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CONTEMPORARY ART REVIEW Biennial Edition Installation • Painting • Mixed media • Drawing • Performance • Public Art • Drawing • Video art • Fine Art Photography

THEA-IREN DALTON DIANA MALIVANI annie de wiest ANNA SYPENOVA ALICE WANG DIMITRA KOULA JOHN LOWE JOHANNA PORTER SIGAL YAAR Sigal Yaar Photo by Sari Ofek


Be that as it may, this catalog or any portion ther eof may not be reproduced or used in any manner whatsoever without express written permission from Peripheral ARTeries and featured artists.

Anna Sypěnová


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Lives and works in Ramat-Hasharon, Israe

lives and works in Hollywood, FL, USA

lives and works in Raleigh, North Carolina, USA

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lives and works in Thessaloniki, Greece

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Lives and works in Seattle, WA (USA)

Lives and works in  Přerov, Czech Republic

Lives and works in Brussels, Belgium

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Lives and works in Limassol, Cyprus

Lives and works in Ireland

Special thanks to: Michael Betancourt, Teresa Wells, Jared Schaffer, Jean-Claude Bise, Ashley Cassens, Hildy Maze, Karissa Hahn, Juliana Pepper, Jane Sheiko, Max Savold, Julia Überreiter, Deborah Esses, Margaret Noble, Joseph Goddard, Nathalie Borowski, Marco Visch, Xavier Blondeau, J.D. Doria, Matthias Callay, Luiza Zimerman, Kristina Sereikaite, Scott D'Arcy, Kalli Kalde, Carla Forte, Mathieu Goussin, Evie Zimmer, Dorothee Zombronner, Olga Karyakina, Robert Hamilton, Isabel Becker, Clare Haxby, Carrie Alter, Jessica Bingham, Agnieszka Ewa Braun, Fabian Freese, Elodie Abergel, Ellen van der Schaaf, Courtney Henderson and Francine LeClercq

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Sigal Yaar Lives and works in Ramat-Hasharon, Israel

Sigal Yaar was born in Tel Aviv, Israel. She studied Visual Communication at 'Escuela de artes aplicadas', BCN, Spain. Her distinctive specialization is painting, sculpturing & graphic design. She uses objects that she collects, recycles and then aspires in them a new meaning & existence. With her special technique and by using the wood texture, She creates an 'airy' and transparent environment which inspires the viewer. Her tendency to combine 3D & 2D, led her to use Assemblage, collage and to develop unique bevel techniques along with illustrative and classical painting skills. Her artwork has been displayed in galleries and has been purchased to the personal collection of notable collectors An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator

substratum due to your Israeli roots direct the trajectory of your current artistic research?

peripheral.arteries@europe.com

Hello and thanks for having me, I'm honored by your interest in my artwork.

Hello Sigal and welcome to Peripheral ARTeries. Before starting to elaborate about your artistic production and we would like to invite our readers to visit https://www.sigalyaar.com in order to get a wide idea about your artistic production, and we would start this interview with a couple of questions about your multifaceted background. You have solid formal training and along with your studies at the Escuela de Artes Aplicadas in Barcelona, Spain: how did those formative years influence your evolution as an artist? In particular, how does your cultural

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I expressed interest in drawing and painting at a very early age. I was encouraged to develop my skills and was selected to be part of an experimental art class already at middle school. I was keen to step up to the challenge and went on to try my best having my first real professional art classes. After my graduation, I have been fortunate to study Art & design both in Barcelona, Spain & Israel. Each of the places added value to the way I

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Sigal Yaar Photo by Sari Ofek


Self portrait in a drawer Oil on a wooden drawer | 32X42 cm


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contemplate the world & see things in a different angle. I view my education as essential and invaluable. It gave me an introduction to art history, composition, colors and technical skills. Most of all, it gave me the opportunity to experiment and expresses myself.

them do discover aesthetics in daily situations: when walking our readers through your usual setup and process, would you tell us how do you usually develop the initial ideas for your artworks? For years I've been in a quest, a quest to conceive a third child. In this body of work, the process I went through was really unique. My series of paintings emanated from my own distress, as I processed and internalized a painful IVF procedure. Over the years I accumulated materials, syringes, medication, and documentation, hoping that someday I would be able to cope with this issue. Well, it took me 5 long years‌ Through all that time, I constantly memorized the emotions, feelings & pain I went through. When I got to the point of the creation itself, I knew exactly what to do‌ it was already set in my mind. As the subject is very personal & intimate, the use of the drawers was a perfect choice conceptually.

I was very lucky to move to Barcelona specifically in 1992, the year of the Olympic Games. It was really fascinating to view how the city had totally transformed; with a huge impact on the design and art. Spanish art is known for many famous and influential artists who have been changing the course of art, the environment indeed inspired me. As an Israeli that experienced life abroad, I can clearly see the difference. Life in Israel can be stressed & hectic but at the same time it is encouraging to inspiration and creativity. It blends so many varying influences from all over the world and Part of the artistic richness is Israel's diversity. The Israeli art scene nowadays is no one style, ideology or medium that defines it. I attend a lot of openings almost every week and I'm really impressed with the number of great artists here.

Now that I was able to succeed in my quest and my third child is 6 years old, each piece tells a different aspect of my story, the story of more than a decade of my life. In order to get the entire puzzle, you'll have to put all the pieces together.

We have appreciated the way the results of your artistic inquiry into the theme of perception convey such a coherent combination between emotional intuition and a rigorous aesthetics and the body of works that we have selected for this special edition of Peripheral ARTeries has at once impressed us for the way you provide the viewers with such a multilayered visual experience, often oriented in addressing

There are several different processes in your work such as assemblage, collage that directed you to develop your unique techniques along with illustrative and classical painting skills. New York City based artist Lydia Dona once stated that in order to make art today one has to

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reevaluate the conceptual language behind the mechanism of art making itself: do you create your works gesturally, instinctively? Or do you methodically transpose geometric schemes? The process of my work always starts with an initial concept & visual. I often take photos of the composition I have in mind. Then I start to seek the platform & material to use. Once starting the creation itself, I let myself experiment with different materials, mixing types of colors & techniques. Picasso once said, "I start with an idea and then it becomes something else". As a designer, I believe in 'Less is more', trying to create an airy and not too busy ambient. Also, I love to combine fonts as part of the composition. The Painting 'All I ever wanted' was created in a special moment when I finally held my baby in my arms, playing in my head the song of Depeche Mode: "All I ever wanted all I ever needed is here in my arms". In that specific moment, it was though I heard the lyrics for the first time and understood what it meant for me. This artwork, consist of a lot of layers painted over and over. In the first coat, the baby was bluish, after that He started to get a real flesh color, I suppose it happened as a consequence of a personal crisis and as a result, different moods while working on it. We have really appreciated the vibrancy of thoughtful nuances that mark out your artworks, and we like the way you combined them in Berries to create tension and dynamics: how did you come about settling

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All I ever wanted... Acrylic and Pastel on wooden box | 49.5X35 cm

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on your color palette? And how does your own psychological make-up determine the nuances of tones that you decide to include in a specific artwork and in particular, how do you develop a texture? The palette is very much determined by my intentions. My natural tendency is towards light and monochromatic color. Selecting colors, I do not follow a strict rule or scheme, but it is a part of the process, trying to experiment as much as I can until the selection of the final colors. Also, I tend to let the material and base lead me…I leave the texture of the wood exposed and uncover it. Most of the time the texture itself, reveal other directions & meanings. Photographer and sculptor Zoe Leonard once stated, "the objects that we leave behind hold the marks and the sign of our use: like archeological findings, they reveal so much about us". We’d love to ask you about the qualities of the materials that you include in your artworks: as an artist working with found recycled objects, how do you select them and what does address you to combine found materials? It took me years until I started to use found and recycled objects in my artworks. I began by painting on pieces of wood and I loved the texture and quality. Ever since the process of selection has evolved…I tend to choose the more damaged wood, preferably with holes and emphasized texture. I believe that the experience of life, leaves us with scratches, same applies to the material that I use. The more "mature" the more

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Reflection Acrylic & glue on plywood | 95X60 cm

interesting. As the quote by Leonard mentioned, it does reveal so much about me. The decision of whether to include objects or


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not depends on the message I want to

their new meaning & existence.

convey.

It is always a surprise that some of the pieces that waited for me had the exact

Normally it takes me a while to discover

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Déjà Vu Acrylic & Pencil crayons on wood| 120X44 cm

requirements for a specific project. Meant to be…

viewers and at the same time invites them to look inside of what appear to be seen, rather than its surface, providing the spectatorship with freedom to realize their own perception. How important is for you to invite the viewers to elaborate personal meaning? And in particular, how open would you like your artworks to be understood?

With its powerful evocative quality due to your use of objects - in this specific case medicines and a syringe - Pandora drawer creates an unsettling atmosphere that challenges the perceptual parameters of the

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I believe you need to experience life in order to fully express it, and as I grow older, I become more accurate. My art arises from my own conflicts, feelings & emotions that I use during the process. My yearning to heal and reveal myself has been my inspiration.

creating a piece I try not to get distracted by those thoughts. I try to be as much loyal to myself as I can. I see my artworks as having independence presence. The spectator connects with his own point of view and experience of life Therefore I have no control over the viewer's

Audience reaction is important to me but while

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"Not going anywhere..."

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Acrylic and mixed technique on plywood|95X70 cm


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"Sittin' on the dock of the bay..." Watercolors and acrylic on wood | 28X53 cm

experience. Whenever I get a chance, I love to be the fly on the wall‌During the shows; I wander around and try to hear the comments of the audience. In many cases, I get a chance to hear real nice interpretations of my artwork.

