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Anniversary Edition

CONTEMPORARY ART REVIEW Special Edition Installation • Painting • Mixed media • Drawing • Performance • Public Art • Drawing • Video art • Fine Art Photography

RASHMI AGARWAL UWE HEINE DEBRODT KYLE STOCKFORD ELENA ANTONIOU YVONNE KRYSTMAN MARCIA TREIGER REVITAL LESSICK TATYANA KANEVA ALBERTO CHIRINOS

Gautama's Logarythm, Oil on canvas, 2017 A work by Alberto Chirinos


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Be that as it may, this catalog or any portion there of may not be reproduced or used in any manner whatsoever without express written permission from Peripheral ARTeries and featured artists.


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Contents 76

Special Issue

Lives and works in Tampa, FL, USA

Francine LeClerque I Am Your Labyrinth, Installation

Lives and works in Tenerife, Spain

Lives and works in Bradenton, Florida, USA

86 Lives and works in Cape Coral, Florida, USA

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Lives and works in Athens, Greece

Lives and works in Boston, Massachusetts, USA

Shai Jossef Jungle

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Hila Lazovski, David Bowie, work in process Photo by Meital Zikri http://www.lazovski-art.com

Lives and works in Tel Aviv, Israel

Lives and works in Mexico City, Mexico

Lives and works in Doha, Qatar

Special thanks to: Julia Ăœberreiter, Deborah Esses, Margaret Noble, Nathalie Borowski, Marco Visch, Xavier Blondeau, J.D. Doria, Matthias Callay, Luiza Zimerman, Kristina Sereikaite, Scott D'Arcy, Kalli Kalde, Carla Forte, Mathieu Goussin, Dorothee Zombronner, Olga Karyakina, Robert Hamilton, Isabel Becker, Carrie Alter, Jessica Bingham, Fabian Freese, Elodie Abergel, Ellen van der Schaaf and Courtney Henderson

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Gautama's Logarythm, Oil on canvas


Alberto Chirinos Lives and works in Tampa, FL, USA

I create paintings, drawings and sculptures in my search for old/new methods to ‘read the subject’. My architectural/sculptural fixation focuses on the tension between object vs light, and more specifically on spaces-places-objects waiting for something (unreal) to happen at any given moment: the solitary corner, the disparage objects composing a still life, the iridescent wink of a faceted glass reflection. With an impressionistic palette and an old fashioned brushstroke that resists the temptation of blurriness, my paintings are geometrically composed, thematically chosen for memory and intimate projection: what part of my memories and obsessions are depicted here? Is it a summer dream or a nightmare? My works are often about contact with architecture and basic living elements. Streets, people, space and landscape are examined in less obvious ways and sometimes developed in absurd ways. By contesting the division between the realm of memory and the realm of experience, I make work that deals with the documentation of events and the question of how they can be presented. My work tries to express this by telling a story or creating a metaphor. It is an investigation into representations of (seemingly) concrete situations as well as depictions and ideas that can only be realized in painting. I currently live and work in Tampa.


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Alberto Chirinos Lives and works in Tampa, FL, USA Tampa based artist Alberto Chirinos' work inquiries into the liminal area where the realms of memory and experience find an unexpected, but still ubiquitous point of convergence. His captivating body of works that we'll be discussing in the following pages act both as stories and as metaphors, providing the viewers with a multilayered visual experience, capable of triggering their perceptual parameters. One of the most impressive aspects of Chirinos's work is the way it accomplishes the difficult task of questioning contemporary visualization practice: we are very pleased to introduce our readers to his stimulating and multifaceted artistic production.

An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator

interest, I was immersed in books since I was a little child. It was in my early teens that I became passionate with art and I made my first paintings, but with age came the family realization that “art does not pay enough”. So, I ended up studying architecture, to pursue the technical, more realistic side of art. Where I discover the tools of what we might call “concept making” was in architecture school. It was the mid 80’s, and postmodernism was the trend. In many ways, I realize now, those experiences were the roots of my life artistic interests. The tension between art and engineering…yes, that is what architecture is, and that is what I still practice when I paint.

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Hello Alberto and welcome to Peripheral ARTeries: we would start this interview with a couple of questions about your background. Are there any experiences that influenced the way you currently conceive your works? And in particular, how does the relationship between your cultural substratum due to your Peruvian roots and your current life in Florida inform the way you relate yourself to art making? Thank you for the opportunity. Answering your question, I do not know if having Peruvian roots gives me some kind of “particular” background that would make an interesting counterbalance to the supposed “cosmopolitism” of the US. Even though I have a very humble background, for a combination of luck and personal

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Your works convey a coherent sense of unity, that rejects any conventional classification. Before starting to elaborate about your production, we would suggest to our readers to visit https://albertochirinos.wixsite.com/mysite-1 in order to get a synoptic view of your

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After the Rain - Oil on Canvas


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work: in the meanwhile, would you like to tell to our readers something about your process and set up? In particular, are your works painted gesturally, instinctively?

How do you select your subjects? In particular, do you think that there is a central idea that connects all of your work as an artist?

Or do you methodically transpose geometric schemes from paper to canvas? The method is the key, and even when something unexpected happens, I try my best to blend the “accident” with the original theme. I usually start with an idea that is developed through sketches and notes, but there is always a central theme, that is based on some picture that I took with my cellphone, or a picture my wife took (she is an accomplished photographer by the way)…and is from there that I start creating a story. And since I have this blessing (or cursing, depending on your point of view) of having an architectural background, my paintings have a strong tendency to use the trickery of architectural hand drawing sketching, to represent specific places: streets, corners, interior views, dramatic perspectives and lightning, etc….all this to frame the individual that is central to the composition. At the end of the day, it is not much more than the old representational paradigm, seasoned with my own not-so-diffuse impressionistic techniques. New York Academy of Art alumni, painter Brent Thorlton (my friend and mentor) used to make jokes about how come we both work “…using ancient methods, nowadays art schools are much more into creating concepts, than they are to teaching the craft of painting”…..and I agree with him completely.

Yes, there is always a central idea. I would not say I was aware of it at the beginning, but, once you pass the stage of just making “pretty” things, there is a yearning for more. And it is at this point that the grand, even pretentious ideas come a float. Right now I am in the process to pass from vague notions of light, places and memories, to make some kind of political and/or emotional statement. That would be my biggest ambition,…to impact, to create an emotion, even to the point to astonish. I wish I could be as direct as Banksy, but I am too old fashioned for that. For this special edition of Peripheral ARTeries we have selected Port of Tampa Hallucination and Firesky on 7th Ave, a couple of interesting works that our readers have already started to admire in the introductory pages of this article. What has at once captured our attention of your artistic research is the way you provided the visual results of your analysis with autonomous aesthetics: when walking our readers through the genesis of Port of Tampa Hallucination and Firesky on 7th Ave would you tell us your sources of inspiration? In particular, how much importance plays the theme of urban environment in your imagery? Urban environment is always a starting point for me. Like some kind of technical template, covered by perspective lines and proportion partitions, . These two paintings represent

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two important points in time for me. Firesky on 7th Ave is actually based almost 100% on a photograph my wife Amy took in Ybor City years ago. When I translated this photograph into canvas, it was probably the first time that I put in practice all the technical tips I had at the time, and was like a “break the fear” step. People like this painting a lot, maybe because depicts in a very realistic way a beloved place in Tampa (Ybor City), the kind of “perfect postal” place we all dream to visit while on vacation: the light effects of the wet asphalt, the redblood sky and a rarely seen street defined by old buildings. On the other side, and a few blocks away from “7th Ave”, is the “Tampa Hallucination” silo depicted here. It is a gritty, industrial area of the Port of Tampa. And, in the middle of it, this gigantic concrete volume, asking for attention. I thought of it as some kind of “alien” presence, and it was maybe the painting that helped me to unleash the not-so-logical elements that became part of it. We have really appreciated the way how the vibrancy of thoughtful nuances of the pieces as Blue label with fruit and Still life with Wonton Soup Bowl, shows the tension between object vs light. How did you come about settling on your color palette? And how much does your own psychological make-up determine the nuances of tones you decide to use in a piece and in particular, how do you develop a texture? My still life painting are mostly exercises…ways for me to achieve something technical. Yes, I usually apply some enhancement over what I see in an specific studio setting. The background

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Still Life with Wonton Soup Bowl, Oil on Canvas Board

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Firesky on 7th Ave, Oil on Canvas Board

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might not have been that dark, the beam of light might not have been so bright, but, and here is where your background comes to the rescue: references…as a child of the early 80’s post punk/postmodern way of understanding the world, I am not afraid of being obvious in my references. But I try not to be so emotional about it. I try to be cold and specific, to use common places, like surrounding light with dark, or centering a composition in an obvious way, or to balance the warm oranges with the cold dark blue of the background….again, to use all the arsenal of art studio techniques. Your practice ranges from Drawing to Painting and Sculpture, revealing that you are a versatile artist, capable of crossing from a medium to another: what draws you to such cross disciplinary approach? And in particular, when do you recognize that one of the mediums has exhausted it expressive potential to self? I do not consider myself an sculptor per se. I have only made a couple of figurative pieces in clay, and this is another (parallel) path that I yearn to follow. Brent told me “..all sculptors can paint, but not all painters can sculpt”. So, I took it as a challenge, and I am in the process of getting immersed in it. My next target is human figure and human gesture. But I am confident that, if I approach any art subject as a construction project (metaphorically speaking), the architect in me is going to help me find the process (the method) to technically achieve a good result.I was just watching a David Bowie’s interview in YouTube. In it, Bowie say that he does not

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consider himself a musician, but an artist, that happens to use music to express himself. Let me be ridiculously arrogant, and say that I aspire to use (any) art as a tool to express myself and reflect the world around me. Your works are sometimes rich with symbols that could play as metaphors, as in the interesting Gautama's Logarythm and your artistic practice seems to aim to look inside of what appear to be seen, rather than its surface: we like the way Moonage Daydream, rather than attempting to establish any univocal sense seems to urge the viewers to elaborate personal associations: when discussing about the role of randomness in your process, would you tell us how much important is for you that the spectatorship rethink the concepts you convey in your pieces, elaborating personal meanings? If I can direct the spectator into something preconceived, I feel like I succeeded. But, happy accidents happen. In “Gautama’s Logarythm”, we are in front of a standard still life…..but, wait, if you associate the Buddha figurine and the nautilus shell , all standing on a seemingly sacred book….the spiritual references go from the obvious (Buddha/Gautama), to the less obvious (Fibonnacci number/sacred geometry/golden ratio). In “Moonage Daydream”(also the title of the third track on Bowie’s masterpiece “Ziggy Satrdust and the Spiders from Mars), I did a profound personal statement: It was a year since David Bowie passed away, and I started processing the loss. It really felt as

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Starchild Oil on Canvas

if things would never be the same. He, as a brilliant artist, influenced me enormously. So, when I made this self portrait, I merged it with the pop-reference to the Aladdin Sane album design jacket. A big format self portrait with a homage to my youth music/art/life inspiration. How would you define the relationship between imagination and representation in your practice? In particular, how does representation and a tendency towards

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Port of Tampa Hallucination

Against the Wind

Oil on Canvas

Oil on Canvas

abstraction find their balance in your work?

ways. There is not much abstraction here to be found. In my case, I find the escape to this by using the medium as a tool. My days as an old fashioned oil painter might be numbered, in favor of a more mixed media approach, without losing my own character and ideas.

