5dr SUV £21,660–£37,050

Flying Spur 4dr saloon £132,800–£169,800

278

48.7-50.4 36.2-37.7 48.7-50.4 36.2-37.7

145-152 171-178 146-152 171-178

AAAAC

AAABC

Undoubtedly luxurious but misses the mark on refinement and tech sophistication. LxWxH 5299x1984x1488 Kerb weight 2417kg

4.0 V8 4.0 V8 S 6.0 W12 AAAAC 6.0 W12 Speed

500 521 616 626

183 190 199 202

4.9 4.6 4.3 4.2

25.9 25.9 19.2 19.2

Mulsanne 4dr saloon £229,360–£275,000

254 254 335 335 AAAAC

If the Rolls Phantom is best from the back seat, the Mulsanne is best in the front. LxWxH 5575x1926x1521 Kerb weight 2685kg 6.75 V8 6.75 V8 Speed

505 530

184 190

5.1-5.3 4.8

18.8 18.8

Bentayga 5dr SUV £135,800–£232,000

342 342 AAAAB

Crewe’s first attempt at a luxury SUV is a solid effort. The Diesel is wondrous. LxWxH 5140x1998x1742 Kerb weight 2505kg

1.0 TFSI 116 1.4 TFSI 150 2.0 TFSI 190 quattro 1.6 TDI 116 2.0 TDI 150 quattro

6.0 W12 4.0 V8 Diesel

122 131 141 122 131

10.1 8.5 6.5 10.3-10.5 8.1

53.3-55.4 48.7-54.3 44.1-44.8 61.4-68.9 56.5-58.9

117-121 119-130 144-146 109-120 125-131

600 429

187 168

4.0 4.6

P

21.6 35.3

296 210

2.0 TDI 190 quattro 2.0 TFSI 252 quattro 3.0 V6 TFSI SQ5 quattro

187 248 349

135 147 155

7.9 6.3 5.4

53.3-56.5 132-138 39.2-40.4 157-164 33.2-34.0 189-195

1 Series 3dr/5dr hatch £21,840–£35,015

AAAAC

A proper compact coupé now. Could be better equipped, however. LxWxH 4432x1774x1418 Kerb weight 1420kg 134 181 248 335 365 148 187 187 220

130 143 155 155 124 132 143 140 151

8.8-8.9 7.2 5.6 4.6-4.8 4.3-4.5 8.2-8.4 7.0-7.1 6.9 6.2

2 Series Convertible 2dr open £27,540 - 39,615

50.4-53.3 47.9-48.7 47.9 36.2-39.8 33.2-35.8 64.2-68.9 64.2-68.9 60.1-62.8 61.4

124-130 133-135 134 163-179 185-199 108-116 109-115 119-124 121

177 226 226 305 394 181 181

149 155 155 155 155 149 145

6.9 5.9-6.0 5.3 4.6-4.9 3.7 7.1 6.7

TT Roadster 2dr open £30,600–£54,200

47.1 43.5-46.3 42.8 38.7-40.9 33.6-34.4 60.1 52.3

138 141-150 153 159-168 187-192 124 142

AAAAC

Plenty of pace and driver reward, along with prestige and designicon style. LxWxH 4177x1832x1355 Kerb weight 1300kg 1.8 TFSI 180 2.0 TFSI 230 2.0 TFSI 230 quattro 2.0 TFSI TTS quattro 2.5 TFSI TT RS quattro

177 226 226 305 394

147 155 155 155 155

7.2 6.1-6.2 5.6 4.9-5.2 3.7

46.3 42.2-45.6 40.9 37.7-39.8 33.6-34.4

142 144-155 158 163-173 187-192

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335 148 187 220

155 132 143 151

4.7-4.9 8.7-8.9 7.4-7.5 6.4

218i 220i 230i

134 181 248

130 143 155

134 181 181 248 321 114 148 160 187 187 254 254 308

130 146 144 155 155 127 133 143 146 144 155 155 155

9.2-9.3 7.5 7.7-7.9 5.9-6.0 5.1 11.1-11.2 8.8-8.9 8.1-8.2 7.4-7.6 7.6 5.6 5.4 4.9

2m

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(g/ O2

km

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34.0-38.2 60.1-64.2 60.1-65.7 57.6

P

9.4-9.6 7.7 5.9

47.1-50.4 131-139 46.3 140 45.6 142

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169-189 116-124 113-124 128

47.9-51.4 44.8-48.7 38.7-44.8 42.2-46.3 40.4 61.4-64.2 61.4-65.7 62.8-70.6 60.1-65.7 56.5-60.1 53.3 51.4 49.6

129-137 134-147 147-169 143-157 164 116-120 114-119 104-118 114-123 124-133 138 145 151

Hatchback practicality meets 3 Series dynamic talent. Dull but decent. LxWxH 4824x1828x1508 Kerb weight 1580kg 320i 320i xDrive 330i 340i 318d 320d 320d xDrive 330d 330d xDrive 335d xDrive

181 181 248 321 148 187 187 254 254 308

146 144 155 155 133 146 144 155 155 155

8.0-8.1 8.1-8.4 6.1 5.1 9.2-9.3 7.7-7.8 7.7 5.7 5.4 4.9

AAABC

Still serves up plenty of pace, style and usability for the money. It’s Better than its 1 Series forebear but lacks truly distinguishing better to drive, too. LxWxH 4177x1832x1353 Kerb weight 1210kg premium qualities. LxWxH 4432x1774x1413 Kerb weight 1440kg 1.8 TFSI 180 2.0 TFSI 230 2.0 TFSI 230 quattro 2.0 TFSI TTS quattro 2.5 TFSI TT RS quattro 2.0 TDI 184 ultra 2.0 TDI 184 quattro

hp

) pg

Great engines and interior, but more of a GT than sports car. LxWxH 4894x1894x1365 Kerb weight 1890kg 640i 650i M6 M6 Competition pack 640d

44.1-47.9 39.8-44.1 45.6 38.7 60.1-64.2 58.9-62.8 58.9-60.1 53.3-54.3 50.4-51.4 49.6

134-146 146-161 136-141 161-166 117-123 118-127 124-126 137-139 144-146 149-151

181 181 248 321 425 444 453 187 187 254 254 308

146 144 155 155 155 155 155 146 144 155 155 155

7.3-7.5 7.6-7.8 5.8-5.9 5.0-5.2 4.1-4.3 4.0-4.2 3.9 7.1-7.3 7.2-7.4 5.5 5.2 4.7

46.3-48.7 40.9-45.6 43.5-48.7 36.7-41.5 32.1-34.0 32.1-34.0 33.6 62.8-65.7 60.1 55.4 52.3 50.4

134-141 144-161 136-151 159-179 194-204 194-204 197 114-119 125 134 142 147

5.5 4.6 4.3 4.0 5.5

35.8-36.7 31.0 27.4 27.4 48.7-50.4

179-184 213 239 239 149-153

AAAAC

315 443 552 591 308

155 155 155 155 155

5.4 4.6 4.2 3.9 5.4

36.2-37.7 32.1 28.5 28.5 49.6-52.3

178-182 206 231 231 147-152

6 Series Gran Turismo 5dr hatch £46,810–£57,570 AAABC A large improvement on the 5GT and dynamically sound. Still an oddball, though. LxWxH 5007x1894x1392 Kerb weight 1720kg 630i 640i xDrive 630d 630d xDrive

254 335 261 261

155 155 155 155

6.3 5.3 6.1 6.0

42.8-43.4 34.4-35.3 53.2-55.3 47.8-49.5

7 Series 4dr saloon £61,300–£135,340

148-152 183-187 139 154

AAAAC

Rules on in-car entertainment and diesel sophistication; otherwise too bland. LxWxH 5098x1902x1478 Kerb weight 1755kg

A talented GT and a brilliant B-road steer that is very well-equipped. 730d xDrive LxWxH 4640x1825x1377 Kerb weight 1475kg 740d xDrive 420i 420i xDrive 430i 440i M4 M4 Competition package M4 CS 420d 420d xDrive 430d 430d xDrive 435d xDrive

155 155 155 155 155

6 Series Gran Coupé 4dr coupé £61,080–£95,500

725d AAAAC 730d

4 Series 2dr coupé £33,110–£89,130

315 443 552 591 308

The 6 Series receives a pair of rear doors – and they’re a brilliant visual coup. LxWxH 5007x1894x1392 Kerb weight 1750kg

640i 650i M6 M6 Competition pack AAAAB 3 Series Gran Turismo 5dr hatch £31,420–£44,610 AAAAC 640d

2 Series 2dr coupé £24,300–£48,940

218i 220i Q7 5dr SUV £51,110–£89,345 AAAAC 230i Unengaging to drive and light on feel, but the cabin is both huge M240i and classy. LxWxH 5052x1968x1740 Kerb weight 2060kg M2 3.0 V6 TDI 218 quattro 215 134 7.3 45.6-48.7 150-161 218d 3.0 V6 TDI 272 quattro 268 145 6.5 44.1-47.1 158-168 220d 3.0 V6 TDI quattro e-tron 254 143 6.2 148.7-156.9 48-50 220d xDrive 4.0 V8 TDI SQ7 quattro 429 155 4.9 37.2-39.2 190-199 225d

TT 2dr coupé £28,850–£52,450

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it sparkle. LxWxH 4633x1811x1429 Kerb weight 1470kg BMW

318i AAABC 320i Strong on performance and economy and as good as it could be. 320i xDrive Q3 5dr SUV £27,910–£37,900 AAABC LxWxH 4329x1765x1421 Kerb weight 1375kg 330i Typically refined and competent but feels more like an A3 than an 118i 134 130 8.5-8.7 52.3-56.5 122-126 340i Audi SUV. LxWxH 4388x1831x1608 Kerb weight 1385kg 120i 181 139-142 7.1 46.3-48.7 135-140 316d 1.4 TFSI 150 148 126 8.9-9.2 45.6-51.4 127-143 125i 220 151 6.1 47.9 134 318d 2.0 TFSI 180 quattro 177 135 7.6 40.4-42.8 152-161 M140i 335 155 4.6-4.8 36.2-39.8 163-179 320d Efficient Dynamics 2.0 TDI 150 148 126 9.6 60.1-62.8 117-124 116d 114 124 10.3 68.9-78.5 94-107 320d 2.0 TDI 150 quattro 148 126 9.3 53.3-57.6 129-140 118d 148 131 8.1-8.3 65.7-74.3 104-114 320d xDrive 2.0 TDI 184 quattro 181 136 7.9 50.4-54.3 136-146 120d 187 141 7.0-7.1 62.8-68.9 109-114 330d 120d xDrive 187 138 6.8 60.1-62.8 119-124 330d xDrive Q5 5dr SUV £39,825–£51,925 AAAAC 125d 220 149 6.3 61.4 121 335d xDrive

Appealing combination of Audi allure, affordable SUV practicality and attractiveness. LxWxH 4663x1893x1659 Kerb weight 1720kg

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420i 181 146 8.2-8.4 42.8-45.6 144-153 430i 248 155 6.3-6.4 40.4-44.8 146-162 440i 321 155 5.4 39.2 167 M4 425 155 4.4-4.6 31.0-32.5 203-213 M4 Competition package 444 155 4.3-4.5 31.0-32.5 203-213 187 146 8.0-8.1 55.4-60.1 124-134 2 Series Active Tourer 5dr hatch £24,270–£35,465 AAAAC 420d BMW’s FWD hatch is a proper contender but not as practical as 430d 254 155 5.9 51.4 144 some of its rivals. LxWxH 4342x1800x1555 Kerb weight 1360kg 435d xDrive 308 155 5.2 47.9 155 218i 134 127 9.2-9.3 53.3-55.4 119-124 220i 181 142 7.4 48.7-50.4 130-134 4 Series Gran Coupé 4dr coupé £33,110–£47,280 AAAAC 225xe 248 125 6.7 134.5-141.2 46-49 Essentially a prettier 3 Series. Good, but not better than the 216d 335 121 10.6 68.9-74.3 104-108 regular saloon. LxWxH 4640x1825x1404 Kerb weight 1520kg 218d 148 129 8.9 65.7-68.9 109-114 420i 181 146 7.5-7.7 46.3-48.7 134-141 220d 187 141 7.5-7.6 62.8-65.7 117-119 420i xDrive 181 144 7.8-8.1 40.9-45.6 144-161 220d xDrive 187 138 7.3 57.6-60.1 124-129 430i 248 155 5.9 43.5-48.7 136-151 440i 321 155 5.1 41.5 159 2 Series Gran Tourer 5dr MPV £26,020–£35,780 AAAAB 420d 187 146 7.3-7.5 62.8-70.6 106-119 Brings a proper premium MPV to the table. Third row seats aren’t 420d xDrive 187 144 7.4-7.6 57.6-62.8 118-129 adult-sized, though. LxWxH 4556x1800x1608 Kerb weight 1475kg 430d 254 155 5.6 53.3 139 218i 134 127 9.8 50.4-51.4 127-130 430d xDrive 254 155 5.3 51.4 145 220i 181 137 7.8 45.6-47.1 139-143 435d xDrive 308 155 4.8 49.6 150 216d 335 119 11.2-11.4 60.1-67.3 110-124 218d 148 127 9.5 58.9-62.8 118-126 5 Series 4dr saloon £35,835–£50,105 AAAAB 220d 187 138 8.0-8.1 60.1-62.8 119-124 The perfect compromise between the comfy E-Class and dynamic 220d xDrive 187 135 7.8 55.4-57.6 129-134 XF, and then some. LxWxH 5493x1868x1479 Kerb weight 1530kg 520i 181 146 7.8 50.4 124-129 3 Series 4dr saloon £26,790–£59,600 AAAAB 530i 248 155 6.2 48.7 132 Decent cabin space and engine range but doesn’t measure up on 540i xDrive 335 155 4.8 39.2 164 handling and finesse. LxWxH 4633x1811x1429 Kerb weight 1425kg 530e 248 146 6.2 141.2 46 318i 134 130 8.9-9.1 51.4-54.3 122-129 520d 187 147 7.5 65.6-72.4 102-114 320i 181 146 7.2-7.3 47.9-51.4 134-138 520d xDrive 187 144 7.6 60.1-62.7 119-124 320i xDrive 181 144 7.5-7.6 41.5-51.4 142-159 525d 227 155 6.6 61.4-64.2 116-121 330i 248 155 5.8-5.9 43.5-48.7 136-151 530d 261 155 5.7 53.2-60.1 124 340i 321 155 5.1-5.2 36.7-41.5 159-179 530d xDrive 261 155 5.4 53.2 138 M3 425 155 4.1-4.3 32.1-34.0 194-204 M3 Competition package 444 155 4.0-4.2 32.1-34.0 194-204 5 Series Touring 5dr estate £38,075–£53,570 AAAAB 330e 248 139 6.1 134.5 45-49 The excellent 5 Series made in more practical form. The 520d is 316d 114 127 10.6-10.7 65.7-68.9 109-113 still the best. LxWxH 4942x1868x1464 Kerb weight 1630kg 318d 148 133 8.4-8.6 64.2-67.3 111-116 520i 181 139 8.2 45.5-48.7 136 320d Efficient Dynamics 160 143 7.8-7.9 65.7-70.6 99-113 530i 248 155 6.5 46.3 139 320d 187 146 7.2-7.3 64.2-67.3 111-116 540i xDrive 335 155 5.1 37.6 172 320d xDrive 187 144 7.3-7.4 58.9-62.8 118-126 520d 187 147 7.8 62.7-65.6 114-119 330d 254 155 5.6 58.9-60.1 131 520d xDrive 187 144 7.9 55.3-57.6 129-134 330d xDrive 254 155 5.3 53.3 139 525d 227 152 6.8 57.6-60.1 124-129 335d xDrive 308 155 4.8 51.4 145 530d 261 155 5.8 56.4 131 530d xDrive 261 155 5.6 51.3 144 3 Series Touring 5dr estate £28,130–£45,620 AAAAB There are more practical estates, butthe 3 Series’ dynamism make 6 Series Convertible 2dr open £66,980–£98,050 AAABC

M240i 218d 220d AAAAC 225d 129 147

Audi’s smallest SUV is a decent stepping stone from the A3 to the Q range. LxWxH 4191x1794x1508 Kerb weight 1205kg 114 148 187 114 148

)

AAAAC

Technical tour de force benefits from Audi’s knack of making very good limousines. LxWxH 5172x1945x1473 Kerb weight 1920kg 3.0 V6 50 TDI quattro 3.0 V6 55 TFSI quattro 3.0 V6 50 TDI quattro LWB 3.0 V6 55 TFSI qu’tro LWB

hp

) pg

Usable but no less involving or dramatic for it. V10 is deliciously brutal. LxWxH 4426x1940x1240 Kerb weight 1590kg

6.0 W12

A7 5dr coupé £66,725–£94,185

Curiously droopy-looking but otherwise impressive. RS7 is brutally quick, too. LxWxH 4974x1911x1420 Kerb weight 1955kg 4.0 V8 TFSI S7 quattro 443 4.0 V8 TFSI RS7 quattro 552 4.0 TFSI RS7 Performance 596

181 181

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R8 2dr coupé £112,450–£141,130

AAAAC 2.5 VVT

Rugged version of the A6 Avant sports a degree of off-roading ability. LxWxH 4938x1898x1534 Kerb weight 1890kg 3.0 V6 TDI 218 quattro 3.0 V6 TDI 272 quattro 3.0 BiTDI 320 quattro

2.0 TDI 184 ultra 2.0 TDI 184 quattro

5.2 V10 FSI RWS 5.2 V10 FSI quattro AAAAC 5.2 V10 FSI Plus quattro

A6 Avant 5dr estate £35,300–£88,345 1.8 TFSI 190 2.0 TFSI 252 quattro 2.0 TDI 190 ultra 2.0 TDI 190 quattro 3.0 V6 TDI 272 quattro 3.0 BiTDI 320 quattro 4.0 V8 TFSI S6 quattro 4.0 V8 TFSI RS6 quattro 4.0 TFSI RS6 Performance

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740e 740Le xDrive 740Li 750i M760Li V12 xDrive

227 261 261 315 254 254 321 443 601

152 155 155 155 155 155 155 155 155

6.9 6.1-6.2 5.8 5.2-5.3 5.4 5.3 5.6 4.7 3.7

58.8-61.4 122-127 57.6-60.1 124-132 54.3-58.9 132-137 52.3-55.4 134-142 128.4-134.5 49-50 113.0-117.7 54-56 40.4-41.5 159-164 34.9-35.3 186-189 22.0 294

X1 5dr SUV £26,900- £37,780

AAAAC

Pick of the premium bunch but a tad unrefined and has ordinary handling. LxWxH 4439x1821x1598 Kerb weight 1395kg

sDrive18i xDrive20i sDrive18d xDrive18d 4 Series Convertible 2dr open £38,260–£63,400 AAAAC xDrive20d A talented gran tourer with the ability to remove the roof. What’s xDrive25d

138 189 148 148 187 227

127 138 126 126 136 146

9.6 7.4 9.2 9.2-9.3 7.6 6.6

50.4-51.4 44.1-44.8 62.8-68.9 57.6-60.1 55.4-58.9 54.3-55.4

not to like? LxWxH 4640x1825x1384 Kerb weight 1700kg

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121-124 146-149 109-119 124-129 126-134 133-138


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AAAAC 1.6 BlueHDi 100 186 185 224

141 137 147

7.7 7.7 6.7

47.8-51.3 126-134 58.8-61.4 121-126 53.2-55.3 133-139

X3 5dr SUV £37,980–£50,350

AAAAC

Continues where the last one left off. Dynamically good and more luxurious inside. LxWxH 4708x1891x1676 Kerb weight 1750kg xDrive20i M40i xDrive20d xDrive30d

181 355 187 261

NA 155 132 149

8.3 4.8 8.0 5.8

38.7-39.8 33.6-34.4 54.3-56.5 47.1-49.6

X4 5dr SUV £38,540–£50,905

163-166 188-193 132-142 149-158

AAABC

Downsized X6 is respectable enough if not loveable, but the X3 is a better option. LxWxH 4671x1881x1624 Kerb weight 1735kg xDrive20d xDrive30d xDrive35d

187 254 308

131 145 153

8.0 5.8 5.2

51.4-57.6 129-145 46.3-49.6 149-159 47.1 157

X5 5dr SUV £48,140–£94,910

AAAAC

Accomplished and luxurious but no longer the standard-setter on SUV handling. LxWxH 4886x1938x1762 Kerb weight 1995kg sDrive25d xDrive25d xDrive30d xDrive40d M50d xDrive40e xDrive50i X5 M

227 227 254 308 375 241 442 567

136 236 143 146 155 130 155 155

7.7 7.7 6.8 5.9 5.3 6.8 4.9 4.2

52.3-53.3 50.4 47.1-47.9 47.1 42.8 83.1-85.6 29.1-29.4 25.4

X6 5dr SUV £59,360–£97,810

139-141 146-148 156-158 157-159 173 77-78 224-226 258

AAABC

The world’s first off-road coupé, but appearances make it difficult to love. LxWxH 4909x1989x1702 Kerb weight 2065kg xDrive30d xDrive40d M50d xDrive50i X6 M

254 308 375 442 567

143 146 155 155 155

6.7 5.8 5.2 4.8 4.2

47.1 44.8 42.8 29.1 25.4

i3 5dr hatch £34,070–£40,125

159 165 174 227 258 AAAAB

Our favourite high-end small car happens to be an EV, and it could change motoring. LxWxH 3999x1775x1578 Kerb weight 1245kg 94Ah 94Ah Range Extender 94Ah S 94Ah S Range Extender

167 167 180 180

93 93 99 99

7.3 8.1 6.9 7.7

i8 2dr coupé £106,310–£116,305

NA 470.8 NA 470.8

0 13-14 0 14

357

155

4.4

CAD I LL AC

CT6 4dr saloon £71,670

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70.6 68.9

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limited. LxWxH 4089x1761x1555 Kerb weight 1040kg 0.9 TCe 90 1.5 dCi 90

87 87

104 104

11.1 11.7

55.4 74.3

115 98

Another four-wheel-drive grand tourer Ferrari that is more usable than the FF. LxWxH 4922x1980x1383 Kerb weight 1865kg

Hasn’t kept pace with its rivals, but sells robust, practical charm better than most. LxWxH 3653x1643x1551 Kerb weight 940kg 68 83 88 93

96-102 103-110 104 104

14.2-14.5 11.2-12.1 12.0 12.5-12.7

51.4-55.4 57.6-68.9 57.6 62.8-64.2

119-129 133-139 114 117-119

B-Max 5dr MPV £16,145–£20,595

LxWxH 4501x1733x1552 Kerb weight 980kg

Given a rugged makeover but still lacks charm. Extremely practical, though. LxWxH 4528x1761x1559 Kerb weight 1090kg

AAABC

Sliding doors, responsive handling and keen value make this a decent small MPV. LxWxH 4077x1751x1604 Kerb weight 1274kg

1.4 90 88 1.0T Ecoboost 100 98 1.0T Ecoboost 125 123 1.0 SCe 75 71 98 14.7 52.3 120 Punto 5dr hatch £11,895–£13,770 AAACC 1.6 105 103 134.5 49 0.9 TCe 90 87 109 11.1 57.7 109 Spacious and characterful but severely dated and out of its depth 1.5 TDCi 75 72 now. LxWxH 4065x1687x1490 Kerb weight 1030kg 1.5 dCi 90 87 107 11.8 80.7 90 1.5 TDCi 95 93 1.2 69hp 68 97 14.4 53.3 124 AACCC Logan MCV Stepway 5dr estate £11,495–£13,895 AAACC 1.4 77hp 76 103 13.2 49.6 132 C-Max 5dr MPV £20,595–£28,895

Sharp-looking saloon is a replacement for the CTS. Still needs a diesel option. LxWxH 5184x1880x1472 Kerb weight 1950kg

hp

GTC4Lusso 2dr coupé £200,165–£240,402

1.2 69hp 0.9 Twinair 85 Logan MCV 5dr estate £7295–£12,095 AAACC 0.9 Twinair 90 AAAAC Lacks its stablemates’ charms but retains their cheapness. 1.3 Multijet 95

