Page 1

Book and Lyrics by

Howard Ashman

Music by

Alan Menken

Directed by

Bill Fennelly

BY

DIRECTED BY


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LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS

A LETTER FROM THE ARTISTIC DIRECTOR

What’s up with the monsters and aliens? Has that ever crossed your mind? I don’t know if you’re watching Stranger Things on Netflix these days (I highly recommend it), but it takes me back, both to my youth (it’s set in 1983) and to my long fascination with creatures from other worlds. Aliens, Poltergeist, Close Encounters: these were the seminal ‘creature’ movies from my early days, but images of invaders from other realms have been with us as long as we’ve had the capacity to be frightened.

Is it the sense that there could be another dimension where malicious forces lurk? A subtle clairvoyance on our part? An aspect of our psyche we haven’t fully integrated into waking life? YOU DECIDE. What’s lucky for us is that Howard Ashman and Alan Menken were both fascinated and amused by the genre of entertainment that traffics in our fears. In Roger Corman’s 1960 cult classic The Little Shop of Horrors, they found their source material and began imagining the piece as a musical. The songs were catchy, the tone both innocent and malevolent, with just a hint of repressed sexuality. And inside the silliness was the core of a good, old-fashioned monster story. Would the humans defeat the forces they couldn’t explain? Or would the forces bring destruction upon all around them? In a moment as complex, confusing and fraught as the one we are currently living through what better way to launch the season, than with the hilarious, infectious story that is Little Shop?

HOLD THESE TRUTHS February 19, 1942 President Franklin D. Roosevelt issues Executive Order 9066, authorizing the imprisonment of thousands of Americans of Japanese ancestry. In the panic that accompanied America’s entry into World War II, Japanese families up and down the West Coast — and in other parts of the country — were rounded up, transported to camps, and held indefinitely. Gordon Hirabayashi was a student at the University of Washington at the time, and he refused to go. He couldn’t imagine that he or his family posed a threat to the welfare of the country, and became one of the Japanese Americans who took their defiance of the expulsion all the way to the Supreme Court.

His story is one of immense courage and moral conviction, as stirring as it is infuriating. And sadly, the chill that runs through the air when you hear his tale has only become more bracing in the light of this year’s political discourse. Listen, ruminate, digest, discuss.

Thank you for joining us for the opening of our 2016–2017 season! — Chris Coleman

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ARTISTIC DIRECTOR | CHRIS COLEMAN

SEPTEMBER 10 – OCTOBER 16, 2016 ON THE U.S. BANK MAIN STAGE

PRESENTS

LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS Book and Lyrics by Howard Ashman

Based on the film by Roger Corman

Music by Alan Menken

Screenplay by Charles Griffith

Directed by Bill Fennelly Music Supervisor Rick Lewis

Choreographer Kent Zimmerman

Scenic Designer Michael Schweikardt

Costume Designer Kathleen Geldard

Lighting Designer William C. Kirkham

Sound Designer Casi Pacilio

Original Vocal Arrangements Robert Billig

Original Orchestrations Robert Merkin

Fight Director John Armour

Stage Manager Mark Tynan*

Dance Captain Johari Nandi Mackey*

Assistant Stage Manager Janine Vanderhoff*

Production Assistants Bailey Anne Maxwell Stephen Kriz Gardner

New York Casting Harriet Bass

Local Casting Brandon Woolley

Co-produced with Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park, Blake Robison, Artistic Director, and Buzz Ward, Managing Director. Originally produced by the WPA Theatre (Kyle Renick, Producing Director). Originally produced at the Orpheum Theatre, New York City, by the WPA Theatre, David Geffen, Cameron Mackintosh and the Shubert Organization. Little Shop of Horrors was originally directed by Howard Ashman with musical staging by Edie Cowan. Little Shop of Horrors is presented through special arrangement with Music Theatre International (MTI). All authorized performance materials are also supplied by MTI. MTIShows.com

PERFORMED WITH ONE INTERMISSION. The videotaping or other photo or audio recording of this production is strictly prohibited. *Member of Actors’ Equity Association, the Union of Professional Actors and Stage Managers in the United States.

SEASON SUPERSTARS

SUPPORTING SEASON SPONSORS

SHOW SPONSORS The Mark and Ann Edlen Family KPFF/Glumac Christine and David Vernier

Portland Center Stage receives support from the Oregon Arts Commission, a state agency funded by the State of Oregon and the National Endowment for the Arts.

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THE ARMORY • LIT TLE SHOP OF HORRORS


FROM THE DIRECTOR BILL FENNELLY As a kid growing up in Wethersfield, Connecticut, in the early 1980s, I loved watching Channel 5, out of New York City. Channel 5 was the best, not because they had great afternoon cartoons, but because they would broadcast my favorite thing in the world at that time: commercials for all of the Broadway musicals. I was thrilled by the electricity of Dreamgirls, dazzled by the golden costumes and high kicking of A Chorus Line, captivated by the passion and grandeur of Patti LuPone in Evita, mesmerized by the electronic music and giant flying tire in Cats, and I wanted to live in a magical allsinging, all-dancing hotel called The Milford Plaza. But in the midst of all of the televised glitz and glitter there was one commercial that was unlike all the others. This commercial was dark, sexy and unsettling: a horror-movievoiced narrator, underscored by scary organ music, introduced a beautiful bleached-blonde starlet with a black eye who warned: “You don’t meet nice boys on Skid Row.” There was thunder and lightning, a shadowy figure of a man carrying a beautiful woman to her death, and a sinister plant vine that suddenly reached out from nowhere to pull another man into a dark room. But the strangest and most interesting detail of all was that the commercial guaranteed audiences this musical was ... a COMEDY?!?!? Yes. This commercial was not only my introduction to Little Shop of Horrors, it was my first memory of being introduced to the allegorical power of theatrical satire. Little Shop of Horrors did not begin its life as a musical. In 1960, a trailblazing independent filmmaker named Roger Corman created a darkly comic sci-fi horror movie. The film had a budget of $30,000 and Corman shot it over the course of two days. This genre-blending film told the story of a bloodthirsty plant who preyed upon the weakness and greed of a seemingly good man. It gained a cult following and earned the status of a B-Movie classic. Corman’s film became the inspiration for the 1982 smash Off-Broadway musical by Howard Ashman and Alan Menken. The musical version of Little Shop of Horrors blends non-traditional character types, Motown rhythms, traditional musical comedy songs, and some ingeniously designed puppetry to create a hilarious and spine-tingling critique of the American Dream.

THE CAST

(IN ORDER OF APPEARANCE)

Chiffon

Johari Nandi Mackey*

Crystal

Alexis Tidwell*

Ronnette

Ebony Blake*

Mushnik

David Meyers*

Audrey

Gina Milo*

Seymour

Nick Cearley*

Orin

Jamison Stern*

The Voice of Audrey II/Wino 1 Chaz Rose*

Audrey II Manipulation

Stephen Kriz Gardner

MUSICIANS

The true theatrical roots of Little Shop of Horrors are thrillingly and smartly ancient. Complete with a girl-group spin on a Greek Chorus, Little Shop of Horrors is really a morality play for a modern audience. The story weaves together thematic threads of a subverted Hero’s Journey with elements of traditional Faustian legend; a man who sells his soul to the devil to gain power, wealth and love. Roger Corman, Howard Ashman and Alan Menken have all contributed to the creation of an enduring story that delightfully employs the timeless tools of humor, horror and satire to hold up a mirror to all of us.

Conductor/Piano

Little Shop of Horrors accomplishes what every great piece of theater seeks to do; it asks us to consider our essential human nature. It asks us who we really are, what we really value, and what we are really willing to do in order to get ahead in this world. And in our current American political moment, Little Shop of Horrors provides us the unique opportunity to consider these big questions — while having a rip-roaring good time!

Drums

Jeffrey Childs

Keyboards Tim Ribner

Bass

Will Amend Mitch Wilson

Guitar

Eric Toner *Member of Actors’ Equity Association, the Union of Professional Actors and Stage Managers in the United States.

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SONG LIST ACT I PROLOGUE (LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS)

Chiffon, Crystal, Ronnette

SKID ROW (DOWNTOWN)

Company

DA-DOO

Seymour, Chiffon, Crystal, Ronnette GROW FOR ME

Seymour

YOU NEVER KNOW

Mushnik, Seymour, Chiffon, Crystal, Ronnette SOMEWHERE THAT’S GREEN

Audrey

CLOSED FOR RENOVATION

Seymour, Audrey, Mushnik BE A DENTIST

Orin, Chiffon, Crystal, Ronnette MUSHNIK & SON

Mushnik, Seymour GIT IT

Seymour, Audrey II, Chiffon, Crystal, Ronnette NOW (IT’S JUST THE GAS)

Orin, Seymour

ACT II CALL BACK IN THE MORNING

Seymour, Audrey

SUDDENLY, SEYMOUR

Seymour, Audrey, Chiffon, Crystal, Ronnette SUPPERTIME

Audrey II, Seymour, Chiffon, Crystal, Ronnette THE MEEK SHALL INHERIT

Company

SOMINEX/ SUPPERTIME (REPRISE)

Audrey, Audrey II

SOMEWHERE THAT’S GREEN (REPRISE)

Audrey

FINALE (DON’T FEED THE PLANTS)

Company

LITTLE LITTLESHOP SHOPOF OFHORRORS HORRORS| |CAST CAST EBONY BLAKE Ronnette

Ebony, making her debut at The Armory, is a native of Dayton, Ohio, and a proud graduate of Wright State University. Some of her favorite credits include: The Book of Mormon (First National Tour), Nefertiti: A Musical Romance (starring role with Deeply Rooted Dance Theater), Black Nativity (The Classical Theatre of Harlem), Aida (National Tour, Aida u/s), The Colored Museum and For Colored Girls (dir. Stanley Wayne Mathis), Jitney (The Human Race Theatre Company), Hairspray (Music Theatre Wichita), The Piano Lesson (dir. Sheila Ramsey) and Ragtime (dir. Greg Hellems). Ebony has also had the pleasure of traveling the world while working for Disney Cruise Lines and Universal Studios Japan. She loves her family, friends and James. Isaiah 40:4. Follow Ebony on Instagram: @eb1933. NICK CEARLEY Seymour

Nick Cearley is one half of the critically acclaimed “undie”-rock comedy duo known as The Skivvies (theskivviesnyc.com), co-created with Lauren Molina. Most recently, he completed five regional premieres of the one person play Buyer & Cellar. Off-Broadway: Puck in A Midsummer Night’s Dream; Pageant: The Musical (Original Cast Album on Jay Records, Drama Desk nomination); and Sex Tips for Straight Women from a Gay Man. Broadway/First National Tour: All Shook Up. Regional highlights: Twelfth Night (dir. Scott Schwartz), Next to Normal, The Great American Trailer Park Musical, The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee, Plaid Tidings (dir. Gordon Greenberg) and The Rocky Horror Show (dir. Hunter Foster); Williamstown Theatre Festival, Bay Street Theatre, Huntington Theatre Company, American Stage Theatre Company, TheatreWorks, New York Stage and Film, City Theatre, Eugene O Neill Center, Berkshire Theatre Group, Ensemble Theatre of Cincinnati, Rubicon Theatre Company, Bucks County Playhouse. TV pilots for Fox, WE and A&E. The Armory debut! Follow Nick on Instagram/Twitter: @clearlycearley @theskivviesnyc.

DAVID MEYERS Mushnik

David Meyers has performed extensively on stage and in TV, film and radio. He has been a company member of many regional theaters, including La Jolla Playhouse — where he worked with James LaPine and William Finn in the world premiere for the original musical adaptation of Little Miss Sunshine, playing Grandpa. David was also honored to be invited, by the creators of Urinetown, to help develop and play Jan the Elder in their original companion piece, Yeast Nation. At San Diego Repertory Theatre, he recently originated the role of Jack Jardin in Matthew Spangler’s adaptation of the T.C. Boyle novel, Tortilla Curtain. David was honored to receive a 2014 Drammy Award for Best Supporting Actor in a Musical for The Light in the Piazza at Portland Playhouse. David makes his home in Portland, with his lovely wife, Bonita, and Baxter the Boxer. GINA MILO Audrey

Gina Milo is thrilled to be making her debut at The Armory. Broadway/ National Tours: Les Miserables (Eponine), Annie, Best Little Whorehouse in Texas. Regional: The Producers (Ulla, Encore Award), A Christmas Story (Mother), Plaza Suite (Muriel, Encore Award) and Hairspray (Penny) at Engeman Theater; White Christmas (Betty), Xanadu (Kira) and Spamalot (Lady of the Lake, JEFF nomination) at Drury Lane Theatre; Annie (Lily St. Regis) at Pioneer Theatre Company; Enter Laughing (Miss B) at Bay Street Theater and Mark Taper Forum; Civil War (Sarah) at Flat Rock Playhouse; Marvelous Wonderettes (Suzy), Das Barbecu (Brunhilde) and Lucky Stiff (Annabelle) at Mason Street Warehouse; Little Shop of Horrors (Audrey) at Casa Mañana and NC Theatre. Special thanks to Carol, my incredible mom-in-law, for being willing to travel 3,000 miles to make this possible, my wonderful husband, Ken, who supports my dreams no matter what, and my beautiful daughter, Olivia, for being the best 2-year-old I could ever ask for.  


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! ! e e r r u u t t l l u u c c i i t t r r OOhh,, HHoo

ager

n, Literary Man

instei by Benjamin Fa e g a e in L l a c ri Little Shop’s Hyste

tidal wave of terror!” shouted the poster for Attack of the Crab People. “Crawling horror rising from the depths of hell!” screamed Attack of the Giant Leeches. “No girl is safe!” warned Night of the Blood Beast. By the time legendary pulp cinema director Roger Corman released The Little Shop of Horrors in 1960, moviegoers had become familiar with such spine-tingling slogans and over-the-top titles. The popularity of the drive-in movie theater peaked in the late ‘50s, and along with it came a rash of films that blended horror, science fiction, and camp sensibilities. Hordes of cinephiles flocked to the parking lot movie palaces, which became stomping grounds for the low-budget “B Movies” that were losing their billing at indoor theaters as double feature programming was phased out. These films tended to chronicle an attempt by an ominous species to extinguish humanity and have been belittled for their hyperbolic acting, outlandish plotlines and cheaply-constructed monsters. But they have also been favorably considered for their frank dramatization of the cultural dread that permeated mid-20th century America. The heart of these films is their exuberant investigation of human fear. Critics have noted the thematic resonance between parasitic creatures like giant leeches and body-snatching seed pods with the social hysteria surrounding communism, McCarthyism, fascist totalitarian rule, xenophobia, and post-war nuclear annihilation. Many of the films, moreover, hearken back to Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, one of sci-fi’s pioneering ancestors, by exploiting the trope of the “mad scientist” whose moral compass spins out of control in his pursuit of progress. Corman’s Little Shop, written by master of the bizarre Charles B. Griffith, winks at the hallmarks of these films and adds a dark sense of humor to

the mix. By incorporating wicked social satire and classic slapstick comedic routines, this seemingly silly story — a dim-witted botanist decides to commit murder to feed his man-eating plant — becomes a nightmarish parable centered on the struggle for upward socioeconomic mobility and the psychic fallout of loneliness. When Howard Ashman and Alan Menken adapted Little Shop into a stage musical in 1982, they remained faithful to their source but pushed the film’s gestures to the extreme. In songs like “Skid Row” and “Somewhere That’s Green,” the financial desperation and existential stasis trapping Seymour and Audrey is brought to the fore. The addition of ‘60s girl group singers Crystal, Ronnette and Chiffon pulls the audience directly into the play. The three women function as Greek Chorus-like narrators, and their musical style brings the show’s contrasting tones of gruesome horror and comic vitality into sharp focus, subtly mirroring the racially divided decade in which the play is set. The musical’s most striking departure from Corman’s film is the alteration to the ending, which has sparked controversy since its premiere and was ultimately rewritten for the star-studded 1986 film adaptation. Beneath the vintage charm and toothsome throwbacks to a bygone era, Little Shop of Horrors conjures an atmosphere of unease. The creators train their visionary eye on humankind’s insatiable appetite for power and control, while skewering our willingness to rationalize our wrongdoings and eschew responsibility for our actions. Ashman and Menken — and Corman and Griffith before them — may have been sending up a culture of trepidation now sixty years old, but their razorjawed observations on social anxiety snap just as tightly today.

