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November January 2014 2013

Oxana Jad copyright © Oxana Jad, VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

ADEL GORGY TANYA STADNICHENCKO TUGBA RENKCI JOLANDA STRAATHOF ANA CVEJIC SHARYN O’SHAUGHNESY SCOTT D’ARCY KRISTINA SEREIKAITE OXANA JAD ELLEN VAN DER SCHAAF Simon Raab


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Oxana Jad's work focuses on the development of artistic cross-media projects which address bodyimage identity. Her work thereby encompasses an interest in the human psyche from a philosophical, religious and mythological pointof-view

Adel Gorgy

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Scott D’Arcy My main drive to make art is a pursuit of truth around how images function and exsist through a long line of experimentation. I am drawn to beauty and very interested in its construction and purpose from a cultural stand point.

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Can an abstract work be further abstracted? Can a conceptual work be abstracted?

Tanya Stadnichencko The feeling of the dominant natural culture is the axis of most projects. She compare asocial environment areas, the urban places and human work directly with them, the author explores all known laws, exposing them.

Can a vision encompass art, nature and self? The answer to these questions is a resounding yes.

Kristina Sereikaite

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special issue

January 2014 Oxana Jad

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The main subject of my photography is a human beings, because they naturally contain the biggest secrets and riches of life. Be it birth or death, joy or fear, vanishing or blossomimg beauty, destructive or creative power – I am srongly attracted by the contrasting natures.

Ana Cvejic My work is based on studying the human body. The aim of my research is displaying the naked body on the way which it shows its emotions, excitements and experiences.

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Tugba Renkci

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74 Sharyn O’ Shaughnessy I was drawn to the dwellings in particular, monumental in the dusty expanse. They are familiar, built to contain people and bare witness to their lives. Structures that come together and come apart over time.

for an artist in process composing a work of art, the artist can affect any object and case that he/she sees in the environment. It is impossible to abstraction his/her work from the nature.

Ellen van der Schaaf

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My interest in this, my passion for art and my experience with awareness I want to combine in my work and propagate. Approximately three years ago , I also focussed on photography.

Often my drawings show an uncomfortable relationship between the characters in the scene, or between the characters and their surroundings. I also see myself as the designer of a very detailled set in which these situations occur.

David Wilde

Jolanda Straathof

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The process of creating and the presentation of art is a fundamental blessing and encouragement for human society that arises from the artists' ability to open to the primal elements of life's appearances. Feeling the heart of events and finding the freedom to express that in media and terms beyond the distortions of ego is a liberating thing that wakes people up to the natural benevolent vividness of circumstances.

Erin O’Malley “With digital macro photography I have been exploring the interaction of light with transparent and reflective surfaces. I consider my photography a series of experiments, a process of trial and error that builds upon past succes-ses through the manipulation of variables”

Feel free to submit your artworks to our art review: just write to peripheral_arteries@dr.com III


Peripheral ARTeries

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JL Maxcy

Peripheral ARTeries

Oxana Jad (Russia / Germany)

Oxana Jad's work focuses on the development of artistic cross-media projects which address body-image-identity. Her work thereby encompasses an interest in the human psyche from a philosophical, religious and mythological point-of-view; the exploration of the human body and its social codes in terms of ethnic, historical and art historical perspectives; and the body within the context of advancing scientific research and discoveries. Currently, her photographic compositions focus particularly on staging complex personal interactions.

Oxana Jad is a Russian artistic-photographer living in Germany and Spain and is considered a master of the psychological portrait and the picturesque landscape. The fascination of her work lies in its symbol-laden aesthetic and the creative and is on display in numerous public and private collections and has received several prestigious awards. 2


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Oxana Jad

an interview with

Oxana Jad Hello Oxana and welcome to Peripheral ARTeries! I would like to start this interview with the following questions: what in your opinion defines a work of art and, moreover, what are the features that mark the contemporariness of an artwork?

Art for me is something that creates a sense of wonder and pushes the observer to question and contemplate; something that pleases the eye, unleashes the imagination, inspires and evokes emotions; an interesting and stimulating idea that is supported by corresponding technical skills.  

I believe that being contemporary is very important for an artist. Some artists achieve this by dealing with issues that affect the world we currently live in, some use the latest technologies in the creation of their works and thereby become contemporary. There will always be new movements that suddenly drive many artists, as directed by a magic hand, in a similar direction. Personally, I very much like living in the Now. I am interested in current issues as well as the latest technologies. It all flows consciously and unconsciously into my art.

Oxana Jad

However, my particular passion is not the external world, but the world seen through the prism of the human psyche. Dreams, wishes, ideas…

of the understanding of art. Photography was something I discovered at the Dresden Academy. Students were free to experiment and try out various forms of artistic expression. In Dresden I was in the sculpture class, but I quickly noticed that the speed with which I was able to realise my ideas was too slow for me.

Would you like to tell us something about your background? After graduating from the Academy of Arts in Dresden you attended other programs both in Dresden and in Leipzig: how have these experiences impacted the way you create your art? By the way, I would also like to ask you on your point of view regarding formal training... I sometimes wonder if a certain kind of training can stifle a young artist's creativity…?

So I focused on photography. At the Academy in Leipzig I deepened my knowledge and skills in photography. Studies in Dresden were very free-spirited. There were no constraints and you could stay focused on the subjects that interest you. For example, for one year I devoted myself almost exclusively to anatomy and figure drawing. Cassandra Hanks

I enjoyed my time at both academies! The exchange with other aspiring artists and with motivating professors opened new horizons for me in terms 6


Oxana Jad

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From the „Foreign Ego RS“ series, 2011 photography, 28 x 41 inches

Later, in Leipzig, where I studied photography, I was particularly interested in technology. I locked myself in the studio and experimented with light for hours and hours…

ke time, some are quickly developed. That depends on how my muse is inspiring me... Most of my artworks are montages. I construct the image and every detail is important and has its own special place.

Before starting to elaborate on your production, would you like to tell our readers something about your work process? In particular, what technical aspects do you mainly focus on in your work? And how much preparation and time do you put in before and during the process of creating a piece?

What interests me is the image of reality, the realm of dreams and emotion, not reality itself and not its documentation. Last but not least, I do not work exclusively with photographic methods.

I always find myself being in a work process, no matter what I do. As an artist, you can never switch off. I'm always looking for a "story". Some ideas ta-

There are techniques of image processing and computer generation involved...

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Oxana Jad

From the „Foreign Ego RS“ series, 2011 photography, 28 x 41 inches

Now let's focus on your specific artworks: I would like to start with Foreign Ego, a recent and interesting series that our readers have already admired in the starting pages of this article: could you tell us something about the genesis of these pieces? What was your initial inspiration? 

but it rhymes“. We all experience very similar situations over and over again, have congruent feelings, are happy, suffer, hope, fail, love, hate... I intended to intermix and juxtapose the highs and lows of the fate of legendary personalities with ordinary people „next door“. This was the genesis of "Foreign Ego".

I'm very much interested in the topic of legendary personalities and their fate. I draw my inspiration from the stories connected with these extraordinary people.

A series that impacted me particularly and on which I would like to spend some time is Identities: even though I'm aware that this might sound a bit naive, I have to say that in a certain sense it unsettles me a bit... it's an effective mix between anguish and thoughtlessness, maybe hidden happiness... I would go as far as to state that this photo, rather than

How would you describe the message and the narrative behind this project — that is, the idea you would most like to convey or the story you are trying to tell?

Mark Twain once said „history doesn’t repeat itself 8


Oxana Jad

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From the Identities series, photography, 28 x 41 inches

simply descriptive, poses a question and forces us to meditate...

to ask you if, in your opinion, personal experience is an absolutely indispensable step in the creative process... Do you think that the creative process can be disconnected from direct experience? 

I am fascinated by the theme of identity. Identity has many facets and is an incredibly complex system that can neither be simply explained nor easily comprehended. What we cannot rationally explain often appears mystical and sometimes even threatening. I wanted to reflect this feeling in my pictures.

If an actor himself has never personally experienced certain emotions, would he be able to authentically reproduce these feeling on stage or on a movie set?

The interplay of the differences and similarities of the childrens’ faces evokes contradiction, conflict and the ambiguity of identity.

Like Stanislavski and his „Method Acting“ which has been the major influence in modern film acting, I believe that personal experiences are very helpful if you want to portray not merely the external but that which hides behind the facade. Having personally experienced certain situations definitely faciltates the creative process.

As a photographer, you are considered a master of the psychological portrait: in a certain sense, a part of your work could be defined as a reportage about human perception: so I would like 9


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Oxana Jad

„The dream“, 2007 photography, 28 x 71 inches

I would like to stop for a moment to consider the "function" of the landscape in your art: especially in Personal Myths it doesn't seem to be just passive background...

Fog invokes doubt, conflict, a dream or a sign of mystery. The wonderful thing is that the viewer can draw his own interpretations.

And I'm sort of convinced that some information and ideas are hidden, or even "encrypted" in the environment we live in, so we need, in a way, to decipher them. Maybe one of the roles of an artist could be to reveal unexpected sides of Nature, especially of our inner Nature... what's your opinion on this? 

In the style of 18th century French painting, art is open to interpretation and every viewer can create their own storyline.

Landscape is the language that I use to tell a story. A dense forest could represent opaque thoughts. Heavy clouds are like a symbol of impending doom. Murky water could symbolize ambiguous intentions, a rising storm is like radical change.

Cassandra Hanks 10


Oxana Jad

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you? Anything coming up for you professionally that you would like readers to be aware of?

I'm currently working on a very exciting project. I do not want to reveal too much, yet I can give away that it deals with legends, passion, mysticism, fate and the often opaque role of serendipity.

An interview by peripheral_arteries@dr.com

For all the images copyright Š Oxana Jad, VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

During these years your works have been exhibited in many venues and moreover you have received several prestigious awards. How important is feedback for you and what impact does it have? Do you ever, during the creative process, reflect upon who will be your target audience?

Feedback is essential! Art is the language with which you express yourself. Of course you want to be understood! But during the conceptual process, my primary focus is on the story I want to convey. Thank you for your time and for sharing your thoughts with us, Oxana. My last question deals with your future plans: what's next for

Anima II, 2008 28 x 18 inches 11


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Scott D'Arcy (United Kingdom) An artist’s statement

My main drive to make art is a pursuit of truth around how images function and exsist through a long line of experimentation. I am drawn to beauty and very interested in its construction and purpose from a cultural stand point. Collective notions of beauty and taste are shared and represented through a wide range of mediums over long periods of history. Even though beauty can sometimes be guilty of buying in to narcissism, what it has in common with the functionality of images is a high level of illusion, that depicts a world more seductive and appealing than our own. The tension between the sentiment the viewer experiences through their gaze and the reality of images is for the most part what my practise investigates. Images are very ephemeral things, put quite simply they are very sophisticated systems and signs that add to our culture. The intangibility of the digital images in a frame-less, free-flowing world has been a key aspect that I believe best represents their paradoxical state. Such ideas are well recognized and explored in Hans Belting's "An Anthropology of Images" and Vilem Flusser's "Into the Universe of Technical Images". I welcome intangibility and surrealism because they best mimics how we really think about images. When we loose contact with a physical copy or walk away from the screen, we hold what we have seen psychologically. Our body becomes a medium that stores what we are exposed to.

Baroque No.7 - photogra

I reference and borrow a lot of content; this could be anything from aesthetics of certain styles to elements from famous historical paintings. For me appropriation is vital when trying to understand an images collective reading, and being able to set a certain appeal against itself in a very different way but still in a very visually way. The viewer then has an opportunity to really think about the new image with a new context. The creative process is not so separate from these ideas. I have a tendency to view the world as an infinite universe of visual references, that merge over one another. A great deal of time is spent scouting locations and building up an achieve or collection through a range of sources; locations, online images from facebook, books, old master paintings. In order to decide which visual engines will work together. 12


Scott D'Arcy

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phy and digital media - 2011

Although digital media allows a platform for manipulation and surrealism, physical distortions can be equally as interesting due to their 'no tricks' approach. Reflections, photographs through water and the doubling up of images in glass are good physical examples of an images temporal existence.

sometimes problematic to assume a final drawninto a state of speculation. It isreading even when the work is finished, but this is what images must do to continue if they want to maintain out attention. So I embrace and play with their shifting and fluid nature, as oppose to making representations or illustrations of more solid events or concepts.

Since my art relies heavily on an audience recognising something familiar in order to be 13


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Scott D'Arcy

an interview with

Scott D'Arcy Hello Scott and welcome to LandEscape. I would start this interview with my usual ice breaker question: what in your opinion defines a work of Art? Moreover, what could be the features that mark the contemporariness of an artwork?

It's a deceptively complex question, ever since we came to the conclusion that art can no longer exist outside of itself. Therefore there are not many boundaries left to push. Anything can be art, although in saying that, not everything is. For me a work of art is defined by its ability to convey a set of ideas in a way that captivates a viewer through sensory experience. Sometimes an emotional connection is seen as a very important aspect, but personally i think this is a by product and down to qualities within the individual and not the work in question. I think pieces that are set out to be contemporary from the start tend to be guilty of being too 'slick' or polished. This doesn't go for the majority of contemporary art, but id say it's sometimes a good indicator of an artist appealing to a built up contemporary fashion in a way.

Scott D'Arcy

Would you like to tell us something about your background? You have studied at the Leeds Metropolitain University: how has this experience of formal training impacted on the way you currently produce your works? By the way, I sometimes I wonder if a certain kind of formal training could even stifle a young artist's creativity... what's your point?

rent up the following week is more often than not frowned upon, even though i have found that if you are serious about your art, no two things are completely unrelated. However at the time i was very much aware that this was what universities had to do in order to grade work. I made art for myself as well as my education and it did make me to value the variety, which is something best recognised early on in an artists progression between what they like to do and what they have to do.

I did study at Leeds Met yes. Institutions are useful in terms of sharing ideas and co-operation. I found having people to hand very useful with my practise in particular because it relies heavily on collective and shared readings. However the downside of making work that is being formally assessed in that way means you are forced to focus on one area. There is freedom within the scope you choose. However wanting to pick something totally diffe-

An art students creativity can be 'stifled' mostly by self consciousness, specifically when they compare themselves to their fellow pupils. The most Cassandra Hanks 14


Scott D'Arcy

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After Vermeer - digital collage - 2012

most common aspect of this i found is when two people arrived at similar areas. I learned the trick is not to compare yourself to your class mates, just relax and understand your practise better. The natural feeling you get is to take a different route, but this is more often than not a false sense of security.

during the process of creating a piece?