If BMW’s plug-in hybrid is what the future of the sports car looks like, we welcome it. LxWxH 4689x1942x1293 Kerb weight 1485kg 1.5 eDrive

r (b

AAAAB 1.5T Ecoboost 182PS 179 137-138 8.8 46.3-50.4 128-140 2.0T Ecoboost 250 ST 246 154 6.7 41.5 159 1.5 TDCi 95 93 112 12.2 74.3 99 AAACC 3.9T V8 592 198 3.5 24.3 265 C4 5dr hatchback £18,750–£22,730 1.5 TDCi 105 103 116 12.1 83.1 88 A good-looking hatchback but lacks the polish and refinement of 6.3 V12 670 208 3.4 18.4 350 1.5 TDCi 120 118 119-120 10.7-11.0 74.3 99 its latest rivals. LxWxH 4329x1789x1489 Kerb weight 1200kg 1.6 TDCi 95 93 112 12.5 67.3 109 1.2 PureTech 110 107 114 10.9 58.9 112 812 Superfast 2dr open £262,963 AAAAA 1.6 TDCi 115 113 120 10.8 67.3 109 1.2 PureTech 130 126 122-124 10.8-10.9 55.4-58.9 110-117 More powerful than the F12, but with better road manners making it 2.0 TDCi 150 148 129-130 8.9-9.0 64.2-70.6 105-115 the star of the range. LxWxH 4657x1971x1276 Kerb weight 1630kg 2.0 TDCi 185 ST 1.6 BlueHDi 100 96 111 11.5 78.5 95 182 135 7.8-8.3 61.4-67.3 110-119 1.6 BlueHDi 120 116 122 10.6-11.1 72.4-74.3 100-104 6.5 V12 777 211 2.9 18.9 340 AAAAC Mondeo 5dr hatch £19,445–£30,595 F I AT C4 Cactus 5dr hatchback £16,575–£20,895 AAABC Does what great Fords do, by over-delivering on practicality, Interesting and novel to look at but flawed to drive. 500 3dr hatch/2dr open £11,615–£21,115 AAABC handling and value. LxWxH 4871x 1852x1482 Kerb weight 1455kg LxWxH 4157x1729x1480 Kerb weight 965kg Super desirable, super-cute city car. Pleasant, if not involving to 1.0 SCTi Ecoboost 125 123 124 12.0 55.4 119 drive. LxWxH 3571x1627x1488 Kerb weight 865kg 1.2 PureTech 75 72 106 12.9 61.4 105 1.5 SCTi Ecoboost 160 157 133-138 9.1-9.2 44.8-48.7 134-146 1.2 PureTech 82 79 106-107 12.9-15.0 61.4-65.7 98-107 1.2 69hp 68 99 12.9 60.1-65.7 99-110 2.0 SCTi Ecoboost 240 236 149 7.9 38.7 169 1.2 PureTech 110 107 117 9.3-9.7 61.4-65.7 100-105 0.9 Twinair 85 83 107 11.0 67.3-74.3 88-90 1.5 TDCi Duratorq 120 118 119 11.7 78.5 94 1.6 BlueHDi 100 96 114 10.6-11.2 78.5-91.1 82-95 0.9 Twinair 105 103 117 10.0 67.3 99 2.0 TDCi Duratorq 150 148 132-134 9.3-9.9 61.4-68.9 107-120 1.3 Multijet 95 93 112 10.7 83.1 89 2.0 TDCi D’torq 150 AWD 148 134 10.3 58.9 124 C4 Picasso 5dr MPV £21,120–£29,145 AAAAC 2.0 TDCi Duratorq 180 177 139-140 8.3-8.6 61.4-64.2 115-120 Plushness and an improved dynamic make for a better car. 500L 5dr MPV £16,195–£21,320 AAACC 2.0 TDCi D’torq 180 AWD 177 140 9.3 54.3 134 LxWxH 4438x1826x1610 Kerb weight 1280kg A costly option but has some style to fill out some of its missing 2.0 TDCi Duratorq 210 207 145 7.9 58.9 134 substance. LxWxH NA Kerb weight NA 1.2 PureTech 110 107 116 11.5 55.4 115 1.2 PureTech 130 126 125-128 10.1 55.4-56.5 115-116 1.4 95 93 103-111 12.8-13.2 45.6-46.3 143-144 Mondeo Estate 5dr estate £20,945–£32,695 AAAAC 1.6 BlueHDi 100 96 109 12.7 74.3 100 1.4 T-Jet 120 118 114-117 10.2-11.0 42.2 155-157 A vast and enjoyable estate that majors on everything a great Ford 1.6 BlueHDi 120 116 117 11.2-11.3 72.4-74.3 100-103 1.3 Multijet 95 93 101-106 13.9-15.5 67.3-72.4 104-109 should. LxWxH 4867x 1852x1501 Kerb weight 1476kg 1.6 BlueHDi 150 145 129-130 9.7-10.1 64.2-68.9 106-115 1.6 Multijet 120 118 114-117 10.7-11.5 65.7-67.3 112-114 1.0 SCTi Ecoboost 125 123 121 12.1 54.3 120 1.5 SCTi Ecoboost 160 157 130-135 9.2-9.3 43.5-47.9 137-152 C4 Grand Picasso 5dr MPV £23,420–£30,845 AAAAC 500L Wagon 5dr MPV £18,495–£22,320 AAACC 2.0 SCTi Ecoboost 240 236 146 8.0 37.7 174 Alternative MPV offers something fresh, comfy, spacious and Loses more of its charm as it gets bigger, but it does come as a 1.5 TDCi Duratorq 120 118 116 11.9 74.3 99 quietly upmarket. LxWxH 4602x1826x1638 Kerb weight 1297kg seven-seater. LxWxH NA Kerb weight NA 2.0 TDCi Duratorq 150 148 129-130 9.4-10.0 58.9-67.3 109-123 1.2 PureTech 130 126 125-128 10.8 55.4-56.5 115-116 1.4 T-Jet 120 118 117 10.6 40.9 158 2.0 TDCi D’torq 150 AWD 148 130 10.5 57.7 127 1.6 BlueHDi 100 96 109 13.1 74.3 100 1.3 Multijet 95 93 105-106 14.4-15.7 68.9-72.4 104-107 2.0 TDCi Duratorq 180 177 135-137 8.4-8.7 58.9-62.3 117-123 1.6 BlueHDi 120 116 117 11.5-11.7 70.6 105-106 1.6 Multijet 120 118 117 10.9 67.3 112 2.0 TDCi D’torq 180 AWD 177 137 9.5 53.3 137 1.6 BlueHDi 150 145 129-130 9.8-10.1 64.2-68.9 106-115 2.0 TDCi Duratorq 210 207 142 8.1 56.5 129 500X 5dr hatch £15,430–£26,650 AAABC DACIA Familiar styling works rather well as a crossover. Drives okay, too. Mondeo Saloon 4dr saloon £26,045–£28,995 AAAAC Sandero 5dr hatch £5995–£10,795 AAACC LxWxH 4248x1796x1600 Kerb weight NA The least practical of the three bodystyles but still as usable as a A clever budget prospect but its limitations are unavoidable, even 1.6 E-Torq 110 108 112 11.5 44.1-47.1 139-147 Mondeo should be. LxWxH 4871x 1852x1482 Kerb weight 1579kg after a smart facelift. LxWxH 4069x1733x1519 Kerb weight 969kg 1.4 Multiair 140 138 118 9.8-9.9 47.1-49.6 133-139 2.0 iVCT Hybrid 187PS 157 116 9.2 67.3 99 1.0 SCe 75 71 98 14.2 54.3 117 1.4 Multiair 170 AWD 167 124 8.6 42.2 157 0.9 TCe 90 87 109 11.1 57.6 109 1.3 Multijet 95 93 107 12.9 68.9 107 Mustang 2dr coupé/open £33,645–£44,895 AAAAC 1.5 dCi 90 87 107 11.8 80.7 90 1.6 Multijet 120 118 116 10.5 65.7-68.9 109-113 American muscle built for the UK. What’s not to like? LxWxH 4784x1916x1381 Kerb weight 1653kg 2.0 Multijet 140 AWD 138 118 9.8 51.4 144 Sandero Stepway 5dr hatch £8995–£12,595 AAABC 2.3 Ecoboost 312 145 5.8 28.8-35.3 179-225 A more expensive and slightly more rugged cheap car – but still Panda 5dr hatch £9405–£18,155 AAABC 5.0 V8 410 155 4.8 12.8-23.5 281-306

A more stylish version of the X1, but we’ll have to wait and see how 1.6 BlueHDi 120 it fares dynamically. LxWxH 4360x1824x1526 Kerb weight 1460kg sDrive20i xDrive20d xDrive25d

e ow

106 109 117 112 98 108

13.8 13.2 10.9 12.1 15.1 13.0

47.1 55.4 57.7 44.1 74.3 74.3

139 119 114 149 98 98 AAABC

A fun-to-drive and easy-to-live-with five-seat MPV.

Tipo 5dr hatch £13,795–£19,795

AAABC LxWxH 4379x1828x1610 Kerb weight 1391kg 3.0 V6 AWD 411 155 5.7 28.8 223 0.9 TCe 90 87 106 12.4 55.4 115 A 90s reboot that has been on a diet. Decent to drive and ample 1.0T Ecoboost 100 98 108 12.6 55.4 117 interior space. LxWxH 4368x1792x1495 Kerb weight 1195kg 1.5 dCi 90 87 106 13.0 72.4 100 1.0T Ecoboost 125 123 116 11.4 55.4 117 CTS-V 4dr saloon £76,550 AAAAC 1.4 95 93 115 12.1 49.6 132 1.6 Ti-VCT 125 123 117 11.5 44.1 149 Eat your heart out, Germany – but lacks handling finesse of its Duster 5dr SUV £9495–£18,395 AAABC 1.6 E-Torq 110 108 119 11.5 44.8 147 1.5 TDCi 105 103 114 12.1 74.3 99 European rivals. LxWxH 5050x1863x1447 Kerb weight 1850kg A value champion. If cheap family transport is what you require, 1.4 T-Jet 120 118 124 9.6 47.1 139 1.5 TDCi 120 118 113-114 11.3-12.4 67.3-68.9 105-109 the Duster delivers. LxWxH 4315x2000x1625 Kerb weight 1147kg 1.3 Multijet 95 6.2 V8 RWD 640 199 3.7 21.7 298 93 112 12.0 76.3 99 2.0 TDCi 150 148 126-127 9.5-10.3 58.9-64.2 114-124 1.6 SCe 115 111 104-105 11.0-12.0 41.5-44.1 145-155 1.6 Multijet 120 118 124 9.8-10.2 74.3-76.3 98-99 Escalade 5dr SUV £82,515–£97,050 AACCC 1.2 TCe 125 121 109-110 10.4-11.0 44.1-46.3 138-145 Grand C-Max 5dr MPV £22,795–£30,395 AAAAC Cadillac’s luxury SUV remains too large and ungainly for the UK. 1.5 dCi 110 105 104-105 11.8-12.4 60.1-64.2 115-123 Tipo Station Wagon 5dr estate £14,795–£20,795 AAABC Mid-sized Ford handles well and can be had in five- or seven-seat

LxWxH 5179x2061x1896 Kerb weight 2635kg 6.2 V8 AWD

420

112

6.7-6.9

22.4

287

Estate version is more practical, which mixes well with its driving characteristics. LxWxH 4571x1792x1514 Kerb weight 1205kg

DS

3 3dr hatch/2dr open £15,365–£26,705

AAAAC 1.4 95 93 115 12.3 49.6 132 C AT E R H A M Premium-brand philosophy and aesthetics appeal, but the 3 lacks 1.6 E-Torq 110 108 119 11.7 44.8 147 Seven 2dr open £17,495–£49,495 AAAAB dynamic refinement. LxWxH 3948x1715x1483 Kerb weight 1090kg 1.4 T-Jet 120 118 124 9.8 47.1 139 The 360 is the sweet spot in the revised range, giving the Seven 1.2 PureTech 82 79 108 12.3 61.4 107 1.3 Multijet 95 93 112 12.3 76.3 99 just the right hit of performance. LxWxH NA Kerb weight 490kg 1.2 PureTech 110 107 117-118 9.6-10.2 61.4-65.7 100-105 1.6 Multijet 120 118 124 10.1-10.4 72.4-76.3 98-101 0.6 Suzuki 160 80 100 6.91 57.6 114 1.2 PureTech 130 126 126-127 8.9-9.0 62.8 105 0.6 Suzuki Super Sprint 95 100 6.91 57.6 114 1.6 THP 165 158 135 7.6 50.4 129 124 Spider 2dr open £21,050–£27,060 AAABC 1.6 Sigma Ti-VCT 270 135 122 5.0 NA NA 1.6 THP 210 202 143 6.5 52.3 125 The 124 name has been revived. Although not perfect, it is fun to drive. LxWxH 4054x1740x1233 Kerb weight 1050kg 1.6 Sigma Ti-VCT 310 152 127 4.9 NA NA 1.6 BlueHDi 100 96 113-117 10.8-11.2 80.7-83.1 87-92 2.0 Duratec 360 180 130 4.8 NA NA 1.6 BlueHDi 120 116 118 9.3 78.5 94 1.4 Multiair Turbo 140 138 134 7.5-7.6 42.8-44.1 148-153 2.0 Duratec 420 210 136 3.8 NA NA FORD 2.0 Supercharged 620S 310 145 3.4 NA NA 4 5dr hatch £21,335–£26,405 AAABC 2.0 Supercharged 620R 310 155 2.79 NA NA A jack of all trades, master of none. Nice styling, though. Ka+ 5dr hatch £9795–£12,095 AAABC

LxWxH 4284x1810x1497 Kerb weight 1255kg CHEVROLET

1.2 PureTech 130 126 123 9.9 AAABC 1.6 THP 165 158 131 8.7 An affordable American muscle car, but LHD only and less usable 1.6 BlueHDi 120 116 117-120 10.9-11.4 and unrefined. LxWxH 4784x1897 Kerb weight 1539kg 1.6 BlueHDi 180 175 127-135 8.6 2.0 Turbo 268 149 5.9-6.1 34.9-35.3 181-184 6.2 V8 446 155-180 4.4-4.8 22.1-25.4 252-290 4 Crossback 5dr hatch £23,655–£30,205

Camaro 2dr coupé/convertible £32,540–£45,030

Corvette 2dr coupé/open £64,010–£110,250

AAABC

LHD only and less usable and less able than rivals, but disarming and inimitable. LxWxH 4492x1872x1239 Kerb weight 1539kg 6.2 V8 6.2 V8 Z06

459 650

180 196

4.1-4.2 3.7-3.8

22.8-23.0 282-284 20.0-22.2 291-322

CITROEN

C-Zero 5dr hatchback £20,495

AAACC

Well-engineered electric city car, but too expensive and lacks the range of rivals. LxWxH 3475x1475x1600 Kerb weight 1120kg Electric

64

80

15.9

NA

C1 3dr hatch/5dr hatch £9,120–£13,475

0 AAABC

Slightly cheaper than its Toyota sibling but less visually charming. LxWxH 3455x1615x1460 Kerb weight 855kg 1.0 VTI 68 1.2 PureTech 82

67 79

99 106

13.0-15.9 67.3-68.9 95-97 10.9 65.7 99

C3 5dr hatchback £11,555–£17,925

AAABC

Funky, fresh look gives a lease of life, shame that underneath isn’t the same. LxWxH 3996x1749x1474 Kerb weight 976kg 1.2 PureTech 68 1.2 PureTech 82 1.2 PureTech 110 1.6 BlueHDi 75 1.6 BlueHDi 100

66 79 107 72 96

107 107 117 106 115

14.0 12.8 9.3 13.7 10.6

60.1 60.1 61.4 78.5 76.3

C3 Aircross 5dr hatchback £13,995–£19,810

108 108 103 92 95 AAABC

79 107 127

103 115 124

15.9 11.3 10.4

82 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 11 APRIL 2018

55.4 56.5 53.3

114-116 130 100-111 115

3.9T V8 116 115 119

The Ka gets two extra doors, and it’s a breath of fresh air for the range. LxWxH 3929x1910x1524 Kerb weight 1055kg 1.2 Ti-VCT 70 1.2 Ti-VCT 85

69 83

99 105

15.3 13.3

56.5 56.5

114 114

98 123 118 148

107 115 111-112 124-126

13.6 12.2 12.3-13.4 9.8-10.4

54.3 54.3 62.8-64.2 56.5-61.4

S-Max 5dr MPV £26,445–£38,395

119 119 113-119 119-129

AAAAC

Better to drive and better looking than most but not quite the class leader it was. LxWxH 4976x1916x1655 Kerb weight 1645kg 1.5 SCTi Ecoboost 160 2.0 SCTi Ecoboost 240 2.0 TDCi Duratorq 120 2.0 TDCi Duratorq 150 2.0 TDCi D’torq 150 AWD 2.0 TDCi Duratorq 180 2.0 TDCi D’torq 180 AWD 2.0 TDCi 210 Bi-turbo

157 236 118 148 148 177 177 207

124 140 114 122-123 122 129-131 128 135

9.9 8.4 13.4 10.8 12.1 9.5-9.7 10.5 8.8

Galaxy 5dr MPV £27,995–£38,645

43.5 35.8 56.5 56.5 52.3 56.5 48.7 51.4

149 180 129 129-134 139 129-134 149 144 AAABC

Huge seven-seat MPV. Easy to place on the road but not cheap to

Fiesta 3dr/5dr hatch £13,165–£21,675

AAAAB buy. LxWxH 4848x1916x1747 Kerb weight 1708kg AAABC Dynamically superb and continues the Fiesta legacy. No longer the 1.5 SCTi Ecoboost 160 157 124 10.0 43.5 149 class leader, though. LxWxH 4040x1735x1476 Kerb weight 1113kg 2.0 SCTi Ecoboost 240 A more rugged version of the DS4 doesn’t make it any better. 236 140 8.6 35.8 180 LxWxH 4284x1810x1497 Kerb weight 1255kg 1.1 Ti-VCT 70 69 99 14.9 64.2 101 2.0 TDCi Duratorq 120 118 114 13.6 56.5 129 1.2 PureTech 130 126 123 9.9 56.5 116 1.1 Ti-VCT 85 83 105 14.0 64.2 101 2.0 TDCi Duratorq 150 148 122-123 10.9 54.3-56.5 129-134 1.6 BlueHDi 120 116 117 10.9-11.4 67.3-72.4 103-111 1.0T Ecoboost 100 98 111-113 10.5-12.2 54.3-65.7 97-118 2.0 TDCi D’torq 150 AWD 148 122 12.2 52.3 139 1.6 BlueHDi 180 175 127-135 8.6 64.2 115 1.0T Ecoboost 125 123 121 9.9 65.7 98 2.0 TDCi Duratorq 180 177 129-131 9.6-9.8 52.3-56.5 129-134 1.0T Ecoboost 140 138 125 9.0 62.8 102 2.0 TDCi Dtorq 180 AWD 177 128 10.6 48.7 149 5 5dr hatch £28,460–£34,710 AAABC 1.5 TDCi 85 83 108 12.5 88.3 82 2.0 TDCi 210 Bi-turbo 207 135 8.9 51.4 144 A design marvel. Shame it doesn’t function all that well. 1.5 TDCi 120 118 121 9.0 88.3 89 LxWxH 4530x2128 Kerb weight 1605kg EcoSport 5dr SUV £17,495–£21,595 AAACC 1.6 THP 165 158 126 9.5 47.9 136 Focus 5dr hatch £20,195–£36,295 AAAAC Facelifted version of the pumped-up Fiesta is okay, but developingworld roots show. LxWxH 4096x1765x1653 Kerb weight 1280kg 1.6 BlueHDi 120 116 117-119 11.7-11.9 68.9-70.6 104-108 Appeals for its dynamics, but not as it once did. Spacious, stylish and well-priced. LxWxH 4360x2010x1469 Kerb weight 1276kg 2.0 BlueHDi 150 145 127 9.9 65.7 113 1.0T Ecoboost 100 99 NA NA NA 127 2.0 BlueHDi 180 175 137 9.2 62.8 117 1.6 Duratec Ti-VCT 85 83 106 14.9 47.9 136 1.0T Ecoboost 125 123 111 12.7 48.7-54.3 119-134 1.6 Duratec Ti-VCT 105 103 116 12.3 47.9 136 1.0T Ecoboost 140 138 116 11.8 54.3 119 7 Crossback 5dr SUV £28,050–£43,535 AAABC 1.0T Ecoboost 100 98 115 12.5 61.4-65.7 99-105 1.5 TDCi Duratorq 100 99 99 14.0 68.8 107 DS’s first premium SUV certainly has the right price tag, equipment 1.0T Ecoboost 125 123 119-120 11.0-12.0 51.4-60.1 108-125 1.5 TDCi Duratorq 125 123 112 10.9 62.7 116-119 and appeal. LxWxH 4570x1895x1620 Kerb weight 1420kg 1.5T Ecoboost 150 148 129-130 8.9-9.2 46.3-51.4 127-140 1.6 THP 225 EAT8 218 141 8.3 57.9 135 1.5T Ecoboost 182PS 179 137-138 8.6-8.9 46.3-51.4 127-140 Kuga 5dr SUV £22,595–£36,095 AAAAB 1.5 BlueHDi 130 NA 121 11.7 68.9 107 2.0T Ecoboost 250 ST 246 154 6.5 41.5 159 Bigger and sharper-looking than before but still retains its taut, responsive handling. LxWxH 4524x1838x1689 Kerb weight 1560kg 2.0 BlueHDi 180 EAT8 171 134 9.9 57.6 128 2.3T Ecoboost 350 RS 345 165 4.7 36.7 175 107Kw Electric Motor 140 84 11.0 NA 0 1.5 Ecoboost 120 118 112 12.5 44.8 145 FERRARI 1.5 TDCi 95 93 112 12.0 74.3 99 1.5 Ecoboost 150 148 121 9.7 44.8 145 Portofino 2dr open £166,180 AAAAC 1.5 TDCi 105 103 116 11.9 83.1 88 1.5 Ecoboost 182PS AWD 179 124 10.1 37.7 173 The entry-level Ferrari has the power, the looks and the touring 1.5 TDCi 120 118 119-120 10.5-10.8 74.3 99 1.5 TDCi 120 118 106-108 12.4-12.7 58.9-64.2 115-124 ability. LxWxH 4586x1938x1318 Kerb weight 1664kg 2.0 TDCi 150 148 129-130 8.7-8.8 64.2-70.6 105-115 1.5 TDCi 150 148 119-121 9.9-10.1 54.3-60.1 122-135 3.9T V8 582 198 3.5 26.4 245 2.0 TDCi 185 ST 182 135 7.7-8.1 61.4-67.3 110-119 1.5 TDCi 150 AWD 148 118 10.9 54.3 134 1.5 TDCi 180 AWD 177 124-126 9.2-10.0 54.3 134-135 AAAAA Focus Estate 5dr estate £21,295–£30,255 AAAAC 488 2dr coupé/open £197,418-£219,274 Calm ride mixed with explosive performance. Well-mannered and comfortable, but a Skoda Octavia will carry AAABC Edge 5dr SUV £35,195–£42,695

LxWxH 4568x1952x1213 Kerb weight 1475kg

Funky-looking C3 gets a jacked-up, rugged SUV look. LxWxH 4155x1765x1637 Kerb weight 1088kg 1.2 PureTech 82 1.2 PureTech 110 1.2 PureTech 130

56.5-57.6 50.4 67.3-74.3 64.2

form. Good value, too. LxWxH 4379x1828x1610 Kerb weight 1493kg 1.0T Ecoboost 100 1.0T Ecoboost 125 1.5 TDCi 120 2.0 TDCi 150

650

203-205 3.0

more. LxWxH 4560x2010x1469 Kerb weight 1313kg 24.7

260

1.6 Duratec Ti-VCT 105 1.0T Ecoboost 100 1.0T Ecoboost 125 1.5T Ecoboost 150

103 98 123 148

116 115 119-120 129-130

12.5 12.7 11.2-12.2 8.9-9.2

47.1 58.9 51.4-58.9 46.3-50.4

139 109 110-125 128-140

Mid-sized, US-developed SUV joins Ford’s fleet to take on Europe’s big SUVs. LxWxH 4808x1928x1692 Kerb weight 1912kg 2.0 TDCi Duratorq 180 2.0 TDCi Bi-turbo 210

177 207

124 131

9.9 9.4

47.9-48.7 149-152 47.9-48.7 149-152


N E W CAR PR I CES P

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Kona 5dr hatch £16,195–£25,980

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AAAAC

Hyundai’s first crossover is the perfect blend of practicality, value and style LxWxH 4165x1800x1550 Kerb weight 1233kg 1.0 T-GDi 120 2WD 1.6 T-GDi 177PS 4WD

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GT 2dr coupé £420,000

AAAAC

112 127

12.0 7.9

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F-Type Convertible 2dr open £56,280–£118,165

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650

216

3.0

NA

NA

G I N E T TA

AAABC

A balanced, affordable and fine-looking track-day car. Some of the finish isn’t quite up to snuff. LxWxH NA Kerb weight 840kg 125

9.0-9.6

Q30 5dr hatch £20,850–£33,865

52.3-54.3 117-125 42.2 153

155 161 171 171 171 171 186 195

5.7 5.3-5.7 4.9-5.5 5.1 4.8 4.9 4.1 3.7

39.2 28.8-33.6 28.8-32.9 31.7 32.9 31.7 25.0 25.0

AAABC the F-Pace’s? LxWxH 4411x1984x1649 Kerb weight 1775kg 2.0 D150 148 124 9.5 60.1 2.0 D150 AWD 148 120 9.9-10.1 50.4-54.3 42.8-47.1 159-174 2.0 D180 AWD 177 127-128 8.7-9.4 50.4-54.3 2.0 D240 AWD 236 139 7.0 45.6 2.0 P250 AWD 245 143 6.6 36.7 AAABC 2.0 P300 AWD 295 151 5.9 35.3

Infiniti’s first hatch uses the A-Class blueprint. Great to look at, not so good to drive. LxWxH 4425x1805x1495 Kerb weight 1407kg

1.6t 122 1.6t 156 H O N DA 2.0t 211 Jazz 5dr hatch £14,115–£18,325 AAAAC 2.0t 211 AWD Not the most compact or vivacious but has decent handling and is 1.5d 109 cleverly packaged.LxWxH 3995x1694x1550 Kerb weight 1066kg 2.2d 170 1.3 DOHC 99 113-118 11.2-12.3 55.4-61.4 106-120 2.2d 170 AWD 135

126 INFINITI

G40 Club Car 2dr coupé £35,000 (+champ pack) 1.8 Zetec

197

NA

NA

NA

120 153 208 208 107 167 167

124 134 146 143 118 137 134

9.4 8.9 7.2 7.3 11.9-12.0 8.3 8.5

49.6 48.7 45.6 42.2 65.7-72.4 64.2 57.6

133 134 143 156 103-111 115 127

some dynamism. LxWxH 4518x1799x1434 Kerb weight 1275kg

car. LxWxH 4425x1815x1530 Kerb weight 1542kg

1.0 VTEC Turbo 129PS 1.5 VTEC Turbo 182PS 2.0 VTEC Turbo Type R

2.0t 211 AWD 2.2d 170 AWD

125-126 10.2-11.2 55.4-60.1 106-117 125-136 8.2-8.5 46.3-48.7 133-139 169 5.8 36.7 176

208 167

143 134

163 199-234 203-234 211 203 211 269 269

F-Pace 5dr SUV £34,730–£53,365

7.3 8.5

42.2 57.6

155 128

124 137-147 137-147 162 174 181

AAAAC

Credible first SUV effort is as refined and dynamic as a Jaguar should be. LxWxH 4746x2070x1667 Kerb weight 1690kg

2.0d 163 2.0 20d 180 2.0 20d 180 AWD 2.0 25d 240 AWD 3.0 V6 30d 300 AWD 2.0 25t 250 AWD Civic 5dr hatch £18,890–£32,995 AAAAC QX30 5dr hatch £30,195–£34,225 AAABC 2.0 30t 300 AWD A fresh look while remaining practical, refined and upmarket. Lacks Q30 with a more rugged look, but doesn’t improve on the standard 3.0 V6 S 380 AWD 127 179 315

)

160 177 177 236 295 246 295 374

121 129 129 135 150 135 145 155

10.2 8.5 8.7 7.2 6.2 6.8 6.0 5.5

57.7 55.4 53.3-54.3 48.7 47.1 38.2 37.0 31.7

129 134 134-139 153 159 170 174 209

118 140

121 10.3 127-130 9.2-11.3

2.0t 211 3.0t V6 405 3.5 V6 Hybrid 364 AAABC 3.5 V6 Hybrid 364 AWD

72.4-74.3 99-103 42.8-45.6 146-155

HR-V 5dr SUV £19,320–£26,860

208 399 359 359

152 155 155 155

7.2 5.1 5.1 5.4

44.8 31 45.6 41.5

146 206 144 159

Q60 2dr coupé £34,300–£47,235

1.5 i-VTEC 1.6 i-DTEC

Good-looking coupé that is half-baked in most places compared with its rivals. LxWxH 2850x2052x1390 Kerb weight 1722kg

116-119 10.2-11.4 49.6-52.3 125-134 119 10.0-10.5 68.9-70.6 104-108

2.0t 211PS AAAAC 3.0t V6 405

CR-V 5dr SUV £23,760–£35,565

208 399

146 155

7.3 5.0

41.5 30.1

AAABC

Q70 4dr saloon £34,260–£48,105

Big Infiniti is spacious but has limited practicality. Daimler diesel is coarse and slow. LxWxH 4980x1845x1493 Kerb weight 1826kg

2.2d 170 AAAAB 3.7 V6 320 Honda’s supercar given a modern reboot, and it’s some piece of 3.5 V6 Hybrid 364

NSX 2dr coupé £144,755

engineering. LxWxH 4487x1939x1204 Kerb weight 1725kg 3.5 V6 hybrid

492

191

2.9

28.2

228

HYU N DAI

8.9 6.2 5.3

57.6-58.9 124-128 26.2 249 45.6 145

QX70 5dr SUV £45,650–£57,150

AAAAC 3.7 V6 320 5.0 V8 390

Prioritises maturity over fun, resulting in a car that is practical and well-priced. LxWxH 3665x1660x1500 Kerb weight 933kg 64 84