I use representational techniques to make the imaginary appear real. That was the old Surrealist dream, and I find it very effective as a way to express an idea. I know, their disadvantage is the tendency to give you only one possible interpretation of what you see. Those paintings you mention are extremely real, in their depiction of urban scenes, shown in serene, almost candid

One of the hallmarks of your practice is the capability to create direct involvement with the viewers, who are urged to evolve from a condition of mere spectatorship. So

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Port au prince, installation , West End Gallery, 2015

Moonage Daydream - Oil on Canvas

before leaving this conversation we would like to pose a question about the nature of the relationship of your art with your

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audience. Do you consider the issue of audience reception as being a crucial component of your decision-making

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Blue Label with Fruit - Oil on Canvas Board


Everything Counts - Oil on Canvas


Epicurean Afternoon on 7th Ave, Oil on Canvas


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wrong with the world, and I hope I never lose that sense of urgent change…thank you Situationists for showing me the path..!!! Thanks a lot for your time and for sharing your thoughts, Alberto. Finally, would you like to tell us readers something about your future projects? How do you see your work evolving? Personal problems (we all have them) forced me to reprogram my priorities, take some time off, and propose new plans. I am prepared to pursue not only new and stronger themes in my art making, but to do something more aggressive about showing what I do. It is not a bout making money (thankfully I am still not compromising the act of paying my bills with the art I make), but to express myself and communicate with others. I make art out of frustration, and I think I am on my way to find my own voice. Right now I have a new series of medium format oils that I started making, and the first one depicts a classic Greek Minotaur theme, mixed with US political references, in some kind of bloody apocalypse scene…my daughter Christina (with her modern Japanese manga and young pop culture background) is helping me more and more in some brainstorming sessions. It sounds like a chaotic pursuit, but it is what I like doing, and I can only say that…”I do not know where I am going,

The Übermensch Oil on Canvas

process, in terms of what type of language is used in a particular context? Reception is a crucial component, as long as it is only related to the kind of language or symbols that I use. I want the message to be heard… not necessarily to be liked. On one of my paintings, called “The Ubermensch”, you can see a seemingly familiar patriotic-soldier-come-back-fromwar scene….until you realize there are some vague nazi references, and links to the nasty political climate in the US right now. I find hard to imagine a situation in which you have no opinion over what is

An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator peripheral.arteries@europe.com

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Tatyana Kaneva Lives and works in Puerto de la Cruz, Tenerife, Spain My paintings are abstract canvases with acrylic , mix technique. I unite applied and fine arts, warm and cold colores, contrast and delicate shades. I create various dimentions with texture made of different materials like sand, paper, glue, cloth ‌ The bright clean colours and the contrast best express my hightly emotional nature, my feisty character and spirit of poet. The forms of my paintings are not concrete, so I let the spectators more space for interpretation. My work is an analytical observation and learning process with focus on the subconscious and the intuition. Transfer to a pararel leality where everything makes other sence, where the magic materializes. My naive desire to change the world.

An interview by Josh Ryders, curator and Barbara Scott, curator

background. You have a solid formal training and after your studies at the National High School of Applied Arts "Dimitar Dobrovich", you nurtured your education with studies in Private Academy of Art "Joul Pasquin" and later in Free University of Movie Arts "Chernorizets Hrabar" in Sofia, Bulgaria. You later had the chance to study in Private Atelie of Professor Konstantin Djidrov: how did these experiences influence the way you currently conceive your works? And in particular, how does the relationship between your cultural substratum dued to your Bulgarian roots and your current life in Spain inform the way you relate yourself to art making and to the notion of beauty?

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Drawing inspiration from beauty of nature, environment and traveling the world artist Tatyana Kaneva-Barnhusen's work provides the viewers with an intense, immersive visual experience: her body of works that we'll be discussing in the following pages, successfully attempts to trigger the viewers' perceptual parameters walking them through the liminal area in which perceptual reality and the realm of imagination find a consistent point of convergence. One of the most impressive aspects of Tatyana Kaneva-Barnhusen's work is the way it accomplishes the difficult task of questioning contemporary visualization practice: we are very pleased to introduce our readers to her stimulating and multifaceted artistic production.

Well, growing up and studying in one country and than living and working in other, very different as a culture and social sistem is not easy, but it gave me an incredibly valuable advantage and life experience. Interaction between different cultures is a big present by the life and I’m very thanksful to have the chanse to live and develop my art in these conditions. The chanse to compare,

Hello Tatyana and welcome to Peripheral ARTeries: we would start this interview with a couple of questions about your multifaceted

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The transfer of my roots


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complement and enrich my mind. After the little shock in the begining of my life here in Tenerife I have had the feeling that everything I’ve been learned, worked, lived in my past in Bulgaria began to make other sence. That the peaces of the chaos of my life find the right plases. Here I found not only better life and pfofessional development. That changing helped me to become a little bit more wise, to understand many fundamental thinks and to find answers to many of my personal eternal questions.

subjects are different in every working phase. But the central idea of my work has always been related to the subconscious and the intuition – very important but often underestimated part of our life. Not to the dreams, but to the immense invisible power wich controls our life, the reason why we act in one way or another. In my young ages I couldn’t find any satisfaction in the material world, but my attemts to ignore it collapsed totally. So I had lo learn living in the world of the matter. I was always searching the way to make a balanse between the spirit and the material world. I realized that my only chanse to live the magic I’d like to live is to create it with my own hands and my art. My philosophical and personal researches in that way, my questions and answers are the base of my work. The opportunity to have lived in differen social sistems ( good or bad) can steal, but also it can be a big advantage. To get solid life experience, much to understand. Depending on social environment and the family one person can be provocked to develop qualities, talent, self control,discipline... or the oposite – to turn in a destructive direction. Is it possible to choise the direction of your life or it’s predicted?

Your works convey a coherent sense of unity, that rejects any conventional classification. Before starting to elaborate about your production, we would suggest to our readers to visit http://www.tatyanakaneva.net in order to get a synoptic view of your work: in the meanwhile, would you like to tell to our readers something about your process and set up? In particular, are your works painted gesturally, instinctively? Or do you methodically transpose geometric schemes from paper to canvas? Thank you so much for “any conventional classification” ! This is what I always definitely tried to archieve – uniqueness and authenticity of my work, as far as possible to keep it clean and free of influences. Without borders of the theory rules, limites of the modern waves or trade preferences. My artworks are painted completely instinctively, no any transpose geometric schemes. In my way to work is very important to catch the moment, I mean the very short moment of inspiration, using the maximum to can transmits an expressive impact. I work with the subconscious energy wich I’ve always been interested in. It’s very delicate and subtle subject and requires a lot of care and honesty.

I’m coming from a country where is not easy to survive and largely lacking order. Chaos is fundamental in the social sistem and of course it reflects on the private life, work, personality of the people. Almost impossible is to transform it. Can be possible only with self control to change it? - Thinking and living through these things I begun my project “Transform the chaos” - there are few art peaces and small instalation with text. I focus on the positive and constructive side of that problem, proving that order is born from chaos. It seems it’s very actual and extensive theme, so I think about working up a second part.

How do you select your subjects? In particular, do you think that there is a central idea that connects all of your work as an artist?

For this special edition of Peripheral ARTeries we have selected Something I can't forget and The transfer of my roots, a couple of interesting works that our readers have already

In every period of my life there are divers matters that excite my spirit and my brain, so the

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started to admire in the introductory pages of this article. What has at once captured our attention of your artistic research is the way you provided the visual results of your analysis with autonomous aesthetics: when walking our readers through the genesis of Something I can't forget and The transfer of my roots would you tell us your sources of inspiration?

Tenerife, as an absolutely direct and symbolic connection with the island wich gave me a new life and opportunities.The sand here has a specific structure and size, different from the beaches in my country. I create “A memory of the ocean” to express my relationship with the Canarians. And as a reply I made “Interaction and road” with the idea of the eternal connection with my native land. I painted that piece in my participation in a international Plein Air in Yambol – the town I grew up.

That two paintings were created in a time when I just begun to feel well placed here in my new land, when I was feeling I started to root. I had a wish to mark that moment, because after few years living between different nations and cultures my soul was feeling more complete. Alive and dinamic inside and the same time peaceful and calm. I captivate the essence of life more fully here than in my country. So that paintings are my way to say that it can be happiness to can moved our present and it can be very good luck to find other earth for our roots.But we can never forget where we’re coming from and we can never change that.

How would you define the relationship between abstraction and imagination in your practice? In particular, how does representation and a tendency towards abstraction find their balance in your work? My way of thinking is largely abstract. Imagination comes to my brain in abstract form, there is not need to transform it. The fantasy of the people who are not artists is coming, I guess, as pictures or concrete forms. Maybe my mind is oriented to alternative direction. When I’m reading abstract poems for example, I perceive them very easily and immediately fit my needs and preferences. So for me this is the most natural way to visualize my imagination, missing a precise element and drawing. This is a paradox – concreteness is in the abstraction.

You are a versatile artist and you like experimenting combining a wide variety of materials, as sand, paper, glue, clothwith in your textures: what does draw you to experiment with such unconventional materials? In particular, what are the properties that you are searching for the materials that you include in your artworks?

Your artistic practice seems to aim to look inside of what appear to be seen, rather than its surface: we like the way Waiting for springs, rather than attempting to establish any univocal sense seems to urge the viewers to elaborate personal associations: when discussing about the role of randomness in your process, would you tell us how much important is for you that the spectatorship rethink the concepts you convey in your pieces, elaborating personal meanings?

I’ve graduated High School for applyed arts, so since I was very young I have formed that decorative thinkig and stylistics that you can always notice in my paintings. I have a need to use some textures, starting many years ago with textile and now experimenting with different materials. Here I wanted to find some way to do the connection between my work and the Canarian Islands – because since 2008 it’s my home. Not any stylish or visual relation, but I was searching some kind of simvolic link . So I begun to use black sand from the beaches in

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We are always waiting for something – springs, after that summertime, than Christmass,

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Transform the chaos

birthday, good luck... And sometimes we are

more and to act instead of waiting? – That was

waiting too long, so long that we forget to live

my concept behind “Wayting for springs”. It’s

the real life. Isn’t it recommendable to move

my suggestion to look beyond the object on the

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wall, to find the invisible. I’m always glad when the spectators elaborate their personal meaning, it’s very important for me. I try to make them think and take some approximate direction, than to feel free. My concept is just the begining of the interpretation, the first step of the way to some new space. We have really appreciated the vibrancy of thoughtful nuances of the pieces as My window and The good in the differences, that show that vivacious tones are not striclty indespensable to create tension and dynamics. How did you come about settling on your color palette? And how much does your own psychological make-up determine the nuances of tones you decide to use in a piece and in particular, how do you develope a texture? “My window” is one of my favourite peaces. The world is too extensive and diverse, but we see throuth our window only what we want to see. And only if we dare to open our senses. Are we putting ourselves on own barriers? About the colors - In the begining of my art studing my color palette was mostly grey. After few years with the help of a friend of mine I realize that it was a reflection of my inside feeling because I was down. I was very young and I did’n want my artworks to create a sense of sadness or depression. On the contrary, I wished to create more powerful and expressive paintings. So I thought that I wonted to change that effect, but I did’n know how. And I begun on the way back, fondly from outside to inside, starting to use intensive, clear and fresh colors. I was surprised by the resentment, so I found my color palette. “The good in the differences” is an example for extreme contrast – presenting that differences and opposites create harmony. The texture I use as additional medium, to fortify the impact of the color.

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The transfer of my roots

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Waiting for springs

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How do you go about naming your work? In particular, is important for you to tell something that might walk the viewers through their visual experience? Naming my work usually is coming together with my feeligns, concerns and researches in the relevant period of my life. One of the solo exhibitions I made here is named “A common lenguage” – a very current topic for me after my experience in the island. The first months of my life here I couldn’t speak neither understand the language. I had a lot of need to communicate, I couldn’t even do some simple quotidian conversations, I could hardly speak Spanish and I didn’t know anybody speaking my lenguage. I was feeling quite lonely. It was incredibly strong sensation, brobably impossible to be undestood by people who haven’t been in such a situation. I hadn’t thought about that before, how important is the comunication, to have some common lenguage and in case we don’t have – to create it and to can harmonize with the environment. So gradually that theme matured and naturally the title came. Yes, I like to provoke the viewers. I like to point them to the parallel road. But not to manipulate to much, I like to let the spectators more space for interpretation. They have to feel free to create their oun associations. Over these years your works have been exhibited in several occasions, including your recent participation to the show "Women and their way of representing" at the Matanza Taun Hall, in Tenerife. One of the hallmarks of your practice is the capability to create direct involvement with the viewers, who are urged to evolve from a condition of mere spectatorship. So before leaving this conversation we would like to pose a question about the nature of the relationship of your art with your audience. Do you consider the

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International Plein Air Exhibition - Yambol, Bulgaria - 2015


Interaction and road


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Fragment

issue of audience reception as being a crucial component of your decision-making process, in terms of what type of language is used in a particular context?

developed associative thinking and for me is always very interesting the conversation with them. Very often the imagination of the audience goes to completely different direction, wich in any case can‘t be called wrong. For me is very important and useful speaking with people and realizing the way they perceive some of my messages and to what kind of associations it drives. I also learn

In one way I realize that in many cases is almost impossible for the viewers to capture that subtle feeling I had in my mind. But in other way there are people with very well

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Believe in magic

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I don't know what time is


What you have in the heart - Solo exhibition in Puerto de la Cruz, Tenerife - 2016


The good in the differences


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My Window

Sun finally

from the public and it’s very good because we create some interaction not only at the surface level.

means of expression, new mix of techniques and fields for presentation. I had worked a little with collage, instalations with text – I’d like to evolve my work in that direction too. I have some ideas but still no too clear.

Thanks a lot for your time and for sharing your thoughts, Tatyana. Finally, would you like to tell us readers something about your future projects? How do you see your work evolving?

Thank you so much for the chance to present my work, I am very happy to be selected for this interview!

