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Inspired by nature number 01 | 2015


EXPOSITION CYBELE YOUNG FORUMGALLERY.COM ART FOR SALE

How Does It Look for Tomorrow? (Lost - umbrella), 2015 Japanese paper construction 40 x 30 x 5 1/2 inches © Cybèle Young, courtesy of Forum Gallery, New York


Hi there new reader! All of my life I've been looking for what inspires me. During the night study graphic design we had to design our own magazine, we could choose the theme and design it from scratch. In the year before I found that nature inspires me and I knew the name instantly. When I graduated, I noticed I really mist the inspiration I got from all the new creativity I found all over the world. And so here we are: welcome at the first edition of Art by nature magazine To everyone reading this magazine: Thanks for choosing this magazine. so nice to meet you! You’re probably wondering - is this a Design Magazine? Nature? Art? Cultural? Local? Internationally? It is that and more. Nature inspires us any way or form. Many magazines are made about nature. And there are many magazine about design, photography, illustration and other crafts. But I’ve never found a magazine where both were united. I hope you get a much inspiration from this magazine as i did making it! I talked (well emailed) with allot of artist, to talk about their work. Some I interviewed, some took the time out of their busy schedule to write about their inspiration. To all I say:”Thank you!” Without them, this magazine wouldn’t be possible. Tessa Valk Founder Editor in chief Designer


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ADVERTISE Will be designed by Art By Nature Magazine. Please contact if you want to advertise in upcoming issues

CONTACT tessa@artbynaturemag.com I thank everybody who took the time to send in articles and photo's. Every person who is in this magazine has been contacted by email. No content maybe used without permision of Art by nature magazine, photos of artist (work) are owned by the artist (all rights reserved)

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During my night study I came across “Design Indaba” (designindaba.com), an online publication with an annual festival that helps bring social impact. Their focus is African and global creativity, through the lens of leading think tanks, trailblazers, trend setters and industry experts. In their newsletter, I found the wonderful story of Ross Symons, a professional origami artist who has big brand projects all over the world.

Ross Symons started out as a web developer on different digital projects. In 2002 after his brother asked him to fold a crane, Symons found his love for origami. Symons feels like every time he creates origami, it’s like solving a puzzle. After deciding to improve on his work in 2013, he challenged himself with the 365 project. Symons folded an origami every single day and documented it on Instagram. A few months in, Symons quit his web developer job. When he was halfway through his project, he decided to brand his origami “White on Rice”, which got him a lot of freelance projects and he was able to grow an income from origami. For fun, Symons started making stop motion

origami, and he uploaded his videos to Instagram. Corporate clients took notice and started requesting videos. Symons has created stop motion for,Dior, installations, social media campaigns, and for brands like Adidas, Red Bull, Old Khaki and Polo.

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Your brother asked you to fold a crane. How did he know to ask you? He asked me to fold the crane for a project he was busy with at design school. He just thought that an origami crane would be a cool thing for me to try and make.

You started out as a web developer, what made you choose that side of the creative industry? You said in an interview that you like origami because you create something tangible. Did you ever have the feeling as a web developer that you missed tangibility, our did you realize it when you started origami? I went into web development was mainly because I enjoy working on a computer. I understand how they work. And Web development requires creativity as well as logic, similar to origami. I enjoy the digital space but I have recently found that making things (tangible things) is more fulfilling for me.

Origami is a very focused and accurate art. I imagine that Origami is tough on your hands, so do you do warm ups? I don’t ever do warm ups as it’s not really tough on your hands. I would say its tougher on your mind than on your hands :)

“ I’M OPEN TO IDEAS ALL DAY LONG SO ANYTHING I SEE |OR HEAR OR SPEAK ABOUT WITH A FRIEND CAN INSPIRE A NEW IDEA.”