137 155 155

96-97 14.7-14.9 60.1-70.6 93-108 103-109 12.1-13.8 47.9-57.6 114-139

315 384

111 113 122

10.2 64.2 115 9.5-10.2 48.7-55.4 134-150 8.9 47.9 155

138 138 182 197 268

116 117 127 126 112

10.9 12.0 8.8 8.5-8.7 8.4

145 149

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Stinger 4dr saloon £31,995–£40,495

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Sleek coupé-shaped saloon has the appeal and dynamics to rival Europe’s best LxWxH 4830x1870x1400 Kerb weight 1717kg 2.0 T-GDi 3.3 V6 T-GDi 2.2 CRDi

244 365 197

149 168 143

5.8 4.7 7.3

35.8 28.5 48.7

Venga 5dr hatch £12,755–£19,330

181 225 154 AAACC

A versatile interior, but firm ride and high price disappoint. LxWxH 4075x1765x1600 Kerb weight 1253kg 89 123 89 114

104 111-115 103 113

12.4 50.4 10.4-11.1 43.4-47.9 13.7 64.2 11.0 64.2

Carens 5dr MPV £19,500–£28,400

130 139-150 115 115

AAABC

Nicely up to scratch without feeling cheap or austere, but no class leader. LxWxH 4525x1805x1605 Kerb weight 1483kg 1.6 GDi 1.7 CRDi 114 1.7 CRDi 139

133 114 139

115 10.9 45.6 143 110 12.7 62.8-67.3 109-118 117-120 10.0-10.9 58.9 127

Niro 5dr SUV £23,135–£27,995

AAABC

Kia’s first full hybrid is a solid attempt, but it lacks the refinement of better rivals. LxWxH 4355x1805x1545 Kerb weight 1500kg 1.6 GDi Hybrid 1.6 GDi Hybrid PHEV

139 139

101 107

11.1 10.4

74.3 217.3

Stonic 5dr SUV £16,295–£20,495

88 29 AAABC

Kia’s first crossover is striking and reasonably good considering the value. LxWxH 4140x1760x1520 Kerb weight 1160kg 1.4 MPI 1.0 T-GDi 1.6 CRDI

98 118 108

107 115 112

12.2 9.9 10.9

51.4 56.5 67.3

125 115 109

Sportage 5dr SUV £19,195–£32,425

AAABC

Good ride, handling and usability. Looks good and is decent value. LxWxH 4480x1855x1635 Kerb weight 1454kg 1.6 GDi 1.6 T-GDi 1.7 CRDi 114 1.7 CRDi 139 2.0 CRDi 134 2.0 CRDi 182

130 174 114 139 134 182

113 125-126 109 115 114 125

11.1 8.8-9.2 11.1 11.1 10.1-11.6 9.2

42.2-44.8 37.2-37.7 61.4 57.6 47.9-54.3 44.8-47.9

147-156 175-177 119 129 139-154 154-166

22.4-23.4 282-292 20.9 316

seven-seater. LxWxH 4780x1890x1685 Kerb weight 1932kg

53.3 50.4 50.4 46.3-50.4 29.4

Grand Cherokee 5dr SUV £48,440–£55,980

139 147 149 149-159 223

2.2 CRDi

197

3.0 V6 CRD 6.4 V8 Hemi SRT

247 461

126 160

8.2 5.0

184 315

Heavy-duty off-roader lacks on-road manners. LxWxH 4223x1873x1840 Kerb weight 1827kg 197 280

107 112

42.8-49.6 149-174 AAAAC

Eccentric looks and sharp handling but expensive. LxWxH 3738x1915x1202 Kerb weight 847kg 290 280

143 143

3.9 4.1

34.0 34.0

189 189

LAMBORGHINI

Huracán 2dr coupé £162,900–£215,500

AAAAC

Junior Lambo mixes usability and drama skilfully. Performante is AABCC the most rounded. LxWxH 4459x1924x1165 Kerb weight 1389kg

Wrangler 2dr/4dr SUV £34,740–£42,175 2.8 CRD 3.6 V6

9.0-9.6

X-Bow 0dr open £57,345–£70,717

AAABC 2.0 R 2.0 GT

40.4 20.9

127 KTM

The best Jeep on sale by some margin. Comfortable and wellequipped. LxWxH 4828x1943x1792 Kerb weight 2266kg

AAACC

A big, powerful SUV but with none of the finesse of the BMW X5 or Land Rovers. LxWxH 4865x1640x1680 Kerb weight 2012kg

i10 5dr hatch £9540–£13,760 1.0 DOHC 1.2 DOHC

167 315 359

118 138 167

roomy. LxWxH 4624x1859x1670 Kerb weight 1738kg

2.0d 140 FWD 2.0d 140 4WD 2.2d 185 4WD 2.2d 200 4WD AAACC 3.2 270 4WD

Tardis-like SUV stalwart has lots of space for five and a big boot. LxWxH 4605x1820x1685 Kerb weight 1515kg 113-125 9.6-11.2 53.3-64.2 115-139 113-118 10.0-12.3 36.7-39.2 168-179

1.6d Multiair II 120 2.0d Multiair II 140 4WD 2.0d Multiair II 170 4WD

156 210

1.6 i-DTEC 2.0 i-VTEC

118 152

r (b

Cherokee 5dr SUV £32,685–£42,850 AABCC Sorento 5dr SUV £28,995–£41,995 AAAAC AACCC Hamstrung by poor UK specification. Uninspiring but practical and Kia moves upmarket with a smart, well-priced and nicely appointed

Cleverly packaged and comfortable. Bland performance and forgettable, though. LxWxH 4294x1772x1605 Kerb weight 1241kg 128 118

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JEEP

Renegade 5dr SUV £18,250–£29,810

Middling compact crossover with chunky looks but no obvious Q50 4dr saloon £29,860–£48,820 AAACC charm. LxWxH 4236x1805x1667 Kerb weight 1346kg Civic Tourer 5dr estate £21,405–£23,660 AAAAC Credible compact saloon competitor with some novel touches. 1.6 E-torQ 110 108 110 11.8 47.1 141 Outgoing estate is versatile, comfortable and frugal; only its price LxWxH 4790x1820x1445 Kerb weight 1676kg 1.4 Multiair II 140 138 112 10.9-11.0 47.1-47.9 137-140 marks its scorecard. LxWxH 4370x1770x1470 Kerb weight 1382kg 2.2d 170 167 143-144 8.7-8.9 62.8-65.7 114-119 1.4 Multiair II 170 4WD 167 122 8.8 40.9 160 1.6 i-DTEC 1.8 i-VTEC

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1.4 1.6 AAAAC 1.4 CRDi Jaguar’s second SUV looks enticing, but can it make an impact like 1.6 CRDi

Santa Fe 5dr SUV £32,845–£39,995 2.2 CRDi Blue Drive 200

km

AAAAB

The GT is back as a race car for the road. Compelling if not perfect. Another big Korean SUV with lots of space for not a lot of cash. LxWxH 4808x1928x1692 Kerb weight 1912kg Slick and comfy. LxWxH 4700x1880x1675 Kerb weight 1939kg 3.5 V6 Ecoboost

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(g/ O2

Costs serious money, but you get a serious car with a likeable wild side. LxWxH 4482x1923x1308 Kerb weight 1545kg

2.0 i4 300 295 3.0 V6 340 335 3.0 V6 380 374 Tucson 5dr SUV £19,855–£33,600 AAABC 3.0 V6 380 AWD 374 Classy, roomy cabin and predictable handling. A very competitive 3.0 V6 400 394 SUV. LxWxH 4475x1850x1650 Kerb weight 1379kg 3.0 V6 400 AWD 394 1.6 GDi Blue Drive 132 130 113 11.5 44.8 147 5.0 V8 550 R AWD 542 1.7 CRDi Blue Drive 116 114 109-115 11.5-13.7 57.6-61.7 119-129 5.0 V8 575 SVR AWD 567 2.0 CRDi Blue Drive 136 134 114-116 10.6-12.0 47.1-58.9 127-156 2.0 CRDi Blue Drive 185 182 125 9.5-9.9 43.5-47.9 154-170 E-Pace 5dr SUV £28,500–£50,710 118 175

hp

h mp

10.6-10.7 31.4-32.1 231-235 8.1-8.9 23.7-25.0 263-276

JAGUAR

XE 4dr saloon £32,015–£48,045

5.2 V10 580-2 5.2 V10 610-4 5.2 V10 Performante

562 593 621

198-199 3.4-3.6 201 3.2-3.4 201 2.9

17.0-19.6 278-283 16.0-17.0 280-285 20.6 314

Aventador 2dr coupé £278,000

AAAAC

KIA AAAAB Big, hairy V12 has astonishing visuals and performance. Handling Tops the pile thanks to outstanding driver appeal. Poised and Picanto 5dr hatch £9495–£13,995 AAACC could be sweeter. LxWxH 4797x2030x1136 Kerb weight 1575kg i20 Coupé 3dr hatch £13,860–£16,260 AAABC engaging but refined. LxWxH 4672x1967x1416 Kerb weight 1450kg Nice drive and cabin, but now overshadowed by rivals. 6.5 V12 S 718 217 2.9 16.7 394 Appealing budget supermini in sleek coupé form, but lacks a little 2.0d 163 160 132 8.2-8.4 68.9-75.0 99-106 LxWxH 3595x1406x1485 Kerb weight 935kg dynamically. LxWxH 4045x1730x1449 Kerb weight 980kg 2.0 20d 180 177 140 7.8 67.3 109-111 1.0 MPI 66 100 13.8 64.2 101 Urus 2dr coupé £NA AAAAC 1.2 84 82 106 12.8 55.4 119 2.0 20d 180 AWD 177 140 7.9 60.6 123 1.25 MPI 83 100-107 11.6-13.2 52.3-61.4 106-124 Lambo’s second SUV is more alluring and aims to use the V8’s power better. LxWxH 5112x2016x1638 Kerb weight 2200kg 1.0 T-GDi 100 98 116 10.8 61.4 107 2.0 25d 240 AWD 236 155 6.1 54.4 137

2.0 20t 200 197 148 7.1 45.1 144 AAAAC 2.0 25t 250 246 155 6.3 45.1 144 2.0 25t 250 AWD 246 155 6.2 42.2 154 2.0 30t 300 AWD 295 155 5.5 41.5 157 1.2 75 74 99 13.6 55.4 119 3.0 V6 S 380 374 155 5.0 34.9 194 1.2 84 82 106 12.8 58.9 112 1.4 100 98 106 13.2 45.6 143 XF 4dr saloon £32,490–£51,100 AAAAB 1.0 T-GDi 100 98 109-116 10.7-10.9 57.6-64.2 102-117 Outstandingly broad-batted dynamically, plus a pleasant cabin. LxWxH 4954x1987x1457 Kerb weight 1545kg 1.0 T-GDi 120 118 118 10.2 56.5 115 2.0d E-Performance 163 160 132 8.7 68.9-70.6 104-109 i30 5dr hatch £16,995–£27,995 AAABC 2.0 20d 180 177 136 8.0-8.1 65.7 114 As good as we’ve come to expect from Hyundai, but not one inch 2.0 20d 180 AWD 177 136 8.4 57.7 129 better. LxWxH 4340x1795x1455 Kerb weight 1194kg 2.0 20d 240 236 153 6.5 53.3 139 1.0 T-GDi 120 118 118 11.1 56.5 115 2.0 20d 240 AWD 236 153 6.5 51.4 144 1.4 T-GDi 140 138 127-130 8.9-9.2 51.4-52.3 124-125 3.0 V6 30d 300 295 155 6.2 51.4 144 1.6 CRDi 110 108 118 11.0-11.2 68.9-74.3 99-109 2.0 20t 200 197 146 7.5 41.5 154 2.0 T-GDi 250 N 247 155 6.4 40.4 159 2.0 25t 250 246 152 6.6 41.5 154 2.0 T-GDi 275 N Performance 272 155 6.1 39.8 163 2.0 25t 250 AWD 246 150 6.6 40.9 159 2.0 30t 300 AWD 295 155 5.8 40.0 163 i30 Tourer 5dr estate £17,495–£25,785 AAABC 3.0 V6 S 380 374 155 5.3 34.4 198

i20 5dr hatch £11,755–£17,760

Combines decent performance with good practicality and running costs. LxWxH 4035x1734x1474 Kerb weight 980kg

Another solid car. Good value and practical but lacks excitement. LxWxH 4585x1795x1465 Kerb weight 1245kg 1.0 T-GDi 120 1.4 T-GDi 140 1.6 CRDi 110 1.6 CRDi 136

118 138 108 134

117 126-129 117 123

11.4 9.2-9.5 11.3 10.9

54.3 51.4 74.3 65.7

120 125-129 99 112

XF Sportbrake 5dr estate £34,910–£59,595

Rio 5dr hatch £11,995–£17,935

1.0 T-GDi 118 1.25 MPi 1.4 MPi 1.4 CRDi 76 1.4 CRDi 89

118 83 98 76 89

118 9.8 107 12.5 103-108 11.8-13.4 102 13.5 108 11.6

60.1 58.8 46.3-56.5 80.7 74.3

98 133 118 201 134

114 118 118 143 117-124

12.3 9.8 10.7 7.3 9.5-10.2

47.1 52.3 57.6 38.2 72.4-78.5

Cee’d Sportswagon 5dr estate £18,525–£25,335

22.2

290

Slightly more practical and easier to live with thanks to those two rear doors. LxWxH 4370x1985x1635 Kerb weight 1679kg

Dripping with desirability; poised and capable on- and off-road. Not practical, though. LxWxH 4370x1980x1605 Kerb weight 1621kg 145 174 234 281

113 121 135 144

10.6 8.5 6.9 6.0

Range Rover Evoque 5dr SUV £30,760–£55,300

2.0 eD4 2.0 TD4 2.0 SD4 2.0 Si4 240 AAABC 2.0 Si4 290

116 11.0 54.3 102-109 121-122 10.1-10.5 67.3-72.4 120

Pro_cee’d 3dr hatch £18,155–£23,835

3.6

138 124 115 170 94-103

Slightly bigger than the hatch but equally forgettable. LxWxH 4505x1780x1485 Kerb weight 1305kg 118 134

189

Range Rover Evoque Coupé 3dr SUV £33,150–£55,300 AAAAC

2.0 eD4 2.0 TD4 2.0 SD4 AAABC 2.0 Si4

Cee’d 5dr hatch £15,365–£24,335 1.4 1.6 GDi 1.0 T-GDi 1.6 T-GDi 1.6 CRDi

631

L AN D ROVE R

107 109 114-140 92 98

Another looker from Schreyer, but dynamically forgettable. LxWxH 4065x1725x1445 Kerb weight 1254kg

AAAAB 1.0 T-GDi 1.6 CRDi

Superb XF is now available in the more practical Sportbrake form. It’s a win-win. LxWxH 4954x1987x1496 Kerb weight 1660kg

AAABC 4.0 V8

Looks great and is well-priced, but nowhere near its European rivals. LxWxH 4065x1725x1445 Kerb weight 1155kg

145 174 234 234 281

113 121-124 135 135 144

10.6 8.5-9.5 6.9 6.9 6.0

67.3 57.7 48.7 38.7

109 129 153 173 AAAAC

65.7 55.4-58.9 48.7 38.7 37.2

113 125-134 153 165 173

Range Rover Evoque Convertible 2dr SUV £45,250–£55,585

AAABC

Loses its roof but retains its ability to stray from the asphalt. LxWxH 4370x1980x1609 Kerb weight 2037kg

AAABC 2.0 TD4 174 121 9.7 49.6 149 2.0 SD4 234 135 7.5 45.6 164 2.0 Si4 234 135 7.6 32.9 201 1.6 GDi 133 118 9.8 52.3 124 1.0 T-GDi 118 118 10.7 57.6 115 Range Rover Velar 5dr SUV £44,830–£72,630 AAAAC 1.6 T-GDi 201 143 7.3 38.2 170 Dubbed the most car-like Landie ever and it doesn’t disappoint. 1.6 CRDi 134 117-124 9.5-10.2 72.4-74.3 99-103 Expensive. LxWxH 4803x2032x1665 Kerb weight 1829kg AAAAC 2.0 D180 174 125 8.9 52.5 142 Mixes dynamism and refinement so well, but not as spacious or Soul 5dr hatch £14,510–£30,495 AAABC 2.0 D240 234 135 7.3 48.7 154 i40 Tourer 5dr estate £21,585–£29,585 AAABC cosseting as some. LxWxH 5130x1899x1460 Kerb weight 1835kg Looks divide opinion. Better value now but still hardly the best 3.0 V6 D300 292 150 6.5 44.1 167 option. LxWxH 4140x1800x1600 Kerb weight 1275kg A practical estate but still rather dull and ordinary. 3.0d V6 300 295 155 6.2 49.6 149 2.0 P250 243 135 6.7 37.2 173 LxWxH 4775x1815x1470 Kerb weight 1514kg 3.0 V6 340 335 155 5.9 31.0 211 1.6 GDi 130 115 10.6 43.5 152 2.0 P300 292 145 6.0 36.2 178 1.7 CRDi Blue Drive 115 113 118 12.6 67.3 110 5.0 V8 510 503 155 4.9 25.5 264 1.6 T-GDi 201 122 7.5 40.9 156 3.0 V6 P380 370 155 5.7 30.1 214 1.7 CRDi Blue Drive 141 139 124 10.5-11.0 60.1-65.7 114-123 5.0 V8 R 575 567 186 4.2 25.5 264 1.6 CRDi 134 112-113 10.7-10.8 56.5-58.8 127-130 30kWh Electric Drive 109 90 11.0 NA 0 Range Rover Sport 5dr SUV £61,615–£99,680 AAAAB Ioniq 5dr hatch £20,885–£26,795 AAABC F-Type 2dr coupé £50,795–£112,680 AAAAB Bigger and better; a cut-price Range Rover rather than a jumped-up First attempt at electrification for the masses is a good effort. A full-blooded assault on Porsche’s backyard, with noise, power Optima 4dr saloon £21,635–£33,995 AAACC Discovery. LxWxH 4850x2073x1780 Kerb weight 2111kg LxWxH 4470x1820x1450 Kerb weight 1370kg and beauty. LxWxH 4482x1923x1311 Kerb weight 1525kg Looks the part but is well off the pace set by its European rivals. 2.0 SD4 234 128 8.3 45.6 164 LxWxH 4855x1860x1465 Kerb weight 1590kg 1.6 Hybrid 141 139 115 10.8-11.1 70.6-83.1 79-92 2.0 i4 300 295 155 5.7 39.2 163 2.0 P400e PHEV 398 137 6.3 101.0 64 1.6 Plug-in Hybrid 141 139 110 10.6 256.8 26 3.0 V6 340 335 161 5.3-5.7 28.8-33.6 199-234 1.7 CRDi 3.0 SDV6 297 140 6.8 40.4 185 139 121-126 9.7-10.6 64.2-67.3 110-116 Electric Motor 118 103 10.2 NA 0 3.0 V6 380 374 171 4.9-5.5 28.8-32.9 203-234 2.0 GDi PHEV 4.4 SDV8 330 140 6.5 33.6 219 202 119 9.1 176.6 37 3.0 V6 380 AWD 374 171 5.1 31.7 211 3.0 V6 330 130 6.8 26.9 243 AAABC 3.0 V6 400 ix20 5dr hatch £15,195–£18,745 394 171 4.8 32.9 203 495 155 5.0 22.1 298 Optima Sportswagon 5dr estate £22,455–£35,145 AAACC 5.0 V8 Usable high-roofed hatch is short on overall flair. Engine and finish leave it well behind rival European estates. 3.0 V6 400 AWD 394 171 4.9 31.7 211 5.0 V8 SVR 535 162 4.5 22.1 298 LxWxH 4120x1765x1600 Kerb weight 1267kg LxWxH 4855x1860x1465 Kerb weight 1620kg 5.0 V8 550 R AWD 542 186 4.1 25.0 269 1.4 90 88 104 12.8 50.4 130 1.7 CRDi 139 124 9.8-10.7 61.4-64.2 113-120 5.0 V8 575 SVR AWD 567 200 3.7 25.0 269 1.6 125 123 112 11.5 43.5 150 2.0 GDi PHEV 202 119 9.1 201.8 33 1.6 CRDi 115 113 114 11.4 64.2 115 2.0d E-Performance 163 160 2.0 20d 180 177 2.0 20d 180 AWD 177 i40 4dr saloon £20,335–£28,235 AAABC 2.0 20d 240 AWD 236 Useful, inoffensive and well-priced, but don’t expect any fireworks. 3.0 V6 30d 300 295 LxWxH 4745x1815x1470 Kerb weight 1497kg 2.0 25t 250 246 1.7 CRDi Blue Drive 115 113 119 12.4 67.3 110 1.7 CRDi Blue Drive 141 139 126 10.3-10.8 60.1-65.7 114-123 XJ 4dr saloon £59,995–£101,370

136 138 136 150 155 150

9.3-9.4 8.8 8.9 6.7 6.6 7.1

62.8 61.4 56.5 48.7 49.6 41.5

118-119 120 132 153 149 155

Slightly smaller and with dynamic looks, but still not a car to remember. LxWxH 4310x1780x1430 Kerb weight 1263kg

11 APRIL 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 83


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Range Rover 5dr SUV £79,595–£141,580

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Levante 4dr SUV £56,250–£70,755

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AAACC 4.0 V8 AMG C63 S

Wherever you are, the Rangie envelops you in a lavish, invincible sense of occasion. LxWxH 4999x2220x1835 Kerb weight 2249kg

Italian flair and good looks in abundance, but diesel not as 1.6 C200d sonorous as petrols. LxWxH 5003x1968x1679 Kerb weight 2109kg 2.1 C220d

2.0 P400e PHEV 3.0 TDV6 258 4.4 SDV8 339 3.0 V6 340 5.0 V8 510 5.0 V8 550

3.0d V6 3.0 V6 3.0 V6 S

398 251 330 330 495 535

137 130 135 130 140-155 140-155

6.4 7.4 6.5 7.1 5.2 5.1

101 40.9 33.6 26.4 22.1 22.1

64 182 219 248 299 299

271 339 424

143 156 164

6.9 6.0 5.2

39.2 26.4 25.9

189 249 253

2.1 C220d 4Matic 2.1 C250d 2.1 C250d 4Matic 2.1 C300h

495 132 165 165 198 198 198

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155 4.0 134-135 9.7-10.2 145-146 7.5-7.7 143 7.5 153 6.6 150 6.8 152 6.4

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34.5 65.7-72.4 64.2-70.6 61.4 64.2 61.4 78.5

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(g/ O2

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192 101-119 103-124 122-132 112-124 122-132 94-103

2.0 CLA250 4Matic 2.0 CLA45 AMG 4Matic 2.1 CLA200d 2.1 CLA220d 2.1 CLA220d 4Matic

211 370 132 171 171

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CLA Shooting Brake 5dr estate £27,380–£49,900

pg

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160 162 105-109 106 123

AAABC

The most practical of the A-Class range, but it suffers for its

MAZDA

2 5dr hatch £12,895–£16,995

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C-Class Estate 5dr estate £30,235–£70,325

AAAAC challenging styling. LxWxH 4640x1777x1435 Kerb weight 1430kg Grown-up, well-made and drives with charm and vigour; engines Decent practicality and fantastic interior. It’s a shame that it’s only 1.6 CLA180 119 130 8.8-9.1 48.7-50.4 130-134 ordinary to drive. LxWxH 4702x1810x1457 Kerb weight 1495kg Discovery Sport 5dr SUV £28,355–£51,070 AAAAB aren’t brilliant. LxWxH 4060x1695x1495 Kerb weight 1075kg 2.0 CLA250 4Matic 211 149 6.7 40.9 160 Seven seats, at home on-road and off-road, plus new-found 1.5 Skyactiv-G 75 74 106 12.1 60.1 110 2.0 C200 178 145-146 7.5-7.7 49.6-51.4 128-139 2.0 CLA45 AMG 4Matic 370 155 4.3 40.9 162 desirability. LxWxH 4599x2069x1724 Kerb weight 1732kg 1.5 Skyactiv-G 90 88 110-114 9.4-12.0 58.9-62.8 105-112 2.0 C200 4Matic 178 145 7.3 40.9 155-165 2.1 CLA200d 132 134 9.2-9.7 65.7-68.9 106-111 2.0 eD4 145 112 10.0 60.1 123 1.5 Skyactiv-G 115 113 124 8.7 56.5 117 2.0 C350e 271 153 6.2 134.5 49-55 2.1 CLA220d 171 142 7.8 67.3 108 2.0 TD4 E-Capability 145 112 11.0 57.7 129 3.0 V6 AMG C43 4Matic 356 155 4.7 34.9 185 2.1 CLA220d 4Matic 171 140 7.8 58.9 126 2.0 TD4 174 117 8.4-9.4 53.3 139 3 5dr hatch £18,195–£24,695 AAAAC 4.0 V8 AMG C63 462 155 4.2 33.6 196 2.0 SD4 234 127 7.1 44.1 169 Pleasing dynamism teamed with good practicality and punchy 4.0 V8 AMG C63 S 495 155 4.1 33.6 195 CLS Coupé 4dr saloon £57,510–£60,410 AAAAC diesel engines. LxWxH 4060x1695x1495 Kerb weight 1351kg 2.0 Si4 240 234 124 7.1 35.3 182 1.6 C200d 132 132-133 10.1-10.6 65.7 109-124 Retains the sleek coupé style and has more tech – without losing 2.0 Si 290 281 135 6.5 33.6 190 2.0 Skyactiv-G 120 118 121 8.9 55.4 119 2.1 C220d 165 142-143 7.6-7.9 64.2-67.3 106-127 its allure. LxWxH 4996x1896x1436 Kerb weight 1935kg 2.0 Skyactiv-G 165 162 130 8.2 48.7 135 2.1 C220d 4Matic 165 143 7.5 60.1 124-134 3.0 CLS350d 4Matic 277 155 5.7 48.7 156 Discovery 5dr SUV £45,895–£68,595 AAAAB 1.5 Skyactiv-D 105 103 115 11.0 74.3 99 2.1 C250d 198 150 6.9 62.8 117-130 3.0 CLS400d 4Matic 330 155 5.0 47.9 156 The country bumpkin given elocution lessons without losing its 2.2 Skyactiv-D 150 148 130 8.1 68.9 107 2.1 C250d 4Matic 198 150 6.8 60.1 124-134 3.0 CLS450 4Matic 356 155 4.8 36.2 184 rugged capabilities. LxWxH 4970x2073x1888 Kerb weight 2115kg 2.1 C300h 198 148 6.7 74.3 99-106 2.0 SD4 234 121 8.0 43.5 171 3 Fastback 4dr saloon £20,295–£23,395 AAAAC SLC 2dr open £32,439–£48,045 AAABC 3.0 V6 Td6 251 130 7.7 39.2 189 Refined and dynamically satisfying in a saloon bodystyle. C-Class Coupé 2dr coupé £32,325–£70,385 AAAAC Another small convertible exhibiting all the charm that a Mercedes LxWxH 4060x1695x1495 Kerb weight 1345kg should. LxWxH 4143x1810x1301 Kerb weight 1435kg 2.0 Si4 295 125 7.3 29.4 222 Nice balance of style, usability and driver reward. LxWxH 4696x1810x1405 Kerb weight 1505kg 3.0 V6 Si6 330 130 6.9 26.0 254 2.0 Skyactiv-G 120 118 123 8.8 55.4 119 1.6 SLC180 152 139-140 7.9-8.1 48.7 132-133 5.0 V8 SVX 510 100 5.3 NA NA 2.2 Skyactiv-D 150 148 132 8.0 72.4 104 2.0 C200 178 146-147 7.3-7.7 48.7-53.3 123-134 2.0 SLC200 178 147-149 6.9-7.0 43.5-47.9 137-150 2.0 C200 4Matic 178 142 7.5 41.5 153-157 2.0 SLC300 237 155 5.8 47.1 138 LEXUS 6 4dr saloon £20,295–£28,595 AAABC 2.0 C300 237 155 6.0 44.8 143-148 3.0 V6 AMG SLC43 356 155 4.7 36.2 178 CT 5dr hatch £23,495–£30,495 AAAAC A compelling mix of size, economy and performance. Interior is a 3.0 V6 AMG C43 4Matic 356 155 4.7 35.3 183 let-down. LxWxH 4870x1840x1450 Kerb weight 1465kg Hybrid-only hatch has a pokey cabin and mismatched character 4.0 V8 AMG C63 462 155 4.0 32.8 200 SL 2dr open £76,955–£117,725 AAAAB traits. LxWxH 4350x1765x1445 Kerb weight 1465kg 2.0 Skyactiv-G 145 143 129 9.5 51.4 129 4.0 V8 AMG C63 S 495 155 3.9 32.8 200 Big, luxurious drop-top is classier than a royal stud farm. Few feel 1.8 VVT-i CT200h 134 112 10.3 68.9-78.5 82-94 2.0 Skyactiv-G 165 162 135 9.1 47.9 135 2.1 C220d 165 145 7.5-7.8 64.2-68.9 106-117 more special. LxWxH 4631x1877x1315 Kerb weight 1735kg 2.2 Skyactiv-D 150 148 130 9.1 68.9 107 2.1 C220d 4Matic 165 143 7.6 61.4 122-127 3.0 V6 SL400 356 155 4.9 36.7 175-179 IS 4dr saloon £32,895–£40,625 AAABC 2.2 Skyactiv-D 175 172 139 7.9 62.8 119 2.1 C250d 198 153 6.7 64.2 115-120 4.7 V8 SL500 442 155 4.3 31.4 205-210 Sleek compact executive car is well-made and interesting but still 2.1 C250d 4Matic 198 149 6.9 61.4 122-127 5.5 V8 AMG SL63 568 155-186 4.1 28.8 234 a left-field choice. LxWxH 4680x1810x1430 Kerb weight 1620kg 6 Tourer 5dr estate £23,125–£29,695 AAABC 2.5 VVT-i IS300h 220 125 8.3 60.1-67.3 97-107 Attractively styled but only average to drive. C-Class Cabriolet 2dr open £36,945–£73,770 AAAAC AMG GT 2dr coupé/open £99,960–£144,460 AAAAC AAAAC