My next step- very soon I’ll be artist in Residency in Iceland. I have many hopes for new inspirations and impressions in that incredible place. I’m searching some new

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Marcia Treiger Lives and works in Bradenton, Florida, USA


Time Shift


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Marcia Treiger Lives and works in Bradenton, Florida, USA Speaking of form, illusions, and other worlds, photographer and visual artist Marcia Treiger's work provides her spectatorship with intense, immersive experience. In her body of works that we'll be discussing in the following pages, she successfully attempts to trigger the spectatorship's perceptual parameters to rethink the notion of memory. One of the most impressive aspects of Treiger's work is the way it accomplishes the difficult task of overcoming the photographic reality of the camera and to create images as metaphors that cannot be seem by the human eye: we are very pleased to introduce our readers to her stimulating and multifaceted artistic production.

An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Barbara Scott, curator

someone I wanted to learn from. He had beliefs about photography that were beyond the mainstream, and back In 1974 he was involved in holography and electronic transmissions of imagery. He also believed that Color Photography was the direction and future of fine art photography. His forward thinking motivated me to think outside of the box, and my final thesis from Tyler represented the inner turmoil I was having distinguishing between illusion and reality. What was more real? An image of a photograph, or a photograph of a commercial image in a photograph? The lines were blurred for me as they were when I was in Moore College of Art. My questions were always the same, the results slightly different and expanded. The workshops I took focused on alternative processes, such as cyanotype, polaroid transfers, Marbling paper, Digital Fine Art techniques, and college level teaching methods. These new educational experiences all became part of the bigger picture in terms of collage and

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Hello Marcia and welcome to Peripheral ARTeries: we would start this interview with a couple of questions regarding your background. You have a solid formal training and after having graduated from the Moore College of Art and Design you nurtured your education with a MFA of Fine Art Photography and Graphic Design from the Temple University. How did these experiences along with the workshops that you attended over the years influence the way you currently conceive and produce your works? Attending Graduate School immediately following college was a deliberate decision as this was the first year that Tyler School of Art was offering the Masters of Fine Arts in Photography and Graphic Arts. The faculty Chairman was Will Larson and

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Radiant Reality


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wherever I go. I react with the mind of a detective looking for clues about life and light. I search for a moment in time that can never be recreated. The digital age has certainly helped with spontaneity, though I still shoot film because I love the grain that is lacking in digital photography.

panoramic imagery. My attitude is always to go beyond presenting the singular image on papers, and explore alternative ways of presentation on different substrates such as stone and aluminum. Your works convey such coherent sense of unity, that rejects any conventional classification. Before starting to elaborate about your production, we would suggest to our readers to visit http://marciatreiger.com in order to get a synoptic view of your work: in the meanwhile, would you like to tell to our readers something about your process and set up? In particular, how much importance does play spontaneity in your process? Do you conceive you works instinctively or do you follow a more methodic process?

We daresay that the inquiry into the notion of illusion is one of the central ideas that connects all the works from your artistic production: what does appeal you of the theme of illusion as much as to center your artistic production on it? My initial frustration with photography was the fact that an object remains and object, and that without thinking like a photographer, or using the elements that are intrinsically unique to photography, ordinary and unforgettable images will be made. My first element is the element of Light, and the way it changes objects. The objects do not change but the light does. The second most important issue concerns the optics of the lenses, and what they are capable of creating. For me an image which is totally in focus has less appeal than one that has in focus and out of focus information. This leads the eye around the frame, and I find that many feel that all must be sharply in focus. I am totally against this idea. Illusion can be created metaphorically with light and focus. When an image works on all these levels, I become engaged in creating powerful imagery this way. Reality is in the eye of the beholder, and I am always aware of the things that most do not see, such as reflections in windows, lights and colors, and how to organize what is included

In my earliest design class, we learned how to make a pinhole camera, which is the Physics of how photographic images are made, discovered long before photography existed. It was how Leonardo da Vinci discovered perspective, and many of the renaissance painters created their underpaintings using a camera Lucida to trace imagery onto light papers that could be transferred onto a canvas. For me this was the utmost magical process, and did not involve expensive equipment. I prefer this way of making images as one cannot see what the pinhole sees. One must just guess and imagine the magic of the moment when light hits your film. Though this process is not spontaneous, in general I prefer the spontaneity of picture making using a Sony Cyber shot as it fits into the palm of my hand, and allows me to make photographs

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they made. My father’s glass store was my first real experience with observing with wonderment at all the translucent objects called glass. The images I shot with the Leonardo da Vinci pinhole camera were time exposures on Fujicolor 4 x 5 sheet film, anywhere between 8 – 15 minutes long. What I discovered was that things that were not observed by the human eye became visible, the invisible became clear as if there is another world beyond what we as humans can see. Scientifically we know this to be true, and yet here was the proof I had been searching for photographically.

within the framework of the image. Photography chooses and eliminates from what exists. It is a subtractive process. Painters start with nothing and must create their vision on a blank canvass. Illusion is so important because I am more intrigued by images that raise questions, rather than those that tell the whole story. For this special edition of Peripheral ARTeries we have selected Radiant Realities, an interesting project that our readers have already started to got to know in the introductory pages of this article and that can be viewed at http://marciatreiger.com. What has at once captured our attention of your successful attempt to open a crack into what was, a caesura in the everydayness is the way you provided the visual results of your analysis with autonomous aesthetics: when walking our readers through the genesis of Radiant Realities would you tell us your sources of inspiration?

Your works are capable of walking the viewers through the dreamlike area where reaity and imagination find unexpected points of convergence. While a student in art school, you titled a series of photographs “When all is real, and nothing is certain”: how would you consider the relationship between the real and the imagined within your work?

My inspiration in making art is always based on curiosity and the process of creation. The Radiant Reality Series is dedicated to my father, Samuel Aron Goldner, who was a glazer by trade. It was in his store that I have my earliest memories of being transfixed by the transparent and translucent glass bins, where materials were stored. My fascination with Illusion began when I was just 4 years old watching his men work at cutting glass, so sturdy and yet so delicate at the same time. It was fascinating to observe a clear piece of glass being painted with a silver substance that turned the glass into a mirror. I remember broken windshields with many cracks and slivers and the patterns

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In college I produced a series of photographs entitled “When all is Real, and Nothing is for Certain”. This project came out of my love of experimentation and my continuation with bending the reality of the world. I would load the film into the 35mm camera, and shoot it twice or three times to double and triple expose scenes on each other. Once again I could create an alternative reality to what was actually out there. There and then I could create strips of images to go beyond the singular image. We like the way Eclipse expresses the tension between the physical and the

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Spirit Field


Blue Plate Universe


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ephemeral, as you have remarked in your artist's statement, your challenge in photography has always been to overcome the photographic reality of the camera and to create images as metaphors, or expressions of something unseen by the human eye: how much important is for to trigger the viewers' perceptual parameters in order to address them to elaborate personal associations?

shapes allow the viewer to form his or her own conclusions. The title ECLIPSE has many meanings, but only one that I can see. An Eclipse is The partial or total blocking of light of one celestial object by another. An eclipse of the Sun or Moon occurs when the Earth, Moon, and Sun are aligned. â—‡ In a solar eclipse the Moon comes between the Sun and Earth.

ECLIPSE can at first glance appear to be a close up of marble shapes. The feeling of movement and the contrast of the orange peeking out from just underneath the green

This is a naturally occurring event that does not happen often, and sometimes instills fear in those who do not understand it’s

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Midnight's Dawn

Clear Intention

science. Speaking as the artist the orange marble represents a bright color emerging from darker colors and hopefully signifies the dawn of a new age.

and places. Once the half tone image was invented thus allowing photographs to be reproduced commercially, Photographs have been reproduced on postcards, advertisements, billboards, on menus in restaurants, and soup cans. In terms of contemporary art, one cannot divorce the photographic image from art or our world. Contemporary Art has no boundaries and it is the artist that chooses to use photography as a substitute for painting. Personally I feel there is a great divide between painting and photography basically because of the materials used, and the reproductive qualities and stability of

Photographer Thomas Ruff stated that "once nowadays you don't have to paint to be an artist. You can use photography in a realistic way. You can even do abstract photographs". What is your opinion about the importance of photography in the contemporary art? Photography historically has always been evidence of reality, architecture, people,

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Purple Majesty


Candlestick


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Remote Viewing

Blue Lightening

the materials.

and challenging of them all. It is an experiment with the existence of light and time. This conversation is of the most primal level that most of humanity does not understand. This speaks of the passage of time, and time that is lost to many generations.

You work with many camera formats, but over all you are fascinated with the expressive potential of the pinhole camera: what does you appeal of this medium? As stated earlier, the pinhole camera is the reason why photographic images exist. They can be made without a lens, without expensive equipment, and some of my favorite camera obscuras are made out of hat boxes and popcorn tins. I own all formats of cameras, and yet the simplest most basic invention is the most magical

Angel Heart reminds us of such supernatural dimension: how much does everyday life's experience fuel your imagery? My life on earth has always been fueled by my intuition and belief in a guiding force, an invisible force watching out for me no

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matter how challenging things have become. When I am in the world, I trust that I am being guided to witness truths and lies. Some synchronocities are not pleasant, and some are awe inspiring. I seek only the highest planes of existence, and feel I can actually experience atmospheres of reality. I feel there is a web of existence where all things are connected, and the sum of the parts is greater than the whole. I would have to say that my spirituality is behind every action in my life, whether it is related to life, liberty or the pursuit of happiness. Above all, the process of living from moment to moment is all that exists for me. The only moment is now.

needs at that moment. If one appreciates my artwork I am grateful for that but rarely set out to capture a “certain audience�. Defining that audience has always been an elusive and unanswerable question. My thoughts turn into projects, and usually center around creating artworks questioning reality. What is important to one person is not necessarily important to me, and I am always happy when my art has touched another’s heart. Whenever I get bored or too comfortable with a project I know it is time to move on. Discovery on any level propels me to places I have never been before, and process is everything to me.

Over the years you have exhibited your fine arts photography all over the country for the past forty years, and is in several permanent museum collections, including the Houston Museum of Fine Arts and the Chrysler Museum in Virginia.and one of the distinctive hallmarks of your practice is the capability to create direct involvement with your spectatorship, who are urged to evolve from a condition of mere spectatorship. So before leaving this conversation we would like to pose a question about the nature of the relationship of your art with your audience. Do you consider the issue of audience reception as being a crucial component of your decision-making process, in terms of what type of language is used in a particular context?

Thanks a lot for your time and for sharing your thoughts, Marcia. Finally, would you like to tell us readers something about your future projects? How do you see your work evolving? I hope to utilize new materials in the future, ones that have never been combined together, and utilize much of the new technology that exists today. I see myself becoming involved with commissioned projects and working with teams of decision makers in a collaborative spirit. Education has always been my trade and passion, and I would like to see myself involved again with education around the world, inspiring minds that want to learn. An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Barbara Scott, curator

As far as my audience, I do not create for them. I create for myself and my own

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Peripheral ARTeries meets

Yvonne Krystman Lives and works in sunny Cape Coral, Florida, USA My art does not come from a happy place; my art is leading there. Each piece I create is simultaneously a bridge from the past, where I’ve come from as well as a preview of the future, where I’m going. It reflects many of my internal contradictions that I have been experiencing and trying to sort out my whole life. I have struggled for many years to fit in a box, to find the labels, to identify myself with a specific social group, philosophy or even belief system – it never worked out; so what if there is no box we can fit in? In my recent works I have been exploring combining opposite or contradicting objects, textures and colors therefore often including rough or 3-d objects and glitter. Even though they represent my own battles and my own journey, I believe some of those feelings are universal. I do not agree with society wanting us to define ourselves. I refuse to be limited by one particular style. I want to remain happily, positively undefined.

An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Katherine Wiliams, curator

introduce our readers to her stimulating and multifaceted artistic production.

peripheral.arteries@europe.com

Hello Yvonne and welcome to Peripheral ARTeries: we would start this interview with a couple of questions about your background. Are there any experiences that did influence the way you currently conceive your works? And in particular, how do your studies of Commercial Art program at St. Clair College in Windsor address your artistic research?