Before starting to elaborate about your production, would you like to tell to our readers something about your process and set up for making your artworks? In particular, what technical aspects do you mainly focus on your work? And how much preparation and time do you put in before and

The preparation onto what engines to use in conjunction with each other requires a great deal of preparation and research, mainly around the formal elements of images but also the philosophical concerns around out perception. I also spend a lot of time scouting out locations and collecting images in order to have a more practical connection to my

It varies depending on the piece. There are a whole host of different techniques i use within the computer (mainly photoshop) and for the most part my practise has been a cycle of pushing images back and forth between the tangible world and digital manipulation until it is resolved.

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Scott D'Arcy

Birth - digital collage - 2013

creative process. Lighting techniques and compositional decisions like in “Birth� is very tough and requires patience. Its an endless game of trail and error, constant observation and experimentation.

After Rembrantd - photography and digital me

Now let's focus on your artworks: I would like to start with Baroque No.7, a recent and interesting piece that our readers have already admired in the introductory pages of this article: would you tell us something about the genesis of this work? What was your initial inspiration?

into a labyrinth of fake tattoos, doubled up figures and digital manipulation. Which i felt reflected our recycling of these tastes and has the possibility to build on its social conjunction. Another pieces of yours in which I would like to spend some words are After Rembrandt and After Vermeer... Although it's crystal clear that this series is pervaded by irony, I have to admit that I'm some puzzled about this aspect: in fact the irony springs from the super imposition of materials of different eras... all in all, if we admire the first version of Cara-vaggio's The Inspiration of Saint Matthew, we can recognize the angel's hand driving Sain Mattew's pen... so why an angel shouldn't help an old man to write with an iPad? I really hope that you will forgive me for this naif observation...

My initial inspiration was the investigation of the multiverse of layers and realities images exist on and the high drama achieved in baroque paintings. I found this aesthetic style to crop up everywhere, from films to fashion from a time where we couldn't have lived. It's as a kind of diachronic nostalgia, which i obviously found very interesting and decided to explore. Baroque No.7 was made at the beginning of my real use of the photography studio. Its intention was to made a new work out of powerful elements of much older ones in the hopes of creating a piece that intoxicated the viewer through visual familiarities. Leading them

I think that if that where the case, we would just 16


Scott D'Arcy

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confusion is the same as the right amount of creative speculation. It goes without saying that modern technology -and in particular the recent development of infographics- has dramatically revolutionized the idea of painting itself: this forces us to rethink to the materiality of the artwork itself, since just few years ago an artwork was first of all -if you forgive me this unpleasent classification- a manufactured article: it was the concrete materialization of an idea... As a digital based artist with high levels of experience both in Painting and in Photography, you would like to know you opinion about this...

Id have to agree with you. Artwork did used to be a concrete manifestation of ideas, it still very much is. However I am reluctant to show any work as print or hard copies, as i believe the digital best represents my concept of the fluid existence of images. I think there are some interesting traits that appear when looking at a painting that non-tangible displays play with. That core desire to touch a realistic paintings originates from some primal urge to test the illusion of the world the painting depicts. Touching the surface disrupts that false perception; one which the artist tried to achieve in its creation. (if we are talking about high realism painting) Otherwise we wouldn't constantly remind visitors of a gallery not to touch the paintings.

dia - 2013

be changing materials within the reality of the painting. Consequently the characters might then be drawn into areas of convincing fancy dress, which would be very final. In a way I am glad you're left at least a little bit at a loose end, but to clarify the irony is important in my re-contextualization of these images. By super imposing two different states in the same setting; using either surrealism of the same figure multiple times. Or alternatively by making a work that appears to be one very resolved image but is in fact two from different periods in time. It prompts the viewer to really participate in their own speculation around the work. So to finalise, the irony wouldn't have this effect if the work was a more linear one. Neither would it be as effective if everyone arrived at the exact same conclusion, it would make the images very bland and dead in my opinion. To me a small amount of

Upon reflection No.23 - photography - 2013

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Scott D'Arcy

After John Martin - digital collage and manipulation - 2012 one of the roles of an artist could be to reveal unexpected sides of Nature, especially of our inner Nature... what's your point about this?

It's that desire that is completely denied when using digital screens or projections, it makes the work not only appear more fake. But destroys the artists 'hand' and distancing a viewer from the creation process. Ironically i find this very useful when getting to the core focus of my work. Digital displays free the image from this distraction of touch and the tangible fixation of a material. If you want ideas to orbit around a particular subject as i do, a temporal medium is best.

I suppose it depends what you mean by inner nature. If you mean it physiologically, i suppose you could see some overlap between that which we project onto the world from personal experience, and an images ability to deflect these experiences back to us in a more mysterious way. Thus peaking our attachment and making us want to explore it, which is exactly how it works for me. I have this huge collection of images, and when i discover something i always have this need or habit to try and attach it to some other picture. This discovery could be anything from a found image, to a location, or something i have been around for years and only just realised its potential. That's when the practical investigation really begins, even though i wouldn't go as far as to say my work is very personal. Hanks But there is defiantly Cassandra

As you have remarked in your artist's statement, you have a tendency to view the world as an infinite universe of visual references, that merge over one another... I would go as far as to state that your Art help us to notice a lot of details around us, allowing us to discover the poetry inside them... I'm sort of convinced that some informations & ideas are hidden, or even "encrypted" in the environment we live in, so we need to decipher them. Maybe that 18


Scott D'Arcy

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something very human about this activity of exploring, deciphering and understanding the world through the memory of images we can relate to. During these years, your artworks have been exhibited in many occasions and moreover you have been recently shortlisted for Vantage art prize... it goes without saying that feedbacks and especially awards are capable of supporting an artist, I was just wondering if an award -or better, the expectation of an award- could even influence the process of an artist... By the way, how much important is for you the feedback of your audience? Do you ever think to whom will enjoy your Art when you conceive your pieces?

Upon reflection No.52 - photography - 2013

Absolutely not. Awards gained, or short listed for don't do it for me (although they are quite nice for a young artists status) I think most artists

would just enjoy the self gratification in the initial moments that we all constantly crave. Beyond that awards and prizes are mostly tools for academics to try and differentiate between good and bad art I guess. They wouldn't influence many dedicated artists I don't think. I do often wonder about who my art is for, if that is the same thing. The references are the most problematic aspect to wrestle with in a pieces reading. But I don't believe the work should stride to be educational through what it appropriates. A small clue in the title is enough for anyone interested in how it originated. Id say my work is for anyone who isn't to fixed on convention and likes to apply their own ideas a lot. Thank you for your time and for sharing with us your thoughts, Scott. My last question deals with your future plans: anything coming up for you professionally that you would like readers to be aware of?

Id like to mention that I am currently collaborating with a hand full of artist in Yorkshire and the Midlands. Some interesting projects are mushrooming out, including some surrounding gaming culture and reconstructing films stills. It's a bit of a left turn for me as my practise has up until this point been solitary, but there will some exciting exhibitions and events for 2014 but I wouldn't like to say any more than that on their behalf. Upon reflection No.17 - photography - 2013

An interview by peripheral_arteries@dr.com

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Adel Gorgy (USA) an artist’s statement

Our senses and minds abstract what we call reality. Art further abstracts this abstraction. In art, abstraction does not end with the artist; the final touches are those of the viewer. When Magritte painted “Ceci n'est pas une pipe” (This not a pipe) he realized only half a truth. The full truth is that once the painting has been exhibited and seen, it can be anything the viewer chooses, regardless of what Magritte intended. It is “Ceci n'est pas une pipe” only to Magritte himself. The contemporary artist, Sherry Levine pushed the concept further in her photographs after Walker Evans or Monet where the medium of photography was her way of abstracting the perceived realism of Evans and the Impressionism of Monet. In my recent work “Seeing Art Anew,” I have added my own layer of abstraction to the works of Matisse, Cezanne, Monet and Van Gogh, and further abstracted works of Picasso. In this series, Abstracting Abstraction - Traces of Pollock, de Kooning and Warhol, I chose three artists, not only because I love their work, or because we have shared the same environment—the beautiful coast of Long Island—but also for what their work means to me in context of my own. Can an abstract work be further abstracted? Can a conceptual work be abstracted? Can a vision encompass art, nature and self? The answer to these questions is a resounding yes. For me, Pollock’s work is an abstraction of an imaginary landscape that exists only in his mind. It is a vision executed through “action painting” that encompasses time and chance, a mixture of accident and intent. Where he aims his paint is one thing; where it actually falls is another. De Kooning’s morphing of lines and adding texture and color to remove the boundaries between representation and abstraction is a visual

Traces of Pollock #3, Pigment Print, 2013, 40 x 72 in. (100 x 180 cm.)

suspension of disbelief. Warhol’s superb ability to make art from the ordinary, to challenge what is customary and expected and present it regardless of the medium is fascinating and inspiring. As I think about the work of all three, I know that what I think may have nothing to do with what they thought. What I see in their work may have little to do with what they saw or intended to say. Looking at their work, for me, is a journey I take. And what I see and perceive is very personal and is only and 20


Roeland Kneepkens

totally my own. This work is a journal of these journeys into the work of Pollock, de Kooning and Warhol, using my own medium, which is photography. It is a journey into my own world, where I like to believe that all is abstraction and realism is a fiction. I hope the viewer will look at my work freely, and alter it in their minds as Pollock did, morph it as de Kooning did, and discover that nothing is ordinary, as Warhol did. I invite them to abstract it further,

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and discover the infinite and the limitless. What they will see is an image and meaning that will have something or nothing to do with what I meant it to be. The final reality of an artwork rests with the viewer, and yet for the artist, his vision and his concept are unscathed. They are different journeys, whose path may or may not cross, but neither is more Ernest or less true than the other. In this work are traces of Pollock, de Kooning and Warhol. 2013, 60x70cm from the The gentlemen’s cabinet series

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Adel Gorgy

Peripheral ARTeries

an interview with

Adel Gorgy Hello Adel and welcome to Peripheral ARTeries. I would start this interview with my usual introductory question: what in your opinion defines a work of Art? Moreover, do you think that there's still a contrast between tradition and contemporary?

Thank you. It's a real pleasure to talk with you about my work. Art is an integral part of life, and its definition is as complex and variable as life, itself. But, as for what it means to me--my medium is photography, and it has been part of me all my life. Art is my way to sharpen observation, bring vision to a focus, provoke thought and evoke emotion. It is my way of heightening awareness and overcoming the apathy resulting from the comfort of the usual and ordinary. And yes, there is a difference between traditional or conventional and contemporary art. Traditional art exists within boundaries defined by historical and conventional standards. Contemporary art is defined by the artist. It is a dynamic process that changes, adapts and evolves with social and technical realties.

Adel Gorgy

Would you like to tell us something about your background? Are there any experiences that impacted on the way you produce your art these days? By the way, I would like to ask to an experienced artist as you are if a certain kind of formal training could even stifle an artist's creativity...

As for formal training, in my case, mastering traditional techniques has been essential. It is the basis and backbone of my understanding of photography as a medium and a process. But, it all depends on the artist. If you allow formal training to limit your creativity and you stay in the confines of what you have learned, it could limit you creatively. But, if you build on what you have learned and grow beyond these limits, then it is an asset. It depends on the artist, rather than training.

My art is all photographic work. I started in the classical black and white tradition of photography, perfecting the techniques of the greats, like Ansel Adams. I mastered and utilized the Zone System, as well as many difficult techniques like selenium toning and archival printing. Perfecting the print is, I believe, the most important part of the process. I am one of very few large format photography artists who print my own work in my own studio, because I insist on the highest level of perfection in each print.

Before starting to elaborate about your production, would you like to tell to our readers something about your process and set up for making your works? In particular, what technical aspects do you mainly focus

Cassandra Hanks

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Adel Gorgy

Peripheral ARTeries

graphs." In another group, “Rhythms… Winter to Fall” the purpose was to present to the viewer a vision that transcended the conventional way of looking at nature. Throughout art, Realism has described nature, Impressionism has colored it, Expressionism interpreted it and Abstraction reduced it. In "Rhythms... Winter to Fall," these boundaries are blurred, imaginary or non-existent. These compositions transcend the traditional pictorial photographic conventions. There is no perspective, no foreground or background. The customary designation of top and bottom, or right and left is immaterial, giving the viewer alternate ways of seeing. For many years, the subject of my work has been art, itself. I thought of a new concept which is interesting to me. We have abstracted everything--portraits, figure, still life, landscape and even concepts, but, oddly enough, we never abstracted art, itself. In my portfolio “Again…Seeing Art Anew,” I used new techniques to abstract the works of Matisse, Cezanne, Monet, Van Gogh, and Picasso among others. Then the question arose, can I abstract abstraction? That was the genesis of my new body of abstract photographic work “Traces of Pollock, de Kooning and Warhol” which was the subject of a solo exhibition at Able Fine Art NY Gallery, in Chelsea in Manhattan. Though the thought behind the image is always what drives the creative process, the execution of the final image is paramount, and for me, it must be of exceptional quality. It is an intensive, time-consuming process that requires multiple techniques. I usually work on different images at the same time, allowing each image to evolve to its comple-tion, which could take weeks or months.

on your work? And how much preparation and time do you put in before and during the process of creating a piece?

The only medium I work in is photography. The three integral components of the work are a concept, a vision and a technique. It all starts as a thought in search of an image or an image provoking a thought. Then I find or develop the technique needed for the image. Most of the techniques I use are my own and developing them is a complex process. This is evident in my portfolio a "Woman and a Sumi Brush," whose concept is rooted in Zen Painting. In these pieces I selectively painted developer onto exposed photographic paper, using a Sumi brush, creating one-of-a-kind "painted photo-

But I believe that in the end, the medium, the technique and the style fall behind or disappear, and only the image remains. Now let's focus on your art production: I would start from the recent and interesting photographic work entitled Traces Of Pollock #3, that our readers have already admired in the starting pages of this article. Would you tell us something about the genesis of this interesting piece? What was your initial inspiration?