LxWxH 4805x1840x1480 Kerb weight 1465kg

GS 4dr saloon £36,125–£73,375

AAABC 2.0 Skyactiv-G 145 143 2.0 Skyactiv-G 165 162 2.2 Skyactiv-D 150 148 56.5-64.2 104-115 2.2 Skyactiv-D 175 172 45.6-46.3 141-145 25.2 260 CX-3 5dr SUV £18,695–£25,195

Engine range limits its appeal, but refinement and cabin quality make amends. LxWxH 4880x1840x1455 Kerb weight 1730kg

128 133 130 137

9.6 9.1 9.3 8.0

50.4 47.9 67.3 61.4

131 136 110 121

Take all the good bits about the coupé and add the ability to take the roof off. Bingo. LxWxH 4686x1810x1409 Kerb weight 1645kg

2.0 C200 178 145-146 7.8-8.2 46.3-47.1 136-141 2.0 C300 237 155 6.4 42.2 155-155 2.5 VVT-i GS300h 220 118 9.2 3.0 V6 AMG C43 4Matic 356 155 4.8 33.6 194 3.5 V6 VVT-i GS450h 340 156 5.9 4.0 V8 AMG C63 462 155 4.2 31.7 208 5.0 V8 GS F 470 167 4.6 AAAAC 4.0 V8 AMG C63 S 495 155 4.1 31.7 208 165 144 8.2-8.3 61.4-62.8 136-138 Another supermini SUV with a sporting bent. Quite pricey but nicely 2.1 C220d LS 4dr saloon £72,595–£105,595 2.1 C220d 4Matic 165 140 8.1 56.5 130-134 AAABC appointed. LxWxH 4275x1765x1535 Kerb weight 1230kg 2.1 C250d 198 151 7.2 61.4 121-126 Luxury saloon gets more tech and opulence but is let down by its 2.0 Skyactiv-G 120 118 119 9.0 47.9 137 hybrid powertrain. LxWxH 5235x1900x1460 Kerb weight 2270kg 2.0 Skyactiv-G 150 148 124 8.7 44.1 150 E-Class 4dr saloon £36,005–£107,580 3.5 V6 VVT-i LS500h 348 155 5.4 43.5 147 1.5 Skyactiv-D 105 103 110 10.1 70.6 105 AAAAC 3.5 V6 VVT-i LS500h AWD 348 155 5.4 39.8 161 A wee bit pricey, and less sporting than its rivals, but still comfy CX-5 5dr SUV £23,995–£33,395 AAAAC and luxurious. LxWxH 4940x1852x1452 Kerb weight 1680kg RC 2dr coupé £37,145–£69,310 AAABC Offers powerful diesel engines and strong performance, plus a 2.0 E200d 145 139 8.4 72.4 102-112 An also-ran, but the V8 RC F packs plenty of character and handles welcoming interior. LxWxH 4550x1840x1675 Kerb weight 1575kg 2.0 E220d 189 149 7.3 72.4 102-112 well enough. LxWxH 4695x1840x1395 Kerb weight 1736kg 2.0 Skyactiv-G 165 162 125 10.4 44.1 149 2.0 E220d 4Matic 189 149 7.5 62.8 117-129 2.0 VVT-i RC200t 241 143 7.5 38.7 168 2.2 Skyactiv-D 150 148 112-127 9.4-10.3 48.7-56.5 132-152 3.0 V6 E350d 251 155 5.9 48.7 153 2.5 VVT-I RC300h 220 118 8.6 56.5-57.6 113-116 2.2 Skyactiv-D 175 172 128-129 9.0-9.5 48.7-52.3 142-152 3.0 V6 E350d 4Matic 251 155 5.9 44.8 167 5.0 V8 RC F 470 168 4.5 26.2 251 2.0 E350e 277 155 6.2 134.5 49-57 MX-5 2dr open £18,795–£24,395 AAAAA 3.0 V6 AMG E43 4Matic 389 155 4.6 33.6 192 LC 2dr coupé £76,595–£91,995 AAAAC Brilliantly packaged, priced and perfectly poised but more vibrant 4.0 V8 AMG E63 4Matic+ 555 155 3.5 31.0 207 Superb-looking coupé shows flickers of what made the LFA great. than the original. LxWxH 3915x1735x1225 Kerb weight 1050kg 4.0 V8 AMG E63 S 4Matic+ 594 155 3.4 31.0 207 LxWxH 4770x1920x1345 Kerb weight 1935kg 1.5 Skyactiv-G 131PS 129 127 8.3 47.1 139 5.0 V8 LC500 470 168 4.4 24.4-24.6 263-267 2.0 Skyactiv-G 160 157 133 7.3 40.9 161 E-Class Estate 5dr estate £38,005–£109,580 AAAAC 3.5 V6 LC500h 354 155 4.7 43.5-44.1 145-148 Far more practical than its rivals, but pricier and less sporty than MX-5 RF 2dr open £22,295–£29,495 AAAAA those closest to it. LxWxH 4933x1852x1475 Kerb weight 1780kg NX 5dr SUV £34,895–£44,395 AAACC Remains perfectly poised and vibrant, even with a folding metal 2.0 E200d 145 135 8.7 67.3 109-120 roof. LxWxH 3915x1735x1230 Kerb weight 1090kg Some good ideas, but dramatically off the pace to drive. 2.0 E220d 189 146 7.7 67.3 109-120 LxWxH 4630x1845x1645 Kerb weight 1905kg 1.5 Skyactiv-G 131PS 129 126 8.6 46.3 142 2.0 E220d 4Matic 189 145 7.8 57.7 126-137 2.5 VVT-I NX300h 4WD 194 112 9.2 54.3-56.5 116-121 2.0 Skyactiv-G 160 157 134 7.4 40.9 161 3.0 V6 E350d 251 155 6.0 46.3 162 3.0 V6 E350d 4Matic 251 155 6.0 42.8 174 McLAREN RX 5dr SUV £48,645–£59,645 AAABC 3.0 V6 AMG E43 4Matic 389 155 4.7 32.8 197 Low flexibility, but hybrid option makes a degree of economic 540C 2dr coupé £126,055 AAAAC 4.0 V8 AMG E63 4Matic+ 555 155 3.6 30.1 214 sense. LxWxH 4890x1895x1690 Kerb weight 2100kg The affordable end of McLaren’s spectrum isn’t any less enthralling 4.0 V8 AMG E63 S 4Matic+ 594 155 3.5 30.1 214 2.0 RX200t 234 124 9.2-9.5 34.9-36.2 181-189 to drive. LxWxH 4530x2095x1202 Kerb weight 1495kg 3.5 V6 RX450h 308 124 7.7 51.4-54.3 120-127 3.8 V8 562 204 3.2 26.6 249 E-Class All-Terrain Edition 5dr estate £58,880 AAAAC

A rugged version of a practical estate, which is also lavishly

570S 2dr coupé/open £145,305-£164,750 AAAAA appointed. LxWxH 4947x1861x1497 Kerb weight 2010kg AAAAC Blisteringly fast and exciting supercar-slayer with hugely appealing 3.0 V6 E350d 4Matic 251 155 6.2 41.5

LOTUS

Elise 2dr open £32,975–£48,755

A delicate, vivid and unfettered drive; if you want a daily driver, shop elsewhere. LxWxH 3824x1719x1117 Kerb weight 830kg 1.6 VVT-i 136 1.8 VVT-i 220 1.8 VVT-i 246

134 217 242

127 145 154

6.2-6.5 4.6 4.3

44.8 37.7 37.7

Exige 2dr coupé £59,375–£72,575

149 173 175

handling. LxWxH 4530x2095x1202 Kerb weight 1344kg 3.8 V8

562

204

3.2

25.5-26.4 249-258

179

562

204

3.4

26.6

249 3.0 V6 E350d 4Matic 2.0 E300 AAAAA 3.0 V6 E400 4Matic

251 237 323

155 155 155

6.0 6.4 5.3

42.8 40.4 33.6

174 160 189

Sharp, uncompromising track car. Unforgiving on the road. LxWxH 4084x1802x1129 Kerb weight 1125kg

720S 2dr coupé £218,020

3.5 V6 VVT-i 350 3.5 V6 VVT-i 380

The start of an era for McLaren and what a way to begin it is. LxWxH 4543x2059x1196 Kerb weight 1322kg

E-Class Cabriolet 2dr open £44,675–£55,715

4.0 V8

Refined and sophisticated four-seater in the same mould as the S-Class Cabriolet. LxWxH 4846x1860x1429 Kerb weight 1780kg

345 374

162-170 3.8-3.9 170-178 3.6-3.7

28.0-30.1 219-235 27.2-29.1 225-242

Evora 2dr coupé £75,775–£86,775 394 404 424

174-186 4.2 174-190 4.1-4.2 190 3.8

29.1 29.1 NA

225-230 225-230 NA

GranTurismo 2dr coupé £94,285

AAACC

Not short on richness or desirability and well capable of stirring the soul. LxWxH 5652x1948x1481 Kerb weight 1873kg

26.4

249

185

4.8

19.7

Quattroporte 4dr saloon £71,530–£118,525

99 119 152 211 211 370 105 132 171 171

118 118 139 149 149 155 118 130 139 137

B-Class 5dr hatch £23,195–£32,265

A slightly odd prospect, but practical and classy nonetheless. LxWxH 4393x1786x1557 Kerb weight 1395kg

331

AAACC

2.0 E220d 189 147 7.7 57.7 126 AAABC 3.0 V6 E350d 4Matic 251 155 6.1 41.5 179 2.0 E300 237 155 6.6 39.2 167 3.0 V6 E400 4Matic 323 155 5.5 32.8 194 10.4-10.6 52.3-54.3 121-126 8.6-8.9 51.4-54.3 121-131 S-Class 4dr saloon £72,705–£187,240 AAAAA 7.8-8.1 49.6-52.3 126-132 Mercedes has given the S-Class a refresh and an added boost of 6.3 41.5-44.8 145-158 tech. LxWxH 5141x1905x1498 Kerb weight 1970kg 6.3 42.2 156 3.0 V6 S350d 277 155 6.0 52.3 139 4.2 40.9 162 3.0 V6 S500 444 155 4.8 40.9 157 11.3 76.4-80.7 89-102 4.0 V8 AMG S63 594 155 4.3 32.1 199 8.8-9.3 68.9 99-111 6.0 V12 AMG S65 611 155 4.2 23.7 279 7.5 68.9 107 6.0 V12 S650 Maybach 611 155 4.7 22.2 289 7.5 58.9 124 AAAAC S-Class Coupé 2dr coupé £103,715–£189,615 AAABC More tech and cleaner engines make the opulent luxury tourer

119 152 105 132 171 171

124 137 118 130 139 137

8.7-9.0 7.9-8.2 11.6 8.9-9.4 7.6 7.9

50.4-51.4 49.6-51.4 70.6 67.3-70.6 67.3 56.5

127-132 127-132 104-107 104-112 108 130

271 339 424 424 522

155 167 179 179 190

6.4 5.1 5.1 4.8 4.7

84 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 11 APRIL 2018

35.8 31.0 29.4 29.1 26.4

163 212 223 226 250

2.0 C200 2.0 C200 4Matic 2.0 C350e 3.0 V6 AMG C43 4Matic 4.0 V8 AMG C63

178 178 271 356 462

147 145 155 155 155

7.2-7.5 7.4 5.9 4.7 4.1

52.3-53.3 41.5 134.5 35.3 34.5

123-137 153-162 48-54 183 192

455 594 611

155 155 155

4.6 4.2 4.1

34.0 31.7 23.7

S-Class Cabriolet 2dr open £115,910–£197,510

188 203 279 AAAAC

As above but with the added allure of a retractable fabric roof. LxWxH 5027x1912x1420 Kerb weight 2150kg

4.0 V8 S560 AAAAC 4.0 V8 AMG S63 6.0 V12 AMG S65

C-Class 4dr saloon £29,035–£69,125

Now a full-sized executive limo, with some added flair. Off the pace Merc ramps up the richness, but the engines and dynamics aren’t in several key areas. LxWxH 5264x1948x1481 Kerb weight 1860kg refined enough. LxWxH 4686x1810x1442 Kerb weight 1450kg 3.0d V6 3.0 V6 3.0 V6 S 3.0 V6 S Q4 3.8 V8 GTS

more appealing. LxWxH 5027x1912x1414 Kerb weight 2065kg 4.0 V8 S560 4.0 V8 AMG S63 6.0 V12 AMG S65

455 594 611

155 155 155

4.6 4.2 4.1

CLA Coupé 4dr saloon £26,490–£49,050

31.4 28.8 23.5

204 225 272 AAABC

Still suffers from divisive styling, although it adds further appeal to the A-Class. LxWxH 4640x1777x1432 Kerb weight 1395kg 1.6 CLA180 2.0 CLA250

119 211

130 155

8.7-9.0 6.4-6.5

51.4-52.3 124-128 42.2-45.6 143-156

462 507 541 568

188-189 4.0 193 3.8 196-197 3.7 198 3.6

30.1-30.4 30.1 24.8-25.0 24.8

GLA 5dr SUV £26,520–£53,705

216-219 219 259 259

AAABC

Not the most practical crossover but good looking and very decent to drive. LxWxH 4417x1804x1494 Kerb weight 1395kg 1.6 GLA200 2.0 GLA250 4Matic 2.0 GLA45 AMG 4Matic 2.1 GLA200d 2.1 GLA200d 4Matic 2.1 GLA220d 4Matic

152 204 370 132 132 171

134 143 155 127 124 135

8.1-8.4 6.6 4.4 9.1-9.5 9.1 7.7

48.7-50.4 43.5 38.2 67.3 58.9 58.9

GLC 5dr SUV £38,820–£91,224

131-138 155 172 108-115 127-130 127-130

AAAAC

Not exactly exciting to drive, but does luxury and refinement better than most. LxWxH 4656x1890x1639 Kerb weight 1735kg 2.1 GLC 220d 4Matic 2.1 GLC 250d 4Matic 3.0 V6 GLC 350d 4Matic 3.0 V6 AMG GLC43 4Matic 4.0 V8 AMG GLC63 4Matic+ 4.0 V8 AMG GLC63 S 4Matic+

165 198 251 356 462 495

130 138 148 155 155 155

8.3 7.6 6.2 4.9 4.0 3.8

56.5 56.5 47.9 34.0 27.4 26.4

GLC Coupé 5dr SUV £41,735–£93,619

129 129 159 189 234 244 AAAAC

A coupé-shaped SUV destined to be outrun by the X4 – unless you’re in an AMG. LxWxH 4732x1890x1602 Kerb weight 1785kg 2.1 GLC 220d 4Matic 2.1 GLC 250d 4Matic 3.0 V6 GLC 350d 4Matic 3.0 V6 AMG GLC43 4Matic 4.0 V8 AMG GLC63 4Matic+ 4.0 V8 AMG GLC63 S 4Matic+

165 198 251 356 462 495

130 138 148 155 155 155

8.3 7.6 6.2 4.9 4.0 3.8

56.5 56.5 47.1 33.6 27.4 26.4

GLE 5dr SUV £54,690–£101,885

131-143 131-143 161-169 192 234 244 AAAAC

The ML replacement isn’t inspiring to drive but does come with a classy interior. LxWxH 4819x2141x1796 Kerb weight 2165kg 198 251 429 379 568

130 140 152 155 155

8.6 7.1 5.3 5.7 4.2

47.9 42.8 76.4 31.7 23.9

GLE Coupé 5dr SUV £63,420–£104,075

156 192 84 205 276 AAAAC

Not the prettiest SUV you will ever see, but a decent option against the BMW X6. LxWxH 4900x2129x1731 Kerb weight 2240kg

3.0 V6 GLE 350d 4Matic AAAAC 3.0 V6 AMG GLE43 4Matic 5.5 V8 AMG GLE63 S 4Matic

Desirable and attractive but lacking a distinguishing drive. LxWxH 4299x1780x1433 Kerb weight 1370kg

1.6 B180 1.6 B200 GranCabrio 2dr open £108,340–£116,385 AAACC 1.5 A180d Fantastic looks and soundtrack but an average chassis overall. 2.1 A200d LxWxH 4971x1945x1461 Kerb weight 1973kg 2.1 A220d 4.7 V8 453 177-179 4.9-5.0 19.4 337 2.1 A220d 4Matic 453

2.9

MERCEDES-BENZ

A-Class 5dr hatch £20,715–£48,660

1.6 A160 1.6 A180 M A S E R AT I 1.6 A200 Ghibli 4dr saloon £51,165–£66,520 AAACC 2.0 A250 Maser’s compact exec has the allure but lacks power and is poorly 2.0 A250 4Matic finished in places. LxWxH 4971x1945x1461 Kerb weight 1810kg 2.0 A45 AMG 4Matic 3.0d V6 271 155 6.3 47.8 158 1.5 A180d 3.0 V6 345 166 5.5 31.7 207 2.1 A200d 3.0 V6 S 424 177 4.9 29.4 223 2.1 A220d 3.0 V6 S Q4 424 177 4.7 29.1 226 2.1 A220d 4Matic

4.7 V8

212

AAAAC

Dynamically it puts nearly everything else in the shade. Shame about the interior. LxWxH 4084x1802x1129 Kerb weight 1395kg 3.5 V6 VVT-i 400 3.5 V6 VVT-i 410 3.5 V6 VVT-i GT430

710

4.0 V8 GT 4.0 V8 GT S 4.0 V8 GT C 4.0 V8 GT R

2.1 GLE 250d 4Matic AAAAC 3.0 V6 GLE350d 4Matic 3.0 V6 GLE500e 4Matic 3.0 V6 AMG GLE43 4Matic 5.5 V8 AMG GLE63 S 4Matic

E-Class Coupé 2dr coupé £40,180–£50,280

Big, laid-back four-seat tourer. Borrows looks from the ravishing 570GT 2dr coupé £154,000 AAAAA S-Class Coupé. LxWxH 4846x1860x1431 Kerb weight 1685kg The 570GT retains the lusty, fast appeal of its sister car, even with 2.0 E220d 189 150 7.4 61.4 119 added practicality. LxWxH 4530x2095x1201 Kerb weight 1495kg 2.0 E220d 4Matic 189 149 7.6 53.3 137

AAAAB 3.8 V8

Million-dollar looks and a railgun V8, but extremely firm chassis affects its usability. LxWxH 4544x1939x1287 Kerb weight 1615kg

251 379 568

140 155 155

7.0 5.7 4.2

39.2 30.0 23.7

G-Class 5dr SUV £92,070–£152,600

187 215 278 AAABC

Massively expensive and compromised, but with character in abundance. LxWxH 4764x1867x1954 Kerb weight 2550kg 3.0 V6 G 350d 4Matic 5.5 V8 AMG G63 4Matic

237 555

119 130

8.9 5.4

28.5 20.5

GLS 5dr SUV £72,530–£105,950

261 322 AAABC

The replacement for the massive GL can still seat seven in comfort. LxWxH 5162x1982x1850 Kerb weight 2475kg 3.0 V6 GLS 350d 4Matic 5.5 V8 AMG GLS63 4Matic

251 568

138 7.8 155-168 4.6

37.2 23.0

199 288

MG

3 5dr hatch £8695–£11,695

AAABC

Neatly tuned and nice sporty styling. Breaks the mould for sub£9000 superminis. LxWxH 4018x1729x1507 Kerb weight 1125kg 1.5 VTI-Tech

104

108

10.4

51.5

124


N E W CAR PR I CES Po

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AAACC

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Competent and likeable enough, but it lacks any real spark. LxWxH 4830x1828x1456 Kerb weight 1410kg

1.5 VTi-Tech 1.0T GDi

1.6 BlueHDi 120 2.0 BlueHDi 150 2.0 BlueHDi 180

109 112

10.9 12.4

GS 5dr SUV £15,095–£21,095

49.6 44.9

129 144

163

km

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125-126 11.0 130 8.9 143 8.5

72.4-74.3 99-102 67.3 109 67.3 110

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RXC GT 2dr open NA

AAABC

Designed for pounding around a track; out of its element on the road. LxWxH 4300x1960x1127 Kerb weight 1125kg 3.5 V6 400 3.5 V6 650

400 650

179 180

2.8 2.7

NA NA

NA NA

AAACC

508 SW 5dr estate £26,685–£35,125

MG’s first attempt at a small SUV is an attempt to re-establish the brand. LxWxH 4500x1800x1665 Kerb weight 1385kg 1.5 TGI

116 145 175

C

(g/ O2

AAABC

Much improved on previous MGs, but still lacks the sophistication of its closest rivals. LxWxH 4314x1809x1611 Kerb weight 1190kg 104 109

p

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112-118 9.6

1.6 BlueHDi 120 2.0 BlueHDi 150 2.0 BlueHDi 180 2.0 Hdi HY4 ETG

MINI

3dr Hatch 3dr hatch £14,640–£25,270

AAAAB

Three-pot engines and cleverly designed interior make the Mini a superb choice. LxWxH 3821x1727x1414 Kerb weight 1190kg

Aero 8 2dr open £88,194

116 145 175 197

123-124 130 137-140 132

R E N A U LT

AAABC

As good as the saloon but better looking. LxWxH 4829x1828x1476 Kerb weight 1430kg

45.5-46.3 139-141

11.2-11.3 67.3-74.3 100-108 9.1 67.3 110 8.6-8.9 61.4-64.2 114-119 8.8 61.4 109

AAABC

2008 5dr SUV £16,495–£22,325

Twizy 2dr hatch £6995–£7995

AAABC

Zany solution to personal mobility is suitably irreverent and impractical. LxWxH 2338x1381x1454 Kerb weight 474kg MB L7e

17

Zoe 5dr hatch £14,245–£26,770

50

NA

NA

0 AAABC

A far more practical zero-emission solution. Attractive price, too.