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LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS | CASTS & MUSICIANS JOHARI NANDI MACKEY Chiffon/Dance Captain

Johari Nandi Mackey is delighted to be making her debut at The Armory. A recent Carnegie Mellon graduate, originally from the south side of Chicago, Johari has always been outgoing and theatrical. She started her musical theater career at Thornwood High School with a production of Little Shop of Horrors, so this show holds a dear place in her heart. She is very excited to relive those moments with a new team for the amazing Portland Center Stage at The Armory. Her recent credits include Les Misérables at The Muny and Gertrude Stein Saints at Abrons Arts Center. Johari wants to thank her mother, Veronica Jackson, and father, Reginald Mackey, as well as her entire family for their constant support and love. CHAZ ROSE The Voice of Audrey II/ Wino 1

Chaz Rose is thrilled to be making his debut at The Armory. Off-Broadway: Black Angels Over Tuskegee and She Like Girls (GLAAD Award winner). Film: Writer’s Block starring Bryan Cranston. Regional/Touring: Ragtime (Coalhouse Walker Jr.), Full Monty (Horse), Court-Martial at Ft. Devens (Philadelphia Fringe Festival), Prom (New Paradise Laboratories), Our Town (Arden Theatre). He is a graduate of The University of the Arts in Philadelphia and a proud member of Actors’ Equity. He has directed and produced over 20 childrens shows, as well as toured and performed for over 100,000 young audiences throughout the United States for various theater companies. He is thankful for the opportunity to work with such a talented cast and crew, as well as the never-ending support he receives from his loving fiancé, family and friends.  JAMISON STERN Orin 

The Armory debut. Broadway/National Tours: By Jeeves (Bingo Little), How the Grinch Stole Christmas (Palm Springs Who), Little Shop of Horrors (Seymour/Orin), Disney’s Beauty and the Beast (Lumiere). Regional: Baker in Into the Woods (NC Theatre);

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THE ARMORY • LIT TLE SHOP OF HORRORS

Zaza in La Cage Aux Folles (Goodspeed Musicals); Arnold in Torch Song Trilogy (The Human Race Theatre Company); Frederic in Young Frankenstein (Fulton Theatre); Fully Committed (Alley Theatre and La Mirada Theatre); The Compleat Wrks of Wllm Shkspr (abridged) (Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park); Sweet Charity (Lyric Theatre of Oklahoma), [title of show] (Theatreworks); Chapter Two and The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee (Theatre Aspen); She Loves Me (Rubicon Theatre Company); Black Comedy, The Invention of Love, As Bees in Honey Drown, Flea In Her Ear, A Comedy of Errors (Alley Theatre). Film/ TV: Mr. Tweed in Annabelle Hooper and the Ghosts of Nantucket, My Bakery in Brooklyn, Day Zero, The Finger Lakes, Law & Order, The Entrepreneurs. Follow Jamison on Instagram/Twitter: @jamisonstern. ALEXIS TIDWELL Crystal

Alexis Tidwell holds a master’s degree in choral music education from the University of Tennessee. She is originally from Memphis, TN, but currently resides in New York, NY. Some of her favorite credits are The Wiz, in which she starred as Dorothy; Ain’t Misbehavin’, in which she performed the Charlaine track; and a host of shows for the Norwegian Cruise Line (Norwegian Dawn), where she was a production cast principal. Further accomplishments include singing in Carnegie Hall with the UT Choral Department; performing her original solo cabaret at Feinstein’s/54 Below; singing backup for Michael Bublé; and performing for Dr. Ben Carson and Hill Harper. Alexis wants to thank God for the opportunity to make her debut at The Armory, her fiancé and family for their continued support, and the wonderful guidance of Rochelle Shulman and RKS Management, LTD. alexistidwell.com WILL AMEND Bass

Will is very excited to be back at The Armory for Little Shop of Horrors, where he was previously in the pit for Ain’t Misbehavin’, Cabaret, West Side Story and The Fantasticks. Other Portland credits include Les Misérables at Broadway Rose Theatre Company, Mars on Life at Artists

Repertory Theatre and The Full Monty at Pixie Dust. He has toured the United States and Britain as a member of eight different bands from the Portland area and beyond. He teaches upright and electric bass, and cello. JEFFREY CHILDS Conductor/Piano

Originally from Chico, CA, Jeffrey has been the staff accompanist at CSU, Chico, as well as the cofounder of Theater, ETC, a musical theater program for children. He has helped to develop shows with the Broadway Junior program at Music Theatre International in New York. He served as assistant music director for Dreamgirls, Fiddler on the Roof and Sweeney Todd at The Armory. Some favorite shows he’s music directed in Portland are The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee, A Taffeta Christmas, Oklahoma! and The World Goes Round (PAMTA, Drammy) at Broadway Rose Theatre Company. Other credits include: A Year with Frog and Toad and James and the Giant Peach at Oregon Children’s Theatre, and Violet at Staged!. Jeffrey teaches classes and camps at Oregon Children’s Theatre and Spotlight Musical Theatre Academy.

TIM RIBNER Keyboards

Tim Ribner played keyboard for the 2014 production of Dreamgirls at The Armory. He has taught and performed with PHAME Academy and Northwest Children’s Theater in Portland. He has also been involved with musical productions at Westminster Choir College, Princeton University, Columbia University and Harlem School for the Arts. He obtained a B.F.A. in Jazz Performance from New School University and enjoys being surrounded by plants.

ERIC TONER Guitar

Having thirty years with his hands at the acoustic, electric and classical guitars, Eric plays a broad cross section of music genres. In his early twenties, he toured nationally for two years in several groups, recording three albums. Also a singer and sound engineer, he spends his time writing, arranging, recording, sound designing, mixing and producing, but his big passion is live performance. These days you will usually find him


LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS | MUSICIANS & CREATIVE TEAM performing in musical theater orchestras in the greater Portland region. Favorite shows include Dreamgirls, Fiddler on the Roof, Next to Normal, Hairspray, Annie, The Kiss and The Devil vs Matthew McConaughey. MITCH WILSON Drums

Though born and raised in Portland, Mitch Wilson has had the opportunity to perform across the country and around the world. He traveled to Taiwan to perform in their tremendous New Year celebration, Festival of Lights. In 2010, Mitch received a B.F.A. from The New School for Jazz and Contemporary Music in New York. While there, he toured with rock band The Pretty Reckless, featuring Taylor Momsen. He also gained a unique insight into the contemporary music industry by working at the prestigious Virgin Records/EMI. Past musicals include: The Armory (One Night with Janis Joplin); Northwest Children’s Theater (Grease, Annie); Artists Repertory Theatre (Footloose); and Broadway Rose Theatre Company (Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat). 

HOWARD ASHMAN Book and Lyrics

Best known as a pivotal creative mind behind the renaissance of Disney animation and his work on The Little Mermaid, Aladdin and Beauty and the Beast (which is dedicated to “Our friend, Howard Ashman, who gave a Mermaid her voice and a Beast his soul”), Ashman’s first love was theater. Ashman was a founder of off-off Broadway’s renowned WPA Theatre, where he conceived, wrote and directed God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater, as well as the classic musical Little Shop of Horrors (both with music by Alan Menken). In 1986, he wrote and directed the Broadway musical Smile (music by Marvin Hamlisch). Lamented as a lost treasure of the 1980s theater scene, Smile remains popular on high school and college campuses throughout the country. Howard Ashman died in 1991 from complications of AIDS. howardashman.com

ALAN MENKEN Music

Alan Menken’s music and lyrics have become an integral part of the fabric of our lives since his first works were produced nearly 40 years ago. His stage musicals include Little Shop of Horrors, God Bless You Mr. Rosewater, Atina: Evil Queen of the Galaxy, Real Life Funnies, Kicks, The Dream on Royal Street, Beauty and the Beast, A Christmas Carol, Weird Romance, King David, The Little Mermaid, Sister Act, Leap of Faith, Newsies, Aladdin, The Hunchback of Notre Dame and The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz. Song and score credits for film musicals include The Little Mermaid, Beauty and the Beast, Newsies, Aladdin, Pocahontas, The Hunchback of Notre Dame, Hercules, The Shaggy Dog, Home on the Range, Enchanted, Tangled and Mirror Mirror. Song credits for film include Rocky V/“The Measure of a Man”; Home Alone 2: Lost in New York/“My Christmas Tree”; Life With Mikey/“Cold Enough to Snow”; Noel/“Winter Light”; and Captain America: First Avenger/“Star Spangled Man.” Songs for television include Sesame Street, the ABC miniseries Lincoln, a musical episode of The Neighbors and the ABC series Galavant. His chart topping songs have included “Beauty and the Beast,” “A Whole New World,” “Colors of the Wind” and “Go the Distance.” He recently won Tony and Drama Desk awards for Newsies. He has won more Academy Awards than any other living individual (including four for Best Score and four for Best Song); 11 Grammy Awards (including Song of the Year for “A Whole New World”); seven Golden Globes; the London’s Evening Standard Award; an Olivier Award; and an Outer Critics Circle Award. Other notable achievements include induction into the Songwriters Hall of Fame and Billboard’s Number One Single (“A Whole New World”) and Number One Album (Pocahontas). In 2001, he was named a Disney Legend. He has doctorates in Fine Arts from New York University and North Carolina School of the Arts. In 2010, he received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Alan’s upcoming works include a

stage production of A Bronx Tale, a New York City Center’s Encores! production of God Bless You Mr. Rosewater, a liveaction film adaptation of Beauty and the Beast, the Sony animated movie Sausage Party, and a film musical project for Universal Pictures. BILL FENNELLY Director

Bill Fennelly is thrilled to return to Portland Center Stage at The Armory where he directed Gypsy and Black Pearl Sings!. Recent projects include The Underpants at Guild Hall in East Hampton, Hairspray and A Midsummer Night’s Dream at Syracuse Stage (S.A.L.T. Awards for Director of the Year and Production of the Year for both productions), Herringbone (Barrymore Award nomination, Best Director of a Musical), and the world premiere of Fly By Night at Dallas Theatre Center and TheatreWorks in Palo Alto (Dallas Column Award for Best Director of a Musical; Bay Area Critics Award nomination for Outstanding Director of a Musical). Bill’s work has been seen on Broadway, Off-Broadway and regionally, including: original assistant director for Jersey Boys; resident director for The Lion King; staff director at New York City Opera; Phil Killian Directing Fellow at Oregon Shakespeare Festival; associate producing artistic director of The Acting Company; and assistant artistic director for Cirque du Soleil. Bill earned his M.F.A. in Directing from U.C.S.D. and is an associate professor of theatre at Drexel University.

RICK LEWIS Music Supervisor

Portland Center Stage at The Armory: Drammy Awards for Ain’t Misbehavin’, Sweeney Todd, Ragtime, Guys and Dolls and West Side Story; Our Town, Dreamgirls, The Last Five Years, Twist Your Dickens, Fiddler on the Roof, Somewhere in Time, Black Pearl Sings!, Oklahoma!, The Huntsmen (JAW), The Imaginary Invalid, Sunset Boulevard, The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee, Grey Gardens, A Christmas Carol (Composer), Cabaret, The Fantasticks

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LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS | CREATIVE TEAM and Bat Boy. He is the creator of the hit Off-Broadway musicals The Taffetas and The Cardigans (New York City Bistro Award for Outstanding Musical Review); musical supervisor for the West Coast regional premiere of Next to Normal (Artists Repertory Theatre); and assistant conductor/vocal director for the preBroadway workshop of Cy Coleman’s The Life. Rick has written for Disney Live Family Entertainment, American Hawaii Cruises and American Classic Voyages, and developed The Cinnamon Bear Cruise. Rick is a private vocal coach, concentrating on musical theater audition and performance technique. rlewismusic.com KENT ZIMMERMAN Choreographer

Kent returns to The Armory where choreography credits include Ain’t Misbehavin’, Dreamgirls and Fiddler on the Roof. Associate choreographer credits include Ragtime (The Armory); It’s a Bird… It’s a Plane… It’s Superman!, Cabaret and Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat (Dallas Theater Center). Directing credits include Sister Act, Young Frankenstein and La Cage aux Folles. Theater credits include Annie Get Your Gun, Thou Shalt Not (Broadway); Show Boat (London); The Producers, Guys and Dolls, Footloose, Show Boat (National Tour); Spamalot, Nice Work If You Can Get It (Ogunquit Playhouse); It’s a Bird… It’s a Plane… It’s Superman!, Cabaret, Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat (Dallas Theater Center); Ragtime, Guys and Dolls, West Side Story, A Christmas Carol (The Armory); Randy Newman’s Faust (The Goodman); A Chorus Line, 42nd Street (Casa Mañana); Smokey Joe’s Cafe (Arts Center of Carolina); and White Christmas (TUTS). Film/TV: The Shawshank Redemption, The Producers and My Favorite Broadway: The Love Songs. Psalms 91:11.

MICHAEL SCHWEIKARDT Scenic Designer

The Armory debut. Selected OffBroadway productions include: The Bus and the American premiere of Frank McGuinness’ Gates of Gold (59E59 Theaters); Bloodsong of Love (Ars Nova); The Black Suits (The Public Theater); and Things to Ruin (Second Stage, The Zipper Factory). Regional Credits include productions at Ford’s Theatre, The Old

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Globe, Cleveland Playhouse, Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park, Asolo Repertory Theatre, Maltz Jupiter Theatre, The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis, Sarasota Opera, The Muny, Papermill Playhouse, and multiple productions for Goodspeed Musicals, including Fiddler on the Roof, The Most Happy Fella, Carousel, Showboat, Annie Get Your Gun, 1776, Big River and Camelot. Tours: James Taylor’s One Man Band, Ella the Musical and Motherhood the Musical. Other productions include Oklahoma!, starring Kelli O’Hara and Will Chase, for the Oklahoma state centennial. Michael recently designed productions of Marie Antoinette and Phantom for EMK International in Seoul, South Korea. msportfolio.com KATHLEEN GELDARD Costume Designer

Recent regional credits: Actors Theatre of Louisville’s Peter and the Starcatcher; Humana Festival (2015 and 2016); Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park’s Mad River Rising; Round House Theatre’s Ironbound; Huntington Theatre Company’s Raisin in the Sun, Invisible Man and Ruined. Other regional credits at Signature Theatre, Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company, La Jolla Playhouse, Berkeley Repertory Theatre, Center Stage, Arena Stage, Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, Studio Theatre, Imagination Stage, Flashpoint Theatre Company, Folger Theatre, Martha’s Vineyard Playhouse, Studio Arena Theater, Children’s Theatre of Charlotte and Liz Lerman Dance Exchange. Awards: 2012 Bay Area Critics Circle nomination for Ruined at Berkeley Repertory Theatre; 2012 IRNE Award nomination for Ruined at Huntington Theatre Company; 2009 Helen Hayes nomination for The Neverending Story at Imagination Stage. WILLIAM C. KIRKHAM Lighting Designer

William C. Kirkham is a recent transplant to Portland from Chicago and is thrilled to be working at The Armory on this production, as well as the upcoming productions of The Oregon Trail and Constellations. Regional credits include American Music Theatre Project, Arizona Broadway Theatre, ArtsWest Playhouse, Chicago Children’s Theatre, Chicago Shakespeare Theater,

Childsplay, Contemporary American Theater Festival, The House Theatre of Chicago, The Hypocrites Theater Chicago, Lookingglass Theatre Company, Phoenix Theatre, Steppenwolf Theatre Company and Utah Shakespeare Festival. Upcoming projects include productions with Alliance Theatre, Arena Stage and South Coast Repertory. William earned his M.F.A. in Stage Design at Northwestern University and is a proud member of USA Local 829. wckirkham.com CASI PACILIO Sound Designer

Casi’s home base is The Armory, where her recent credits include A Streetcar Named Desire, Great Expectations, Ain’t Misbehavin’, Three Days of Rain, Cyrano, The People’s Republic of Portland, Threesome and Dreamgirls (PAMTA Award); Other Desert Cities, Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike, A Small Fire and Chinglish with composer Jana Crenshaw; and ten seasons of JAW. National shows: Holcombe Waller’s Surfacing and Wayfinders; Left Hand of Darkness, My Mind is Like an Open Meadow (Drammy Award, 2011), Something’s Got Ahold Of My Heart and PEP TALK for Hand2Mouth Theatre. Other credits include Squonk Opera’s Bigsmorgasbord-WunderWerk (Broadway, PS122, national and international tours); I Am My Own Wife, I Think I Like Girls (La Jolla Playhouse); Playland, 10 Fingers and Lips Together, Teeth Apart (City Theatre, PA). Film credits include Creation of Destiny, Out of Our Time and A Powerful Thang. Imagineer/maker of the Eat Me Machine, a dessert vending machine.

JOHN ARMOUR Fight Director

John is an actor and fight director who has been choreographing violence for more than 25 years. He is based in Portland, where he choreographs for many local theater companies and teaches throughout the region at colleges, high schools and middle schools. John’s work has been seen regularly on stage at The Armory, Portland Opera, Artists Repertory Theatre, Oregon Children’s Theatre, Miracle Theatre and many others. John’s work has twice been recognized within the Portland theater community for Best Fight Design.


LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS | CREATIVE TEAM MARK TYNAN Stage Manager

Imagine being in a room full of artists, watching the birth of an idea, a movement given purpose, a sentence, phrase, scene, act given life. Then imagine that room translating to the stage with lighting, sound, costumes, scenery and props, then you can imagine what Mark’s job is like. Special thanks to the phenomenal production assistants, Stephen Kriz Gardner, Will Bailey, Kristina Mast, Bailey Anne Maxwell and Kristen Mun, who help keep the vision attainable. Prior to The Armory, Mark toured nationally and internationally with musicals including Dreamgirls, The King and I with Rudolf Nureyev, How to Succeed …, Grand Hotel, The Phantom of the Opera, Rent and Jersey Boys. Other Portland credits include several summers with Broadway Rose Theatre Company in Tigard. Regional credits include Alley Theatre (Houston, TX), La Jolla Playhouse (La Jolla, CA) and Casa Mañana Theatre (Fort Worth, TX).

JANINE VANDERHOFF Assistant Stage Manager

Janine is glad to be back for her second season at The Armory. Previous credits at The Armory include: JAW 2016 (stage manager), Great Expectations (stage manager), Ain’t Misbehavin’ (assistant stage manager) and Our Town (stage manager). Other Portland credits include Portland Opera’s Sweeney Todd (followspot caller); the world premiere of DC Copeland’s Play (stage manager/ production manager); and How to End Poverty in 90 Minutes and The Other Place at Portland Playhouse (stage manager). Touring stage management credits include: The Graduate (starring Morgan Fairchild), Cats, The Vagina Monologues, Jekyll & Hyde and Show Boat. While in New York, Janine had the opportunity to work on The Lion King on Broadway, as well as with many Off-Broadway and regional companies. Production management credits include: The Daily Show with Jon Stewart for “Democalypse 2012 Republican National Convention” (Tampa, FL); Straz Center (Tampa, FL); and The Fox Theatre (Atlanta, GA). Proud NYU graduate and AEA member.

STEPHEN KRIZ GARDNER Audrey II Manipulation/ Production Assistant

As a local production assistant/stage manager, Stephen has been seen (and many times not seen) on stage handing off props or moving scenic pieces, sometimes even in costume, but this will be Stephen’s first production where he takes part in bringing a significant character in a play to life. He could not be more excited to take on this role during his fourth season at The Armory. So, in the words of his stage manager, “let’s see what happens.”