Experimenting with a wide variety of materials to express the ideas she explores, artist Yvonne Krystman's work rejects any conventional classification regarding its style, to address the viewers to a multilayered visual experience. In her Art of the Heart series that we'll be discussing in the following pages, she successfully attempts to trigger the spectatorship's perceptual parameters, with a deeper focus on a complementary dialogue between materiality, content, the exhibition space and the encounter with the viewers. One of the most impressive aspects of Krystman's work is the way it accomplishes the difficult task of inquiring into the liminal area where the abstract and the figurative find an unexpected still consistent point of convergence: we are very pleased to

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Hello, first of all I feel honored to be interviewed by you and share the pages with so many exceptional artists. I have study various types of art from a very early age; I actually don't remember ever wanting to be anything other than an artist. During high school years I study drawing and sculpture at the, then, most famous art studios in Warsaw. I did not continue my education in sculpture after that, but I still consider myself a sculptor at heart, so that's why all my pieces

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Port au prince, installation , West End Gallery, 2015

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are 3 dimensional in one way or another. As per later influences, I remember my first week of Commercial Art program at St, Clair College when one of my instructor said: “and now forget everything you have ever learned in every fine art class you have ever taken”... and even though I left commercial art world shortly after the graduation, certain things stayed with me like: deeper understanding and admiration for Andy Warhol and also my desire to occasionally forget everything I ever learned about something and re-learn from scratch. And also this is the starting point of my new project… but I will tell you more about it later.

I am a woman and an empath so I am always lead by emotions. So yes, the central idea is to portray human emotions and I use my own as a jumping board. I believe all emotions are universal, so even thought my art is deeply personal it is my desire to induct a personal journey in my viewers and start a conversation where those emotions are played separately and together at the same time. For this special edition of Peripheral ARTeries we have selected Making it work, an interesting project that our readers have already started to got to know in the introductory pages of this article. What has at once captured our attention of your artistic inquiry is the way you provided the visual results of your analysis with autonomous aesthetics: when walking readers through the genesis of Making it work would you tell us your sources of inspiration?

Your works convey a coherent sense of unity, that rejects any conventional classification. Before starting to elaborate about your production, we would suggest to our readers to visit http://www.winnerschoice.net in order to get a synoptic view of your work: in the meanwhile, would you like to tell to our readers something about your process and set up? How much importance does play spontaneity in your work? In particular, do you conceive you works instinctively or do you methodically elaborate your pieces?

Ha… this is my most intimate series, but since as an artist I do expose myself thru my art anyway, I will tell you: the first one is the blue one, I created it after almost 2 months of artistic hiatus, due a change in my relationship status and other circumstances. “Making it work” is simply about making past and present work to create the future. Every single piece of rusted / bend material has a history, from sheet metal background, through fence net, to combination of rusted/ banded and brand new nails/screws and together they are woven into totally new composition… Just like in life. And just like in life, I use opposite, often contradicting elements, and try to make them work. I try to fit them in, just the way I have been doing all my life, and in the process some of those elements bend, brake and some simply refuse

Thank you, for noticing that, I like staying “positively undefined”. As per my process: the inception of each piece starts with a feeling that I want to translate and articulate visually, and I go from there. Sometimes the gestation period takes longer then the rendering of a piece itself. Usually at this point, I allow my emotions to guide me, and the rest is totally spontaneous. And unfortunately, I usually reach that liminal place late at night, and I end up in my studio instead of my bed. :-) How do you select your subjects? In particular, do you think that there is a central idea that connects all of your work as an artist?

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to fit in. It is also about observing and accepting things. You are a versatile artist: you use a wide variety of unconventional materials and the spectrum of your artistic interests covers a whole range of topics rather than one single working style. What are the properties you are searching for in the materials that you include in your materials? And in particular, when do you recognize that one of the mediums has exhausted its expressive potential to self? As I said earlier I am guided by emotions, so I am in a constant search of materials that will best represent them. I am fascinated by versatility of various metals in a way of being able to represent a huge scale of emotions and meanings; it is also the sculptor in me, that wants to go beyond 2 dimensional frame. My art is a my diary, so as things in my emotional/ spiritual life evolve, so my art and materials do. Recently I started to desire more simplicity in my life, therefore I started to experiment with synthesizing my emotions and finding the simplest ways to express them as possible. Catching a Dream is a successful attempt investigate about the connection between the dreamlike dimension and our perceptual reality. How do you view the concepts of the real and the imagined playing out within your works? How would you define the relationship between abstraction and representation in your practice? Quantum physics tells us that there is not much difference between so called “real� and

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imagined, and that anything we perceived as real is real. Representational art uses symbols that we agreed on as humans; I also use them,

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for the purpose of facilitating a conversation: if I use a heart for example, it is a universal symbol/point of reference. Then if I use a

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is an abstract? To me abstract is more like

chain, it triggers a wide variety of interpretations, depending on the receiver – similar as in dream interpretations‌And what

multiple realism, open to interpretation.

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In your Art of the Heart collection you address the viewers to explore a wide range

how does everyday life's experience fuel you as a creative?

of emotions associated with love and life:

I am an empath, I am run by emotions: mine and

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people around me, and sometimes it is difficult

and that is a never ending source of

to separate them. I am also a perpetual

frustration that can keep fuel any artist

immigrant, trying to find my place and fit in

lifetime lol

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As you have remarked in your artist's statement, you do not agree with society wanting us to define ourselves and you want

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to remain happily, positively undefined. Mexican artist Gabriel Orozco once stated, "the artist’s role differs depending on which

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part of the world you’re in. It depends on the political system you’re living under". How do you consider the relationship between artists and society? Moreover, what could be in your opinion the role of Art in the contemporary age?

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I absolutely agree with Gabriel Orozco! As to the role of an artist, I believe that anyone who has access to a larger audience, not just an artists, has a moral obligation to speak out, if there is an injustice, but it is still a


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personal choice. As per wanting to remain happily undefined.. ha..it is more like embracing the fact that there never been labels for me, and the fact that I am currently living in a fourth country doesn't make things easier.

As per artist’s role depending on which part of the world you’re in… I grew up in communist Poland, and for example, I have always seen graffiti as a selfless expression of creative and passionate people. People

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who are willing to put their time, talents, and often risk prosecution in the name of art or truth. In a country where you could not trust any media outlets, the truth was spray painted on the street walls. Therefore I will never see graffiti as an act of vandalism.

like to tell us readers something about your future projects? How do you see your work evolving? It was such a pleasure to talk to you. I loved your thought-provoking questions. As per the near future: I recently become fascinated by the idea of re-imaging familiar concepts and objects and re-discovering the force and energies in colors, shapes, lines and objects, It is based on a theory that the eye can focus upon only a very small area and to obtain adequate information it quickly moves around the visual field, collecting a succession of focused data.

Actually one of my very few political pieces” The walls” is about this, because I know that often the only truth is still being spray painted daily on walls around us. Over the years your works have been showcased in several occasions, including your recent solo exhibitions at Art for Acts Gallery in Fort Myers as well as being part of a group show at some prestigious venues like Aqua Art Miami (satellite show to Miami Basel) and Orlando Museum of Art, to name the few. One of the hallmarks of your practice is the capability to create direct involvement with the viewers, who are urged to evolve from a condition of mere spectatorship. So before leaving this conversation we would like to pose a question about the nature of the relationship of your art with your audience. Do you consider the issue of audience reception as being a crucial component of your decision-making process, in terms of what type of language is used in a particular context?

After a rapid scanning of the situation in front of us, we stitch together all the received messages and form in our minds a visual image. We do not in fact see any geometrical figures and yet any deviation in the observed shape is noted and interpreted as a distortion, if it doesn't fit in any pre existing concepts. So, I started to create a series titled: “Re-imagine “ it attempts to unlearn that temporarily and explore things beyond the labels we have formed in our minds. I hope to have this series completed by the end of the year, and hopefully I will find a suitable venue to exhibit it in the spring of 2018.

My art is intended to have an intimate relationship with its audience; I like leaving only some hints; provoking details, that only suggest a very general direction and the rest is up to the spectator.

An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Katherine Wiliams, curator

Thanks a lot for your time and for sharing your thoughts, Yvonne. Finally, would you

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sunny Cape Coral, Florida, USA

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Paula Blower Natural, pure and spontaneous. It is on this dimension that I propose my work's development. As a freedom and permission to multiply, separate, transform. I allow myself to be a book, to wear it. I wear the sea, I wear the repulsion, I wear the solitude, I wear myself as a child. I decide when I'm born. It's all about choices and the powerful machine that is our own mind. And this is my new childhood. Literature inspires me and for freedom of expression I try to materialize it. Einstein once said “Imagination is more important than knowledge. For knowledge is limited to all we now know and understand, while imagination embraces the entire world, and all there ever will be to know and understand.�. I seek to explore impermanence, autonomously, using different languages, techniques, and unconventional materials most often ephemeral. Through a search for the answer or just a reaction to the personal experiences I try to express them in a playful way as a conversation with the viewer. As a request for help or just the reflection of intense relationships of dialogue with our demons. Think of the body as something volatile and immaterial. A body in constructive transformation. This body that can be object, house, a feeling of longing, yellow, slurry. I'm just a correspondent. I try to stimulate the senses and different ways of thinking the inner and outer body.

The answer is in the verse, 2016 - Photographer Marcelo Hallit


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Elena Antoniou Lives and works in Athens, Greece Artist Elena Antoniou’s work rejects any conventional classification regarding its style and addresses the viewers to a multilayered visual experience. In her body of works that we’ll be discussing in the following pages, she successfully attempts to trigger the spectatorship’s perceptual parameters, with a deeper focus on a complementary dialogue between materiality, content, the exhibition space and the encounter with the viewers. One of the most impressive aspects of Antoniou’s work is the way it accomplishes the difficult task of inquiring into the liminal area where the abstract and the figurative find an unexpected still consistent point of convergence: we are very pleased to introduce our readers to her stimulating and multifaceted artistic production.

An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator

Hello to you too and thank you for your interest regarding my work. I feel honored to be hosted in your pages.

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Besides relevant art studies and practices through the years, that have given me the theoretical and technical knowledge of creating a piece of art, experience is the word that connects all of the above and is of course what counts. And it pleases me a lot that you have pointed this out.

Artist Elena Antoniou’s work rejects any conventional classification regarding its style and addresses the viewers to a multilayered visual experience. In her body of works that we’ll be discussing in the following pages, she successfully attempts to trigger the spectatorship’s perceptual parameters, with a deeper focus on a complementary dialogue between materiality, content, the exhibition space and the encounter with the viewers. One of the most impressive aspects of Antoniou’s work is the way it accomplishes the difficult task of inquiring into the liminal area where the abstract and the figurative find an unexpected still consistent point of convergence: we are very pleased to introduce our readers to her stimulating and multifaceted artistic production.

On one hand, everyday’s lived experience is what fuels my creativity and production. No matter if it is a positive encounter, such as the interaction with nature, or maybe a trip, or even if it is a negative situation, such as the results of a recent war in a neighboring country, that constantly brings thousands of human beings seeking for a safe shelter, seeking refuge, in my homeland. On the other hand, my cultural substratum and background is the solid basis that enrich and endure both of the above. I was fortunate to be born, raised and now live in a country of immense and widespread cultural importance. Art in Greece is put in human scale. Easy to approach, Not only to observe it through a high definition screen. It is not only knowledge. It is experience. Since the prehistoric times (the Stone Age) up until now, is continuous and all around. One can

Hello Elena and welcome to Peripheral ARTeries. We would start this interview with a couple of questions about your background. Are there any experiences that particularly influenced the way you currently conceive your works? And in particular, how does your cultural substratum and your everyday life experience, fuel you as a creative?

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Warsaw's mermaid loves Greece

touch it, examine it, feel it, listen to it, dance to it, walk on it, share its experience with others. Art in Greece is friendly, open, welcoming, and simple. From ancient times up until now. If you want to meet with Art, it’s here, waiting for you.

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I think that both of the above, culture and experience, have opened the state of my being and my mind. They are two precious gifts that have helped me develop the way I think,, live, create, relate, behave, share, accept. Live in convergence and peace with myself and the environment.