AAABC LxWxH 4084x1730x1562 Kerb weight 1470kg 5AGEN2 86 84 13.5 NA 0 4.4 V8 367 170 4.5 23.0 282 5AGEN3 89 84 13.5 NA 0 1.2 PureTech 82 79 105 13.5 57.6 114 NISSAN 1.2 PureTech 110 107 117-119 9.9-10.3 58.9-64.2 103-110 Twingo 3dr hatch £9995–£15,515 AAACC Micra 5dr hatch £12,295–£20,365 AAAAC 1.2 PureTech 130 126 124 9.3 58.9 110 Handsome, unusual rear-engined city car but not a class leader. LxWxH 3595x1646x1554 Kerb weight 865kg Refreshed look and better handling makes it an enticing choice. 1.6 BlueHDi 75 74 103 13.8 76.3 97 Has its flaws, though. LxWxH 3991x1743x1455 Kerb weight 1490kg 1.6 BlueHDi 100 96 112 11.3 76.3 97 1.0 SCe 70 67 94 14.5 56.5-67.3 95-112 5dr Hatch 5dr hatch £15,250–£23,130 AAAAB 1.0 71PS 70 98 16.4 61.4 103 1.6 BlueHDi 120 116 119 9.6 76.3 96 0.9 TCe 90 87 103 10.8 58.9-65.7 99-108 Mini charm in a more usable package, but still not as practical as 0.9 IG-T 90 88 109 12.1 64.2 99 0.9 TCe 110 105 113 9.6 54.3 115 rivals. LxWxH 3982x1727x1425 Kerb weight 1240kg 1.5 dCi 90 88 111 11.9 88.3 85 3008 5dr SUV £22,765–£34,165 AAAAC 1.5 One 101 119 10.1-10.5 57.6-58.9 112-116 Cleverly packaged Peugeot offers just enough SUV DNA to make Clio 5dr hatch £12,445–£22,995 AAAAC 1.5 One D 93 116 11.4 80.7 92-94 Pulsar 5dr hatch £13,275–£21,035 AAABC the difference. LxWxH 4447x2098x1624 Kerb weight 1250kg An attractive,stylish and practical proposition, but cheap in places 1.5 Cooper 134 129 8.1-8.2 58.9-60.1 109-114 Undeniably fit for purpose, but its appeal goes no deeper than that. 1.2 PureTech 130 126 117 10.5-10.8 54.3-55.4 117-120 and feels dated. LxWxH 4062x1732x1448 Kerb weight 1059kg 1.5 Cooper D 114 125-126 9.4-9.5 74.3-78.5 95-102 LxWxH 4387x1768x1520 Kerb weight 1245kg 1.6 THP 165 159 128 8.9 48.7 129 1.2 16V 75 71 103 14.5 50.4 127 2.0 Cooper S 189 143-144 6.8-6.9 47.9-52.3 125-139 1.2 DIG-T 115 113 115-118 10.7-12.7 54.3-56.5 117-121 1.6 BlueHDi 100 96 108 13.1 70.6 103 0.9 TCe 90 87 112 12.2-13.1 60.1-67.3 94-105 2.0 Cooper SD 167 139-140 7.3-7.4 68.9 107-112 1.5 dCi 110 108 118 11.5 78.5 94 1.6 BlueHDi 120 116 115-117 11.2-11.6 70.6 104-108 1.2 TCe 120 115 124 9.0-9.2 52.3-53.3 118-120 1.6 DIG-T 190 187 135 7.7 49.5 134 2.0 BlueHDi 150 145 129 9.6 64.2-67.3 114 1.6 Turbo RS 200 194 143 6.7 47.9 133 Convertible 2dr open £19,265–£28,910 AAABC 2.0 BlueHDi 180 EAT6 175 131 8.9 58.9 124 1.6 Turbo RS 220 214 146 6.6 47.9 135 A fun open-top car but compromised on practicality and dynamics. Juke 5dr hatch £15,080–£26,000 AAABC 1.5 dCi 90 87 109-112 12.0-12.9 80.7-88.3 82-92 LxWxH 3821x1727x1415 Kerb weight 1280kg High-riding, funky hatch is a compelling package. High CO 2 figures, 5008 5dr SUV £24,495–£35,895 AAAAC 1.5 dCi 110 107 121 11.2 80.7 90 1.5 Cooper 134 128-129 8.7-8.8 55.4-57.6 114-123 though. LxWxH 4135x1765x1565 Kerb weight 1605kg Less MPV, more SUV, and shares its siblings’ good looks. Competent to drive, too. LxWxH 4641x1844x1640 Kerb weight 1511kg 1.5 Cooper D 114 125-126 9.9 72.4-74.3 100-109 1.6 94 92 104 12.0 47.1 138 Mégane 5dr hatch £17,790–£27,990 AAABC 2.0 Cooper S 189 142-143 7.1-7.2 47.1-50.4 131-142 1.2 DIG-T 115 113 111 10.8 48.7-49.6 128-132 1.2 PureTech 130 126 117 10.4-10.9 54.3-55.4 117-120 Stylish and refined but bland. Nothing exceptional. LxWxH 4359x1814x1447 Kerb weight 1340kg 2.0 Cooper SD 167 149 6.5-6.6 43.5-47.9 138-152 1.6 117PS Xtronic 115 106 11.5 46.3-47.1 139-142 1.6 THP 165 EAT6 159 128 9.2 48.7 133 2.0 John Cooper Works 167 149 6.5-6.6 43.5-47.9 138-152 1.5 dCi 110 108 109 11.2 68.9-70.6 104-107 1.6 BlueHDi 100 96 108 13.6 68.9 106 1.2 TCe 130 128 122-124 10.3-10.6 50.4-52.3 120-125 1.6 DIG-T 190 187 134 8.0 47.1 139 1.2 BlueHDi 120 116 113-115 11.4-11.9 65.7-67.3 108 1.6 TCe 205 199 143 7.1 47.1 134 Clubman 5dr hatch £20,370–£31,895 AAAAC 1.6 DIG-T 190 4WD Xtronic 187 124 8.4 43.5 153 2.0 BlueHDi 150 145 129 9.6 61.4 118 1.5 dCi 110 107 116 11.3-12.3 72.4-76.4 96-101 Cheery and alternative Mini ‘six-door’ takes the brand into new 1.6 DIG-T Nismo RS 215 137 7.0 39.2 168 2.0 BlueHDi 180 EAT6 175 131 9.1 58.9 124 1.6 dCi 130 126 123 10.0 70.6 104 territory. LxWxH 4253x1800x1441 Kerb weight 1375kg 1.6 DIG-T Nismo RS Xtronic 211 124 8.0 38.7 172 2.0 BlueHDi 180 EAT8 175 NA NA NA NA 1.6 dCi 165 158 133 8.8 61.4 120 1.5 Cooper 134 127 9.1 55.4 118-123 PORSCHE 1.5 Cooper D 148 132 8.5-8.6 68.9 109-115 Qashqai 5dr SUV £19,295–£32,530 Mégane Sport Tourer 5dr estate £19,090–£29,290 AAABC AAAAB 2.0 Cooper S 189 142 7.1-7.2 45.6-48.7 134-147 The defining modern crossover. The Mk2 is better in all areas, 718 Boxster 2dr open £44,758–£64,030 AAAAB Stylish and refined estate car is still bland like the hatch. Smaller 2.0 Cooper S All4 189 142 6.9-7.0 40.9-44.8 146-162 hence its popularity. LxWxH 4394x1806x1590 Kerb weight 1331kg Our idea of drop-top heaven. Exceptional to drive, whether cruising than its predecessor. LxWxH 4626x1814x1457 Kerb weight 1409kg or hurrying. LxWxH 4379x1801x1280 Kerb weight 1335kg 2.0 Cooper SD 187 139 7.4 62.8-65.7 114-122 1.2 DIG-T 115 113 108-115 10.6-12.9 50.4 129 1.2 TCe 130 128 122 11.0-11.7 50.4-52.3 120-125 2.0 Cooper SD All4 187 139 7.2 58.9 126-129 1.6 DIG-T 163PS 160 124 8.9 48.7 134 2.0 290 170 4.9-5.1 38.2-40.9 158-168 1.6 TCe 205 199 143 7.4 47.1 134 2.0 John Cooper Works 227 148 6.3 38.2-41.5 154-168 1.5 dCi 110 108 113 11.9 74.3 99 2.5 S 339 177 4.4-4.6 34.9-38.7 167-184 1.5 dCi 110 107 116 11.6-12.7 72.4-76.4 96-101 1.6 dCi 130 128 114-118 9.9-11.1 60.1-64.2 116-122 2.5 GTS 355 180 4.3-4.6 31.4-34.4 186-205 1.6 dCi 130 126 123 10.6 70.6 104 Countryman 5dr hatch £23,035–£33,145 AAABC 1.6 dCi 130 4WD 128 118 10.5 57.6 129 1.6 dCi 165 158 133 8.9 61.4 120 Bigger than before, but still more funky than useful. Still not all that 718 Cayman 2dr coupé £42,897–£62,169 AAAAA pretty, either. LxWxH 4299x2005x1557 Kerb weight 1440kg X-Trail 5dr SUV £23,385–£37,410 AAABC Scalpel-blade incisiveness, supreme balance and outstanding Scenic 5dr MPV £21,605–£30,805 AAABC driver involvement. LxWxH 4379x1801x1295 Kerb weight 1335kg Good-looking MPV riding on 20in wheels, but overall a bland car to 1.5 Cooper 134 126 9.6 51.4 126-130 There aren’t many cheaper ways of owning an SUV. Has a better 1.5 Cooper All4 135 122 9.8 46.3-47.1 136-143 range of engines, too. LxWxH 4640x1820x1710 Kerb weight 1505kg 2.0 290 170 4.9-5.1 38.2-40.9 158-168 drive. LxWxH 4406x1866x1653 Kerb weight 1428kg 1.5 Cooper D 148 129 8.8-8.9 64.2-65.7 113-120 1.6 dCi 130 128 111-116 10.5-11.4 53.3-57.6 129-139 2.5 S 339 177 4.4-4.6 34.9-38.7 167-184 1.2 TCe 115 112 115 12.3 48.7 129 1.5 Cooper D All4 148 127 8.7-8.8 58.9 126-132 1.6 dCi 130 4WD 128 115 11.0 52.3-53.3 139-143 2.5 GTS 355 180 4.3-4.6 31.4-34.4 186-205 1.2 TCe 130 128 118 11.4 48.7 129 2.0 Cooper S 189 140 7.4-7.5 45.6-47.1 137-144 1.6 DIG-T 163 160 124 9.7 44.1-45.6 145-149 1.5 dCi 110 107 114 12.4 70.6-72.4 100-104 2.0 Cooper S All4 189 138 7.2-7.3 40.4-44.1 146-162 2.0 dCi 177 174 123 9.6 48.7-50.4 148-152 911 2dr coupé £77,891–£207,506 AAAAB 1.5 dCi 110 Hybrid Assist 107 NA NA 80.7 94 2.0 Cooper SD 187 137 7.7 61.4 121-125 2.0 dCi 177 4WD 174 121-126 9.4-10.0 46.3-50.4 149-162 Still as brilliant and distinctive as any before it. More than worthy 1.6 dCi 130 126 118 11.4 62.8 116 of its iconic status. LxWxH 4499x1808x1294 Kerb weight 1413kg 1.6 dCi 160 2.0 Cooper SD All4 187 136 7.4 57.6 129-133 156 124 10.7 62.8 118 2.0 John Cooper Works 227 145 6.5 38.2-40.9 158-169 370Z 2dr coupé £29,185–£39,375 AAABC 3.0 Carrera 359 180-183 4.3-4.6 32.5-38.2 169-201 1.5 Cooper S E-Hybrid 220 123 6.8 134.5 49-52 Old-school and profoundly mechanical coupé. The Healey 3000 of 3.0 Carrera T 359 180-182 4.2-4.5 29.7-33.2 193-215 Grand Scenic 5dr MPV £23,445–£32,605 AAABC today – but meaner. LxWxH 4265x1845x1315 Kerb weight 1496kg 3.0 Carrera S 408 188-191 4.0-4.3 31.8-36.7 174-204 Good-looking seven-seat MPV is bland to drive and the third row MITSUBISHI 3.7 V6 323 155 5.3 26.6-26.9 245-248 3.0 Carrera GTS 437 191-193 3.6-4.1 29.7-34.0 188-216 seats are tight. LxWxH 4634x1866x1655 Kerb weight 1495kg Mirage 5dr hatch £12,175–£14,175 AAACC 3.7 V6 Nismo 339 155 5.2 26.6 248 3.8 Turbo 524 198 3.0 31.0 212 1.2 TCe 115 112 115 12.3 48.7 129 A straightforward hatchback – but not for the likes of us. 3.8 Turbo S 564 205 2.9 31.0 212 1.2 TCe 130 128 118 11.4 48.7 129 LxWxH 3795x1665x1505 Kerb weight 845kg GT-R 2dr coupé £82,525–£151,525 AAAAC 4.0 GT3 486 197-198 3.4-3.9 21.9-22.2 288-290 1.5 dCi 110 107 114 12.4 70.6-72.4 100-104 1.1 Mi-VEC 79 107 11.7-12.8 65.7 99-100 Monstrously fast Nissan has been tweaked and sharpened. Still a 3.8 GT2 RS 680 211 2.8 23.9 269 1.5 dCi 110 Hybrid Assist 107 NA NA 80.7 94 blunt object, though. LxWxH 4710x1895x1370 Kerb weight 1725kg 1.6 dCi 130 126 118 11.4 62.8 116 ASX 5dr SUV £16,255–£28,905 AAACC 3.8 V6 562 196 NA 23.9 275 911 Cabriolet 2dr open £86,732–£156,381 AAAAB 1.6 dCi 160 156 124 10.7 62.8 118 Decent engines, but otherwise an unexceptional crossover. 3.8 V6 Nismo 591 196 NA 23.9 275 Cutting the top off enhances the aural drama. For visual impact LxWxH 4355x1770x1640 Kerb weight 1260kg choose the Targa. LxWxH 4499x1808x1289 Kerb weight 1500kg Captur 5dr SUV £15,615–£24,025 AAAAC NOBLE 1.6 Mi-VEC 115 114 11.5 47.9-48.7 135-136 3.0 Carrera 359 178-181 4.5-4.8 31.7-37.7 172-206 Jacked-up Clio is among the better downsized options. Stylish and 1.6 DI-D 2WD 112 113 11.2 61.4 119 M600 2dr coupé £248,000–£287,600 AAABC 3.0 Carrera S 408 187-188 4.2-4.5 31.4-36.2 184-204 fluent-riding. LxWxH 4122x1778x1566 Kerb weight 1184kg 1.6 DI-D 4WD 112 111 11.5 56.5 132 Deliciously natural and involving; a bit ergonomically flawed. 3.0 Carrera GTS 437 190-192 3.7-4.2 29.1-33.6 190-220 0.9 TCe 90 87 106 13.2 55.4 114 LxWxH NA Kerb weight 1198kg 2.2 DI-D 4WD 148 118 10.8 48.7 152 3.8 Turbo 524 198 3.1 30.4 216 1.2 TCe 120 115 113-119 9.9-10.6 51.4 125 4.4 V8 662 225 NA 20.1 333 3.8 Turbo S 564 205 3.0 30.4 216 1.5 dCi 90 87 106 13.1 78.5 95 Eclipse Cross 5dr SUV £21,275–£29,750 AAACC 3.0 Targa 4 359 178-179 4.5-4.7 31.7-35.8 182-206 1.5 dCi 110 107 112 11.4 76.4 98 PEUGEOT Stylish, future-looking mid-sized SUV shows where Mitsubishi’s 3.0 Targa 4S 408 187-188 4.2-4.4 35.3-31.4 184-204 destiny lies. LxWxH 4695x1810x1710 Kerb weight 1425kg iOn 5dr hatch £20,495 AABCC 3.0 Targa 4 GTS 437 190-191 3.7-4.1 29.1-32.5 196-220 Kadjar 5dr SUV £19,785–£29,615 AAAAC 1.5 Mi-VEC 2WD 160 124-127 9.3-10.3 42.2-42.8 151-154 Good electric powertrain; looks extremely old hat against better Fine value, practical, decent to drive and good-looking, but the EV rivals. LxWxH 3474x1475x1608 Kerb weight 1120kg 1.5 Mi-VEC 4WD 160 124 9.8 40.4 159 Panamera 4dr saloon £67,898–£146,545 AAAAA Qashqai is classier. LxWxH 4449x1836x1607 Kerb weight 1306kg 47kW 62 81 15.9 NA 0 Revamped big saloon is an absolute belter, making it almost the 1.2 TCe 130 128 119 10.1-10.7 50.4-51.4 123-126 perfect grand tourer. LxWxH 5049x1937x1423 Kerb weight 1815kg 1.6 TCe 165 Outlander 5dr SUV £25,255–£46,055 AAABC 158 127 9.2 47.1 134 Creditable effort, but still cheap in places: PHEV a boon for fleet 108 3dr/5dr hatch £9120–£14,585 AAABC 3.0 V6 321 164 5.7 37.7 173 1.5 dCi 110 107 112-113 11.7-11.9 74.3 99 users. LxWxH 4695x1810x1710 Kerb weight 1565kg Sister car to the Aygo – and a distant second to most city car 3.0 V6 4 321 162 5.5-5.6 35.8-36.2 177-180 1.6 dCi 130 128 118 9.9 65.7 113 2.2 DI-D 4WD 148 118-124 10.2-11.6 48.7-53.3 139-154 rivals. LxWxH 3475x1615x1460 Kerb weight 840kg 2.9 V6 4S 428 179 4.4-4.5 34.0-34.9 184-189 2.0 Mi-VEC PHEV 200 106 11.0 116.1 41 1.0 68 67 99 13.0-15.9 67.3-68.9 95-97 2.9 V6 E-Hybrid 449 172 4.6-4.7 113.0 56 Koleos 5dr SUV £28,000–£36,700 AAABC 1.2 PureTech 82 79 106 10.9 65.7 99 4.0 V8 4S Diesel 416 177 4.5 42.2 176 Koleos name returns and is a vast improvement on before, but no Shogun 5dr SUV £32,645–£43,305 AABCC 4.0 V8 Turbo 533 190 3.8-3.9 29.7-30.4 212-217 class leader. LxWxH 4672x2063x1678 Kerb weight 1540kg Has its appeal. Needs more chassis finesse but still charming. 208 3dr/5dr hatch £14,630–£23,550 AAABC 4.0 V8 Turbo S E-Hybrid 660 192 3.4-3.5 97.4 66 1.6 dCi 130 128 115 11.4 57.6 128 LxWxH 4385x1875x1870 Kerb weight 2185kg A big improvement for Peugeot, if not for the supermini class. 2.0 dCi 175 169 126 10.7 50.4 148 3.2 DI-DC 4WD 187 111 10.4-11.1 30.4-31.4 238-245 LxWxH 3475x1615x1460 Kerb weight 1065kg Panamera Sport Turismo 5dr estate £74,652–£139,287 AAAAA 2.0 dCi 175 4WD X-Tronic 169 125 9.5 47.9 156 1.2 PureTech 68 66 103 13.8 60.1 108 The Panamera in a more practical form, and now it’s a good-looking MORGAN R O L L S - R OYC E beast. LxWxH 5049x1937x1428 Kerb weight 1880kg 1.2 PureTech 82 79 109-111 12.2-14.5 62.8-67.3 97-104 3 Wheeler 0dr open £38,920 AAAAA 1.2 PureTech 110 107 118 9.8-9.6 62.8-65.7 99-104 3.0 V6 4 321 160 5.5 36.2 180 Wraith 2dr coupé £224,823–£280,223 AAAAB The eccentric, characterful and brilliant Morgan is a testament to 1.6 THP 165 159 135 7.4 50.4 129 2.9 V6 4S 428 177 4.4 34.9 189 An intimate and involving Rolls. Not as grand as some, but other English creativity. LxWxH 3225x1720x1000 Kerb weight 525kg traits make it great. LxWxH 5285x1947x1507 Kerb weight 2360kg 1.6 THP 208 GTi 202 143 6.5 52.3 125 2.9 V6 E-Hybrid 449 170 4.6 108.6 59 2.0 V-twin 68 68 115 7.0 34.9 187 4.0 V8 4S Diesel 416 175 4.5 42.2 176 6.6 V12 624 155 4.6 19.8 327 2.0 V-twin 82 82 115 6.0 30.3 215 308 5dr hatch £18,570–£28,590 AAAAB 4.0 V8 Turbo 533 188 3.8 30.1 217 Classy all-round appeal makes it a serious contender, but rear Dawn 2dr open £266,055–£302,655 AAAAB 4/4 2dr open £39,055 AACCC space is a little tight. LxWxH 4253x1804x1457 Kerb weight 1190kg Macan 5dr SUV £45,915–£86,267 AAAAB Essentially as above, except with a detuned engine and in elegant convertible form. LxWxH 5295x1947x1502 Kerb weight 2560kg Has its appeal but not as rewarding to drive as it could be. 1.2 PureTech 110 107 117 11.1 70.6 95 Spookily good handling makes this a sports utility vehicle in the LxWxH 4010x1630x1220 Kerb weight 795kg 1.2 PureTech 130 126 128-129 9.1-9.6 62.8 104-106 purest sense. LxWxH 4692x1923x1624 Kerb weight 1770kg 6.6 V12 563 155 5.0 19.6 330 1.6 i4 Sigma 110 115 8.0 44.1 143 1.6 THP 205 199 146 7.5 50.4 130 2.0 244 142 6.7 39.2 172 1.6 THP 270 264 155 6.0 47.1 139 3.0 V6 S 330 157 5.4 32.1 212 Ghost 4dr saloon £227,423–£262,823 AAAAC Plus 4 2dr open £42,835 AABCC 1.5 BlueHDi 130 126 127 9.8 80.7 93 3.0 V6 GTS 350 159 5.2 31.7 215 ‘A ffordable’ Rolls is a more driver-focused car than the Phantom. Still hugely special. LxWxH 5399x1948x1550 Kerb weight 2360kg Needs more chassis finesse, but the Plus 4 still charms 1.6 BlueHDi 100 96 112 12.2 76.3 96 3.0 V6 S Diesel 251 142 6.3 46.3 164 nonetheless. LxWxH 4010x1720x1220 Kerb weight 927kg 1.6 BlueHDi 120 116 117-118 10.2-10.3 72.4-74.3 98-101 3.6 V6 Turbo 388 165 4.8 31.4 216 6.6 V12 563 155 4.9-5.0 19.8-20.0 327-329 2.0 GDi 154 118 7.5 40.0 164 2.0 BlueHDi 150 145 131-132 8.6-8.9 68.9-72.4 102-108 3.6 Turbo P’formance P’kge 428 169 4.4 29.7 224 2.0 BlueHDi 180 EAT8 175 140 8.2 64.2 116 Phantom 4dr saloon NA AAAAA AACCC AAAAB Phantom takes opulent luxury to a whole level. Roadster 2dr open £52,915 Cayenne 5dr SUV £55,965–£99,291 LxWxH 5762x2018x1646 Kerb weight 2560kg More advanced, but pricey and needs better brakes. AAAAB Refreshed look, improved engines, interior and a better SUV 308 SW 5dr estate £19,520–£28,240 LxWxH 4010x1720x1220 Kerb weight 950kg overall. LxWxH 4918x1983x1696 Kerb weight 1985kg Estate bodystyle enjoys the classy appeal of the hatchback. 6.75 TV12 563 155 5.3-5.4 20.3 318-319 LxWxH 4585x1563x1472 Kerb weight 1190kg 3.7 V6 Cyclone 280 140 5.5 28.8 230 3.0 V6 330 152 6.2 30.7 213 1.2 PureTech 110 107 117 11.6 67.3 99 2.9 V6 S 428 164 5.2 31.4 209 Plus 8 2dr open £83,405 AAACC 1.2 PureTech 130 126 127 9.5-10.0 61.4-62.8 106 4.0 V8 Turbo 533 177 4.1 24.1 272 Old V8 charm lives on, but there’s no ignoring the high price. 1.5 BlueHDi 130 126 126 10.0 76.3 111-112 LxWxH 4010x1751x1220 Kerb weight 1100kg 1.6 BlueHDi 120 116 121 9.9-10.1 74.3-88.3 85-99 4.4 V8 367 155 4.5 23.0 282 2.0 BlueHDi 150 145 130 8.9-9.2 65.7-72.4 102-112 2.0 BlueHDi 180 EAT8 175 139 8.4 61.4 120 1.5 One 1.5 One D 1.5 Cooper 1.5 Cooper D 2.0 Cooper S 2.0 Cooper SD 2.0 John Cooper Works

101 93 134 114 189 167 227

121 10.1-10.2 118 11.0 130 7.8-7.9 127 9.2 145-146 6.7-6.8 140-141 7.2-7.3 152 6.1-6.3

57.6-58.9 83.1 60.1-62.8 76.3-80.7 49.6-54.3 70.6 44.8-49.6

109-114 89-92 105-112 92-99 122-136 104-109 133-147

Morgan’s flagship is a modern take on a classic look, although the old charm remains. LxWxH 4147x1751x1248 Kerb weight 1180kg

Efficient and well-mannered but facelift still leaves it short on space and style. LxWxH 4159x1829x1556 Kerb weight 1045kg

11 APRIL 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 85


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Not as desirable or plush as the Up but nearly as good to drive. LxWxH 3557x1643x1474 Kerb weight 929kg 59 74

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Tivoli XLV 5dr SUV £17,000–£21,700

S E AT

Mii 5dr hatch £10,555–£11,830 1.0 60 1.0 75

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14.4 13.2

64.2 64.2

Ibiza 5dr hatch £13,410–£19,300

102 102

Leon SC 3dr hatch £19,995–£29,600

112 106 108 112 99 99 AAAAC

1.4 TDI 90 1.6 TDI 115

88 113

115 125

11.3-11.4 62.8-70.6 105-106 9.7 60.1 109

Rapid Spaceback 5dr hatch £14,535–£19,335

With the Rapid’s skinny body, a hatchback shape makes the most sense. LxWxH 4304x1706x1459 Kerb weight 1090kg

1.4 TSI 125 1.4 EcoTSI 150 1.8 TSI 180 2.0 TSI 300 2.0 TDI 150 2.0 TDI 184

1.0 TSI 95 1.0 TSI 110 1.4 TDI 90 1.6 TDI 115

123 148 177 295 148 181

126 8.9 134 7.9 139-140 7.1-7.4 155 5.6-5.7 134 8.3 140-142 7.4

57.6 57.6 47.1-48.7 40.9-42.2 64.2 61.4-62.8

114 115 134-138 153-158 112 118-120

Leon 5dr hatch £17,970–£29,900 113 108 123 148 177 295 113 148 181

114 123 114 123

10.6 9.5 11.2-11.3 9.6

52.3 51.4 62.8-64.2 60.1

103 106 105-106 109

AAAAC

123-126 9.6-10.0 121 9.9 126 9.1 134 8.0 139-140 7.2-7.5 155 5.7-5.8 122 9.8 134 8.4 140-142 7.5

64.2 56.5 54.3 57.6 47.1-48.7 40.9-41.5 68.9-70.6 64.2 61.4-62.8

102 116 120 114-115 134-138 156-158 105-109 112 118-120

1.0 TSI 115 1.4 TSI 150 1.5 TSI ACT 150 2.0 TSI 230 vRS 2.0 TSI 245 vRS 1.6 TDI 115 2.0 TDI 150 2.0 TDI 184 vRS 2.0 TDI 184 4x4 vRS

113 148 148 226 241 113 148 181 181

126 9.6-9.7 136 7.8-7.9 136 7.9-8.0 155 6.5-6.6 155 6.4 126 9.8 135 8.1 143-144 7.6 142 7.3

58.9 54.3-57.7 57.7 42.8-43.5 42.8-44.1 68.9-72.4 65.7 57.7-62.8 55.4

Octavia Estate 5dr estate £18,700–£30,685

108-110 114-121 113-114 149 146-150 103-106 113 119-129 134

Makes practical senses but otherwise leaves no long-lasting impression. LxWxH 4482x1706x1461 Kerb weight 1190kg

not on price. LxWxH 4861x1864x1468 Kerb weight 1340kg

1.4 TSI 125 123 129 9.6 39.8 130 1.4 TSI 150 148 137 8.3-8.5 44.8-45.6 119-121 2.0 TSI 220 217 152 6.8 34.9 147 2.0 TSI 280 4X4 276 155 5.6 31.7 160 Arona 5dr SUV £16,555–£23,095 AAAAC 1.6 TDI 120 118 128 10.5-10.6 57.7-60.1 110-111 Seat’s second SUV doesn’t disappoint, with it taking charge of the 2.0 TDI 150 148 135-137 8.5-8.6 52.3-56.5 113-116 class dynamically. LxWxH 4138x1780x1543 Kerb weight 1165kg 2.0 TDI 150 4x4 148 134 8.7 49.6 124 1.0 TSI 95 93 107 11.2 57.6 111 2.0 TDI 190 187 146 7.4 50.4 123 1.0 TSI 115 113 113 9.8-10.0 56.5-57.6 113-114 2.0 TDI 190 4X4 187 143 7.3 44.8 138 1.5 TSI EVO 150 148 127 8.3 55.4 115 1.6 TDI 95 93 107 11.9 70.6 105 Superb Estate 5dr estate £22,015–£37,310 AAAAC 1.6 TDI 115 113 NA NA NA NA Even more commendable than above, primarily thanks to its 108 113

124 125

9.8 10.0

61.4 67.3

106 109

enormous boot. LxWxH 4856x1864x1477 Kerb weight 1365kg

Ateca 5dr SUV £18,670–£31,590

AAAAB 1.4 TSI 125

Seat’s first SUV is very good. So good, in fact, it’s a Qashqai beater. 1.4 TSI 150 LxWxH 4363x1841x1601 Kerb weight 1280kg 2.0 TSI 220 1.0 TSI Ecomotive 115 1.4 EcoTSI 150 2.0 TSI 190 4Drive 1.6 TDI 115 2.0 TDI 150 4Drive 2.0 TDI 190 4Drive

