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Hello Art by Nature readers! How time flies, summer is finally here! Unfortunately in the Netherlands it hasn’t really been very summery. I love how the sun keeps nature vibrant and lively, and that’s what this magazine is all about; showcasing nature as creatives envision it. So many amazing artists submitted to this edition. It’s always amazing when artists send in their work, I get to see so much fantastic talent. Because of how many submissions I received, I adjusted the submission page again. If you feel your project, art, design or product is a perfect fit for the magazine, check out this page and send me an email! I’ve also started a hashtag on Instagram called #inspiredbynature, because I want to see all of your wonderful submissions.

are written by the artist, along with some questions I just had to ask. Thanks again to Danielle Spires, who edits all the articles and helped make this magazine feasible. Check out her awesome throwback pin on page 30! And of course Katia Plewnia, of Labour of Art leather goods for her amazing bags and who is my sounding board and design inspiration. It brings me great joy to talk with others about design and nature! As always there are buttons in some articles with extra images or movies. Also new in this edition in most of the articles is the social media buttons, for even more information about the featured artist!

I’m so thankful to each and every You can follow the magazine individual who has contributed to the magazine, without you, it wouldn’t exist! Some of you even took the time to rewrite your article to fit my designs, which was helpful And share with others. and amazing. All of the stories Thanks!

Tessa Valk Founder, Editor in chief, Designer

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COVER tessaontwerpt.nl ADVERTISE To advertise in upcoming issues click here LIKE THE MAGAZINE? Support the magazine artbynaturemag.com CONTACT tessa@artbynaturemag.com SPECIAL THANKS TO Danielle Spires of Danielle Spires Photography Katia Plewnia of Labour of Art Carol Devine Ryota Matsumoto Michael Jantzen Alex Cearns Neil Perry & Susannah Kelly of Antler Gallery Alex Eckman-Lawn Zoe Keller Ariadna Bakhmatova for Laki Senanayake Karin Margolis

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Every person who is in this magazine has been contacted by email. No content maybe used without permision of Art by nature magazine, photos of artist (work) are owned by the artist (all rights reserved)

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AQUAMESS: PORTRAITS OF GARBAGE AT PORTRAITS OF GARBAGE AT THE TOP OF THE TOP OF THE EARTH THE EARTH: CLEAN IT

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CAROL DEVINE

I’m a global and earth health activist. When I was younger I dreamed I was at the North Pole, but I was still quite far away in Northern Ontario. But my love for ice was born during long Canadian winters. Svalbard above the Arctic Circle was a bit of magic. It’s such a harsh human history but also one of tenacity and reinvention that it gives me hope for this dangerously heating and thawing planet.

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I am also a member of the Association of Polar Early Career Scientists,  Humanities and Social Sciences Expert Group (HASSEG)  of Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research, Linking Tourism & Conservation and the Society of Women Geographers.


BEHIND THE SCENES

P THESE GARBAGE “PORTRAITS” WERE COLLECTED AROUND SVALBARD DURING A CITIZEN INITIATIVE, CLEANUP SVALBARD. FROM AUGUST 28 - SEPTEMBER 1, 2015

Portraits of garbage at the top of the earth: Clean It Near the North Pole there are more polar bear paw prints than human footprints. But there on beautiful forlorn shores are our remnants - a mustard bottle, a cigarette lighter, a slipper, a dolls head and endless plastic.

Our trash scatters the Arctic map and swirls in far north waterways, some arriving in the Gulf Stream, entangling wildlife and dissipating into our planet’s water molecules. Plastic created ostensibly to simplify our lives chokes us. This survey of garbage on Svalbard is about us. Globalized peoples. Some­ body somewhere eats Chinese noodles, another smokes British tobacco, drinks Russian vodka, uses Norwegian fishing rope; their discarded packaging washes up on shores of the most northern inhabited place on earth. A child’s plastic pig catches next to a rogue log that drifted from Siberia to Sjuøyene (Seven islands) above 80ºN.   Svalbard is a group of islands at the top of Norway. The North Pole is closer to Svalbard than Oslo. The islands are home to the third largest ice cap after Greenland and Antarctica. From seas surrounding Svalbard a current of trash enters its many fjords. A lot of discarded plastic has already disintegrated and entered our food chains and ocean systems, but much of it still harms wildlife, suffocating and entrapping them.

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BEHIND THE SCENES

CAROL DEVINE

I’m a global and earth health activist. When I was younger I dreamed I was at the North Pole, but I was still quite far away in Northern Ontario. My love for ice was born during long Canadian winters. Svalbard above the Arctic Circle was a bit of magic. It’s such a harsh human history but also one of tenacity and reinvention that it gives me hope for this dangerously heating and thawing planet.

ART BY NATURE

I am also a member of the Association of Polar Early Career Scientists,  Humanities and Social Sciences Expert Group (HASSEG)  of Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research, Linking Tourism & Conservation and the Society of Women Geographers.


BEHIND THE SCENES

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Portraits of garbage at the top of the earth: Clean It Near the North Pole there are more polar bear paw prints than human footprints. But there on beautiful forlorn shores are our remnants - a mustard bottle, a cigarette lighter, a slipper, a dolls head and endless plastic.

Our trash scatters the Arctic map and swirls in far north waterways, some arriving in the Gulf Stream, entangling wildlife and dissipating into our planet’s water molecules. Plastic created ostensibly to simplify our lives chokes us. This survey of garbage on Svalbard is about us. Globalized peoples. Some­ body somewhere eats Chinese noodles, another smokes British tobacco, drinks Russian vodka, uses Norwegian fishing rope; their discarded packaging washes up on shores of the most northern inhabited place on earth. A child’s plastic pig catches next to a rogue log that drifted from Siberia to Sjuøyene (Seven islands) above 80ºN.  

