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THE WEISS GALLERY

THE WEISS GALLERY 59 JERMYN STREET LONDON SW1Y 6LX TEL 020 7409 0035 FAX 020 7491 9604


THE WEISS GALLERY 59 JERMYN STREET LONDON SW1Y 6LX TEL 020 7409 0035 FAX 020 7491 9604

www.weissgallery.com


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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

This book has been published to coincide with my 25th Anniversary Exhibition, held in the gallery 24th June – 10th July 2010. I would like to offer my heartfelt gratitude to both the institutional lenders, the Bristol City Museum and Art Gallery, English Heritage, Historic Scotland, the National Portrait Gallery, The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust and Tate Britain as well as the private lenders including Mr & Mrs Michael J. Allen, Sir Victor & Lady Blank, Jasper Conran, Mr & Mrs Terry Hughes and Mr & Mrs David Kowitz.

I would also like to thank my researcher Natasha Blumenthal, my wife Catherine and especially my Associate Director, Florence Evans, for all their hard work and kind assistance in the production of this commemorative publication; and a special thank you to Ashted Dastor for the design and production.

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CONTENTS

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T H E W E I S S G A L L E R Y : 2 5 Y E A R S Mark Weiss 7 – 15

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AN ADVOCATE FOR EARLY E N G L I S H P O R T R A I T S Roy Strong 16

M U S E U M A C Q U I S I T I O N S Malcolm Rogers 17

MARK WEISS AND S C O T T I S H H E R I T A G E Duncan Thomson 18 – 19

ACQUISITIONS FOR THE HUNTINGTON ART GALLERY, S A N M A R I N O , C A L I F O R N I A John Murdoch 20 – 21

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P L A T E S 22 – 169

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A R T I S T S ’ I N D E X 170 – 171

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DEDICATION

I would like to dedicate this book and exhibition to the memory of my father, Ivor, and especially to my beloved mother Joan, without whose love, support and inspiration I could not have achieved what I have over these last twenty-five years.

Ivor, Joan and Mark Weiss, April 1983

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THE WEISS GALLERY: 25 YEARS

This summer marks the 25th anniversary of the founding of The Weiss Gallery, and I thought it only appropriate to celebrate this significant milestone with an exhibition and book to commemorate the event. What follows is not meant to be a comprehensive history, but a personal ricordo of the gallery with a selection of the paintings that I have handled. My career began in 1972 having left school aged nineteen, when I started work in my parents’ business, Ivor and Joan Weiss. My mother and father were artists who had drifted into art dealing in the early 1960s. They quickly built up a very successful business in Essex, originally dealing from our small home in the seaside town of Brightlingsea, then moving to a large Victorian mansion in Colchester and subsequently opening an art gallery in the town centre with its own framing business and restoration studio. At the height of their success, my parents had a staff of sixteen people working for them. Our market at the time was primarily Victorian paintings, yet for some reason for which I have no explanation, I was drawn to, and always made a point of buying, 16th and early 17th century portraits whenever I came across them in country auctions. My first notable discovery came in 1977 with a portrait of a young girl identified as Elizabeth of Bohemia, which had come from a distinguished private collection in Suffolk. It turned out to be the earliest known portrait of Queen Christina of Sweden, dating from 1634, and we were able to sell it to the National Museum of Fine Arts in Stockholm. The next significant discovery was in 1984 when having bought a striking late Elizabethan panel portrait of an unknown lady, it was identified by Sir Roy Strong, then director of the V&A, as a work by the Elizabethan court painter George Gower (76). Sir Roy’s support enabled me to sell the painting to the Art Gallery of South Australia in Adelaide. By this time it was clear to me that our family business in East Anglia had reached the limit of its potential, and that to expand we needed to be in the heart of the London art market. If we were to have any chance of success, this new gallery would have to have a unique area of specialisation in order to compete and stand out from the rest – and so the concept of The Weiss Gallery was born.

1985-1990

My vision was to open a gallery dealing exclusively in Tudor and Jacobean portraits, building on my earlier successes. The business was launched in 1985 with money raised under the Thatcherite Business Expansion Scheme (or BES) which enabled individuals to invest up to £40,000 in a new start-up company and write it off against the then high tax rate of 60%. So that

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autumn, having raised £600,000 through the blue-chip stockbrokers W. Greenwell & Sons, The Weiss Gallery began its life as a PLC and a new shell premises was acquired in Mayfair at 1b Albemarle Street. As with all building projects, the work took far longer than anticipated and the gallery did not formally open until April 1986. Sadly my father did not live to see this proud day, having died suddenly of heart disease two months earlier aged only sixty-seven. Therefore I was very much reliant in the early years for the strong support of my mother and also sister Debra, who together undertook much of the picture restoration, invaluable work which Debra continues to do to this day. The gallery in Albemarle Street was quite small and indeed quite awkward on the basement level, however our designer made the most of what space we had and most importantly, he created a very beautiful and eye-catching bronze shop front which was particularly effective when lit at night (opp. right). I was very proud when my new business got off to a flying start with the very first sale made to the Tate, a noble and magnificent portrait by Soest which is now an honoured guest in our anniversary exhibition (145). For the first few years, I relied a great deal on the expertise and friendly advice that I received Mark and Joan Weiss, opening day of new gallery, April 1986.

from Sir David Piper, who was employed as my art advisor. David, or Pete as he was known to his closest friends, had just retired as Director of the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford, and prior to that had been Director of the National Portrait Gallery and subsequently the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge. I could not have asked for a better mentor; he had a brilliant eye and was a conscientious scholar. He was also incredibly gentle and kind, freely sharing his knowledge with me. Unfortunately, his health was to be increasingly compromised by emphysema which ultimately left him bed-ridden, and so I used to have to carry paintings up to his bedroom for him to see. His death in 1990 was, in its way, as sad to me as the death of my own father. My first major client was Bruce Toll, who lived in Philadelphia and made his fortune as the largest builder of executive homes in America. His initial purchase in 1987 was one of my early important discoveries, a hitherto undocumented child portrait by William Larkin that I had bought from Christie’s in New York as ‘English School’ (114). This beautiful image subsequently graced the front cover of Sir Roy Strong’s monograph on the Mark and Debra Weiss, October 1997

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artist published by Franco Maria Ricci in 1993. Over the next few years Bruce went on to buy a number of my most important pictures including works by Cornelius Johnson (123 & 124) and Robert Peake (87), as well as a remarkable late Elizabethan three-quarter-length of Mary Fitton (98). The first five years, as perhaps to be expected, were not easy. Apart from the pressure of endeavouring to build up the business in the very new for me and highly competitive London art market, I was answerable to my outside co-directors and shareholders for its success, or more worryingly, the occasional lack of it. I have always been a very independent person and the pressure of working within the confines of a corporate business eventually came to a head over what proved to be a seminal acquisition.

1990-1995 In November 1989, a ravishing portrait by Robert Peake came up for auction which had been identified as one of the Pope family, and which formerly had been part of the great collection that once hung at Wroxton Abbey (103). Estimated at £80,000-£120,000, I bought the painting against a competitor in the trade for £200,000. Fortuitously, my subsequent research revealed that it was a highly important royal portrait of Elizabeth Stuart, later known as the ‘Winter Queen’. As a result I was able to sell the painting for £300,000 to the National Maritime Museum. It was to hang in the newly refurbished Queen’s House at Greenwich, which was formally opened by Her Majesty in the

1b Albermarle Street

summer of 1990, where I even managed to meet her. However, since I had neglected to discuss this significant expenditure with other directors, it was decided that it would be the best for all concerned if I took the business private. Thus, in 1990, ‘The Weiss Gallery PLC’ became ‘Mark Weiss Ltd’. The start of this new decade and new direction for the gallery was marked by another substantial sale, that of a very rare early family group portrait by the sixteenth century Bruges painter, Anthonis Claessins (14). This was purchased by The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust for one of their properties in the bard’s home town of Stratford-upon-Avon.

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It is also the period when I met my next significant client, Frederick W. Hughes – and what an extraordinary, unforgettable man he was. In truth, I found him rather intimidating; he had a witheringly quick wit, a brilliant mind and profound knowledge of English history and its nobility, allied to a very acerbic sense of humour that sometimes verged on the cruel. An arch socialite, Fred had been Andy Warhol’s business partner and upon Warhol’s death in 1987, he became the sole executor of his vast artistic estate from which he created the immensely powerful Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. Like Warhol, Fred was a compulsive collector and his ivy-covered town house on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, which he called Hotel Anglomania, was stuffed to the gills with the most extraordinarily eclectic objects: Russian Empire vying with early American furniture; a collection of bat skeletons mixed with native American art and early Mickey Mouse models; my early portraits hung with Orientalist works, and, of course, the obligatory Warhols. Sadly by the time I came to know him well, he was increasingly crippled by multiple sclerosis, the disease which was ultimately to kill him. However, in a buying spree that only lasted a few years, Fred acquired some wonderful paintings from me including a masterpiece by John Michael Wright (146) and a highly important portrait of James V of Scotland by Corneille de Lyon (8). Some of my most memorable experiences I had with Fred included the last time he visited London in 1991 when he decorated his suite at the Ritz with five paintings that he had ‘borrowed’ from my gallery. On the day of his departure, I went to collect them to be waived away with an imperious gesture and a curtly barked comment not to touch his paintings. And thus he bought the lot on the spot! The following year, on a visit to Paris, staying at Le Meurice, he invited me to join him for breakfast in his suite. I arrived to witness that Fred had ordered literally everything on the breakfast menu, delivered by a phalanx of waiters pushing trolley after trolley into the room… and, whilst I ate like a king, he barely touched a thing. Such extravagance would strain any wallet, and to his assistant’s dismay, American Express stopped his card, and I had to assist in settling his bill. By 1993, Fred’s illness was such that he ceased to be an active buyer, and indeed in the years leading up to his death in 2001, and in the subsequent estate sale, I bought back the majority of these works and sold them on to other collectors. Another client I held in particularly high regard was Guy Acloque, who died only recently. In the mid-1990s he bought a number of significant Tudor and Jacobean portraits of British royalty and nobility including a rare profile portrait of Edward VI by William Scrots (68), a spectacular full-length of Anne of Denmark from the studio of Marcus Gheeraerts (102), another William Larkin discovery that I made of William Cavendish and, best of all, an absolutely ravishing portrait of Elizabeth of Bohemia, the ‘Winter Queen’ (38), her hair in