Audrey and Marylin. As you have remarked in your artist's statement through the years you have experienced all kinds of emotions, conflicts and moments which gave you inspiration. How do you consider the nature of the relationship between your memory and your creative process? In particular, how does everyday life's experience fuel your artistic research?

You sometimes draw from figures belonging to universal imagery, as in your works Elvis,

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Pandora drawer Acrylic, medicine, forms and mixed media on wooden drawer | 31X47 cm

The question of how I perceive the world has

through my fingers. Since then I've been

always occupied my mind. As a child, I used to

engaged in the quest of 'framing' my unique

walk along the streets and frame the world

realm of humanity and the surrounding

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Pandora drawer Acrylic, medicine, forms and mixed media on wooden drawer | 31X47 cm


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Fertility – Untitled Acrylic and Pastels on wood | 64X30 cm

environment. In the Case of the iconic figures, I tried to get out of the frame with the use of the color tube. It is a reference to the pop art and the mass consumption by

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using the hairdresser color tubes; i.e everything is fake. Music has always influenced my artwork. I

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can only create the right music. It inspires me and I have a few pieces with song's names. I always wonder does it only happen to me? I turn on the radio and the song describes

exactly what I feel‌ That was the case of the painting "Not going anywhere", a selfportrait named after a song by Keren Ann. "People come and go and walk away but I'm

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not going anywhere". That was the case of the painting "Sittin' on

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the dock of the bay" named after a song by Otis Redding.

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Art making is a physical experience that reveals not only a work of art but also a state

of being. You are a versatile artist and your practice is marked out with sapient

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Marilyn Mixed media on wooden platter | Diameter 37 cm

combination between 3D and 2D techniques that provides artworks of yours as the interesting One last nonsense with such a SPECIAL ISSUE

tactile quality: what did address you to explore the boundary between 2D and 3D? Moreover, is important for you that the

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viewers experience a tactile relationship with your artworks?

involvement plays a role. I paint with the hope that people will relate and reflect on their own experiences.

As a Graphic Designer, my natural tendency is towards 2D. At first, I used the paste itself in order to create a beveled effect. Over the years, I crossed boundaries by studying Ceramic sculpture. I must say, even 13 years later, 3D isn't easy for me but I do struggle…

As I mentioned before, I love the immediacy of being in contact with the audience, to see that my artistic signature is recognized by the viewer. It is important to me that my work will be appreciated and accepted. Once sold, I intend to get to know the buyers and assure that my artwork got a loving home.

As part of the process, I started to explore the combination of 2D and 3D. I tried different techniques; Papier Mâché, Assemblage, etc.

We have really appreciated the multifaceted nature of your artistic research and before leaving this stimulating conversation we would like to thank you for chatting with us and for sharing your thoughts, Sigal. What projects are you currently working on, and what are some of the ideas that you hope to explore in the future?

Over the years, I was encouraged by my mentor and sculptor teacher, Dalit Mosseri. Together, we experimented and tried different styles. She is the person to consult regarding a new material and an idea. With her, I learned that "Everything is possible". It is important to me that the viewers experience a tactile relationship with my artworks.

My main focus now is on a solo exhibition with the Fertility series. I'm also working on a new installation exploring new materials and techniques. I find it very challenging.

I love the fact that people discover that a certain artwork from another angle appears to be 3D…If they reach out and touch it…it means I succeed. Over the years your artworks have been showcased in a number of occasions, including your recent participation to the group exhibition 'Credit Point', Eretz Israel Museum, curated by Shulamit Nuss & Vera Pilpoul, in Tel-Aviv: how do you consider the nature of your relationship with your audience? And what do you hope your audience take away from your artworks?

As for evolving, future is something I can't predict. I'm very much excited and looking forward to finding out how things will unfold; the work may take a path on its own.

When a work it out there, pursuing fulfillment, that is when the viewer's

and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator

Thank you so much for the opportunity to discuss and share my work. An interview by Josh Ryder, curator

peripheral.arteries@europe.com

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Johanna Porter Livesand and works in ____________ Lives works in Hollywood, FL, USA

I’m a visual and graphic artist living in Hollywood, FL. Being a native South Floridian is truly a love/hate relationship. The frustrations of navigating a congested urban landscape is counterbalanced by intense moments of beauty and kinship within this constructed paradise. I have always made art. I approach my work in the studio as therapy- to explore social, gender, environmental and political issues through the lens of my internal microscope. What results are visual allegories- tall tales of solitude and companionship, using a repository of organic shapes, animal symbolism and pervasive sub-tropical color. My dreams and subconscious drive the work forward in unexpected ways. Each piece starts as a drawing on paper where I can process raw emotions. I then digitize the art and begin adding layers of color and form, slowly building until the underlying drawing is like a dream that is forgotten upon waking. My current toolkit includes my sketchbook, ink pens, an intuos tablet, iphone, laptop and the adobe creative suite. Working digitally, I can travel and work anywhere there is an electrical outlet and wifi. This gives me freedom to explore places and cultures- as I digest new experiences, my art is evolving.

An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator

you to develop your attitude to experiment? Moreover, how does your cultural substratum as a native South Floridian direct the trajectory of your current artistic research?

peripheral.arteries@europe.com

Hello Johanna and welcome to Peripheral ARTeries. Before starting to elaborate about your artistic production we would like to invite our readers to visit www.PicturesWithin.com in order to get a wide idea about your artistic production and we would start this interview with a couple of introductory questions. You have a solid formal training and you hold a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Graphic Design, that you received from the University of North Florida: how did those formative experiences influence your evolution as an artist and help

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Thank you for the opportunity to discuss my artwork. My formal studies included graphic design, illustration and photography, but figure drawing classes really shaped my future as an artist. My wonderful instructor, Louise Freshman Brown, taught me about drawing from direct observation and how to project my energy into the drawing- to pursue vigorous line work, bold color, and dramatic explorations of light and shadow. I was encouraged to experiment with various media, although at the

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Night Stalker


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combination between figurative and captivating abstract feeling, whose background create such an oneiric atmosphere: how would you consider the relationship between abstraction and figurative in your practice? In particular, how does representation and a tendency towards abstraction find their balance in your work?

time, Derwent colored pencil was my favorite tool, because I could overlay many rich layers of color quickly. During my studies my art evolved into a more abstract color topography of the human form. Life in South Florida is fast-paced, rich in cultures from around the world, a montage of intense beauty, tropical color, and frantic energy. My escapes into nature and art are my therapy- the perfect antidote to this constructed, artificial paradise. I often find myself wandering outdoors, away from the studio, for inspiration. Much of my practice focuses on people immersed in natural settings or dream landscapes with other lifeforms.

Sometimes energetic abstract forms and color are all that is needed to successfully convey an emotional state. Figurative form and details provide the subject of the piece with a focal point. By continuously adding transparent layers, I am able to create an ethereal, abstract space where the viewer can get lost for a moment in the mood of the piece.

The body of works that we have selected for this special edition of Peripheral ARTeries and that our readers have already started to get to know in the introductory pages of this article has at once impressed us for the way you sapiently combined elements from reality with captivating abstract sensitiveness, to provide the viewers with such a multilayered visual experience: when walking our readers through your usual workflow and process, we would like to ask you if you think that there is a central idea that connects all your works.

Your artworks are marked with such a rigorous sense of geometry and symmetry - as in the interesting Power of Sisters and Mother to All Things Wild - to create such a coherent combination between sense of freedom and unique aesthetics: do you conceive you works instinctively or do you methodically elaborate your pieces? In particular, how importance does spontaneity play in your work? When I start each piece I have no preconceived ideas about a final composition. Using a quick sketch, I pre-define the emotional temperature and the symbolic heirarchy. Because I allow myself this freedom, the work evolves significantly from start to finish. Spontanaeity and the ability to play in a childlike way are the essence of my work and elemental to the process.

In ancient times, art and spirituality were inseperable and connected to every aspect of daily life. Everything made was imbued with a deep reverence for the Divine. I attempt to make art as a bridge between the worlds of perceived reality, dreams, and the subconscious. Some of the spiritual symbolism used is intensely personal, something discovered while I’m sleeping, or perhaps as a visceral reaction to living in a complex and often chaotic world.

I find art to be a form of meditation and therapy where one can surrender to the flow and become a channel for creativity. As each layer is added to the original sketch, the drawing becomes deeper visually and pulls me

Your artworks features such effective

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Power of Sisters, 2018, mixed media digital drawing


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Stasis

in. Upon completion, the original art is like a dream forgotten upon waking.

envelope of the expressive potential of the images and the symbols that you included: what importance do symbolically charged images play in your work? In particular, did you aim to provide your work

Marked out with a powerful narrative drive on the visual aspect, your artworks push the

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Divining Light and Dark, 2019, mixed media digital drawing

with an allegorical feature? Visual allegory is an accurate description. I define my artwork as visual tall tales of companionship and solo emotional or spiritual journeys.

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Sometimes I hide subliminal messages in my work, and frequently use animal symbolism to convey meaning. I am fond of indigenous art and often specific symbolism found in those traditions find their


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Evolution of Self- Awareness, 2019, Mixed media digital drawing

way into my work as power icons.