“THESE GARBAGE “PORTRAITS” WERE COLLECTED AROUND SVALBARD DURING A CITIZEN INITIATIVE, CLEANUP SVALBARD.” FROM AUGUST 28 - SEPTEMBER 1, 2015

Svalbard is a group of islands at the top of Norway. The North Pole is closer to Svalbard than Oslo. The islands are home to the third largest ice cap after Greenland and Antarctica. From seas surrounding Svalbard a current of trash enters its many fjords. A lot of discarded plastic has already disintegrated and entered our food chains and ocean systems, but much of it still harms wildlife, suffocating and entrapping them.

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BEHIND THE SCENES

“THIS ACT MADE ME CERTAIN IT’S WORTHWHILE MAKING AN EFFORT, EVEN REMOVING ONE PIECE OF PLASTIC AT A TIME.”

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While preparing for this trip I discovered a photo thinking at first it was an art work. Then I realized it was two reindeer struggling to death, their antlers caught in plastic net. I was obsessed to learn their fate. The image was taken by Sveinung Råheim who was out snow­ mobiling in Svalbard with his wife when they happened upon the beasts in distress. They were able to cut the rope and free the reindeer. This act made me certain it’s worthwhile making an effort, even removing one piece of plastic at a time. But this is far from enough.

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We started our cleanup in Longyearbyen, Svalbard’s main port, and travelled into the pack ice north of the island Nordaustlandet, covered largely by a glacier. We cleaned up at four official stops on the way noting our GPS locations to share details with the Governor. Along the way we sighted polar bears, under threat from climate change here like everywhere they roam: the apex mammal is the icon of our potential extinction. The volunteers were nature, travel and Arctic enthusiasts, adventurers and more - they included a British marine biologist, a Mexican environmentalist, a retired French editor, a Norwegian social documentary maker, an Israeli professor who lived in the Amazon rainforest studying natural medicines and a 13-year old Dutch boy with his nature journalist father. Many clearly have (a good) polar fever and environmental concerns.


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BEHIND THE SCENES

“THIS ACT MADE ME We started our cleanup in CERTAIN IT’S WORTHWHI- Longyearbyen, Svalbard’s main port, and travelled into LE MAKING AN EFFORT, the pack ice north of the island EVEN REMOVING ONE PIE- Nordaustlandet, covered largely Over four days and some by 10 a glacier. nautical We miles cleaned up at CE OF PLASTIC AT AupTIME.” we picked 13.5 cubicfour metres official of garbage stops on the way

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including 3.5 cubic metres noting of plastic our GPS nets. locations to share Ultimately we need more details radical with the Governor. personal, community and Along industrial the way we sighted polar While preparing for this change trip behaviour and regulations bears, undertothreat use from climate I discovered aless photo hereand like everywhere they andthinking produce morechange recyclable at first it was biodegradable an art work. Then products. roam: the apex mammal is the I realized it was two reindeer icon of our potential extinction. struggling to We death, are their all toantlers a degree planet trashers. caught in plastic net.are I was Some worse offenders The than volunteers others.were nature, obsessed to learn their fate. travel Arctic enthusiasts, Astronauts floating above ourand cosmos The image was taken by Sveinhave assured us the planet adventurers earth willand more ung Råheim who was but out ifsnow­ survive, we are to- survive they included on it, we a British mobiling in Svalbard hisclean up.  have ourwith act to marine biologist, a Mexican wife when they happenedmany uponinspiring Fortunately environmentalist, innovations a retired the beasts in and distress. They were initiatives recognize French this. v editor, a Norwegian able to cut the rope and free the social documentary maker, an reindeer. Thiscaroldevine.info act made me cerIsraeli professor who lived in tain it’s worthwhile making an the Amazon rainforest studying effort, even removing one piece natural medicines and a 13-year of plastic at a time. But this is far old Dutch boy with his nature from enough. journalist father.

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NATURE’S

MOON is the most accurate lunar globe, using NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter topographic data combined with electronic and mechanical engineering alongside careful craftsmanship in mold making.

WANNAHAVES Sharing Water

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kickstarter.com/moon

With this design, Maezm lets a plant only hold as much water as necessary for itself, and it stores surplus as energy. Ordinary flower pots flow surplus water out purposelessly, however ‘Sharing water’ feeds back surplus water and uses it as energy for other living bodies. maezm.com

Tattoo by Nature Painted by Stina Persson in her rich and distinctive style, these watercolor butterflies are sure to lift your spirits and spark your imagination. stinapersson.com

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Tempescope The tempescope is an ambient physical display that visualizes various weather conditions like rain, clouds, and lightning. Based on weather forecasts from the internet, it can reproduce tomorrow’s sky in your living room. tempescope.com

19 Solar roof tiles SolTech, has a solution that allows you to better integrate solar power to your roof. Their solar roof tiles are installed just like regular tiles, but they include some energy capturing systems. A common use for these is to use the energy immediately for hot water, but it can also be sent to the grid. soltechenergy.com

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THROUGH THE EYES OF

< Artwork:  “Transient Field in the Air and Sketches. The story: The whirlpool of chaos at the primordial stage of self-organization of bioorganic entities.

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RYOTA MATSUMOTO I was born in Tokyo and had spent most of my childhood and the better part of my 20’s in Hong Kong, the United States and Britain. My experience of living and studying abroad at an early age has certainly fostered my creativity and helps me to approach things from multiple angles.