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Sea creatures and transparent waters. Watercolor on paper 010x015 Your works convey a coherent sense of unity, that rejects any conventional classification. Before starting to elaborate about your production, we would suggest to our readers to visit www.arthinmanyways.com, in order to get a synoptic view of your work. In the meanwhile, would you like to tell to our readers something about your process and set up? How much importance does play spontaneity in your work? In particular, do you conceive your works instinctively or do you methodically elaborate your pieces?

inner feeling, attitude and balance. So I honestly deeply appreciate that you had this feeling also. Spontaneity is always there. It is a glance. It is –as I call it-, a “stigmi”. Stigmi in Greek is the minimum counting of time, it refers to the exact moment. So yes. My inspiration can happen in a “stigmi” (a moment). It is spontaneous. But the process, is a totally different thing. Any work, whether it is a small, simple, or an elaborate one, can take days or even weeks before it is finished. Some, can even stay half finished until the right moment comes. It is not always a matter of inspiration, because it is easy for me to get inspired, to have the idea of creating something new. Many times it is the procedure that delays the end of a work, or maybe the lack of one material that I would like to use. It is

This is a question that cannot be answered in a simple way. It actually has to do with both. But I am very glad that you observe the sense of unity in my work, because I challenge myself to try different topics and to use different materials. Having always the same

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important to me to be able to express exactly what I want on my paper or canvas. Only when I sign my work, I know that it is finished. Many times the work itself is telling me how to proceed with it. How do you select your subjects? In particular, do you think that there is a central idea that connects all of your work as an artist? Hmmm, interesting question. The first thing that came in my mind is No. No, there is no central idea that connects all of my work. But, with a second thought, I realized that all of the subjects that move my feelings and fuel me creatively, such as nature, human condition, global problems, history references, inner peace and so on, connect in one word. “Being”. So yes. My central idea is “being”, expressed in all the ways I have tried so far. Actually it is what motivates me to do what I do. The body of works that we have selected to this special edition of Peripheral ARTeries and that our readers have already to got to know, are in the introductory pages of this article. What has at once captured our attention of your artistic inquiry is the way you provided the visual results of your analysis with autonomous aesthetics: when walking our readers through your usual process and set up, would you tell us your sources of inspiration? If my intention was to be provocative for your readers, I could only use one word that says it all. LIFE. And then let them, interpret it in their own way. Life is the core of my inspiration. But if this one word needs to be put in more phrases, so as to describe a bit more my work, I can say that the source of my inspiration can be nature, can be a book, a melody, a song, a smell, a well cooked meal, a gesture, a happening, an experience, a travel, a feeling, the light, and simultaneously an agony, a war, a disaster, a disability, or it can easily be the absence of all the above. It is life itself with all that it includes. Anything that can strongly move or vibrate me. So, LIFE. This is the word. You are a versatile artist and in you have included unconventional materials, as olive tree leafs in Warsaw’s mermaid loves Greece. What were your aesthetic decision about this piece and in particular, what are the properties you are searching for, in the materials that you include in your materials?

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In my deep blue waters. Acrylics on paper 040x050

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Translucent was. Acrylics on paper 040x050

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Since I am from Greece, it was natural for me, to include olive tree leaves in one of my works. It was a spontaneous inspiration that surprised me more than the others. There is a cute story behind this painting that explains my choise. I was asked to prepare a small size art work as a possible wedding gift to a young couple in Poland from a good Greek friend of theirs. The bride’s life is a very interesting story, but for many reasons I do not intent to say more. This made me read a lot about Poland’s history, traditions etc, and of course of the story of Warsaw’s Mermaid. I wanted somehow to make a statement regarding the friendship between the two girls from the two different countries and at the same time to connect the two countries traditions and stories. Knowing the ancient Greek myth of gifting Athenians with an olive tree, symbol of peace and prosperity, I had the thought to include it in my work. And the outcome pleases me a lot. Some of the natural materials I use, are already dry and can stay without any changes for many years. Some others –some leafs- are fresh. When I choose the fresh ones, is when I want to observe the changes as the time goes by. To some of my works, I want to have the chance to see how time can have a dialogue with me, or the spectator. How something that shows green at first, sometime later, can gradually turn brown,or shrink, or simply disappear from the surface, leaving only a hint of its former existence. And what the reaction of the viewer will be. No matter if the viewer is someone who decided to be the owner of this piece, or if it is a piece that I keep for myself. I understand that some of the materials might look unusual, but I personaly find them necessary for the completion of the work. Your works have a seductive beauty on the surface, capable to provide the spectatorship with an immersive experience and we have really appreciated the vibrancy of thoughtful nuances of The Apple, that show that vivacious tones are not strictly indispensable to create tension and dynamics. How did you come about setting on your color palette? And how much does your own psychological make-up determine the nuances of tones you decide to use in a piece and in particular, how to you develop a texture?

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fishes on newspaper


City Angel


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City Angel. Child of War. Nothing left behind.

City Angel. Child beggar.

Marker & Acrylics on canvas 025x030

Marker & Acrylics on canvas 025x030

I prefer using vibrant, clear but cool colors. Sharp, full of light and transparency, even when they are put in thick layers. It is my personal inner pallete. It is not a matter of choise. I just feel comfortable with these tones. I suppose that everyone of us has his own color preferarnce. Exactly as taste, smell, rhythm or sound. My favorite colors are two certain tones of blue. .

point in many of my works. In some, it is repeated individualy in a more complex synthesis. Not always easy to be observed by the viewer, but it is there.

Concerning this painting, (The Apple), I can tell you that this is a very special work.

In this painting, the attention of the character is drawn to something that sees or relates to. A silent pause. The apple is not so apparent. It is somehow hidden and wait the viewer to find it, guided by the title. And then, the interpretation of the work is free for him or her. It has a lot to do with ones’ references.

What I see? What I observe? What I understand? Is the subject real? Is it all? Is there something behind of what I at first saw? Or is there something hidden? Do I see something different of what someone else sees?

It all started with an eye. An eye glued on the canvas. All the rest, was shaped, formed, developed from that and little, certain point. The eyes, the vision, physical or inner, is something that always attracts my attention. And it is a central

Despite to clear references to perceptual reality, City

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Reflection in the water. Acrylics, glued paper and gold leaf on canvas 020x020 Angel shows that your visual has a very ambivalent

The relationship between imagination and its

quality. How do you view the concepts of the real

representation on a work, operates supplementary.

and the imagined, playing out within your works?

Imagination assists representation and

How would you define the relationship between

representation strengthens the imaginative

imagination and representation in your practice?

inspiration at the same time. Primarily, it has to do

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Flowers flow. Acrylics on handmade paper glued on canvas 056x076


Pine tree in the dark. Acrylic on handmade paper glued on canvas 036x056.


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Sea creatures. Mixed media collage and painting on canvas 020x020

with the cause, the start line of the work. Then the

to believe that they will have a better job opportunity elsewhere.

skeleton, the positioning, the synthesis –in one wordof the project.

Here we have the portrait of a beautiful young woman (real person), whose facial expression is not easily explicable, it can be easily misread by the viewer. Is she welcoming you or is she pushing you away?

In this specific work, the cause was women trafficking, which in recent years is enlarging due to poverty in many countries. Women that are mislead

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My secret melody. Watercolors and pencil on paper 030x045


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A flower crown. mixed material on canvas 020x020

Symbolically she is being surrounded by an angel’s wings and the background is colored gold- symbol of wealth and glow.

and not ambivalent quality. But your definition-

In this piece, I can define the relationship between imagination and representation as a paradox unity

diverge.

description, pleases me a lot. Somehow both expressions meet. They converge. They do not

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We like the way your works address the viewers to challenge their perceptual parameters and allow an open reading, with a wide variety of associative possibilities. The power of visual arts in the contemporary age is enormous. At the same time, the role of the viewer’s disposition and attitude is equally important. Both our minds and our bodies need to actively participate in the experience of contemplating a piece of art. It demands your total attention and a particular kind of effort –it’s almost a commitment. What do you think about the role of the viewer? Are you particularly interested if you try to achieve to trigger the viewers’ perception as starting point to urge them to elaborate personal interpretations? Of course. It is absolutely important to me and I am very interested when people “translate” my work giving their own interpretation. When a spontaneous thought motivates me to create a new project, I do not at all have in mind the possible future viewer. It is only –in that moment- what I want to express, the way I want to and the way I feel. But when I exhibit this piece or when I am asked to participate in an exhibition which usually is under a specific title, then of course I am totally and absolutely interested on viewers’ interpretation. I will admit here, that I stay on the side, observing the viewers. This is part of my project. Reactions, talks, observations, interpretations have a strong impact on me. The project, the observer viewer, myself as a viewer of the space, the project and the viewer, we are included in one unity. I can feel it as a live art performance. In one of your previous questions, I have already mentioned the use of fresh leafs that gradually mature and of course, change and die. So the project, gets life and evolves simultaneously with me. I feel very satisfied and happy that you have distinguished this quality in my work. Over these years your works have been showcased in several occasions, including your recent participation to MEDfaces expo de Rostres at MHIC (Museu d’historia de la immigracio de Catalunya). One of the hallmarks of your practice is the capability to create direct involvement with the viewers, who are urged to evolve from a condition of mere spectatorship. So before

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April. Mixed media collage and acrylics on canvas 020x020

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leaving this conversation we would like to pose a question about the nature of the relationship of your art with your audience. Do you consider the issue of audience reception as being a crucial component of your decision-making process, in terms of what type of language is used in a particular contex? To be totally honest, No. Most certainly, I am sincerely interested –as I have already mentioned before-, of the viewers reaction, and even more when I realize that one of my works have attracted his attention, his interest or feeling, his acceptance and of course his personal choise. But what interests me the most, what characterizes me, is the fact that what I want is for myself to be sincere, honest and consistent when I create something. With any of the expressive means that I use. And of course to be free to follow or break some academic rules. The core of it all, is there. I put my truth in and during my work. Weather someone favors it or not. I cannot do differently. Thanks a lot for your time and for sharing your thoughts Elena. Finally would you like to tell us readers something about your future projects? How do you see your work evolving? The pleasure is all mine. Yes, of course. So far, working mostly on small pieces I have been practicing different techniques on color and scheme details. Discipline, a lot of patience and caring attention were imperative. My next step towards painting is to start working again on bigger scale projects. I think that this will free my hand, my expression, my brushstrokes. Apart from that, I intent to go back to school again for mosaic or pottery classes. It is such a blessing that Art lessons never end.

An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator peripheral.arteries@europe.com

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Handmade paper mix with white & red feathers. 020x028

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Kyle Stockford Lives and works in Boston, Massachusetts, USA


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Peripheral ARTeries meets

Kyle Stockford Lives and works in Boston, Massachusetts, USA Kyle Stockford is a Boston Based painter studying at Massachusetts College of Art and design under Professor Peter Wayne Lewis. Kyle uses a vast array if different mark-making to create many microhappenings within the surface. Kyle creates compositions apart from the status quo through abstraction.

An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator

Art and Design under Professor Peter Wayne Lewis. How does this experience influence the way you currently conceive and produce your works?

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Rejecting any conventional classification regarding its style, Kyle Stockford's work draws the viewers through an unconventional and multilayered experience. The central theme of his work is the exploration of the relationships that form between collage, painting and drawing and in his body of works that we'll be discussing in the following pages he accomplishes the difficult task of exciting the observers to motivate their imagination to create personal associations: we are very pleased to introduce our readers to Stockford's stimulating and multifaceted artistic production.

MassArt has provided me with a rich experience in observational as well a nonrepresentational drawing, painting, and printmaking. Two years painting from observation left me feeling empty to be quite honest, I would work nonrepresentational outside of school, trying to figure out another realm of painting. I felt as though I was searching for something, I did not know what, however, I knew would discover somthing more with tenacity and growth. So i worked on about 45 paintings no one ever saw, I didn’t want anyone to see this work, it was for me. Junior year i got my studio and began to study under Professor Lewis i really started to work, i decided i would buy 50 yards of raw canvas, i created the paintings before i could stretch them over a wooden frame. I finally felt free. I continued to to work on another 25 paintings or so, only 6 made it to

Hello Kyle and welcome to Peripheral ARTeries: we would start this interview with a couple of questions about your background. You have a solid formal training and you are currently pursuing your BFA at the Massachusetts College of

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our attention for the way you have provided the results of your artistic inquiry with autonomous aesthetics: when walking our readers through your usual process and set up? In particular, how much everyday life's experience does fuel your creativity?

critique. The most vital piece of advice Peter gave me that semester was to experiment, that moment was wehn i understood why the painting studio was called “The Lab”. I told myself “if I don’t try it i am never going to know what that mark or that stoke could of done”.

I start working as soon as I get to the studio, whether or not i'm actually painting, just having a conversation with myself about what worked, and what didn’t, and why? Asking myself questions about the last session helps me get focused and realize what's going to be important today.

The results of your artistic inquiry reject any conventional classification, still convey a consistent sense of unity: before starting to elaborate about your production, we would suggest to our readers to visit https://www.kylestockford.com in order to get a synoptic view of your multifaceted artistic production: while walking our readers through your process, we would like to ask you if you think that there is a central idea that connects all of your work as an artist.

Creativity, i don't like that word, i guess i should uhm. Well more influential than anything to me is the words and works of other artists from Raschemburg to my studio mates. Artists are my main source of inspiration.

I’d say the main element or idea that connects my work is controlled chaos. When I’m in the first stages of a painting there is mostly just pandemonium, when things seem just out of control. There is a lot of energy in the work at first, its glorious, and hard to preserve that energy through the last couple of stages when i organize, edit, add, and subtract. My use of mixed media certainly connects all of my pieces; almost every piece in my recent collection includes acrylic paint, charcoal, collaged paper, and oil pastel.