“artists’ roles differ depending on which part of the world they’re in”. Does your artistic research respond to a particular cultural moment? In particular, do you think that artists can raise awareness to an evergrowing

We like the way your artworks convey such a subtle yet still effective socio political criticism. Mexican artist Gabriel Orozco once stated,

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Origins, 2019, mixed media digital drawing


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Fruition, 2019, mixed media digital drawing

audience on topical issues as gender, environmental and political issues in our globalised age?

artists understand that people seem ready to

We do live in a time of global awakening. Many

uplift and raise awareness with my artistic vision,

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embrace the concepts of equanimity, social and environmental justice. My hope is that I can

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Mother to All Things Wild, mixed media digital drawing

making the audience think about how to make this world a better place. My artwork is my quest towards those ends.

ink pens, an intuos tablet, iphone, laptop and

Your current toolkit includes your sketchbook,

extended the range of possibilities and the line

the adobe creative suite. Manipulation in visual arts is not new, but digital technology has

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Screens 24-7-365, 2018, mixed media digital drawing

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The Promise, 2019, mixed media digital drawing

between straight and manipulated images is increasingly blurry. How do you consider the role of digital technology playing within your artistic practice?

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Technology is a very useful tool for me. But the seed of each piece originates as an idea that sometimes takes weeks to germinate. That is where the soul of the art lies. The wonderful

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Rise, 2019, mixed media digital drawing

thing about my current work flow is that I work from almost anywhere there is an electrical outlet and a wifi connection. My experiences of travel have contributed to

my work as I absorb new environments and cultures. I see the evolution of my work over the past few years as a series of digital experiments. It will be interesting to see what it

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becomes as new technology becomes available.

Origins, 2019, mixed media digital drawingFor years I was hesitant to show my artwork publicly The internet has changed everything, making it possible for me to share with people around the globe. I now have an immediate and constant connection with my audience that was not possible before on social media. Whatever meaning the viewer takes away from my art is perfectly correct.

We have really appreciated the vibrancy of the nuances that mark out your artistic production: in particular, we like the way your artworks show that vivacious tones are not indispensable in order to create tension and dynamics: how does your own psychological make-up determine the nuances of tones that you decide to include in a specific artwork in order to achieve such brilliant results?

There is no right or wrong interpretation, because each person sees through their own life’s filter. I respect and embrace that philosophy in life and in art. I hope to inspire others through my art to embrace quiet moments, where there is time and space to live a more contemplative life.

I’m in a love/hate relationship with South Florida at this point in my life. I’m a very private person and Miami is increasingly sprawling, congested, and excessively busy. And yet, I still draw inspiration from the subtropical energy that flow through each day and night spent here.

We have really appreciated the multifaceted nature of your artistic research and before leaving this stimulating conversation we would like to thank you for chatting with us and for sharing your thoughts, Johanna. What projects are you currently working on, and what are some of the ideas that you hope to explore in the future?

The light in South Florida and dramatic shifts in weather are often catalysts for dramatic and sometimes moody tone in my work. I believe that subconsciously I digest these experiences and then birth my art from them. In turn, they become integral to my artistic palette. All my work is tagged PicturesWithin.

My biggest project is one that will, mostly likely, shift my artistic production in an entirely new direction. I am relocating my studio to the Pacific Northwest this year, a true diagonal line across the United States.

My work is my therapy and an alternate reality where I get to decide how much of my inner visions I want to reveal. Over the years your artworks have been showcased in a number exhibitions, including your recent participation in Pinnacle National Juried Art Competition, at the Foster Tanner Fine Arts Gallery and your upcoming show at , “Cover These Walls- 2019 Building Wrap”, at the Palos Verdes Art Center: how do you consider the nature of your relationship with your audience? And what do you hope your audience take away from your artworks?

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I’m really looking forward to the next chapter of my life there and new artistic collaborations, especially those centered on an environmental and spiritual cross-pollination. An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator peripheral.arteries@europe.com

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The Bad Seed, 2018, mixed media digital drawing


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John Lowe

Lives and works in Raleigh, North Carolina

My work is a free-form collaboration between the paint and the surface. By employing a flow medium and varying the depth of the background paint, engaging forms are created which allow the viewer to interpret the work based on their own unique perspective.

An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator

become intrigued by his process of splattering paint across a large canvas. The next day I bought some paint and canvases, built myself an easel, and started creating. I initially tried to imitate Pollock, but found it was harder than it seemed. I switched to florals and landscapes, with a loose interpretive style, and have developed from there.

peripheral.arteries@europe.com

Hello John and welcome to Peripheral ARTeries. Before starting to elaborate about your artistic production we would like to invite our readers to visit http://jloweartworks.com in order to get a wide idea about your artistic production and we would start this interview with a couple of introductory questions. Are there any experiences that did particularly influence your evolution as an artist and help you to develop your attitude to experiment? Moreover, how does your cultural substratum direct the trajectory of your current artistic research?

The direction of my work comes not so much from cultural impressions but rather as a result of my personality, which is somewhat contrary and independent. I have never enjoyed staying within the lines, so to speak. The body of works that we have selected for this special edition of Peripheral ARTeries and that our readers have already started to get to know in the introductory pages of this article has at once impressed us for

About 15 years ago, I watched the movie “Pollock� about the American abstract artist Jackson Pollock, and SPECIAL ISSUE

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the way you sapiently combined element from reality with captivating abstract sensitiveness, to provide the viewers with such a multilayered visual experience: when walking our readers through your usual workflow and process, we would like to ask you if you think that there is a central idea that connects all your works.

create tension and dynamics: how does your own psychological make-up determine the nuances of tones that you decide to include in a specific artwork in order to achieve such brilliant results? As I mentioned, my approach to life is very big-picture, paint outside the lines thinking. I have never been one to go the traditional route.

The only central idea is freedom. Freedom of expression, of movement, of color, of interpretation. As has been often said, art appreciation is in the eye of the beholder. I love creating work that allows each person to see what they wish to see.

If there are a lot of people in a line, I will try to form a new line. If most people are turning right, I am apt to turn left. I believe this fundamental approach to life is a driving force in my painting, as well as my poetry.

I may have something I am trying to create, but another person may not see that at all, but see something else that moves them. If you paint a still-life or portrait, there is not much for the viewer to interpret. With work like mine, it is all about individual interpretation.

As you have remarked in your artist's statement, you like to work quickly, allowing colors to mix and flow and create a relationship with each other. Your paintings - in particular Searching and Storm Clouds - are marked with such a rigorous sense of geometry, to create such a coherent combination between sense of freedom and unique aesthetics: do you conceive you works instinctively or do you methodically elaborate your pieces? In particular, how importance does spontaneity play in your work?

We have really appreciated the vibrancy of the delicate nuances of that mark out your artistic production, and we have highly appreciated the thoughtful tones of blue that provide The Boathouse with such an ethereal quality. In particular, we like the way your artworks show that vivacious tones are not indispensable in order to

Spontaneity is everything in my work. I have few pre-conceived notions when I start a piece. I may have a thought 51

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about particular colors or patterns, but each piece quickly takes on a life of its own. If someone commissions a piece, I will of course work with their ideas of color and shape and texture, but eventually, the work decides it’s own life. We like the way your artworks convey such a stimulating combination between figurative and captivating abstract feeling, whose backgrounds creates such an oneiric atmosphere: how would you consider the relationship between abstraction and figurative in your practice? In particular, how does representation and a tendency towards abstraction find their balance in your work? If I create an impressionistic piece, like The Boathouse, I will try to represent the initial object, but I always will give it an abstract flair. Again, my personality does not allow me to paint with detail or intricacy. I have great admiration for artists who can paint beautifully detailed work. That is simply not me. Marked out with a powerful narrative drive on the visual aspect, your artistic practice seems to aim to look inside of what appear to be seen, rather than its SPECIAL ISSUE

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surface: we like the way your artworks provide the spectatorship with freedom to realize their own perception. How important is it for you to invite the viewers to elaborate personal meanings? And in particular, how open would you like your artworks to be understood? The viewer’s personal interpretation of my work is everything. I primarily paint for my own enjoyment, with the hope that people will find something in a piece that speaks to them. I have had pieces that I have loved that have not gathered much attention, and others that I did not particularly like which sold immediately. My work is completely open to one’s own imagination. How do your memories and your everyday life's experience fuel your creative process? And how do you think your works respond to it in finding hidden, crystallized moments in the everyday? I try to always be in the moment. I lost my first wife suddenly to cancer, and that experience taught me much about the human experience and how quickly life can be taken away. My motivation to paint is also driven by the moment. I cannot create if I am not “feeling” it in the moment. 55

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The same with my writing. I may write several poems in a day, and then not write again for weeks. Since I work fairly fast

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by color. I think it is amazing how the eye and brain interprets colors, so I am not bound by traditional approaches to

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and the physical aspect of your daily practice as an artist? In my flow paintings, the physical and 62


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abstract are completely linked. The process of pouring paint and moving the canvas are wed together.

and direction. It then takes a life of its own. In my work with brush or pallet knife, there is more of a connection between my mind and hands and the paint, trying to convey a real object or

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place with some abstract thought or

stronger link with the physicality. In my

interpretation. In more detailed work

work, the connection is more

like portraits, I believe there is a

mental/emotional than physical.