ART BY NATURE


“I COULD SAY BOTH PATHWAYS MERGED NATURALLY FOR ME.”

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 rtwork: “Imaginary Echo Chamber” A and Sketch

My interest in technology, science, sociology and art initially led me to take up architecture as my profession. While I practice as a designer, I always paint whenever time allows. In my view, both fields have certain similarities in terms of creative outlets and complement each other well as far as visual communication methods are concerned. Suffice to say that art and architecture share a lot in common in terms of engaging with forms, structures and color. So I could say both pathways merged naturally for me ever since I graduated from the college.

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ART BY NATURE NATURE

Ink and graphite sketches as springboards for initial inspiration


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What is the the process behind your paintings? T

My blended background in architecture and visual art led me to explore a hybrid approach in drawings whereby I combine and merge the traditional media and digital media R

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in the working process. The various constituent methods of architectural, graphic and mixed media conventions are synthe sized seamlessly in this approach. The method involves base images that are composed by 3D modelling software incorporating generative and recursive procedures.

Then they are overlaid with traditional media such as acrylic, ink and graphite, as well as scanned images of found objects. These are further processed and looped


THROUGH THE EYES OF “T HE HYBRID TECHNIQUE ALLOWS FOR A CERTAIN DEGREE OF UNPRE­DICTABILITY OF VISUAL DYNA­MICS.”

 rtwork: “the Indistinct Notion of an A Object Trajectory” and Sketches. The story: The stacks of biologically enhanced urban farm towers embedded with multi-functional components.

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through a series of arithmetic and stochastic operations by image editing programs and plugins. The hybrid technique allows for a certain degree of unpredictability of visual dynamics. Furthermore, painterly, organic sentiments reveal themselves amidst the otherwise detached precision of digital drawings.

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By employing this specific approach, the degrees of depth, spatial dimensionality and scalability vary, distort and warp the finer details and the overall composition. The drawings are effectively liberated from the restrictive traditions of the Cartesian coordinate system. The application of this working process allows the work to bridge the gap between analog and digital media as well as between two- and multi-dimensional domains. My compositional technique imbues the work with the very essence of post- digital constructs beyond the conventional protocol of architectural and artistic formalities.

ART BY NATURE


THROUGH THE EYES OF How do you connect with nature if you have such a technical process? Is this when you come up with the basis for your design? And in what way? T

My work speculates about the morphological transformations of everevolving urban and ecological milieus that are influenced by the eco-political reality of the Anthropocene epoch, emerging technologies of genetic modification, the advancement of biomaterial technologies, a socially R

“...I ALWAYS FIND THE WAY TO BREAK DOWN BARRIERS BETWEEN FIELDS...” constructed value system and rapid environ­mental transformation accelerated by the interplay of socioeconomic activities and technological innovations. They are notable agendas emerging from current critiques of the relation­ship between humans and nature. Moreover, most of my technical aspects of work are based on

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generative dynamical and agent-based systems that simulate organic behavior and spontaneous irregularities. They are elemental phenomena that are immanent in nature. Does your Japanese heritage play a roll in your inspiration and style? Were you creative as a child? T

R I never have chance to settle down in one place for more than five years and live a life of constant travel since my childhood. So I am inspired and influenced by people from different cultural backgrounds rather than from a particular cultural heritage.

Why did you live abroad and in what way did living and studying abroad at an early age foster your creativity and in what angles?  T

As I mentioned earlier, the experience expands my perceptions of creative industries in general. It seems to me the R

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The generative templates as integral basis for final works

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> Artwork: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Field Scope Observations in Post Landingâ&#x20AC;? The story: The biomorphic cellular units begin to merge into each other to form habitable urban agglomerations. Each unit is the composite of semiorganic, biomimetic structures made of eco-based biomaterials.

boundaries between art and design disciplines are no longer of any significance and they tend to blur more often than not. As a designer, we tend to work as a bridging point among various disciplines. From our formative years, we are trained to pick things up quickly from different fields and apply them to address various architectural agendas. In that respect, interdisciplinary thinking comes naturally to me and I always find the way to break down barriers between fields rather than balancing between them to cultivate common ground, even when I am engaged in art or any other related fields. v

ryotamatsumoto.com

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INSPIRED BY NATURE

MICHAEL JANTZEN ART BY NATURE

We are so lucky that creative individuals send in their visionary work inspired by nature. In every edition, we will put in reader-inspired contributions.


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New Mexico Mirage is a series of photomontages that explore alternative ways in which to reinterpret the New Mexico landscape. Only parts of the original scenes were changed in order to form an unexpected juxtaposition between the real known world, and the new surreal

photomontage world, as interpreted by each individual viewer. The ultimate goal is to create a new magical, New Mexico landscape. v michaeljantzenstudio.com

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America’s favorite bull terrier was not a dog, instead he was known only as an Executive or Senior Party Consultant. If there’s two things we know about him, it’s that he always showed up to the party, and the girls loved him. However, he was really a she, and the advertising firm went to great lengths to hide this fact. Now we can celebrate that the world’s foremost Senior Party Consultant was a cool chick!


DANIELLE SPIRES

daniellespires.com


“THE TENACITY OF ANIMALS TO OVERCOME ADVERSITY NEVER CEASES TO AMAZE ME.”

PHOTODOC ALEX CEARNS From dogs with three legs, to cats born without eyes, Perfect Imperfection celebrates the intrinsic beauty of animals who have overcome adversity and adapted to a physical impairment.