In an interview you said that during the day you think about upcoming projects, as well as old projects and how to improve them. How do you find your inspiration, and are there other origami artists that inspire you? I get inspired by almost everything around me. I’m open to ideas all day long so anything I see or hear or speak about with a friend can inspire a new idea. I had a few origami heros: Sipho Mabona, Quentin Trollip, Roman Diaz, Robert Lang.

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THROUGH THE EYES OF As a new recruit to origami when you started your 365 project, did you get help from the Origami community? Did you think up all the 365 origami creations, or did others help you with what to create next? There is a large origami Photo Ockie Fourie community on Instagram and I / @theworldsyoungestman definitely got help from some of them. The figures I folded during the 365 day project were mostly done by other designers. But I found all the designs in books and online and them folded them.

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Do you work on the projects solo, or do you ever have help (for instance with the ADIDAS shop window)? It depends on the project. Generally I work alone but sometimes I work with other people or companies. For the ADIDAS shop window I just did the origami and not the full installation of each shape. There is a misconception that because origami uses paper, it would be easy to do. What makes it so difficult? Could you take me on your creative journey with a project? To create basic origami shapes is not very difficult. When you start doing more complex shapes and designs it gets more technical and requires more skill and

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“ ITS THEN A PROCESS OF TRIAL AND ERROR AND TRYING AND TESTING UNTIL I HAVE THE SHAPE I WANT.” patience. I start by gathering references of what I will be folding. I find these online or in books. I then start looking at what other artists have done and how I could do something similar. Then I just start folding to get the basic shape/base. It’s then a process of trial and error and trying and testing until I have the shape I want.

You spoke of your love for paper, what makes you never grow bored of origami? I don’t really know the answer to that. I think it could have something to do with the fact that I’m creating something new every time I fold paper. Even if its the same figure its a new figure.


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Bull's head designed and folded by Ross


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In an interview with Design Indaba, I noticed you were sitting in the park. Do you often go different places to fold and do you use nature to get inspired? I keep paper with me all the time so if I get an idea or feel inspired it doesn’t matter where I am, I will start folding. Ever since you started with origami, do you see the world different? For me as a designer, I started to see typography everywhere, even walking around in nature. Definitely. I often look at things now and think about what it would look like as a folded figure. Artist like Hoang Tien Quyet use a wet folding technique so he gets smooth curves instead of the sharp, geometric styles. Do you have your own way of folding? What kind of paper do you work with and does it depend on the project? I use wet folding as a technique sometimes. I don’t really have my own style at this stage. I use different paper for different figures. It all depends on the project.

What are upcoming project for you? Are there clients that rehire you? I will be doing a project for a client that I have done work with before. I also have some new projects on the go for clients over seas (Australia and Namibia). On your website I saw a lamp inspired by origami. What kind of material do you use for that, and can we expect more of these kinds of products in the future? That lampshade is made from paper. It was just an idea that I decided to try out. I might make more products like this in the future but I am focusing on getting my art out there. v white-onrice.com

“I AM FOCUSING ON GETTING MY ART OUT THERE.”

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Belts designed for Katie Gallagher’s Spring/Summer 2013 Collection.

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Francis Bitonti Studio is a design studio focused on emerging models of mass production and processes for material formation. We focus on information driven production and manufacturing models. We are designers, developers and materials scientists. We are focused on the future of manufacturing. We assume materials can be generated and modified as digital media. We don’t design static things, we design systems and algorithms that shape materials. We design objects, spaces and warbles through information systems. This is NOT design for the “next industrial revolution.”


Photo Oriana Layendecker Colaboration with United Nude and 3D Systems for the release their collection Mutatio

THI S I S DESI G N FOR THE I N FORMATI O N AGE.