BAILEY ANNE MAXWELL Production Assistant

Bailey Anne Maxwell is thrilled to be returning to The Armory for another season, after acting as production assistant for Stupid F**king Bird, Sex with Strangers, Other Desert Cities, Twist Your Dickens (2014 and 2015) and Dreamgirls. Bailey also worked as a deck crew member on Great Expectations at The Armory last season. In the past, Bailey has worked as a production assistant with Artists Repertory Theatre on The Motherf **ker with the Hat, Foxfinder, Ten Chimneys, The Lost Boy and Seven Guitars. Bailey has recently enjoyed being the stage manager for Up the Fall with PHAME Academy and The Wizard of Oz with Broadway Rose Theatre Company. She has also worked with Profile Theatre as a stage management apprentice on Buried Child, Eyes for Consuela and In the Next Room. Bailey is a proud Linfield College graduate and a member of the EMC program.

CINCINNATI PLAYHOUSE IN THE PARK Co-Producer

which have gone on to subsequent productions or publications. Artistic Director Blake Robison and Managing Director Buzz Ward oversee a full-time staff of 75. Together with a board of 54 trustees and nearly 1,000 volunteers, they remain committed to a tradition of excellence that carries the Playhouse well into its sixth decade. The Playhouse offers productions 10 months each year, attracting nearly 190,000 people annually to its two theaters and education and outreach programs. MUSIC THEATRE INTERNATIONAL

Music Theatre International (MTI) is one of the world’s leading theatrical licensing agencies, granting theaters from around the world the rights to perform the greatest selection of musicals from Broadway and beyond. Founded in 1952 by composer Frank Loesser and orchestrator Don Walker, MTI is a driving force in advancing musical theater as a vibrant and engaging art form. MTI works directly with the composers, lyricists and book writers of these musicals to provide official scripts, musical materials and dynamic theatrical resources to over 70,000 professional, community and school theaters in the United States and over 60 countries worldwide. MTI is particularly dedicated to educational theater and has created special collections to meet the needs of various types of performers and audiences. MTI’s Broadway Junior™ shows are 30- and 60-minute musicals for performance by elementary and middle school aged performers, while MTI’s School Editions are musicals annotated for performance by high school students.

Founded in 1960 and a recipient of two Tony Awards — the 2004 Regional Theatre Tony Award and the 2007 Tony Award for Best Revival of a Musical for Company — Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park is known for its artistic excellence, commitment to new works, creative educational programming, and as an artistic home for some of America’s best actors, directors and designers. For the past 20 years, the Playhouse has produced at least one world premiere production each season, several of

THE ARMORY • LIT TLE SHOP OF HORRORS

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SPONSOR STATEMENTS TELL US WHAT YOU THINK OF THE SHOW!

THE MARK AND ANN EDLEN FAMILY While our sponsorship of Little Shop of Horrors has something to do with a certain nostalgia for the ‘60s and an appreciation of the 1986 film produced by David Geffen, it actually has more to do with our dedication to the brave and bold mission of Portland Center Stage at The Armory to bring stories to life in unexpected ways. Our support is also deeply tied to the vision and dedication of Bob and Diana Gerding, whose leadership helped ensure that this mission would happen within an amazing, historic and beautiful building — creating community, challenging our minds and opening our hearts.

GBD ARCHITECTS

When we were given the opportunity to design The Armory, we knew the project had to be more than special. Good theater can affect an audience deeply, so the architecture had to support that mission. Creating a magical place for people from all walks of life to experience the arts was a gift for us, and a gift to the city for generations to come.

Find us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

CHRISTINE AND DAVID VERNIER

Most of the time, a sponsor of a play has some profound comment to make about the production. This time, all we can say is: “It sure is fun!” Little Shop of Horrors started as a low-budget dark comedy filmed in 1960. The musical version premiered in 1982. Locally, it had two runs at the long gone, but not forgotten, Portland Civic Theater in 1986 and 1990. When we went to the PCT production, local television star and future Oregonian columnist, Margie Boule, was a great Audrey. The son of one of The Armory’s great supporters and our friend, Julie Vigeland, was also in the cast. Little Shop of Horrors helped give us, Julie, and her son the theater bug. Every year we invite our employees to a production at The Armory. This year we chose Little Shop of Horrors because we know they will love it. We are sure you will too!

Pearl District | Old Town | Park Square | SE Division Postal Building | Director Park | Hassalo on 8th

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THE ARMORY • LIT TLE SHOP OF HORRORS


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ARTISTIC DIRECTOR | CHRIS COLEMAN

OCTOBER 1 – NOVEMBER 13, 2016 IN THE ELLYN BYE STUDIO

PRESENTS

HOLD THESE TRUTHS

By Jeanne Sakata Directed by Jessica Kubzansky Scenic and Lighting Designer Ben Zamora

Sound Designer and Original Music John Zalewski

Original Costume Design Soojin Lee

Performance Stage Manager Kelsey Daye Lutz

Rehearsal Stage Manager Alyssa Escalante

Production Assistant Kristen Mun

With Ryun Yu as Gordon Hirabayashi Hold These Truths was first produced in 2007 by East West Players in Los Angeles, California, under the title of Dawn’s Light: The Journey of Gordon Hirabayashi. It was commissioned in 2004 by Chay Yew, former director of Center Theater Group’s Asian Theatre Workshop, and further developed with the Lark Play Development Center, New York Theatre Workshop and Epic Theatre Ensemble.

PERFORMED WITHOUT INTERMISSION. The videotaping or other photo or audio recording of this production is strictly prohibited. The Actor and Stage Managers employed in this production are members of Actors’ Equity Association, the Union of Professional Actors and Stage Managers in the United States.

SEASON SUPERSTARS

SUPPORTING SEASON SPONSORS

SHOW SPONSORS Anonymous Diana Gerding Yuki Lynne and Craig Johnston To honor Tule Lake Camp incarceree and mother, Miyoko Inouye Takushi

Portland Center Stage receives support from the Oregon Arts Commission, a state agency funded by the State of Oregon and the National Endowment for the Arts.

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Chrys A. Martin and Jack Pessia Marcy and Richard Schwartz


FROM THE PLAYWRIGHT

FROM THE DIRECTOR

JEANNE SAKATA

JESSICA KUBZANSKY

THIS PLAY IS BASED ON A TRUE STORY, inspired by many hours of interviews I conducted with Gordon Hirabayashi and several of his friends from the 1940s, by numerous letters written by Mr. Hirabayashi during his imprisonment, and by contemporary articles written by and about Mr. Hirabayashi. It is a work blending historical fact with fiction, and certain actual events have been compressed or altered in terms of chronology or content for dramatic purposes. In Act II, Gordon’s letters are works of fiction inspired by his actual writings from the Ring Family Papers in the University of Washington Special Collections, Accession Number #4241-001. Dramatic license has been taken with the actual historical texts. 

I HAD THE PRIVILEGE of meeting this play of Jeanne Sakata’s in a very early stage of development, and was blessed to get to develop and direct it from then forward to its world premiere production and beyond. It has been an extraordinary gift.

In May 2012, Gordon Hirabayashi was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian honor, by President Barack Obama.

SPECIAL THANKS

Not only because playwright Jeanne Sakata is herself an extraordinary light and spirit, and Ryun Yu, the actor who created the role, a beautiful man and a hugely gifted actor with enormous passion and integrity, but because, as I worked on this play, which is in some ways a love story between a man and his Constitution, I began to realize that for the first time in my life I was encountering a hero. A true hero. An American hero. Before Gordon Hirabayashi came into my awareness, my understanding of the word hero was different. A hero was someone who rescued folks from burning buildings, or did something physically perilous to save people, or defied death for the greater good. It seemed a louder kind of word, one I associated with noisier, showier deeds. 

A very special thanks to Gordon Hirabayashi for his time, hospitality and generosity in sharing his story. Also special thanks for invaluable help to Susan Carnahan, James Hirabayashi, Chay Yew, Len Berkman, Morgan Jenness, Douglas Sugano, Timothy Patterson, Jessica Kubzansky, Ryun Yu, Tim Dang, Lisa Rothe, Joel de la Fuente, Zak Berkman, Ron Russell, Robert Chelimsky, Melissa Friedman, Thom Sesma, James Yaegashi, Mark Schneider, John Eisner, Daniella Topol, James Nicola, Linda Chapman, Geoffrey Scott, Toni Amicarella, Mia Katigbak, Jeff Liu, Grant Ujifusa, Kathryn Bannai, Shannon Mayers, Julie Crosby, Megan Carter, Arthur and Virginia Barnett, Eleanor and Charles Davis, Tama Tokuda, Peter Irons, Marie Masumoto, Carla Rickerson, Francis Jue, Akemi Kikumura, Lane Hirabayashi, Don Nakanishi, Shawn Tolleson, Barbara Deutsch, Dr. Linda Seger, José Rivera, Greg Watanabe, Kelvin Yu, Tessa Thompson, Clay Storseth, Jake Paque, East West Players, Epic Theatre Ensemble, Lark Play Development Center, New York Theatre Workshop, Dartmouth College Theater Department, Gerald W. Lynch Theatre at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, Antaeus Company, Women’s Project, Japanese American National Museum, UCLA Asian American Studies Center, UCLA Department of Asian American Studies, 2007 Asian American Theatre Festival, Asian American Writers’ Workshop, 2003 Mark Taper Forum Writers’ Workshop, and University of Washington Special Collections Division.

But in meeting Gordon (and Jeanne’s gift to the world is that she makes you feel that you do indeed get to meet Gordon), I discovered that he is the embodiment of a genuine hero. One who has the courage of his own convictions in times of great personal danger. One who quietly defies things he knows to be wrong, who stands for what he believes against the wisdom of even those who love him and are terrified for his safety. One who speaks out when it is more prudent and safer to be silent. And one who, even after incredible, unbelievable disappointment (when the profoundness of his convictions seem to have led him astray), does not become embittered, but goes on to lead a brilliantly productive life until vindication finally arrives.

In memory of my parents, Tommy and Lily Sakata.

Thank you.

In my own life, I am constantly struck by the difference between the nobility of my absolute convictions in my mind, and the frailty of my human fear when faced with actual hardship. Gordon Hirabayashi lived his beliefs in the face of enormous opposition and adversity, and did so with humility and grace. He is a shining example of the kind of hero I aspire to be in everyday life. Today more than ever we need people to model courage and integrity for us. If every day we strive to be a little more like Gordon, we will enrich humanity and imbue it with more common good. For all of this and more, I am humbled, awed, and grateful for the opportunity to share this towering American hero with you.

THE ARMORY • HOLD THESE TRUTHS

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SUSPENDED JUSTICE JUSTICE By Benjamin Fainstein, Literary Manager

HOLD THESE TRUTHS

breathes theatrical life into the true story of Gordon Hirabayashi’s lifelong struggle to obtain justice from the Supreme Court for violations of his civil rights during the Second World War. Following the bombing of Pearl Harbor in December 1941, Japanese Americans encountered extensive discrimination, especially on the West Coast. They faced public scorn and bigotry, were subjected to a restrictive curfew, and were stripped of their licenses to conduct business. Most shockingly, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066 in February 1942, which mandated the forced removal of nearly 120,000 Japanese Americans from their homes. Many of them were citizens born and raised on American soil, but their constitutional rights to life, liberty and property were ignored. They were imprisoned in camps, behind barbed wire fences, under military suspicion based solely on their race and not for specific crimes committed. Those who defied the orders were arrested and convicted. President Gerald Ford issued an official apology for Executive Order 9066 in 1976, but it was not until 1987 that Hirabayashi’s conviction was overturned in federal appellate court. His fight was bolstered by legal historian Peter Irons’ discovery of military documents admitting that confining Japanese Americans to the camps had not been a necessary security measure. Irons’ findings paved the way for Hirabayashi’s much-delayed victory. Soon after, Congress passed the Civil Liberties Act in 1988, which included recognition of the violations of Japanese Americans’ rights and distributed reparations to affected individuals and their families. But Hirabayashi was not the only one vindicated by Irons’ discovery. Two other men convicted for dissidence, Minoru Yasui and Fred Korematsu, brought their cases to the Supreme Court in the 1940s. Like Hirabayashi, they had waited 40 years for justice. Yasui, a native of Hood River and the first Japanese American attorney admitted to the Oregon State Bar, was arrested for violating the curfew. At his trial in Portland, the sitting judge claimed that Yasui had forsworn his citizenship by virtue of his

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stint working for the Japanese Consulate in Chicago in 1940 and for becoming a fluent Japanese speaker. Yasui spent a year in the Multnomah County Jail, until his case appeared before the Supreme Court in 1943. The Court ruled against both Yasui and Hirabayashi on the same day. It disagreed with the Portland judge’s reasoning, but still held Yasui accountable for violating the curfew. He spent the next year incarcerated at a camp in Idaho and, following his release, became a civil rights community leader until his death in 1986. His conviction was vacated by a federal court in 1983, but has never been officially overturned. Fred Korematsu of Oakland, California, tried to enlist in the United States Navy during the war but was rejected due to health issues. Two years later, he refused Executive Order 9066 and went into hiding. After being found, he was tried, convicted and imprisoned. He appealed his case all the way to the Supreme Court, who ruled against him in 1944, citing Hirabayashi and Yasui’s cases as precedent. In the camps, some Japanese Americans who were intent on demonstrating unified American loyalty objected to Korematsu’s actions and to those of other dissidents. After the war, an anguished Korematsu moved away from the spotlight of politics and focused on family life. His conviction was overturned in federal court in 1983. Fred Korematsu was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest civilian honor in the United States, by President Bill Clinton in 1998. President Barack Obama posthumously bestowed the same honor upon both Gordon Hirabayashi and Minoru Yasui, in 2012 and 2015, respectively. Yasui was additionally honored by the Oregon Legislature in February 2016 with the passage of House Bill 4009, which henceforth designates March 28 as Minoru Yasui Day. None of these three men are still living today. However, their legacy as champions of the democratic ideals of equality and justice survives them, and they will forever occupy a distinguished place in American history as beacons of courageous conviction.

CAST CAST RYUN YU Gordon Hirabayashi

This production marks Ryun Yu’s debut at The Armory. Ryun originated the role of Gordon Hirabayashi in the 2007 world premiere of Hold These Truths (under the title Dawn’s Light) at East West Players in Los Angeles, and most recently performed the role for Seattle’s ACT Theatre. Ryun has twice collaborated with David Henry Hwang, playing Mark in the film adaptation of Hwang’s play Bondage, and starring as the fictional David Henry Hwang in the playwright’s Yellow Face in the first adaptation of a major theatrical play for YouTube. In 2015, Ryun originated the lead role of Takeshi in the world premiere of Kimber Lee’s Tokyo Fish Story at South Coast Repertory. Other theater credits include the West Coast premiere of Richard Greenberg’s Take Me Out at Geffen Playhouse; Philip Kan Gotanda’s Sisters Matsumoto at Seattle Repertory Theatre and Huntington Theatre Company; the world premiere of Lloyd Suh’s American Hwangap at San Francisco’s Magic Theatre; Art and the Los Angeles premiere of Julia Cho’s The Language Archive at East West Players; and Sea Change at the Gay and Lesbian Center. Ryun co-wrote, co-produced, directed and stars in the upcoming feature film The Last Tour, and has also appeared in the films Only the Brave, The Brothers Solomon and The Mikado Project. TV appearances include Fuller House, Bones, Good Luck Charlie and Castle. He was the first Korean-American to train at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in London and also has the first theater degree ever awarded by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Ryun would like to dedicate this performance to his son, Kenji, and his daughter, Miyako.