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“THE TENACITY OF ANIMALS TO OVERCOME ADVERSITY NEVER CEASES TO AMAZE ME.”

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still show the scare of their former lives. Others have had surgeries for illnesses like cancer, leading to the removal of limbs or eyes in order to prolong their lives. In her images, Alex leads with the beauty of each animal, making their physical issue almost a subtle afterthought and photographing each one with care and sensitivity. Sitting only a foot away from her subjects, in a quiet studio, she is able to ensure each animal is relaxed and engaged in their photo session.

PHOTODOC

Perfect imperfection Professional animal photographer Alex Cearns photographs over 900 domestic pets with three legs, to From dogs each year in her Alex catches their cats born without eyes, Perfect studio in Perth, personalities shining through Imperfectionin celebrates the Australia. split second ‘moments’. intrinsic beauty of animals Her human clients respond Many of her subjects very favourably to their who have overcome adversity have been adopted from Perfect Imperfection and adapted to a physical portrait rescue organisations and images.

ALEX CEARNS impairment.

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PHOTODOC

“One of my most passionate aims as an animal photographer is to capture the adorable subtleties that make all creatures precious and unique. I love every animal I have the privilege of photographing, but those perceived as ‘different’ hold a special place in my heart. These are the creatures who have lost a leg, been born without eyes, or are still showing the scars of former abuse. Most animalwith ‘afflictions’ don’t dwell on them. “

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“They adapt to their bodies without complaint and they survive with deter­mi­nation. They push on, always, wanting to be included and involved in everything as much as they can, and as much wadversity never ceases to amaze me. They make the most out of life and from them I have learnt so much about always seeing the positive in every situation and never giving up.” v houndstoothstudio.com.au

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PHOTODOC

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L4 A I C SPE Y R LLE A G

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ART BY NATURE


“ W E INQUIRED WITH A LOCAL NON-PROFIT ABOUT THE POSSIBILITY OF RENOVATING A SMALL OFFICE CUBICLE...”

How did you start the gallery and why? With what sort of artist do you work? T

We started the gallery because a few of our favorite spaces in the city had closed in a short period of time. We were upset about it but realized that we could either keep complaining or try to change it. We inquired with a local non-profit about the possibility of renovating a small office cubicle in their building and turning it into a gallery. The space was small but it had a large window on a busy street. Thankfully the response was very positive and in a short space of time we were able to move into our own, bigger space. S

GALLERY SPECIAL FEATURING

Last year the gallery was able to bring a group of artists to the Audubon headquarters in Portland draw the “Education Birds” - birds that are unable to be released back in the wild after treatment and are used to educate the public. The sketches from that event were later sold to benefit the charity. Neil and Susannah are both working artists and have an active interest in the natural world, which is reflected both in their individual artwork and curatorial style. The pair love being located in Portland due to it’s close proximity to nature and the inspiration that give to the creatives living in the city.

4 ARTIST

We work with a lot of independent artists here in Portland, as well as people across the country and even international artists. We show a lot of drawing and painting and some ceramic sculpture. Most of the work is representational with a strong narrative. We exhibit a lot of works by artists who are inspired in some way my wildlife and the natural world. We tend to work with emerging and midcareer artists primarily. N

antlerpdx.com

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NEIL M. PERRY Is an artist and illustrator who grew up on the North East coast of England, currently living and working in Portland, Oregon. Neil has participated in group and solo exhibitions at galleries in Europe, the United States and Japan. Thanks largely to David Attenborough, he has been fascinated by the animal kingdom since childhood. This has driven him to develop

a body of work which utilizes animal association, color psychology and recognizable patterns/symbols to engage in social commentary. What is your obsession with snakes? And are they fantasy or based on real ones? T

I have always been fascinated by snakes, their patterning and colors are mesmeric and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re the focal point of lots of incredible mythology across a number of cultures. In my early paintings of snakes I would usually paint real snakes. More recently the patterns are either invented in order to express meaning through color psychology or based on man-made patterns. N

neilmperry.net

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GALLERY

SUSANNAH KELLY

How did you start the gallery and why? “ W E INQUIRED WITH A With what sort of artist do you work? LOCAL NON-PROFIT is a painter and drawer currently problems or obstacles, sometimes self inflicted practicing in Portland, She and sometimes We started shot the by the gallery unknown. because Being a few of ABOUT THEOregon. POSSIBILITY has lived in Oregon for the past favorite spaces in the city hadthey closed a more our primitive type of weapon, to me RENOVATING 10 yearsOF having relocated fromA SMALL in athat short time. Weare were upset represent ourperiod manyof struggles often Southern California. Susannah derivedabout from it just buta realized few basic that flaws. we could either OFFICE CUBICLE...” often draws on the human figure keep complaining or try to change it. We T

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as a source of inspiration for her inquired with a local non-profit about the work. Working primarily in graphite, possibility of renovating a small office her subject matter deals with the susannahkellyart.com cubicle in their building and turning it into brutalityLast of human year the relationships, gallery was able a gallery. The space was small but it had a both with to others bring aand group in ourselves. of artists to the large window on a busy street. Thankfully She hasAudubon exhibitedheadquarters her work in many in Portland the response was very positive and in a cities including draw thePortland, “Education Tokyo, Birds” St. - birds short space of time we were able to move Louis, San thatDiego, are unable and Seattle. to be released back into our own, bigger space. in the wild after treatment and are N We work with a lot of independent T Whatused connects to educate your “human” the public. The drawingsketches to nature? from that event were later artists here in Portland, as well as people sold to benefit the charity. across the country and even international S At the very core we are all artists. We show a lot of drawing and animals,Neil we and do our Susannah best to escape are both painting and some ceramic sculpture. our primal working instincts artists to create and have an Most of the work is representational with and maintain active civilization, interest in the but natural the a strong narrative. We exhibit a lot of natural world, world inevitably which is reflected slips out. both works by artists who are inspired in some There isina their terrifying individual and chaotic artwork and way my wildlife and the natural world. balancecuratorial to nature that style. I love, The pair love We tend to work with emerging and midand I think being every located livinginbeing Portland is due to career artists primarily. a microcosm it’s close of that, proximity from the to nature and complicated the inspiration inter-workings that of give ourto the bodily systems creatives toliving our impact in theon city. our ecosystems. I frequently use antlerpdx.com arrows in my work to symbolize