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TECHNOLOGY DEEPLY CONNECTED TO BEI N G HUMAN The dress, named as the Bristle Dress, was created with students from multiple design industries and used computational design. “The workshops are about finding the new aesthetic formal language of this

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new manufacturing paradigm. It’s not just about replicating a form from the computer, though that is part of it —it’s about cultivating new material behaviors.” francisbitonti.com


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It looks like you get even more out of that walk in the woods than you already did!

s < flBirch Bark Lamp • wine or fishing line • bark • utility knife • leather punch • 60 watt lightbulbs

e  4 gauge electrical wir • 1 t dan pen or and sockets at ble aila (av lamp kits local hardware stores or at Ikea)

ch-bark-lamps/ ruffledblog.com/diy-bir

Dandelion paperweights > • buy a vending capsule • P  ick a dandelion befor it puf fs • W  atch it explode • Buy resin and catalyst • F  ollow the instructions • P  our the resin andcatalyst into the vending capsule • G  ently push the dandelion into the liquid • w  ait until liquid hardens dandelionpaperweights.com

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< flMoss Graffiiti

• 3-4 hands full of mo ss • blender • 700ml of luke warm water. • 3-4 tablespoons of wa ter retaining gel • 120 ml of buttermilk • bucket. • rough concrete or wo oden surfaces. • weather dry, mist we ekly

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will  length of fabric that • a r pot you und aro e onc p wra • Fevicol autiscott-emma.com/be ts/ -po ant ful-pl

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BEHI N D THE SCENES

SCARLETT HOOFT GRAAFLAND "Vanishing Traces"


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For me nature is very important, many times it is a piece of nature why i travel to places. For example a special colored lake or an endemic tree that only grows in one particular forest on one particular island. I made my first travel to Bolivia in 2004 to visit a green lake. I heard stories about a Bolivian artist who organizes exhibitions and performances in this lake, Laguna Verde, high in the Andes mountains of the Altiplano. Through South American friends I was able to trace him down, Gaston Ugalde was his name, and I proposed him the idea I had for this particular lake. He liked my idea and we decided to make it happen."

A few months later I traveled to La Paz to meet him and there, together with his assistants, we made the travel to the Laguna Verde, a few days on bumpy roads with 4wheel drives in the Andes. To reach the green lake we also crossed a white lake and a red one, Laguna Colorada. This lake as well was stunningly beautiful! It is one of the reasons why I came back, 2 years later, to make â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Vanishing Tracesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;.


BEHIND THE SCENES With some white balloons we created a kind of spiral in the lake, putting little stones on ropes underneath the balloons to keep them in place. One of my most favorite sculptures is the land-art piece by Robert Smithson, the ‘Spiral Jetty’, made in 1970. My "Vanishing Traces" is an homage to him. His Spiral Jetty. Instead of tons and tons of earth and rocks that he used to make his ‘permanent’ spiral, I used

light balloons. Easy to remove after taking the photo. The wqwwwind was already blowing some away at the moment I took the photograph. " Only a few weeks later when I came home, reading more about Smithson’s Spiral Jetty, I found out that actually his first idea was to create this work in the Laguna Colorada! I was amazed! Only because the location was too isolated, too expensive to reach with big machinery, he changed his mind and decided to make his piece in the Great Salt Lake in Utah instead. ❖ scarletthooftgraafland.nl

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DANIELLE SPIRES CAT GANGS IN EAST LA Underneath the 6th Street bridge in East LA, there is a cat gang that rules the streets. This gang of about 20 cats is led by a tough female calico. There is a man named Mike that lives inside the bridge column who feeds the cats every day and watches over them. Mike is friendly with the cats and seems to care for them the best he can. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m intrigued by the fine line between wild animal and domesticated pet. I witnessed 5 kittens tear apart a bird and drag it under the bridge, and an hour later, watched the same kittens nap and play under the streetlights. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s such a departure from my own experiences with my lovable and lazy cats. I hope to visit the gang again soon and continue the photo documentary. daniellespires.com