113 148 187 113 148 187

114 123-125 132 114 122 132

11.0 8.5-8.6 7.9 11.5 9.0 7.5

53.3-54.3 51.4-53.3 40.4 62.8 55.4-56.5 53.3

Alhambra 5dr MPV £25,690–£36,320

119-120 122-125 159 118-119 128-129 135

AAAAC

2.0 TSI 280 4X4 1.6 TDI 120 2.0 TDI 150 2.0 TDI 150 4x4 2.0 TDI 190 2.0 TDI 190 4X4

123 148 217 276 118 148 148 187 187

128 9.7 135 8.4-8.6 151 6.9 155 5.6 127-128 10.6-10.7 132-135 8.6-8.8 132 8.8 145-146 7.5-7.8 142 7.4

39.8 44.1-44.8 34.9 31.4 56.5-62.8 52.3-56.5 48.7 50.4-54.3 44.8

129 121-122 148 164 102-114 114-117 125 115-124 139

Yeti replacement may not have its forebear’s quirkiness, but it’s brilliant otherwise. LxWxH 4382x1841x1603 Kerb weight 1265kg

1.4 TSI 150 2.0 TDI Ecomotive 150 2.0 TDI 184

1.0 TSI 115 1.5 TSI EVO 150 1.6 TDI 115 2.0 TDI 150 4x4

124 9.9 43.5 150 123-124 10.2-10.3 54.3-55.4 130-137 132-134 8.9.9.4 53.3 139-141

113 148 113 148

115-116 126 116 121

10.3-10.4 8.1-8.3 10.4-10.5 8.4-9.0

53.3-54.3 51.4-52.3 61.4-64.2 54.3-56.5

Citigo 3dr hatch £8780–£11,735

AAABC

118-119 123-125 117-120 131-137

Kodiaq 5dr SUV £22,625–£37,120

A Czech take on the city car is more fun to drive than its plain-Jane Skoda’s first seven-seat SUV is a viable alternative to a traditional exterior suggests. LxWxH 3597x1641x1478 Kerb weight 854kg MPV. LxWxH 4697x1882x1676 Kerb weight 1430kg 59 59 59 74 74

100 100 100 107 107

13.9 16.2 13.9 13.1 14.4

51.4 53.3 57.7 57.7 53.3

Fabia 5dr hatch £11,370–£18,675

1.4 TSI 125 1.4 TSI 150 1.4 TSI 150 4x4 2.0 TSI 180 4x4 2.0 TDI 150 2.0 TDI 150 4x4 AAAAC 2.0 TDI 190 4x4 101 100 96 96 103

Dull design, and no class leader on handling or cabin space, but strong otherwise. LxWxH 3992x1732x1467 Kerb weight 1005kg 1.0 MPI 60 1.0 MPI 75 1.0 TSI 95 1.0 TSI 110 1.4 TDI 75 1.4 TDI 90 1.4 TDI 105

59 74 93 108 74 88 103

99 107 115 122 107 113 120

15.2 14.2 10.3 9.2-9.5 12.7 10.7 9.8

47.9 47.9 54.3 52.3 64.2 64.2 60.1

Fabia Estate 5dr estate £13,270–£19,940

123 148 148 177 148 148 187

118-123 123 120-122 128 123 120-122 130

9.3-10.2 9.3 9.5-9.6 7.7 9.8 9.4-9.6 8.3

44.8-46.3 44.8 39.8-40.9 38.2 56.5 49.6-52.3 49.6

139-143 143 155-163 170 131 141-149 150

Four doors give the Smart more mainstream practicality. Still expensive, though. LxWxH 3495x1665x1555 Kerb weight 975kg

1.0 MPI 75 1.0 TSI 95 1.0 TSI 110 1.4 TDI 75 1.4 TDI 90 1.4 TDI 105

1.0 71 0.9 90 0.9 109 Brabus Electric Drive

109 116 123 109 114 122

14.4 10.3 9.3-9.6 12.7 10.9 9.9

47.9 54.3 52.3 64.2 64.2 60.1

Rapid 4dr saloon £15,470–£20,260

111 101 103-106 104 104-105 112

93 108 123

116 124 129

94 102 96 80

15.9-16.9 11.2-11.9 10.5 12.7

67.3 65.7-67.3 61.4 NA

96-97 98-99 104 0

S S A N G YO N G

Tivoli 5dr SUV £13,495–£20,945

37.7 175 53.3 139-152 40.9-48.7 152-179

much. LxWxH 4195x1795x1590 Kerb weight 1270kg

10.6 9.5 8.7

86 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 11 APRIL 2018

53.3 51.4 45.6

103 106 115

1.6 128 1.6d 115 1.6d 115 4x4

126 113 113

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Model X 5dr SUV £70,500–£128,250

my

(m

pg

) (g/

178

323 602 602

130 155 155

115

AAAAB 4.9 4.7 2.9

NA NA NA

0 0 0

T OYO TA

AAABC

1.0

67

99

14.2-15.5 74.3-78.5 95-97

Yaris 5dr hatch £13,295–£19,595

Toyotas. LxWxH 3495x1695x1510 Kerb weight 975kg

1.0 1.5 1.5 Hybrid AAACC 1.8 VVT-I GRMN

67 108 71 206

96 108 102 143

15.3 11.0-11.2 11.8 6.3

65.7 58.5-60.1 85.6 37.0

99 105-112 82 170

Incredibly ungainly but offers huge real estate for the money. LxWxH 5130x1915x1850 Kerb weight 2115kg

Auris 5dr hatch £20,155–£25,805

2.2d 178

Disappointingly average. There are many better rivals out there. LxWxH 4330x1760x1475 Kerb weight 1235kg

108-116 NA

Impreza 5dr hatch £23,995–£24,995

36.2-39.2 189-205

1.33 VVT-i AAACC 1.2 Turbo VVT-i 1.4 D-4D 1.6 D-4D 44.1 145 1.8 VVT-I Hybrid 42.8 152

Appealing hatchback has been steadily improved but still feels old-fashioned. LxWxH 4415x1740x1465 Kerb weight 1374kg 1.6i 2.0i

112 153

112 127

12.4 9.8

130

8.9

109 124 112 121 112

12.6 10.1-10.5 12.5 10.5 10.9

51.4 58.9-61.4 80.7 67.3 80.7

128 106-112 92 108 79

exceptional either. LxWxH 4595x1760x1485 Kerb weight 1285kg

1.33 VVT-i 1.2 Turbo VVT-i 1.4 D-4D XV 5dr SUV £22,495–£27,495 AAACC 1.6 D-4D No-nonsense crossover doesn’t quite make enough sense. 1.8 VVT-I Hybrid 167

96 112 87 108 134

AAABC

Auris Touring Sports 5dr estate £21,255–£26,905 AAABC AAACC Nothing wrong with this estate, but then there’s nothing

Levorg 5dr estate £29,995

Impressively practical but only offered with an automatic gearbox and one trim. LxWxH 4690x1780x1490 Kerb weight 1568kg 1.6i

)

Impactful styling does a lot to recommend it, but not as refined nor as practical as some. LxWxH 3455x1615x1460 Kerb weight 840kg

11.3-11.9 34.0-36.2 204-218

Turismo 5dr MPV £19,995–£26,245 175

km

CO 2

AAABC AAABC Stylish interior but ultimately a scaled-down version of bigger

A vast improvement. Better on the road but without ditching its argicultural roots. LxWxH 4850x1960x1825 Kerb weight 2102kg

39.8

164

Forester 5dr estate £28,495–£32,495

96 112 87 108 134

109 124 112 121 112

13.2 10.4-10.8 13.0 10.7 11.2

50.4 58.9 72.4 68.9 80.7

Verso 5dr MPV £22,570–£25,450

130 110-112 100 108 81 AAABC

One of Toyota’s better niche models and one unburdened by a hybrid powertrain. LxWxH 4460x1790x1620 Kerb weight 1430kg

AAACC 1.6 Valvematic 128 114 11.7 42.8 154 1.8 Valvematic 142 114 11.1 42.8 153 1.6 D-4D 108 111 12.7 62.8 119 118-119 10.6-11.8 40.9-43.5 150-160 137 7.5 33.2 197 Avensis 4dr saloon £19,690–£27,280 AAACC 117-118 9.9 46.3-49.6 148-158 Nothing wrong with the mid-sized saloon but hard to recommend

Solid, spacious and wilfully unsexy. A capable 4x4 nonetheless. LxWxH 4610x1795x1735 Kerb weight 1488kg 2.0i 150 2.0i 241 2.0d

148 237 148

over rivals. LxWxH 4750x1810x1480 Kerb weight 1360kg

Outback 5dr estate £32,995–£34,995 Acceptable in isolation but no class leader. LxWxH 4815x1840x1605 Kerb weight 1612kg 2.5i 2.0d

172 148

130 10.2 119-124 9.7-9.9

AABCC 1.6 D-4D 108 115 11.4 62.8-67.3 108-116 2.0 D-4D 138 124 9.5 58.9-62.8 119-124 1.8 Valvematic 142 124 9.4-10.4 43.5-47.9 138-149 40.4 161 46.3-50.4 145-159 Avensis Touring Sports 5dr estate £20,870–£29,300 AAACC

Estate comes with a good spec but is otherwise unexceptional.

BRZ 2dr coupé £26,495–£27,995

AAAAA LxWxH 4820x1810x1480 Kerb weight 1390kg 1.6 D-4D 108 115 11.7 2.0 D-4D 138 124 9.8 36.2-39.8 164-180 1.8 Valvematic 142 124 9.7-10.7

The GT86’s half-brother looks great in Subaru blue. Cheaper, too. LxWxH 4240x1775x1320 Kerb weight 1242kg 2.0i

197

130-140 7.6-8.2

WRX STI 4dr saloon £31,995

AAABC

Appealing and behind the times all at once. LxWxH 4595x1795x1475 Kerb weight 1534kg 2.5i

295

159

5.2

27.2

Celerio 5dr hatch £7999–£11,449

242

66 66

C-HR 5dr SUV £21,595–£28,615 1.2 Turbo 1.2 Turbo AWD 1.8 VVT-I Hybrid

96 96

13.5-16.4 65.7 13.0 78.4

99 84

bereft of asphalt. LxWxH 3700x1660x1595 Kerb weight 855kg 106 106 103

11.8 11.4 11.1

61.4 65.7 60.1

104 97 106

it’s no class leader. LxWxH 3840x1735x1495 Kerb weight 890kg 1.2 Dualjet 1.2 Dualjet SHVS 4x4 1.0 Boosterjet SHVS 1.0 Boosterjet

87 87 108 108

114-118 10.9-11.1 47.1-47.9 117-118 111 11.4 44.8 128 105 11.0 72.4-74.3 92-93

RAV4 5dr SUV £27,450–£34,985

2.0 D-4D 2.0 AWD AAAAC 2.5 Hybrid Cute and rugged-looking 4x4 city car capable of tackling roads 2.5 Hybrid AWD 87 87 87

112 112 119

111 105 121 118-121

11.9 12.6 10.6 10.0-10.6

65.7 62.7 65.7 56.5-61.4

98 101 97 104-114

AAACC

A solid option but ultimately outgunned by Korean competition. LxWxH 4605x1845x1675 Kerb weight 1605kg

Ignis 5dr hatch £11,499–£15,964 1.2 Dualjet 1.2 Dualjet SHVS 1.2 Dualjet SHVS 4x4

AAAAC

AAABC

Pleasing to drive, cheap to buy and decent to sit in. No-nonsense and likeable for it. LxWxH 3600x1600x1540 Kerb weight 835kg 1.0 K10B 1.0 K10C Dualjet

62.8-67.3 109-116 58.9-61.4 120-124 43.5-47.1 139-149

Coupé-shaped crossover certainly turns heads and impresses on the road. LxWxH 4360x1795x1565 Kerb weight 1320kg

SUZUKI

141 149 194 194

121 114 112 112

9.6 10.7 8.4 8.4

60.1 43.5 57.6 55.4

Land Cruiser 5dr SUV £37,230–£58,580

123 152 115 118 AAABC

A real go-anywhere vehicle. Totally rugged and available with seven seats. LxWxH 4335x1885x1875 Kerb weight 2010kg 2.8 D-4D

171

109

12.1-12.7 38.2-39.2 190-194

GT86 2dr coupé £26,855–£30,270

AAAAB

Almost the most fun you can have on a limited budget. Splendid. LxWxH 4240x1775x1320 Kerb weight 1247kg 2.0i

197

130-140 7.6-8.2

36.2-39.8 164-180

Prius 5dr hatch £24,115–£27,870

AAAAC

Better all round compared with its predecessors. Challenging

Baleno 5dr hatch £12,999–£17,379

LxWxH 3995x1745x1470 Kerb weight 920kg 1.0 Boosterjet 1.2 Dualjet SHVS

108 87

118-124 11.0-11.4 57.6-62.7 105-115 105 12.6 70.6 94

Jimny 3dr SUV £12,999–£15,784

Prius Plug-in Hybrid 5dr hatch £31,695–£33,895

AAAAC

Plug-in version is clever and appealing. Seems more comfortable in its skin. LxWxH 4645x1760x1470 Kerb weight 1530kg

AAACC 1.8 VVT-i Hybrid

120

101

11.1

283.0

22

The smallest four-wheel-drive Suzuki is capable off-road but looks dated now. LxWxH 3675x1600x1705 Kerb weight 1090kg

Prius+ 5dr MPV £27,660–£31,930

1.3 M13A

Expensive, old and ugly variant of the Prius, but can carry seven. LxWxH 4645x1775x1575 Kerb weight 1500kg

83

84-87 14.1-17.2 38.7-39.8 162-167

Vitara 5dr SUV £15,999–£25,099

AAABC 1.8 VVT-i Hybrid

lease of life. LxWxH 4300x1785x1585 Kerb weight 1160kg 1.0 Boosterjet 1.0 Boosterjet Allgrip 1.4 Boosterjet Allgrip 1.6 DDiS 1.6 DDiS Allgrip

108 108 136 116 116

106-112 109 124 112 109 TESLA

AAABC

AAABC Trails the Duster as the best-value small crossover – but not by

Essentially a Fabia in saloon form, so likeable, if slightly dull. LxWxH 4483x1706x1461 Kerb weight 1095kg 1.0 TSI 95 1.0 TSI 110 1.4 TSI 125

68 87 105 79

p)

132

AAACC 103

11.3

64.2-68.9 96-101

Utterly worthy addition to the class drives better than most.

SMART

Fortwo 3dr hatch/open £9995–£23,655

Far more practical, majoring on boot space while doing what a good Skoda should. LxWxH 4257x1732x1488 Kerb weight 1029kg 74 93 108 74 88 103

12.5 9.9 9.9

AAACC LxWxH 4175x1775x1610 Kerb weight 1075kg Pricey two-seater has urban appeal but is short on performance 1.6 M16A 116 112 11.5-12.5 51.3-53.3 123-127 and handling. LxWxH 2695x1663x1555 Kerb weight 890kg 1.6 M16A Allgrip 116 112 12.0-13.0 49.5-50.4 130-131 1.0 71 68 94 14.4-15.5 65.7-68.9 93-99 1.6 DDiS 116 112 11.5 70.6 106 0.9 90 87 96 10.4-11.7 65.7-68.9 96-99 1.6 DDiS Allgrip 116 112 12.4 62.7-67.2 111-118 0.9 109 Brabus 105 102 9.5 61.4-62.8 102-104 1.4 Boosterjet S Allgrip 136 124 10.2 51.3-52.3 127-128 Electric Drive 79 80 11.5-11.8 NA 0 S-Cross 5dr SUV £17,499–£26,249 AAABC AAAAC Forfour 5dr hatch £10,490–£22,010 AAACC A worthy crossover if not a class leader. Refreshed looks give a 110 111 101 103-106 104 104-105 112

(bh

AAABC looks, though. LxWxH 4540x1760x1470 Kerb weight 1375kg AAAAC Suzuki’s family-sized hatchback makes use of clever little engines. 1.8 VVT-i Hybrid 120 112 10.6 85.6-94.1 70-76

S KO DA

1.0 MPI 60 1.0 MPI 60 ASG 1.0 MPI 60 GreenTech 1.0 MPI 75 GreenTech 1.0 MPI 75 ASG

101 115 115

Swift 5dr hatch £11,999–£17,334 AAABC AAAAC Given mature looks, more equipment and a hybrid powertrain, but

Karoq 5dr SUV £20,875–£31,690

This cheaper version of the VW Sharan is spacious, versatile and good to drive. LxWxH 4854x1904x1730 Kerb weight 1755kg 148 148 181

144 175 175

AAAAC LxWxH 4450x1780x1615 Kerb weight 1355kg 2.0i 148 116 10.5-10.7 40.4-43.5 151-160 2.0d 145 123 9.3 52.3 141

AAAAC LxWxH 4667x1814x1465 Kerb weight 1247kg Good-looking and responsive hatchback-turned-estate. 1.0 TSI 115 113 124-125 9.8 58.9 108-110 LxWxH 4549x1816x1454 Kerb weight 1236kg 1.4 TSI 150 148 134 7.9-8.0 53.3-56.5 117-124 1.0 TSI Ecomotive 115 113 126 9.8-10.2 64.2 102 1.5 TSI ACT 150 148 135-136 8.0-8.1 56.5-57.7 114-115 1.2 TSI 110 108 121 10.1 57.6 116 2.0 TSI 230 vRS 226 152-153 6.6-6.8 42.8-43.5 149 1.4 TSI 125 123 126 9.4 54.3 120 2.0 TSI 245 vRS 241 155 6.5 42.8-44.1 146-150 1.4 EcoTSI 150 148 134 8.2 56.5-57.6 114-117 1.6 TDI 115 113 124-125 9.8-9.9 68.9-72.4 103-106 1.8 TSI 180 177 134-138 7.7-7.8 47.1-48.7 134-138 2.0 TDI 150 148 132-134 8.2-8.3 58.9-65.7 113-119 2.0 TSI 300 295 155 4.9-6.0 39.2-40.4 161-164 2.0 TDI 150 4x4 148 130 8.1 60.1 124 1.6 TDI 115 113 122 9.9 67.3-68.9 108-112 2.0 TDI 150 4x4 Scout 148 129 8.8 56.5 130 2.0 TDI 150 148 134 8.6 67.3-68.9 112 2.0 TDI 184 vRS 181 142-143 8.0-8.1 57.7-62.8 119-129 2.0 TDI 150 4Drive 148 129 8.7 58.9 125 2.0 TDI 184 4x4 vRS 181 139 7.4 55.4 134 2.0 TDI 184 181 140-142 7.8 58.9-61.4 121-125 2.0 TDI 184 4x4 Scout 181 136 7.5 55.4 133 2.0 TDI 184 4Drive 181 139 7.1 52.3 139 Superb 5dr hatch £20,695–£36,030 AAAAC Toledo 4dr saloon £16,670–£22,110 AAACC Another great Czech value option that’s big on quality and space if

Po

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Aygo 3dr hatch £9255–£14,895

Class-leading amount of space and practicality. Comfortable, too.

Leon ST 5dr estate £18,965–£32,580

1.0 TSI 110 1.6 TDI 115

)

AAACC

SUBARU

Octavia 5dr hatch £17,695–£29,485

Does comfort and practicality like no other. Good, frugal engines AAAAC too. LxWxH 4670x1814x1461 Kerb weight 1225kg

As above but swaps three-door sleekness for five-door practicality. LxWxH 4282x1816x1459 Kerb weight 1202kg 1.0 TSI Ecomotive 115 1.2 TSI 110 1.4 TSI 125 1.4 EcoTSI 150 1.8 TSI 180 2.0 TSI 300 1.6 TDI 115 2.0 TDI 150 2.0 TDI 184

93 108 88 113

km

99-106 11.0-12.0 37.2-39.8 165-176 107-109 12.0 47.9-62.8 117-154 107-109 12.0 44.8-57.6 127-164

Rexton 5dr SUV £27,995–£37,995

AAABC 2.2d 181

A cut-price Golf with Spanish styling, crisper handling and an alluring coupé shape. LxWxH 4246x1810x1431 Kerb weight 1213kg

C

(g/ O2

75D 100D P100D

126 113 113

2.0 146 2.2d 178 2.2d 178 4x4

57.6 60.1 60.1 57.6 74.3 74.3

)

1.6 128 1.6d 115 1.6d 115 4x4

1.0 MPI 75 1.0 TSI 95 1.0 TSI 115 1.5 TSI EVO 150 1.6 TDI 80 1.6 TDI 95

14.7 10.9 9.3 7.9 8.6 7.5

pg

A genuine luxury seven-seat electric SUV which also has a large range. LxWxH 5036x2070x1684 Kerb weight 2459kg

Good for a Ssangyong but poor by class standards. LxWxH 4410x1830x1710 Kerb weight 1725kg

104 113 121 134 107 113

(m

AAABC

Reinvigorated Ibiza is more mature and takes the class honours from the Fiesta. LxWxH 4059x1780x1444 Kerb weight 1091kg 74 93 113 148 79 93

my

Now grown in size for more practicality but that doesn’t increase the Tivoli’s appeal. LxWxH 4440x1798x1635 Kerb weight 1405kg

Korando 5dr SUV £16,295–£23,995

AAAAB

o on

99-106 11.0-12.0 39.2-44.1 149-167 107-109 12.0 51.4-65.7 113-146 107-109 12.0 47.9-60.1 123-156

Model S 5dr hatch £64,700–£122,200

11.0-12.4 12.0 10.2 12.0 13.0

54.3-56.4 53.3 49.5-50.4 68.8 64.2

113-119 119 127-128 106 114

VA U X H A L L

Viva 5dr hatch £10,050–£11,815

AAABC

Plenty of space but lacks its rivals’ equipment, joie de vivre and refinement. LxWxH 3675x1595x1485 Kerb weight 939kg 1.0i

74

106

13.1-14.0 60.1-62.8 103-106

Adam 3dr hatch £13,295–£20,140

AAACC

Certainly looks the part, but there are better superminis ahead of it. LxWxH 3698x1720x1484 Kerb weight 1101kg 1.2i 70 1.4i 87 1.4i 100 1.0i Turbo 115 1.4i Turbo 150

69 85 98 113 148

103 109-111 115 121 130

14.9 12.5-13.9 11.5 9.9 8.5

53.3 52.3-56.5 52.3 57.6 47.9

Corsa 3dr/5dr hatch £11,045–£20,345

125 118-125 125 112 139

AAABC

Refined, stylish and practical, but its engines aren’t so good.

AAAAB LxWxH 4021x1736x1479 Kerb weight 1141kg Large range makes it not only a standout EV but also the future of 1.4i 75 74 101 15.5 luxury motoring. LxWxH 4978x1963x1445 Kerb weight 2108kg 1.4i 90 88 109 13.2 75D 323 140 4.2 NA 0 1.4i Turbo 100 98 115 11.0 100D 602 155 4.1 NA 0 1.0i Turbo 90 88 112 11.9 P100D 602 155 2.5 NA 0 1.0i Turbo 115 113 121 10.3 1.4i Turbo 150 148 129 8.9 1.6i Turbo VXR 205 202 143 6.5

54.3 54.3 55.4 62.8 58.9 49.6 37.7

120 120 119 104 111 132 174


N E W CAR PR I CES Po

1.3 CDTi 75 1.3 CDTi 95

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74 93

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102 113

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14.8 11.9

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72.4 78.5

Astra 5dr hatch £17,115–£27,415

(m

p

g)

C

(g/ O2

km

104 94

)

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Polo 5dr hatch £13,855- £22,640

my

(m

p

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C

(g/ O2

km

)

Po

AAAAC 2.0 TDI 150 2.0 TDI 190

A thorough going-over makes it more mature, but the Polo is still a bit boring. LxWxH 4053x1946x1461 Kerb weight 1105kg

AAAAC 1.0 65 64 102 15.5 58.9-60.1 108-110 1.0 75 74 106 14.9 58.9-60.1 108-110 1.0 TSI 95 93 116 10.8 60.1-64.2 101-107 102 1.0 TSI 115 113 NA NA NA NA 124 1.5 TSI EVO 150 148 NA NA NA NA 124 2.0 TSI GTI 200 197 NA NA NA NA 128 1.6 TDI 80 79 NA NA NA NA 142 1.6 TDI 95 93 NA NA NA NA 88 99 Golf 3dr/5dr hatch £18,230–£34,790 AAAAB 109 Does exactly what everyone expects. Still the king of the family

r we

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128-129 9.3 137 8.2

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61.4 58.9

Sharan 5dr MPV £27,900–£38,130

(m

p

g)

C

(g/ O2

1.0i Turbo 105 1.4i 100 1.4i Turbo 125 1.4i Turbo 150 1.6i Turbo 200 1.6 CDTi 110 1.6 CDTi 136 1.6 CDTi BiTurbo 160

1.4 TSI 150 2.0 TDI 115 2.0 TDI 150 2.0 TDI 184

10.5 12.6 8.6 7.8 6.6 10.2 9.0 8.1

64.2 52.3 52.3 51.4 45.6 85.6 74.3 68.9

car. LXWXH 4258x1790x1492 Kerb weight 1206kg

Astra Sports Tourer 5dr estate £18,465–£26,690

AAAAC 1.0 TSI 85 83 112 11.9 1.0 TSI 110 108 122 9.9 1.4 TSI 125 123 127 9.1 1.0i Turbo 105 103 121 11.0 62.8 103 1.5 TSI EVO 130 128 NA NA 1.4i 100 98 115 13.1 51.4 127 1.5 TSI EVO 150 148 134 8.3 1.4i Turbo 125 123 127 9.0 51.4 127 2.0 TSI 230 GTI 226 154-155 6.4 1.4i Turbo 150 148 134 8.2 50.4 130 2.0 TSI 245 GTI Performance 241 154-155 6.2 1.6i Turbo 200 197 146 7.2 45.6 143 2.0 TSI 310 4Motion R 305 155 4.6-5.1 1.6 CDTi 110 108 121 10.7 78.5 96 1.4 TSI GTE 148 138 7.6 1.6 CDTi 136 134 127 9.5 74.3 101 1.6 TDI 115 113 123 10.2-10.5 1.6 CDTi BiTurbo 160 157 137 8.4 68.9 109 2.0 TDI 150 148 133-134 8.6 2.0 TDI 184 GTD 181 143-144 7.4-7.5 GTC 3dr hatch £22,330–£30,110 AAABC Sleek-shaped hatchback matched with good handling and decent Golf Estate 5dr estate £20,995–£35,840

More composed and practical than the hatchback. LxWxH 4702x1809x1510 Kerb weight 1273kg

118 138 197 276 108 134

119 125 143 155 113 123

10.1 8.9 7.3 5.9 11.6 9.5

108 107-109 119-120 NA 114-116 145 144 160-180 38 102-109 109-117 116-124

46.3 46.3 42.2 34.9 67.3 65.7

144 144 154 189 111 115

package. LxWxH 4567x1799x1515 Kerb weight 1295kg

1.0 TSI 85 83 112 12.6 58.9 109 1.0 TSI 110 108 122 10.4 57.6 110-112 1.4 TSI 125 123 127 9.5 53.3 118-123 1.5 TSI EVO 130 128 NA NA NA NA 1.5 TSI EVO 150 148 135 8.7 55.4 114-116 2.0 TSI 310 4Motion R 305 155 4.8 39.2 164 Cascada 2dr open £28,010–£34,105 AAAAC 1.6 TDI 90 88 116 12.9 68.9 106 Good-looking proper four-seat convertible that rivals premium 1.6 TDI 115 113 124 10.7 68.9 103-106 versions. LxWxH 4696x1839x1443 Kerb weight 1714kg 2.0 TDI 150 148 134-135 8.9 65.7 111-114 1.4i Turbo 140 138 129 10.2 43.5 149 2.0 TDI 184 GTD 181 143-144 7.8-7.9 60.1 124-125 1.6i Turbo 170 167 146 8.2 40.9 158 1.6i Turbo 200 197 136 9.2 37.2 176 Golf Alltrack 5dr estate £29,240–£31,525 AAAAB 2.0 CDTi 170 167 135 9.6 57.6 129 And to complete the Golf line-up is a rugged version of the estate.