"Traces of Pollock # 3" is one of several images inspired by a visit to the Pollock-Krasner House studio on 23


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Adel Gorgy

Meeting de Kooning Again, Pigment Print, 2013 40 x 55 in. (100 x 138 cm.)

Long Island, NY. On the floor of Pollock's studio are remains of splattered paint. I thought that recomposing the paint into new abstract compositions would be interesting conceptually and visually. It took literally hundreds of photographs to complete the series, and it proved to be a wonderfully successful group of works.

as one of the ten highlights of the week of the opening by the Village Voice, one of New York's most important newspapers. Another work of yours on which I would like to spend some words is entitled "Marilyn... Persona", with a clear reference to Wharol's work. It is based on a deep involvement of the viewer and his personal perception of a lot of concepts that are part of our History... how much do you draw inspiration from our reality?

I showed the work to Michelle Yu, the director of Able Fine Art NY Gallery in Chelsea, in Manhattan, and she invited me to have a solo exhibition at the gallery, "Traces of Pollock, de Kooning and Warhol." It just ran from December 4-31 2013, and the show generated a great deal of interest from both the public and the press. Able Fine Art NY put together a beautiful exhibition that was selected

"Marilyn ‌ Persona" is interesting because Warhol presented her as an iconic figure that we all know. I think Marilyn was a brilliant personality, in that she presented to spectators what they wanted to see, and I believe we were never exposed to the 24


Adel Gorgy

Peripheral ARTeries

Marilyn...Persona, Pigment Print, 2013 40 x 55 in. (100 x 138 cm.)

process: both for creating an artwork and for enjoying it: all in all, the final reality of an artwork rests with the viewer... Do you think that such creative process could be disconnected from direct experience?

real Marilyn. In my image, there are two faces of Marilyn with the eyes, which are the window to her soul, masked in red. In these, we only see the sensuous lips and beauty mark that are so characteristic of Marilyn. There are another two representations of Marilyn with the eyes uncovered, and watching us, the viewers. It is a kind of role reversal here, with the viewer being the one being watched.

This is a very important question. It speaks to the body of work I did titled, "Portraits of Art." In it, I raised the question in whose presence are we when we are looking at a work of art? For example, if we are looking at the Mona Lisa, are we in the presence of da Vinci, of the painting, of La Giaconda as a person, or are we, finally, in the Ernest presence of ourselves? The ultimate reality of the artwork2013, rests 60x70cm with the viewer, yet for the artist, his vision and his concept from the The gentlemen’s cabinet series

As you have remarked in the starting lines of your artist's statment, abstraction does not end with the artist; the final touches are those of the viewer... I would like to ask you if in your opinion personal experience is an absolutely indespensable part of a creative 25


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Adel Gorgy

My Meeting with Warhol, Pigment Print, 2013 40 x 55 in. (100 x 138 cm.)

that some information & ideas are hidden, or even "encrypted" in the environment we live in, so we need -in a way- to decipher them. Maybe that one of the roles of an artist could be to reveal unexpected sides of Nature, especially of our inner Nature... what's your point about this?

are unscathed. They are different journeys, whose paths may or may not cross, but neither is more or less true than the other. Creating or viewing art should always be free. Of course, it can echo direct experience, but it can also be imaginary. Art belongs to the artist and the viewer independently. My journey in producing the pieces in "Traces of Pollock, de Kooning and Warhol" or in abstracting Matisse, Cezanne or Monet, is distinct and unique. I am both the viewer and the artist, and my journey and experience is independent of theirs.

Many of the most important messages and ideas are, of course, hidden. Art is the ability of the artist to make his visions and ideas visible to others. In "My Meeting with Warhol" I've taken the intentionally flattened surface and re-introduced depth. In many of my works, I've elimiated persepctive, but here, I've created a very inten-tional vanishing point. It feels almost as if one is entering a gallery Cassandra Hanks

While admiring "My Meeting With Warhol" I realized that there's a way to go beyond the subtle dichotomy between tradition and modernity... by the way, I'm sort of convinced 26


Adel Gorgy

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Red Whispers, Pigment Print, 2013 40 x 55 in. (100 x 138 cm.)

and that's the idea. What might be considered ordinary is really not. Creating soup is an art. Marketing it is an art. Warhol's painting is, of course, art. So I am creating an image that reflects the multiple layers of art that I saw embodied in his iconic paintings of the soup cans.

ting aggressivity or pulsion... even though I'm aware that this might sound a bit naif, I would dare to define it a thoughtful red: it suggests me an intellectual action... By the way, any comments on your choice of "palette" and how it has changed over time?

And I couldn't do without mentioning Red Whispers and especially Deception, that I have to admit is one of my favourite pieces of yours... among the others, a feature that has mostly impacted on me is the effective mix of dark tones, which are capable of creating such a prelude to light as in Cosmic Dance... I also noticed that red is a very recurrent tone in your works, with nuances that far from sugges-

"Red Whispers" is one of my favorite pieces. It is also composed from the splattered paint from Pollock’s studio floor. I created it to echo a favorite Zen story about a court musician who studied Zen music for ten years, at the end of which, his long awaited performance was just a single note from his flute. The idea is that one note can encompass all music. For me, this single stroke of red whispers all colors and all abstractions. 27


Sonnet for Love Traces of Pollock and de Kooning, Pigment Print, 2013 40 x 72 in. (100 x 180 cm.)


Peripheral ARTeries

Adel Gorgy

Deception, Pigment Print, 2013 40 x 55 in. (100 x 138 cm.)

"Deception" is a complex work. It speaks of my belief that our senses and understanding are quite relative. It is an abstraction of a small work by Pollock, but yet, it is not a painting. It is a photographic work that is completely different. There are no brushstrokes, no paint and no painter standing behind the work. My pieces are often mistaken for paintings, though the medium is photography. I am often asked how I paint them. I like to say that deception of our senses is the rule rather than the exception, that in art "all is abstraction and realism is a fiction."

dio. The abstraction is far removed from the original but maintains that cosmic connection between light and dark. Of course no art work is meaningful without considering the palette carefully. I feel free to change the colors at will to serve the image and the idea. But, of course, the color has to work compositionally and conceptually. There is an unexplained feeling artists experience. It's like a whisper telling me, "now it is complete." That's when I stop. Avoiding overworking an piece is learned only through experience.

"Cosmic Dance" is a taken from one of my pieces titled "Veiled Moon." Here, I decided to add two white strokes taken from the floor of Pollock’s stu-

During these years your works have been exhibited and presented in several occasions: how important is for you the feedback of your audi30


Adel Gorgy

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Cosmic Dance, Pigment Print, 2013 40 x 55 in. (100 x 138 cm.)

you would like readers to be aware of?

ence? Do you ever think whom will enjoy your Art when you conceive your pieces?

I am working on abstracting Italian Renaissance and Dutch masters, which I have already begun in compositions for El Greco and Rembrandt. And I am also currently working on abstracting Noguchi's sculptures. For me, art as the subject of my work is a journey I delight in. I am very thankful for all the great artists whose work is inspirational for me and for my art.

I believe that the journey of the artist and the viewer are different and independent. When I finish a work, my journey with this piece is completed and the journey of the viewer begins. The viewer becomes the artist, to see, interpret, abstract, or just pass by indifferently. I hope they will delight in my work as much as I already did, and invite them to look at it freely, interpret it or even abstract it.

Also, I thank you for this very detailed interview which really reflects keen understanding of my work. Your questions really go to the heart and Ernest essence of my work and, in fact, of all art.

Let me thank you for your time and for sharing your thoughts with us, Adel. My last question deals with your future plans: anything coming up for you professionally that

2013, 60x70cm An interview by peripheral_arteries@dr.com

from the The gentlemen’s cabinet series

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Tanya Stadnichenko (Russia) an artist’s statement

The main direction Tatiana`s works is to transfer graphic and compositional laws in the space of streets, parks, abandoned factories. For her works are important historical, architectural and landscape contexts. In the installations she widely uses colors, graphic quality, the refraction of light, spatial content, the violation of the optical illusions. The feeling of the dominant natural culture is the axis of most projects. She compare asocial environment areas, the urban places and human work directly with them, the author explores all known laws, exposing them. The natural background is becoming legislator and inspirer, and organic natural forms combined with the industrial world and the increasing globalization of nomadism - tools for translating ideas.

Tanya Stadnichenko Strikes, 2012 Installation, Summer Đ?cademy in Salzburg

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STRIKES, installation Summer Academy in Salzburg-2012 The clearness of blow depends from the shooter, from experience, which has been saved up on years. Today artist is a densely connected to itself with all society. The young artist has no time for mistakes, relying on intuition and analyzing a situation, it strikes new blow. The blow should be the accurate, uncompromising, exact, with clear statement . vimeo.com/48279411 2


Peripheral ARTeries

Tanya Stadnichenko

an interview with

Tanya Stadnichenko Hello Tanya, and a warm welcome to Peripheral ARTeries. I would start this interview with my usual ice breaker question: what in your opinion defines a work of Art? By the way, what could be in your opinion the features that mark an artworks as a piece of Contemporary Art? Do you think that there's still a dichotomy between tradition and contemporariness?

Artist for me now it's not just a creator – it's a person, who can make a difference in the environmental situation, change the areal of his habitat through the dialogue with people. I like to measure the depth of human perception; I immerse myself and people in unusual environment, for to expose factors that are absolutely impossible to see in everyday life. For example, I had a series of public-art projects in which I examined the laws of attraction and gravitation. The plane has outlived its usefulness for me. For me now the drawing, painting and photography can't show all the energy and speed of the modern world. It's a problem, that in Russia we have a huge gap between classic art and contemporary. For example, in the common art- university (like my first one) the history of art ended on the Malevich. And our education system too old, that’s why people didn't get used to think when they see the art, they just say: «Is it really art? I can do the same».

Tanya Stadnichenko

Would you like to tell us something about your background? You have received a formal training, during your studies of Fine Arts, at the prestigious Institute of the Contemporary Art of Moscow. How has this experience impacted on the way you currently produce your artworks? By the way, I sometimes I wonder if a certain kind of formal training could even stifle a young artist's creativity... what's your point?

ed to work another way, try new materials, technology; strive for clarity of expression and multilayered work. About background I think that my motherland played an important role in my art. I was born in a little city in Siberia and I used to live in a huge vast, I walked a lot in endless fields, forests and abandoned buildings. That's the one of reason why I prefer to work with a big spaces or on the streets and public spaces with a nature, use the wind and air.

In Moscow we have some new private art- institutions where artist could have some fresh knowledge and information about what's going on in the art-world now. That’s why I have 2 art- educations. After ICA (Institute of Contemporary Art in Moscow) the borders of my art-perceptions opened and I start-

Before starting to elaborate about your production, Cassandra would you like to tell to our Hanks 34


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output the laws of graphic and compositional to the streets, parks, abandoned factories. The historical, architectural and landscape contexts, colors, graphic quality, the refraction of light, space filling, in violation of optical laws are rather important for me. Now let's focus on your art production: I would like to start with Strikes that our readers can admire in these pages and that I would suggest them to view it directly at vimeo.com/48279411: in the meanwhile, would you tell us something about the genesis of this project? What was your initial inspiration?

I did this installation in the Summer Art Academy in Salzburg, Austria. I came to study there for one mounth. And there was an atmosfere like in artfactory, where is an everybody have to do powerfull «strike» with his project. The young artist has no time for mistakes, relying on intuition and analyzing a si-

readers something about your process and set up for making your artworks? In particular, what technical aspects do you mainly focus on your work? And how much preparation and time do you put in before and during the process of creating a piece?

Basically all of my recent projects deal with temporality. It's going from the my life and social -situation when is nothing for a long time. I'm interested in the theme of the short duration of art. During last year I did nothing for «white cube» space, because I want to my projects works with people on streets and parks and the viewer can participate in the installation. I try to

Strikes, detail 35


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Tanya Stadnichenko

The Labyrinth, Land-art project Life of every person - a labyrinth. We always search for easy road, we wander in search of happiness, we lose faith, we find, we rejoice grass. It breaths, moves, changes a direction, cooperates with the nature.

this piece that has mostly impacted on me is the effective synergy that you have been capable of establishing an effective dialog between Nature and our inner nature... Could you lead us through the development of this project?

tuation, it strikes new blow. The blow should be the accurate, uncompromising and exact, with clear statement. In the installation I tried to visualize some of these strikes of the young artist as they could be in a formal vision. And it was interesting to worked with salt-space (That factory was a salt factory before the O. Kokoschka did it place for art-study).

It was project about the human being with idea that ÂŤWe alwayse looking for easy road, wander in search of happiness, we lose faith, we find, we rejoice or we long, we come back to old roads and we search for new waysÂť. I cut the grass for to do kind of labyrinth, where people can sit and think about his life. But also I felt this like a big

Another piece of yours on which I would like to spend some words is Labyrinth, an interesting land art work that I like very much: as you have remarked, it breaths, moves, changes a direction, cooperates with the nature... A feature of 36


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reality and start to live it's s own life, especial when I work with public-art. For example, when I did work «Adrift», I didn't expect that reflections in the water will play a significant role in the composition, and I didn't think that 40 kg of apples from the project «Juice» will exude an incredible smell, supplementing installation. And we couldn't do without mentioning Temporary Waterfall that is one of my favourite pieces of yours: I would daresay that this work sums in an image the well-known Bauman's concept of «liquid modernity». I can recognize in it a subtle social criticism... And I'm sort of convinced that Art in these days could play an effective role not only making aware public opinion about socio political issues: I would go as far as to say that nowadays Art can even steer people's behavior... I would take this chance to ask your point about this.

or we long, we come back to old roads and we search for new

animal which breathe, move and participate in all that process. Being strictly connected to the chance to create a deep interaction, your artworks are capable of communicating a wide variety of states of mind: have you ever happened to discover something that you didn't previously plan and that you didn't even think about before? I'm sort of convinced that one of the roles of an artist could be to reveal hidden sides of life and nature... what's your opinion about this? Temporary Waterfall, detail

For sure, everey project from sketches come to 37


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Temporary waterfall, Anapa, 2013 installation from series of temporary sculptures I`ve the only here and now. There is nothing permanent it`s a «liquid modernity» time. Here is only sky and sand. I don`t know what will happen tomorrow because of speed information. The first work from a series of break down objects.