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artful disarray over a sumptuously embroidered costume. Guy was an ‘old school’ connoisseur collector, a man with a keen eye for quality and an encyclopaedic knowledge of the genealogy of the English aristocracy. Around this time, I also became good friends with Jim Welu, Director of the Worcester Art Museum in Massachussets (left), and within a short period he had acquired two remarkable works. The first was a rare Elizabethan three-quarter-length of John Farnham by Steven Cornelisz. van Herwijck (73), and the second was an intimate small-scale portrait by Frans Hals of his friend, the painter Frans Post (53).

Mark and Jim Welu, in Worcester Art Museum, October 1994

1995-2003

1995 was a significant year as it saw the opening of Dynasties, the Tate’s first exhibition dedicated to early British painting for over twenty-five years. The last, in 1969, had been Roy Strong’s hugely acclaimed show The Elizabethan Image, to coincide with which Strong also published his seminal, and now renowned, book The Elizabethan Image. In 1991, I had been approached by Nick Serota, the Tate’s Director, to ask if I could help raise some funds to assist in the financing of a new curatorial position dedicated to Tudor and Jacobean painting, the curator’s first task being to prepare and curate this new exhibition. I made a small personal donation and managed to persuade Fred Hughes, through the Warhol Foundation, to give a substantial one. All of which helped fund the appointment of Karen Hearn, the current curator of sixteenth and seventeenth century British painting. It was only natural that I should want to put on my own exhibition to coincide with the opening of the Tate’s, and Roy very kindly agreed to assist with my show. Looking back on it now, I am quite proud of the impressive selection of portraits that I gathered together which were part loan and part for sale. Included were important royal portraits of Henry VIII (sold to The Peter Moores Foundation, 66), Edward VI (67), Elizabeth I (loaned from Hever Castle), Anne of Denmark (sold to the National Maritime Museum, 101) and Elizabeth of Bohemia (103), as well as James V (8) and James VI of Scotland (sold to Historic Scotland, 68). The most noteworthy painting was a magnificent late Van Dyck of Pompone de Bellièvre, who had been the French ambassador to London (52).

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The Van Dyck was a great discovery, both for the attribution and sitter, and in order to assist in maximising its potential, I brought in as a partner Tim Bathurst and his gallery, Artemis, which was based in Duke Street, St. James’s. Tim, who sadly died last year, was a doyen of the art trade and a man whom I hugely admired for his integrity and connoisseurship. Above all, over the years he had proven to be a great and incredibly supportive friend and I trusted him implicitly. Sure enough, with his assistance, I achieved a brilliant success with the Van Dyck. It sold to the Seattle Art Museum in October 1997, for just under two million dollars, at that time easily the biggest deal of my life. Earlier that year, I was invited by Rex Irwin to put on a selling exhibition in his gallery in Sydney, Australia. Though it was a risky gamble, as Rex’s business was predominantly contemporary indigenous artists, it was a tempting opportunity. I had a huge stroke of luck on the eve of the opening. Since my reputation as a passionate collector of great Burgundy wine had preceded me, I was invited to a tasting dinner where one of the other attendees informed me that the sitter in my Elizabethan portrait of Frances Reynell was an ancestress of his (89). His family had been one of the earliest settlers in Adelaide, establishing one of the first commercial vineyards in Australia called Chateau Reynella, which still exists today. This exciting news made it very easy for me to convince Ron Radford, the Director of the Art Gallery of South Australia, to agree to buy the painting. This sale, combined with a few others, encouraged me to return two years later, and again the show was a success. However, a third visit during the Sydney Olympics in 2000 was a disaster, and my show had virtually no visitors – art and sport do not mix! The summer of 2001, was a time of great joy for me, as after a life of bachelordom, I married Catherine in August 2001, in New York’s Central Park, with six friends as witnesses. My new wife was now to join me working in the gallery, and it is largely due to her tremendous organisational skills that I have subsequently been able to grow the business as much as I have. Mention must be made of Jasper Conran who, in a short burst of activity in the late 1990s, bought a number of early English portraits from me including works by Robert Peake (109) and William Larkin (113). Subsequent publicity for his exquisitely designed homes, displaying my paintings in interiors with a striking contemporary edge, has proved to be important in showing clients that you do not need a period setting to display early portraits. Our business relationship was not all one way, and Catherine and I will also be eternally grateful to Jasper for giving us the opportunity to buy his fabulous house in the south-west of France where we now happily spend as much time as we possibly can.

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The new millennium saw my business expand with three new clients, who became increasingly important to the gallery, and they have all proved to be representative of a new breed of buyer of Old Masters. David Kowitz, Terry Hughes and Brace Young, all Goldman Sachs trained, quickly became very successful financiers in the emerging world of hedge funds. They and their wives have become very good friends as well, and over the years, I am proud of the paintings that I have helped these families acquire. David in particular is a significant buyer in the Old Master market, building a burgeoning collection of major paintings.

2003-2010 With my business growing ever more successful, it became clear that the gallery in Albemarle Street was too cramped. Though it had served me well for nearly twenty years, it was now time to look for larger premises and again, as so often has happened in my life, a confluence of events conspired to assist me. First was the lucky purchase in 2002 of an unrecognised masterpiece in Sotheby’s first Old Master auction to be held in Paris. Mistakenly catalogued as a copy, and missed by all, I bought for about £40,000 a full-length portrait of Louis XIII by Frans Pourbus the Younger (25). The painting, which was clearly signed and dated, was in virtually pristine condition and on an unlined canvas. What nobody, including the then curator of the Louvre, had failed to notice was that the so-called original, which was in the Pitti Palace in Florence, clearly depicted the sitter at a slightly older age, even leaving aside the obvious subtle changes in the design. Research subsequently proved that my painting was the original, likely commissioned as a marriage portrait to be sent to Spain, and that the portrait in the Pitti was a later, second version. The painting quickly sold in 2003 to the Cleveland Art Museum for £650,000. This sale coincided with the opportunity to acquire 59 Jermyn Street (right), one of the greatest and most prestigious gallery spaces in London. Formerly the home for some forty years of the renowned Old Master dealership, the Heim Gallery, it had been occupied for the last ten years by the eminent sculpture dealer Danny Katz. Deciding that he wanted to move to Old Bond Street, Danny approached me thinking I was the best person to take it over. In truth, though flattered, I was somewhat intimidated at the prospect of taking on a gallery with such a 59 Jermyn Street, June 2003

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quantum increase in scale. However, instilled with the confidence of the Cleveland sale, I was excited at the prospect and eventually, after a somewhat fraught negotiation, we successfully closed a deal. With the contracts signed, I could not believe my good fortune. This was followed by yet more good news, when we received an invitation to exhibit the following year at TEFAF in Maastricht, the greatest art fair in the world. We have been successfully exhibiting there ever since, putting on what is widely regarded as one of the most dramatic displays in the Old Master section.

TEFAF Maastricht, March 2008

In recent years, due to the ever diminishing supply of good examples of Elizabethan and Jacobethan portraits, I have taken an increasing interest in French and, in particular, Flemish portraiture, and am proud to have handled some undoubted masterpieces such as Jean Clouet’s portrait of Francois I’s daughter, Madeleine of France (3), Frans Pourbus the Younger’s portrait of Vicenzo Gonzaga, Duke of Mantua (24) and the highly significant sale of Anthony van Dyck’s The Martyrdom of St. Sebastian (49, opp. right) which was purchased by the Spanish government and restituted to its former home in the royal collection at the palace of the Escorial. Apart from these great paintings, I have also been privileged to broker the sale of an extraordinarily rare triptych by the father of Flemish landscape painting, Joachim Patinir (1). This remarkable work will be publicly displayed for the first time ever in this country during my 25th anniversary exhibition.

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So what might the future hold for an Old Master gallery such as mine? Without a doubt, there is a dwindling supply of pictures coming on the market, as can be seen by the decreasing scale and number of auctions held by the major houses. However, my business model has never been based on a high turnover with multiple purchases. Rather, my success has come more from scholarly research and discovery, combined with connoisseurship and an eye for a great painting, and above all, integrity both in business and in the vision I have always had for the gallery. With these tools, I feel not only confident but excited at what the future holds; for there are always new discoveries to be made and I am convinced that my gallery will continue to be an invaluable resource for collectors and museums alike looking for unique and compelling sixteenth and seventeenth century paintings.