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ALEX ECKMAN-LAWN

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I was born in West Philly and moved further west into the burbs when I was 6 so I think the interaction of plants, and animals with more industrial shapes, spaces, and houses has been a big part of how I see the world from a very young age. I love architecture and enormous structures, and I especially love to see when they begin to become overgrown, buried, or reclaimed by natural forces. It can come across as apocalyptic but for whatever reason that kind of imagery has always been very soothing to me. I like to see the harsh points and angles of civilization softened by moss and time. I’m also a sucker for little ecosystems and small creatures scurrying around in the midst of a larger

ART BY NATURE

picture. There’s an order there, though it can seem like chaos at first. My pieces, in particular “This Is Mine” and “the Nest” are about trying to harness and organize chaos. I think

the movement of animals is a good analogy for thisa flock of birds, or line of ants. The collection of specimens, to document, understand, and neatly bind the chaos is perhaps


GALLERY “AS I LOOK BACK AT THE THINGS THAT REALLY EFFECTED ME AS A KID, MOEBIUS ACTUALLY PLAYED A BIG PART IN A LOT OF THEM.” an even more obvious reference “ W E INQUIRED WITHthat AI tend to make pretty frequently in my work. LOCAL That specific ideaNON-PROFIT is particularly present in my pieces for the Growth and Decay joint ABOUT THE POSSIBILITY show, at Paradigm Gallery + Studio and OF RENOVATING A SMALL Antler Gallery.

OFFICE CUBICLE...”

Are there artist, philosophers, writers wor others that inspires you now or growing up? T

I findLast music year really the gallery helps me wasget able inspired bring a group artists to the to maketopictures. Lately of lots of grind and Audubon in Portland atmospheric blackheadquarters metal have been my draw the “Education - birds go-to inspiration. That said, IBirds” love Moebius that are unable to beatreleased back and I get caught up staring his work for longinstretches. the wild after As I look treatment back at and theare used to educate theme public. things that really effected as a The kid, he’s thatin event later actuallysketches played afrom big part a lotwere of them. sold to benefit charity.for me, That was a really cool the discovery and I’m incredibly grateful to have been andwork Susannah are age botheven if exposedNeil to his at an early working I didn’t realize it. artists and have an active interest in the natural T Howworld, is reflected both do youwhich start with a project, what in their individual artwork and is your process? curatorial style. The pair love A My cut being located in Portland due paper work usually starts in to it’s close proximity to nature Photoshop. Sometimes I’ll begin with and a the inspiration thatthat givewill to sit the digital painting or drawing creatives livingand in the city. at the core of the piece then start burying it with collaged elements, be it A

How did you start the gallery and why? With what sort of artist do you work? T

We started the gallery because a few of our favorite spaces in the city had closed in a short period of time. We were upset about it but realized that we could either keep complaining or try to change it. We inquired with a local non-profit about the possibility of renovating a small office cubicle in their building and turning it into a gallery. The space was small but it had a large window on a busy street. Thankfully the response was very positive and in a short space of time we were able to move into our own, bigger space. S

We work with a lot of independent artists here in Portland, as well as people across the country and even international artists. We show a lot of drawing and painting and some ceramic sculpture. Most of the work is representational with a strong narrative. We exhibit a lot of works by artists who are inspired in some way my wildlife and the natural world. We tend to work with emerging and midcareer artists primarily. N

antlerpdx.com Photos Moebius work

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4 LGALLERY A I C SPE Y R LLE A G

ART BY NATURE


“ W E INQUIRED WITH A LOCAL NON-PROFIT I GUESS THAT TRAPS ME IN ABOUT THE POSSIBILITY THE “THINKER” CATEGORY. OF RENOVATING A SMALL OFFICE CUBICLE...” from scanned or found images, or from my own work that i’m cutting up and repurposing. Sometimes it’s just as simple Last year the gallery was able as choosing a shape, and deciding which bring a group of artists to the sectionstowill have what kind of images, Audubon inthan Portland and what sectionsheadquarters will be higher draw there’s the “Education Birds” - birds others, since a 3 dimensional arework. unable to bewith released elementthat to my I start jewelback cut diagrams in athe lotwild for inspiration after treatment and and I think are to educate public. The you canused see that in a lot the of my work. sketches from that event were later T Are you solda to benefit charity. thinker orthe a doer? Neil andto Susannah both I guess I’d like think I doare a bit of both, working artists and but I’ve been obsessing overhave how an to interestfor inan the natural answer active this question embarrassing is reflected both amountworld, of timewhich so I guess that traps me in in their individual artwork and the “thinker” category.  curatorial style. The pair love T How being located in Portland due to did you start with the paper close proximity to nature and cuts andit’s why. the inspiration that give to the A It wascreatives city. actually aliving bit of in anthe accident, which is how think all my best work gets A