HOLD THESE TRUTHS | CREATIVE TEAM JEANNE SAKATA Playwright

Jeanne is thrilled to return to Portland Center Stage at The Armory with Hold These Truths, last seen by audiences in ACT Theatre’s 50th Anniversary Mainstage Season following four soldout performances in the ACT Lab. Hold These Truths will also be produced this year at Guthrie Theater and Perseverance Theatre. Premiering at East West Players in 2007, Hold These Truths had its Off-Broadway debut with the Epic Theatre Ensemble in 2012 (Drama Desk Nomination for Outstanding Solo Performance) and has since been performed at PlayMakers Repertory Company, People’s Light, Honolulu Theatre for Youth (co-produced with Daniel Dae Kim), terraNOVA Collective, Silk Road Rising (Millennium Park) and Coachella Valley Repertory Theatre. Jeanne is also an acclaimed actress who previously performed with Portland Center Stage at The Armory in David Henry Hwang’s M.Butterfly and Chay Yew’s Red, as well as with The Public Theater, Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, Kennedy Center, Mark Taper Forum, South Coast Repertory, La Jolla Playhouse, Intiman Theatre, ACT Theatre (Seattle), ACT (San Francisco) and Berkeley Repertory Theatre. Screen credits include the internationally acclaimed indie film Advantageous (US Dramatic Special Jury Award for Collaborative Vision, 2015 Sundance Film Festival) and guest starring roles on Bravo’s True Fiction, Dr. Ken, NCIS Los Angeles, Tyler Perry’s Meet the Browns, Desperate Housewives, Presidio Med, ER, Threat Matrix, Line of Fire, American Family, John Ridley’s I Got You, and Sex and Marriage, a Justin Lin YOMYOMF YouTube series. Special honors: LA Ovation Award for Outstanding Lead Actress in Red at East West Players; Lee Melville Award for Outstanding Contribution to the Los Angeles Theatre Community, Playwrights’ Arena; Outstanding Artist Award from LA Asian Pacific American Friends of Theatre; Entertainment Today Award for Best Supporting Actress in A Winter People at The Theatre @ Boston Court; and the establishment of the Jeanne Sakata Collection in the Library of Congress Playwrights Archive, Asian American Pacific Islander Collection. Special thanks to Tim, now and always. jeannesakata. com, holdthesetruths.info

JESSICA KUBZANSKY Director

Jessica Kubzansky is the co-artistic director of The Theatre @ Boston Court in Pasadena and an award-winning director working nationally. She is delighted to be back at The Armory, where she last directed James Still’s James Beard play, I Love to Eat. She developed and directed the world premiere of Hold These Truths with Jeanne and Ryun at East West Players and elsewhere, including Chicago’s Silk Road Rising and Seattle’s ACT Theatre. Other recent work includes: Stupid Fucking Bird (ACT Theatre, Seattle); Luis Alfaro’s Mojada, A Medea in Los Angeles (The Theatre @ Boston Court/ Getty Villa); Pygmalion (Pasadena Playhouse); RII, her own three-person Richard II (The Theatre @ Boston Court); The 39 Steps (La Mirada Theatre); Macbeth (Antaeus Theatre Company); and Hamlet with Leo Marks (Theater 150). Kubzansky does a great deal of new work, including the recent New York premiere of Sheila Callaghan’s Everything You Touch (Rattlestick at The Cherry Lane) and the world premieres of Stefanie Zadravec’s Colony Collapse, EYT, Michael Elyanow’s The Children, Jordan Harrison’s Futura, Laura Schellhardt’s Courting Vampires, Salamone/ McIntyre’s Gulls, Mickey Birnbaum’s Bleed Rail, Carlos Murillo’s Unfinished American Highwayscape…, Van Itallie’s Light, Cody Henderson’s Cold/Tender (all at The Theatre @ Boston Court), among many others. Kubzansky received the Los Angeles Drama Critics’ Circle Award for Sustained Excellence in Theatre. BEN ZAMORA Scenic and Lighting Designer

Ben Zamora’s design work has been seen internationally at venues including The Barbican Centre and Royal Festival Hall (London), Mariinsky Theatre (Russia), Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, Brisbane Festival (Australia), Baltic Sea Festival (Stockholm), Helsinki Festival, Berliner Festspiele, Lucerne Festival (Switzerland), ACT Theatre (Seattle), Walt Disney Concert Hall and Getty Villa (Los Angeles), De Doelen (The Netherlands), and Festival d’Aix-en-Provence and Salle Pleyel (France). Moving seamlessly between performance and visual art, Zamora has created light-based sculptures and art installations for performance-based

works, including projects with Kronos Quartet, Berlin Philharmonic, The Barbican, Deutsche Oper Berlin, Los Angeles Philharmonic, Saint Genet and Hammer Museum (Los Angeles). His artistic collaborators have included Bill Viola, Gronk, Peter Sellars, Steve Reich and Beryl Korot, and the renowned firm Olson Kundig Architects. Zamora has created large-scale installations and sculptures for Park Avenue Armory in New York, Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival, Art Basel/Design Miami, Kunsthalle Krems in Austria, Frye Art Museum, Suyama Space, as well as for a number of other galleries, museums, private art collections and public art projects. JOHN ZALEWSKI Sound Designer and Original Music

Zalewski’s work has been seen at Center Theatre Group, The Los Angeles Theatre Center, Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts, Guthrie Theater, The Armory, South Coast Repertory, Humana Festival, Walt Disney Concert Hall, Geffen Playhouse, The Broad Stage, Cherry Lane Theatre, Evidence Room, The Theatre @ Boston Court, Antaeus Theatre Company, Padua Playwrights, The Actors’ Gang and 24th Street Theatre. Awards include seven LA Stage Alliance Ovations, seven LA Weekly Awards, three LADCC Awards and 10 Backstage West Garland Awards. Recent credits include the immersive The Day Shall Declare It in London and Downtown Los Angeles; Everything You Touch at Cherry Lane Theatre; Tokyo Fish Story at South Coast Repertory; La Olla at Getty Villa and The Los Angeles Theatre Center; My Barking Dog at The Theatre @ Boston Court; A Steady Rain at Alliance Theatre and Guthrie Theater; Women Laughing Alone with Salad at Kirk Douglas Theatre; Destiny of Desire at Arena Stage (Washington, DC) and South Coast Repertory/Goodman Theatre; and Mexican Trilogy at The Los Angeles Theatre Center.

KELSEY DAYE LUTZ Performance Stage Manager

The Armory credits include: stage manager for The Pianist of Willesden Lane, Each and Every Thing, Forever, The Santaland Diaries, The Lion, The People’s Republic of Portland (second engagement), Vanya and Sonia and Masha

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HOLD THESE TRUTHS

CREATIVE TEAM

and Spike, The Typographer’s Dream, The Last Five Years and A Small Fire; production assistant for Clybourne Park, Venus in Fur, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, The North Plan and Anna Karenina. Kelsey Daye is a graduate of University of North Carolina at Greensboro. She would like to thank her pups for all their unconditional love, and Shamus for being wonderful. ALYSSA ESCALANTE Rehearsal Stage Manager

Alyssa is an Equity stage manager in Los Angeles who is always thrilled to work with the talented Jessica Kubzansky. Some of her favorite Los Angeles credits include Haunted House Party (dir. Matt Walker), Mojada: A Medea in Los Angeles (dir. Jessica Kubzansky), Criers for Hire (dir. John Lawrence Rivera), Cash on Delivery (dir. Ray Cooney), My Barking Dog (dir. Michael Michetti), The Missing Pages of Lewis Carrol (dir. Abigail Deser), Happy Days (dir. Andrei Belgrader), RII (dir. Jessica Kubzansky) and Proof (dir. John Hindman). She has also toured the United States with Placas: The Most Dangerous Tattoo (starring Ric Salinas).

CHRIS COLEMAN Artistic Director

Chris joined Portland Center Stage at The Armory as artistic director in May, 2000. Before coming to Portland, Chris was the artistic director at Actor’s Express in Atlanta, a company he co-founded in the basement of an old church in 1988. Chris returned to Atlanta in 2015 to direct the world premiere of Edward Foote at Alliance Theatre (Suzi Bass Awards for Best Direction, Best Production and Best World Premiere). Other recent directing credits include the Off-Broadway debut of Threesome at 59E59 Theaters; a production that had its world premiere at The Armory and was also presented at ACT Theatre in Seattle. Favorite directing assignments for Portland Center Stage at The Armory include A Streetcar Named Desire, Ain’t Misbehavin’, Three Days of Rain, Threesome, Dreamgirls, Othello, Fiddler on the Roof, Clybourne Park, Sweeney Todd, Shakespeare’s Amazing Cymbeline (which he also adapted), Anna Karenina, Oklahoma!, Snow Falling on Cedars, Ragtime, Crazy Enough, Beard of Avon, Cabaret, King Lear, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, Man and Superman, Outrage, Flesh and Blood and The Devils. Chris has directed at theaters across the country, including Actor’s Theater of Louisville, Oregon Shakespeare Festival, ACT Theatre (Seattle), The Alliance, Dallas Theatre Center, Pittsburgh Public Theatre, New York Theatre Workshop and Center Stage (Baltimore). A native Atlantan, Chris holds a B.F.A. from Baylor University and an M.F.A. from Carnegie Mellon. He is currently the board president for the Cultural Advocacy Coalition. Chris and his husband, Rodney Hicks — who is appearing in the new musical Come From Away, which opens on Broadway in March — are the proud parents of an 18-lb Jack Russell/Lab mix, and a 110-lb English Blockhead Yellow Lab.

KRISTEN MUN Production Assistant

Kristen Mun is originally from Hawaii and graduated from Southern Oregon University with a B.F.A. in Stage Management. This is her fourth season at The Armory, where previous credits include: production assistant on A Streetcar Named Desire, Each and Every Thing, Forever, The Santaland Diaries, Three Days of Rain, Threesome and LIZZIE, and 2nd production assistant on Fiddler on the Roof. Outside of Portland, she has worked at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, Idaho Repertory Theatre and Actors Theater of Louisville. In Portland, she has worked as a production assistant and stage manager with theater companies including Artists Repertory Theatre (And So It Goes … and Red Herring), Oregon Children’s Theatre (A Year with Frog and Toad, Charlotte’s Web, Ivy and Bean and Junie B. Jones) and Broadway Rose Theatre Company (Oklahoma!). Outside of stage managing, Kristen is a fight choreographer and stage combat teacher. 

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THE ARMORY • HOLD THESE TRUTHS

Portland Center Stage at The Armory is the largest theater company in Portland and among the top 20 regional theaters in the country. Established in 1988 as a branch of the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, the company became independent in 1994 and has been under the leadership of Artistic Director Chris Coleman since 2000. An estimated 150,000 people visit The Armory annually to enjoy a mix of classical, contemporary and world premiere productions, along with a variety of high quality education and community programs. Eleven productions are offered each season, in addition to roughly 400 community events

created — in partnership with 170+ local organizations and individuals — to serve the diverse populations in the city. As part of its dedication to new play development, the company has produced 20 world premieres and presents an annual new works festival, JAW: A Playwrights Festival. The Northwest Stories series was recently launched to develop and produce works about, or by artists from, the Northwest region. Home to two theaters, The Armory was the first building on the National Register of Historic Places, and the first performing arts venue, to achieve a LEED Platinum rating.


SPONSOR STATEMENTS ANONYMOUS SPONSOR Once again The Armory brings to the forefront an issue that has taunted our country for centuries. As Americans, we take pride in being a melting pot of people, of welcoming all who seek freedom and opportunity. But when we fear a person’s home country or religion, all bets are off. In times of stress our fear takes over unjustifiably, just as the Puritans feared the Quakers. This play, looking back at World War II, is about a young man who refuses to be treated as an enemy because of his ethnicity. Born in America, the son of Japanese parents, he stands up for his rights as an American citizen. The theme of this story is as relevant today as it has ever been. We are reminded of what’s happening once again in this country.

YUKI LYNNE AND CRAIG JOHNSTON The story of the Japanese incarceration is a dark chapter in America’s history and often goes undiscussed in history classes. Having attended a recent pilgrimage to the Tule Lake segregation camp with my mother who was incarcerated there, I realize the importance of the lessons of Hold These Truths. But trauma can make it hard to retell these stories. At 89 years, my mother is tough — a trait that many Japanese who went through incarceration share. When asked to talk about her experience she often recites the Japanese motto of Gaman, which means “to endure the seemingly unbearable with patience and dignity.” Thus, the story of Gordon Hirabayashi is an extremely rare and valuable one, and I applaud Portland Center Stage at The Armory for bringing this production to Northwest audiences. Hirabayashi spoke on behalf of the constitutional rights of American citizens. We must learn from the past if we are to uphold the rights of citizens today. CHRYS A. MARTIN AND JACK PESSIA The story of a hero and how the law eventually gets it right. Hold These Truths is a poignant and personal tale of one man’s fight for justice. While thousands of Japanese Americans were interned against their will during World War II, Gordon Hirabayashi said “NO.” His powerful message of conviction and commitment to protecting our constitutional rights is as relevant now as it was then. Hold These Truths is a reminder that the path to justice can be arduous, and the lessons of yesterday can shape a better tomorrow. We are proud to sponsor Hold These Truths and thank Portland Center Stage at The Armory for providing a platform to bring this heroic story back into the spotlight, where it will educate and inspire a new generation in the ongoing fight for social and legal justice. MARCY AND RICHARD SCHWARTZ We are pleased to sponsor this moving play, a story of personal courage that prompts reflection on what it means to be an American and how we can best assure national security. Although focused on events that occurred during World War II, the ideas explored by Jeanne Sakata have particular relevance in this time of international strife and presidential campaign debates over citizenship, loyalty, and the meaning of our Constitution. Congratulations to Portland Center Stage at The Armory for bringing this work to Portland.

INFO | THE ARMORY Website: Ticket Office Group Sales Admin. Offices Contributions Volunteer Info Lost and Found Emergency # Audition Hotline Education Building Rentals

www.pcs.org 445.3700 boxoffice@pcs.org 445.3794 groups@pcs.org 445.3720 445.3744 giving@pcs.org 445.3825 volunteer@pcs.org 445.3700 boxoffice@pcs.org 445.3727 445.3849 casting@pcs.org 445.3795 education@pcs.org 445.3824 rentals@pcs.org

128 NW ELEVENTH AVE. BOX OFFICE HOURS

Phone: Noon–6:00 p.m., Daily Walk-Up Window: Open Until Showtime Single tickets and season tickets may be purchased in person, online at PCS.ORG, or by phone at 503.445.3700. PLEASE ARRIVE EARLY. Late seating may be offered but is at the discretion of the House Manager; late seating is not guaranteed. Those arriving late to a performance or exiting the theater during the performance may be asked to view the show on the lobby monitor until intermission. Refunds and/or exchanges are not available for late arrivals. NO LATE SEATING AVAILABLE IN THE STUDIO. Because of the intimate nature of the Ellyn Bye Studio, it is not possible to accommodate late seating. NO CAMERAS OR RECORDING EQUIPMENT. No recording devices of any kind are allowed in the theaters. PLEASE SILENCE ALL CELL PHONES. You may check your cell phones with the concierge and they will notify you in case of an emergency. CHECK BACKPACKS and LARGE PARCELS. For safety purposes, please check large backpacks and parcels at the coat check. THE ARMORY IS FULLY ACCESSIBLE. Anyone with a special seating need (such as moderate sight or hearing impairment) is encouraged to inform the Box Office in advance to accommodate the request. ASSISTED LISTENING DEVICES ARE AVAILABLE. Listening devices are available at the concierge desk free of charge. CHILDREN UNDER THE AGE OF SIX ARE NOT ADMITTED. While we encourage you to bring interested children to the theater, as a courtesy to other patrons and actors, we do not admit anyone under the age of six years to our performances. FOOD IS NOT ALLOWED INSIDE THE THEATER. Beverages are allowed, but must be in a compostable cup with a lid. All food must be consumed in the lobby. PLEASE DO NOT WEAR STRONG PERFUMES/ COLOGNES. Strong perfumes or colognes can be distracting for other patrons and for people with allergies. Please use moderation when applying strong fragrances before the performance.

THE ARMORY • HOLD THESE TRUTHS

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LEAD CORPORATE CHAMPION

Umpqua Bank

ACTORS TAKE CHANCES.

Sometimes they work. Sometimes they don’t. But none of these actors would be on stage tonight without taking chances. It’s part of growth, and we’re all made to grow. That’s why we’re such a proud supporter of Portland Center Stage at The Armory. Let this performance inspire you to take the chances that power your own growth.

SOMETIMES, OUR HIGHEST HEIGHTS HAPPEN

LONG BEFORE TAKEOFF. Proud Sponsor of Portland Center Stage.

p o r t l a n d ’ s h o t e l t o th e ar t s IN THE HEART OF PORTLAND’S WEST END DISTRICT

4 0 9 S W 1 1 T H AV E P O R T L A N D | 5 0 3 . 2 2 4 . 3 2 9 3 | M A R K S P E N C E R . C O M 24

THE ARMORY


DONORS

THANK YOU, DONORS!

We gratefully acknowledge the supporters of our 2016–2017 season.ofTheir generosity allows us to inspire our community Portland Center Stage gratefully acknowledges the supporters our 2013–14 season. Their generosity allows us to inspire our community byby bringing stories to to lifelife in in unexpected ways. WeWe thank them. bringing stories unexpected ways. thank them.

CORPORATE GIFTS SEASON SUPERSTAR ($150,000+)

OVATION SOCIETY ($100,000+) U.S. Bank

LEADERSHIP CIRCLE ($25,000+) Curtis T. Thompson, M.D. and Associates, LLC Oregonian Media Group Wells Fargo

SEASON STARS ($10,000+)

AHA! Boeing Company Davis Wright Tremaine Delta Air Lines GBD Architects Hoffman Construction KeyBank Moda NW Natural The Standard Stoel Rives LLP Work for Art, including contributions from more than 75 companies and 2,000 employees

PLAYMAKERS ($5,000+)

Arciform Glumac KPFF Mentor Graphics Perkins Coie Troutman Sanders LLP Wieden + Kennedy

PRODUCERS ($2,000+)

Bank of America D’Amore Law Group Hygeia Healing PCC Structurals, Inc. Pricewaterhousecoopers LLP Vernier Software & Technology Zimmer Gunsul Frasca

BENEFACTORS ($1,000+)

Break-Away Tours Downtown Development Group Pacific Office Automation

STARS ($250+)

Cupcake Jones Graphic Arts Building Heathman Hotel ShadewoRx

IN-KIND

Acme Scenic and Display Aesop The Alison Inn Al’s Garden Center Arciform Argyle Winery Art of Catering

Artemis Foods Asia America Azul Barbara Baker Ben & Jerry’s in the Pearl Bill Dickey Bluehour Blush Beauty Bar Bonnet Café Umbria Car 2 Go Cargo, Inc Casa del Matador. Cassidy’s Restaurant Chehalem Wines Chez Joly Classic Pianos Culinary Artistry & Lincoln Restaurant Cupcake Jones Cynthia Duran Daily Café Davis Wright Tremaine Dazzle Deschutes Brewery Pub Deponte Cellars Devil’s Food Catering Diago/Ketel One Diane Benjamin Document Technologies Inc Sallie & Dan Dutton Eastside Distilling EcoVibe Apparel Elephant’s Deli Elizabeth St Inn

Ether Shoes Food in Bloom Fancy Leathers Charlie Frasier & Rick Taylor Free Geek Geranium Lake Flowers Ginger Carroll Grayling Jewelry Tasca & Paul Gulick Heathman Hotel Hip Hound Holland America Hotel DeLuxe Indigo Ipnosi Clothing Irving Street Kitchen Jamie Bosworth Photography Jan Baross Jefe Restaurant Jenna St. Martin Photography Jimmy Mak’s Joni Photo Ka’anapali Golf Courses Karen Story Keith & Sharon Barnes Lela’s Bistro Drs Skye & Jane Lininger Little Bird Bistro Local Ocean Restaurant Luck Me Boutique Lucky Limosine & Towncar Services Manor Fine Wares Mario’s Dedre Marriott

FOUNDATION & GOVERNMENT SUPPORT

(AS OF AUGUST 10, 2016)

OVATION SOCIETY ($100K+)

Collins Foundation The Fred W. Fields Fund of The Oregon Community Foundation Meyer Memorial Trust James F. & Marion L. Miller Foundation The Regional Arts & Culture Council, including support from the City of Portland, Multnomah County, and the Arts Education and Access Fund The Wallace Foundation

LEADERSHIP CIRCLE ($25K+)

The Kinsman Foundation Oregon Arts Commission , a state agency Oregon Cultural Trust Shubert Foundation The Rose E. Tucker Charitable Trust

Mark Spencer Hotel Marlene Montooth McCann Engineering LLC Sue McGrath & Rob Rieke McMenamins Pubs and Breweries Aaron Meyer Mingo Restaurant Greg Mockford Morel Ink Multnomah Whiskey Library New Deal Distillery New Renaissance Bookstore Nikasi Brewing Nike NW Natural Nossa Familia Oregon Coast Aquarium Oregon Shakespeare Festival Oven and Shaker Paragon Restaurant & Bar Parish Pearl Gallery & Framing Stan & Suzanne Penkin Pepino’s Performance Promotions Pinch. A Design Office Pinkham Millinery Portland Furniture Portland Paramount Hotel Portland Piano Company Portland Rose Festival Portland Spirit Portland Timbers Portland Trail Blazers Portland Wine Storage

Precision Graphics Rex Post Rhino Digital Printing Pat Ritz Rocco Winery Sammy’s Flowers Santa Fe Taqueria Sara Sherwood Richard & Marcy Schwartz Ralph & Ellie Shaw Signa & Richard Gibson SmithCFI Simpatica Catering Studio Luxe The Standard Third Angle New Music Ensemble Three Monkeys U.S. Bank UU Yogurt Umpqua Bank Vibrant Table Catering & Events Vavace Cofffee House Viridian Reclaimed Wood Vivian Coffee Wells Fargo West Coast Event Productions West of the Moon Widmer Brothers Brewing Company Willamette Valley Vineyards Willamette wine Storage Zeppo Zipcar 105.1 The Buzz

SEASON SUPERSTARS

SEASON STARS ($10K+)

Anonymous (2) The Holzman Foundation/Renée & Irwin Holzman Jackson Foundation Krishnamurthy Charitable Fund PGE Foundation Travel Oregon

ARTISTIC DIRECTOR’S CIRCLE ($3K+)

SUPPORTING SEASON SPONSORS

H.W. & D.C.H. Irwin Foundation

PRODUCERS ($2K+)

AOH Foundation Autzen Foundation D. Margaret Studley Foundation

BENEFACTORS ($1K+)

Big Sky Fund of Equity Foundation Leupold & Stevens Foundation

STARS ($250+)

Swigert-Warren Foundation

Portland Center Stage receives support from the Oregon Arts Commission, a state agency funded by the State of Oregon and the National Endowment for the Arts.