Mark Weiss

Mark Weiss, October 2008

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... my success has come more from scholarly research and discovery, combined with connoisseurship and an eye for a great painting

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AN ADVOCATE FOR EARLY ENGLISH PORTRAITS

Few reassessments in the history of English art have been as dramatic as those affecting early portraiture. Sixty years ago when I first became obsessed by such pictures they were regarded at the most with condescension. Holbein and the miniaturists were of course accorded their due but, otherwise, large-scale painting from about 1550 to 1620 was appreciated mainly in terms of antiquarian curiosity rather than as having an aesthetic merit of its own. That that has changed is a reflection not only of the work of scholars in the field, but also to a rising appreciation of such pictures within the art trade. For twenty-five years Mark Weiss has been their advocate, recognising and handling some of the most exciting items to surface during those decades. More, he has assisted in guiding some of them into their place as star items in one or other of our national collections. In addition, the presence of the gallery on Jermyn Street guarantees such pictures a shop window open to every passer-by, and that I think Larkin (114)

is important. It is always exhilarating to peer in and see what is on the walls

Holbein (61)

of this gallery, for Mark has a remarkable ability to surprise with his discoveries. And they can only be made by someone with a sure eye and a keen sense of the research demanded to elucidate the status of such objects. To that we can add the benefits of the enormous advances in our knowledge of the technique of such pictures which has rendered their careful restoration often so revelatory. In this way The Weiss Gallery has contributed substantially to the rediscovery and appreciation of a magic period of English painting.

Sir Roy Strong

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... The Weiss Gallery has contributed substantially to the rediscovery and appreciation of a magic period of English painting

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MUSEUM ACQUISITIONS

In the twenty-five years since it was founded, The Weiss Gallery has played a significant role in identifying major works and placing them in museums in Britain and abroad. Consider just the portraits: the gallery’s first ever sale – invoice no. 1 – was the haunting portrait of Mr Tipping and his dog by Gilbert Soest (145), now in the Tate Gallery; Robert Peake’s full-length portrait of Princess Elizabeth, later Queen of Bohemia (103), purchased by the National Maritime Museum in 1990 and now hanging in The Queen’s House, Greenwich; and, in the late 1990s, Van Dyck’s portrait of Pompone de Bellièvre (52), purchased by the Seattle Art Museum. Outside the field of the portrait, imagine, most recently, the satisfaction in returning to its former home – no less than the Escorial in Spain – Van Dyck’s group of The Martyrdom of St. Sebastian (49). The sale of works to institutions often takes patience, but it also takes the ability to recognize works of the highest quality and artistic interest. In this Mark Weiss has succeeded again and again.

Malcolm Rogers Director of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Invoice No. 1

Soest (145)

... The Weiss Gallery has played a significant role in identifying major works and placing them in museums in Britain and abroad

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MARK WEISS AND SCOTTISH HERITAGE

Of the many extraordinary early British paintings that have passed through the hands of Mark Weiss in the past twenty years, a fair number have had a Scottish dimension. However, before saying a little about these paintings it is worth emphasising what a major contribution Mark and his gallery have made to the study and understanding of the painting of this period, a contribution not only appreciated by private collectors but by public institutions worldwide. No-one has a surer eye for quality and a firmer grasp of what is significant – and such dedication to the thorough research of his acquisitions. This is perfectly exemplified in his most recent publication, the multi-authored book on the astonishing portrait of the musician Nicholas Lanier of 1613 (119). My own links with Mark were forged shortly after I became Keeper of the Scottish National Portrait Gallery in the early 1980s. Although our discussions were nearly always about early British portraiture, he did step out of his own territory on one memorable occasion and bought on my gallery’s behalf a portrait of Alexander Carlyle by Sir Henry Raeburn, painted Mytens (117)

in 1798 for Lord Haddington’s library at Tyninghame, where Mark made the purchase. But generally, our exchanges were about earlier painters close to both our hearts – none more so than Daniel Mytens and John Michael Wright. The Wright exhibition I had curated in 1982 included the artist’s documented portrait of Lady Bagot and her little granddaughter from Wolverhampton Art Gallery – but lacked its companion piece of Mrs Salusbury with two other grandchildren of the same family – a picture lost since 1945 and known only from old photographs. Dropping into his gallery one day, Mark was able to tell me that he had found the painting in a private collection in Madrid! Wright had trained in Edinburgh in the 1630s with the Scottish painter George Jamesone, and had married a Scottish noblewoman. An artist whose work should be represented in Scotland’s national collection, the opportunity presented itself in 1986 when Mark acquired one of the most lusciously decorative of all Wright’s portraits, the threequarter-length of Sir Edward Turnour (146). We agreed that its home ought to be in Edinburgh, but at the time its acquisition proved not to be possible.

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The beautiful and touching portrait of the seven-year-old Lady Mary Feilding by Daniel Mytens (117) could also find itself in a Scottish context. In 1622 she would marry the future first Duke of Hamilton, one of the great political players of the age and the subject of what many believe to be Mytens’s masterpiece, the full-length of 1629 now in the Scottish National Portrait Gallery. The portrait of Mary Feilding (left), one of the most evocative of all portraits of children, was the subject of an essay I wrote for the Weiss Gallery’s website in 2006. Two other portraits, one of them certainly Scottish, that I can recall discussing exhaustively with Mark, were a portrait of the young James VI (68), now happily housed in Stirling Castle, and a superb portrait by Corneille de Lyon that was believed to be of James V (8) – the words ‘le roi’ that were once recorded on the reverse the only certain testimony for that identification. There was no portrait of this king of comparable quality and that made certainty difficult for me. We differed, but as time passed I began to get a sneaking feeling that I was wrong! Recently it appeared on the 62 pence postage stamp. But there were no such doubts about the portrait of James VI, a man painted by a number of accomplished artists, though he hated sitting for his portrait. Almost certainly the work of Adrian Vanson, one of the ‘progenitors’ of early modern Scottish art, the inscription suggests that it was sent from Scotland to play its part at a European protestant court. These, and a whole range of other portraits, were the subject of intensive research before they reached their present homes, published in a series of Weiss Gallery catalogues which have become enticing, even indispensable, compendia of the art of the period.

Corneille (8)

Dr. Duncan Thomson

... No-one has a surer eye for quality and a firmer grasp of what is significant – and such dedication to the thorough research of his acquisitions

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ACQUISITIONS FOR THE HUNTINGTON ART GALLERY, SAN MARINO, CALIFORNIA

Until the British Art Center at Yale University opened in 1977, the Huntington was the principal US institution dedicated to British art. Under the direction of Robert Wark, the collections had developed significantly beyond the grand manner portraits, which had been acquired by Henry Huntington mostly from Joseph Duveen at the height of the Gilded Age. The most spectacular of Wark’s purchases for the British collections was the Van Dyck portrait of Mrs Kirke, acquired through Agnews in 1983. Since his retirement, his successors have continued with his policies, extending coverage of the field of British art deep into the 19th century, and opening new galleries for both the 19th century and the Italian, Netherlandish and French collections which had been founded, but somewhat hidden, by Mr Huntington himself when he established the Arabella Huntington Memorial Collection in side rooms of his library building in 1927. Purchases by the Huntington from the Weiss Gallery over the period since 1995 have reflected the same broad ambitions to extend the scope of the collection and to set the history of art in Britain more securely in its continental context – especially, given Mark Weiss’s specialism, in the 17th century. At the Huntington, Wark’s successor, Ed Nygren, bought from the Weiss Gallery in 1996 the beautiful head and shoulders of an unknown sitter by Cornelius Johnson, dated 1632 (131). This was the year of Van Dyck’s arrival in London, and the painting showed, arguably, a consciousness of Flemish baroque portrait design in response to Van Dyck. One could also argue that the particular turn and flourish of the sitter’s posture, and closely observed naturalism of the face, had already been introduced to English court portraiture by Van Dyck’s predecessors for at least a decade by 1632 – but it is exactly that sort of discussion that the acquisition was intended to stimulate. The same discussion was forwarded by the purchase again from Mark of a painting by Jan Weesop, another Flemish painter who worked in England and continued after Van Dyck’s death to endow his sitters with a semblance of the triumphalist Van Dyckian 1630s. In this case, the sitter was putatively identified as Marmaduke d’Arcy, an officer in the king’s service, caught in mid-swagger, his blue sash, polished armour and gorgeous golden-thread coat catching a broad beam of oblique light (143). Weesop’s oeuvre had been quite recently resurrected by Sir Oliver Millar, and the purchase of this portrait was Johnson (131)

astute. But like all good museum acquisitions, this one serves to highlight other gaps – for example Lely’s early work in England for the Carnarvons, the emergence of a naturalistic ‘sad-coloured’ portraiture during the war years, and the spread of portraiture in metropolitan non-Court circles during the 1650s – 60s. For the Huntington, this remains a significant gap.