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Over the years your artworks have

Southern Contemporary Artist Exhibit

been showcased in a number

and at the AJ Fletcher Foundation

exhibitions, including your show at the

offices in Raleigh: how do you consider Albert Einstein acryl oil collage 70cm x 1m

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the nature of your relationship with

I want people to take away whatever

your audience? What do you hope your

moves them and whatever they see in

audience take away from your works?

my work. It may not be what I see, or

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what their friends see, but it is only

gallery or exhibition where my work is

important what they find there in the

being displayed and listening to the

picture. I really enjoy hanging around a

people comment on my work when

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they do not know I am the artist. Even when they may not like a piece, I still embrace their reactions. We have really appreciated the multifaceted nature of your artistic research and before leaving this stimulating conversation we would like to thank you for chatting with us and for sharing your thoughts, John. What projects are you currently working on, and what are some of the ideas that you hope to explore in the future? I really want to take on larger pieces. I’d like to create big works, say 10 feet by 10 feet or even bigger. Because of the weight of my paint, this requires working on solid backgrounds like wood, so I need larger spaces to work. I also really admire impressionistic work such as by Stephen Shortridge, and would like to better apply my imagination to real life images. I am also doing more sketching and drawing, with free-flowing lines and sweeping interpretations. An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Melissa C. Hilbon, curator peripheral.arteries@europe.com

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Dimitra Koula Lives and works in Thessaloniki, Greece

Dimitra Koula is an artist and art teacher. Born in Veria,a small town of North Greece she studied painting in the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki-dpt .of Fine and Applied Arts.She participated in many group exhibitions in Greece and abroad the last ten years,with most important the Florence Biennale of 2007 .She also collaborated with Agora gallery,in Chelsea NY exhibiting in the Odyssey Within art event last December.

An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator

In regards to my Academic studies, I have to mention that we as students were taught mostly about European Art and Art Movements. We tried to realize what was the main idea in the heart of the artistic movements and the impact they had to the generations that followed .

peripheral.arteries@europe.com

Hello Dimitra and welcome to Peripheral ARTeries. Before starting to elaborate about your artistic production we would start this interview with a couple of questions about your background. You have solid formal training and you graduated in Painting from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki: how did those formative years influence your evolution as an artist? In particular, how does your cultural substratum due to Greek culture direct the trajectory of your current artistic research? SPECIAL ISSUE

What I know about the ancient Greek art I mainly reached out myself to find, during my university studies and in the years that followed. Nevertheless, there was so much of this ancient Greek background inside me, that sooner or later it would surely come to the surface in some way. I was very much influenced since childhood by the presence of my father in the 4


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sensitiveness, to provide the viewers with such a multilayered visual experience: when walking our readers through your usual workflow and process, we would like to ask you if you think that there is a central idea that connects all your works.

house: he was a Classical Greek language school teacher and had many ancient philosophy books in our library at home - He was reading Socrates and many others but often referred to him as he knew him closely. He was telling us details of his-and others- personal life The least I want to mention here is that I walk the road in front of my town Museum very often: many of the ancient marbles are laid outside in the front ,and I catch myself having this strange feeling I cannot describe. There is somehow an inner dialogue and a very deep admiration, especially when I look at the big white marble face that is said to be in the ancient fortress wall in the entrance of my home town of Veria

Surely, there is a Central idea in this part of my art work but all this started many years ago. I then started to work on the idea of communication- or lack of communication. That notion inspired me in my youth,because the large City I moved to seemed impersonal. Some artwork refers to the idea of communication I also considered upon some theory of Herakleitos, an Ancient Greek philosopher whose main part of work is not widely known. He referred to the Rule of Constant Change that runs through the Universe.

This is a picture of the Ancient human head in the entrance of the local Museum of Veria in North Greece

It is interesting to see not only the notion of change as a Fundamental Law, but the circumstances in which the change takes place in our life,extending it perhaps to the change of the form in matter in science etc. New York City based artist Lydia Dona once stated that in order to make art today one has to reevaluate the conceptual language behind the mechanism of art making itself: do you

We have appreciated the way the results of your artistic inquiry convey such a coherent combination between emotional intuition and a rigorous aesthetics and the body of works that we have selected for this special edition of Peripheral ARTeries has immediately impressed us for the way you sapiently combined element from reality with captivating abstract 9

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create your works gesturally, instinctively? Or do you methodically transpose geometric schemes? I cannot say that I just create my arworks instinctively . I usually think about what I have to depict. I often relate it to some of my other works in this same series But most of the time it is a complicated process: we must not forget that this is a common practice among many famous artists :Picasso for instance created many sketches and drawings before he end up to his famous masterpieces ,Guernica ,and many others . Van Gogh almost always made sketches of the lanscape he wanted to depict -in his letters to This brother Theo we see how well he organised his work Anyway, the artistic instinct is lurking under all this : all the aesthetic result is a combination and finally a synthesis of many elements ,as I believe it should, so as to avoid being one-dimensional. We begin with an idea,but it takes time to make it grow, to cultivate and end up with the hope that the result will not refute us. We have really appreciated the vibrancy of thoughtful tones that mark out your artworks, and we like the way they create tension and dynamics, as in your interesting Collage. How did you come about settling on your color SPECIAL ISSUE

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Collage, paper cut, size approx A4

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Booking office, large Dimension arwork. Oil Colours on Canvas . size approx 180x185 cm

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palette? And how does your own psychological make-up determine the nuances of tones that you decide to include in a specific artwork and in particular, how do you develop a texture? In the artwork Collage (in fact I created some other Collage too at that time) what I mostly want to say is that the color palette was not my main aim. It had its own importance of course, but what troubled me was the connection of these series with the original concept, but rendering it in another form We really appreciate the way Booking office explores the point of convergence between the figurative and the abstract, to challenge the viewers to explore realms of the imagination, how do you consider the relationship between the real and the imagined playing within your artistic research? My direct experience is connected to this , it troubled me and I see it somehow as a mechanism of hourglass where the sand slips In both parts: one where my fantasy lays and another of my everyday life. One corresponds to the other and they are inseparable . With their powerful narrative drive, your artworks often include references to common scense from everyday life, as the interesting Driver: how does daily 13

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experience fuel your creative process?

would be very poor if one cannot see what is happening in everything

There was always a strong connection

surrounding him.

between both parts. Artistic vocabulary

But in this case I took this scene to

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include it in the main thematology. I want

A quality of your artworks that has at

also to also make a correlation with

once captured our attention, is the way

artworks of great masters like Matisse's

they seem to invite the viewers to look

'Open Window�

inside of what appear to be seen, rather 17

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than its surface, providing the spectatorship with freedom to realize their own perception. As an artist who

works on the convergence between figurative imagery and abstract visuals, how important is for you to invite the 19

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viewers to elaborate personal meaning? And in particular, how open would you like your artworks to be understood? SPECIAL ISSUE

You are very right to refer to that, because I wanted my relation with the viewer to be distinctive leaving him 12


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elements I kept and passed in my current work

space to realize himself some things. I just attempt to open the path for the fantasy but make him try to walk through it and make a search on his own. It is known from the past that as a practice is no good everything to be open and visible,it is rather better sometimes to offer a hint. This extends also to forms of art other than painting, like photograpy, writing and so on

Over the years you have participated in many group exhibitions both in Greece and abroad, including the Florence Biennale. We have really appreciated the originality of your artistic research and before leaving this conversation we want to catch this occasion to ask you how importance has for you the feedback of the viewers: how do you consider the nature of your relationship with your audience? And what do you hope your audience take away from your artworks?

Nevertheless ,the answer to this question varies because of the multiple aspects of our living experience Painting is a physical experience that reveals not only a work of art but also a state of being: how do you consider the relation between the emotional nature of the concepts that you explore in your artistic research and the physical aspect of your practice?

I am glad you make this question> I seldom refer to this part, because sometimes the audience’s comments really surprised me . They happen to have seen my work differently and from an other perspection that I really didn’t see it existed. Anyway,when there is some important concept I wish to be recognised from the part of the viewers

The emotional experience as a human being is of high importance and runs throughout my main art process. One of the most useful things I learned during my studies was to edit the elements I was going to use referring to the outside world and select carefully the ones I will use Often it happens that notes and drawings are simply a diary of my everyday life. Looking back over the years I realize mistakes I used to and what what

We have really appreciated the multifaceted nature of your artistic research and before leaving this stimulating conversation we would like to thank you for chatting with us and for sharing your thoughts, Dimitra. What projects are you currently working on, and what are some of the ideas that you

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hope to explore in the future? I now work not on painting but on Wooden Constructions. It is all related to the notion of time – (like the boxes you previously saw in the Fotos) mixing as usual aspects of my everyday life walking the line with the imaginary World . I find it more interesting and amusing for me as a means of expression, I mean to express what I have in my mind playing with pieces of wood I like wood as a material. It is warm and natural I have to mention here something that happened in my personal life that inevitably influenced my work as an artist. That was the situation of health of my mother: she is in bed the last 15 months, so one of my next art constructions is dedicated to her. I also made her portrait on canvas. The figure of my mother is very dominant as I believe it is for many people I hope to find enough time to complete the cycle of artworks that is referred to Herakleitos ideas and filosophy. I recur from time to time to my material. I don’t know whether it is something good or bad, but through the latest years I narrowed my thematology and I am concerned with very fiew topics An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator peripheral.arteries@europe.com

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Alice Wang Lives and works in Seattle, WA (USA)

Alice Wang is a fine artist and freelance illustrator who lives and works in Seattle, Washington. Her subject matter varies from the realistic to the imaginative and blurs the line between the two amidst abstraction. She has participated in national and international exhibitions and publications and is a winner of numerous competitions including SIGGRAPH's poster design competition and Illustrators of

An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator

attitude to experiment? Moreover, how does your cultural substratum direct the trajectory of your current artistic research?

peripheral.arteries@europe.com

Hello Alice and welcome to Peripheral ARTeries. Before starting to elaborate about your artistic production we would like to invite our readers to visit https://alicezyuwang.pb.online in order to get a wide idea about your artistic production and we would start this interview with a couple of introductory questions. Are there any experiences that did particularly influence your evolution as an artist and help you to develop your SPECIAL ISSUE