Your insightful inquiry into the relationships that form between collage, painting and drawing reveals that you are a versatile artist capable of capture the creative potential of a wide variety of media: what are the qualities that you are searching for in the materials and the techniques that you combine in your works? All of the materials i use in my paintings handled very literally, the paint is dripping, the collage evokes a paper texture, the charcoal also is applied blatantly. I guess what i'm trying to convey is that the materials are applied just as they are. I use a lot of clothing patterns, a blueprint for a piece of clothing. Although the pieces of

The body of works that we have selected for this special edition of Peripheral ARTeries and that our readers have already started to get to know in the introductory pages of this article has at once captured

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translucent paper i utilize can often can transformed to be are a color, line, and or another layer of the painting. As you have remarked in your artist's statement, multiple layers of paint and college give you the freedom to add and subtract until the work you feel whole: How much importance does play spontaneity in your work? In particular, do you conceive you works instinctively or do you methodically elaborate your pieces? Spontaneity is huge, at first. Most of my work has five or six layers of addition and subtraction of painting, drawing and collage, nothing really happens in the first couple layers unless i am spontaneous. We all have those days when we really don't feel like putting in hours in the studio, that's when the spontaneity comes in. Just lay a canvas down and experiment, try something completely new, I believe it's important for me to be spontaneous in the first couple of layers because as the paintings build up there isn't so much room for grand gestures anymore. As the painting gets tighter i get more methodical and thoughtful about what my next move is. We have really appreciated the vibrancy of thoughtful nuances of your pieces, that as PaintWithMe, shows that vivacious tones are not strictly indispensable to create tension and dynamics. How did you come about settling on your color palette? And how much does your own psychological make-up determine the nuances of tones you decide to use in a piece and in

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particular, how do you develop a painting’s

My palette is almost always mixed, nothing

texture?

really comes straight out of the tube.

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Professor Stuart Diamond taught me alot

interact with one another. I don't plan to

about color and texture, and how they

use my most admired colors but more

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often than not my paintings consist of my

subconscious. Grey, Blue, Black, and

personal favorite colors. I guess it's

White. I think it's vital for a viewer to be

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paint is fantastic! The Storm is a reflection Brant Rock, Massachusetts in particular a blizzard in January of 2015, named Juno. I was raised in Brant Rock MA, our house just a few feet from the water during these blizzards, its vicious to say the least, so i thought it was important for me to be more painterly and guestural while still trying to evoke a feeling of connection to place, time and the storm that shook New England that year. Your artwork are pervaded with images rich with symbolic features, as Banana 55 and Antenna. German multidisciplinary artist Thomas Demand once stated that "nowadays art can no longer rely so much on symbolic strategies and has to probe psychological, narrative elements within the medium instead". What is your opinion about it? Morever, how would you describe your personal iconography and what is the importance of symbols in your imagery? I do not think its always necessary for a painting to tell a story or have a special psychological meaning within a piece. Paintings with a narrative can add to the meaning or the reason the work became, but it won't win against a well formulated painting. I used a lot of different gestures, different types of mark making, slight color shifts, also perspective and color to add a spatial dynamic. I have a bag of tricks or a book of drawings, whatever you want to call it there are shapes, forms, lines, and colors that reoccur within each painting that i would consider signature to my work. These are essential parts of my

able to feel the viscosity of the paint without actually touching the work so i cut it with water to thin and gel medium to thicken. While referring to reality, The Storm conveys such captivating abstract feeling: how do you view the concepts of the real and the imagined playing out within your works? The juxtaposition between photos as collage embedded in the expressiveness of

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paintings because of how they play off each other.

sense, you seem to urge the viewers to

We like the way your artworks, rather than attempting to establish any univocal

you tell us how much important is for you

elaborate personal associations: would

that the spectatorship rethink the

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Port au prince, installation , West End Gallery, 2015

concepts you convey in your pieces, elaborating personal meanings?

another element, or a new mark in my

I found a stamp in the garbage one day and i thought this could be excellent as

quality of the pressed stamp against wet

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work. I liked the idea of the strict line paint, you know there are just some marks

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you cannot make with a paint brush. I stamped into PaintWithMe it turned out to work great but it said “Paid” and Professor Lewis agreed that this would raise questions. Don’t get me wrong i admire when a painting practically forces you to ask questions but i had no direct association to what the stamp said and felt like it was false in that sense.

mind when working, my dad always told me “don’t let people rent space in your head”.

Over the years your works have been exhibited in several occasions, including your recent participation to “Moving Parts” an Exhibition at the Post Office Gallery, North Truro MA. One of the hallmarks of your work is the capability to create a direct involvement with the viewers, who are urged to evolve from a condition of mere spectatorship. So before leaving this conversation we would like to pose a question about the nature of the relationship of your art with your audience. Do you consider the issue of audience reception as being a crucial component of your decision-making process, in terms of what type of language is used in a particular context?

Yes, and thank you for your time and these thought provoking questions. The Storm and my largest work to date (untitled) will be on display at The Velir Corporation in Somerville MA for a month or so. It's very difficult to predict when it comes to the work evolving, because i didn't think i would be painting what i'm painting two years ago, it’s always surprising what happens in the studio. I would like to see my work grow in size, but i think that would mean my studio would have to too. In the near future i will graduate from Massachusetts College of Art and Design and apply to graduate school to earn an MFA.

I am just in the beginning of a long life of being an artist, i need feedback and value critique, it's all necessary to my growth as an painter. It’s an accomplishment to have an audience, i am so thankful every viewer that has stood in front of one of my works, but thinking about other people seeing your work can alter your state of mind and your work. When I am in the studio i try not to think about myself, an audience, or upcoming exhibitions mainly because it can affect my decision making during a painting. Its fundamental to have a clear

An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator

Thanks alot for your time and for sharing your thoughts, Kyle. Finally, would you like to tell us readers something about your future projects? How do you see your work evolving?

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Peripheral ARTeries meets

Revital Lessick Lives and works in Tel Aviv, Israel

An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Katherine Williams, curator

were preoccupied with issues that bothered me. Together we could develop an artistic discourse.

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The studies enabled me to expand my areas of thought in the art world, and promoted my work significantly.

Hello Revital and welcome to Peripheral ARTeries. We would start this interview with a couple of questions about your multifaceted background. You have a solid formal training and you degreed with a Master of Arts in the Track of Integration of Arts in Education, from Lesley College. You later nurtured your education with a M.F.A. that you received from the University of Haifa: how did these experiences, along with your participation to the artist workshop "Pyramid" influence the way you currently conceive and produce your works?

Learning at the Leslie College allowed me to see art not only as a means of personal expression, but as an educational tool that could open new worlds for children. Meanwhile, I had a studio in the Artists' workshop "Pyramid", where I obtained experience in curatorship and teamwork. The results of your artistic inquiry convey a coherent sense of unity that rejects any conventional classification. We would suggest to our readers that they visit http://lrevital.com in order to get a synoptic view of your work. While walking our readers through your usual process and setup, can you tell them

Over the years I have learned quite a bit. My master's degree at the University of Haifa allowed me to meet artists who

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something about the evolution of your style? In particular, do you think that there is a central idea that connects all of your work as an artist?

is a description of the struggle for survival as a woman. The violent survival atmosphere that characterizes life in my country, undoubtedly influences the considerable violence in the drawings.

My work usually stems from an emotional place. It is influenced by two main factors: One: My childhood experiences. I grew up in a small town in Israel called Afula. My father was a forester, and the forest was an important place in my life as a child. It was where my father spent a long time, taking care of the integrity of every tree. The forest was the place that intrigued me, where my father would disappear for hours at a time. As an artist the forest and the dark / funny creatures therein, is a recurring motif in my oil and drawing works.

These days, the drawing language allows me to create an installation in display spaces. It allows me to create "Sight Specific", that responds to a given space.

Another source of inspiration is daily life. I react - especially in drawing - about what I'm going through.

For this special edition of Peripheral ARTeries we have selected The Dream, an extremely interesting video animation project that our readers have already started to get to know in the introductory pages of this article. What has at once captured our attention of your inquiry into the story of a woman and her struggle in life is the way you provided the visual results of your analysis with autonomous aesthetics: when walking our readers through the genesis of The Dream would you tell us your sources of inspiration? And what did address you to focus on this theme?

My artistic way began with painting oil on canvas. I used small, general sketches as a draft for large paintings. Over time I noticed that the little sketches have their own power. So I began to develop a new language - drawing. I created worlds from small figures. The common denominator of many of these drawings

The main motivation for creating the animation came from the drawings themselves. I felt that the worlds that I was creating from the little characters wanted to get a life and move on their own. And so I hooked up with my son Ido Back, who is an illustrator, a graduate of "Bezalel" Academy of Art

The forest represents, for me, a place of subconscious. But also a reflection of Haifa, the city where I live today.

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and Design, and we started to build the animation together. The narrative of the animation describes a complete journey of life, summarized into images and symbols. Here too, as in drawings and paintings, the forest appears. The animation character goes to search for her dog in the forest. The starting point in the story is the safe and comfortable place. The character walks to the beach. She enjoys the sound of the waves and the pleasant sun, and nothing threatens her. Then comes the crisis: her favorite dog, whom she thought, loved her and believed in her, he being an important part of her world, disappeared and fled. She is forced to plunge into the subconscious (the forest) to seek an answer in the depths of her soul, and when it seems that she is almost lost in herself, suddenly salvation comes in the form of the eagle that saves her. The Eagle may represent the active side of her and the passion for life, or perhaps a divine providence. It is not really clear whether this is salvation or accompaniment to another world. In any case it is a refuge from pain and loss. She ascends to high spheres, reaches deep insights, and disconnects for a while from earthly and everyday life. But not for long, because eventually

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After the storyboard was ready, we started working on the animation (Ido and I). It was hard and long work. Ido studied the motion of the characters and objects in the drawing, and translated it into innumerable drawings by the "classical animation" method. Although the animation length is only about two minutes, it consists of more than two thousand drawings. The Dream is rich with high symbolic values: as you remarked once, the animal is like a mirror, that enables observing, through a private mythology. What is your opinion about the importance of symbols in your practice? And in particular how did you conceive the narrative and especially the visual unity for this captivating work? One of the most prominent points in the animation is the transition between different environments. she lands back on earth, her life suddenly understood in a new way. She opens her eyes - literally. Her dog is coming back, what she lost is coming back in another way. She must now see reality in a new way. Was all she had been through a dream? Or until the crisis happened, had she lived in a delusional and dreamy reality?

At first the figure is in an open place, after that she moves to the place that closes in on her, and then she is released again by force of gravity to a boundless place, and once again falls (gently) to the land. The transition between the different spaces represents different levels of 73

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consciousness, and also builds on my anxieties - like claustrophobia.

Haifa is a city built on the Carmel Forest, the search in the forest is not entirely imaginary either.

However, some of the environments in which the character operates are not imaginary. The trip with the dog is real. I really do walk with the dog on the beach of my hometown, and since

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other ones that comes from imagination: how do you consider the relationship between imagination and reality within your work?

back on it, and draw reality from memory. My perception of art is not very different from the "giant" Gauguin. My painting comes from looking out at the world around me, but when I draw, I am faithful to a new world of pictorial reality. I allow myself to distort reality

I used to read about Paul Gauguin, who said that in his opinion a painter should look at the reality, and then turn his 75

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as necessary, and devote myself to the canvas or to the paper.

artist Gabriel Orozco once stated, "the artist’s role differs depending on which part of the world you’re in. It depends on the political system you’re living under". Not to mention that almost everything, ranging from Caravaggio's Inspiration of Saint Matthew to Joep van Lieshout's works, could be

You work seems to convey such subtle socio political criticism, focussing on the dilemmas that women are exposed to, in a society, that is controlled by the masculine point of view. Mexican

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considered political, do you think that your work could be considered political in a certain sense? Moreover,

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what could be in your opinion the role of Art in the contemporary age?

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I agree with the idea that any work of art can be considered political. The artists are part of the community, and their work is influenced by life, by the decisions of the government, and by social problems. Their work of art is not created in laboratory conditions, they are influenced by politics. Therefore they are political – one way or another.

My starting point for the work, as I have already mentioned, is emotional, but the creative process leads me many times to express a social opinion. The women in my drawings raise a sword and fight not because they are strong; I give them strength that they do not have in reality. I see this as a 81

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symbol of the struggle of every weak group in my country or in the world.

not a heavy feeling. I work with many thin layers of oil paint, sometimes almost erasing the painting with another layer of white paint, and starting from the beginning. I do not aspire to do realistic painting. I emphasize the expression and atmosphere that the portrait radiates.

Art in the contemporary era is a voice, a protest, a language, which is supposed to be free of all restrictions and prohibitions. Art should burst out from the boundaries of the museum and the "polite" gallery, and make its presence felt in the streets, on the walls of buildings and in the gardens.