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More recently, however, the Weiss Gallery has been able to supply other desiderata. In 2007, a wonderfully epicene portrait of the medallist Jacques Roettiers IV, a late work by Nicolas de Largillière was acquired (150). Largillière exemplifies the complexity of relations between England, the Netherlands and France during the later 17th and early 18th centuries. Trained in Antwerp and London, Largillière was associated with Lely before escaping the anti-French political mood in England in the 1670s. Safely in Paris, he became the supreme exponent of the French cult of luxury and elegance, and to a great extent represented almost everything that the British political culture of John Bull most wanted to differentiate itself from. This is remarkably evident in the portrait of Roettiers, yet Roettiers was himself later to be appointed to an English office as Engraver to the Royal Mint. A distant descendant of the artists and craftsmen of Van Dyck’s Iconographia, Largillière’s portrait of Roettiers stands in the sharpest contrast to English portraits of metropolitan artists and intellectuals from the period. The Huntington’s main representation of this latter tradition is in the work of Hogarth and his succesors, so the Largillière reminds us of the collection’s gap in the period dominated in England by Kneller. Finally, in 2010, the Huntington acquired from Mark the portrait of M. de Thévenot (151), the distinguished French Levantine traveller and natural philosopher, painted by Flemishborn Philippe de Champaigne in the early 1660s. The painting is something of a discovery, being only recently attributed to the artist on the basis of a larger version in a French private collection, and the sitter identified by his convincing likeness to the engraved frontispiece of de Thévenot’s Relation d’en Voyage fait au Levant of 1664. Even more than the sumptuously painted Turkish costume, the naturalism of the veined hands, and slightly bloated flush of Champaigne (151)

the cheeks and nose, are aesthetically dominant in the image. The picture thus continues the theme of painters whose fundamental vision and expertise are rooted in Flemish art of the early 17th century, but in whose hands the style, iconography and social affiliation of the art of portraiture develop freely in response to the changing cultural and historical circumstances of early modern Europe. These four paintings are splendid acquisitions for a scholarly, research-oriented institution like the Huntington. They are also a proud reminder that the tradition of the scholar-dealer is alive and well in the London art trade, not least in the beautiful premises that Mark Weiss now occupies in worthy succession to Heim's Andrew Ciechanowiecki, and to Danny Katz.

John Murdoch Director of Art Collections, The Huntington Library Art Collections, San Marino, California

... a proud reminder that the tradition of the scholar-dealer is alive and well in the London art trade

” 21


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THE WEISS GALLERY


TTHE WEISS GALLERY

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1. Joachim Patinir and Workshop (c.1480 – 1524) Triptych with St. Jerome, St. John, St. Anthony and Mary Magdalene Oil on panel: central panel 35 5⁄8 x 35 in. (90.5 x 89 cm.) and side panels 35 x 15 in. (89 x38 cm.) c.1517 – 24

23


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THE WEISS GALLERY

2. Jan van Scorel (1495 – 1562) An unknown gentleman Oil on panel: 24 1⁄4 x 16 3⁄4 in. (61.6 x 42.5 cm.) c.1530 – 1535

24


THE WEISS GALLERY

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years

3. Jan van Scorel (1495 – 1562) An unknown nobleman Oil on panel: 17 ¾ x 14 ¼ in. (45.5 x 36.3 cm.) c.1547 25


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THE WEISS GALLERY

“... painted for François I, the king of France, one of only 13 surviving autograph works by the father of French portraiture”

4. Jean Clouet (c.1485 – 1541) Madeleine of France (1520 – 1537) Oil on panel: 6 3⁄5 x 5 1⁄4 in. (16.7 x 13.3 cm.) c.1522

26

5. Studio of François Clouet (c.1515 – 1572) Hercule-François, Duke of Alençon, Anjou and Brabant (1555 – 1584) Oil on panel: 12 x 9 ¼ in. (31.2 x 23.2 cm.) c.1556 – 1558


THE WEISS GALLERY

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years

6. François Clouet (c.1515 – 1572) Madeleine Le Clerc du Tremblay Oil on panel: 13 9⁄16 x 9 13⁄16 in. (34.5 x 24.9 cm.) c.1570 – 72

27


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THE WEISS GALLERY

“... the only known portrait of the king to be painted in his lifetime”

7. Corneille de Lyon (c.1510 – 1575) Jean d’Albon, Sieur de Saint-André (c.1505 – 1562) Oil on panel: 6 5⁄8 x 5 11⁄16 in. (16.8 x 14.5 cm.) c.1530 – 1535

28

8. Corneille de Lyon (c.1510 – 1575) James V of Scotland (1512 – 1542) Oil on panel: 6 ¾ x 5 1⁄2 in. (17 x 14.5 cm.) c.1536 – 1537


THE WEISS GALLERY

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years

9. Corneille de Lyon (c.1510 – 1575) An unknown gentleman Oil on paper: 16 3⁄8 x 12 ¼ in. (41.6 x 31.1 cm.) c.1540 – 1545

29


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10. The Monogrammist G.E.C. (fl.1560 – 1575) Christine of Denmark, Dowager-Duchess of Milan and Lorraine (1522 – 1590) Oil on panel: 13 ½ x 10 in. (36 x 26.5 cm.) c.1568 – 72

31


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THE WEISS GALLERY

11. Pieter Jansz. Pourbus (c.1523/4 – c.1584) An unknown lady, holding a pomander on a gold chain Oil on panel: 18 7⁄8 x 15 in. (48 x 38 cm.) c.1560 – 1565

32


THE WEISS GALLERY

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years

12. Pieter Jansz. Pourbus (c.1523/4 – 1584) Sebastian I of Portugal (1554 – c.1578) Oil on panel: 17 1⁄8 x 13 7⁄8 in. (43.5 x 35.3 cm.) c.1575 – 1580

33


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THE WEISS GALLERY

13. Pieter Jansz. Pourbus (c.1523/4 – 1584) The Last Supper Oil on panel: 63 13⁄16 x 77 13⁄16 in. (162.1 x 195.2 cm.) c.1562 – 1565

34


THE WEISS GALLERY

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years

14. Anthonius Claeissins (c.1538 – 1613) A family saying grace before a meal Oil on panel: 38 x 56 in. (96.5 x 142 cm.) c.1585 The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust, Stratford-upon-Avon

35


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THE WEISS GALLERY

15. Hieronymus Francken the Elder (c.1540 – 1610) The Family of Adrien de Witte, Lord of Buerstedde and Wekene (1555 – 1616) Oil on panel: 46 ½ x 81 in. (118 x 206 cm.) 1608

36


THE WEISS GALLERY

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16. Flemish School, c.1605 – 1610 The del Prado family Oil on canvas: 60 x 120 in. (152.4 x 304.8 cm.) c.1605 – 1610

37


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THE WEISS GALLERY


THE WEISS GALLERY

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17. Martino Rota (1520 – 1583) Archduke Ernst of Austria (1553 – 1595) Oil on canvas: 43 5⁄8 x 35 7⁄8 in. (110.8 x 91.1 cm.) c.1580

39


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THE WEISS GALLERY

18. Adriaen Thomasz. Key (fl.1544 – 1589) Jacob Claesz. Basgen of Bas (1536 – 1589), burgomaster of Amsterdam Oil on panel: 39 ¼ x 28 in. (101.2 x 71.3 cm.) c.1586 Private collection, on loan to the Royal Museum of Fine Arts, Antwerp

40


THE WEISS GALLERY

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years

19. Pieter Pietersz. (c.1540/1 – 1603) Cornelis Jorisz. Roodhoorn (1564-1599) Oil on panel: 45 ½ x 34 ½ in. (116.2 x 87.7 cm.) c.1589

41


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THE WEISS GALLERY

20. Gortzius Geldorp (1553 – 1616) Bernhard Sigismund von und zum Pütz (1558 – 1628) and his three sons Sigismund, Johann and Jacob Oil on panel: 39 x 28 ½ in. (98 x 72 cm.) 1598

42

21. Gortzius Geldorp (1553 – 1616) Catharina von und zum Pütz, née Broelman (b.1559) and her four daughters Sophia, Gertrud, Christine and Catharina Oil on panel: 39 x 28 ½ in. (98 x 72 cm.) 1598


THE WEISS GALLERY

22. Frans Pourbus the Younger (c.1569 – 1622) Catherine van Damme, wife of François de Groote Oil on panel: 41 ¾ x 29 ½ in. (106 x 75 cm.) 1591

25

years

23. Frans Pourbus the Younger (c.1569 – 1622) Joost Lips, called Justus Lipsius (1547 – 1606) Oil on panel: 26 ¼ x 20 ¼ in. (67.1 x 51.4 cm.) c.1595 – 1599 Private collection, on loan to the Royal Museum of Fine Arts, Antwerp

43


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THE WEISS GALLERY

“... a prodigious and historic masterpiece, of one of the greatest collectors of all time”

24. Frans Pourbus the Younger (c.1569 – 1622) Vincenzo Gonzaga, Duke of Mantua (1562 – 1612) Oil on canvas: 78 13⁄16 x 43 3⁄8 in. (202 x 112 cm.) c.1604 – 1605

44


THE WEISS GALLERY

25

years

“... painted for Marie de’ Medici, and a pristine state of preservation, this acquisition was one of my greatest coups”

25. Frans Pourbus the Younger (c.1569 – 1622) Louis XIII of France (1601 – 1643) Oil on canvas: 62 ½ x 37 in. (158 x 94 cm.) 1611 The Cleveland Museum of Art, Ohio

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THE WEISS GALLERY

26. Frans Pourbus the Younger (c.1569 – 1622) Henri IV of France (1553 – 1610) Oil on panel: 15 x 9 ¼ in. (37.9 x 24.9 cm.) c.1610