Alice Wang: Hi. Being exposed to the internet from a young age and having used it as a jumping off point since the beginning of my art career has certainly exposed me to a variety of different art forms and introduced me to contemporary artists as well. This all tends to foster an outlook of experimentation in my mind, as I want to emulate and learn from so many different artists and styles. 4


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In the end, I just want to see how much I can push myself to try new things and synthesize concepts and styles together. This is what directs my artistic research as well; I always know I have many art resources and pieces at my fingertips that I can learn from. The body of works that we have selected for this special edition of Peripheral ARTeries and that our readers have already started to get to know in the introductory pages of this article has at once impressed us for the way you sapiently combined element from reality with captivating abstract sensitiveness, to provide the viewers with such a multilayered visual experience: when walking our readers through your usual workflow and process, we would like to ask you if you think that there is a central idea that connects all your works. Alice Wang: Thank you. I don’t think that all of my works have a particular theme that connects them, although some works may be part of a series or explore a similar concept. I always, however, keep in mind that I want the viewer to think critically when they come in contact with my SPECIAL ISSUE

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art, no matter what type of piece I am working on. So I always try to surmise what an audience might see looking at my work. We like the way your artworks convey such a stimulating combination between figurative elements and captivating abstract feeling, whose background - as in the interesting Art of the Agescreates such an oniric atmosphere. As you have remarked in your artist's statement, your subject matter varies from the realistic to the imaginative and blurs the line between the two amidst abstraction: how would you consider the relationship between abstraction and figurative in your practice? In particular, how does representation and a tendency towards abstraction find their balance in your work? Alice Wang: I am of the perhaps controversial opinion that highly realistic representation in artwork is not an ideal – think Edward Hopper’s quote, “If you could say it in words, there would be no reason to paint.” So I always go for some level of 11

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Transit

abstraction in my work, or maybe not even de facto abstraction but a sense of surrealism that levels my artwork off the plane of photography.

I think that my art is tending towards including more abstract elements now

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look like differs from piece to piece; some are more figurative than others, depending on my purposes.

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as my style develops further; I’ve definitely included more experimental elements in recent works in progress.

pieces? In particular, how importance does spontaneity play in your work? Alice Wang: I tend to be a highly spontaneous artist. I concieve my ideas based on simply a vague sense of what I want to convey – a “feeling” of the piece, if you will.

We have really appreciated the vibrancy of the dark nuances that provide The Philosophers with such an aethereal quality. In particular, we like the way your artworks show that vivacious tones are not indespensable in order to create tension and dynamics: how does your own psychological make-up determine the nuances of tones that you decide to include in a specific artwork in order to achieve such brilliant results?

Sometimes I know exactly what elements or composition I want to use, but often times I don’t. I rarely ever use thumbnails, I just draw and implement in my piece what feels necessary as I go along. It’s laborious, but I think it allows me the freedom to evolve the theme and message of my piece if necessary.

Alice Wang: I’m not sure that my psychology per se influences the nuances of my tones, though I wonder if it can explain why I tend to use dark tones and shadows in my work.

Marked out with a powerful narrative drive on the visual aspect, your artistic practice seems to aim to look inside of what appear to be seen, rather than its surface: especially your recent Vision provides the spectatorship with freedom to realize their own perception. How important is it for you to invite the viewers to elaborate personal meaning? And in particular, how open would you like your artworks to be understood?

I rather like the somber and almost mysterious air dark chiascuro effects produce, perhaps because I tend towards severity as well. Your paintings - in particular The View - are marked with such a rigorous sense of geometry, to create such a coherent combination between sense of freedom and unique aesthetics: do you conceive your works instinctively or do you methodically elaborate your

Alice Wang: I am not an artist who is particularly pedantic about the 17

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Alice Wang: I am of the belief that even the most avant-garde works of contemporary art have roots – whether compositional, ideological, or aesthetic – in classical, even premodern artistic trends. I have indeed read several papers on this. I personally consciously take a broad range of artistic disciplines and aeshetics into account when creating my work, for I think there’s something valuable to emulate in every artistic period.

meaning of their painting. I, of course, have a particular idea, concept and message in mind with a work, but I deliberately leave my work somewhat open-ended in order to prompt more investigation and interpretation on the part of the viewer. So it is quite important to me that my audiences are able to interpret my works however they wish, or at least have freedom in doing so. Of course, I would hope none of my work is badly misconstrued or interpreted to represent the opposite of what I intended it to, but if it isn’t, I would say that to the average individual viewing a piece, it is likely less important to them that they understand each word of my artist’s statement than having the freedom and curiosity to ask and answer their own questions about my work.

Over the years your artworks have been showcased in a number of national and international exhibitions and publications, moreover, your are a winner of numerous competitions including SIGGRAPH's poster design competition and Illustrators of the Future: how do you consider the nature of your relationship with your audience? And what do you hope your audience take away from your artworks?

We have particularly appreciated the way Waiting I and The Singularity explore the tension between traditional aesthetics and contemporary sensitiveness: how do you consider the relationship between the heritage from classic aesthetics and contemporariness? SPECIAL ISSUE

Alice Wang: As I’ve said, I always try to wonder about what a viewer would think when they look at my piece – walk in their shoes, if you will. The goal of my work is, again, to encourage critical thinking in a viewer. Perhaps this work will spark 18


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Also, in the future, I am hoping to explore ways that I could blur the line between a traditional and digital work even further.

an idea within them, or motivate a deeper pondering beyond a quick glance at something that looks nice, or cause them to look at the world even slightly differently.

We have really appreciated the multifaceted nature of your artistic research and before leaving this stimulating conversation we would like to thank you for chatting with us and for sharing your thoughts, Alice. What projects are you currently working on, and what are some of the ideas that you hope to explore in the future?

Of course, my work is varyingly successful at that. Still, I try as much as possible to enable a mental takeaway in viewers. Direct relationship with the audience in a physical is definetely the most important one, in order to snatch the spirit of a work of Art. However, as the move of Art from traditional gallery spaces, to street and especially to the online realm increases: how would in your opinion change the relationship with a globalised audience?

Alice Wang: Thank you. Currently, I am working on pieces that have a more surrealist touch to them, aiming to explore the effects that pure symbols and symbolic imagery (especially Classical imagery) have on an audience and a piece when combined into one composition.

Alice Wang: Being a digital artist, my work doesn’t automatically fit into a traditional gallery space even now. It totally exists in the online realm or as a digital file, and any prints I make are merely copies; the original work is never physical.

This delves a bit more away from my usual subject matter and compositional style, and I am considering making a series of paintings perhaps based on such an idea.

So I’ve always been really interested in digital painting and art and how it fits into the art world, and I welcome the age of new media and the insights that come with it.

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Anna Sypěnová Lives and works in Přerov, Czech Republic

An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator

questions, it makes me good to find the answers… Your first question was about my studies and how they affected/or develop my creativity.

peripheral.arteries@europe.com

Hello Anna and welcome to Peripheral ARTeries. Before starting to elaborate about your artistic production we would like to invite our readers to visit http://www.annanas.cz in order to get a wide idea about your artistic production and we would start this interview with a couple of introductory questions. You have a solid formal training in Painting and you studied in Brno, Mainz and Ljubljana: how did those formative experiences influence your evolution as an artist and help you to develop your attitude to experiment? Moreover, how does your cultural substratum direct the trajectory of your current artistic research?

I appreciate the meeting with interesting and professional people. The have always big positive impact, because of their tension. In the Faculty of Fine Art VUT Brno I came in time, when „old time changed to the new“, in Atelier of Painting 1 was originally more traditional atmosphere (the leader was figurative painter Jiří Načeradský and then Petr Veselý, with his minimalism) and I came, when there became teach artist Tomas Lahoda. He is very professional, but we didn´t look similar on the things. I am more „spiritual“ and he had no support for thise my constitution.. so I quiet closed myslef and stubbornly

First of all I would like to thank you very much for such a „deeplooking“

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think that there is a central idea that connects all your works.

painted the clouds. By the sentecne „old time changed to new“ I thought, that I feel more oldschool, I loved whole my childhood Rembrandt´s painting and this „master style“ and by this „new“ I think all this conceptual tendentions, which are not such a part of my nature. So in Fine Art faculty I was little bit an outsider and with this feeling I peacufully paint further and further, no matter.

central idea...hmm..I think, I observe my own perception and I try to visualise what I want and in the same time I want show the observer :) is it understandable? The beauty of ordinary things or situations (gem of reality) and often I concentrate to the „God theme“. I am interested in this topic. I love this elevated states and maybe I want to make advertisement to them.

In Akademie fur Bildende Kunste in Mainz it was similar, I painted what I wanted and the professeur Anna Berning had the same opinion as Tomas Lahoda, they wanted something new and not so spiritual in Ljubljana it was funny, I made one book from textile and lot of sketches. I can say, that we need the teachers, but we don´t need their praise.

This time is open to all kind of spiritualities and I finally found a home in the Chrisitianity. We have really appreciated the vibrancy of the delicate nuances of that mark out your artistic production, and we have highly appreciated the thoughtful tones of blue that provide The Crystal of the Christianity with such an aethereal quality. In particular, we like the way your artworks show that vivacious tones are not indespensable in order to create tension and dynamics: how does your own psychological make-up determine the nuances of tones that you decide to include in a specific artwork in order to achieve such brilliant results?