In the paintings of forests and nature I sometimes draw from a photograph, but over time I leave it and let the color, composition and borders of the canvas dictate the nature of the place painted.

You seem to draw a lot from direct experience: with a consistent focus on the theme of women, as the ones from your interesting Portraits series reveals a marked capability of capturing with apparent minimalism both the ideas that you explore and the stories you tell in your paintings. How much importance does play direct experience in your creative process? Do you spend a lot of time exploring the places that we can admire in your paintings or do you rather instantly capture their spirit?

Even in this case the process is slow. I can work days, weeks and even months on one canvas. In the ending lines of your artist's statement, you have remarked that although you refer to feminism through your private life, you don’t see yourself as a feminist artist: do you think that your being a woman provides your artistic research with some special value?

The process of painting for the oil paintings is relatively long. In the feminine portrait series, I investigated my face with a mirror and a camera. At first I clung to the features of the face, and then freed myself from the limits of resemblance to my face. My goal in painting is, that at the end of the process, there will be an airy and

Despite all the declarations that all art is political, I want to think that when I approach the canvas, I am as free from previous statements and opinions as to what I am. I would like to think that every time I recreate myself. Of course it is not possible, because I am who I am.

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I am a woman, who has lived through pains and joys, and I have my own opinions. However, feminism is a limiting concept, and I do not consider myself a feminist artist. My opinions and work are not bound by this concept. Of course, the fact that I am a woman provides my work with a certain value. If I were a man, I would certainly have dealt with other issues and from a completely different perspective :) How do you go about naming your work? In particular, is important for you to tell something that might walk the viewers through their visual experience? In the past, I avoided giving my work a name. I thought it limited the viewer's imagination, and in doing so I forced my ideas on him. Today I think that when I do not give a name to the work I evade responsibility, and I do not commit myself to what happens on the canvas. It's okay not to always know what the name is. But you should understand that this is a kind of evasion. If a painting, or any kind of art is a kind of communication, a sound, then the viewer, with whom I try to communicate, should understand more

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Port au prince, installation , West End Gallery, 2015

perhaps it should illuminate the work a

Over the years your works have been

bit.

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hallmarks of your work is its ability to create a direct involvement with the viewers, who are urged to evolve from a condition of mere spectatorship. So before leaving this conversation we would like to pose a question about the nature of the relationship of your art with your audience. Do you consider the issue of audience reception a crucial component of your decision-making process, in terms of what type of language you use in a particular context? This is an interesting question, which still does not have a fully consolidated response. From the beginning of the creative process, I have certain people in my head, with whom I would like to correspond. I "talk" with them during the creative process. Sometimes it's a conversation with my father, who is no longer alive. Sometimes I talk to colleagues.

Today in the age of social networking, there is a danger that the "likes" may disrupt the artist's judgment, and make him want to flatter the audience. I'm really trying to make sure that it does not affect my new direction of development.

I can use symbols in the painting, which I know, only those certain people will understand, and the wider audience will not notice their existence, and will understand the work on a different level. It's fine with me. Beyond that, I do not think the audience has any importance in my decision-making.

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An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Katherine Williams, curator peripheral.arteries@europe.com

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Uwe Heine Debrodt Lives and works in Mexico city

System Failure. Gif https://giphy.com/gifs/3o6ZtpVUsAXLebHb8c


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Uwe Heine Debrodt Lives and works in Mexico city Rejecting any conventional classification regarding its style, Uwe Heine Debrodt's work draws the viewers through an unconventional and multilayered experience. In her work Fotosintetico that we'll be discussing in the following pages he accomplished an insightful inquiry into the photosynthetic process. One of the most impressive aspects of Debrodt's work is the way it accomplishes the difficult task of emulating the organic structures tha can support life: we are very pleased to introduce our readers to his stimulating and multifaceted artistic production.

An interview by Josh Ryders, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator

subatomics, was where I learned that the microcosmic world was actually a macrocosmic world.

peripheral.arteries@europe.com

Later I acquire some analogue synthesizers and begin to experiment with the sounds and frequencies generating surroundings relationated to the nature, mixing them in occasions with electronic sequences giving as a result a very experimental sound, getting to play live in cultural centers like Museo Tamayo, Laboratorio arte alameda, ex teresa arte actual and many other cultural centers. In most of these concerts there were Vjs that mixed the sound work with images, however I wasn't satisfied with the projections they did or I imagine other type of images, in that moment I decided to experiment with the video and started studying by myself about softwares for the production, edition and the creation of 3D environments. All of this process of learning and audiovisual experimentation takes around 10 years since my first video art project was in 2007.

Hello Uwe and welcome to ART Habens: we would start this interview with a couple of questions about your multifaceted background. You have a solid formal in Chemistry and you later attended UNAM workshops at the academy of San Carlos: how do these experiences influence the way you currently conceive and produce your works? My studies in the school of chemistry, were essential as they gave me a scientific perspective towards the elements and the origin of nature. The subjects that attracted me the most were microbiology and cellular physiology in which we use the laboratory´s microscopes. I found it really amazing to watch this microuniverse with it´s shapes, structures, etc. Each part inside it´s physiology has a specific mechanism so everything can have an absolute order just as it is the nature. Another subject I study ¨raw material structure¨ is about the atomic particles -

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About the workshops in the academy of San Carlos and other cultural centers, they have not impacted me deeply in my work at the

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production level because I knew my plastic and visual path, however they have been really important to have some level of knowledge and technique. The results of your artistic inquiry convey together a coherent sense of unity, that rejects any conventional classification. Before starting to elaborate about your production, we would suggest to our readers to visit http://www.visionorganica.com in order to get a synoptic view of your multifaceted artistic production: while walking our readers through your process, we would like to ask you if you think that there is a central idea that connects all of your work as an artist. All these experiences of study planted an idea about what I wanted to show in my piece that was to emulate organic forms and structures in nature that replicate from the micro to the macro and everything it represents like the golden mean that connects these universes. An important pillar in me are the sacred geometries and hermetic symbols, I am amazed by the knowledge and wisdom that some ancient civilizations had. So I link either by traditional means painting - Sculpture and technological media audio-video. A style focused on these ideas. My way of working is that I can be modeling a sculpture, but while I mold it there can be an idea about an audiovisual project or a sound and vice versa, so I connect these arts and I develop them together, each with the possibilities of each area. For this special edition of ART Habens we have selected Fotosintetico, an intresting project that our readers have already started to admire in the introductory pages of this article. What has at once captured our attention of this captivating transdisciplinary research project about the magical chemistry of the

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photosynthetic process is the way you provided the visual results of your analysis with autonomous aesthetics. Would you tell us something about the genesis of Fotosintetico?

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How did you developed the main idea and what was the most challenging step of the process?

of life. From any point of view, scientific or spiritual is fascinating. I always wanted to develop a work that explored this photosynthetic process and the properties of plants from medicinal to psychotropic.

The process of photosynthesis seems to me as one of the most fantastic and magical processes

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On the other hand I feel an absolute sadness and discomfort with the devastation of the environment, the jungles and forests that are being destroyed in a disproportionate way changing the planet's balance.

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I had to unite these thoughts into one work. So I try to make it extremely visual and attractive to the viewer full of colors and sounds showing in a surreal way this series of processes. And at

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microscope that sees all this magic. So at first I experienced a lot with renders and video editing until it was taking shape little by little. When I Finish the video process I started with the music, Add a sound environment of the jungle, which was perfect with the video and later the synthesizers and electronic sequences. The process from start to finish was about 3 months. The most complicated part was that I did not have a computer powerful enough for this type of work and was very slow the process of rendering and visual experimentation We like the way Fotosintetico accomplishes the difficult task of to enhacing awareness about keeping the balance in every level of life: could you comment this aspect of your work? In the audiovisual work I manage images by their colors forms and movements so this could arise a mystical idea, an astral or shamanic journey by ingestion of sacred plants next to the frequencies that exist in the jungle, the viewer visualize the magic that exists In nature and in the end the message that I am trying to generate is an awareness of what is happening in the world, that imbalance of our environment, that perfect balance of life is gradually destroyed until it becomes irreversible. I think that the damage to the environment is proportional to the apathy of people, since that spiritual contact is being lost with the awareness of nature, which is fundamental, because we are part of it. And without it we would not exist. A global consciousness is urgent.

the same time raise awareness of this global problem.

Nowadays people prefer to spend most of the time with addictive technologies or shopping malls consuming excessively, gradually dehumanized and desensitized until arriving at

I wanted to show visually from inside of the plant, as it breathes and transforms, like a

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a total indifference to spiritual balance. This work is about reflection. Fotosintetico also offer an open reading and also unveil the channel of communication between the conscious level and the subconscious sphere. Are you particularly interested if you try to achieve to trigger the viewers' perception as a starting point to urge them to elaborate personal interpretations? Photosynthetic along with other audiovisual works that I have always tried to awaken that subconscious level in the viewer with the symbols, colors, shapes, geometries and sound environments trying to connect with our natural roots and see another perspective of a reality that maybe the Spectator is not familiar with, but that is attracted by the theme or as it is taking the rhythm of the audiovisual work to a more spiritual or surreal trip. Each viewer has his own point of view, and it is interesting when I ask people who observe it because they sometimes visualize something that I had not noticed or other ideas but almost everytime in the same syntony. The sculptures that I am making today and the organic forms that I make, show the viewer a harmony with nature, many of the people who see them want to touch them to have a tactile feeling. I'm on a sound project with some musician friends called Apeiron 432 which is a mix of electroacoustic music - experimental electronics, the sound work is remastered at 432Hz *. People who hear it feel a state of hypnotic relaxation. So I try to make the work seek that subconscious connection to a deeper perception. * 432 Hertz vibrates in the beginning of the gold media PHI, unifies the properties of the light, time, space, matter, gravity, the magnetism of the biology, DNA code and the conscience. The natural tuning to LA 432 Hz has deep effects in

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the consciousness, and in the cellular level of our body too. Your work also highlights how the impetuous way modern technology has came out on the top has dramatically revolutionized our lifes as well as the idea of Art itself. We daresay that new media will

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soon fill the apparent dichotomy between art and technology, to assimilate one to each other: what's your opinion about the relationship between Art production and Technology?

Technology is very important for production in all spheres of art, and new technology is being incorporated every time. The artist must always be studying the management of software to have the tools and the technique to be able to improve his work and express it

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properly, always trying to experiment and innovate.

must maintain that caution between the middle and the end

However, technology is only a tool and does not solve all the technical or training voids. I think that in some cases this has been abused, leading to works without spirit or value. So we

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Fotosintetico provides the viewers with an immersive and multilayered experience: how

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However, there is a lack of cultural initiation in order to appreciate and value artistic works. There is a lot of work without any value in the large platforms of video. The internet is full of this type of audiovisual work, meaningless, and the public who access these, think they have some kind of merit. That is why public spaces are important to exhibit the works, where the people can appreciate and approach them. Multidisciplinary artist Angela Bulloch onced remarked "that works of arts often continue to evolve after they have been realised, simply by the fact that they are conceived with an element of change, or an inherent potential for some kind of shift to occur". Technology can be used to create innovative works, but innovation means not only to create works that haven't been before, but especially to recontextualize what already exists: do you think that the role of the artist has changed these days with the new global communications and the new sensibility created by new media? The artist today has to be multidisciplinary and acknowledge how to take advantage of current technology in order to give more strength to his work, I think the artist has to be committed to awakening a certain degree of awareness oriented to the changes that are happening on our planet and that his Work maintains the critical balance with aesthetics. As technology advances, there are new elements that multiply artistic possibilities, technology is rising to a new language with its own beauty and obviously nourished with all previous languages, allowing the possibility of reinterpreting an existing work and giving it a new orientation Which may differ from the original work. The art had been or is focused according to its culture, at the moment with a more globalized culture is more universal the

do you see the relationship between public sphere and the role of art in public space? Art in general has to be accessible to all the public regardless of age or socioeconomic levels. Since art is directed to the essence of human nature, sensitizing the viewer.

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artistic language but it runs the risk that the art becomes superfluous and disposable since a society oriented to the consumption is a society oriented to waste.

Do you consider the issue of audience reception as being a crucial component of your decision-making process, in terms of what type of language is used in a particular context?

Over the years your works have been internationally showcased in several occasions, including participation to festivals in Argentina, Austria, Brazil, Ecuador, France, Germany, Greec , Italy, Mexico, Spain and Peru: one of the hallmarks of your work is the capability to create a direct involvement with the viewers, who are urged to evolve from a condition of mere spectatorship. So before leaving this conversation we would like to pose a question about the nature of the relationship of your art with your audience.