THE ARMORY

25


INDIVIDUAL GIFTS (AS OF AUGUST 10, 2016) The membership levels and names listed below are determined by your individual gift membership renewal date and are recognized for twelve months. We make every attempt to acknowledge your name accurately. If you find a mistake, want to make a change or think your name should be listed and want to inquire further, please don’t hesitate to call 503.445.3744 to let us know. We are more than happy to make changes for the next playbill. Those donors whose names are in bold are a part of our Sustaining Supporters group. We want to honor those donors who have given every year for the last five years. Your consistent support means a great deal to us and keeps our theater thriving. Thank you for your loyalty and generosity. OVATION SOCIETY ($100,000+) Keith & Sharon Barnes Don & Mary Blair

Heather Killough Joanne M. Lilley Fund of The Oregon Community Foundation

LEADERSHIP CIRCLE ($25,000–$99,999)

Broughton & Mary Bishop Family Advised Fund, a charitable fund of the Community Foundation of Southwest Washington Andy & Nancy Bryant Dream Envision Foundation Ginger Carroll Roger Cooke & Joan Cirillo Brigid Flanigan Ronni Lacroute/ WillaKenzie Estate Dedre J. Marriott Helen Stern Mr. & Mrs. W.T.C. Stevens David E. Wedge Trust Dan Wieden & Priscilla Bernard Wieden

SEASON STARS ($10,000–$24,999)

Anonymous Dr. Don & Jessie Adams John & Linda Carter Sarah Crooks Martin & Karin Daum Ray & Bobbi Davis William & Karen Early Mark & Ann Edlen The Wayne & Sandra Ericksen Charitable Fund CLF Family Charitable Foundation Diana Gerding Tasca & Paul Gulick Steven & Marypat Hedberg Dr. Barbara Hort Marilyn & Ed Jensen Craig & Y. Lynne Johnston Kevin & Karen Kelly James & Morley Knoll Hilary Krane & Kelly Bulkeley Charles & Carol Langer Chrys A. Martin & Jack Pessia Michael E. Menashe J. Greg & Terry Ness Reynolds Potter & Sharon Mueller Pat & Trudy Ritz/ Ritz Family Foundation Arlene Schnitzer Jordan Schnitzer

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THE ARMORY

Richard & Marcy Schwartz Drs. Ann Smith Sehdev & Paul Sehdev Douglas & Teresa Smith Christine & David Vernier Ben & Elaine Whiteley Steven & Deborah Wynne

PLAYMAKERS ($5,000–$9,999)

Anonymous (2) Scott & Linda Andrews Gerry & Marilyn Cameron Glenn Dahl & Linda Illig Jess Dishman David Dotlich & Doug Elwood Carol Edelman Robert Finger Lois Seed & Dan Gibbs Rob Goodman Greg Hazelton & Dori Flame Roy Schreiber & Carole Heath Tom & Betsy Henning Gregg & Diane Kantor Judy Carlson Kelley Ms. Kirsten Lee & Mr. Joseph Sawicki Drs. Dolores & Fernando Leon Jim & Jennifer Mark Peter K. McGill Preble Family Charitable Trust of the Bank of America Charitable Gift Stephen Reynolds & Paula Rosput Reynolds Leonard & Lois Schnitzer Family Fund of the Oregon Jewish Community Foundation Elba, Ralph, Russell, Lorraine & Renee Shaw Barbara A. Sloop Marilyn Slotfeldt John & Jan Swanson John Taylor & Barbara West Susan & Jim Winkler

ARTISTIC DIRECTOR’S CIRCLE ($3,000–$4,999)

Carole Alexander Kathi & Ted Austin Peter & Susan Belluschi Family Fund of The Oregon Community Foundation Richard Louis Brown Bill Byrne & Dennis Scolard Kelly K. Douglas & Eric H. Schoenstein Joan & Jim English Randy Foster Paul & Samantha Harmon Jon & Sheila Levine Steve Cox & Vikki Mee Laurie & Gilbert Meigs Steven C. Neighorn James H. O’Lennick

Jim & Linda Patterson Franklin & Dorothy Piacentini Charitable Trust Fred L. Ramsey Robert Reed Bob & Marilyn Ridgley Dave & Lori Robertson Sue & Drew Snyder Don Waggoner & Eunice Noell-Waggoner Mary & Pat Wolfe

PRODUCERS ($2,000–$2,999)

Anonymous Ruth & Jim Alexander Julia & Robert S. Ball Phil & Julie Beyl Jack Blumberg & Tom Anderson Ann Brayfield & Joe Emerson Lee Anne & George Carter Judy Dauble Edward & Karen Demko Robert Falconer Sharon & Henry Hewitt Dale Hottle Dennis C. Johnson Raymond & Marilyn Johnson Stephen & Marjorie Kafoury Tim Kalberg Jina Kim & Hyung-Jin Lee Thom King Bernard & Carol Kronberger Cindy & Keith Larson Regan & Gina Leon Edwards Lienhart Family Foundation Grateful Patron John D. & Nancy J. Murakami Nathan Family Joan Peacock Brenda Peterson Dennis & Diane Rawlinson Pat & Al Reser Bobbie & Joe Rodriguez Teri Rowan Raj Sarda MD Stephen & Trudy Sargent Mark Schlesinger & Patti Norris Trina & Michael Sheridan CollierTrust Burt & Barbara Stein W R Swindells Minh Tran & Gary Nelson E. Walter Van Valkenburg & Turid L. Owren Ted & Julie Vigeland Trudy Wilson & Terry Brown

BENEFACTORS ($1,000–$1,999)

Anonymous (2) Rukaiyah Adams Richard & Kristin Allan

CORPORATE CHAMPIONS WE SUPPORT OUR CORPORATE CHAMPIONS WHO GIVE MORE THAN $10,000 ANNUALLY

Umpqua Bank

AHA! Boeing Company Curtis T. Thompson, M.D. and Associates, LLC Davis Wright Tremaine Mr. Stan Amy & Ms. Christy Eugenis Phyllis Arnoff Brenda K. Ashworth & Donald F. Welch Cheryl Balkenhol & James Alterman Robin & Thomas Barrett Christian, Lisa & Ella Bisgard Lawrence S. & Susan W. Black Fund of The Oregon Community Foundation Sam & Adriane Blackman Dr. Gene Baker & Regina Brody Linda & William Brown Marianne Buchwalter John Bush & Greg Zarelli Walter & Mary Bush Tim O’Leary & Michelle Cardinal Rick Caskey & Sue Horn-Caskey Dr. Richard & Nancy Chapman Collier Trust Mary Chomenko Hinckley & Gregory K. Hinckley Drs. Marguerite Cohen & Joe Roberts Leslie Copland M. Allison Couch & Tom Soals Betsy Cramer & Greg Kubecek Leslie & James Culbertson Gail & Mike Davis Kirk & Marsha Davis Dan Drinkward Gerard & Sandra Drummond Karen & John Durkheimer Family Fund of The Oregon Community Foundation John & Jane Emrick John Briggs & Jeffrey Feiffer Mike & Chris Feves Larry & Deborah Friedman Daniel & Leah Frye Cynthia M. Fuhrman Cathie Glennon Mike Golub & Sam Shelhorse John & Jacque Guevara Dylan Gulick Heather Guthrie & Gil Parker Del Hall Donald F. Hammond Susan M. & Robert S. Hatfield Marcia Hauer & Jeanne Knepper Lani Hayward Arnold & Virginia Israelit Brad & Judy Johnson Kathy & Steve Johnson Dr. Laurie Kash & Michael Carter Selby & Doug Key Ray & Terry Lambeth

GBD Architects Hoffman Construction Key Bank Moda NW Natural Oregonian Media Group Brad & Cindy Larsen Dorothy Lemelson Shari & Frank Lord Carol & Charles Mackey Jean & Steve Mann Robert Matheson & Kimberly Porter Katherine McCoy of West Portland Physical Therapy Clinic Shelly McFarland Lindsey & Marilen McGill Jack & Carolyn McMurchie Rob & Kate Melton Lora & Jim Meyer Bryan Nakagawa Hester H. Nau Bradford & Linda Needham Deborah Neft & Salvatore D’Auria Neilsen Family Fund of The Oregon Community Foundation Paul & Lisa Nourigat Allan & Madeline Olson Duane & Corinne Paulson Stanley & Susanne Penkin Ellie Picologlou Dr. & Mrs. Charles Poindexter David Pollock Judson Randall Michael Remsing Dianne Rodway Halle & Rick Sadle Darryl Saunders & Randy Mannen Lynne & Ron Saxton Carol Schnitzer Lewis Fund of The Oregon Community Foundation Marian & Elihu Schott Family Fund of The Oregon Community Foundation Michael & Karen Sherman John Shipley Geoff & Susie Strommer Michael Simon Veterinary Surgical Center of Portland Carl Snook George & Molly Spencer Ray & Pat Straughan Mary & Jeff Strickler Donald & Roslyn Sutherland Katherine & Nickolas Tri Carol & David Turner Dennis & Jean Wilde Jay Wilt David & Sherri Zava

STARS ($500–$999)

Anonymous (4) Charles & Gloria Adams Margaret & Stuart Albright Stacy Allison Thomas & Brada Bailey

Stoel Rives LLP U.S. Bank The Standard Wells Fargo Work for Art

David & Bonnie Bennett Dr. Janet Bennett Randy & Rebecca Bissinger Bob Schuler & Debra Blanchard Jill Blanchard Lesley Bombardier Craig Boretz Norma Bradfish Stephen & Marge Brenneke Brenda & Duke Charpentier Bruce & Janis Collins Sonja L. Connor Erik Cubbage Tracy A. Curtis & Rick Nagore Craig Dewey & Julie Coop Stephen Early & Mary Shepard Gregory Flick Ronald Fraback Carol Fredlund & John Betonte Charles & Kyle Fuchs Don & Judy Fuller Richard & Kristine Gates Paul & Faye Gilbarg Melissa & Robert Good Michael & Nancy Graham Gail & Walter Grebe Rick & Susan Gustafson Bill & Elaine Hallmark Lourri Hammack Kregg & Andrea Hanson Richard L. Hay Patsy Heinlein MJ & Lee Alan Helgerson Herman Charitable Foundation Paul & Ruth Herrington Laurie Holland Dixie & Patrick Huey Susan Immer & Larry Juday Christina Isacson Cecily Johns Jessie Jonas Douglas & PJ Jones Kevin & Suzanne Kahn Gerri Karetsky & Larry Naughton Carla Kelley Nancy Keystone & Michael Schlitt Kevin & Lee Kidd Lucien & Sally Klein BettyLou Koffel & Philip Moyer Mr. Rudy Kohnle & Ms. Krista Larson Jon & Karen Kruse Bruce & Cathy Kuehnl Susan Lair & Doug Trobough Bonnie & Mike Leiser Richard M. Linn Elaine & Richard Lycan Stephen Mason & Christine Fisher JS & Robin May


DONOR LIST (CONTINUED) Karen & Brent McCune Jessica McVay Richard Meeker & Ellen Rosenblum Merry Melonas & John Melonas Robert & Violet Metzler Michael & Susan Mueller Ward & Pamela Nelson Don & Doris Nielsen David & Anne Noall Juris V. & Silvia Orle John & Carolyn Parchinsky Greg & Vicki Page Carol Pelmas Elizabeth Perris & Beverly Schnabel Jim & Pam Phillips Wallace & Elizabeth Preble Dick & Linda Reedy Drs. Scott & Kay Reichlin Leslie Rennie-Hill & Ken Hill Tony & Sherryl Reser Kelly Ritz-Eisenstein & Scott Eisenstein Mary & Craig Ruble Mardi Saathoff Steven & Carol Sandor Aurora WindDancer Dianne Sawyer & Richard Petersen Peter Shinbach Brad Simmons & Shannon Hart J & C Skuster Walter & Carol Smith Kimberly Smith-Cupani Rick & Denyse Stawicki Elaine R. & Rudolph B. Stevens Janice Stewart & Gordon Allen Dan & Linda Sullivan Dr. Jeffrey & Mrs. Roberta Swanson Libbi Layton & Lawrence Tamiyasu Meri & Stephen Taylor Bruce & Rebecca Teborek Beverly Terry Don & Judy Thompson Marcia K. Timm Eleanor & Peter van Alderwerelt Lewis & Susan Van Winkle Virginia Vanderbilt & Michael Garrison Dan Volkmer & Frank Dixon Richard Wallace & Patricia White Wendy Ware & Dan Gleason Joan & David Weil Dr. & Mrs. Bennett Wight Brian R. Wilson Fabian & Julie Yeager

PATRONS ($150-$499)

Anonymous (13) Jose Alcarez Joan & Brian Allen Philip & Pip Allen Kris Alman Linda C. Anderson Thomas R. Anderson & Joan Montague Mr. & Mrs. John K. Ankeney Nigel & Kerry Arkell Kregg Arn & Ted Fettig Lee & Lynn Aronson Elizabeth Ash & David Morganstern Jean & Ray Auel

Jean & David Avison Susan Bach & Douglas Egan Grover & Susan Bagby Mrs. Bernice Bagnall Gary & Christine Barbour Mr. & Mrs. Peter Barnhisel Diane & Arthur Barry Sidney & Barbara Bass George W. Bateman Richard Baumann Kathleen Bauska Donald C. & Doris Beard Rob & Sharon Bennett Jamie & John Birkett Cheryl A. Bittle Anita & Clark Blanchard Ms. Catherine Blosser & Mr.Terry Dolan Robert E Blum & Carol M. Black Brian & Karen Borton Kay Bristow Patsy Bruggere Mr. Lamar Bryant & Ty Stober Mary Butler Tim & Susan Carey Andrea Carlson Carolyn & Walter Carr Brett & Barbara Carson Michael Carter & Teresa Ferrer Tyler Case Jean Carufo & Barb Engelter Susan Cassady & Neal Thompson Brent & Barbara Chalmers Gordon B. Chamberlain Tim Chapman Bob & Patty Chestler Valri & Vincent Chiappetta Susan F. Christensen Carl & Carolyn Christoferson Cynthia Church Susan Clarke Miguel Cobian John & Kathryn Cochran Elaine & Arnold Cogan Rhonda Cohen Rick & Jean Collins Lisa & Skip Comer Elizabeth Cordrey Sherie P. & John M. Corley William & Harriet Cormack Jerry & Jean Corn Karen Costello John & Ann Cowger Allen & Sue Craig John Crawford & Kathryn Crawford Marian & Neale Creamer Arthur & Winnifred Danner Marcia Darm & Bruce Berning Betty Daschel Maureen Sproviero Davis & Kerwin Davis Aishwarya Deenadayalu Carolyn DeLany-Reif Duane & Prudence Denney Bill & Brenda Derville Linda & Jerry Dinan Ken & Laura Dobyns Arthur H. Dodd John & Danuta Donovan Pat Dooney Edith & Michael Dorsen Steve Dotterrer & Kevin Kraus CDR Robert duBiel & Nancy Dougherty Beverly Downer