The body of works that we have selected for this special edition of Peripheral ARTeries and that our readers have already started to get to know in the introductory pages of this article has at once impressed us for the way you sapiently combined element from reality with captivating abstract sensitiveness, to provide the viewers with such a multilayered visual experience: when walking our readers through your usual workflow and process, we would like to ask you if you

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Your paintings - in particular Gem of experience and Start of a Gem - are marked with such a rigorous sense of geometry, to create such a coherent combination between sense of freedom and unique aesthetics: do you conceive you works instinctively or do you methodically elaborate your pieces? In particular, how importance does spontaneity play in your work? Yes I am very spontaneous. More instinctive, not so patient. I think the random access can enrich me by something better than I planned. One way- rational is to think about th etopic, make 50 sketches and show the best. But finally you can feel as a „printer of the idea“ . The creativity for me is about flow, I focus on something and let it hapend. I love to paint outside, but more often I paint at home in atelier „from my head“ or from the photos which inspire me We like the way you artworks convey such a stimulating combination between figurative elements - as wetlands, mudflats and grasses, ponds, fields- and captivating abstract feeling, whose background - as in the interesting Start of a gem - creates such an oniric atmosphere: how would you consider the relationship between abstraction and figurative in your practice? In particular,

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how does representation and a tendency

Yes I am balancing. Maybe if I try just paint

towards abstraction find their balance in

in abstract it can be better, but I need the

your work?

figure for showing what I mean...

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I still want to show something. Maybe it is not healthy. It is my feeling. We are the energy+intelligence in a body.

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now the figures which are in the process of appearance and disappearance. Marked out with a powerful narrative drive on the visual aspect, your artistic practice seems to aim to look inside of

what appear to be seen, rather than its surface: especially your recent The merciful Father provides the spectatorship with freedom to realize their own perception. How important is 121

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for you to invite the viewers to elaborate

I think there is just one way how to understand my pieces... no, I am joking.

personal meaning? And in particular, how open would you like your artworks to be understood?

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thing with his own originall story and experience and backround. I tried to give myself the dare „new altar painting“ in Christian tradition.

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C.S.Lewis: „What is not eternal is from the view of eternity archaic.“

sacral, but the name of painting lead the watcher how to understand it.

Your artworks have often explanatory titles, that often conveys messages from the realm of spirituality, as the interesting I am the way, truth and the life, and that allow you to clarify the message while maintaining the element of ambiguity: how do you go about naming your work ? In particular, is important for you to tell something that might walk the viewers through their visual experience?

There can be sometimes problem with the word God.It is specific. But I am very open. I don´t want make any holy war and make from everybody Christians.

Of course. Not all of my paintings are

My aim is to show and inspire a nd share my own enjoyment. We sometimes tend to ignore the fact that a work of art is a physical artefact with tactile qualities: how do you how do you consider the relation between the abstract nature of your creative process

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and the physical aspect of your daily practice as an artist?

Over the years your artworks have been showcased in a number exhibitions, including your recent solo FASETS OF THE EXPERIENCE in Brno: how do you consider the nature of your relationship with your audience? And what do you hope your audience take away from your artworks?

My daily practise, I go out with my dog, prepare coffe and arround 10o clock morning I start paint with oil, I have around 10 canvases „in a process“ I am finishing paintings long time, so I make more step by step.

Thank you.

Little bit there, than watching, than there... and after lunch I go to Primary school of Art every day and try to look as a serious teacher.

My audience are often my friends, but also some new people are coming, I always wonder how they see my paintings.

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I think my work is understandable, but for somebody it is too easy to read it and it is boring and for somebody it is still hard.

Thank you too for your time and questions, I am honoured.

So I paint maybe for just a small audience. We have really appreciated the multifaceted nature of your artistic research and before leaving this stimulating conversation we would like to thank you for chatting with us and for sharing your thoughts, Anna. What projects are you currently working on, and what are some of the ideas that you hope to explore in the future?

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Currently I continue on Madona paintings, through-figures, Christ which was crossed and one small book for children. I hope I will explore the topic of Gems, I like it and I am looking forward to go to a nature on holidays and paint outside. An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator peripheral.arteries@europe.com


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Peripheral ARTeries meets

annie de wiest Lives and works in Brussels, Belgium

Annie de wiest is a bona fide Belgian artist who works on photographs, text and images.She was tutored by Berthe Dubail and inspired by masterpieces from the greats.For her the world of images is a great escape. An odissey to the hearth of colors and sensations. A modus operandi for remembering a spot, a situ or urbs.As a sociology graduate, she brings back from around the world palettes that describe life.Animated by the wish to travel to the farthest parts of her art, she is now working on graphic pallets and produces her ink works on canvas and frame.Each painting is unique. Not only talentwise, but also for illuminated aficionados or collectors.

An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator

way you are developing a more and more distinct visual identity. How has your practice evolved over these five years and in what direction are you currently addressing your artistic research?

peripheral.arteries@europe.com

Hello Annie and welcome back to Peripheral ARTeries. We already got the chance to introduce our readers to your artworks in a previous edition and we are now particularly pleased to discover the development of your artistic production. The new body of works that we have selected for this special edition of Peripheral ARTeries and that our reader can view at https://www.instagram.com/anniedewi est has captured our attention for the

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My program is effectively dependent on new technologies, as it was in 2014 (my first publication on your screens): the very conception and development happen on my iPad. The tablets and the apps have tremendously evolved, and I have to master the resources in order to not be enslaved, and this requires time and

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punctiliousness: the price to pay is higher and higher. But the process is mesmerizing, and by the way, we art makers are in a position to propose unexpected progress to the designers of apps. Your artworks are marked with such rigorous sense of geometry, to create such a coherent combination between sense of freedom and unique aesthetics: do you conceive you works instinctively or do you methodically elaborate your pieces? In particular, how importance does spontaneity play in your creative process? As you aptly formulated, I try to confront free creation and demanding geometrical constraints. Sometimes the achievement is there after some dozens of minutes, and sometimes it doesn't happen, while some projects ask for repeated work, under another mental state, or a different light. With their powerful abstract evocative quality, your artworks seem to invite the viewers to look inside of what appear to be seen, rather than its surface, providing the spectatorship with freedom to realize their own perception. This is particularly evident in Prisme: how importance has for you to invite the

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viewers to elaborate personal meanings? And in particular, how open would you like your artworks to be understood? My public is associated to my work. This is of the essence. Their perceptions, their sensibility and their comments... In Esthetics, the key word is perception, and I do always have this in mind in my explorations. In Prisme, I leave it open to decide: ascension or fall? This ambiguity is indeed expressly determined by the name I did choose. We have particularly appreciated the way Just numbers draws from contemporary digital imagery, to question its elusive aesthetics. How do you consider the relationship between the digital realm including digital image technology - and traditional painting techniques? Does digital world inspire your artistic research? My opinion is that new technologies are on the table to remain with us, just as tubes of paint since John Goffe Rand. Some creators will positively ignore the paint brush. This is just a process of diversification. Any tool is an instrument, as shows the

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history of stringed instruments: let music

of thoughtful nuances that mark out your

decide.

artworks, and we like the sapient combination between vivacious tones and

We have really appreciated the vibrancy

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geometrical pattern that provides

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Oblique character with tension and

artworks and the colors that you include in them?

dynamics. How do you structure the relationship between the geometric qualities of your

Oblique is quite specific, as it fuses two

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scrim layers, and this induces unexpected

some places, and not in other.

and rich tensions among forms and colours: chromatics abound in

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Another couple of artworks from your

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current artistic production that has

are entitled Sour orange and

particularly impressed us and that we

Recapitulation. How did you conceive

would like to introduce to our readers

these captivating works of art?

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Even if these two pieces are visually similar, they proceed from two quite diverse conceptions. Sour orange explores the power of one

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hue, namely orange, which dominates, while occupying a small space. This is a very deep mystery.

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Recapitulation submerged me while hearing the news on radio, which were grim. I wanted to express the complexity of our

world by this small sun ray. Your artworks have often explanatory titles, as Woman and L’esprit de l’escalier,

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that allow you to clarify the message while maintaining the element of ambiguity: how do you go about naming your work ? In particular, is it important for you to tell something that might walk the viewers through their visual experience? I expect the viewer to do his homework, and to enjoy his way. Sometimes the evidence is what was imposed upon me: world news, states of mind, memories‌ It took weeks to find the name L'esprit de l'escalier; Woman was a flash nomination. We sometimes tend to ignore the fact that a work of art is a physical artefact, and to treat it more as a window, or even as a portal towards new universes. Artist Lydia Dona once remarked that in order to make art today one has to reevaluate the conceptual language behind the mechanism of art making: as an artist in continuous travel, how do you consider the role of the physical act of creating your artworks, of being there, when an artwork takes birth? And how has your daily routine changed over the recent years?

solitude to create; not isolation, as I need the connectedness with the world, the very vibrations of it.

I enjoy comparing artistic creation and travelling. Once it is finished, the art work has its own life, and I meet it as I visit a new city. I felt some years ago that I needed

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The persons who follow my work have noticed how events exert an influence on my work, as during the heat wave of 2018: I had to draw flowers. As the move of Art from traditional

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gallery spaces, to street and especially to online platforms such as Instagram increases, how would this in your opinion change the relationship with a globalised audience?

They are indeed important, but all these processes, monopolies, speculation‌ induce a deplorable segmentation of the market, which does affect even the musea.

I enjoy this evolution, as art does not need galleries.

Street art, Instagram and Facebook show the way of a brighter future.

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Thanks a lot for your time and for sharing your thoughts again, annie. How do you see your evolution as an artist over time? Are there any things that you do fundamentally differently from when you started years ago?

more disciplined, more focused. Dispersion helped me to explore and confront more virtualities than I knew, a kind of serendipity.