LxWxH 4567x1799x1515 Kerb weight 1541kg

Insignia Grand Sport 5dr hatch £17,635–£33,375

AAAAC 1.8 TSI 180 4Motion 178 NA NA 42.2 156 2.0 TDI 150 4Motion 148 129 8.9 55.4 133 2.0 TDI 184 4Motion 181 136 7.8 54.3 137 1.5 Turbo 140 138 130 9.3 47.6 133 Golf SV 5dr MPV £20,475–£28,595 1.5 Turbo 165 162 138 8.4 47.1 136 AAAAC 2.0 Turbo 260 4x4 256 155 6.9 32.8 197 Probably the least appealing member of the Golf family but still resolute. LxWxH 4338x2050x1578 Kerb weight 1335kg 1.6 Turbo D 110 108 127 10.9 70.6 105 1.6 Turbo D 136 134 126-131 9.9-10.2 55.4-65.7 114-134 1.0 TSI 85 83 110 13.0 57.6 112 2.0 Turbo D 170 167 139-140 8.2-8.4 51.4-54.3 136-145 1.0 TSI 110 109 119 10.7 56.5 113 2.0 BiTurbo D 210 4x4 207 144 7.4-7.5 40.4-40.9 183-186 1.5 TSI EVO 130 128 126 9.6 55.4 116 1.5 TSI EVO 150 148 132 8.8 54.3 118 Insignia Sports Tourer 5dr estate £19,135–£34,475 AAAAC 1.6 TDI 115 113 119 11.0 67.3-68.9 107-110 The practical version of the Insignia that aims to take the fight to 2.0 TDI 150 148 130 9.2 61.4 119

The good-looking and tech-filled Insignia makes an attractive proposition. LxWxH 4897x1863x1455 Kerb weight 1714kg

premium rivals. LxWxH 4986x1863x1514 Kerb weight 1487kg 1.5 Turbo 140 1.5 Turbo 165 2.0 Turbo 260 4x4 1.6 Turbo D 136 2.0 Turbo D 170 2.0 BiTurbo D 210 4x4

138 162 256 134 167 207

129 135 152 127-132 137-139 144

9.6 8.6 7.1 10.1-10.5 8.4-8.6 7.4-7.5

47.1 46.3 32.5 54.3-62.8 49.6-53.3 39.8-40.4

136 139 199 119-137 139-150 186-187

Jetta 4dr saloon £19,740–£25,670

123-124 114 123-124 132-136

9.9 12.6 10.3 8.9

43.5 56.5 55.4-56.5 53.3

T-Roc 5dr SUV £18,950–£31,485

150-156 130 130-137 138-141

1.5 TSI EVO 150 2.0 TSI 190 4Motion

148 187

127 134

8.3 7.2

52.3-53.3 120-121 41.5 155

Tiguan 5dr SUV £23,250–£39,510

1.2i 81 1.2i 110 1.2i Turbo 130 1.6 Turbo D 99 1.6 Turbo D 120

80 108 128 97 118

105 117 128 112 116

14.0 10.6 9.1 12.0 9.9

54.3 57.6-58.9 55.4 76.3-78.5 70.6

116 109-111 116 93-95 105

123 148 148 177 113 148 148 187 236

118 124-125 123-124 129 115 125-127 124-125 131 142

10.5 9.2 9.2 7.7 10.9 9.3 9.3 7.9 6.5

46.3-47.1 48.7-49.6 40.9 38.2 60.1 58.9-60.1 52.3-53.3 49.6 44.1

137-139 130-140 155-163 170 123 123-129 139-149 149 167

1.4 TSI 150 2.0 TSI 180 4Motion 2.0 TDI 150 2.0 TDI 150 4Motion 2.0 TDI 190 4Motion 2.0 BiTDI 240 4Motion

148 177 148 148 187 238

123-124 129 124-126 123-124 130 142

9.5 8.2 9.8 9.9 8.6 6.7

43.5-46.3 36.7 55.4-56.5 47.9-49.6 47.9 43.5

Touareg 5dr SUV £45,530–£51,490

137-148 175 131-132 150-153 153 170

3.0 V6 TDI 204 3.0 V6 TDI 262

201 258

128 140

8.7 7.3

42.2 41.5

176 180

V40 5dr hatch £21,115–£32,785

100 106 114 80

14.4 13.2-13.5 9.9 12.4

1.4 TSI 150 2.0 TDI 110 2.0 TDI 150

96-101 96-103 108 0

NA NA 7.9

2m

ph Ec

o on

my

(m

pg

) (g/

km

)

CO 2

55.4-58.9 127-136 51.4-55.4 136-146 56.5-57.6 131-133 AAABC

185 228 247 310

127 137 137 140

8.4 7.2 6.8 5.3

54.3-55.4 51.4 38.7-39.2 134.5

133-136 144 164-167 49

2.0 D5 PowerPulse AWD 2.0 T6 AWD 2.0 T8 Twin Engine

228 310 310

137 143 140

7.8 6.5 5.6

49.6 34.9 134.5

149 184 49

VUHL

05 0dr open £59,995- £89,995

AAAAC

Mexican track-day special has a pleasingly pragmatic and forgiving chassis. LxWxH 3718x1876x1120 Kerb weight 725kg 2.0 DOHC Turbo 2.3 DOHC Turbo RR

285 385

152 158

3.7 2.7

NA NA

NA NA

WESTFIELD

Sport 2dr coupé £19,950–£35,800

AAAAC

Sport Turbo is very quick and fun but not a patch on the Caterhams. LxWxH NA Kerb weight NA 135 155 200 252

NA NA NA NA

NA NA NA NA

NA NA NA NA

Mega 2dr coupé £14,999–£15,595

NA NA NA NA AAABC

Mega engines make it rapid, but not as fun as Caterham’s R range. LxWxH NA Kerb weight NA 1.3 Suzuki Hyabusa 2.0 VTEC S2000

177 240

136 NA

3.0 NA

NA NA

NA NA

ZENOS

E10 0dr coupé £26,995–£39,995

AAAAB

The latest in a long line of mid-engined British marvels. Expect a dedicated following. LxWxH 3800x1870x1130 Kerb weight 700kg 2.0 Ecoboost S 2.3 Ecoboost R

250 350

145 155

4.0 3.0

NA NA

NA NA

AAAAC

2.0 D2 2.0 D3 2.0 D4 2.0 T2 1.5 T2 Auto 2.0 T3 1.5 T3 Auto 2.0 T5

116 145 185 119 119 148 148 237

118 130 143 118 118 130 130 149

10.5 8.4 7.2-7.4 9.8 9.8 8.3 8.3 6.4

72.4-78.5 68.9-74.3 67.3-74.3 50.4 51.4 50.4 51.4 47.9

94-104 101-108 99-109 127 129 127 129 137

W H AT ’ S C O M I N G W H E N

AAABC

148 108 148

137 8.6 122 11.0 135-137 8.9

53.3-54.3 115-122 68.9 107-112 65.7-68.9 108-120

Mature and appealing cabin, nice looks and smooth to drive. Too

Passat Estate 5dr estate £23,625–£40,185

LxWxH 4635x2097x1545 Kerb weight 1634kg

Passat Alltrack 5dr estate £35,775

AAAAC 2.0 D3 2.0 D4

A rugged-looking Passat wagon with its distinguishing features left intact. LxWxH 4777x2083x1530 Kerb weight 1674kg 2.0 TDI 190 4Motion

187

142

7.7

54.3

137

145 185

127 130

9.1 7.8

61.4-67.3 111-120 61.4-67.3 111-120

S90 4dr saloon £34,465–£57,705

AAAAC

Volvo’s mid-sized exec majors on comfort, style and cruising

Arteon 4dr saloon £31,095–£40,305

1.2 TSI 105 Dune 1.4 TSI 150 2.0 TDI 110 2.0 TDI 150 AAAAC 2.0 TDI 150 Dune

64.2-68.9 64.2-68.9 60.1 NA

0

/6 -60

Not perfect, but handsome, well-packaged, pragmatic and likeable. LxWxH 4370x2041x1470 Kerb weight 1417kg

V90 Cross Country 5dr estate £40,905–£56,855

59 74 88 81

h)

V O LV O

Volvo’s large comfy estate given a jacked-up, rugged makeover. LxWxH 4936x2019x1543 Kerb weight 1826kg

1.0 60 1.0 75 1.0 90 e-Up

mp

Big boot, pleasant driving dynamics and well-priced, but overall it’s V40 Cross Country 5dr hatch £24,415–£34,730 AAAAC dull. LxWxH 4659x2020x1482 Kerb weight 1341kg Handsome hatchback gets a rugged makeover but loses some of its likeable nature. LxWxH 4369x2041x1439 Kerb weight 1428kg 1.4 TSI 125 123 128 9.6 53.3 122

117 10.9-11.1 51.4-55.4 117-127 115-117 11.8-12.2 61.4-70.6 104-118

It’s no revolution, but VW’s hallmarks are in abundance. LxWxH 3600x1428x1504 Kerb weight 926kg

2.0 D4 AWD 2.0 D5 PowerPulse AWD 2.0 T5 AWD 2.0 T8 Twin Engine

AAAAC

Only five seats but it remains a comfy, capable and obedienthandling SUV. LxWxH 4801x2208x1732 Kerb weight 2185kg

1.2 Turbo 1.6 Turbo D

Up 3dr/5dr hatch £9320–£25,640

NA NA 130

d(

XC60 5dr SUV £36,045–£58,700

1.6 Sigma AAAAC 1.6 Sigma

Tiguan Allspace 5dr SUV £29,370–£39,965

Does well to disguise its 3008 roots but too bland to stand out in a car. LxWxH 4288x1825x1488 Kerb weight 1395kg congested segment. LxWxH 4477x1811x1630 Kerb weight 1350kg 1.2 TSI 105 103 111-112 10.9-11.7 51.4-54.3 121-127

VO L K S WAG E N

ee

Looks like a small XC90 and carries on where the old one left off. A good, capable cruiser. LxWxH 4688x1999x1658 Kerb weight 1781kg

Has all the Tiguan’s sensibility and refinement, now with the bonus 2.0 Duratec of seven seats. LxWxH 4486x1839x1654 Kerb weight 1490kg 2.0 Ecoboost

AAABC ability. LxWxH 4963x2019x1443 Kerb weight 1665kg Mokka X 5dr SUV £21,160–£30,365 AAABC VW’s flagship saloon is well-made and luxurious but rather bland to 2.0 T4 185 130 8.7 42.2 153 drive. LxWxH 4862x1871x1450 Kerb weight 1505kg Compact and competent but lacks any persuasive qualities. 2.0 D4 185 140 8.2 64.2 116 LxWxH 4275x1780x1658 Kerb weight 1394kg 1.5 TSI EVO 150 148 NA NA NA NA 2.0 D5 PowerPulse AWD 228 145 7.0 58.9 127 1.6i 115 113 106 11.8 42.2 155 2.0 TSI 190 187 149 7.7 47.1 135 2.0 T8 Twin Engine AWD 310 155 4.8 141.2 46 1.4 Turbo 140 138 119-122 9.3-10.1 43.5-47.1 140-149 2.0 TSI 280 4Motion 276 155 5.6 38.7 164 1.4 Turbo 140 4x4 138 116 9.3 43.5 152 2.0 TDI 150 148 137 9.1 62.8 116 V90 5dr estate £36,435–£59,705 AAAAC 1.4i Turbo 152PS 4x4 150 120 9.4 43.5 150 2.0 TDI 190 187 148 8.0 60.1-61.4 119-122 luxury estate takes on the 5 Series and the E-Class. Comfy and a good cruiser. LxWxH 4936x2019x1475 Kerb weight 1679kg 1.6 CDTi 110 108 112 11.5 70.6-72.4 103-105 2.0 TDI 190 4Motion 187 145 7.8 55.4 134 1.6 CDTi 136 134 117-118 9.3-10.3 56.5-68.9 106-132 2.0 BiTDI 240 4Motion 236 152 6.5 47.9 152 2.0 T4 185 130 8.9 40.9 156 1.6 CDTi 136 4x4 134 116 9.7 60.1 124 2.0 D4 185 140 8.5 62.8 119 Beetle 3dr hatch/2dr open £17,745–£29,815 AAABC 2.0 D5 PowerPulse AWD 228 145 7.2 57.6 129 Grandland X 5dr SUV £22,485–£33,995 AAACC A huge improvement, but the Golf hiding underneath is the better 2.0 T8 Twin Engine AWD 310 155 4.8 141.2 46 128 118

To

p ps

AAAAC

An improvement on the previous model and will continue to sell by the bucket load. LxWxH 4486x1839x1654 Kerb weight 1490kg

AAAAC small, however. LxWxH 4635x2097x1484 Kerb weight 1572kg 6.2i V8 549 155 4.5 15.3-15.8 363 All the Passat’s redeeming features in spacious, practical estate 2.0 T4 185 140 7.3 48.7 135-136 form. LxWxH 4767x2083x1516 Kerb weight 1395kg 2.0 Polestar 356 155 4.8 34.9 186 Zafira Tourer 5dr MPV £20,200–£31,165 AAABC 1.4 TSI 125 123 128 9.9 51.4-53.3 117-127 2.0 D2 116 121 11.5-11.7 65.7-72.4 104-114 Looks upmarket and some clever packaging inside but feels 1.4 TSI ACT 150 148 135 8.6 54.3-55.4 119-120 2.0 D3 145 130 9.1 65.7-68.9 108-114 mundane overall. LxWxH 4666x1884x1685 Kerb weight 1628kg 1.8 TSI 180 177 143 7.9-8.1 46.3 131-137 2.0 D4 185 140 7.7 64.2-70.6 104-116 1.4i Turbo 138 124 9.9 44.1 156 2.0 TSI 220 217 152 6.9 44.1 149 2.4 D4 AWD 185 127 8.9 49.6 149 1.6 CDTi 134 120 10.4 60.1-62.8 119-125 1.4 TSI GTE 153 140 7.6 156.9 40 2.4 D5 Twin Engine 158 130 6.9 155.2 48 2.0 CDTi 167 129 9.1 54.3-57.7 129-137 1.6 TDI 120 118 127-129 11.0 67.3-74.3 96-110 2.4 D6 Twin Engine 214 143 6.0 155.2 48 2.0 TDI 150 148 135 8.9 65.7-67.3 110-124 Crossland X 5dr SUV £16,835–£23,810 AAABC 2.0 TDI 190 187 145-146 7.9-8.1 65.7 111-120 V60 Cross Country 5dr estate £32,405–£39,080 AAAAC Vauxhall’s small SUV is competent enough but lacks any real 2.0 BiTDI 240 4Motion 236 148 6.3 48.7 152 Mature and smooth-driving estate given a rugged makeover.

character. LxWxH 4212x1765x1605 Kerb weight 1245kg

145 145 185

p)

AAAAC

2.0 D2 116 118 10.6 72.4-74.3 99-104 2.0 D3 145 118 8.5 68.9-72.4 102-109 2.0 D4 185 130 7.5-7.7 65.7-70.6 104-112 Insignia Country Tourer 5dr estate £25,635–£ 28,435 AAAAC 2.0 T3 148 130 8.5 50.4 128 Spacious estate gets a rugged makeover – and it doesn’t spoil the Passat 4dr saloon £22,025–£38,585 AAAAC 1.5 T3 Auto 148 130 8.5 50.4 131 fine formula. LxWxH 4986x1863x1514 Kerb weight 1666kg Lands blows on rivals with its smart looks, civilised refinement, 2.0 T5 AWD 237 130 6.1 44.1 149 2.0 Turbo D 170 167 135-137 8.6-8.8 47.1-51.4 145-157 quality and usability. LxWxH 4767x2083x1476 Kerb weight 1367kg 2.0 Turbo D 170 4x4 167 135 9.3 43.5 172 1.4 TSI 125 123 129 9.7 52.3-53.3 114-126 S60 4dr saloon £22,945–£35,435 AAAAC 2.0 BiTurbo D 210 4x4 207 142 7.7 39.8 188 1.4 TSI ACT 150 148 137 8.4 56.5-57.6 115-118 Ageing saloon soon to be replaced. Understated, mature and laid1.8 TSI 180 177 144 7.7-7.9 47.9 130-136 back. LxWxH 4635x2097x1484 Kerb weight 1512kg VXR8 GTS-R 4dr saloon £74,500–£76,200 AAABC 2.0 TSI 220 217 153 6.7 44.8 146 2.0 T4 185 143 7.2 48.7-50.4 131-134 Charismatic, brutish and unsophisticated but hugely compelling. It 1.4 TSI GTE 153 140 7.4 156.9 40 2.0 D2 116 121 11.2-11.4 65.7-72.4 102-113 will be missed. LxWxH NA Kerb weight 1858kg 1.6 TDI 120 118 128-130 10.8 67.3-70.6 95-107 2.0 D3 145 130-134 9.0 65.7-70.6 105-113 6.2i V8 590 155 4.2 18.0-18.5 363-373 2.0 TDI 150 148 135-137 8.7 65.7-67.3 109-121 2.0 D4 185 143 7.6 65.7-72.8 102-113 2.0 TDI 190 187 146-147 7.5-7.9 67.3 109-119 VXR8 Maloo 2dr pick-up £66,500 AAABC 2.0 BiTDI 240 4Motion 236 149 6.1 49.6 150 V60 5dr estate £24,145–£53,325 AAAAC

What’s not to like? This whacking great V8-engined pick-up is a brute to drive. LxWxH 5121x1899x1465 Kerb weight 1825kg

D3 D3 AWD D4 AWD

(bh

VW’s junior SUV is beguiling and sophisticated. It drives rather well, XC90 5dr SUV £49,905–£70,405 AAAAC too. LxWxH 4234x1992x1573 Kerb weight 1270kg Clever packaging, smart styling, good to drive: Volvo’s closest thing to a class-leader. LxWxH 4950x2008x1776 Kerb weight 1961kg 1.0 TSI 115 113 116 10.1 55.4 117

1.4 TSI 125 1.4 TSI 150 1.4 TSI 150 4Motion 2.0 TSI 180 4Motion 2.0 TDI 115 2.0 TDI 150 2.0 TDI 150 4Motion AAAAB 2.0 TDI 190 4Motion Practical load-lugging estate doesn’t erode the well-rounded Golf 2.0 BiTDI 240 4Motion

engines. LxWxH 4466x1840x1482 Kerb weight 1459kg 1.4i Turbo 120 1.4i Turbo 140 1.6i Turbo 200 2.0i Turbo 280 1.6 CDTi 110 1.6 CDTi 136

58.9 58.9 54.3 NA 55.4 44.1 43.5 37.7 166.2 67.3-68.9 65.7-67.3 61.4-64.2

148 113 148 181

Po

r we

AAAAB

Full-sized seven-seater offers versatility, space, VW desirability and tidy handling. LxWxH 4854x1904x1720 Kerb weight 1703kg

121 115 127 134 146 124 127 137

)

119-122 125

Good handling and nice engines, but its working-class roots still show through. LxWxH 4370x1809x1485 Kerb weight 1244kg 103 98 123 148 197 108 134 157

km

103 148 108 148 148

109-110 125-126 112-113 123-125 122-124

11.3-12.1 8.7-9.1 11.0-11.7 8.9-9.3 9.2-9.6

50.4-54.3 47.9-49.6 61.4-65.7 57.6-61.4 56.5-62.4

Touran 5dr MPV £23,395–£32,910

122-129 132-136 113-121 119-129 119-130

AAAAC

2.0 D4 AWD 2.0 D5 PowerPulse AWD 2.0 T6 AWD

185 228 310

130 140 140

8.8 7.5 6.3

54.3 53.3 36.7

XC40 5dr SUV £27,905–£40,055

AAAAC 138 139 176 AAAAC

Dull overall, but it’s a capable MPV, well-made and hugely refined. LxWxH 4527x1829x1659 Kerb weight 1436kg

Volvo’s take on the crossover aims to rival BMW, Mercedes and Audi. LxWxH 4425x1910x1658 Kerb weight 1626kg

1.2 TSI 110 1.4 TSI 150 1.6 TDI 115

T3 T4 AWD T5 AWD

108 148 113

117 130 118

11.3 8.9 11.4

51.4 49.6 61.4

128 126-133 112-119

152 185 243

NA NA 140

NA NA 6.5

NA NA 39.2

NA NA 162-164

Lexus UX On sale early 2019, price £26,000 (est) Lexus has utilised the underpinnings of the Toyota C-HR to create the UX, a new family SUV. It will be available with a 168bhp 2.0-litre four-cylinder petrol engine alone, or in a hybrid powertrain, the latter producing 176bhp. Lexus claims the UX is “agile and sporty”, with hatchbacks such as the Audi A3 having been used as handling benchmarks during development. APRIL

Audi A6, Citroën C4 Cactus update, Ferrari Portofino, FXX-K Evo, Jeep Grand Cherokee Trackhawk, MG 3 update, Mitsubishi Shogun Sport, Morgan Aero GT, Plus 8 50th Anniversary, Renault Mégane RS M AY

Alpine A110, Aston Martin DB11 Volante, Audi Q8, BMW 2 Series Active update, 2 Series Gran Tourer update, M3 CS, M4 Convertible 30 Jahre, Mercedes-Benz A-Class, Suzuki Swift Sport, Volkswagen Polo GTI JUNE

Aston Martin Vantage, Bentley Bentayga PHEV, BMW i8 update, i8 Roadster, Jaguar F-Pace SVR, Mercedes-AMG E53, CLS 53, Mercedes-Maybach S-Class, Renault Zoe R110 J U LY

Audi Q3, A6, A6 Avant BMW M2 Competition, Dacia Duster, Ford Focus, Hyundai Kona Electric, Jaguar XE SV Project 8, F-Pace SVR, I-Pace, Mercedes-AMG G-Class, Mercedes-Benz C-Class update, Vauxhall Corsa GSi AUGUST

BMW X4, Honda CR-V, Kia Ceed, Maserati Levante Trofeo, Mercedes-Benz CLS, Subaru Outback SEPTEMBER

Aston Martin Vanquish, BMW X3 M, Honda CR-V, Isuzu D-Max update, Land Rover Range Rover SV Coupé, Mazda 6 update, Mercedes-AMG GT 4dr Coupé, Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV update, Peugeot 508, Porsche Macan update, Volvo V60, Volkswagen Touareg L AT E 2 0 1 8

Audi A1, E-tron, RS5 Sportback, SQ2, SQ8, BMW 8 Series, X7, Z4, Brabham BT62, Citroën C5 Aircross, Cupra Ateca, Hyundai i30 N Fastback, Nexo, Santa Fe, Infiniti QX50, Jeep Wrangler, Land Rover Discovery Sport update, Range Rover Velar SVR, McLaren Senna, MG 3 update, 6, Morgan EV3, Porsche 911 GT3 RS, Rimac C_Two, Seat Tarraco, Skoda Kodiaq vRS, Subaru Forester, TVR Griffith, Volkswagen Passat update, T-Cross, Volvo S60, Wiesmann new model

11 APRIL 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 87


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0800 121 4750 Simply the Best in the Business


P26 AAA £250 N24I AAA £I50 LI9 AAB £250 F29 AAC £250 P33 AAD £250 R2I AAM £450 P2 AAW £450 N92 ABA £I50 Y55 ABB £450 K20 ABD £I25 FI7 ABE £450 J94 ABE £450 SI8 ABH £I25 CI2 ABM £250 SIII ABP £350 TI6 ABR £I50 R3I ACB £250 R3I ACC £450 P32I ACC £250 P33 ACD £I50 S66 ACF £I25 P28 ACH £450 PI2I ACH £350 R25 ACK £450 P27 ACK £350 PI2I ACK £250 N27 ACM £450 N32I ACM £250 K333 ACM £350 P3I ACS £250 R27 ACT £350 S200 ACT £350 P333 ACT £250 P28 ACW £250 Y3I ACY £350 R25 ADA £450 P29 ADB £350 PI2I ADB £250 K60 ADC £250 P32I ADD £450 N333 ADD £450 T600 ADD £450 PIII ADF £I50 P23 ADH £250 YI2 ADL £250 B9 ADN £450 M60 ADN £250 P23 ADR £250 N28 ADR £350 PIII ADT £I00 S99 ADW £250 N3I ADY £450 M235 ADY £250 T40I ADY £350 M20 AFB £250 NI2I AFC £350 AFZ 323 £350 P26 AGB £250 N88 AGE £I50 P27 AGS £350 AGZ 585 £350 AGZ I65I £I00 P29 AJA £250 Y32I AJD £350 R32I AJF £250 M999 AJF £350 P24 AJG £450 A388 AJH £450 P27 AJK £250 RI2I AJL £250 SI8I AJL £350 P2I AJN £250 N27 AJP £450 NI2I AJP £350 N24 AJR £450 ME54 AJS £250 R600 AJT £350 AJZ 2688 £250 R90 AKE £350 N8 AKP £350 N3I AKS £450 P888 AKS £350 P2I AKY £350 N20 ALA £450 P24 ALA £350 RI2I ALB £450 N29 ALC £450 NI2I ALC £350 N26 ALD £450 T900 ALD £450 R25 ALE £350 P26 ALE £450 N29 ALG £350 RI7 ALH £350 P27 ALH £250 P27 ALL £350 R27 ALL £450 P24 ALM £250 PI2I ALM £I50 P23 ALN £450 PI2I ALN £350 N29 ALP £450 P29 ALP £350 RI2I ALP £350 P5II ALP £250 N26 ALW £250 N900 ALX £350 OX05 ALY £350 PI23 AMA £450 P32I AMD £450 R29 AME £350 T222 AME £250 P2I AMF £350 R27 AMJ £350 P24 AML £450 RI2I AML £250 R24 AMM £450 RI2I AMM £250 R2I AMP £450 N32I AMP £450 R32I AMP £350 N23 AMR £450 P24 AMT £250 R23 AMW £350