How did you start the gallery and why? With what sort of artist do you work? T

We started the gallery because a few of our favorite spaces in the city had closed in a short period of time. We were upset about it but realized that we could either keep complaining or try to change it. We inquired with a local non-profit about the possibility of renovating a small office cubicle in their building and turning it into a gallery. The space was small but it had a large window on a busy street. Thankfully the response was very positive and in a short space of time we were able to move into our own, bigger space. S

We work with a lot of independent artists here in Portland, as well as people across haha! the country and even made, I was cutting up international a digital artists. We show a lottoofsee drawing and collage I had printed if I could painting and some ceramic new sculpture. rearrange it into something and Most of that the work representational with realized I had is left these cool windows a strong narrative. exhibit a lotofofthese in the paper. I tried We layering a few works by artists who are inspired in some and realized I could make these interesting way my wildlife the naturalmaps world. little spaces, like and topographical We tendI’ve to work emerging with and midalmost. been with experimenting that careersince, artiststrying primarily. space to get more depth, more intricate cuts, more secret spaces. N

antlerpdx.comalexeckmanlawn.com

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L4 A I C SPE Y R LLE A G

F TO S I ART

ZOE KELLER I make highly detailed graphite drawings that examine the natural world. Much of my inspiration comes from explorations of wild places across the country.

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My time on the northern Maine coast, my brief visits to the national parks of the American Southwest, and my current explorations of the Pacific Northwest, have introduced me to species and ecosystems that continue to show up in my work. When I am working out of a city, as I am now in Portland, Oregon, I spend a lot of time reading field guides, science books and articles online; I feel really lucky to live in a time where a few keystrokes on a laptop can bring up all kinds of information about animals and plants on the other side of the planet. My current practice draws heavily on the education that I received at the Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA),

ART BY NATURE


GALLERY

“ W E INQUIRED WITH A LOCAL NON-PROFIT ABOUT THE POSSIBILITY OF RENOVATING A SMALL OFFICE CUBICLE...”

Last year the gallery was able to bring a group of artists to the Audubon headquarters in Portland draw the “Education Birds” - birds that are unable to be released back in the wild after treatment and are used to educate the public. The sketches from that event were later sold to benefit the charity. Neil and Susannah are both working artists and have an active interest in the natural world, which is reflected both in their individual artwork and curatorial style. The pair love being located in Portland due to it’s close proximity to nature and the inspiration that give to the creatives living in the city.

in Baltimore, Maryland. Over my four years there, I studied oil painting, illustration, graphic design and printmaking. This wellrounded visual education definitely armed me with a multitude of ways of problem- solving a twoT How did dimensional you start the surface. gallery I am and why? With what also sort extremely of artist thankful do you work? We started the gallery because a few of our favorite spaces in the city had closed in a short period of time. We were upset about it but realized that we could either keep complaining or try to change it. We inquired with a local non-profit about the possibility of renovating a small office cubicle in their building and turning it into a gallery. The space was small but it had a large window to have onreceived a busy street. huge Thankfully the response scholarships was verytopositive attend MICA. and in a short space Being of time able to wegraduate were able to move into our debt-free own, bigger allowed space.me to take a lot of big risks after N We work school; withI avolunteered lot of independent fullartists here time inat Portland, an artistas collective well as people across the forcountry three seasons, and even and international took artists. We another show a three lot of seasons drawing toand painting work and some full-time ceramic on a sculpture. personal Most of the collaborative work is representational project with a with a strong close narrative. friend. WeBoth exhibit of these a lot of works byexperiences artists who shaped are inspired my work in some way my wildlife and the and waythe thatnatural I moveworld. We tend through to work with the world. emerging and midcareer artists primarily. There a few subjects that I return to over and over again when I am trying to unwind antlerpdx.com primarily mushrooms. S

“I DRAW MUSHROOMS TO UNWIND...”

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L4 A I C SPE Y R LLE A G

F TO S I ART

“ I HOPE MY DRAWINGS, CAN HELP TO INFORM AND INSPIRE PEOPLE TO PRESERVE BIODIVERSITY...” But usually my drawings begin with a period of research. I will read up on a specific species that I want to draw, or read a bunch of articles, until I find something that I want to illustrate. Then I move on to gathering reference photos, from my own collection, from library books and from the internet. If it is a large drawing I may do a much smaller thumbnail of the composition, but usually I dive right in on the final

ART BY NATURE

drawing surface, moving from light sketch to a more refined line drawing. Because graphite is so delicate I generally fully render the drawing from top left to the bottom right corner, and then adjust values as needed towards the end of the drawing. We live in this very strange moment in time where information about the natural world is more accessible than ever, even as species are vanishing into extinction

at a terrifying speed. Some of the species that I love drawing most will probably be gone in my lifetime. My hope is that as my drawings become more directly science-based, that they can help to inform and inspire people to preserve biodiversity on a local level through habitat preservation and at a global level by fighting climate change. Could you tell something about your kickstarter project “Intricacies” T

Z Together with Christina Mrozik I left my home for a tiny studio on a


GALLERY

“ W E INQUIRED WITH A LOCAL NON-PROFIT ABOUT THE POSSIBILITY OF RENOVATING A SMALL OFFICE CUBICLE...” once-blueberry-farm in Hudsonville, Michigan. Here, we committed ourselves to a slower kind of living. We took the time to observe Lastthe year natural the gallery worldwas around able us and focused to bring ourastudio group efforts of artists exclusively to the on the series Audubon of illustrations headquarters forin Intricacies. Portland For fivedraw months the we “Education had a joyful Birds” stream - birds of collaboration, that arewith unable us constantly to be released bouncing back concepts in back the wild andafter forthtreatment and sometimes and are passingused a single to educate drawing the between public. The our desks until sketches a page from wasthat full.event were later sold to benefit the charity. T What determines the style of your drawing? Neil and Susannah are both working artists and have an Z It varies active from interest drawing in the to natural drawing, depending world, on which what Iisam reflected trying to both achieve! inItheir actually individual feel likeartwork most ofand my drawings curatorial have at style. least The some pair small love surreal being element. located v in Portland due to it’s close proximity to nature and the inspiration that give to the creatives living in the city. zoekeller.com