46


THE WEISS GALLERY

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years

27. Circle of Frans Pourbus the Younger (1569 – 1662) Charlotte-Marguerite de Montmorency, La Princesse de Condé (1594 – 1650) Oil on canvas: 27 7⁄8 x 22 in. (70.8 x 55.9 cm) c.1605 – 1610

47


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THE WEISS GALLERY

28. Pieter Fransz. Isaacsz. (1569 – 1625) Christian, Prince of Denmark (1603 – 1647) Oil on canvas: 39 x 29 in. (98 x 74.3 cm.) c.1615 – 1617 Frederiksborg Castle, Hillerød, Denmark

48


THE WEISS GALLERY

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years

29. Jacob van der Doort (? – 1629) Duke Ulrik, Prince of Denmark (1611 – 1633) Oil on canvas: 43 ½ x 37 ½ in. (110.6 x 82.6 cm.) c.1615 – 1616

49


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THE WEISS GALLERY

30. Pieter Fransz. Isaacsz. (1569 – 1625) The family of Johann Friedrich, Duke of Württemberg (1557 – 1608) Oil on copper: 12 x 9 ½ in. (30.5 x 24 cm.) c.1610 – 15 Württemberg Museum, Stuttgart

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THE WEISS GALLERY

31. Flemish School, c.1619 Jean V de Coudenhove (d.1625) Oil on canvas: 76 ¾ x 42 7⁄8 in. (195 x 109 cm.) c.1619

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years

32. Flemish School, c.1619 Jacqueline de Rodoan de Berleghem, Lady Coudenhove Oil on canvas: 76 ¾ x 42 7⁄8 in. (195 x 109 cm.) c.1619

51


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THE WEISS GALLERY

“... Fuentes and van den Bergh were both formidable soldiers and each ruled as Governor-Generals of the Spanish occupied Netherlands”

33. Juan Pantoja de la Cruz (c.1553 – 1608) Don Pedro Henriquez de Avecedo, Count of Fuentes (1560 – 1610) Oil on canvas: 87 ½ x 47 7⁄8 in. (223 x 119.5 cm.) c.1596 – 1600

52


THE WEISS GALLERY

25

years

34. Otto van Veen (c.1556 – 1629) Count Hendrik van den Bergh (1573 – 1638) Oil on canvas: 75 ¼ x 45 ¼ in. (191 x 115.5 cm.) c.1618 Huis Berg, ‘s-Heerenberg, the Netherlands

53


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THE WEISS GALLERY

35. Michiel Jansz. van Miereveld (1567 – 1641) Ambrogio Spinola, 1st Marquis of Los Balbases (1569 – 1630) Oil on canvas: 42 ¾ x 34 in. (108.6 x 84.5 cm.) 1611 54


THE WEISS GALLERY

36. Michiel Jansz. van Miereveld (1567 – 1641) Sir Henry Wotton (1568 – 1639) Oil on panel: 44 ½ x 32 7⁄8 in. (113 x 83.5 cm.) 1620

25

years

37. Nicolaes Eliasz. Pickenoy (1588 – c.1650/6) An unknown gentleman Oil on panel: 48 x 33 ¼ in (121.9 x 84.3 cm.) c.1622

55


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THE WEISS GALLERY

“... another discovery and, along with the 1603 portrait by Peake, the most beautiful and best preserved of her portraits” 38. Master of the Informal Court Half-Lengths (c.1620 – 1630) Elizabeth Stuart, Electress of Palatine and Queen of Bohemia (1596 – 1662) Oil on panel: 26 ½ x 21 in. (67.5 x 53 cm.) 1622 56


THE WEISS GALLERY

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years

39. Michiel Jansz. van Miereveld (1567 – 1641) Elizabeth Stuart, Electress of Palatine and Queen of Bohemia (1596 – 1662) Oil on panel: 32 x 43 ¾ in. (81 x 111 cm.) c.1626 57


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THE WEISS GALLERY

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40. Michiel Jansz. van Miereveld (1567 – 1641) An unknown old man Oil on panel: 27 ¼ x 21 ¾ in. (69 x 55 cm.) 1629

59


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THE WEISS GALLERY

41. Jan Anthonisz. van Ravesteyn (1570 – 1657) Marten Adriaansz. Stuylingh (1583 – 1635) Oil on panel: 26 3⁄8 x 23 in. (68.2 x 58.5 cm.) 1632

60

42. Jan Anthonisz. van Ravesteyn (1570 – 1657) Brechtje Stuylingh, née Gerritsdr. van der Does Oil on panel: 26 3⁄8 x 23 in. (68.2 x 58.5 cm.) 1632


THE WEISS GALLERY

43. Jan Anthonisz. van Ravesteyn (1570 – 1657) An unknown officer Oil on canvas: 49 ¼ x 35 ¼ in. (125 x 89.5 cm.) 1634

25

years

44. Jan Anthonisz. van Ravesteyn (1570 – 1657) Maria van Gogh, wife of Hendrik Thibaut (d.1669) Oil on panel: 48 x 35 in. (122 x 89 cm.) 1632

61


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THE WEISS GALLERY

45. Cornelis Cornelisz. van Haarlem (1562 – 1638) An unknown man, as Adonis Oil on canvas: 27 ½ x 22 in. (70 x 56 cm.) 1620

62

46. Cornelis Cornelisz. van Haarlem (1562 – 1638) An unknown woman, as Venus Oil on canvas: 27 ½ x 22 in. (70 x 56 cm.) 1620


THE WEISS GALLERY

47. Wybrand de Geest (1592 – 1660) An unknown officer Oil on canvas: 42 x 32 in. (107 x 81 cm.) c.1625 – 1630

25

years

48. Wybrand de Geest (1592 – 1660) Lucia van Walta (1609 – 1674) Oil on canvas: 40 x 31 ½ in. (102 x 80 cm.) 1629

63


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THE WEISS GALLERY

“... the restitution back to Spain

of this lost masterpiece will surely always remain a crowning moment in my career”

64


THE WEISS GALLERY

25

years

49. Sir Anthony van Dyck (1599 – 1641) The Martyrdom of St. Sebastian Oil on canvas: 55 7⁄8 x 76 3⁄8 in. (142 x 194 cm.) c.1622 – 1623 Patrimonio Nacional, San Lorenzo de El Escorial, Madrid

65


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THE WEISS GALLERY

50. Sir Anthony van Dyck (1599 – 1641) An unknown gentleman Oil on canvas: 22 ½ x 19 ¼ in. (57 x 39 cm.) c.1628 – 29

66

51. Sir Anthony van Dyck (1599 – 1641) An unknown cleric Oil on canvas: 22 ½ x 18 in. (57 x 46 cm.) c.1625 – 1630


THE WEISS GALLERY

25

years

52. Sir Anthony van Dyck (1599 – 1641) Pompone II de Bellièvre, Chevalier seigneur de Grignon (1606 – 1657)

Oil on canvas: 54 x 43 ½ in. (137.2 x 110.5 cm.) c.1640 – 1641 Seattle Art Museum, USA

67


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THE WEISS GALLERY

53. Frans Hals (c.1581 – 1666) Frans Post Oil on panel: 10 ¾ x 9 in. (27.2 x 23 cm.) c.1663 – 1664 Worcester Art Museum, Massachusetts

68


THE WEISS GALLERY

25

years

54. Pieter Hermansz. Verelst (c.1618 – after 1671) An unknown old man Oil on panel: 29 x 23 1⁄2 in. (74 x 59.5 cm.) c.1647 – 1650

69


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25

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“... maybe an unusual purchase, but I fell in love with the poetic symmetry of Christ”

55. Nicolas Tournier (1590 – 1639) Christ Carrying the Cross Oil on canvas: 86 5⁄8 x 47 5⁄8 in. (220 x 121 cm.) c.1632 – 1635

71


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THE WEISS GALLERY

56. Otto van Veen (c.1556 – 1629) An unknown family Oil on canvas: 75 ¼ x 45 ¼ in. (191 x 115.5 cm.) c.1615 – 1620

72


THE WEISS GALLERY

25

years

57. Jan van Teylingen (c.1600 – 1654) An unknown family from Hoorn, Holland Oil on canvas: 59 x 85 ½ in. (150 x 218 cm.) c.1640

73


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THE WEISS GALLERY

58. Jacob Fransz. van der Merck (c.1610 – 1664) An unknown family in a landscape Oil on canvas: 59 ½ x 66 7⁄8 in. (151 x 170 cm.) 1635 – 1640

74


THE WEISS GALLERY

25

years

59. Dirck Dircksz. Santvoort (1610 – 1680) An unknown family from Amsterdam Oil on canvas: 50 ¼ x 73 ¾ in. (152 x 220 cm.) c.1640 – 1645

75


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THE WEISS GALLERY

60. Circle of Adriaen van der Linde (1580 – 1630) An unknown boy holding a kolf club and ball Oil on panel: 41 x 31 in. (107.3 x 78.7 cm.)