Thanks for having invited me! I do feel now

peripheral.arteries@europe.com

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Diana Malivani Lives and works in Limassol, Cyprus

Diana is always in the mood to create: this happy inclination and impulse arise spontaneously within her and form an integral part of her life. Nature, for Diana, is the best source of new ideas. A walk along the Mediterranean coast, contemplation of the high crowns of the eucalyptus and palms against the background of the setting sun, and the boundless southern sky create the illusion that the surrounding world is inexhaustible and limitless: this is what fills the artist with energy and inspiration. Diana believes that it is very important for a human being to be in harmony with self and nature. Only then is it possible to commune with all the beauty of the surrounding world, hear the murmur of the trees and flowers, be in touch with the music of waterfalls and torrential rain, and sense the breath of the sea and passing clouds. The creative process, this special magical world in which the artist is submerged, is invariably accompanied by music, which has always occupied an important place in Diana’s life. Listening to classical and modern music, she is transported to a special realm where different images and pictures appear, sometimes just bright splashes of color responding to each other, which the artist then tries to transfer to canvas. Diana’s artworks reflect the images evoked in her soul as she listens to music. The Artist believes that painting and music are interconnected by special deep inner ties having the same foundation as the diverse manifestations of life. Diana, with her background in medicine, is convinced that painting, like music, can heal spiritual wounds and help people find their own life paths.

An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator

would like to invite our readers to visit https://www.instagram.com/malivani_ar

peripheral.arteries@europe.com

t_gallery as well as

Hello Diana and welcome to Peripheral

https://www.instagram.com/gwr_art_gal

ARTeries. Before starting to elaborate

lery in order to get a wide idea about

about your artistic production we

your artistic production and we would

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Artist Diana Malivani at her Solo Art Exhibition «The Scent of Thousands of Petals» in Dreams Gallery, Limassol, Cyprus.


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start this interview with a couple of

drawing turned into a kind of mania for

introductory questions. Are there any

painting: “no day without a brush”.

experiences that did particularly

With reference to the most important

influence your evolution as an artist and

artistic experiences and influences, let

help you to develop your attitude to

me quote the Critique “Diana Malivani.

experiment ? Moreover, how does your

Critical Analysis” by Mr. Timothy

cultural substratum due to your medical

Warrington, Art Critic and member of the

studies and profession direct the

International Confederation of Art Critics

trajectory of your current artistic

(ICAC):

research ? My creative path as an artist began at

“… the Impressionistic approach to

birth: I was born on the shores of the

classical concepts is a delight to observe

Black Sea, awash in the profusion of

and, upon close analyses, an element of Expressionism can be detected in the

colors of the Caucasus. I remember that,

luxurious use of her medium...”

since childhood, I was attracted to what

“… Malivani’s deep affinity to nature is also shared with the Pre-Raphaelites...”

was beautiful, and paintings evoked my particular interest. I loved to look, hour after hour, at pictures by the great

“… much of Malivani’s work has firm roots in Nineteenth and early Twentieth Century art...”

Russian masters, peering intently at the smallest details of their work and dreaming of one day repeating those

“… her nuanced fusion of style

visions. Like any child who loves to draw,

masterfully reflects the movement of the

I always had brushes, paints, and pencils

cantering horses and the powerful tides

on hand. Gradually, the simple hobby of

of the sea by invoking references to

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Edouard Manet, Rosa Bonheur and

To answer your question about my

Eugène Delacroix...”.

background etc., indeed, I’m, by my training and profession, a physician-

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scientist, i.e., a Doctor of Medicine, and

to better realize that painting is a living

holder of a double degree, M.D.-Ph.D.

organism possessing energy and

And my medical background helps me

emotions. When creating a picture, a

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new story is created, to be read by the

sapiently combined element from reality

viewer (the viewer is co-author), and each

with captivating abstract sensitiveness,

person will have his or her own story. A

as masterfully shown in your Art Project

picture by the hand of an artist (not a

The Blue Butterfly's Dream, to provide

printout on canvas, not the work of a

the viewers with such a multilayered

computer) is not autonomous in itself. It

visual experience: when walking our

all depends on who is looking at the

readers through your usual workflow

picture, and the neurochemical processes

and process, we would like to ask you if

occurring in the brain in the particular

you think that there is a central idea that

case (I say this as a physician). This is

connects all your works.

“first person experience”, or “it seems to For me as an artist, landscapes and

me that ...”. The evaluation of a picture

seascapes represent an inexhaustible

occurs at the level of sensory perception;

source of inspiration. A principal goal of

feelings that cannot be described in

artists depicting them is to convey the

words arise somewhere deep in the

«music of nature», or the «music of the

subconscious. A person either perceives

sea». I believe that landscapes and

and accepts a work of art on some

seascapes created on canvas should

powerful level or rejects it, finds it alien;

awaken in the soul of the viewer the

simply speaking, does not understand it.

desire not only to participate in the The body of works that we have selected

subject of the painting but also to hear

for this special edition of Peripheral

such music. Having said that, I also do

ARTeries and that our readers have

have to say that for an artist, music

already started to get to know in the

represents an inexhaustible source of

introductory pages of this article has at

inspiration, too. One of the most difficult

once impressed us for the way you

goals of artists depicting music on canvas

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is to convey its rhythm, brilliance, and

images evoked in my soul as I listen to

uniqueness in abstract compositions.

music. As you have remarked in your artist's

While listening to music, I am transported

statement, you draw a lot from natural

to a special realm where different images

environment, and we have really

and pictures appear, sometimes just

appreciated the way your artworks

bright splashes of color responding to

conveys such captivating sense of

each other, which I then try to transfer to

engagement with Nature: how does

canvas. My abstract artworks reflect the

everyday life's experience fuels your

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creative process ? And how do you think

allows me to see what others do not

your works respond to it in finding

notice, and to draw familiar objects in a

hidden, crystallised moments in the

special way. The artist can see, feel, and

everyday ?

think in a special way, and the task of the artist is to bring a small part of his or her

Indeed, for me, the most important in

world to the viewer.

creative process is finding beauty in everyday life. A painter looks at the

We like the way you artworks convey

world with “fresh eyes�, like a child

such a stimulating combination between

seeing something for the first time. This

figurative elements and captivating

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abstract feeling, whose backgrounds - as

Marked out with such a powerful drive

in the interesting Come Back and

on the visual aspect, your artistic

Awakening - create such an dreamlike

practice seems to aim to look inside of

atmosphere: how would you consider

what appear to be seen, rather than its

the relationship between abstraction and

surface, providing the spectatorship

figurative in your practice? In particular,

with freedom to realize their own

how does representation and a

perception. How important is for you to

tendency towards abstraction find their

invite the viewers to elaborate personal

balance in your work ?

meanings? And in particular, how open would you like your artworks to be

Let me quote again the Critique “Diana

understood ?

Malivani. Critical Analysis” by Mr. Timothy Warrington:

Let me simply tell you that I’m currently working on the Art Project which bears

“… her aesthetic is clearly influenced by

the name “Seeing The Invisible”...

the Impressionists, diverse movements We have really appreciated the vibrancy

ranging from the Pre-Raphaelites to Abstract Expressionism can be detected

of intense nuances of red that marks

from her involute opuses...”

out your captivating See Who Dances: in particular, we like the way your

“… her use of shape, form and colour as a

artworks show that vivacious tones are

form of expression solidifies conceptual

not indespensable in order to create

ties with Wassily Kandinsky and Gerhard

tension and dynamics: how does your

Richter while her use of line is reminiscent

own psychological make-up determine

of Kazimir Malevich and Piet Mondrian...”.

the nuances of tones that you decide to

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include in a specific artwork in order to

Time is valuable, art is eternal, and life is

achieve such brilliant results?

short (in Latin: “Ars est longa et brevis vita”). I often think about how many

Let me quote again the Critique by Mr.

pictures could be painted, and try not

Warrington: “… an influence from

to waste time.

Theodore Rousseau and the Nineteenth Century French Realists can be observed

Thus, I work all day long, and it is very

particularly in the coruscating array of

pleasing to create in a home studio with

colours utilised in the scintillating skies

a panoramic view on the Mediterranean

of the paintings.

Sea. Painting is my special world, bringing me joy, satisfaction, and

Gentle pinks, blues and oranges ebb over

happiness. For me it is important, above

the canvas to convey the magnificent

all, to live in harmony with myself,

horizon in every season and time of day”.

because a part of the artist’s soul remains in each painting created. Each

Your artworks are marked with such a

work reflects the artist’s attitude to life,

rigorous sense of geometry, as the

to nature, to everything in his or her

interesting Contemplation and The

surroundings.

Illusion of Presence, to create such a coherent combination between sense

It's important to remark that you are

of freedom and unique aesthetics: do

also the author and illustrator of

you conceive you works instinctively or

children’s books published in several

do you methodically elaborate your

countries and that over the years your

pieces? In particular, how importance

artworks have been showcased in a

does spontaneity play in your work ?

number of galleries in Cyprus, where

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you are currently based: how do you

is art, and painting in particular, that

consider the nature of your relationship

forms our brains from a medical-

with your audience ? By the way, as the

biological point of view (we are talking

move of Art from traditional gallery

about the establishment of neurogenic,

spaces, to street and especially to online

neuro- sensory connections), and also

platforms as Instagram increases, how

affects our souls, making Man an

would in your opinion change the

inspired being.

relationship with a globalised audience ? We have really appreciated the As for Cyprus, I was impressed by the

multifaceted nature of your artistic

general atmosphere in the local art

research and before leaving this

scene. I mean the relationship between

stimulating conversation we would like

artists and art lovers and collectors. The

to thank you for chatting with us and for

latter are many; they enthusiastically and

sharing your thoughts, Diana. What

sincerely support their creative

projects are you currently working on,

compatriots, by their attention, by their

and what are some of the ideas that you

kind words, and, of course, by acquiring

hope to explore in the future ?

their work. The year 2020 will be a year very rich in I am happy to realize that there are far

Biennales. I’m already working on the

more opportunities for people in the

matter.

contemporary world, even compared to relatively recently, to come into contact

An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator

with art in some form or another.