How did you start the gallery and why? With what sort of artist do you work? T

We started the gallery because a few of our favorite spaces in the city had closed in a short period of time. We were upset about it but realized that we could either keep complaining or try to change it. We inquired with a local non-profit about the possibility of renovating a small office cubicle in their building and turning it into a gallery. The space was small but it had a large window on a busy street. Thankfully the response was very positive and in a short space of time we were able to move into our own, bigger space. S

We work with a lot of independent artists here in Portland, as well as people across the country and even international artists. We show a lot of drawing and painting and some ceramic sculpture. Most of the work is representational with a strong narrative. We exhibit a lot of works by artists who are inspired in some way my wildlife and the natural world. We tend to work with emerging and midcareer artists primarily. N

antlerpdx.com

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L4 A I C SPE Y R LLE A G

F TO S I ART

GALLERY

NEIL PERRY SUSANNAH KELLY

Antler Gallery is located in the Alberta Arts District of Portland, Oregon and is co-owned by Susannah Kelly and Neil Perry. They opened in their first space in January 2012 as the smal­lest art gallery in the city. The original location was a 100 square foot office cubicle with a large window facing Alberta Street. Due to the incredible support of the neighborhood and their collectors they were able to relocate into their own, larger space 10 blocks away.

N ART BY NATURE

Neil and Susannah curate the gallery together, only showcasing artists and works that they both love. Antler Gallery has a strong focus on nature, and partners with the Audubon Society of Portland every January for a benefit that raises awareness for endangered and extinct species.


“ W E INQUIRED WITH A LOCAL NON-PROFIT ABOUT THE POSSIBILITY OF RENOVATING A SMALL OFFICE CUBICLE...”

Last year the gallery was able to bring a group of artists to the Audubon headquarters in Portland draw the “Education Birds” - birds that are unable to be released back in the wild after treatment and are used to educate the public. The sketches from that event were later sold to benefit the charity. Neil and Susannah are both working artists and have an active interest in the natural world, which is reflected both in their individual artwork and curatorial style. The pair love being located in Portland due to it’s close proximity to nature and the inspiration that give to the creatives living in the city.

How did you start the gallery and why? With what sort of artist do you work? T

We started the gallery because a few of our favorite spaces in the city had closed in a short period of time. We were upset about it but realized that we could either keep complaining or try to change it. We inquired with a local non-profit about the possibility of renovating a small office cubicle in their building and turning it into a gallery. The space was small but it had a large window on a busy street. Thankfully the response was very positive and in a short space of time we were able to move into our own, bigger space. S

We work with a lot of independent artists here in Portland, as well as people across the country and even international artists. We show a lot of drawing and painting and some ceramic sculpture. Most of the work is representational with a strong narrative. We exhibit a lot of works by artists who are inspired in some way my wildlife and the natural world. We tend to work with emerging and midcareer artists primarily. N

antlerpdx.com

ART BY NATURE

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NATURE BY DESIGN

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DIYABUBULA

Renowned Sri Lankan artist Laki Senanayake designed Diyabubula as a hideaway to compliment his water garden. He chose 100 year old railway sleepers as basic building material. This wood, seasoned by sun and rain over a century, has been combined with sleek and beautiful timber sourced from all over Sri Lanka, and hand-crafted right at Diyabubula.

ART BY NATURE


TRAVELS WITH

“DO ART, SEE NATURE AND EXPLORE THE CULTURE OF SRI LANKA AT.”

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The jungle hideaway has five individually handcrafted villas made from 100 year old railway sleepers and locally sourced timber. Encompassing the surrounding environment, Laki uses the growing trees and running waters of Diyabubula to create living, natural accommodation so you not only see the jungle but experience it at its core. Laki’s studio is centrally located and he regularly encourages guests to join him to draw,

paint and discuss the abundant wildlife that adorns the area. Diyabubula boasts a water garden which every year plays host to migratory birds who make the most of the generous food on offer and warm climate and is an ideal bird watching spot. When not taking in beauty of Diyabubula, guests can experience nature, wildlife and the mountains of Sri Lanka right on their doorstep by visiting nearby natural sites.

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TRAVELS WITH

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“DIYABUBULA IS AN IDEAL PLACE FROM WHICH TO EXPLORE ART AND ARCHITECTURE.” • Rose Quartz Mountain: among the oldest and largest rocks in Southeast Asia, the seven mountains are 180 and 300 metres above sea level and date back to almost 550 million years!

ART BY NATURE


NATURE BY DESIGN

• Ritigala Forest Reserve: an ancient Buddhist monastery, as well as a mountain range, and a forest nature reserve with medicinal plants, ruins and rock inscriptions dating from the 1st century.

• Minneriya National Park: every year between the months of July and October up to 200 wild elephants come together on the receding shores of the reservoir for the

Minneriya Elephant gathering (voted as one of the sixth largest wildlife gatherings by Lonely Planet).