Do you think that it's an exaggeration? And what could be in your opinion the role that an artist could play in our society?

As I told in the beginning of the interview, I think that now the artist can't just sit in the studio and create an esthetic objects or pictures like 100 years ago. Now is everybody artist, everybody has a photo camera and internet. And the true artist has to be more than just artist. He must be a mirror of society, reflection of reality and «changer of time». What about «Temporary waterfall», I was inspired by book of Bauman because he indicated very clearly all social problems of our days. In my life (as in the histories of all my friends also) there is nothing stable, everything too much unreliable, and nobody knows what will be tomorrow. It's kind of the capitalism's consequence and unwillingness of people to change something in the situation. That’s why I want to do exhibition with temporary objects which will crushed during exposition. Your art practice ranges from Installations, public art as Gravitation to performance, as Limits: while crossing the borders of different artistic fields have you ever happened to

Limits, video, 2’42’’, 2013 Hanks Cassandra 38


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THE GRAVITATION Public-art- installation, Moscow-2012 I feel the power of gravitation, it surrounds me. It works anywhere, anytime. I want to dip you in the sense with destruction borders of things and distorted forms. I want to levitate and break any area of perception. I measure the gravity at different locations. vimeo.com/52576741

realize that a synergy between different disciplines is the only way to achieve some results, to express some concepts?

I don't have a single medium for work. I try to express idea by all possible means of expression, and sometimes all this mediums works only together.

The Marked Place, public installation 39


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Tanya Stadnichenko

During these years you have exhibited your artworks in several occasions: you recently had your solo "Tissue" and moreover you received a grant from the Academy of Fine Arts in Salzburg. It goes without saying that feedbacks and especially awards are capable of supporting an artist, I was just wondering if an award -or better, the expectation of an award- could even influence the process of an artist... By the way, how much important is for you the feedback of your audience? Do you ever think to whom will enjoy your Art when you conceive your pieces?

I'm inspired by dialogs and discussions with the audience. And every new exhibition like new competition – you never know reaction of people, but I can't work without society attantion. And every new project like explore of my own borders and opportunities and it's hard but also enjoy. Thanks a lot for your time and your thoughts, Tanya. My last question deals with your future plans: what's next for you? Anything coming up for you professionally that you would like readers to be aware of?

I just received an invitation for spring from the residence «La Napoule Art Foundation» (France). I've some ideas for explore French style- garden there. And also may be I've to travel more for totally

TISSUES, 2011-Moscow 2012 There is a Own law for all elements of the Universe. We are the total model of the our planet, including all its parts: the earth, water, fire, air (wind), heavenly space (ether).

contemporary art!

The face of person in an old ages looks such as the mirror, is similar to an earth crust surface. It is possible to judge his life on mimic wrinkles of folds of the person. All stresses, pleasures, physiological and spiritual processes leave an accurate trace on us. The Earth have the similar processes, but in galactic scales - explosions of volcanoes, earth crust shifts, a tsunami, climatic fluctuations, changes of degree of an inclination of a terrestrial axis. I consider history of a universe on an example of my own family tree. Portraits of great-grandmothers, great-grandfathers, uncles, are compared with maps of those territories on which their life proceeded.

An interview by peripheral_arteries@dr.com 40


Serene Greene

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Global Warming

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Kristina Sereikaite (Lithuania) an artist’s statement

Photography allows me to pass on the coded messages to the public and at the same time raise questions, enable the viewers to look for their own answers that speak to them personally. The main subject of my photography is a human beings, because they naturally contain the biggest secrets and riches of life. Be it birth or death, joy or fear, vanishing or blossomimg beauty, destructive or creative power – I am srongly attracted by the contrasting natures. In my photograph series I express my personal understanding of the world, relationship with passing time, encounter with inner „me“. It is a visual exchange with the viewers about the fragility of human being and the dramatic attempt to reveal the biggest secret of human life.

Kristina Sereikaite Critics by Egle Jaskuniene The author has formed a unique artistic style which reflects romantic personification of modern society. Her works talks about individual emotional state, which is still separated from urbanistic, civilized, demographic influences that is akin to modern times. The photographs reflect states of reminiscence, recollection, associations of their subjects. These states are conveyed through the prism of youthfulness, feminism, generation change or historical personal experience. In this cosmopolitic globalization context the works of Kristina Sereikaite attracts with emotional subjectivism which is cohesive with modern European globalistic identity. The art of photography by Kristina Sereikaite is marked by stilistic maturity and cosistency. It shows sound artistic logic and purposeful visual mind. The fact that the artist has studied and worked as a film shooter also added some cinematographic quality to her photograph series. It has some dream space filled feeling that is often found in films. The author has formed a unique artistic style which reflects romantic personification of modern society. Her works talk about an emotional state of an individual, which is still separated from urbanistic, civilized, demographic influences that is akin to modern times. The photographs reflect states of reminiscence, recollection or associations of their subjects. These states are conveyed through the prism of youthfulness, feminism, generation change or historical personal experience. In this cosmopolitic globalization context the works of Kristina Sereikaite attracts with emotional subjectivism which is nevertheless cohesive with modern European globalistic identity.

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Kristina Sereikaite

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Peripheral ARTeries

Kristina Sereikaite

an interview with

Kristina Sereikaite Hello Kristina and a warm welcome to Peripheral ARTeries. I would start this interview with my usual ice breaker question: what in your opinion defines a work of Art? Moreover, what could be the features that mark the contemporariness of an artwork?

Many people understand art differently. It depends on a unique personal experience, worldview and education of those evaluating art. In my opinion, art is the means to awaken viewer’s feelings and intelectual sensitivity. It’s a possibility to take a fresh look at the world and maybe rethink your stance on it. Because it is becoming harder to fight for a spot in a time frame of a modern busy man, contemporary art creates such structures that are attractive not only on esthetic levels, but also offers intelectual and emotional challenges and seeks to provoke inner thought. It is vital for contemporary art to present an alternative view on daily phenomena and bring life and art together to be intriguing. No wonder it is being created „here and now“ in attempts to innovate, change traditional ways and look for new forms of expression.

Kristina Sereikaite

Internship in this photography school gave me an impulse for deeper self analysis and motivation “why and what for I am doing this”. In 2006 I was accepted to Lithuanian Academy of Music and Theatre, Faculty of Theatre and Film to study Audiovisual Arts, cameraman's professional qualification.

Would you like to tell us something about your background? You hold a Bachelor of Audiovisual Arts and a Master in Film, that you received form Lithuanian Academy of Music and Theatre. How has this experience of formal training -and especially moving for a while from Lithuania to France, where you attended an Internship at the National Photography school- impacted on the way you currently produce your works?

Only after I’ve found photography and cinema, have I understood that I can express myself best here. I could realize visions and ideas that wandered in my mind or in my dreams. Anyways, I think that all the studied disciplines have broadened my views and personality. I also think that these two art forms are intertwined in my works in both fields. You can notice cinematographic elements in my photographs as well as photographic shots in my cinematographic works.

Photography and cinema weren’t the only art forms I tried. I had been searching for myself in many other artistic disciplines. I finished art and music schools, was enrolled in Vilnius Art Academy, studied artistic direction and acting in Klaipeda University. In 2005, I finished Photographic Technology in Vilnius College of Construction and Design and enrolled in a prestigious National Photography School in Arles, France. There I developed my views on photography, refined my visual esthetics and formed as an artist.

Before starting to elaborate about your production, would you likeHanks to tell to our readers Cassandra 44


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something about your process and set up for making your artworks? In particular, what technical aspects do you mainly focus on your work? And how much preparation and time do you put in before and during the process of creating a piece?

First of all, it is necessary to have a strong inner drive and motivation to create. If it’s in place, life itself, surroundings, people, or particular time speaks out of the subjects for artwork. When I make photography, I start with the idea I want to communicate and then use technical knowledge and creativity to dress that idea up. It’s the subject and idea that defines time, place, methods, dispositions, rythm, colors, style or composition of my cinematographic or photographic works. So, composition, harmony of brightnes/ darkness, color range or good technical equipment are just the serving means to communicate the main idea. The technical skills are important, but to make a good photo or video you also need relentless motivation and intuition, and, of course, to put a lot of work into it.

TERRA HUMANA, 2011, Lithuania The human being is linked to Nature. His survival depends on it, but the Earth does not belong to him. Humanization and destruction of Nature turns against him. Human seeks to recover a lost harmony, but he is unable to escape from a circle of consumptive routine.

Now let's focus on your artworks: I would like to start with Terra Humana, a recent and inte45


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Kristina Sereikaite

resting project that our readers have started to admire in the introductory pages of this article: would you tell us something about the genesis of this series? What was your initial inspiration?

I acquire my inspiration from observing human life and it’s relationships with nature. I constantly speak of the fragility of human life and it’s dramatic place in nature. This series is dedicated to a human relationship with one of the nature elements – the Earth. The Earth is the basic prerequisite of human existance and death. This lively, pulsating matter is open to both – birth and death. It’s a place where a clod of dirt can turn into life and life into a clod of dirt. What is a human being? It is a temporary particle in the Earth cycle... Many of your works, as Silent Horizons seems to show such a dark side of Nature: I'm sort of convinced that some informations & ideas are hidden, or even "encrypted" in the environment we live in, so we need to decipher them. Maybe

From the Silent Horizons Series

that one of the roles of an artist could be to reveal unexpected sides of Nature, and thinking to Remorse, I refer especially of our inner Nature... what's your point about this?

We need art to survive things that depress us. Art helps us go through feelings that sometimes we are not able to express. However, I don’t want to dictate the feelings or specific visions that my viewers should experience looking at my works. That’s why my works talk “inside out” to bring out some of the most secret peculiarities and truths about human beings. Of course, there is always a written reference that talks about author’s idea. In my artwork I try to help my viewers understand and comprehend our environment better, raise questions and leave open space for my viewers to answer them in their own way, trusting their experiences, guts and intelligence.

From the Terra Humana Series, 2011, 100 x 100 cm 46


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As you have remarked, photography allows you to pass on the coded messages to the public and at the same time to raise questions I'm sort of convinced that Art in these days could play an effective role not only making aware public opinion, but I would go as far as to say that nowadays Art can steer people's behavior... what's your point about this?

It’s obvious that creativity rears and sometimes even heals people, helps them interpret their thoughts ant feelings. Art can serve as a spiritual teacher and as a self finding technique, therefore, has great importance for modern people, who struggle to find inner peace. It has a quality of life importance. However, it would be naOve to say it is able to solve some deep painful problems of today’s world. Art doesn’t owe anyone anything and is not obliged to prove anything to our society. It rather can direct our attention to a specific problem or phenomena and foster our critical thinking.

From the Silent Horizons Series 47


Peripheral ARTeries

Kristina Sereikaite

From the Innocence Series

Another piece of yours on which I would like to focus is INNOCENCE, which I have to admit is one of my favourite works of yours: I have been struck with the effective symbiosis between the dark blue tone and such an emerging light... could you lead us through the development of this project?

Actually, I was prepared to shoot another subject, but I simply stumbled upon this specific location which suggested the topic itself. It was wonderful that my model and his body plasticity, his blending in that particular environment was a perfect match for my idea. The model himself gave me new and wonderful inspirations, different angles that I just needed to notice and shoot. Regarding the technological aspects of this shooting, I have to admit work under those particular conditions was a tough challenge, because I needed to work with ever moving elements – falling water and a moving model. There is no photo manipulation of pictures though. I just did some retouching in Photoshop and went over the colors for final adjustments and consistency. During these years, you have organized twelve personal photography exhibitions held both in

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Lithuania, and in France and Denmark. Moreover, your works have been awarded in 2005, when you won a photography competition organized by French Cultural Center in honour of Robert Doisneau, and then you had your first solo exhibition “Travel without baggage”... it goes without saying that feedbacks and especially awards are capable of supporting an artist, I was just wondering if an award -or better, the expectation of an award- could even influence the process of an artist... By the way, how much important is for you the feedback of your audience? Do you ever think to whom will enjoy your Art when you conceive your pieces?

No doubt this award gave me more confidence. I try to participate in these kind of photography competitions and am glad to win them. I am also happy about my personal photography exibitions in other countries. It is very pleasing to me and I believe to other artists to know that your art is wanted and understood. It broadens my outlook and let’s me understand that there are no boundaries of human spirit and art. The same things that excite or disturb an old lady from Lithuanian countryside, have a similar effect on a politician in Mexico.

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Kristina Sereikaite

From the Josette Series

From the Josette Series

In a way it’s a reality check to see if what you’re doing works, if it is important to your viewers. However, despite the fact that there is a strong need of recognition and possitive evaluation of your works, it shouldn’t guide an artist as to what to create, because the most important role of art is to be a field for self expression. Aspirations for recognition shouldn’t limit your inspirations or ideas as an artist. In my projects, first of all, I try to answer questions that I relate to and then hope that these will touch my viewers.

I appreciate it as a possibily to broaden creativity boundaries for those searching and creating ideas. It‘s a nice addition to develop your idea on a contemporary level with the potencial of contemporary visual and technical means. I still see the idea of an art project behind all the technical solutions and enhancements as the most actual and important part of work. Thank you for your time and for sharing with us your thoughts, Kristina. My last question deals with your future plans: anything coming up for you professionally that you would like readers to be aware of?

There's a series of yours entitled Josette, that I would suggest our readers to view directly at http://www.kristinasereikaite.com/index.html. One of the visuals that have mostly impacted on me of this stimulating work is the skilful usage of the white which does not play the mere role of a background, and it suggests me a reference to Bill Viola... By the way, I'm sort of convinced that new media art will definitely fill the dichotomy between art and technology and I will dare to say that Art and Technology are going to assimilate one to each other... as a Photography Director, what's your point about this?

Right now I am working on a series called „Megaorganisms“. This series was inspired by

I agree that technical aspect plays an important role in contemporary Art. Technical possibilities enable artists to find new angles and make old things look differently as visual rendering partially becomes an interpretation or improvisation on a subject.