NI2I AMW £250 R28 ANE £350 N28 ANJ £450 P32I ANJ £350 N2I ANK £250 N2I ANL £350 P27 ANS £450 N26 APB £350 NIII APE £I50 N27 APH £250 P23 APP £250 N26 APR £450 P27 APR £350 R23 APS £350 S43 APS £350 P32I APS £350 N26 APW £350 P333 APW £250 P26 ARA £250 RI23 ARA £250 W56I ARC £450 R25 ARD £450 P29 ARD £350 P28 ARH £250 P23 ARJ £250 R24 ARK £450 P28 ARK £450 P25 ARL £450 R25 ARL £450 NI2I ARM £450 RI2I ARM £450 R32I ARR £250 P28 ARW £250 N27 ARY £450 R3I ARY £450 X746 ARY £450 OX02 ASA £I00 R29 ASA £250 T88 ASA £350 P90 ASA £350 N3I ASB £450 R333 ASB £250 P28 ASC £250 DO06 ASH £350 A55 ASJ £450 R2I ASM £450 N29 ASP £250 N28 ASR £350 K22 ASW £350 ASZ 2I04 £50 AI4 ATB £350 RI2I ATH £450 T600 ATH £350 C20 ATM £I50 N3I ATS £450 R32I ATS £350 N23 ATT £350 H4 ATW £450 K800 AUD £450 D5 AUG £450 P25 AUG £250 P6 AWR £350 AXZ 676 £350 XO02 BAB £250 N28 BAB £450 PI2I BAB £350 RI2I BAD £450 R23 BAK £450 P26 BAK £450 P27 BAL £250 P222 BAM £450 R555 BAM £450 N24 BAN £250 P32I BAN £350 P23 BAR £350 Y222 BAR £250 Y339 BAR £I50 N24 BAS £450 P25 BAX £450 N24 BAY £350 P26 BAY £450 R24 BBB £250 K6 BCR £250 BCZ 828 £350 V60 BDH £I00 NI8 BEA £450 P25 BEA £450 R27 BEA £450 P29 BED £250 N333 BED £I50 R3I BEE £450 Y700 BEE £350 J9 BEH £I50 NI2I BEL £450 R29 BER £450 RI2I BER £350 P555 BER £450 P28 BES £250 R3I BES £250 R25 BET £450 V222 BET £350 BEZ 3696 £I50 BFZ I4I £350 BIG 7284 £350 GI4 BJB £350 R27 BJB £250 N27 BJC £450 L40 BJD £I50 M90 BJS £450 PI2I BJW £I50 BJZ 464 £350 R29 BLU £450 P26 BMC £350 PI2I BMC £250 R23 BMS £250 GP03 BMW£350 P25 BON £350 F86 BON £450 T95 BON £450 P32I BON £250 P23 BOO £450 PI2I BOO £350 N600 BOS £350 T88 BOT £450

J53 BOW £450 N26 BOY £450 NI23 BOY £350 AII BPG £350 SI5 BRA £250 R89 BRL £I00 R29 BRN £350 P3I BRN £250 P333 BRN £I00 P29 BRO £450 P32I BRO £350 N400 BRO £350 R3I BRU £450 NI23 BRU £350 M555 BRU £450 PI2 BRW £I25 Y7 BSH £450 BSZ I502 £50 L222 BUC £450 MY04 BUG £450 KII7 BUK £I25 N25 BUL £450 P29 BUL £450 PI2I BUL £350 N2I BUN £350 P24 BUN £250 PI23 BUR £450 N32I BUR £450 R32I BUR £450 N27 BUT £350 T32I BUT £450 P700 BUT £450 H4 BUY £350 BXZ 434 £250 OL04 CAB £I25 Y25 CAB £450 Y700 CAB £350 P2I CAC £450 N3I CAD £450 R23 CAF £450 N24 CAF £250 P26 CAF £350 B72 CAG £450 D83 CAG £450 P23 CAH £450 NI2I CAH £350 N23 CAN £450 R25 CAN £450 R475 CAR £350 N28 CAV £350 N27 CAW £450 Y333 CAW £350 J70 CBJ £I50 P26 CBR £250 N3I CCS £450 P23 CDB £250 N8 CDK £250 M33 CDP £350 P26 CDS £I50 R27 CEB £250 R24 CEC £450 RI2I CEL £250 X33 CES £350 AC52 CES £I50 N333 CFC £350 Y900 CFC £350 L6 CFS £450 CFZ 939 £350 CFZ 5794 £I50 K7 CGD £350 CGZ 6283 £50 CGZ 8537 £50 P3I CHA £450 N200 CHE £350 N27 CHR £350 RI2I CHR £450 P26 CJA £250 P29 CJD £250 N28 CJG £350 F26 CJL £450 N27 CJP £250 NI2I CJP £I50 N26 CJR £350 P700 CJR £250 NI23 CJS £450 P28 CJT £250 P24 CLA £450 RI2I CLA £350 RI2I CLB £350 N28 CLC £450 P23 CLH £350 P29 CLM £350 P32I CLM £250 P3I CLR £350 NI23 CLS £450 P24 CLW £350 P24 CMD £250 TI2 CME £I00 W90 CMH £350 P32I CMH £250 P26 CML £250 P28 CMM £250 P23 CMR £250 N23 CMS £450 P27 CMW £350 PI23 CMW £250 CNZ 3426 £I50 JD06 COB £I50 N32I COB £350 P24 COD £450 N28 COM £350 N2I COP £450 J78 COP £450 S8I COP £450 N24 COR £450 T99 COR £450 NI23 COR £350 T23 COS £450 UT05 COT £I50 P24 COT £250 T32I COT £350 R600 COT £350 MI4 COV £350 R26 COW £450

Elite Registrations OPEN: MON-FRI 9AM-7PM, SAT 9AM-5PM, SUN I0AM-5PM

Tel: 01380 818181 elitereg.co.uk All registrations are offered on a first come, first served basis. All are subject to VAT and the £80 Dept. for Transport transfer fee. Prices may fluctuate. See website for full terms. We have been trading for over 40 years. Write: P.O.Box 100, Devizes, SN10 4TE P27 COW £350 N77 COW £350 WII CPB £350 CI5 CPL £250 M60 CPL £I25 N77 CPM £350 R24 CPR £I50 CI5 CPS £350 LIII CPW £250 N27 CRA £450 R26 CRB £250 R333 CRB £I50 N700 CRG £350 N25 CRL £250 N26 CRM £250 P2I CRO £250 N23 CRS £350 D6 CRT £350 P24 CRW £250 M55 CRX £I00 L9 CRY £250 P2I CRY £I50 CRZ 8I8 £350 R24 CSB £250 N22 CSR £I50 J33 CTW £I00 P2I CUN £250 P27 CUR £450 P29 CUT £250 R3I CUT £350 L700 CUT £350 CXZ 353 £250 R32I DAB £350 P23 DAC £350 R26 DAC £350 NI2I DAC £250 N23 DAD £450 Y33 DAD £450 YI4 DAF £250 R2I DAF £450 P29 DAF £350 R28 DAG £250 P333 DAG £I50 P32I DAH £250 RI23 DAL £450 M47I DAL £250 T28 DAP £450 P3I DAP £450 WI0I DAR £350 MB04 DAS £250 P27 DAS £450 P8II DAV £450 RI2I DAW £450 W29 DAY £350 PI2I DAY £450 R29 DBS £250 P28 DCB £250 H6 DCD £450 W9 DCG £450 R28 DCH £250 N2 DCJ £350 P2I DCM £350 W9 DCP £450 K77 DCP £I50 EI2 DCS £350 P27 DCS £250 PI23 DCS £I50 BII DCW £450 DCZ I7I £350 M90 DDC £I25 P24 DDS £350 LY02 DEB £450 DF05 DEC £I50 R32I DEC £450 V9 DEG £250 Y33 DEG £I50 B20 DEK £450 P2I DEK £450 R24 DEK £450 R28 DER £450 N29 DER £450 P888 DER £450 DH06 DES £250

DGZ 2444 £I50 LI3 DHB £I00 M33 DHC £I00 DHZ 6I6 £450 DHZ 4587 £350 GI4 DJA £450 N28 DJD £450 R29 DJE £250 N29 DJF £250 N24 DJG £450 PI23 DJG £350 TT04 DJH £350 N32I DJH £450 P27 DJL £350 W32I DJR £450 N25 DJS £450 OX53 DJS £250 P24 DJT £350 NI2I DJT £250 TW08 DJW £350 DJZ 787 £350 P26 DLB £250 P24 DLM £250 N23 DLS £450 P29 DMB £450 PI2I DMB £250 P2I DMD £350 T25 DMG £350 N27 DMH £450 R32I DMH £250 R2I DMJ £250 R23 DMP £250 P24 DMR £350 N32I DMS £450 W700 DMS£350 M90 DMT £250 R23 DMW £350 R32I DMW £250 N27 DOB £450 R700 DOB £350 T888 DOB £250 AP09 DOC £350 V32I DOC £450 T576 DOD £I25 N99 DOL £250 P29 DOR £450 R29 DOR £450 J600 DOR £450 P3I DOW £250 T999 DOW £350 Y23 DPD £I00 PII DPK £I25 AII DPT £450 T222 DRB £250 P27 DRC £250 P26 DRH £250 NI00 DRH £I50 N24 DRM £250 EI0 DRP £350 RI2I DRS £250 P24 DRU £450 N27 DRU £450 R24 DRW £350 DRZ 595 £450 KII DSA £350 P23 DSB £350 RII DSF £I25 G6 DSJ £350 P24 DSM £250 LII DTP £I50 PI2I DUB £450 P29 DUF £250 S96 DUF £350 L2 DUM £250 R24 DUN £450 NI23 DUN £450 HII DUT £450 DXZ 292 £250 P29 EAM £I50 P222 EAN £450 P23 EAR £250 P66 EAS £450 T99 EAS £250

EFZ 5I5 £350 P29 EGG £350 R29 EGG £450 R32I EGG £350 RIII EGS £I25 EHZ 2I2 £350 R27 EJB £350 P3I EJC £250 RIII EJD £I00 R24 EJH £250 R29 EJM £250 Y8 EJP £350 MI2 EJP £I50 N55 EJW £250 EJZ 464 £350 R3 EKP £I00 T8 EKS £450 PI23 ELE £450 N26 ELL £350 C20 ELM £450 R28 ELM £450 N3I ELM £450 P3I ELM £250 PI2I ELS £350 RI23 ELY £450 P27 EMB £350 N25 EMC £350 V700 EMM £450 P6 EMR £350 RI2I EMS £450 PIII EMW £I00 P23 EMY £450 N3I ENN £450 P25 ENY £250 RIII EPS £I00 HI4 ERL £350 P26 ERN £450 DI0I ERN £450 AI6 ERP £250 L55 ERR £250 T800 ERS £350 N6I8 ERT £250 ERZ 484 £350 N60 ESA £350 R26 ESH £450 N32I ESH £350 P23 ESS £350 N27 ESS £350 R27 ESS £350 S444 ESS £350 N29 EST £450 J900 EST £350 M900 EST £250 N2I ETT £350 P29 ETT £250 XO06 EVO £350 RI23 EVS £450 Y3I FAB £450 X2 FAD £350 P23 FAR £450 S666 FAR £450 N999 FAR £350 P23 FAT £450 T3I FAT £450 PI2I FAT £350 FBZ 7I7 £350 S2 FCS £350 VI5 FEB £250 P23 FEB £250 K600 FEE £450 P24 FEN £450 N26 FEN £450 R400 FEN £450 P25 FER £250 N28 FER £350 M99 FEW £450 FFZ 434 £250 FIG 6423 £I50 TI8 FLY £450 R23 FLY £450 NI2I FLY £350 P6 FMH £350 AI9 FMR £250

P900 GAS £350 Y9 GBR £350 GBZ 9550 £250 T3 GCD £450 AI5 GCG £I50 K5 GCM £350 HI0 GCR £250 GCZ 686 £350 GCZ 8683 £I25 W7 GDB £450 B7 GDS £450 V7 GEB £450 P23 GED £350 P26 GEE £350 R32I GEF £450 N27 GEN £350 RO5I GEO £350 N32I GEO £450 R23 GER £350 PI2I GER £450 CII GES £450 LI3 GES £350 GFZ 525 £250 GHZ 696 £350 R26 GJB £350 R3I GJH £I50 V99 GJH £250 GJI 535I £250 N26 GJM £250 NIII GJR £I50 P3I GJS £250 AI6 GJW £350 GJZ 969 £350 GKZ 353 £350 CII GMA £350 M3I GMH £350 CI9 GMS £250 P25 GOR £350 R32I GOR £350 T333 GOR £350 LIII GPH £250 M999 GRE £350 AI0 GRM £350 W7 GSL £350 X70 GSW £I25 N27 GTS £350 NI23 GTS £250 XO53 GXS £I00 GXZ 838 £250 N27 HAD £350 P3I HAD £I50 AH07 HAL £250 W900 HAM£350 Y222 HAR £350 NI2I HAS £350 PI23 HAT £350 P28 HAW £350 R3I HAW £350 T90 HAW £350 H525 HAW £350 HBZ 747 £350 R6 HCB £250 HDZ 585 £350 R90 HEB £350 AJ06 HED £250 PW5I HER £I00 N99 HER £250 N27 HEW £250 R555 HEW £350 HFZ 474 £250 N9 HMB £350 N24 HOB £350 R70 HOB £350 S900 HOB £350 DS58 HOG £I50 Y22 HOP £350 RI2I HOW £350 A6 HRB £250 HRZ 787 £350 P6 HSW £350 P26 HUG £250 L999 HUT £350 M47 HYA £350

N28 JBS N900 JBS R32I JCB W629 JCB N23 JCC E9 JCE P2I JCG P32I JCH P28 JCK P25 JCM P28 JCP N29 JCR P888 JCR R32I JCS NI2I JDH TIII JDN N26 JDP P2I JDR X999 JDW JDZ 9555 Y28 JEB P3I JEC P32I JEC P3I JEL R29 JEP P24 JER RI2I JER JEZ 5972 M99 JFM EI8 JFS TIII JFW JFZ 363 P3I JGB S30 JGM P26 JHN JHZ 282 JIG 9565 JIL 79II N26 JJB N77 JJD N25 JJH P28 JJJ P28 JJM P2I JJR R29 JJS A40 JKG PI2I JLC P23 JLD P23 JLG RI2I JLH PI23 JLM N27 JLP P24 JLS RI2I JLS P24 JLW PI2I JLW P29 JMA R27 JMK N32I JML PI2I JMR P23 JNS SII JNW P2I JOB S400 JOR PI2I JPC P2I JPD R2I JPH P32I JPH V700 JPM KI6 JPR P28 JPW N32I JRB N29 JRG YI6 JRM R27 JRM JRZ 2364 L60 JSA NI2I JSB N600 JSC R23 JSD RIII JSF N28 JSG NI23 JSH

£350 £250 £350 £250 £350 £250 £250 £350 £350 £350 £350 £250 £I50 £350 £350 £I25 £350 £250 £350 £250 £350 £250 £I50 £350 £350 £350 £350 £350 £250 £250 £I50 £350 £350 £I50 £350 £450 £250 £450 £350 £I50 £350 £I50 £350 £250 £250 £I50 £250 £250 £250 £350 £350 £250 £250 £I25 £350 £250 £350 £350 £350 £350 £350 £250 £250 £350 £250 £350 £350 £250 £250 £250 £350 £350 £350 £250 £350 £50 £I00 £250 £350 £250 £250 £350 £350

N8 KAC £350 J20 KAG £350 P2I KAH £350 P26 KAS £350 Y222 KAS £250 KWI0 KAY £350 KAZ 6694 £450 AI0 KDM £250 D7 KDW £250 NI23 KEE £350 N24 KEY £350 KEZ 7363 £350 KFZ 868 £250 KIG I248 £I50 RI2I KJB £350 N24 KJC £350 N3I KJM £350 N32I KJM £250 J23 KJP £250 V29 KJS £250 PI2I KJS £I50 N29 KJW £350 N888 KJW £250 KJZ 252 £350 KKZ I077 £I00 R26 KMB £I50 PI2I KMC £350 J28 KMG £I50 GI9 KMS £350 N900 KNG £250 P23 KOP £250 RI2I KOP £I50 C20 KPH £I50 R9 KRP £250 P23 KRS £I50 KRZ 3078 £I00 KRZ 3079 £I00 KRZ 5295 £50 M7 KSP £250 KXZ 767 £350 RI2I LAB £350 N25 LAC £350 N444 LAC £250 P25 LAD £350 M600 LAD £350 N900 LAD £250 P27 LAH £250 R555 LAH £I50 N29 LAS £350 NI2I LAS £250 PI23 LAS £350 P23 LAT £350 AU04 LAU £250 P23 LAY £350 LBZ 949 £350 N9 LCJ £250 A4I2 LCS £I00 LCZ 646 £350 M500 LDH £I25 R26 LEC £350 T28 LEC £350 SI94 LEC £I25 P24 LED £350 R25 LED £I50 P2I LEG £350 P27 LER £350 YI2I LET £I50 N900 LET £250 P29 LEX £350 YI6 LEY £350 H9 LFB £I00 LFZ 363 £350 LIG 972I £I50 LIW 5I0 £350 P27 LJC £350 N32I LJC £250 P200 LJH £250 LJI 9567 £350 N26 LJP £250 N26 LJR £250 RI2I LJS £350 M888 LJW £350 N24 LLS £350

D3I LWC £I00 A8 LWH £350 LXZ 939 £350 NI2I MAB £250 VI4 MAF £250 V333 MAH £350 V26 MAJ £350 P23 MAM £350 N80 MAM £250 MF07 MAR£350 D452 MAS £350 NI23 MCA £250 MB08 MCB£250 R25 MCB £350 M65 MCC £350 NI2I MCH £350 V900 MCK £350 G475 MCL £350 PI2I MCM £350 N27 MCP £350 P29 MCP £250 R400 MCP £350 T888 MCR £250 R26 MCT £250 G4I MCT £350 MCZ 9040 £I50 R3I MDB £I50 N23 MDC £250 SIII MDK £250 K60 MDM £I50 S30 MDR £I50 P32I MDS £350 P2I MDW £350 MDZ 797 £350 MDZ 9700 £250 P32I MED £350 P28 MEE £350 DI9 MEH £250 SIII MEP £I50 P28 MES £350 N29 MES £350 K666 MES £I50 N26 MET £350 R32I MET £350 P24 MFC £350 P23 MGB £350 V44 MGF £250 X54 MGJ £I50 P23 MGR £250 L77 MGS £350 LII MHP £I25 T7 MHW £350 MHZ 656 £350 V90 MJA £350 RI2I MJA £250 P24 MJE £350 PI2I MJF £250 MJI 56I0 £450 Y29 MJL £350 NI2I MJP £350 NI2I MJS £350 PII MKR £250 R3I MLB £250 P333 MLB £I50 L2I2 MLY £250 T700 MMA £350 H6 MMJ £350 P29 MMM £250 R28 MMS £350 DW03 MMW£50 P26 MOD £350 R27 MOE £350 P888 MOE £250 CII3 MOK £I00 PIII MOP £250 OX02 MOR £I50 N27 MOR £350 R32I MOR £350 RI2I MOS £350 N26 MPB £250 P2I MPC £350 SI0 MPD £350 NII MPE £I50

W29 NAD YI4 NAG RI2I NAG N26 NAH J600 NAM N23 NAN X66 NAN CI4 NBS NBZ 8I8 P26 NCH J2 NDM NDZ 353 R28 NED N2I NEE X444 NEL R788 NEL P24 NER R26 NET RI23 NET N28 NEV RI2I NEW RI23 NEY NFZ 9I9 P24 NJB N600 NJB R26 NJC P333 NJH P28 NJM N29 NJW EI5 NKY RI23 NKY N23 NNN Y53 NOL RI2I NOR S22 NOT H5 NSP NUI 848 N23 NUT R32I NUT AB09 OAB RI2I OAK OBZ 232 N2I OCT P23 OCT ODZ 929 OFZ 8I8 OIB 9559 OIG 2093 OJI 9700 OJZ 575 R27 OLA P200 OLA LI9 OLD P28 OLD T3I OLD RI5 OLS W77 OLY V444 OLY P4 ONA YI5 ONE AII OVX T8 OWD P400 OWL GPI5 PAC V25 PAD L800 PAD P2I PAK CO02 PAN P29 PAN RI2I PAR N32I PAS P6 PAY C6 PBB TII PBB TIII PBS TII PBW V4 PCG W8 PCK PCZ 7I7 LII PDK N27 PDS PDZ 929 N20 PEB

£350 £350 £250 £350 £350 £350 £350 £I50 £350 £250 £350 £250 £350 £350 £350 £350 £350 £350 £350 £250 £250 £350 £250 £350 £250 £350 £350 £350 £250 £350 £250 £250 £I00 £350 £I00 £I50 £350 £350 £350 £I00 £350 £350 £350 £350 £350 £250 £350 £I50 £350 £250 £350 £350 £350 £350 £350 £I00 £350 £250 £350 £250 £I00 £I00 £350 £250 £350 £350 £250 £250 £350 £350 £350 £350 £250 £I50 £250 £I50 £250 £I50 £350 £I50 £350 £350 £250

SIMILAR REGISTRATIONS WANTED

FOR IMMEDIATE PURCHASE DO06 DES DI6 DET P23 DEV J400 DEV R24 DEW N27 DEW T222 DEW L700 DEW P25 DEX R26 DEX N27 DEX DEZ 9649 VO06 DFJ N9 DFR G2 DFS DFZ 969 DGZ 535

£350 £350 £450 £450 £450 £350 £350 £250 £250 £350 £250 £350 £25 £350 £350 £350 £450

P2I EAT P25 ECK R26 ECK T5 ECS ECZ 494 XO06 EDD Y9 EDG P54 EDP P24 EDS X25 EDS N29 EDW N24 EDY P50 EDY YIII EDY R2I EEE P24 EEL K65I EEP

£250 £450 £450 £450 £350 £350 £350 £I00 £250 £350 £450 £450 £450 £350 £450 £350 £50

R29 FOS P800 FOS J40 FRA N88 FRA P88 FRA MII FRB RI23 FRY TIII FSH FXZ 252 P23 GAB R24 GAB N3I GAL R23 GAM N26 GAM P26 GAM S7I GAN N29 GAP

£450 £250 £450 £450 £450 £I50 £450 £I25 £250 £450 £450 £450 £450 £350 £250 £450 £450

IDZ 383 IHZ 878 ILZ 750 IXZ 949 IXZ 640I P2I JAA R33 JAE Y29 JAF R23 JAJ OX02 JAL V28 JAL M94 JAP T800 JAP N29 JAR P28 JAT N562 JAT W748 JAW

£250 £250 £350 £250 £50 £250 £250 £250 £250 £I00 £250 £350 £350 £350 £250 £I50 £250

PIII JSK P222 JSM R29 JSP L333 JSR N29 JSS M22 JTC JH05 JTH B20 JTM R32I JUN R32I JUS R3I JWB T888 JWB P27 JWH JXZ 737 P25 JYM P29 KAB PI2I KAB

£I00 £350 £250 £250 £250 £I50 £350 £250 £350 £350 £350 £250 £250 £250 £250 £250 £I50

S222 LLS N26 LLY NI2I LMC P24 LMH P25 LMR R77 LMS N32I LMS P24 LMW W44 LOD TI60 LOL Y800 LOR R26 LOT S333 LOT PI2I LOV R888 LSA RIII LSH LUI 7957

£250 £350 £350 £350 £250 £350 £250 £250 £I00 £350 £350 £350 £250 £250 £350 £I50 £I50

K23 MPH £250 RI2I MPH £I50 PI23 MPS £350 PI2I MRC £I50 W29 MRH £350 V444 MRH £250 R24 MRM £250 R26 MRT £250 R2I MRW £350 MRZ 3263 £50 P29 MSB £350 SI3 MSG £I50 P24 MSH £250 P33 MSM £I50 LI00 MSR £I50 LC06 MUM£350 NI23 MUR £250

L200 PEB PI2I PEH N27 PEP P29 PEP PI2I PEP PEZ 575 N3 PFR PFZ 323 M70 PGG PI2I PHL T9 PHW KI39 PHW PHZ 858 PHZ 8434 PIB I276 NI2I PJB R29 PJD

£I25 £I50 £350 £350 £250 £450 £350 £250 £I00 £350 £250 £50 £350 £250 £250 £350 £250

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11 APRIL 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 89


Matt Prior

E S TA B L I S H E D 1 8 95

TESTER’S NOTES

Motor tour of the world 14 September 1907

Countrywide ban on pavement parking is being considered ark: the sound of change is afoot. What has been standard in That London for many, many years might soon be coming to the provinces, introducing a new method of thinking to our towns and villages. No, not ‘being allowed into nightclubs wearing trainers’ or ‘the chance to eat out after 9.30pm’, but something rather more mundane. Something, I might say, rather more ominous. I give you Rule 244 of the Highway Code. You remember that one. It’s a classic. “You must not park partially or wholly on the pavement in London,” it reads, “and should not do so elsewhere unless signs permit it.” It’s the “should not do so elsewhere” part of things that could be changing. “Should not” means that it isn’t technically illegal to stick two wheels on a pavement, so you can, though if you’re causing an obstruction, you can get a parking ticket for it. So use your nous. This is fairly standard, sensiblesounding stuff, right? Perhaps not. The Department for Transport is considering whether to

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New rules could mean fines up to £70 90 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 11 APRIL 2018

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Parking on the pavement causes obstructions, but can also make life easier

HAVING MADE A fortune as a telecommunications pioneer in the late 1800s, Massachusettsborn Charles Glidden turned his attention to the automobile industry. Convinced of the car’s potential, Glidden, together with his wife Lucy and a mechanic named Charles Thomas, set off to tour the world aboard a Napier. Having started in 1902, five years later he’d covered 42,367 miles in 35 countries, including the Arctic Circle and New Zealand, and planned to finish in 1911. “He had been received by men from crowned heads downwards in all parts of the world with the greatest possible enthusiasm,” wrote Autocar.

a

roll out a ‘must not’ pavement parking rule for the entire country, except on roads where local authorities issue a specific exemption. Apparently, many local councils have been pushing for a blanket ban. Why? Well, the problem is that, as the Code goes on to explain, “parking on the pavement can obstruct and seriously inconvenience pedestrians, people in wheelchairs or with visual impairments and people with prams and pushchairs”. Of course it can. But what parking on the pavement can also mean – and half an hour picking out random villages on Google Street View will give you tens, hundreds, thousands of examples – is that on narrow roads that have pavement or verge width to spare, or near the ends of culs-de-sac where nobody walks, or in areas where car quantities outnumber spaces, it makes life a bit easier for everybody. It can allow traffic to get past more easily, means people don’t have to annoy their neighbours by parking in front of their houses: all while, actually, not blocking paths or inconveniencing anybody in any way. A law change would remove that ability; remove that discretion: “Sorry, your wheels are on the pavement. You’re ticketed, mate” – whether it’s a nuisance to others, or

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actually useful to others. Why would you want to make that change? Along with the blanket ban, local authorities would introduce £50-£70 fines for the offence. So this is where I – like the AA, who told The Times “we would be concerned if there were a blanket ban” – am worried. Already local councils can ticket drivers who obstruct pavements. Obviously some people park like the entitled, arrogant arses they are. There are places where blocked pavements are a nuisance, where a poorly parked car makes things miserable, even dangerous. These people should be ticketed. And they already can be ticketed. Making it an automatic offence means nobody can use their judgment to try to do themselves and others a favour. And, I don’t know, just adds to the world’s apparently increasing trend of assuming everyone is stupid so that the default position is becoming ‘you can’t do that unless we say you can’, instead of ‘you can do what you want, unless there’s a good reason you shouldn’t’. It’s a trend I’m getting pretty tired of.

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