Julie & Jim Early Janet & Barry Edwards Steven Ehlbeck & Vassiliki Tsikitis Mary A. & Peter Eisenfeld Kris & R. Thomas Elliott Ronnie-Gail Emden & Andrew Wilson Ed & Marilyn Epstein Sharon Ewing-Fix Renee Ferrera & James Johnson Patrick & Eileen Fiegenbaum David Filer & Marlene Anderson Sally & Jerry Fish Peter & Nancy Fisher Sherry & Paul Fishman Greg Fitz-Gerald Mary Flahive & David Finch George H. Fleerlage Per-Olof Jarnberg & Joan Foley Steve & Susan Ford Bernard A. & Loretta E. Fox Larry & Judy Fox Terry Franks & Carolyn Duran Bruce & Kate Frederick Gail & Kim Frederick Richard Smith & Patricia Frobes Jerome & Mary Fulton William & Beverly Galen Susan & Seth Garber Colleen Gekler Merry Gilbertson Lisa Goldberg Lynn Goldstein Barbara Gordon-Lickey K&J Rosemond Graham Patricia & Tim Gray Mark & Michelle Greenwood Nancy & Ron Gronowski Elisabeth Hall Ulrich H. Hardt & Karen Johnson Gary Hargett Tom & Jan Harvey Fred & Sara Harwin Mark & Paige Hasson Jane L. Hatch Regina Hauser & Chris Carson Tracey Heinrich Tom & Verna Hendrickson Mr. & Mrs. Clayton Hering Diane M. Herrmann Gary & Jane Hibler Frances & Hunter Hicks Margaret & Timothy Hill Suzanne Hiscox Barbara & Mark Hochgesang Mrs. Beverly Hoeffer & Mrs. Carol Beeston Jay Howell Karen & Chuck Hoff Janet Hoffman & John Harland Andrew Hoffmann Kevin Hogan & Aaron Larson Barry & Fanny Horowitz Jeanne Provost & R. Brian Hough Donald & Lynnette Houghton Dr. Hal Howard Robert & Jill Hrdlicka Nancy Hull & Chris Sproul Kathy & Tom Iberle Robina & Tim Ingram-Rich

Willard & Shirley James Joanne Jene, M.D. Becky & Jarrett Jones Joan Jones Vanessa Abahashemi & Soren Jorgensen Jack & Farol Kahle Cindy Kaplan Ross Kaplan & Paula Kanarek Chad & Mary Karr Rebecca Karver Ron & Ruth Katon Franki Keefe Katherine Keene Jane Kennedy Heather Kientz Julie King/John Pump Jim & Lois King Nancy Kingston Frederick Kirchhoff & Ronald Simonis Romy Klopper Michael Knebel & Susan Shepard Tricia Knoll & Darrell Salk Kohnstamm Family Foundation Drs. Bill & Ricky Korach Ed & Margaret Kushner Brian & Annika Lamka Robert & Sally Landauer David Lapof Robert & Nancy Laws Bob & Sally LeFeber Roger & Joy Leo Brian & Chris Lewis Bob & Debbie Lindow Peter & Janice Linsky Steve Rosenberg & Ellen Lippman Bill Bagnall & Clayton Lloyd Joyce & Stanley Loeb Ralph London R. Lubomirski Rebecca MacGregor Jerry & Judy Magee Jeanne & Jim Magmer Tim & Barbara Mahoney Jane Maland Caroline Mann Linda & Ken Mantel Joe Marrone/ Ann Balzell Kenneth & Nancy Martin Don & Susan Masson Pamela Matheson Oscar & Mary Mayer Susan & Bill McConnell Maryl M McCullough Susan McFadden Charles & Kathleen McGee Lisa McKinney Alan & Daina McLean Gretchen McLellan Steven McMaster & Kathleen Brock Bart McMullan Jr. & Patricia Dunahugh Gayle & George McMurria-Bachik Trisha Mead Karolyn Meador Julia Meck Ruth E. Medak Mariellen Meisel & Steve Glass Peter & Joan Melrose Susan Sammons Meyer & Dennis Meyer Stacy Michaelson

Louis R. Miles Mr. Jay Miller & Ms. Elise Menashe Roger & Karen Miller Kate & Jack Mills Sherry Mills Tom & Lia Mills David & Machteld Mok Grant Molsberry & William Apt Brandon Monroe Douglas & Malinda Moore Jane Moore & David Pokorny William & Jane Moore Clint & Donna Moran Mike & Jan Morgan Sonny Jepson & Felice Moskowitz Laura & Joseph Munoz Fran Nay Jeanne Newmark Ann Nickerson Landscape Design Linda Aso Susan & Peter Norman Kay Novak Mary Lou Obloy Ron & Janet O’Day Ric Oleksak Barry D. Olson Eileen & Alfred Ono Jamie Ordower Beverly J. Orth Lottie Goodwin Lynda Paige Callie & Ana Winner JoAnn Pari-Mueller & Dan Mueller Gail & Alan Pasternack Janet Peek Jennifer Peery Steve & Melissa Peterman Francis Peters John M. & Suzy J. Petersen Kevin Phaup Donna Philbrick Sue Pickgrobe & Mike Hoffman Nancy Pitney Shirley Pollock Michael Ponder & Bea Davis David & Margo Price Kathy Querin Edgar & Prudence Ragsdale Jay & Barbara Ramaker Michael R. Rankin Bonnie & Peter Reagan Mark Reploeg Helen Richardson & Don S. Hayner David Robertson & Chuck Brimmer Michael Robertson & Gwyn McAlpine Gertrude Robinson Lucinda Rodgers Charles & Judith Rooks Kelly & Tomilynn Ross Davia & Ted Rubenstein Jim & Joanne Ruyle Bunny & Jerry Sadis Linda Salinsky Deborah Santomero & Lisa Hoffman Christine & Steven Satterlee John & Stephanie Saven Jim Scherzinger & Claire Carder Sheldon & Jean Schiager Peter C. & Jeanette M. Scott

Michael & Pam Shanahan Dr. Jeffrey D Sher Carl R. Shinkle Virginia Shipman & Richard Kaiser Rodger & Marcella Sleven Charles E. Smith Neil Soiffer & Carolyn J. Smith George Soule & Maurice Horn Doug Sparks & Casey Bass Harley & Robyn Spring Karen Springer Sarah Sterling Zach & Vassie Stoumbos Milan & Jean Stoyanov Rhonda Studnick Kaiser Tony & Vanessa Sturgeon Margie Sutherland, MD Mr. & Mrs. John Sutton Roger & Gale Swanson John & Jan Switzer Amy & Emanuel Tanne Kara & Tyler Tatman Ann & Dave Taylor Jerome & Kathleen Taylor Jane Thanner & Tim Smith William & Lori Thayer James & Linda Thomas Grant & Sandra Thurston Sandra Teel Trainer Mr. Michael Traylor & Derek Holmgren Peter & Cathy Tronquet Mark & Christy Uhrich Phil & Mimi Underwood Dawn Vermeulen Ginni Vick James N. Stamper & Jennifer P. Villano Mark & Mary Ann Vollbrecht Karen & Charles Waibel John N. & Betty K. Walker Nancy Walker & Terry Foty Sheila Walty Ms. Shu-Ju Wang & Mr. Mike Coleman Michael Weiner & Kathy Davis-Weiner Brandon & Betty Jean Wentworth Karen Whitaker Chris & Jana White James M. White JD & D’Alene White Bill & Pat Nelson Maurice & Lauretta Williams Marjorie & Tom Wilson Alan Winders Greg Winterowd Loring & Margaret Winthrop Jeff & Jaynie Wirkkala Don & Jan Wolf Richard & Leslie Wong J. Marcus Wood & Sue Hennessey Linda M. Wood Robert & Vickie Woods Paul Wrigley Jack Wussow & Kyle Adams Russ & Mary Youmans Kurtis Zenner & Michaell Zenner Alan & Janet Zell

THE ARMORY

27


BOARD OF DIRECTORS

IN TRIBUTE Ginger A. Carroll in memory of J. Michael Carroll Chris Coleman in memory of Jerry Stern, a blessing to have known him Scott & Jeanette Depoy in memory of Annette Coleman Bill Dickey in memory of Richard Lawson Tom & Betsy Henning in memory of Annette Coleman Dr. Hal Howard in memory of Carol Howard Christina Isacson in honor of Ann Smith Sehdev Cindy Kaplan in honor of Lisa Sanman Nancy Keystone in memory of Annette Coleman Portland Center Stage in memory of Bing Sheldon Rhian Rotz in honor of Leslie Copland Sarah Sterling in memory of Julie Sterling Minh Tran & Gary Nelson in memory of Richard Lawson Ted and Julie Vigeland in memory of Annette Coleman Ted and Julie Vigeland in fond memory of Richard Lawson who loved and strongly supported Portland Center Stage at The Armory. He was loved by us and so many others. Ted and Julie Vigeland in grateful memory of Jerry Stern and his fondness for and tremendous support of Portland Center Stage at The Armory. In memory of David E. Wedge (as of August 10, 2016) TRIBUTE GIFTS Why not try something different? Instead of searching for that perfect gift or struggling over how to acknowledge a special achievement, you can recognize someone with a 100% tax deductible Tribute Gift. We’ll make it even easier for you by specially notifying the appropriate person that a Tribute Gift was made in honor or memoriam and list your gift in the playbill. If you would like to make a Tribute Gift, please contact 503.445.3744 or giving@pcs.org.

Portland Center Stage at The Armory operates under an agreement among the League of Resident Theatres (LORT), Actors’ Equity Association, the Union of Professional Actors and Stage Managers in the United States, and the Society of Stage Directors and Choreographers. Portland Center Stage at The Armory is a member of LORT, Theatre Communications Group, Portland Business Alliance and Travel Portland. Portland Center Stage at The Armory is a participant in the Audience (R)Evolution Program, funded by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation and administered by Theatre Communications Group, the national organization for the professional not-for-profit American theater.

The Scenic, Costume, Lighting and Sound Designers in LORT are represented by United Scenic Artists Local USA-829, IATSE

28

THE ARMORY

Ted Austin, Chair Senior Vice President, The Private Client Reserve of U.S. Bank Betsy Henning, Vice Chair CEO and Founder, AHA! Strategic Communications Brigid Flanigan, Treasurer President, Shamrock Holdings, LLC Steven E. Wynne, Secretary Executive Vice President, Moda Health Mary Boyle, Immediate Past Chair Civic Volunteer Chris Coleman, President Artistic Director, Portland Center Stage at The Armory Sharon Barnes, Community Volunteer Phil Beyl, President, GBD Architects Sarah Crooks, Partner, Perkins Coie, LLP Evelyn Crowell, Retired, Portland State University Gustavo J. Cruz, Jr., Senior Council, Farleigh Wada Witt Lana Finley, Community Activist Diana Gerding, Community Volunteer Mike Golub, COO, Portland Timbers Lani Hayward, Executive VP, Creative Strategies, Umpqua Holdings Corp Greg Hazelton, Senior Vice President and CFO, NW Natural Tasca Gulick, Community Activist Yuki “Lynne” Johnston, Advocate for the Arts Kevin Kelly, Retired Jim Knoll, President, Knoll Mediation Karen O’Connor Kruse, Partner, Stoel Rives LLP Dedre Marriott, Community Volunteer Charles McGee, President and CEO, Black Parent Initiative Peter Potwin, Retired, CFO, Benson Industries, Inc. Dennis Rawlinson, Firm Chair and Partner, Miller Nash Graham & Dunn, LLP Joe Sawicki, Vice President and General Manager, Mentor Graphics, Design-To-Silicon Division Marcy Schwartz, Senior Vice President, CH2M HILL Ann E. Smith Sehdev, Physician, Cascade Pathology Doug Smith, Retired, Senior Vice President, AMEC J. Greg Ness, Director Emeritus, Chairman, President and CEO, Standard Insurance, StanCorp Financial Group Pat Ritz, Director Emeritus, Chairman and CEO, Footwear Specialties International Julie Vigeland, Director Emeritus, Civic Volunteer In Memoriam Bob Gerding


STAFF

Artistic Director | Chris Coleman

ARTISTIC

Associate Artistic Director: Rose Riordan Producing Associate: Brandon Woolley Literary Manager: Benjamin Fainstein Company Manager: Will Cotter Literary Associate: Mary Blair

EDUCATION/COMMUNITY PROGRAMS

Education & Community Programs Director: Kelsey Tyler Education & Community Programs Associate: Clara-Liis Hillier Education & Community Programs Assistant: Eric Werner Resident Teaching Artist: Matthew B. Zrebski

ADMINISTRATION & FINANCE

Chief Operating Officer: Cynthia Fuhrman General Manager: Creon Thorne Finance Director: Lisa Comer Accounting Manager: Aurora Sanquilly Accountant: Alan King HR Manager: Caitlin Upshaw Executive & HR Assistant: Nia I. Adams IT Administrator: Christian Kisanga Database/Tessitura Consultant: Bob Thomas

DEVELOPMENT

Development Director: Lisa Sanman Associate Development Director: Jennifer Goldsmith Grants Manager: Marlene A. Montooth Special Events Manager: Kate Bowman Professional Development Volunteer: Carolyn DeLany-Reif

MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS

Director of Marketing & Communications: Cynthia Fuhrman Associate Director of Marketing: Mandy Morgan Public Relations & Publications Manager: Claudie Jean Fisher Marketing & Communications Associate: Alice Hodge Group Sales Coordinator: Liz Brown Graphic Designer: Mikey Mann Multimedia Designer: Kate Szrom Webmaster: Christian Bisgard Production Photographer: Patrick Weishampel

PATRON SERVICES

Patron Services Manager: Luke Robertson Patron Services Assistant Managers: Klint Keys, Sierra Walker Senior Patron Services Associate: Emily S. Ryan Patron Services Associates: Madelyn Clement, Megan Harned, David Harper Sales Associates: Michael Erickson, Jack E. Ridenour, Mark Woodlief

OPERATIONS

Operations Manager: Sean Andries Operations Lead: Lauren Knapp

Operations Assistants: Mitchell Bohanan, Katie Cronin Events & Rentals Manager: Jessica Metteer Rentals Assistant: Elizabeth Hjort Custodians: Gregery Lee, Tim Taylor

PRODUCTION

Production Manager: Liam Kaas-Lentz Production Coordinator: Lydia Comer Stage Managers, AEA: Kelsey Daye Lutz, Mark Tynan, Janine Vanderhoff Production Assistants: Bailey Anne Maxwell, Kristen Mun Technical Director: Derek Easton Scene Shop Manager: Seth Chandler Master Carpentar: Nick Foltz Staff Carpenters/Welders: Nathan Crosby, Michael Hall, Phil A. Shaw Properties Master: Michael Jones Lead Props Artisan: Rachel Peterson Schmerge Scenic Charge Artist: Kate Webb Lead Scenic Painter: Shawn Mallory Scenic Painter: Kiona McAlister Costume Shop Manager: Alex Wren Meadows Cutters/Drapers: Paula Buchert, Eva Steingrueber-Fagan First Hand: Larissa Cranmer Costume Crafts Artisan: Barbara Casement Wardrobe Mistress: Bonnie Henderson-Winnie Wig Supervisor: Danna Rosedahl Lighting Supervisor: Ben Courtney Master Electrician, U.S. Bank Main Stage: Alexz Eccles Master Electrician, Ellyn Bye Studio: Em Douglas Deck Manager: Tim McGarry Resident Sound Designer & Sound/Video Supervisor: Casi Pacilio Sound Engineer & Lead Programmer: Scott Thorson Sound Engineer & Programmer: Adam Bintz

FRONT OF HOUSE

Concierges: Miles Bennette-Eaton, Meghan Howard-Hakala, Wynee Hu, Bailey Anne Maxwell, Eric Murray Volunteer Coordinator: RaChelle Schmidt Lead House Manager: Michael Rocha House Managers: Jenna Barganski, Nhu Nguyen, Emerson Scott, RaChelle Schmidt Food and Beverage Manager: Noelle dePinna Kitchen Supervisor: Erik Sanchez Catering Supervisor: Logan Starnes Café Supervisor: Franz Rutherford Kitchen Assistant/Cook: Sam DiChiara Food & Beverage Service Staff: Chris Klarer

VOLUNTEER COMMITTEE

Office Assistants Chair: Connie Guist Entertainers Chair: Jo McGeorge Supporting Cast Chair: Karen Watson

FOR THIS PRODUCTION LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS ASSISTANT TO THE DIRECTOR

Alan Cline

RUN CREW

Zahra Garrett Kathleen Reid SCENIC PAINTERS

Elecia Beebe Elizabeth Kowash Nora Victoroff

PUPPET FABRICATORS

Michael Jones, Properties Master Rachel Peterson Schmerge, Lead Props Artisan Barbara Casement, Costume Crafts Artisan Nancy Aldrich Robert Amico Bill Holznagel Kathleen Reid Lance Woolen PROPS ARTISAN

Jon Flora

RUN CREW

Zahra Garrett STITCHERS

Sanne Dodier Morgan Bird Reaves FOLLOW SPOT OPERATORS

Rob Forrester Ian Hale

LIGHTING PROGRAMMER

Duncan Lynch

FRONT OF HOUSE SOUND MIXER

Scott Thorson

DECK AUDIO

Molly Gardner Ruth Nardecchia HOLD THESE TRUTHS COSTUME COORDINATOR

Alex Wren Meadows

SOUND BOARD OPERATOR

Adam Bintz

SPECIAL THANKS

Brendan Patrick Hogan Little Shop of Horrors cover art by Mikey Mann Hold These Truths cover art by Julia McNamara and Mikey Mann.

THE ARMORY

29


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NOV. 30 – DEC. 30

TWO HOLIDAY CLASSICS! Portland Center Stage at

Tickets at pcs.org, by phone at 503.445.3700 or drop by at 128 NW Eleventh Avenue. Above: Hershey Felder in Hershey Felder as Irving Berlin. Photo by Eighty Eight Entertainment; Below: Darius Pierce in The Santaland Diaries. Photo by Patrick Weishampel/blankeye.tv.

NOV. 26 – DEC. 24


®

AT TH E P E R FO R M A N C E A CIT Y PL AYBILL AND PERFORMING ARTS MAGA ZINE

ROLE OF A LIFETIME

One-of-a-kind actor Lauren Modica steels her nerves for a solo show.

44

andy warhol likes boring things

FEATURES

EDITOR-AT-LARGE 34 by Barry Johnson EVENT CALENDAR 38 Be in the know.