1603 76

61. Circle of Jan Claesz. (before 1570 – after 1618) Portrait of an eight-year-old boy, possibly of the Blauhulc. family, holding a horse Oil on panel: 44 x 32 ½ in. (111.8 x 82.5 cm.) 1618


THE WEISS GALLERY

25

years

62. Adam Camerarius (fl.1644 – 1685) Five children and their pet antelope

Oil on canvas: 60 x 74 in. (152.4 x 188 cm.) c.1650 77


25

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78

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THE WEISS GALLERY

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63. Jacob Gerritsz. Cuyp (1594 – 1652) Maria Strik van Scharlaken (1646 – 1669), as a shepherdess Oil on panel: 32 ¾ x 25 ½ in. (83.2 x 64.8 cm.) 1650

79


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THE WEISS GALLERY

64. Studio of Hans Holbein the Younger (c.1497/8 – 1543) Lady Alice More (c.1474 – c.1551) Oil on panel: 14 ½ x 10 ½ in. (36.9 x 26.7 cm.) c.1530

80


THE WEISS GALLERY

25

years

65. Hans Holbein the Younger (c.1497/8 – 1543) Sir Thomas Wyatt the Younger (1521 – 1554) Oil on tondo panel: diameter 12 5⁄8 in. (32 cm.) c.1540 – 1542

81


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THE WEISS GALLERY

66. Follower of Hans Holbein the Younger (c.1497/8 - 1543) Henry VIII of England (1491 – 1547) Oil on panel: 38 5⁄8 x 16 1⁄8 in. (98 x 72 cm.) c.1544 – 1550 Peter Moores Foundation, Compton Verney House, Warwickshire

82


THE WEISS GALLERY

67. Follower of Hans Holbein the Younger (c.1497/8 – 1543) Edward VI, as Prince of Wales (1537 – 1553) Oil on panel: 20 7⁄8 x 16 ¼ in. (53 x 41.5 cm.) c.1542 – 1547

25

years

68. Studio of William Scrots (fl.1537 – 1553) Edward VI, as Prince of Wales (1537 – 1553) Oil on panel: 13 ½ x 11 ¾ in. (35 x 30 cm.) c.1546

83


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THE WEISS GALLERY

69. English School, c.1557 Elizabeth I, as Princess Royal (1533 – 1603) Oil on panel: 20 1⁄4 x 14 1⁄8 in. (51.5 x 36 cm.) c.1557 Hever Castle, Kent

84

70. The Master of the Countess of Warwick (fl.1560 – 1570s) A young boy holding a book and flowers Oil on panel: 19 x 14 ¼ ins. (48 x 36 cm.) 1576


THE WEISS GALLERY

25

years

“... an incredibly rare, indeed unique, Elizabethan group portrait of a musical theme”

71. The Master of the Countess of Warwick (fl.1560 – 1570s) A group of four children making music Oil on panel: 30 x 54 in. (76 x 137 cm.) c.1565

85


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THE WEISS GALLERY

72. Steven Cornelisz. van Herwijck (c.1530 – c.1565/67) Henry Carey, 1st Baron Hunsdon (1526 – 1596) Oil on panel: 24 ¼ x 16 ¾ in. (61.5 x 42.5 cm.) c.1561 – 1563 Private collection, on loan to Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre, London

86


THE WEISS GALLERY

25

years

73. Steven Cornelisz. van Herwijck (c.1530 – c.1565/67) John Farnham, Gentleman-Pensioner to Elizabeth I

Oil on panel: 43 ½ x 32 ¾ in. (110.5 x 83.2 cm.) 1563 Worcester Art Museum, Massachusetts 87


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THE WEISS GALLERY

74. English School, c.1590 An allegory of man Oil on panel: 22 ½ x 20 ¼ in. (57 x 51.4 cm.) c.1590 Tate Britain, London

88


THE WEISS GALLERY

25

years

“... another unique Elizabethan painting of a servant and her charge”

75. English School, c.1588 John Dunch (b.c.1586) and his nurse, Elizabeth Field Oil on panel: 31 ¼ x 25 in. (79.3 x 63.5 cm.) c.1588

76. George Gower (c.1540 – 1596) A lady thought to be Isabel Biddulph, née Gifford Oil on panel: 32 ¾ x 23 ½ in. (83 x 60 cm.) c.1570 – 1575

89


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THE WEISS GALLERY

77. Adrian Vanson (fl.1580 – 1601) James VI of Scotland, and later I of England (1566 – 1625) Oil on panel: 32 ½ x 24 in. (82.5 x 61 cm.) c.1585 Historic Scotland, Stirling Castle

90


THE WEISS GALLERY

25

years

78. English School, c.1590 – 1595 Elizabeth I of England (1533 – 1603) Oil on panel: 36 5⁄8 x 26 ¾ in. (93 x 68 cm.) c.1590 – 1595

91


25

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THE WEISS GALLERY

“... a rare signed portrait, painted during the year of the Great Comet, a celestial event that amazed all Europe”

79. Cornelius Ketel (1548 – 1616) Richard Goodricke of Ribston, Yorkshire (1560 – 1601) Oil on panel: 41 ¾ x 32 in. (106 x 81 cm.) 1577 Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide

92


THE WEISS GALLERY

25

years

80. George Gower (c.1540 – 1596) An unknown lady Oil on panel: 31 x 25 in. (79 x 63.5 cm.) c.1590 Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide

93


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years

THE WEISS GALLERY

“... I bought this from the estate sale of the legendary Rudolf Nureyev”

81. Sir William Segar (c.1565 – 1633) An unknown lady Oil on panel: 36 ¼ x 25 ¼ in. (92 x 64 cm.) c.1585 – 1590

94

82. Sir William Segar (c.1565 – 1633) Elizabeth Drury (1579 – 1654), later Lady Burghley and Countess of Exeter Oil on panel: 27 x 20 ¾ in. (68.5 x 52.5 cm.) c.1591 – 1595


THE WEISS GALLERY

25

years

83. Attributed to Robert Peake (c.1551 – 1619) John Croker of Hook Norton (b.c.1565) Oil on panel: 25 x 21 in. (63.5 x 53.5 cm.) 1584

95


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years

THE WEISS GALLERY

“... the earliest known depiction in English art of M E L A N C H O LY , a modish affectation assumed by courtiers with artistic or philosophical aspirations”

84. English School, c.1589 – 1590 Sir Robert Sidney, Viscount de L’Isle and Earl of Leicester (1563 – 1626) Oil on canvas: 73 ½ 42 in. (187.7 x 106.8 cm.) c.1589 – 1590

96


THE WEISS GALLERY

85. John Bettes II (c.1550 – 1616) An unknown gentleman Oil on panel: 27 ½ x 20 ¾ in. (70 x 52.5 cm.) 1586

25

years

86. John Bettes II (c.1550 – 1616) Thomas Cavendish (1560 – 1592), circumnavigator Oil on panel: 35 x 29 in. (89 x 74 cm.) c.1588 – 1591 Chatsworth House, Derbyshire

97


25

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98

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THE WEISS GALLERY

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87. Robert Peake (c.1551 – 1619) Lady Catherine Drury and her son Drue Drury Oil on panel: 36 x 29¼ in. (91.5 x 74.2 cm.) 1594

99


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100

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THE WEISS GALLERY

25

years

“... Lady Frances was an ancestress of early settlers who established the first winery in South Australia, still known today as Chateau Reynella ”

88. Robert Peake (c.1551 – 1619) An unknown lady Oil on panel: 36 ½ x 28 in. (92.7 x 71.1 cm.) 1591

89. Attributed to Robert Peake (c.1551 – 1619) Lady Frances Reynell of West Ogwell, Devon (d.1605) Oil on panel: 44 ¾ x 34 ¾ in. (113.5 x 88.5 cm.) c.1595 Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide

101


25

years

THE WEISS GALLERY

90. English School, c.1593 - 1595 Dorothy Dormer (b.1577), wife of Henry Huddleston of Sawston Oil on canvas: 48 x 36 in. (121.6 x 91.5 cm.) c.1593 – 1595

102


THE WEISS GALLERY

25

years

91. Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger (c.1561/2 – 1636) Lady Lucy Reynell of Forde, Devon (1577 – 1652) Oil on canvas: 44 ½ x 35 in. (112.5 x 89 cm.) c.1600

103


25

years

THE WEISS GALLERY

92. Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger (c.1561/2 – 1636) An unknown gentleman Oil on canvas: 41 ½ x 32 ¼ in. (105.5 x 81.5 cm.) c.1590s

104

93. English School c.1596 Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex (1565 – 1601) Oil on panel: 30 x 24 in. (76 x 61 cm.) c.1596 – 1597


THE WEISS GALLERY

25

years

94. Circle of Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger (c.1561/2 – 1636) A courtier and his lady Oil on panel: 35 ½ x 29 ¾ in. (90.2 x 75.5 cm.) c.1590 – 1595

105


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years

THE WEISS GALLERY

95. Robert Peake (c.1551 –1619) Sir Edward Coke (1552 – 1634) as Attorney-General, later Lord Chief Justice Oil on panel: 39 ¾ x 32 ¼ in. (101 x 82 cm.) 1609

106

96. John de Critz (c.1552 – 1642) Robert Cecil, 1st Earl of Salisbury (c.1562 – 1612) Oil on panel: 44 ½ x 32 ½ in. (113 x 82.5 cm.) c.1608 – 1610


THE WEISS GALLERY

25

years

“...Having lost his identity, my researches restituted this fine portrait of the Earl who was to become one of the richest and most powerful men in England. His house Audley End, the largest in the country, was cryptically described by James I as ‘too big for a King but not for a Lord Treasurer’”

97. English School, 1598 Lord Thomas Howard, 1st Earl of Suffolk (1561 – 1626) Oil on canvas: 83 x 49 in. (210.8 x 124.5 cm.) 1598 English Heritage, Kenwood House, London