From the Josette Series 50


Kristina Sereikaite

Peripheral ARTeries

From the Josette Series

ART loop project and I have participated in it among with 9 other artists from 9 different countries.The idea of this project is to give an idea to the first artist, and after he/she creates a piece of art, it goes to the next artist in a different country to create another piece of art inspired by the previous work. Meanwhile the process of creation is being filmed by the project organizers from Montreal, Canada. I got a painting from Enda O’Donoghue, Ireland. Inspired by his work I created my own interpretation that I called „Megaorganisms.“ These days I am making some additions for this new series. It will talk about a fragile human life in times of perfect technologies. People subconciously imitate their body functions creating and inventing new technologies. With the power to create them, human beings become

the strongest and the most powerful live species on earth. The power of a man‘s intelligence and the fragility of his body took us to the age of technology. A man wholeheartedly invents technological megaorganism that should serve the needs of his microorganism. The question I raise is whether a man will be happier and freer after he overcomes his fragility. Will he become the slave of his own technology? Will he get it that the greatness of his spirit lies in this fragility? In 2014, all works of this project will be displayed in a group exhibition. Documentary videos and photographs on how the works have been created will be also presented. An interview by peripheral_arteries@dr.com

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Ana Cvejic (Serbia)

My work is based on studying the human body. This is the second year of that research. The aim of this research is displaying the naked body on the way which it shows its emotions, excitements and experiences. Also, in my work, the role of observer is very important, especially the way in which he or she experiences the nude body and how he or she can observe it. Although we live in the 21st century, people stay rather conservative and closed to all movements which are different from everyday life, even to the art which displays the nude body. Because of these reasons, in my opinion, my art should reveal the hidden truth by removing all taboos. Other movements were significantly improved while the art stagnated because of the fear of the naked body. Because of the time deadlock and invariability of art’s approach to naked body and erotic, my aims are liberal and that is the purpose of each liberal artist. It is the eternal wish for changes. Democracy permitted the freedom of art speech. However, for the naked art, more liberal changes and larger freedom of speech and understanding are necessary. It is not so much important that an artist tells a story about a past or present. It is important that he or she flies to future. An artist and his/her works. The artist and his/her work don’t have a purpose if they do not serve to the humanity. How is it possible to archive that, which way to go? It is necessary to have a free and not limited imagination, to know the purpose of meaning and to do it in an easy way.

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At the window 43 x 64cm, Colors pencils on paper, 2012 2


Ana Cvejic

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an interview with

Ana Cvejic What in your opinion defines a work of Art? And moreover, what could be the features that mark the contemporariness of an artwork?

Art is a reflection of an artist. It represents the feelings and emotions at the time. Artistic expression is the way of showing artists opinion and his personality. My work is characteristic and recognizable , and it is said that stating that I am the author is unnecessary. Modern works of art often carries an obvious message, the fact that is seen by ordinary man . These pieces of work have certain characteristic that distinguish them and differ them from others. Contemporary art is in majority honest, genuine. As such it has provided its existence that will last long. Would you like to tell us something about your background? After your musical studies you enrolled in the Faculty of Fine Arts in Belgrade where you degreed just a couple of years ago: how has this experience impacted on the way you produce your artworks? Moreover I would ask you what's your point about formal training: I sometimes happen to wonder if a certain kind of training could even stifle a young artist's creativity...

Ana Cvejic

Ana Cvejic lives and works in Belgrade, Serbia Contact : ana.cvejic@gmail.com Website : anacvejic.weebly.com www.artinfo.com.rs/ceo_profil.php?korisnik_id=85 4#info_1

I was born in a small country, Serbia. From an early age I had a passion for art. At 8 years old I started to play the violin. I finished secondary music school, department Violin. I was closer and more creative in painting than playing violin because of these reasons I was enrolled in 2007 Faculty of Fine Arts in Belgrade, department of painting.

Education: 2000-2004 High Musical School “Josip Slavenski”, Department of Violin, Belgrade 2007. started to sudy Facutately of Fine art in Belegrade department of Painting 2009 – 2010 She was the Fund for Young Talents of the Ministry of Youth and Sports 2010. completed undergraduate studies at the department of Painting in class of professor Gordan Nikolic 2012.

The time I spent at the music school gave me the professional lessons that are now applied in the painting. I've learned that I have to be honest in my art, durable, regardless of the circumstances. An important lesson I learned is that behind every artist must stand large and hard work. The first two years in college, we had tasks that we ended

Finished master study inFacutately of Fine Art in Belegrade at the department of Painting in class of professor Gordan Nikolic 2013. Member of Association of Fine Artists of Serbia (ULUS)

Cassandra Hanks

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Deconstruction_40x60cm_Linocut, _2013

up successfully, in the master studies I chose the topic and direction of my art while the professor was there to properly direct me and show to the fact that . In college, I learned to appreciate and respect my colleagues. The professor taught me to respect other artists' line especially if someone is steadfast and persistent in their work.

show all of human beauty that we're carrying . I do not want to provoke the viewer, but to confront their own feelings and soul. In my works, I want to show man's feelings and behavior that is linked to emotion. Human behavior and his emotions perceived in terms of pleasure, sadness, misery is my goal that I want to display more emotional. Their mystique comes from the point of feelings and behaviors and we as observers can ask if they really love or is it a hidden mask worn by actors.

Before starting to elaborate about your production, would you like to tell to our readers something about your process and set up for making your works? In particular, what technical aspects do you mainly focus on in your work? And how much preparation and time do you put in before and during the process of creating a piece?

With closed eyes they look for feelings that will connect them to another realm because they do not know what their hearts are saying. Was it an act of love, what they feel, if there is any honesty and respect among them. In the first stage, I watch people, their faces and

Since 2009 I have dedicated my work to erotic art. Experimenting with a naked body I want to 55


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Ana Cvejic

bodies. My art needs a striking bodies and persons speaking. I take photos of them (different types) to make them finally presented in a way that I feel it and experience it. Now let's focus on your artworks: I would like to start with your recent series of mixed media drawings, that our readers have already admired in the starting pages of this article, and I would suggest them to visit your website at http://anacvejic.weebly.com/drawings.html in order to get a wider idea of this interesting series: in the meanwhile, would you tell us something about the genesis of these pieces? What was your initial inspiration?

"Resident Evil" is the name of a series of works that occurs in the period 2013 mixed media (acrylic, pencil, dry pastel, color pencil).

Resident love,_88 x 130 cm, 2013

This series shows the human condition in different emotional stages. The idea is to show the reasons why some of these condition lead men into despair and horror. Above it there is the shadow of another person who has emerged from the deep subconscious of the conscious and afraid to show us again at some point drives to uncover hidden desires and fantasies of the soul. In the center of events is the man and his naked body and mind using their bodies in certain situations. Figures shown are deconstructive and as such their state of being is shaken. Series starts portrait of a boy whose eyes are not calm but upset, continues to cry a man in such a state does not see his own future. The same cry of the presen-

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The man and Evil 88 x 130cm Mix media on paper, _2013

By the way, you have stated that today people stay rather conservative and closed to all movements which are different from everyday life, even to the art which displays the nude body, and on this side I can recognize such a socio political feature in your Art: and I'm sort of convinced that Art these days could play an effective role not only making aware public opinion, but I would go as far as to say that nowadays Art can steer people's behavior... what's your point about this?

I believe that art has the power to specifically direct the people, it exists as a witness who has the task. Sometimes authors are creating what they were specified and todays artists create what they feel. ted in several ways, at different stages and moments. State of a woman who is in a desperate moment, the second tends towards insanity and the third state of calmness and reflection. This series can describe and deconstruct itself in a society where we are because it is identified with the behavior of the everyday and the desire of ordinary people who daily strive for a fight, whether it comes about that the internal or social. Works are done so that they approximate dimensions 130x88cm, thus item has not been placed on the format or the technology, but the very existence of the personalities within it.

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Ana Cvejic

Adam and Eve, 2013 Mezotint 12,5x13,5 cm

People today often confuse the concept of show business with art and this is a big problem. The difference between these two terms is that the former focuses particularly young people and others enriches the soul, which are sometimes vague and frozen. Visual Arts particular lost over time the role of the camera today it is a sign of a lost soul, an artifact that directs us to emotion, as such it is harmless.

In the Moon, Oil on canvas, 120x150cm, 2013

Focusing on strictly human details as the nude body, as in your oil entitled In The Moon, I would go as far as to state that your Art help us to notice those little things around us, discovering the poetry inside them... I'm sort of convinced that some informations & ideas are hidden, or even "encrypted" in the environment we live in, so we need -in a wayto decipher them. Maybe that one of the roles of an artist could be to reveal unexpected sides of Nature, especially of our inner Nature... what's your point about this?

displaying my paintings, people were ashamed, were left shocked and stunned. No one now believes that I am very conservative girl, the question that is often asked is “why this picture”? It is not need a reason it is emotion. The Bible says, "And God said to multiply”, Adam and Eve are depicted naked. My opinion is that there is no mysterious and never sufficiently disclosed beauty as the human body. My pictures do not represent the sexual act, they carry a message of love and in that moment they see something deeper than just pleasure. Cassandra Hanks

First thought about my work at a show is "What is it?" In many situations I've had problems with 58


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looking at my work that they are the fruit of my personality and personal experience. Something is there, experienced, tried before. They experience emotions perhaps because of the strong colors, which is sometimes so strong that scream. Once a professor of art history art asking why I use strong colors and colors that are not so typical. The motives which deal more specifically erotic art may come from my subconscious and perhaps out of a desire for something that I was currently unavailable and forbidden. All that exists in my work is my own world where I better get by and live, maybe it's a world that in my real life do not exist. Scene at my work did not exist in my life, but just living in my creativity. Will creativity be perceived or imagined it depends on the author. In my case it is invented. It's a world I have in mind and how they should be. “Adam and Eve�

You are a very prolific painter, and your works as Adam and Eve are filled with deep, very intense emotion as well such a meditative feeling as in Among the clouds. Is painting like a release for you or is it emotionally draining? By the way, I would like to ask you if in your opinion personal experience is an absolutely indispensable part of a creative process... Do you think that a creative process could be disconnected from direct experience? Lady, Soft pastel on paper_64x43cm,_2012

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Ana Cvejic

was created as a graphics feeling of the kiss was innocent and honest on the other hand may have a deeper meaning that connects him to his eroticism. “Among the clouds� graphics that presents a imaginary female figure sitting on top of the sand deeply inserted in the space that is in front of her. Maybe it's that life itself an artist, mysterious, in anticipation, in constant disbelief and thoughtfulness. A visual of Deconstruction that has impressed me is the synergy between the of the lines that pervades the background: this gives a sense of rhythm to the piece: would you tell us more about the evolution of this stimulating technique?

Deconstruction is the first work that presents a series of graphics. They are in the process of creation and are created in the technique of linocut. My goal is to present a persona that doubled as a shadow. The shadow emerges as the process of influencing other personalities that each of us carries within itself and that one of a time to show it. The works are meant to be on them clearly shows a strong personality and her shadow. The shadow is our second personality that exists within us, and that in certain life situations shows. For linocut technique as I opted for using it can present a strong form and other fine side. This technique does not provide technical, computer display, but also allows breathing, she isn’t mechanically, it depends on the personalities of artists who bring life into it. I support the classical approach to graphics that I think needs to take place and that is endangered in the age of digitization. During these years your woks have been exhibited in several occasions and so far you had five solo exhibitions... it goes without saying that feedbacks are capable of supporting an artist, I was just wondering if this could even influence the process of an artist... By the way, how much important is for you the feedback of your audience? Do you ever think to whom will enjoy your Art when you conceive your pieces?

Among the clouds, 2011 Aquatint, open bite and etchi

At the beginning of my creativity I was being ho-

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honest in my work. I knew then and now that there are people who will be like my works or not. I think people today are more conservative in terms of art than they once were. It is a great achievement, I am very happy when my work is a place on the international exhibition. An artist should not be motivated by money, but by their work that needs to live. Sometimes my friends say me that they think I live for my works. The largest of inspiring for me is when we recognize someone who ranks organizes exhibitions from other countries. I think people have a sense of passion and lust for my work but it awakens in them a feeling of love. Those who have sinned will always be sinners, they have approached out of curiosity. It's all a matter of taste, art is subjective, someone will not like someone like. Everyone is entitled to their opinion but if it is genuinely I do respect and appreciate. In February 2014 I will have an exhibition in the “Windows gallery� Arps & Co in Amsterdam. It is for me a great honor and achievement when you consider that Serbia is not a popular country in the world and the artists who come from my country much more difficult to affirm rather than someone who comes from a more advanced and affluent countries. Thank you for your time and for sharing with us your thoughts, Ana. My last question deals with your future plans: anything coming up for you professionally that you would like readers to be aware of?