43

THE POLITICS OF ART 40 Quotable quotes

43 FAVORITE PLACES Featuring Vin Shambry

44 ARTIST PROFILE Featuring Lauren Modica

ANDY WARHOL: PRINTS FROM THE COLLECTIONS OF JORDAN D. SCHNITZER AND HIS FAMILY FOUNDATION OCT 8 – JAN 1

49 ARTIST PROFILE

Featuring XX Digitus Duo

52 CROSSWORD Think you know art?

49

54 DAY JOBS

Featuring Margo Yohner

portlandartmuseum.org SEP T E MB ER/O C TO B ER 2016

A RT S L A N D I A .COM

Andy Warhol (American, 1928–1987). Space Fruit: Still Lifes, Cantaloupes II (II.198), 1979. Screenprint. 30 x 40 in. Courtesy of Jordan D. Schnitzer and His Family Foundation. © 2016 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

ARTSL ANDIA AT THE PERFORMANCE • SEPT | OCT 2016

33


FROM THE EDITOR-AT-LARGE What I like best about Shakespeare is the way his plays, even the minor ones, can suddenly reflect a shard of my own experience, my own feeling, my own attempts to understand my world. In this bitter election year, I found “Timon of Athens” just about perfect when I spent a few days at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival in Ashland. Who is more bitter than Anthony Heald’s Timon, so gentle and generous at the beginning of the play and so savage toward humankind by the end? Here is the crucial moment, Timon at full rant, sputtering and spitting against the Athenians who had accepted his gifts and wallowed in the luxury of his table: Most smiling, smooth, detested parasites, Courteous destroyers, affable wolves, meek bears, You fools of fortune, trencher-friends, time’s flies, Cap-and-knee slaves, vapours, and minute-jacks!

I had to fetch my glossary, “Shakespeare’s Words,” to discover that a “minute-jack” was a “mind-changing villain, fickle lout,” though I got the idea without a precise definition. Oh, and a “cap-and-knee slave” is a sycophant (who removes his cap, descends to one knee and flatters a great man or lady). But that was just the beginning for Timon. Sure, he abandons the precincts of Athens for the wild countryside. (And maybe you’ve threatened to the do the same if one particular candidate emerges triumphant in November.) But he goes beyond that. The general Alcibiades, who hates Athens, too, asks the hermit his name. “I am Misanthropos and hate mankind,” Timon answers. And nothing in the rest of the play proves any different. Timon is done with us. Strangely, presented with this picture of Timon, I found my own bitterness about the state of things abate a little. Shakespeare does that. He does it in the festival’s production of “Richard II” as well, another play for our times. Richard is surrounded by flatterers and bad advisers, and England is suffering for it: “A thousand flatterers sit within thy crown,” the dying John of Gaunt tells Richard. And CONTINUED ON PAGE 35

34

ARTSL ANDIA AT THE PERFORMANCE • SEPT | OCT 2016


before long Richard has created the enemy, Henry Bolingbroke, who will depose him and then assume the crown himself as Henry IV. Shakespeare doesn’t abandon Richard II, though, even if history destroys him. Instead, he gives Richard the beginning of wisdom, too late for his crown, but the peace of understanding is its own reward. On this trip, the plays were constantly speaking directly to this time and our politics, which have managed to corrupt our democracy. Qui Nguyen’s Vietgone spoke directly, sympathetically and surprisingly to the immigrant experience in America just as the very word “immigrant” has become ensnared in the worst kind of politics. And by the time “Hamlet” rolled around, the words of Marcellus to Horatio—“Something is rotten in the state of Denmark”—made heads nod in affirmation all over the outdoor Elizabethan Theatre in the festival’s Doom Metal version of Shakespeare’s play. So, I really needed Twelfth Night and Viola’s optimism, though she’s caught in a tangle of love and duty: “O Time, thou must untangle this not I;/It is too hard a knot for me t’ untie.” Her prayer is even answered! For the next couple of months, we’ll conclude a hundred times that something is rotten in our body politic. We’ll watch a hundred ads attempt to ignite our most reflexive, least human responses. We’ll be tempted, like Timon, to turn our backs on all of it, because none of it makes sense. In “The Long Revolution”, British culture critic Raymond Williams writes, “Democracy and community have again and again been made over into the old kind of restriction and direction. Individualism has passed into selfishness and indifference by the facts of its own incompleteness.” The complexity of things in the modern era, he suggests, have led to a general sense of insecurity. But despite the failures of democracy, his thinking leads back to it: “If man is essentially a learning, creating and communicating being, the only social organization adequate to his nature is a participatory democracy, in which all of us, as unique individuals, learn, communicate and control.” In his argument Williams quotes The Brothers Karamazov. Dostoyevsky says that when a man seeks the greatest possible “fulness of life” for himself, “all his efforts result...in arriving at complete solitude.” At Timon, in short. We figure out a way to work together or we die alone. The arts lead us to a vast amount of human wisdom, but maybe this is the most important. At least for the here and now. .

“SOME OF THE BEST DANCERS YOU WILL EVER SEE” – CALGARY HERALD

TICKETS OCT 13 - 15 / 7:30PM

NWDANCEPROJECT.ORG 503.828.8285

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LINCOLN PERFORMANCE HALL

PHOTO / CHRISTOPHER PEDDECORD ART / MONA JONES CORDELL DANCERS / CHING CHING WONG + ELIJAH LABAY

MEDIA SPONSOR James F. & Marion L. Miller Foundation

DROWNING GIRLS

THREE BRIDES - ONE GROOM - THREE BATHTUBS - ONE HAUNTING TALE

A PACIFIC NORTHWEST PREMIERE OCTOBER 13 - 31, 2016 THE VENETIAN THEATRE, HILLSBORO BAGNBAGGAGE.ORG

ARTSL ANDIA AT THE PERFORMANCE • SEPT | OCT 2016

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®

AT TH E P E R FO R M A N C E

PUBLISHER & FOUNDER Misty Tompoles EDITOR-AT-LARGE Barry Johnson COPY EDITOR Kristen Seidman DESIGNERS Megan C. Cutler Lisa Johnston-Smith MEDIA DIRECTOR Chris Porras PUBLISHERS REPRESENTATIVE Lindsey Ferguson PUBLISHING COORDINATOR Bella Showerman SPECIAL PROJECTS Ahnyah Krummenacker CONTRIBUTING WRITERS A.L. Adams Barry Johnson PHOTOGRAPHERS Will Nielsen EDITORIAL INTERNS Lauren Abbott Anyi Wong-Lifton Carleigh Oeth DESIGN INTERN Anna Payne

PORTLAND CENTER STAGE AT THE ARMORY Claudie Jean Fisher, Public Relations & Publications Manager

Artslandia at the Performance is published by Rampant Creative, Inc. ©2016 Rampant Creative, Inc. All rights reserved. This magazine or any portion thereof may not be reproduced or used in any manner whatsoever without the express written permission of the publisher. Rampant Creative, Inc. /Artslandia Magazine 6637 SE Milwaukie Ave. #207 | Portland, OR 97202

ARTSLANDIA.COM

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ARTSL ANDIA AT THE PERFORMANCE • SEPT | OCT 2016


LISTEN ONLINE!

THE NETHER by Jennifer Haley

MUSIC DANCE THEATRE

Buy your tickets today at www.thirdrailrep.org. September 30-October 22, 2016 — Third Rail at Imago Theatre — 17 SE 8th Ave, Portland

PHOTO BY OWEN CAREY

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ARTSL ANDIA AT THE PERFORMANCE • SEPT | OCT 2016

37


OUT & ABOUT MUSIC

DANCE

THEATER

ONE NIGHT ONLY!

FAMILY SHOW

DIAVOLO ARCHITECTURE IN MOTION WHITE BIRD

HUGHIE

IMAGO THEATRE

It’s summer of 1928 in the concrete jungle that is New York City; the sun is hot and the lights are bright, but small-time gambler Erie Smith is in a hotel lobby spinning tall tales about himself to a bored night clerk. Written by Eugene O’Neill, “Hughie” is an insightful two-character theatrical masterpiece. SEPTEMBER 2–18; IMAGO THEATRE

THE GRADUATE

BAG&BAGGAGE

Benjamin’s academic success and bright future are nearly swallowed whole by his sexual misadventures with Mrs. Robinson. This stage-set bittersweet odyssey of the ‘60s cult novel and revolutionary film, “The Graduate,” will transport you back to the beginnings of counter-culture and give you a good laugh along the way. SEPTEMBER 8–OCTOBER 2; THE VENETIAN THEATRE

LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS

PORTLAND CENTER STAGE

What would go on to inspire the Roger Corman film of the same name, this offBroadway musical follows florist’s assistant Seymour as he cares for a strange little plant with a lot of secrets. The mysterious plant brings about fame, fortune, and much more for our hapless but lovable protagonist, set to a score of Motown and rock n’ roll.

SW 6th between Oak & Pine hours MON–FRI 11:30am–Midnight SAT & SUN 5:00pm–Midnight reservation 503.688.5952 littlebirdbistro.com 215 SW 6TH AVE. PORTLAND, OR 97204

38

ARTSL ANDIA AT THE PERFORMANCE

SEPTEMBER 10–OCTOBER 16; U.S. BANK MAIN STAGE, THE ARMORY

RENÉE FLEMING

OREGON SYMPHONY

Renée Fleming inaugurates the Oregon Symphony’s 120th season! Her rich voice and enthralling presence never fails to captivate her audiences. Known as the “people’s diva,” this Grammy Award and National Medal of

Arts winning soprano has preformed at the White House, 2008 Olympic Games, the Super Bowl and Buckingham Palace. SEPTEMBER 10; ARLENE SCHNITZER CONCERT HALL

AUGUST WILSON’S HOW I LEARNED WHAT I LEARNED

PORTLAND PLAYHOUSE

Follow the life August Wilson and take a journey through the triumphs and tribulations of African-America history. This one-man autobiographical performance is both humorous and poignant, and uncovers the extraordinary mind of one of America’s most prolific playwrights. SEPTEMBER 21–OCTOBER 23 PORTLAND PLAYHOUSE

HOLD THESE TRUTHS

PORTLAND CENTER STAGE

Inspired by true events, Hold These Truths chronicles Gordan Hirabayashi’s struggle to fight the government program of mass incarceration of Japanese people during the second World War. With a passionate and unwavering belief in the constitution, Hirabayashi begins a journey towards understanding America’s triumphs— and failures. OCTOBER 1–NOVEMBER 13; ELLYN BYE STUDIO, THE ARMORY

DIAVOLO ARCHITECTURE IN MOTION

WHITE BIRD

Exhilarating athleticism and grace are showcased in this program as dancers traverse a transforming staircase and huge set of cubes. Diavolo presents three pieces including L.O.S.T. (Losing One’s Self Temporarily), a new two-part performance featuring fearless physicality. OCTOBER 6–8; NEWMARK THEATRE


OUT & ABOUT GIANTS

OREGON BALLET THEATRE

This production includes George Balanchine’s Serenade and William Forsythe’s In The Middle, Somewhat Elevated. In their time, these choreographers were innovators of modern ballet. The Oregon Ballet Theatre hopes to continue this evolution with their new production, Giants, created by Nicolo Fonte, which draws inspiration from the past and incorporates modern techniques and abilities. OCTOBER 8–15, 2016; KELLER AUDITORIUM

BOLERO+

NORTHWEST DANCE PROJECT

Opening with a bang, the season starts out with three promising choreographers who are carving their own paths in the future of contemporary dance. Ihsan Rustem, Lucas Crandall, and Felix Landerer will present three original pieces that pulse with passion and inspiration.

The Oregon Community Foundation provides tax-deductible options to help create a brighter horizon for Oregon’s future.

OCTOBER 13–15; LINCOLN PERFORMANCE HALL, PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY

CAMILLE A. BROWN & DANCERS WHITE BIRD

Award-winning choreographer Camille A. Brown’s newest work Black Girl: Linguistic Play explores African American women’s complex challenge of creating a self-identity in a politically and racially charged world. Brown is known for invigorating dance performances from the contemporary black female perspective. OCTOBER 13–15; NEWMARK THEATRE

THE DROWNING GIRLS

BAG&BAGGAGE

Rising from the watery graves of the bathtubs in which they drowned, three breathless brides convene to gather evidence against their conniving and murderous husband, George Joseph Smith. This astounding fantasia is an adaptation of the transcripts a 20th century murder trial in England, “Brides in a Bath.” OCTOBER 13–31; THE VENETIAN THEATRE

INBAL PINTO & AVSHALOM POLLAK

WHITE BIRD UNCAGED SERIES

Colorfully costumed dancers create inventive shapes against a gleaming white backdrop and poignant Japanese score in Wallflower. Inbal Pinto and Avshalon Pollak are worldrenowned choreographers and directors bringing their unique, award-winning work to White Bird for the first time in ten years. OCTOBER 20–22; LINCOLN HALL, PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY

oregoncf.org

DROWNING GIRLS

THREE BRIDES - ONE GROOM - THREE BATHTUBS - ONE HAUNTING TALE

A PACIFIC NORTHWEST PREMIERE OCTOBER 13 - 31, 2016 THE VENETIAN THEATRE, HILLSBORO BAGNBAGGAGE.ORG

ARTSL ANDIA AT THE PERFORMANCE • SEPT | OCT 2016

39


AN ARTSLANDIA FEATURE

the

of art

FUNDING I truly donʼt think of donations as a chief motivator when Iʼm at the point of decision-making about the kind of work we do. Itʼs rather the opposite direction: I work with artists and audience to identify our artistic aesthetic, then we seek funders who support the idea of the work we want to do. The other way around would feel backwards.

GROWTH Weʼre tr ying to reach the same group of people that all other art organizations are tr ying to reach: young adults, 35 and younger! Bringing in younger audiences creates a promising future.

PAT Z A G E L O W FRIENDS OF CHAMBER MUSIC

DAMASO RODRIGEZ

ARTIS TS REPERTORY THEATRE

DIVERSITY MORE PLAYS ARE MAKING IT TO THE STAGE THAT HAVE PEOPLE OF COLOR TELLING THEIR STORIES. MORE PLAYS ARE INTEGRATING PEOPLE OF COLOR INTO ROLES TYPICALLY PLAYED BY WHITE ACTORS. THE DOORS ARE OPENING, AND ARTISTS ARE WALKING THROUGH THEM.

WORLD PERSPECTIVE

K A R O L C O L LY M O R E

ARTS & EDUC ATION LEADER

In Hamburg, where I first conducted, the arts were government subsidized, whereas in the U.S., government contribution to the arts is negligible. In Europe, the best gigs went to conductors and musicians with the most experience. In the U.S., everybody wants to discover the new, the unknown talent. C A R L O S K A L M A R OREGON SYMPHONY

40

ARTSL ANDIA AT THE PERFORMANCE • SEPT | OCT 2016


DIVERSITY

THE ECONOMY

We took a long, hard look at ourselves. We committed to evolving in this arena holistically and authentically—which meant self-refl ection within individuals and organizationally; it meant transparent and humble examination of our presuppositions, internalized biases, relationship to privilege, and assessment of how those things play a part in the culture we create.

UPS AND DOWNS IN THE ECONOMY AFFECT THE ARTS. WHEN PEOPLE ARE FEELING FINANCIALLY SECURE AND PROSPEROUS, THEY'RE MORE LIKELY TO PARTICIPATE IN THE ARTS— AND THOSE ECONOMIC FACTORS ARE IMPACTED BY POLITICS.

MAUREEN PORTER

T H I R D R A I L R E P E R T O R Y T H E AT R E

ANNE MUELLER THE PORTLAND BALLET AN ARTS-FRIENDLY TOWN STARTS WITH AN ARTS-FRIENDLY MAYOR. OUR LAST MAYOR TO BE AN ALLY OF THE ARTS WAS SAM ADAMS; I’M HEARTENED TO THINK THAT OUR NEXT MAYOR WILL REASSERT THE ARTS AS A PRIORITY.

NICK FISH PORTLAND CIT Y COMMISSIONER

DIVERSITY Weʼre not a “Latinos only” club; we welcome others of different races and ethnicities to participate, enjoy, and actively collaborate. Our deepseated commitment to equity, diversity, and inclusion motivates and guides us.

FUNDING In my opinion, those corporations with names on the sides of high-rises should be loosening their purse strings. Come on! They have money! They have no problem funding every sports team from little league to professional. They obviously don’t see the importance of the arts.

RONNI LACROUTE

MAJOR THEATER DON OR

MELISSA SCHMITZ MIL AGRO THEATRE AR T W ORK BY M IC HA E L B U C HIN O E D I TE D F O R B R E V IT Y

ARTSL ANDIA AT THE PERFORMANCE • SEPT | OCT 2016

41


128 NW Eleventh Avenue, Portland, Oregon 97209

Chris Coleman, Artistic Director

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pcs.org

Portland Center Stage at

SEASON TICKETS START AT JUST $70.50! Visit www.pcs.org for more info.

LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS By Alan Menken and Howard Ashman On the U.S. Bank Main Stage Sept. 10 – Oct. 16, 2016

HOLD THESE TRUTHS By Jeanne Sakata | In the Ellyn Bye Studio Oct. 1 – Nov. 13, 2016

ASTORIA: Part One By Chris Coleman; based on the book ASTORIA: John Jacob Astor and Thomas Jefferson’s Lost Pacific Empire, A Story of Wealth, Ambition, and Survival by Peter Stark | On the U.S. Bank Main Stage Jan. 14 – Feb. 12, 2017

HIS EYE IS ON THE SPARROW

A musical biography of Ethel Waters

THE OREGON TRAIL By Bekah Brunstetter On the U.S. Bank Main Stage Oct. 29 – Nov. 20, 2016

By Larry Parr | In the Ellyn Bye Studio Feb. 4 – Mar. 19, 2017

WILD AND RECKLESS A new musical event from Blitzen Trapper

THE SANTALAND DIARIES

On the U.S. Bank Main Stage Mar. 16 – Apr. 30, 2017

By David Sedaris; adapted for the stage by Joe Mantello | In the Ellyn Bye Studio Nov. 26 – Dec. 24, 2016

HERSHEY FELDER AS IRVING BERLIN By Hershey Felder On the U.S. Bank Main Stage Nov. 30 – Dec. 30, 2016

Visit www.pcs.org for tickets! Katie deBuys in Stupid F***ing Bird. Photo by Patrick Weishampel/blankeye.tv.