107


25

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108

THE WEISS GALLERY


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98. English School, c.1600 A lady thought to be Mary Fitton (b.1578) Oil on panel: 44 ½ x 34 ¾ in. (113 x 86 cm.) c.1600

109


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110

THE WEISS GALLERY


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99. English School, c.1600 – 1603 Anne Russell, Lady Herbert, later Countess of Worcester (d.1639) Oil on canvas: 76 x 38 in. (192 x 96.5 cm.) c.1600 – 1603

111


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THE WEISS GALLERY

“...The ghostly pentiment of faces from an earlier painting can be seen on the legs of King James”

100. English School, c.1618 James VI of Scotland and I of England (1566 – 1625) Oil on canvas: 76 ½ x 47 in. (194 x 119 cm.) c.1618

112


THE WEISS GALLERY

25

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101. John de Critz (c.1552 – 1642) Anne of Denmark (1574 – 1619) Oil on panel: 45 x 34 ¼ in. (114 x 87 cm.) c.1603 – 1605 National Maritime Museum, Greenwich

113


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THE WEISS GALLERY

102. Studio of Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger (c.1561/2 – 1636) Anne of Denmark (1574 – 1619) Oil on canvas: 82 x 45 in. (208.2 x 114.2) c.1615

114


THE WEISS GALLERY

25

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115


25

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116

THE WEISS GALLERY


THE WEISS GALLERY

25

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“... undoubtedly the most beautiful of all Peake’s portraits, also the earliest example of a British royal depicted in a landscape setting”

103. Robert Peake (c.1551 – 1619) Elizabeth Stuart (1596 – 1662), Princess Royal, later Electress of Palatine and Queen of Bohemia Oil on canvas: 53 ½ x 37 ½ in. (136 x 95.2 cm.) 1603 National Maritime Museum, Greenwich

117


25

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THE WEISS GALLERY

104. English School, 1614 Three unknown children Oil on canvas: 42 x 50 in. (106.7 x 127 cm.) 1614

118


THE WEISS GALLERY

25

years

105. Robert Peake (c.1551 – 1619) Charles I of England, as Duke of York and Albany (1600 – 1649) Oil on canvas: 57 ¼ x 36 ¾ in. (146 x 93.5 cm.) c.1611 – 1612

119


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THE WEISS GALLERY

106. English School, c.1604 Sir Reginald Mohun, 1st Bt. of Hall and Boconnoc (1564 – 1639) and his wife Dorothy, née Chudleigh, of Ashton, Devon Oil on panel: 75 x 44 in. (190.5 x 111.4 cm.) c.1604

120


THE WEISS GALLERY

25

years

107. English School, 1612 Sir Edward Pytts (1546 – 1618) and his grandson, Edward Pytts(c.1606 – 1672) Oil on panel: 72 ½ x 42 ½ in. (183.5 x 110.5 cm.) 1612

121


25

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THE WEISS GALLERY

108. Robert Peake (c.1551 – 1619) Elizabeth Coningsby and her eldest son, Sir Edmund Wyndham (c.1601 – 1683) Oil on canvas: 74 x 39 in. (188 x 99 cm.) c.1608

122


THE WEISS GALLERY

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109. Robert Peake (c.1551 – 1619) Cecilia Nevill, wife of Fitzwilliam Coningsby of Hampton Court, Herefordshire (d. after 1652) Oil on canvas: 83 x 46 in. (211 x 117 cm.) c.1617

123


25

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THE WEISS GALLERY

110. English School, c.1605 – 1610 Alice Spencer, Countess of Derby (1559 – 1637) Oil on canvas: 45 x 35 ½ in. (114.5 x 90 cm.) c.1605 – 1610

124


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111. Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger (c.1561/2 – 1636) A Lady thought to be Lady Anne Wadd Oil on panel: 44 x 32.5 in. (111.8 x 82.5 cm.) c.1610

125


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THE WEISS GALLERY

“... no other artist provides us with such a spectacular parade of Jacobean court splendour than William Larkin”

112. William Larkin (c.1580/5 – 1619) An unknown lady Oil on panel: 22 ½ x 17 in. (57 x 43.2 cm.) c.1615 – 1618

126

113. William Larkin (c.1580/5 – 1619) An unknown gentleman Oil on panel: 22 ¾ x 17 ½ in. (57.7 x 44.7 cm.) c.1616 – 1619


THE WEISS GALLERY

114. William Larkin (c.1580/5 – 1619) A baby, said to be Lady Waugh Oil on panel: 35 ½ x 28 in. (90.2 x 71 cm.) c.1615

25

years

115. William Larkin (c.1580/5 – 1619) Lady Catherine Stanhope, widow of Sir John Stanhope of Shelford and Elvaston (d.1611) Oil on canvas: 80 x 48 in. (203 x 122 cm.) c.1615

127


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128

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THE WEISS GALLERY

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116. William Larkin (c.1580/5 – 1619) Lady Jane Thornhagh (d.1660) Oil on panel: 44 ¾ x 33 in. (113.8 x 83.8 cm.) 1617

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“... one of the finest child portraits of the Jacobean age, depicting the sevenyear-old niece of the Duke of Buckingham at the time of her marriage”

117. Daniel Mytens (c.1590 – 1647) Lady Mary Feilding as Countess of Arran, later Marchioness of Hamilton (1613 – 1638) Oil on panel: 45 x 30 ½ in. (115 x 78 cm.) 1620

130


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118. Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger (c.1561/2 – 1636) Elizabeth Vernon, Countess of Southampton (1572 – 1655) Oil on canvas: 79 x 51 in. (200 x 129 cm.) 1622

131


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THE WEISS GALLERY

119. Anglo-Flemish School, 1613 Nicholas Lanier (1588 – 1666) with The Liberation of St. Peter by Hendrik van Steenwyck the Younger (c.1580 – 1649) Oil on panel transferred to canvas 35 5⁄8 x 28 3⁄8 in. (90.5 x 72 cm.) 1613

132


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120. Daniel Mytens (c.1590 – 1647) Charles I of England as Prince of Wales (1600 – 1649) Oil on canvas: 27 ½ x 25 ¾ in. (70 x 60 cm.) 1624

133


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THE WEISS GALLERY

121. Paul van Somer (1576 – 1621) A lady and her daughter holding a bunch of cherries Oil on canvas: 43 ½ x 37 in. (110.5 x 94 cm.) c.1620

134


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"... the earliest depiction in English art of a tennis racket and ball"

122. Paul van Somer (1576 – 1621) Frances, Lady Willoughby with her son Lord Francis, 5th Lord Willoughby of Parham, Suffolk (1614 – 1666) Oil on canvas: 43 ½ x 37 in. (110.5 x 94 cm.) c.1618 – 1620

135


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THE WEISS GALLERY

“... these are two of Johnson’s earliest works, dated 1619, the year he likely finished his apprenticeship”

123. Cornelius Johnson (1593 – 1661) Sir Thomas Boothby Oil on panel: 45 x 33 ½ in. (109.2 x 85 cm.) 1619

136

124. Cornelius Johnson (1593 – 1661) Anne Grafton, wife of Sir Thomas Boothby Oil on panel: 45 x 33 ½ in. (109.2 x 85 cm.) 1619


THE WEISS GALLERY

25

years

“...

Lord Coventry was Johnson’s most faithful patron, and these two portraits are part of a series of four for which he sat over a ten year period”

125. Cornelius Johnson (1593 – 1661) Thomas, 1st Baron Coventry, Lord Keeper of the Great Seal (1578 – 1640) Oil on canvas: 46 ¾ x 38 ½ in. (118.8 x 97.8 cm.) 1627

126. Cornelius Johnson (1593 – 1661) Thomas Coventry, later 1st Baron Coventry, Lord Keeper of the Great Seal (1578 – 1640) Oil on canvas: 50 x 40 in. (127 x 101.7 cm.) 1623 137


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THE WEISS GALLERY

127. Cornelius Johnson (1593 – 1661) William Lenthall, Speaker of The House of Commons (1591 – 1662) Oil on panel: 26 ½ x 20 in. (67 x 51 cm.) 1620

138

128. Cornelius Johnson (1593 – 1661) Sir Robert Heath, Attorney-General (1575 – 1649) Oil on panel: 31 x 24 ¼ in. (78.8 x 62.2 cm.) 1630


THE WEISS GALLERY

129. Cornelius Johnson (1593 – 1661) Peter Courthope of Goddards Green, Sussex (1577 – 1657) Oil on panel: 30 1⁄8 x 24 in. (76.5 x 61 cm.) 1631

25

years

130. Cornelius Johnson (1593 – 1661) Judith, Countess of Dover (1590 – 1629) Oil on panel: 30 x 25 in. (76 x 63.5 cm.) 1628

139


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THE WEISS GALLERY

131. Cornelius Johnson (1593 – 1661) An unknown gentleman Oil on canvas: 30 x 24 in. (76 x 61 cm.) 1632 The Huntington Art Collections, San Marino, California

140


THE WEISS GALLERY

25

years

132. Cornelius Johnson (1593 – 1661) An unknown Cavalier Oil on copper: 12 5⁄8 x 9 3⁄8 in. (32 x 24 cm.) c.1620s

141


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THE WEISS GALLERY

133. Circle of Gilbert Jackson (fl.c.1621 – 1640) A gentleman of the Vaughans of Crosswood Oil on canvas: 76 x 47 in. (193 x 119.5 cm.) 1630