Located in the middle of the cultural centre of Sri Lanka, Diyabubula is an ideal place from which to explore art and architecture of the country’s world heritage sites including: the cave temple of Dambulla, the massive rock fortress of Sigiriya and the ancient city of Polonnaruwa. v diyabubula.com

ART BY NATURE


CRAFT KAREN MARGOLIS


61 I have been obsessed with inner workings ever since childhood when my father, an electronics repairman, removed the back of a television, exposing a miniature world of exotic components and wires. I was dazzled that this chaotic morass could produce moving pictures and it aroused my curiosity and life long interest in operations beneath the surface. Shortly thereafter, my discovery of Psychology led me to explore inside the self. < Iha

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CRAFT “I FOUND COLOR TO BE A FITTING VISUAL COUNTERPART TO THE QUALIA OF EMOTIONS.” communication I expand the circle’s vocabulary through architecture and color, imbue it with meaning as well as encrypt it to obfuscate comprehension.

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Conceptually based and materially driven, my works deconstruct and subsequently integrate the mental and physical processes of art making and psychoanalysis. My interest lies in exploring operations of the mind rather than in finding meaning, so I look for ways to visualize the dynamic elements of the psyche in lieu of trans-

ART BY NATURE

mitting personal data. My imagery is based on the circle, an essential component in existence. It is a molecule, a neuro­ transmitter and an Enso, a sacred symbol in Zen Buddhism, embodying infinity and perfection. I’m drawn to its mystical elements as well as the paradox of imperfection and reinterpret the circle in both positive and negative space as a shared language connecting body to mind. As my primary means of

The integration series developed from my journal writings. Fascinated by the power emotions wield, I have been chronicling my feelings for a long time as a way to prevail over negative emotions. The Cyclical themes that emerged out of my writings inspired me to develop ‘mappings’ of my feelings. Wanting to articulate universals and not divulge intimate feelings, I found color to be a fitting visual counterpart to the qualia of emotions and devised a flow chart that assigns each emotion a pantone reproducible color.


< Baburu


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Beginning each compo­ sition by burning holes into paper to produce space and volume, I allow forms to emerge within the lattice structure. It is a symbolic act for me, of penetrating inward. After that, I paint a primary black hole, which is intended as the subconscious element

ART BY NATURE

“I HAVE INTRODUCED MAPS INTO MY WORK AS A WAY TO TALK ABOUT THE EXTERIOR WORLD.”

of my work. I include numerous black holes that notate inability to access feelings. Themes from my writings are scribbled onto the forms in pencil

and working from my flow chart, I translate feelings to color directly onto the composition, allowing for extemporaneous free association in


CRAFT â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sonogramsâ&#x20AC;? installation at Bridgewater University

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subjectivity as they are about documenting my interior monologues.

addition to inaccuracies in color mixing. As I paint dots to create a sense of molecular activity within the brain my process transitions

into developing color relationships and color mergers. My system is flawed so the works ultimately are as much about inaccuracy and

I have introduced maps into my work as a way to talk about the exterior world. Composed of vascular systems and arteries, maps also act as proxies for our physical selves.

ART BY NATURE


CRAFT I penetrate into the mapâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s surface, deleting holes and creating discs of displaced locations. The ability of maps to communicate their intended data is frustrated, but possibilities for new connections emerge. Map fragments from my

penetrations find their way into my integration works as indicators of various states of mind. Color-coded dots expand three-dimensionally in my sculptural work and into murkier conversations between material and

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< Continnuum

space. In these works I try to attain a form that is in between substance and immateriality, a state of indeterminacy. Contingent to the making of my constructions are sonograms of my unborn creations, produced by residual paint from the


drying process on transparent polyester film and rolled into tube structures. What do you do to get inspired? T

What drives me as an artist is trying to find out who I am. I feel like I exist K

in a fluid state within the world around me, absorbing certainties of others with no absolutes of my own. I am inspired to excavate my own interior in order to reconcile the private with my public self. In many ways I believe my

art making can be reduced to a struggle between destruction and creation and within these margins I explore damage and mending through intimate expressions of being touched by circumstances of life.

“I BELIEVE MY ART MAKING CAN BE REDUCED TO A STRUGGLE BETWEEN DESTRUCTION AND CREATION ”

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CRAFT

“MY PROCESS IS VERY MUCH A SYNTHESIS OF MEDITATION AND STREAM OF CONSCIOUSNESS...”

< Deviation

When did the Enso start to inspire you? And what role does Zen Buddhism play in your life? T

I discovered Buddhism when I was a teenager and was immediately attracted to it but did not begin serious practice until I was quite a bit older. I learned that an aspect of practice was to repeatedly draw an Enso with the understanding it will never be a perfect circle. I relate to the sisphean metaphor and first came to work with the concept of the Enso in the 90’s when I was K

exploring the dimensionality of lines, creating large wall installations composed of layers of linear drawings that expanded the volume of twodimensional space. Every mark I make is about aspiration for perfection and awareness of its impossibility. The technical operations of my work parallel my meditation practice very strongly, I focus on my mark making as one would on breathing. My process is very much a synthesis of meditation and stream of consciousness, becoming aware of obsessive thoughts and channeling them into my art making. v

karenmargolisart.com Note to reader: No colour was used by me to expres a feeling, I just love this colour green! T

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DESIGN OUT OF THIS WORLD ANGELAADAMS.COM


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Number 4 Art by Nature Magazine  

Nature inspires. An independent magazine dedicated to creativity inspired in any way or form by nature.

Number 4 Art by Nature Magazine  

Nature inspires. An independent magazine dedicated to creativity inspired in any way or form by nature.

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