LAUREN WEEDMAN DOESN’T LIVE HERE ANYMORE By Lauren Weedman On the U.S. Bank Main Stage Mar. 17 – Apr. 30, 2017

MARY’S WEDDING By Stephen Massicotte In the Ellyn Bye Studio Apr. 15 – May 28, 2017

CONSTELLATIONS By Nick Payne On the U.S. Bank Main Stage May 13 – June 11, 2017


WHAT’S YOUR

WE INTERVIEWED 50 OF OUR FAVORITE ARTISTS ABOUT THEIR FAVORITE PORTLAND PLACES.

FAVORITE

PLACE

Photo by David Rollins.

Vin Shambry ACTOR & AUTHOR

FAVORITE PLACE Colonel Summers Park

HOMETOWN Portland, Oregon

WHY IS THIS YOUR FAVORITE PLACE? “Colonel Summers Park was a place where I started going four years ago to learn lines, do yoga and light workouts early in the morning. There is a stillness and calmness to the parks vibe. The trees that surround the park are stunning.”

PORTLAND HAS CHANGED... “its identity quite a bit. It is my duty as a performing artist to elaborate and tell the stories of the people who have been displaced and how that pain feels.”

Vin is currently starring in The Gun Show at CoHo Productions. Go to artslandia.com and listen to Vin and The Gun Show playwright, E.M. Lewis, discuss the production with Susannah Mars, host of the podcast Adventures in Artslandia.

ARTSL ANDIA AT THE PERFORMANCE • SEPT | OCT 2016

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Photo by Will Nielsen.

One-of-a-kind actor Lauren Modica steels her nerve for a solo show.

44

ARTSL ANDIA AT THE PERFORMANCE • SEPT | OCT 2016


AN ARTSLANDIA FEATURE

It’s

an understatement to say that Lauren Modica's in a unique position. Quick to claim that she's the “most inspirational half-Black dwarf actor in town,” she's equally quick to laugh that accolade o�f, admitting she craves a bigger challenge than winning in a category where there's technically no contest.

Oh—and she’s fully aware that that level of laboration with Chicago’s legendary Second Murray, and she’s mustering her courage for frankness can shock people...but no more City comedy troupe. That show continued one of acting’s greatest feats: the one-perthan others’ remarks have sometimes over three holiday seasons and was by all son show. The ultimate assertion of self-reshocked her. From friends who’ve insensi- accounts a physical and comedic “workout,” flection and the pure, unadorned ability to tively blurted that they “couldn’t imagine” finally gave Modica the visibility and further entertain, the solo show is also the mode of raising a dwarf child; to a homeless inebriate on-the-job training her talents deserved. expression Modica’s biggest heroes Patton yelling “midget” at her in a parking lot; to Oswalt and Jeanine Garofalo have chosen. “I’ve been so, so lucky to work with the comBut she says the idea of the “one woman family members who initially discouraged panies I have, as often as I have,” she gushes. her from following her dream of acting, Modshow” comes with unique baggage. As she ica’s lived through a rare spectrum and prospective director Pat Moran of tragicomedy. Some stories, she’ll undertake preliminary planning, I think if I weren’t a dwarf, I wouldn’t volunteer in conversation. Others, they’ve already joked about one even be a performer. I’d have just stuck woman show clichés. she’s saving for the stage.

Since coming of age in Portland, with journalism or public relations. Modica’s paid her dues on the theater scene, starting with community productions, then attending “the gen- “I hope that continues! But I don’t want to feel erals” and bigger companies’ open auditions bitter or helpless if it ever changes.” to snag an ever-steadier stream of ensemble Well, there’s only one surefire way to ward roles. Having earned an extraordinary repoff The Casting Blues—star in your own utation for hard work, humor and intensity, play—so that’s the actor’s next plan. Modica’s in 2013 she got her first big break: a role (or currently workshopping an original two-peractually several) in Portland Center Stage’s son show with fellow local luminary Chris sketch comedy Twist Your Dickens, a col-

“I feel like people will expect me to wear a black turtleneck, and at some point I’m just gonna drop to my knees and let out a primal scream!” she laughs. “But who wants to listen to that?” She’d prefer, she says, to give her material a wry twist, and to balance any dwarf-specific stories with plenty of universal themes.

“Don’t get me wrong; I have deep grief sometimes for what I rolled in, basically, genetic CONTINUED ON PAGE 46

The Role of a Lifetime

by A.L. Adams


CONTINUED FROM PAGE 45 roulette, but I also have a fierce self-protectiveness that doesn’t let me go there. For some reason, this has been the year when people keep coming up to me and saying, ‘I know a dwarf who committed suicide.’ I realize they’re unburdening themselves by sharing...but I’m like, ‘Where does that leave me?’ Dwelling on unfairness onstage would be irresponsible. We’d all end up feeling worse. At the same time, I’m aware that many people see me as an inspiration...but I don’t want to frame myself that way, either, like:”

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ARTSL ANDIA AT THE PERFORMANCE • SEPT | OCT 2016

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to wear a black turtleneck, and at some point I’m just gonna drop to my knees and let out a primal scream! But who wants to listen to that?

Here, Modica perks up into her best suburban housewife impression. “Look at her! She’s doing it! Shopping at New Seasons! Living her best life!” Her switch into the funny voice evokes another Lauren—Lauren Weedman, who previewed her own solo show in progress, the PCS-commissioned Lauren Weedman Doesn’t Live Here Anymore, at this summer’s JAW Festival. Modica pulled some strings at PCS to workshop with Weedman, and came away energized. “She has such a great way of combining physicality, musicality, tragedy—and this ability to drop these profound revelations on you out of nowhere...and she doesn’t mind leaving space for you to really feel whatever she’s said.” Weedman encouraged Modica explore possibilities for props and sets, but Modica’s not sure she’s ready. “I don’t think I can wheel out some box of scarves on my first attempt,” she


September/October LAUREN MODICA laughs. “I’m more picturing just one stool in the middle of the stage. But we’ll see.” Her plans are proceeding at an interesting political moment. As Black Lives Matter haunts the national conscience, local diversity discussions are popping up with increased frequency among arts groups like Portland Emerging Arts Leaders and dedicated issue forums like The Color of Now (led by Modica’s friend and former Dickens castmate Chantal DeGroat). When it comes to “intersectionality”—the study of so-called minorities within minorities—Modica alone can address her three particular forms of “otherness.” “Dwarfism is always what people see first.” she declares, but she also admits that she’s pondered a list of “what ifs”: “I think if I weren’t a dwarf, I wouldn’t even be a performer. I’d have just stuck with journalism or public relations.” “If I were a different race—well, I am half white, and people always misidentify my race anyway. Hawaiian, Pacific Islander...most people guess wrong. Whenever they get it without guessing and just go, ‘Yeah, you’re Black,’ I’m like, ‘Thank you.’ So I guess if I were a different race, maybe not much would change?” And as a male dwarf? “I’d probably be a really loud, obnoxious, joker-partier-skater type of bro. I can totally see myself in a backwards baseball cap, taking dares, calling out strangers, with absolutely nothing to lose. Sometimes I play a character like that to tease my sisters, and they’re like, ‘Knock it off ! We don’t like that guy.’” As much as a solo show will enable Modica to explore her existing facets (bro voice optional), she also hopes it will help clear her passage into a next phase. “I’m starting to want things. Like a house. A dog. A fig tree. Maybe children? A solo show is something I’ve wanted but resisted for a long time, and this is the point when I have the fewest reasons I’ll ever have to say no. I want this show to be like building a tiny house: a secure structure that I can inhabit for a while and take it places. I intend to live without regret.”

JASON ALEXANDER

SINGS BROADWAY

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15, 7:30 PM SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 3 PM Jeff Tyzik, conductor Jason Alexander, vocals Long before becoming world-renowned as the iconic George Costanza on “Seinfeld,” Jason Alexander was a Tony Award-winning Broadway song and dance man. His appearance features hilarious retellings of his journey to and on the Broadway stage, with great music from the theater, along with comedy and audience interaction. It’s a much-heralded performance of music, laughter, and fun. Tickets start at $23 – while they last!

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Modica pauses. And we feel it. . ARTSL ANDIA AT THE PERFORMANCE • SEPT | OCT 2016

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EXPERIENCE CREATIVITY

THROUGH RHODA’S RHODA S EYES

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ARTSL ANDIA AT THE PERFORMANCE • SEPT | OCT 2016

PDXOS-PortlandOpenStudios_Artslandia_2.23x9.6875_F.indd 8/21/16 1 2:59 PM


AN ARTSLANDIA FEATURE

THE SOUND OF TWENTY FINGERS DANCING

An afternoon practice with XX Digitus Duo YOU KNOW WHAT’S HARD TO SHARE? A PAIR OF ROLLER

by A.L. Adams

SKATES. A SINGLE TIRE SWING. OR ONE PIANO. WATCHING XX DIGITUS DUO RUN THROUGH THEIR PRACTICE, I’M GETTING FLASHBACKS OF TRYING TO SHARE WITH MY SISTER.

I

n Maria Garcia’s spacious Eliot living room, she and Momoko Muramatsu deftly and emotively co-pilot a Fazioli grand piano (“the Ferrari of pianos,” as Momoko calls it), pausing occasionally to discuss dynamics and scribble notes on their sheet music. As one piece percolates and rises to a rumble, the pencil flies off the piano and skitters across the hardwoods, startling Maria’s dog Cosmo from a rapturous nap. It’s easy to see why the Duo describes their coordinated playing as “choreography.” Their four hands often crisscross over each other; three of their four feet evade the piano’s three pedals while one foot plays designated driver; and whenever one player begins a run up or down the keyboard, the other fluidly completes it. As with roller skates or a tire swing, it takes a lot of synchronized swaying to move forward and stay out of each other’s way. And that’s only the half of it. “In practice, we’re more subdued. We’re giving this about fifty percent,” Momoko explains. “When we’re performing, we’re giving a hundred percent, so we’re twice as animated!” What’s more, Maria is near-sighted while Momoko is far-sighted, tempting them to lean

respectively forward and backward. They’ve long since set some ground rules: never share a bench, keep your elbows in. It’s a wonder this system works at all, and a marvel how beautifully. Each accomplished concert pianists in their own right, Maria and Momoko formed XX Digitus Duo in 2014—more recently than their rapport might suggest. That’s because the pair have been crossing paths since college. They first met while training at the New England Conservatory of Music in Boston, then reconnected when they both lived in New York years later. “Life brought us back together in different places,” says Maria, and each time, they discussed putting together a project; it just never happened til they were both in Portland. Embracing Portland’s reputation for flouting convention, the friends forewent an obvious name choice like “Muramatsu/Garcia” in favor of more alternative branding: XX “isn’t ex-ex,” Maria clarifies, “it’s the Roman numeral for twenty”—and “Digitus” is Latin for fingers. “We did wonder, ‘Does it sound risqué?’” she notes, “but ultimately, we like that it’s unique and sets us apart.” Their expanded tagline, “Twenty Finger Symphonic Sounds of Eclectic Repertoire,” sums up their mission as well as their name’s meaning. The novelty of four-hand piano is far from the Duo’s only hook. They’re equally if not more invested in that part about “Eclectic Repertoire,” CONTINUED ON PAGE 50

ARTSL ANDIA AT THE PERFORMANCE • SEPT | OCT 2016

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XX DIGITUS DUO CONTINUED FROM PAGE 49

to which they could add, “rare.” Nerds for the four-hand form, they’ve collected hardto-find pieces from artists all over the world who’ve experimented with it. Today, they play from a book of Renaissance works that Hungarian composer György Kurtág reset in four-hand to pla y alongside his wife Márta well into their old age. They also bust out some four-hand arrangements of Juan Morel Compos that Maria retrieved from the closet of a former teacher in Puerto Rico who had a four-hand act with her sister. Between the pieces Maria has inherited and those Momoko’s gotten from her mother Tamiko Muramatsu, a career concert pianist in Japan, Digitus’ catalog contains some deep cuts. Some of the hardest works to adapt, oddly enough, are pieces conceived for two full pianos. They tend to be written to exuberantly engulf the whole length of both keyboards, and hence are tricky or even impossible to shrink. Surprisingly, Digitus often finds it easier to convert whole orchestra scores to piano duos, or to divvy a solo piano piece into two parts. Some works, like Morel Campos’ Tambien Lo Dudo, come notated in two distinct sets of different sheet music, while other pieces present two parts in a doubledecker stack, with two treble and two bass clefs stacked into every bar. Reading such scores is certainly not as easy as Maria and Momoko make it sound, but it’s becoming second nature.

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ARTSL ANDIA AT THE PERFORMANCE • SEPT | OCT 2016

XX Digitus Duo debuted in the summer of 2014 at Director Park, purportedly the firstever four-hand group to grace All Classical Radio’s Thursdays @ Three. After putting in a few more appearances at the Old Church and the Community Music Center, they realized their next step should be recording, for which they sought and got a 2016 project grant from Regional Arts and Culture Council. Grant money bankrolled their debut e.p., 4 + 1, including a new commission by composer Ken Selden and an upcoming November album release at Alberta Rose Theatre. Conceived as more “event” than mere “concert”—the show will feature Agnieszka Laska Dancers and perhaps more special guests. After that, they’d like to settle into a threeshow-a-season schedule and potentially some travel, and continue to establish themselves as a fixture in Portland’s thriving chamber-tainment scene. And maybe do some gigs on two pianos? “We can dream.” . For more information about XX Digitus Duo’s upcoming performances, visit www. xxdigitusduo.com.

C

M

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CM

MY

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CMY

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mind opening

since 1869.

OREGON EPISCOPAL SCHOOL

open houses

Grades 6 to 12 (parents and students)

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Always

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DOWN

1. He is perhaps one of the most celebrated and well-known composers of all time.

17. The song “When You Wish Upon A Star” is originally from Disney’s .

3. The Drowning Girls is a play based on a murder trial in this country.

19. Jason Alexander, who is making a triumphant return to Broadway, is most famous for his character in this ‘90s sitcom .

5. First name of T.J. Miller’s character in HBO’s Silicon Valley.

.

6. What is the real last name of the author of Cat in the Hat (not the pen name Dr. Seuss)?

22. Female comedian originally recognized for her work on The Chris Rock Show.

8. Explosions in the Sky created the soundtrack for a television series centered around this sport.

23. Jazz vocalist Catherine Russel was born in this state.

11. This African-American playwright produced a series of 10 plays, each taking place in a different decade.

26. This dance company explores a blend of body movement and architecture.

13. Not once, not twice, but

.

15. An event in which participants wear a costume and a mask. 52

21. Coo-coo-cachoo, Mrs.

ARTSL ANDIA AT THE PERFORMANCE • SEPT | OCT 2016

27. John Williams, renowned cinematic composer and pianist, produced the film score for which successful 1975 thriller? 30. What is the name of Shakespeare’s longest play?


ACROSS

A WORLD PREMIERE!

2. King in Shakespeare’s A Winter’s Tale. 4. Dia de los Muertos is a tradition largely practiced throughout Latin . America, but originated in 7. Last name of Vietgone’s playwrite.

THE MUSICAL

PHANTOM of the

AUDITORIUM BASED ON THE SCHOLASTIC BY BOOK SERIES

9. This is the name of the protagonist detective in the sci-fi play The Nether.

NEWMARK

THEATRE

R.L . STINE

10. The real first name of singersongwriter Anderson Paak.

www.octc.org

12. Nick Jones, writer of the play Trevor, is well known for his writing of this popular Netflix original series (acronym). 14. The Legend of Zelda was originally developed by

OCT 22– NOV 20

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16. During the filming of The Rocky Horror Picture Show, actress Susan was sick with the flu.

Recommended for ages 8 & up

18. The name of this play is also the name of a specific cut of meat. 19. In the original story of The Wizard of Oz, Dorothy’s magical shoes were not red, but .

™ & © Scholastic Inc. Scholastic, Goosebumps and associated logos are trademarks and/or registered marks of Scholastic Inc. Based on Goosebumps® Phantom of the Auditorium.

oregon arts commission

20. In Broadway’s Chicago: The Musical, who plays the lead role of Roxie Hart? 22. Roe v.

.

24. The year of 1776 marks America’s . 25. What is the title of the most recent album of boy band “Boyz II Men”? 28. Before premiering on Broadway, The Lion King was first performed as a musical in the state of . 29. A synonym for ghost. 31. The Old Church, one of Portland’s historical buildings and renovated event venues, is an example of what kind of architecture? 32. As his first instrument ever, David Bowie was given a at the age of 12. 33. A musical group consisting of five members.

Think you got ‘em all right? Find the answers to this crossword puzzle on our website! ARTSLANDIA.COM

ARTSL ANDIA AT THE PERFORMANCE • SEPT | OCT 2016

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WHAT’S YOUR

DAY

MANY OF PORTLAND’S MOST TALENTED PERFORMERS HAVE SIDE JOBS—OR EVEN COMPLETE CAREERS—BEYOND THE PERFORMING ARTS. HERE’S ONE!

JOB

Margo Yohner AERIAL DANCER & PRINT COMPANY PRESIDENT BY DAY President of Bridgetown Printing Company

BY NIGHT

“In both roles, I aim to please! Whether I’m onstage or off, I’m most satisfied when customers, audience members, employees, fellow dancers, and my employer and artistic directors are elated with my performance. The biggest difference? Financial responsibility. At AWOL, I don’t have oversight of the Profit & Loss.” –Margo

PHOTO BY JASON QUIGLEY.

Margo is a performer with A-WOL Dance Collective, a company who defies gravity by using various types of apparatus—think hoops and silks—to dance aloft. She’s appeared recently in A-WOL’s Art in the Dark, a fantastical production among the trees that must be seen to be believed.


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