142


THE WEISS GALLERY

25

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134. Circle of Gilbert Jackson (fl.c.1621 – 1640) A lady of the Vaughans of Crosswood Oil on canvas: 76 x 47 ins. (193 x 119.5 cm.) 1630

143


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THE WEISS GALLERY

135. Circle of Gilbert Jackson (fl.c.1621 – 1640) Florence Poulett, daughter of John, 1st Lord Poulett (c.1585 – 1649), and her husband Thomas Smyth (b.1609), of Ashton Court, Somerset Oil on canvas: 79 x 64 in. (197 x 160 cm) c.1630

144


THE WEISS GALLERY

25

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136 Circle of Gilbert Jackson (fl.c.1621 – 1640) A young girl thought to be Florence Smyth (b.1634), daughter of Thomas and Florence Smyth of Ashton Court, Somerset, with her black page

Oil on canvas: 33 x 26 in. (84 x 66 cm.) c.1640 Bristol City Museum and Art Gallery

145


25

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146

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THE WEISS GALLERY

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159


25

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160

THE WEISS GALLERY


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years

137. Franco-Flemish School, 1630 Charles II, as Prince of Wales (1630 – 1685) Oil on canvas: 47 x 35 ¾ in. (119 x 91 cm.) 1630 National Portrait Gallery, London

147


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THE WEISS GALLERY

138. Cornelius Johnson (1593 – 1661) Charles II, as Prince of Wales Oil on copper: 10 x 8 ¼ in. (25.5 x 21 cm.) c.1632

148


THE WEISS GALLERY

25

years

139. John Weesop (fl.1640 – c.1655) Esmé Stuart, 2nd Duke of Richmond and Lennox (1649 – 1660) Oil on canvas: 50 x 43 ¾ in. (127 x 111.5 cm.) c.1652 The Rienzi Collection, The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston

149


25

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THE WEISS GALLERY

140. Thomas Wyck (1616 – 1677) Oliver Cromwell, The Lord Protector (1599 - 1658) Oil on canvas: 35 ¼ x 29 ¼ in. (90 x 74 cm.) 1655 – 1658

150


THE WEISS GALLERY

25

years

141. John Weesop (fl. 1640s – c.1655), after Sir Anthony van Dyck Charles I (1600 - 1649) Oil on canvas: 37 3⁄8 x 33 1⁄2 in. (95.1 x 84.9 cm.) after c.1637

151


25

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THE WEISS GALLERY

142. William Dobson (1611 – 1646) William Ashburnham (1623 – 1655) Oil on canvas: 34 x 25 in. (86 x 63.5 cm.) c.1642 – 1644

152


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25

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143. John Weesop (fl.1640 – c.1655) Marmaduke d’Arcy (1615 – 1687) Oil on canvas: 29 1⁄4 x 23 1⁄2 in. (74.2 x 59.6 cm.) c.1645 – 1648 The Huntington Art Collections, San Marino, California

153


25

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THE WEISS GALLERY

144. Sir Peter Lely (1618 – 1680) Samuel Crew (d.1660) Oil on canvas: 30 x 25 in. (76.2 x 63.5 cm.) c.1648 – 1652

154


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155


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156

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145. Gilbert Soest (1600 – 1681) A gentleman, thought to be Sir Thomas Tipping (1615 - 1693) Oil on canvas: 45 ¼ x 37 in. (94 x 115 cm.) c.1660 Tate Britain, London

157


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THE WEISS GALLERY

146. John Michael Wright (1617 – 1694) Sir Edward Turnour of Great Hallingbury, Essex (1643 – 1721) Oil on canvas: 49 x 39 in. (124.5 x 99 cm.) 1672

158


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25

years

147. John Michael Wright (1617 – 1694) A lady, thought to be Lady Wilbraham, later Lady Myddleton (1653 – 1675) Oil on canvas: 49 ½ x 40 ¼ in. (125.5 x 102.5 cm.) c.1670 – 1675 161


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THE WEISS GALLERY

148. William Wissing (c.1656 – 1687) and John Vandervaart (c.1653 – 1727) Lady Frances (b.1674) and Lady Catherine Jones (b.1674) Oil on canvas: 82 x 53 ins. (208.3 x 134.6 cm.) c.1687

162


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25

years

149. James Maubert (1666 – 1746) The Family of Edward Bathurst of Finchcocks, Kent (1680 – 1772) Oil on canvas: 94 x 121 in. (239 x 308 cm.) c.1715

163


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164

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150. Nicolas de Largillière (1656 – 1746) Jacques Roettiers de la Tour (1707 – 1784) Oil on canvas: 32 x 25 ¼ in. (81.2 x 64.1 cm.) c.1730 The Huntington Art Collections, San Marino, California

165


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THE WEISS GALLERY

151. Philippe de Champaigne (1602 – 1674) Jean de Thévenot (1633 – 1667) Oil on canvas: 23 ½ x 17 in. (59.5 x 43 cm.) c.1660 – 1663 The Huntington Art Collections, San Marino, California

166


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“...

with a virtually unbroken provenance, this painting once hung at 10 Downing Street, in the dressing room of Sir Robert Walpole’s wife” 152. Antoine Watteau (1684 – 1721) Le rêve de l’artiste Oil on canvas: 25 1⁄8 x 31 5⁄8 in. (63.8 x 80.6 cm.) c.1710

167


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THE WEISS GALLERY

153. Johann Georg von Hamilton (1672 – 1737) Prince Adam Franz zu Schwarzenberg (1680 – 1732) on a Lipizzaner, performing a capriole Oil on canvas: 102 3⁄8 x 106 ¼ in. (260 x 272 cm.) c.1705 – 1715 168


25

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THE WEISS GALLERY

ARTISTS’ INDEX

170

Anglo-Flemish School, 1613 – 119

English School, c.1600 – 98

Bettes II, John – 85, 86

English School, c.1600 – 1603 – 99

Camerarius, Adam – 62

English School, c.1604 – 106

de Champaigne, Philippe – 151

English School, c.1605 – 1610 – 110

Claeissins, Anthonius – 14

English School, 1612 – 107

Claesz., Jan – 61

English School, 1614 – 104

Clouet, François – 5, 6

English School, c.1618 – 100

Clouet, Jean – 3

Flemish School, c.1605 – 1610 – 16

de Critz, John – 96, 101

Flemish School, c.1619 – 31, 32

Cuyp, Jacob Gerritsz. – 63

Francken the Elder, Hieronymus – 15

Dobson, William – 142

Franco-Flemish School, 1630 – 137

van der Doort, Jacob – 29

de Geest, Wybrand – 47, 48

van Dyck, Sir Anthony – 49, 50, 51, 52

Gheeraerts the Younger, Marcus – 91, 92, 94, 102, 111, 118

English School, c.1557 – 69

Geldorp, Gortzius – 20, 21

English School, c.1588 – 75

Gower, George – 76, 80

English School, c.1589 – 1590 – 84

van Haarlem, Cornelis Cornelisz. – 45, 46

English School, c.1590 – 74

Hals, Frans – 53

English School, c.1590 – 1595 – 78

von Hamilton, Johann Georg – 153

English School, c.1593 – 1595 – 90

van Herwijck, Steven Cornelisz. – 72, 73

English School, c.1596 – 93

Holbein the Younger, Hans – 64, 65, 66, 67

English School, 1598 – 97

Isaacsz., Pieter Fransz. – 28, 30


THE WEISS GALLERY

25

years

ARTISTS’ INDEX

Jackson, Gilbert – 133, 134, 135, 136

Pourbus the Younger, Frans – 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27

Johnson, Cornelius – 123 ~ 132, 138

Pourbus, Pieter Jansz. – 11, 12, 13

Ketel, Cornelius – 79

van Ravesteyn, Jan Anthonisz. – 41, 42, 43, 44

Key, Adriaen Thomasz. – 18

Rota, Martino – 17

de Largillière, Nicolas – 150

Santvoort, Dirck Dircksz. – 59

Larkin, William – 112, 113, 114, 115, 116

van Scorel, Jan – 2, 3

Lely, Sir Peter – 144

Scrots, William – 68

van der Linde, Adriaen – 60

Segar, Sir William – 81, 82

de Lyon, Corneille – 7, 8, 9

Soest, Gilbert – 145

Master of the Countess of Warwick, The – 70, 71

van Somer, Paul – 121, 122

Master of the Informal Court Half-Lengths, The – 38

van Teylingen, Jan – 57

Maubert, James – 149

Tournier, Nicolas – 55

van der Merck, Jacob Fransz. – 58

Vandervaart, John – 148

van Miereveld, Michiel Jansz. – 35, 36, 39, 40

Vanson, Adrian – 77

Monogrammist G.E.C, The – 10

van Veen, Otto – 34, 56

Mytens, Daniel – 117, 120

Verelst, Pieter Hermansz. – 54

Pantoja de la Cruz, Juan – 33

Watteau, Antoine – 152

Patinir, Joachim – 1

Weesop, John – 139, 141, 143

Peake, Robert – 83, 87, 89, 95, 103, 105, 108, 109

Wissing, William – 148

Pickenoy, Nicolaes Eliasz. – 37

Wright, John Michael – 146, 147

Pietersz., Pieter – 19

Wyck, Thomas – 140

171


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