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And this is extremely important, since it

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Peripheral ARTeries meets

Thea-Iren Dalton Lives and works in Ireland

Born 1975 in Tallinn, Estonia. Thea-Iren lived there until 2011 when she moved to Ireland for a job offer. Thea has been painting occasionally through-out the years as a hobby.Recently she dwelled into it more seriously. She started out in 2016 with series of POP Art style paintings but found naĂŻve style to be more enjoyable and mirroring her personality and sense of humor. She draws inspiration from folk art, patterns, fabrics and tribal art. She chooses her colors carefully to compliment each other. Pictures are mostly showing alternate, better, bright and colorful world, where fantastic animals and creatures are flourishing. Thea considers her mission accomplished when viewer has a smile on their face. Enjoy! An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator

any experiences that did particularly influence your evolution as an artist and help you to develop your attitude to experiment? Moreover, how does the relationship between your cultural substratum due to your Estonian roots and your current life in Ireland direct the trajectory of your current artistic research?

peripheral.arteries@europe.com

Hello Thea-Iren and welcome to Peripheral ARTeries. Before starting to elaborate about your artistic production we would like to invite our readers to visit https://www.foundmyself.com/Th eaIrenDalton in order to get a wide idea about your artistic production and we would start this interview with a couple of introductory questions. Are there SPECIAL ISSUE

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much for the opportunity to introduce naive art for readers.

humour behind these paintings. I’ve carried memory of these first observations of the style to this day. I also like the symbolism in ancient folk art and handicraft. In my painting “ World behind the curtain “ I’ve used Estonian symbols that has been used by our ancestors to decorate their handicraft. In Ireland I can see ancient celtic symbolism everywhere and I do plan to use some patterns in my future paintings. But it is not only about Estonia or Ireland symbols and patterns. I just fancy any kind of patterns.

My artistic journey started when I finished High School and my parents made me a present on that occasion. It was oil paints and easel. As I had supplies, I just started to paint. Not the easiest medium to start. When I think back to that time it was a trial and error time but I do not recall that I never abandoned the work. I kept working on it until I felt that it is finished and I am happy to look at it myself. This is always my goal, I have to feel that I am happy with the result. Among my first paintings were still life, my brother portrait and imaginary landscapes. I got a lot of encouragement from parents and soon my paintings were hanging at my grandmothers and brother wall. I did paintings for the birthday presents for my colleagues too.

The body of works that we have selected for this special edition of Peripheral ARTeries and that our readers have already started to get to know in the introductory pages of this article has at once impressed us for the way you sapiently combined element from reality with captivating abstract sensitiveness, as well as elements from the real of fantasy. We have really appreciated the vibrancy of the thoughtful nuances that marks

There are many naïve artists in Estonia and I was familiar with their work as this is the fun style that I’ve always liked. Specially the 9

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out your works, particular, we like the way your artworks show that vivacious tones are not indespensable in order to create tension and dynamics: how does your own psychological make-up determine the nuances of tones that you decide to include in a specific artwork in order to achieve such brilliant results? My paintings have been colourful from the beginning. Yes, I’ve noticed that I often use “clashing” colours but when these colours are used again in different areas on the same painting, the painting will look whole and aesthetically pleasing. Vibrantly coloured frame often compliments the picture within. Some of my paintings I frame with the painted border. A lot of this process involves knowing and visualizing what will look good together. Psychological aspect on creative process is to try “ uplift”. I try to uplift my own state of mind through colours and painting and I know that this is also transferred into painting. Viewers should feel uplifted SPECIAL ISSUE

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as well. I’ve been told that I’ve achieved it. An important aspect of your artistic research is focussed on finding your inner child again as an adult, in order to to appreciate and wonder about beauty and world around us: how do your memories and your everyday life's experience fuel your creative process? An adult life is a complicated life and because of that adults often loose the childish simplicity. I’ve painted some POP art style paintings and used oil painting in the past. I did like to paint these works and medium but it was not as enjoyable as painting in naïve style. Because then I was trying to achieve complicity. Now I can let complicity go and be free to achieve simplicity. Children see the world where everything is new and bright. I like to put myself into children’s position and wonder about simple things and find the same curiosity and fascination towards ordinary that they have. It has made me to appreciate life and find beauty in details, simple 13

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things and moments in life. We like the way you artworks convey such a stimulating combination between figurative elements and captivating abstract feeling, whose create such a dreamlike atmosphere: how would you consider the relationship between abstraction and figurative in your practice? In particular, how does representation and a tendency towards abstraction find their balance in your work? The abstraction and dreamlike feeling in naïve style can be created by colours and objects that float. Objects, figures or patterns are often not attached to anything. Patterns that I draw over objects or back round ( like dot’s and zig-zags, that I use most ), the viewer knows that these are not there in real life – there the dream and abstractions kicks in. Therefor abstraction and figurative can both be seen in my paintings. Marked out with a powerful drive on the visual aspect, your artistic practice seems to aim to look inside of what appear to be seen, rather than its surface, providing the spectatorship SPECIAL ISSUE

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with freedom to realize their own perception. How important is for you to invite the viewers to elaborate personal meanings? And in particular, how open would you like your artworks to be understood? My naïve style is a bit different that overall considered. Naïve style is considered to show a scene, landscape or cityscape with very detailed objects and activities happening. I am trying to zoom viewer in into one specific moment or object. I often put these objects even into different boxes, they might not have anything in common but they are pleasant to look as an object separately and as a whole together. Usually there is no deep meaning on my paintings except some of them where I playfully like to swap the positions about where someone stands in the “ food chain “. Like instead of bird in the cage, there is human in the cage and of course it is up to viewer to decide…if they’d like to be the ones in the cage. Other work of mine “ Lady with the 17

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dog�, where Fly is the lady and her dog is a spider. I know these kind of swaps provoke a smile to peoples face and I was amused to work on these paintings myself. My goal is to humor and make people feel good by looking my works. Drawing inspiration from art, patterns, colours and fabrics, your artworks convey such captivating sense of engagement with your surroundings: how does everyday life's experience fuels your creative process? And how do you think your works respond to it in finding hidden, crystallised moments in the everyday? I do draw inspirations from everyday. It can be anything. Sometimes I just like to look what clothes people are wearing and be inspired of the patterns seen on fabric and sometimes even person speaking to me standing infront of certain colour backround. I find myself thinking that I like this combination. Different color cars that compliment eachother, can freeze into my memories. Of course nature itself is a endless sorce of inspiration. I like to exaggerate with SPECIAL ISSUE

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small object size by making them oversized. That will draw viewer attention. Your artworks are marked with such a rigorous sense of geometry, to create such a coherent combination between sense of freedom and unique aesthetics: do you conceive you works instinctively or do you methodically elaborate your pieces? In particular, how importance does spontaneity play in your work? My paintings are pretty spontanous. When I am working on one painting I have often paint leftovers that I don’t want to waste, so I cover new canvas with that color in random shape. When it comes to start a new painting I often look the shapes and colors that are there and start to visualize what could be there. In other times, of course I have a clear idea or theme in my head. Over the years your artworks have been showcased in a number of occasions, including your recent participation to international naïve 19

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art exhibitions and you also received the “The Heart of Art” online contest Special award for four paintings in 2018 and you are going to participate to the annual Art Naif Festiwal in Katowice, Poland (http://artnaiffestiwal.pl/en/home/) : how do you consider the nature of your relationship with your audience? And what do you hope your audience take away from your artworks? By the way, as the move of Art from traditional gallery spaces, to street and especially to online platforms as Instagram increases, how would in your opinion change the relationship with a globalised audience?

that I am a bit different in style and that gave me courage to share in other artists online communities. Then I found out the exhibition possibilites and beeing accepted to exhibit - motivates me even more. We have really appreciated the multifaceted nature of your artistic research and before leaving this stimulating conversation we would like to thank you for chatting with us and for sharing your thoughts, Thea-Iren. What projects are you currently working on, and what are some of the ideas that you hope to explore in the future? I create my paintings because it is like meditation to me and if audience finds joy from looking and having my works - that feels very good. My paintings have found new homes in Ireland, Slovakia, Malta, Israel, Estonia and USA. I am continuing painting for myself and others and dreaming about my own little studio or gallery.

Today’s artists are very lucky. Their works can be seen instantly through social media. At first I posted pictures of my paintings on Facebook. Getting instant feedback and specially positive feedback is like throughing oil into the flames. I was able to search out other naive artists from internet and to see and compare my work to theirs. I found

An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator peripheral.arteries@europe.com

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Profile for Artpress

Peripheral ARTeries Art Review, Special Edition  

Featuring: Thea-Iren Dalton Diana Malivani Annie De Wiest Anna Sypenova Alice Wang Dimitra Koula John Lowe Johanna Porter Sigal Yaar

Peripheral ARTeries Art Review, Special Edition  

Featuring: Thea-Iren Dalton Diana Malivani Annie De Wiest Anna Sypenova Alice Wang Dimitra Koula John Lowe Johanna Porter Sigal Yaar

Profile for artpress
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