I think that my work in the places that has been exposed has a similar impact since plastic & audiovisual ideas are of a broad spectrum in the global culture, on one side the forms and colors of nature are within our consciousness of humanity And can be perceived similarly anywhere, also much of the current problems are common in various regions of the planet. I have used the sound environments as the only language in the projects I have done, so

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when I do an audiovisual work the sound part is as important as the visual part. Thanks a lot for your time and for sharing your thoughts, Uwe. Finally, would you like to tell us readers something about your future projects? How do you see your work evolving? At the moment I am in an audiovisual project called consume-consumer. The central idea is the criticism of the mass media for its propaganda to a consumerism of supply from any point that is seems, that becomes swaying and how corporations handle us to buy their products. The consumer buys without thinking about the repercussions that can generate his way in which consumes. There is no education or orientation to consume properly and intelligently. Much of the problem of deforestation and global pollution is due to this. I continue to study and experiment with new 3D environments software with particle and render systems that are impressive. So I want my ideas on my organic theme to be more visually attractive without forgetting the thematic issues of global pollution and destruction of the environment. I am very involved in ceramic sculpture, in the modeling of textures emulating surfaces and organic forms, with the oxides & pigments and learning new techniques of burning in the furnace as is raku ceramics. Follow my experiments with digital images and visual platforms such as Gif's An interview by Josh Ryders, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator peripheral.arteries@europe.com

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Rashmi Agarwal A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step Artist Rashmi Agarwal, Founder and Chairperson of the Qatar based Art Community-MAPS, living in the State of Qatar since 2004. She is the Community Instructor in Virginia Common Wealth University-(VCU), Qatar for Silk Painting. She is the Board member of Silk Painters International- SPIN, USA. Art is her first love. She uses all kinds of surface design techniques in her work like Dyes, Paints, block printing and materials like textile paint, ink, and fusible web. Since child- hood, she has been highly engaged in visual art. Having groomed up in an educated background with learned parents, silk painting, to her, represents meditation and very near to God and nature. She is a experienced master artist whose work gets consistently better from one painting to the next to rely on inspiration is to starve. She wants to do a timeless collection. That’s got nothing to do with the season, or get defined by trends. “she is not bound by rules”. On the creation of her latest silk painting, an art she looks at as something spiritual than aesthetic, a passion than a profession. “When colour spreads on the soft silk beautifully, something is coming out of your soul,” she explains. She is also interested in how art communities can use web tools to better promote themselves, and would be committed to building on your existing platform. She analyse every design she make to ensure it is the best it can be. Artists need to have an intuition and eye for design that cannot always be taught and to be a successful artist and designer, fashion has to be your lifestyle. She has always been motivated by the challenge of meeting a tough deadline. Over the years, Agarwal’s proficiency in multiple styles of hand-made silk painting has established her as Qatar’s foremost silk artist, attested in no small measure by the upper echelons of Qatari society and a long line of art connoisseur expats, all of who have bought her diverse works that traverse nuanced painting and calligraphy with equal ease.

The founder of Qatar-based art community MAPS or Middle-East Art and Silk Painters, didn’t really have to exit her comfort zone and switch to an entirely new territory of silk art. But she did, and successfully so. “The moment I touch my colour- dipped brush on a piece of silk, I can feel that passion rising in me,” she says, gently tapping her forearm with her fingers, “The beautiful fluidity of the dye colours is such that you feel like you just can’t stop painting. The moment your brush touches silk, the colour flows and dances across the cloth. It’s mesmerising beyond words.” Agarwal grew up in Kolkata, racking up degrees in Economics and Finance that had nothing to do with art. Destiny rewarded her effort. She lives in Doha, the capital city of Qatar. It is the wild beauty of her surroundings that inspires her silk painting. She grew up in India and has been creative since childhood, drawings, paintings and other art activities among others. She enjoys creative adventures, including oil painting and stained glass art, a display artist, an interior designer, a copy writer, and a song writer. Painting on silk, colour and detail, are her passions. She really enjoys the freedom of the silk colours as it stimulates her imagination and offers so many exciting possibilities. She believes each has something precious and special to give to all of us and each painting is a tribute to these amazing creatures, where she strive to capture their essence. Many of the paintings she paints have a spiritual quality with the power to heal hearts and spirits, if one is open to their message. All her art says some story and she believes that good art asks more questions than it answers. And so it is often in this clash between the architecture of man and the architecture of nature , where I gain most of my artistic inspiration. It is where the most compelling questions can be asked, and where the stories I wish my art to tell can most often be found. It is adorable to see Rashmi at work; each stroke is the baton of a master conductor, harmonizing every aspect of her designs, patterns, textures, and colours, are all united to create a masterpiece. She adds: "With my art, i am giving a part of me.”


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Rashmi Agarwal Lives and works in Qatar

Artist Rashmi Agarwal produces captivating mixed media artworks that provide the viewers with a multilayered experience. Agarwal's practice is focussed on the Silk and its Art. We are very pleased to introduce our readers to Rashmi Agarwal's stimulating and multifaceted artistic production.

An interview by Josh Ryders, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator

As a President of MAPS Qatar, MAPS is an organization that is helping many budding artists as well as famous artists as a platform to pursue their dreams. What really made you initiate such a non-profit organization? Qatar is a country with a rich culture. It has a lots of potential for art. It is one of the most beautiful countries that provides many platforms for budding and professional artists to pursue their dreams. There are many people with hidden talents, I am facilitating them an engaging arena to expose their capabilities in art.

peripheral.arteries@europe.com

Hello Rashmi and welcome to Peripheral ARTeries: before starting to elaborate about your artistic production would you like to tell us something about your background? You are the founder and Chairperson of the Qatar based Art Community-MAPS, living in the State of Qatar since 2004. You are also the Community Instructor in Virginia Common Wealth University: how do these experiences influence your evolution as an artist? And in particular, how does your cultural substratum inform the way you relate yourself to art making?

Your approach is very personal and your technique condenses a variety of viewpoints, that you combine together into a coherent balance. We would suggest to our readers to visit https://oystersilkart.com in order to get a synoptic view of your work: in the meanwhile, would you tell us if you think that there is a central idea that connects all of your work as an artist?

Thank you for everything. Art was my ďŹ rst love. Since child- hood, I been highly engaged in visual arts. As a true artist who bring trained and experienced master and whose work gets consistently better from one period to the next to rely on inspiration is to starve.

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Yes its true. I work on different techniques and different patterns but all leads to one point thats ART TO SEE and ART TO FEEL. an art she looks at

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as something spiritual than aesthetic, a passion

your soul,� I feel. I feel near to God-the Supreme

than a profession. “When colour spreads on the

Power.

soft silk beautifully, something is coming out of

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The body of works that we have selected for this

introductory pages of this article has at once

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captured our attention for the way you provided

our readers have already started to admire in the

the visual results of your analysis with

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autonomous aesthetics: would you like to tell to

your main sources of inspiration?

our readers something about your process and set up? In particular, would you shed light to

I feel Spiritual and medicated when i paint. I

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always believe that when someone sees my painting after waking up or any time, they feel energetic and with positive vives.

Art has to be my lifestyle. As you have remarked once, the moment you touch your colours - dipped brush on a piece of silk, you can feel that passion rising in yourself: what significance have for you the colors that you use? Do you expect the viewers to react in a

I am a blessed child and have an intuition and eye for art that cannot always be taught and to be a successful artist and designer, passion towards

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specific way?

As i said before also that “The moment I touch my colour- dipped brush on a piece of silk, I can

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feel that passion rising in me,” she says, gently tapping her forearm with her fingers, “The beautiful fluidity of the dye colours is such that you feel like you just can’t stop painting. The moment my brush touches silk, the colour flows

and dances across the cloth.The Silk Colours meaningfully dances on the silk with no theme but with great inspirational and exciting to not only me but also to the viewers. They feel very positive and inspired after seeing my Art. They

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Port au prince, installation , West End Gallery, 2015

all feel as if its made for themselves only. They feel COMPLETE.

point to urge them to elaborate personal interpretations?

Your works are riches with symbols: are you particularly interested if you try to achieve to trigger the viewers' perception as starting

I believe each has something precious and special to give to all of us and each Art is a tribute to these amazing creatures, where I

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from a medium to another and over the years you have used all kinds of surface design techniques including dyes, paints, block printing and materials like textile paint, ink, and fusible web. What are the qualities that you are searching for in the materials that you

strive to capture their essence. Many of the Art i paint have a spiritual quality with the power to heal hearts and spirits, if one is open to their message. You are a versatile artist, capable of crossing

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include in your works? And in particular, when do you recognize that one of the mediums has exhausted it expressive potential to self? I am very optimistic towards everything in my life. I create joy through small moments. Through a visualizing technique,I pay attention to client's ideas and desires and also i feel for the things they dont tell me. What they want is usually in between. Then by close my eyes and in a spiritual minutes, hours, days etc , the entire painting visualized in my mind as it will look when it's finished. Then i create an Art with that dream and idea with passion. How much importance does play spontaneity in your work? In particular, do you conceive you works instinctively or do you methodically elaborate your pieces? Yes, but not because I paint. I am a good artist because of my ability to transform the natural from invisible to prominent through my expressed passion, which I may or may not choose to communicate in a visual image.

admire his or her work. The public needs the artist to remind him that in a world of tangibles, art offers them something they desperately need: spiritual values.

Do you think that your being a woman provides your artistic research with some special value or with a particular kind of sensitiveness?

How would you consider the role of imagination within your practice? Do you paint your image from your imagination of from real life?

To some extent i believe in this. I catch the sensitivity and grab in my art so the other person feels its rays and waves. Art as we know it has always been about business. That art should not be concerned with this. I agree with the principle of this sentiment, to a point. There is a certain belt of truth which in the artist always hopes, secretly perhaps, which will

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To be a great artist is to have a gift from God. In a good Art, the characters in a lines should pull you into a world of illusion that is interpreted by reflecting on personal experience. It is the wild beauty of my surroundings that inspires my paintings.

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I believe that art does not exist merely to entertain and gratify; it must edify. It can improve our collective existence by participating in the development of attitudes which can lead eventually to a better society.

mere spectatorship. So before leaving this conversation we would like to pose a question about the nature of the relationship of your art with your audience. Do you consider the issue of audience reception as being a crucial component of your decision-making process, in terms of what type of language is used in a particular context?

You are also interested in how art communities can use web tools to better promote themselves, and would be committed to building on your existing platform. Multidisciplinary artist Angela Bulloch onced remarked "that works of arts often continue to evolve after they have been realised, simply by the fact that they are conceived with an element of change, or an inherent potential for some kind of shift to occur": do you think that the role of the artist has changed these days with the new global communications and the new sensibility created by new media? And how will in your opinion the web affect the consumption of Art in our age?

As you said the platform World Art Dubai, i would like to say that it is a wonderful platform under one roof to every participants, whether you sell your art or not, this doesnt matter. Because for any artist, the most important thing is Recognition. Here all participants artists get highly recognition not only with the viewers but also from each other present there. I am really thankful to them.Its a language of feeling, understanding, motivating and also inspiring with and through Art. Thanks a lot for your time and for sharing your thoughts, Rashmi. Finally, would you like to tell us readers something about your future projects? How do you see your work evolving?

I totally agree on it. The role of an artist plays in society is wide and complex topic to go on and also largely dependent on the personality of the artist and on that artist's chosen theme. An artist can lead, follow or provoke with their work. The artist provides society with emotions, color, and texture. Through his or her art.But i strongly believe that there should be a platform where an Artists can get Fame, Money and also eager to teach in commercial and passionate way to others. Through this he can provide a pure environment with educator and learner both under one roof.

My dream and future projects are all inter related. It is that my silk art-Wall art and Wearable art, both is used by Royal & Ruler families of the world with great respect and with luxury. I want to create also something unique hand painted art on most royal silk Pashmina either under some big brands like HERMES or Similar. I hope it comes true. Thankyou!!!!

Over the years you have showcased your artworks in several occasions, including your recent participation to World Art Dubai: one of the hallmarks of your work is the capability to create direct involvement with the viewers, who are urged to evolve from a condition of

An interview by Josh Ryders, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator peripheral.arteries@europe.com

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Shai Jossef

Peripheral ARTeries Art Review - Biennial Edition, Summer 2017  

Contemporary Art Review, featuring Marcia Treiger • Rashmi Agarwal • Tatyana Kaneva • Uwe Heine Debrodt • Kyle Stockford • Elena Antoniou •...

Peripheral ARTeries Art Review - Biennial Edition, Summer 2017  

Contemporary Art Review, featuring Marcia Treiger • Rashmi Agarwal • Tatyana Kaneva • Uwe Heine Debrodt • Kyle Stockford • Elena Antoniou •...

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