I am planing to realize a large number of exhibitions and to connect and keep in touch with other artists from other countries. Once one professor said to me that I am on a mission to carry the message, my wish is that the message is presented. I know it will not be easy and it is very difficult road for an artist, although I believe that my wish will be redeem one day for displaying my art that lives and I live through it. Person, figure ,investigator always in a different way that I could is that better closer to the people and to life. Feelings that they carry must be transferred to the audience. ng 47,5x36,5cm An interview by: peripheral_arteries@dr.com

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Tugba Renkci (Turkey) an artist’s statement

I reflect my feelings and opinions on painting platform with my unique style. By adapting abstract and concrete expression of any stuff that I see and feel to my art, I want figures (any materials around us) and feelings (concerns, happiness, sadness and all other emotions in our daily life) be included in the painting. I aim to form body and structure of emotion by combining painting, figure and emotion. This is a way of considering about any subject for me. Therefore, ideational side of my works outweighs. Instead of imitation, they aim to take modernist painting understanding and traditionalism as well as a postmodern understanding as model. Expressionistic forms in stairs section are usually results of shapes in my mind. The shapes in my mind result from experiential learning. Nevertheless, objects in nature have been stylized. While some of objects are rough and indented, some are smooth. Each section tells a period of life and transitions happen to the next step with some changes; nothing remains constant. While these transitions happen, new pieces show up from top, bottom or even middle of section. It is like occurring of several different events at the same time; a continuous journey. As this part tells activeness and liveliness, monotony color transitions tell silence and journey… According to me, for an artist in process composing a work of art, the artist can affect any object and case that he/she sees in the environment. It is impossible to abstraction his/her work from the nature. Because the artist is also a part of nature. As a general, among the artists who I have affected, there are very important names the history of Turkish painting. Those are, Adnan Coker, Ismail Ates, Zekai Ormanci, Gungor Taner etc. If the foreign artists; Wassily Kandinsky’s geometric form and sense of abstract painting, Paul Klee completely geometrizes to the nature, Salvador Dali’s flowing objects and shapes are among the affecting factors in my sense of art. I try to analyze those artist’s art works looking at them throughout many times in my art life. I research the reflection of expressive effect of subconscious states placed, geometric or the "things" that are similar situations. Generally I prefer to paint my work with acrylic paint. In addition, l am also use to oil painting, water color, collage and some of different techniques and materials in my works. l try to reflect the identity of paint on the surface making a state of textural three-dimensional effect. Therefore, l process textures and form in a detailed manner. Paint depicting forms of the expression aims to reflect establishing a connection with my life. I work in sections the parts of crossing that are in my paintings. They are in transition from one chapter to other. Thus, among the integrity of the image in different parts of the aesthetic a surface is presentation. I do some of trying to provide the color balance of my paintings. For example, l prefer to use warmer colors specially for the part of stairs but l want to increase to effect of the painting by using contrast colors in between. I would rather the darker shades of the colors that are the best reveal the forms (particularly black) for the backgrounds. To obtain interesting color effects, l care that the colors are bright and clean. These are very substantial elements comprising structure color of my art works.

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Tugba Renkci

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Tugba Renkci

an interview with

Tugba Renkci Hello Tugba and a warm welcome to Peripheral ARTeries. I would start this interview with my usual ice breaker question: what in your opinion defines a work of Art?

Firstly, I want to say hello to Peripheral arteries magazine, readers and whole art-lovers. Also, I would like to thank you from Peripheral ARTeries magazine For giving me a chance to do this interview. First of all, to reduce to a single judgement a work of art would be wrong that defines an artist’s message and opinion. Because, each work of art, by shaping artist's fiction and accordance with the intention can express many things. However, to tell the most common phrase (in my opinion): Art is a very different magic. Works of art, sometimes cannot be expressed with words or writing of inner feelings, thoughts, experiences are established through visual approaches. So, the artist takes the source of art from the nature. Thus, with their own comments and originality, the artists' influences shape again in the direction of a new designs.

Tugba Renkci

And moreover, what could be the features that mark the contemporariness of an artwork?

handled as a conceptual work of art is one of the other elements that marks in contemporariness of an artwork.

I think that is an important factor bearing the traces of work of art from the Postmodern era. In other words; especially in the post modern era and within the scope of changing world, existence of conception of cultural affects the artist's philosophic demands. In particular, consumer culture and the social significance of the culture industry and feature is in an important of the scope of circulation in human life.

In Contemporary artwork, instead of how much talent or skill the artist has, his intellectualreflective dimension is more important. When we look at contemporary works of art this is seen; idea... Intellectual ability to describe; Design dimension... The presentation to the audience; to use the present method of displaying by the good way... This and many other factors may be the things that mark modernity. I tried to express with the most general sense here.

Therefore, the artist reconsiders today's culture and society mechanism in the works of art. So this situation, sometimes it can be compulsion to identify and difficulty of expressing. Also, it is a case of within that boundaries cannot be determined. Even artists may not know what to do in such situations. Because cultural phenomenon is reshaped nowadays. Also, an artwork that is

Would you like to tell us something about your background? You hold a Master of Arts degree in graphic design, that youHanks have received form Cassandra 66


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examining and questioning them to create a unique style of understanding. You understand better in this process art is a different area than imitating nature of slavery. Also, to have knowledge of art history, in the period up to the present process flows and reading the artists help me to get more different information. If you seriously want to get started in this business, it cannot be by reading the history of art. In order to understand today's art, this adventure will be need to know. The nicest part of my career education process, there is no end of learning. This case is one of the most important reasons why l want to do academic career, in particular as someone who loves art, reading, learning during life... In the academic environment, every day, any moment, you hear the name of a different artist and you can see their work. Thus, if we look and read much more; design and ideas phenomenon develop in our mind. In an artwork, instead of expressing the way of the object, primarily I'm trying to grasp the basis of philosophical dimension in the artwork. You want to create something new but it's up to you what you want to connect. Here is a painful process comes into play, of course. Need to investigate the theoretical part of the job. In fact, the important issue here, the relationship between art and nature is an in-depth examination and questioning. Art education requires a serious knowledge and experience. The wrong directions may cause distress the creating of youth originality. First, we should look at the given type of education here. Artists or young candidates artists given the type of training should be planned in a very good way.

University For The Creative Arts and you have recently earned your : moreover you are currently working from your PhD. How have these experiences of formal training impacted on the way you produce your artworks? By the way, I often ask to myself if a certain kind of training could even stifle a young artist's creativity: what's your point about this?

based. Lesson plans and annual adjustments should be developed in this direction.

There is no doubt that education period of my life has been many contributions to knowledge and abilities. Among those factors, the most important one for me; creating my art in a conscious way to gain the ability I have. So when you create your masterpiece you learn to put forward in a more conscious way. One of the things that makes you special, separates from the people who do not get education about art in this area; life and nature by

Moreover, the instructor is a very important factor here. Some instructors quite loose students and contrast to this some of instructors may leave them much tightening in the design process. I think both attitudes are wrong. The students should be treated very attentive in the educational process. A good distinction should be made between discipline and leave them. Instructors 67


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should find the middle way here. Because if student does not feel free, it may kill his creativity. On the other hand, if he/she feels free too much, this could be result in lacking in design rules. Without force and authority, students should be told seriousness of his work. Here, art educators have many responsibilities. Before starting to elaborate about your production, would you like to tell to our readers something about your process and set up for making your works? In particular, what technical aspects do you mainly focus on your work? And how much preparation and time do you put in before and during the process of creating a piece?

Principally, l project that what I want to do design or work. I draw those my ideas in my any sketchbook. It is a sketchbook that l noted design of many ideas came to my mind. It makes no difference to do canvas or installation etc.. If l make an installation, l do its reasoning certainly in my mind; "how much it can be told much with less and extract the object or fiction". Also I make an a detailed research on related artists whom l am impressed from their workart. This case is a valid for many studies. l choose what l found suitable for my work and l try to use them as needed in my work process. The Textural Color of Emotion, Oil Painting on

In my opinon, for an artist in process composing a work of art, the artist can be affected by any object and case that he/she sees in the environment. It is impossible to abstract his/her work from the nature. Because, the artist is also a part of nature. Among the artists who I have affected, there are very important names the history of Turkish painting. Those are, Adnan Coker, Ismail Ates, Zekai Ormanci, Gungor Taner etc. The foreign artists are; Wassily Kandinsky’s geometric form and sense of abstract painting, Paul Klee completely geometrizes to the nature, Salvador Dali’s flowing objects and shapes are among the affecting factors in my sense of art. I try to analyze those artists’ art works by looking

Untitled, Acrylic on Canvas, 45 x 60 cm, 2013 68


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Untitled, Acrylic on Canvas,100 x 80 cm, 2013

Canvas 70 x 100 cm, 2009

work, this process can be quite long. For example, Section of Flower and The Color of Emotion Textural. Such style works require a long time. Generally I prefer to paint my work with acrylic paint. In addition, l am also use to oil painting, water color, collage and some of different techniques and materials in my works.

at them throughout many times in my art life. The colors I prefer in my works, are usually depends on the my current mental state. l love highlight the vivid colors in the large surface. l would like to have an impact that the colors is shoot up from the canvas. Generally, I prefer to paint my work with acrylic paint. In addition, l also use oil painting, water color, collage and some of different techniques and materials in my works. l try to reflect the identity of paint on the surface making a state of textural three-dimensional effect. Therefore, l process textures and form in a detailed manner. Paint depicting forms of the expression aims to reflect establishing a connection with my life. The process of creating work depends on the composition. if l am doing a detailed composition

l try to reflect the identity of paint on the surface making a state of textural three-dimensional effect. Therefore, l process textures and form in a detailed manner. Paint depicting forms of the expression aims to reflect establishing a connection with my life. The process of creating work depends on the composition. if l am doing a detailed composition work, this process can be quite long. For example, Section of Flower and The Color of Emotion Textural. Such style works require a long time. 69


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Tugba Renkci

Now let's focus on your artworks: I would like to start with your interesting works Flow of Sections and The Textural Color of Emotion that have been admired by our readers in the starting pages of this article: would you tell us something about the genesis of these pieces? What was your initial inspiration?

I work in sections the parts of crossing that are in my paintings. They are in transition from one chapter to other. Thus, among the integrity of the image in different parts of the aesthetic a surface is presentation. I do some of trying to provide the color balance of my paintings. For example, l prefer to use warmer colors specially for the part of stairs but l want to increase to effect of the painting by using contrast colors in between. I would rather the darker shades of the colors that are the best reveal the forms (particularly black) for the backgrounds. To obtain interesting color effects, l care that the colors are bright and clean. These are very substantial elements comprising structure color of my art works. I research the reflection of expressive effect of subconscious states placed, geometric or the "things" that are similar situations. Consisting of different fractures, sections and circles constitute the continuation of the next stage as connected to each other in life cycle. it is a valid for many situations in our life. it cannot be City - Chaos, Acrylic on Canvas, 45 x 60 cm, 2013

though independently of each other some events and the formation in nature life. When l consider some of the system on earth, symbolic representation of events and situations in surrounding area, almost all of them turns into a serious chaos in my mind. So how should be a reflection of this chaos? Based on those events, it takes me to describe a fact that pushes the boundaries that is the face of the events relation to grip awareness and our will situations in our life. Covering feelings in the subconscious or the emotions that are evoked, within a geometric form and unsteady but as a whole with each other in defferent parts is reflected through allegorical color textures.

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Complicated Dreams, Acrylic on Canvas, 146 x 146 cm, 2012

Istanbul l did my City-Chaos work. l hadn't ever lived a metropolis city like Istanbul, maybe l shaped such a artwork that period. Think about it, suddenly you find yourself in the middle of a metropolitan city and a big crowded. You have a good job at a university and also you have to be patient that crowded and stress. l think I reflected the feelings that gave me the emotion in a chaos. Series of cross-section requires a serious discipline and attention to detail. *Wassily Kandinsky’s geometric forms and Sevil Buyukerman’s worked titled “Dort Mevsim” have provided the inspiration for the work art titled “The Color of Textural Emotion”.

Therefore sometimes I need to do some artworks to relieve my brush and myself. In this process, l have chance to do my research on colors and stains on the work. Hot and cold gradations of color and bold brush strokes have always impressed me. Especially l think that red is a dramatic impact to my style. So, to use thick brush strokes, paints fluid, free and convenient way the picture on the surface. In my recent works, I represent my inwardness lyrical expres-sionist style.

Another interesting pieces of yours on which I would like to spend some words are your recent paintings City - Chaos and Untitled (2013): a feature of these piece that as mostly impacted on me is the fluidity of the color and especially the deep, intense red, which is a recurrent tone in your creations and that can be admired in a flooding nuance in Red Dress as well. By the way, any comments on your choice of "palette" and how it has changed over time?

And I couldn't do without mention your stimulating installation Are Women Flowers? And especially Greater Middle East Initiative, which I have to admit is one of my favorite work of

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of yours... I would call it a "painted installation": I have been struck with the way you have been capable of establishing such an effective synergy between different materials, creating a symbiosis rather than a contrast... by the way, how do you decide upon which materials you incorporate within a piece?

My installations are on a theme. For example, “Are Women Flowers?” artwork is on Hazard theme and “Greater Middle East Initiative” artwork is on Eastern theme. Those two works generated on those two themes. As specific l considered the things that are reminiscent me Hazard and Eastern within the scope of theme. In this direction l transformed the most completely installations that the feelings of those themes evoke in me. The key point here, in particular it evokes many things with at least one material in the audience. It is not an easy task to select the right materials for the message you want to give

Are Women Flowers?" Mixed Technique, Installa

as visual. What is important here; instead of what is ready object, how the artist use it in artistic approach. Therefore, to make integrity an artwork and a reasonable inference need to spend the mental effort. l have met about many objects in any way when l go out at shopping district or any place, l try to reason with that question: "How and what way do l evaluate in my art?" I'm looking and investigating for examples of installations which are done before. Hence, l think it needs to make that art is a lifestyle... During these recent years you have received acceptances from the international symposiums... it goes without saying that feedbacks and especially awards are capable of supporting an artist, I was just wondering if an award -or better, the expectation of an award- could even influence the process of an artist... Corporate Identity and City Branding”,

By the way, how much important is for you the feedback of your audience? Do you ever think

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the simpler one- I receive the most complex answers: what aspect of your work do you enjoy the most? What gives you the biggest satisfaction?

For me, the most enjoyable part is losing myself in the artwork by isolating from everything and everybody. You are focusing on only one thing for a long time! Think about it! You do not even care the rest of the world. Sometimes I forget to eat food. It is really fantastic! Another enjoyable part, painting makes me feel refresh. Think this like a therapy. Especially, when I hold the brush, I feel the excitement of beginning to a new adventure. Also, working with impressive colors on a surface looks like a very funny game. When you do not make painting for a while, you feel a glow of inspiration and desire. And you live the explosion of this situation. Then, when you take a look, the product of this explosion smiles you J This is really amazing! tion Art, 2013

Thank you for your time and for sharing with us your thoughts, Tugba. My last question deals with your future plans: anything coming up for you professionally that you would like readers to be aware of?

to whom will enjoy your Art when you conceive your pieces?

Of course. I am getting set my first solo exhibition that is going to be in Yildiz Technical University, Yuksel Sabanci Art Gallery in end of April. During my PhD studies l will join various exhibitions that are in domestic and abroad. One of them is KUNST 2014 that will be in Berlin in February.

Awards are nice entertaining activities that motivate the artists. However, the point is achieving (and even exceeding) an aim the artist set himself/herself. In other words, this achievement desire should motivate the artist primarily. For me, award or the expectation of an award is not such a big thing. After all, I am doing my job because I love it. I am trying to exceed myself in my art. I show my artworks to my family and friends firstly. Their comments and opinions are very important for me. Also, I prefer that my artworks be open-ended to lots of thoughts. Instead of calling just single thing to my audience easily, I want to push them to consider much. I’d like to address young artists and art-lovers, in Turkey in particular. I want to improve my artworks in this direction.

It can be found more information at this link: http://www.cac.ca.gov/artistcall/acdetail/id/25984 Also it will be decisive my field of expertise about thesis in the coming period. in this process, It will continue my participation to international symposiums that are arranged by different universities.

without asking to the artists that I happen to interview, since -even though it might sound

An interview by: peripheral_arteries@dr.com

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Sharyn O’Shaughnessy (Ireland)

an artist’s statement

“We are like the spider. We weave our life and then move along in it. We are like the dreamer who dreams and then lives in the dream.” I spent a few months taking road trips around southern California’s Mojave Desert where the weather was hot and dry and the dust tracks were long and desolate. The vast wilderness of the desert was occasionally interrupted by the detritus of previous inhabitants long gone. Evidence of domesticity tried and failed, structures collapsed and towns abandoned. A harsh environment containing artifacts of the past presented in the stillness of total isolation. I was drawn to the dwellings in particular, monumental in the dusty expanse. They are familiar, built to contain people and bare witness to their lives. Structures that come together and come apart over time. They retain marks and belongings, the everyday mundane become artifacts, a sort of social archeology. They are no longer safe places that offer shelter, their function has been overtaken by time and nature. The camera serves as a looking glass through which an inventory of fragments, remnants, are presented. The images suggest narratives somewhere between what we see and what we imagine. The work invites the viewer to speculate. The photograph captures a place at a moment in time, they are documents of the past and the subjects will continue to change. The work explores the idea of place and spaces, from the vast isolation of the desert to the confines of domesticity. Lines which are often blurred as the desert and time transform both. The work explores themes of nostalgia, decay and transformation.

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Sharyn O’Shaughnessy

an interview with

‘Shaughnessy Sharyn O ‘Shaug hnessy Hello Sharyn, and a warm welcome to Peripheral ARTeries. I would start this interview with my usual ice breaker question: what in your opinion defines a work of Art? By the way, what could be in your opinion the features that mark an artworks as a piece of Contemporary Art? Do you think that there's a dichotomy between tradition and contemporariness?

Defining art is an interesting question, I think you find what you look for. I recognise a work of art as something that challenges or reflects things that we take for granted, it makes us look a little closer to seek out some sort of meaning from the things around us. I think contemporary art serves as a sort of parallel coverage of current events, it comments on how our perceptions change and where our focus lies at a point in time. The dichotomy between traditional and contemporary art can be seen as a dichotomy between nostalgia and questioning. Tradition evokes meaning by relying on symbolic representation and established metaphors whereas contemporary art will often question and challenge the values of tradition and seek to provide new ways of representation.

Sharyn O'Shaughnessy

king environment. My current practice, responding to environments, is based on a lot of travel and experience in order to create a finished work, it is an informal approach and no two days are the same.

Would you like to tell us something about your background? Are there particular experiences that have impacted on the way you currenly produce your artworks? By the way, I sometimes I wonder if a certain kind of formal training could even stifle a young artist's creativity... what's your point?

Art education can definitely open up a student to possibilities in terms of practice and process. Being surrounded by other working artists can be very inspiring. By the same token I don't think that formal education is all together necessary, often the best work can result from a questioning mind and not necessarily from education. For me having the freedom to travel and work suits my practice, formal education and institutes can be stifling, working within an institution can often mean being bound by certain constraints and limits.

I received a degree in painting from Limerick School of Art and Design, at that time I was working with lots of mixed media textures and creating sensory installations. In terms of the materials and processes my practice has evolved into something more spontaneous and my medium reflects that. The work I am making now continues to explore the richness of textures, layers and the impact of spaces but the process has changed to suit my wor-

Before starting to elaborate about your production, would you like to tell to our readers

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time makes the process suitable to my approach to creating work. Now let's focus on your art production: I would like to start with your works NothingOnTV and Wear It Out that our readers can admire in these pages: would you tell us something about the genesis of these pieces? What was your initial inspiration?

The work featured is from a trip through the Southern California deserts. There are some incredible abandoned buildings and items in this amazingly beautiful and unforgiving landscape. Social artefacts, like monuments of contemporary life tried and failed. NothingOnTv was shot at the Salton Sea, an abandoned resort town which gave way over time to a almost ghost town landscape of trailers and very few inhabitants. The vintage TV set on the porch is evocative of ordinary daily

something about your process and set up for making your artworks? In particular, what technical aspects do you mainly focus on your work? And how much preparation and time do you put in before and during the process of creating a piece?

The actual process of creating these images is done with my Nikon. I try to keep my equipment to a minimum when I'm out on a shoot, shooting mostly handheld as a response to the environment I find myself in. The preparation for the shoot is usually done when I'm scouting for locations, I often discover subjects by chance when I'm driving by an abandoned mining town or military base. Because my work is created on the road I am constantly surprised and inspired by what I find. As a photographer the potential to record and document aspects of a landscape in a moment of

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life but the context, how time has transformed this scene has created a curious sort of installation.

I would like to stop for a moment to consider the "function" of the landscape, in your pieces [2] and [4]: I can recognize that it is not just a passive background... I'm sort of convinced that some informations & ideas are hidden, or even "encrypted" in the environment we live in, so we need -in a way- to decipher them. Maybe that one of the roles of an artist could be to reveal unexpected sides of Nature, especially of our inner Nature... what's your point about this?

Wear It Out is a Route 66 piece. The abandoned highway is scattered with remnants from a time when it was the main street of America. Discarded garments have many connotations, from suicide, to gang territory to ownership. A garment on a chair lets us know that the chair is held for somebody, this vest stretched over the door might suggest ownership, and it also poses questions as to who might have left the garment at what appears to be an abandoned building on the desert roadside miles from anywhere. 'Wear it out' is taken to mean use or be used until no longer in good condition or working order, in this instance the vest and the location have not worn out but have been replaced.

How we conceive of a landscape can be affected by where we're standing, whether we are inside looking out or outside, especially in the desert. The point of view already conveys something of exposure vs. security. The dried out desert hose and vandalised desert hut paradoxically represent security and exposure. The effect of time and nature are not visible in the landscape but in the things that punctuate it's vastness. It's these things 78


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without mention Peter Tabor who once said that "collaboration is working together with another to create something as a synthesis of two practices, that alone one could not": what's your point about this? Can you explain how your work demonstrates communication between two artists?

that can often suggest a history, clues that can be interpreted of nature's effect on ways of life. I find the vastness of the desert to be an amazing background, there is a sense of wilderness that makes items strewn around appear mysterious. like when there are no people around for miles and you find a derelict hut with some curious graffiti inside it. The desert cannot be a passive background, vast and unforgiving even when there appears to be nothing but stillness the desert landscape is full of activity.

I think that's an interesting quote, from my experience I would have to agree. Sometimes as an artist working independently your practice can become focused on one aspect or another, working with another artist opens up the possibilities of where your work can go and through collaboration the final work can evolve from very abstract beginnings to a surprising final piece which I really enjoy.

You are currently working towards a collaborative project detailing the desert and its transformations: I personally find absolutely fascinating the collaborations that artists can established together as you did: especially because this often reveals a symbiosis between apparently different approaches to art... and I can't help

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together in all sorts of conditions. It's a great opportunity to explore new techniques and see another artist respond to a subject you are working on. As a photographer, in a certain sense, a part of your work could be defined as a reportage about human perception: and I would go as far as to state that Hanging Out and Chair communicate the absence of the human element... In a way, what we see is not "independent" from human presence: so I would like to ask you if in your opinion, personal experience is an absolutely indispensable step of a creative process... Do you think that a creative process could be disconnected from direct experience?

These places are influenced by human presence. The objects were placed in these situations with a function in mind but these functions have changed. HangingOut with the seated stuffed fabric body falling apart and trailer in the distance suggests human presence where there is none. There is an air of mystery and intrigue in the scene that has come together over time and which I encountered on a particular day. Chair comes from Amargosa, the desert mining town that gave way to the legend of Marta Becket and her Opera. The story of an auditorium of empty seats in her hand painted Opera at Death Valley Junction has become legendary. This is simply a chair in Becket's one horse town of Amargosa, there is a sense of human absence and also something poignant about the peeling, weathered setting in the shadow of the vacant opera house. Personal experience has a huge effect on my creative process, I cannot separate one from the other. The images I capture are very responsive to the situation I find myself in, sometimes by choice sometimes by chance. It is my direct experience of a landscape that forms the basis of the images I will shoot. While inspiration and creative process can come from a variety of places, my practice is very much based in direct experience, a creative process can be objectively conceptual and based on interpretation rather than a direct experience. It goes without saying that feedbacks and especially awards are capable of supporting an artist: I was just wondering if an award -or better, the expectation of an award- could even influence the process of an artist... By the way, how much important is for you the feedback of your audience? Do you ever think to whom will enjoy your Art when you conceive your pieces?

Feedback can be really interesting, I'm always intrigued by interpretations of my work. When I am creating my priority is to capture the essence

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of a place or object, the thing that attracts me, something that conveys meaning or suggests possibilities. The audience are invited to respond and interpret my work, I don't try to cater to an audience instead I prefer to leave it up to interpretation. question that I often pose to the artists that I interview: what aspect of your work do you enjoy the most? What gives you the biggest satisfaction? Well, actually ain't

I'm really interested in the transformation of objects and places by time and function so I really enjoy that my work records moments of time, like a time capsule in a constantly changing landscape. I would like to revisit these sites in the future and record their transformations, like a wasteland full of monuments to life in the desert, there is always potential for transformation by time and human presence that will add to the quiet history of the desert. I think that my work can expose the audience to things, places and ways of life that are not often considered, audience response is very interesting and a very satisfying aspect of my work. Thanks a lot for your time and your thoughts, Sharyn. My last question deals with your future plans: what's next for you? Anything coming up for you professionally that you would like readers to be aware of?

I'm really excited about the next project I am working towards. A collaborative project that will further explore the desert and it's idioscynscarcies, in a variety of mediums the exhibition will seek to evoke very particular aspects of the environment. 81


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Ellen van der Schaaf (The Netherlands) an artist’s statement

My work consists of figurative drawings of daily life with a twist of alienation. My drawings have a surreal slant, to underscore the idea behind them. This is impossible with pure realism. This doesn't mean I favor surrealist art. I'm actually more a fan of the Flemish primitives and Japanese prints. Often my drawings show an uncomfortable relationship between the characters in the scene, or between the characters and their surroundings. I also see myself as the designer of a very detailled set in which these situations occur. I do not want to make pretty pictures, but strive to create tension. A drawing should possess a certain beauty, but pure beauty is an illusion that clashes with what I intend to show. That is why I combine precise detail with the unsettling elements of decay and mortality. My hands and thoughts are one while I create. I never know in advance what is going to happen. I don't do preliminary sketches, I just let my intuition guide me. I start somewhere on the paper and the idea forms while I work. Of course accidents happen, to which I respond to regain control of the drawing.

Ellen van der Schaaf

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Ellen van der Schaaf

an interview with

Ellen van der Schaaf Hello Ellen, and a warm welcome to Peripheral ARTeries. I would start this interview with my usual ice breaker question: what in your opinion defines a work of Art? By the way, what could be in your opinion the features that mark an artworks as a piece of Contemporary Art? Do you think that there's a dichotomy between tradition and contemporariness?

For me, contemporary art is as indefinable as the universe. It's constantly evolving, turns around, speeds up or repeats a previous movement. The moment I try to define contemporary art, it's already moved on. I do think each work of art contains a message in a personal language. I don't always understand the meaning of contemporary art. Unlike traditional art, there aren't any handy categories to guide you. For a creator this lack of boundaries provides a lot of room to play. And yet, I usually stick to the same thing. Odd, that. I do create borders, by zooming in on what's close to me. Would you like to tell us something about your background? You have received a formal training, and you have studied at the Academie voor Beeldende Kunst, in Kampen. How has this experience impacted on the way you currently produce your artworks? By the way, I sometimes I wonder if a certain kind of formal training could even stifle a young artist's creativity... what's your point?

Ellen van der Schaaf

When in art school, I thoroughly prepared for my work. It needed to be good. But I started to doubt the usefulness of preliminary sketches and such . After the academy I let go of preliminary research and sketches. Instead, I go directly to pen and ink to commit my improvisations to paper. I started with stamp-sized doodles but this mushroomed over the years to the 32x50 cm (12,5x20 inch) works I make today.

Ellen van der Schaaf (Bolsward, the Netherlands, 1972) studied at the Academie voor Beeldende Kunst, in Kampen. Aside from her autonomous work, she made illustrations for books and magazines. Ellen uses pen and ink and mixed media to create intimate, everyday scenes, which under closer scrutiny turn out to be surreal in nature, while remaining very human and recognizable. She draws intuitively without advance sketches or plans. Cassandra Hanks

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Before starting to elaborate about your production, would you like to tell to our readers something about your process and set up for making your artworks? In particular, what technical aspects do you mainly focus on your work? And how much preparation and time do you put in before and during the process of creating a piece?

Currently I draw with ink, but also use paint and collaging. I suddenly felt the need to work with colour, which transformed my studio in a mess of paper scraps and colours that might be of use one day. Sometimes I start my composition by pasting scraps. Sometimes I start with a drawing. I don't think it really matters for the end result. I start intuitively until I notice elements that I connect to. I then begin to see connections between the elements on the paper. It's then that the work moves into a more coherent direction which elicits thoughts, feelings, memories and dreams. I continue from there. That's usually the half-way point. It usually takes about four weeks before I achieve the right balance between contents and atmosphere. I often discover a paradox in the resulting work. I see how the different and often conflicting meanings that grew from the theme now work hand in hand. The result is often busy and detailed, and I have put in everything I possibly could. Now let's focus on your art production: I would like to start with Stilleven * and Ten Prooi that our readers can admire in these pages and that I would suggest them to visit directly your website www.tekeningenkijken.nl in order to get a wider idea of your art: in the meanwhile, would you tell us something about the genesis of these pieces? They seems quite different form each other: what was your initial inspiration?

Central in her work is the impossibility of relationships. She toys with the ideal that many pursue but most people never attain. She searches for tension between beauty and the ever-present decay.

Stilleven (still life) is an experiment to let go of all those complicated relationships. Sometimes I wish I could make peaceful drawings without all that tension. Creating a still life seemed a good idea, but can I draw a scene that shows things as they are? So far, my still lives are either on the brink of explosion or about to collapse. So I am not really succeeding in expressing peace. Perhaps I will succeed when I'm old, grey and wise.

An important aspect in her work is extreme attention to detail, which draws the viewer into the picture. Once inside, these details can invoke a sense of unease. e-mail: ellen@tekeningenkijken.nl website: www.tekeningenkijken.nl 85


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Ten Prooi ("Fell prey") is a drawing that I created in the way I described above. It's about the paradox of Man as the most highly evolved form of life, who isn't able to live in a paradise. Even though everything in creation is linked, there is no harmony. Even though I wish for the best, guilt or fate make it impossible to escape a dose of misery. Everything in the world is related to each other, and yet I often feel isolated. Another piece of yours on which I would like to focus is entitled Big Bang. I noticed that your works are intricately and complexly layered, often revealing a lot of symbolic elements: I would go as far as to state that your Art helps us to notice a lot of details around us, allowing

Ten Prooi

us to discover the poetry inside them... I'm sort of convinced that some informations & ideas are hidden, or even "encrypted" in the environment we live in, so we need to decipher them. Maybe that one of the roles of an artist could be to reveal unexpected sides of Nature, especially of our inner Nature... what's your point about this?

I believe that every drawing I make is a selfportrait. I'm not literally in it, but the way I see things, is. Big Bang shows the world as a laboratory. We see a lot happening of which we can't predict the eventual outcome. It could be destroyed at any second, but could just as easily blossom. While I was working on this drawing, news broke about the removing of left-over rods of radioactive material from the Fukushima

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Smakelijk

reactors. All of that lethal material was still there even though it's been a long time since the disaster. You can lose everything in one swoop. In one swoop, something we never wanted to lose: gone. We all fantasize about something blowing up. It's rarely a good idea. What gives you the right to destroy?

And I couldn't do without mentioning Smakelijk, a piece that has particularly impacted on me: I found it both fleshy, and at the same time it suggests such allegorical features... Being strictly connected to the chance to create a deep intellectual involvement, your artworks are capable of communicating a wide variety of states of mind: have you ever happened to discover something that you didn't previously plan and that you didn't even think about before? I'm sort of convinced that one of the roles of an artist could be to reveal hidden sides of life and nature... what's you point?

Is it the idea that if you destroy something wicked, you create room for something more beautiful? In this drawing you see Lady Justice as well as a devil. Justice and evil form a tricky duo. People try to tinker with the world to make it better, but will they succeed? Doubt is an important ingredient in my work. When I mix my sensory perception of the world with what's going on inside me, things often clash.

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Muzen in het atelier

is a pointless endeavour. By that I mean that I get further by playing than by knowing. I don't think a finished thought is very interesting for a drawing. While drawing I play with what's happening inside me and what makes me curious. A story forms which I did not know yet. "Smakelijk" is Dutch for "tasteful", both in the meaning of good tasting food and as 'in good taste', in the ethical sense. The drawing is both tasteful and distasteful. How wonderful or disgusting is abundance when others starve? Is it noble or ungrateful if you don't embrace abundance and live in abstinence? My work is a personal reflection on things that happen inside me. By creating an image, I get a grip on ideas, fantasies, impressions and feelings that would otherwise flutter around in my head unchecked. I give them a place on the paper. While admiring your series of portraits, I have been impressed by a line of your artist's statement as well, when you tell that you do not want to make pretty pictures [...] since pure beauty is an illusion that clashes with what you intend to show... this has me reminded a Michelangelo's quote, when he was wondering if the real beauty that we can recognize is a feature of the work that we admire, or if in a certain sense it's "inside of ourselves", and all that an artwork can do is to awaken our inner sense of beauty...

There is a lot of beauty. I understand the need of artists to capture beauty. All beauty is fleeting, which is a pity. For me, the reality that beauty is temporary overshadows the value of beauty.

Boze Tongen

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That's why I accompany beautiful elements in my drawings with things that threaten them. Appealing apples will have to deal with worms. Lovers will see their romance fall in pieces because a menace from the outside world threatens them Your works have been exhibited in several occasions: you recently had an exhibition at “Gogyoshi Art Project"... it goes without saying that feedbacks and especially awards are capable of supporting an artist: I was just wondering if an award -or better, the expectation of an award- could even influence the process of an artist... By the way, how much important is for you the feedback of your audience? Do you ever think to whom will enjoy your Art when you conceive your pieces?

The Gogyoshi Art Project is a collective of artists who created work based on the poems of Taro Aizu. A Gogyoshi is a form Japanese poetry.

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These particular poems deal with the aftermath of the nuclear disaster in Fukushima. It's both a way to draw attention to the continuing hardship of the people who suffer from this disaster, and a way for the artists to draw inspiration and perhaps beauty out of something that is in essence ugly and horrible. For me it was a challenge to create work based on the thoughts of the poet and to combine this with my own sensibilities and methods. You ask how important feedback is on my work. Feedback doesn't influence my work. I don't actively seek out feedback. I create with what happens inside my head and on the page. I'm not consciously trying to send a message to a potential viewer. That doesn't mean feedback doesn't affect me. I am always surprised when it happens. I really enjoy it when people give feedback because it means they took the time to actually look at my work. I think my drawings don't really do much if you glance over them. It requires some effort from the observer, and I am always very grateful if someone actually is willing to make that effort. I actually feel honoured if someone does that and if they take something away from it. question that I often pose to the artists that I interview: what aspect of your work do you enjoy the most? What gives you the biggest satisfaction? Well, actually ain't

Expression is a great motivator. I enjoy being able to create everything: a chair no one owns, an animal that no one has

Toeschouwer

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Dag en nacht

ever seen or a plant that doesn't exist. These creations helpme to entertain and surprise myself. The mess in my head requires a pressure valve, and by creating images I order the chaos in my mind a bit. What I enjoy the most is being able to focus fully on my drawing, especially the tiny details. It doesn't matter if the shape I work on is upholstery or a dustbin. It's quite possible that something in a supporting role gets as much detail and attention as a shape that's the central object. Thanks a lot for your time and your thoughts, Ellen. My last question deals with your future plans: what's next for you? Anything coming up for you professionally that you would like readers to be aware of?

Thanks for the interview and for your interest! For the future I hope to finally capture that harmony that I so desire and apply it to my art. Perhaps as a still life? Perhaps landscapes will become more prominent in my work. Most of my scenes take place in-doors. These are just thoughts, not concrete goals. Things develop in their own way, in their own time. I can't define the future any better than I can define the universe. It's always in motion. It's constantly evolving, turns around, speeds up or repeats a previous movement. And now we're back where we started.

Vuile Handen

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Jolanda Straathof (The Netherlands)

an artist’s statement

About ten years ago I started taking a number of classes at Arti Total to master the very different painting techniques under which old French and Italian murals. The time I started painting has also begun my spiritual journey . My interest in this, my passion for art and my experience with awareness I want to combine in my work and propagate. Approximately three years ago , I also focussed on photography. The beach is mostly my studio, small things look bigger. The phenomenon nature always fascinates and raises many emotions. So I sometimes come after viewing my photos to amazing discoveries and therefore I would like to share this beautiful experience. I design and create my own frames, often made of beautiful, weathered by the sea and shaped pieces of wood found on the beach. The frames I paint creating a beautiful symbiosis between picture and frame. I hope that the audience is fascinated, I try this by putting my own " Jol 's touch" to indicate through beautiful colors because that's what I want, make people happy with my work . It is extraordinary to discover what kind of a sense the colors, shapes and materials moves me . Will you come with me on a travel?

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Jolanda Straathof

an interview with

Jolanda Straathof Hello Jolanda and welcome to Peripheral ARTeries. I would start this interview with my usual ice breaker question: what in your opinion defines a work of Art? And moreover, what could be the features that mark the contemporariness of an artwork?

Art is where the heart is. The creation of unique, beautiful creative things from the heart. Art is really more a generic term for the total of artistic works, this can be diverse. For me it’s painting, photography, poetry, designing and creating frames at my photos. The frames I paint are creating a beautiful symbiosis between photos and frame. It is something I like to do to create for others.  Art is a recreation of the reality in accordance with the  experience of the artist. In my case the spiritual experience, the ability to make the special events to be able to see in photos. Would you like to tell us something about your background? Are there particular experiences that impacted on the way you produce your artworks? By the way, since times ago you started to take classes at Arti Total to master the different painting techniques I would like to ask your point about formal training... I sometimes happen to wonder if a certain kind of training could even stifle a young artist's creativity...

Jolanda Straathof

ting, including murals and old French and Italian walls for example. The courses given there are of a high level and people from all over the country are coming over. On the question whether some training can also stifle the creativity, yes, that is true. During some lessons, given by a teacher, I had the assignment to put some lines on paper, ultimately creating a city of lines. All the appearing boxes then had to filled with different colours, which was not really given to me. I’d rather paint expressive, from the soul, not knowing what will occur, being surprised by the shapes and colours.

I was born in Roosendaal and afterwards I often moved to places on the coast. At the moment I live in IJmuiden, near the beach. I went to the Lyceum and started working at the office for 27 years. For a long time I worked for a company named KPN . After a reorganization I lost my job. This however gave me the space and time to expand my painting skills. During this time I also started with photography and photo editing. and I have made my first collection to expose my work. For years I have previously followed several courses at Arti Total to learn the various styles of pain-

Before starting to elaborate about your production, would you like to tell to our readers something about your process and set up for making your works? In particular, what

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frame and photo will become one, using beautiful colours.  Creating a work of art will take several hours. Now let's focus on your artworks: I would like to start with your project Knieval, that our readers have already admired in the starting pages of this article: would you tell us something about the genesis of thos work? What was your initial inspiration?

My work with the title 'Knieval’ is created during a walk in the forest. My inspiration was the natural environment. I was surprised by the beautiful shapes of the pieces of bark by which the trees were coated. These were the parts of the tree which I did photograph. By editing this photo those wonderful shapes were underlined. technical aspects do you mainly focus on your work? And how much preparation and time do you put in before and during the process of creating a piece?

Let me confine to this question here to the photography and the frames I design and manufacture. By editing the photos in two different programs, Adobe Photoshop an Picassa, colour effects can be used showing special items which are not that clear as they are on the original. The frames I design are often made of beautiful, natural weathered pieces of wood, often with special shapes, washed up on the beach. These pieces I take home with me, put them to dry and clean them. Minding the shapes in the photo, I create a design. By using my own ‘Jol’s touch,

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By flipping the photo in Adobe there was an additional artistic effect and by using these beautiful shapes and colours on the affected and erosed frames, it completed the work of art. How would you describe the message and the narrative behind this project — that is, the idea you would most like to convey or the story you are trying to tell?

Nature fascinates. Viewing the shapes and colors is a trip of itself. What’s particularly interesting in trees, there is always a lot to see. Especially old trees are very animated. This also applies to pieces of wood washed up by the sea. Very spectacular is a photo I took from a thousand year old tree, which shows a lot of secrets. It is viewed by many people and each time there are new discoveries. This tree has already experienced two wars. When I stood there I felt very tiny. At the same time I saw the aura of the tree which was enormous. Various souls were signalled on the photos as well as faces and body shapes. Being just a small part of the tree, this was just a fraction to be seen. Duizend Jarige Boom

Since many of the readers of our review are artists, would you like to tell us if digital technology as post-editing has impacted on your creative process? All in all, modern technologies allows us not only to make possible what was once hard to make, but are also and especially capable of helping us to conceive new kind of works...

The digital technology and in particular the digital programs enable me to edit my photos giving me the results I like. By using this I am able to show details which can’t be seen without it. The colors emphasize this again.  I would like to ask you if in your opinion personal experience is an absolutely indespensable part of a creative process... Do you think that a creative process could be discon-

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nected from direct experience?

Spiritual backgrounds are a part in a lot of my works. I myself am a spiritual person for a long time now. This is a journey that no one can make for you. You have to experience it by yourself. This enables me to experience the things around me consciously. This also enables me to see with some deeper look. I often see things other people do not see. My spiritual experiences brought me a lot of beautiful things which caused a lot of strength inside myself. Knowing there is more between heaven and earth I would like to transfer this spiritual awareness to other people..  The creative process can also be separated from this experience. 

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I have been very impressed with a line of your artist's statement, when I read that you sometimes come after viewing your photos to amazing discoveries and therefore you would like to share this beautiful experience... I'm sort of convinced that some informations & ideas are hidden, or even "encrypted" in the environment we live in, so we need -in a wayto decipher them. Maybe that one of the roles of an artist could be to reveal unexpected sides of Nature, especially of our inner Nature... what's your point about this?

Yes I am sure. I see it as my task to point out what’s to be seen on the photo’s. 'For example, I made close-ups from shells to which an embryo was seen with four souls of girls heads on it and on the same photo is the watchful eye. There are plenty of hidden examples. I can promote The spiritual awakening of the phenomena in nature through my passion for art. Just days ago I have happened to read that "the worst reaction you can have to an artist’s work is no reaction at all"... How much important is for you the feedback of your audience? Do you ever think to whom will enjoy your Art when you conceive your pieces?

I think it is very nice to get feedback on my work

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Especially if I notice that it touches people. For instance, there was a woman. Her child had died and she was directly touched by seeing my photo showing very clear the image of a soul on the inside of the shell. That’s doing something with me. I would like to make people happy with my work. Thank you for your time and for sharing with us your thoughts, Jolanda. My last question deals with your future plans: what's next for you? Anything coming up for you professionally that you would like readers to be aware of?

In the future I would like to extend a bit more. I like to be surprised, let me by what comes my way and then I would actually like to end where I started. Art is where the heart is. 

An interview by peripheral_arteries@dr.com

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Peripheral ARTeries Art Review - January 2014