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ADVERTORIAL

CRAFT

ROBERT VAN EMBRICQS

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Fascinated by the aesthetically pleasing, yet intricate complexity of the natural form. Robert Finds inspiration for his designs in bone structure, plant life and movement, one question remained ever present: ‘to what degree is the object you’re creating capable of dictating its own design?’ This led him to develop a minimalistic design approach that can best be described as collaboration between designer and his material. An important aspect of his design process is Van Embricqs’ conscious focus on marrying functionality with an aesthetically pleasing look. A conscious choice for functionality in design doesn’t necessarily mean one has to be burdened by conformity, let alone predictability. Aside continuing his furniture line, Robert van Embricqs establishes flexible concepts on bigger scale in which movement creates interaction between the users and the architecture. He focused his attention on finding new ways to adapt the techniques he developed for outdoor and interior solutions.


SOMTIMES AN OBJECT IS CAPABLE OF DICTATING ITS OWN DESIGN

ROBERTVANEMBRICQS.COM


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NATURE’S WANNAHAVES Modular BEEcosystem observation hive brings honeybees inside your home In a bid to get more people reconnected with the nature of their food, Living Interiors’ new modular observation beehive helps to highlight the critical importance of pollinators to our food system. To bad this Kickstarter campaign didn’t follow through, but it’s a perfect wannahave.

Don’t you just love a bathroom that manages to elegantly integrate natural elements such as sand, stone and glass? For today, we would like to show you these original natural stone bathroom sinks that look appealing and genuine. Even though their color differs from one model to another, their essence is the same: raw natural beauty. freshome.com

The Micro Planter Chess Set, as they appropriately named it, consists of various shapes that represent each chess piece. The design of the chess set itself was inspired by a Bauhaus chess set, and the geometric forms make a nice contrast with the natural elements they contain. The set featured was printed on an Ultimaker printer. youmagine.com

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‘Glasshouse‘ by designer kristýna pojerová

A mini greenhouse that double functions as pendant lamp. The donut-shaped base features an opening at its centre, allows one to reach inside the glass form to plant small herbs within the gutterlike opening which runs around the radius of the lamp. not only facilitating easy access to the plants, it also acts as the passage of light from which an electrical bulb hangs, and ensures adequate ventilation enhancing the natural microclimate. glasshouse.cz

‘Frog bike‘ by Alex Suvajac

The bike utilizes current technologies and material. It looks progressive, sleek, fast and fan. No website found

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ADVERTORIAL

THE WEBSTORE OF

LABOUR OF ART Labour of Art - Leather Goods, is a new and upcoming label for natural leather bags and accessories by Katia Plewnia. She has developed her business over the past five years. Her workshop is located in the centre of Utrecht, The Netherlands. From conception to finishing touches, the process of making her bags takes place in the creative hub called 'Druk'. With there attached shop and slow coffee bar, where locals and tourists come together and sit by the water, she has found the perfect spot to showcase her products.

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Having worked as a graphic designer for many years, Katia gradually developed an interest in working with paper, wood, textiles and leather. While experimenting with different natural materials she explored various crafting techniques from bookbinding and silk screening to sewing. Combining these manual skills with new technologies such as laser cutting, lead to surprising effects, enhancing the appearance of an object. Katia's focus now lies on designing oversized Hobo Bags which vary in detail and colour. "Making a bag for me is like reading a book where you can't wait to see how it will end. Travelling through, the plot is the most exciting part, wondering what happens next. I want to try things out, push my own boundaries and be intrigued by the result."

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Adrett und Eigen - Preppy and distinct 'Adrett und Eigen' â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a quote from Oma Elise â&#x20AC;&#x201C; seems to be the Leitmotiv (guiding theme) throughout Katia's collection. You might want to translate it into 'preppy and distinct'. A simple and authentic design with a twist. What you'll remember are the reoccurring floating shapes that appear while assembling the bag. Coming from Lake Constance in the South of Germany, the baroque landscape and surroundings have been an inspiration.


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“T HE MORE YOU USE THE BAG THE MORE IT BECOMES YOUR OWN.” The lake with it's ever changing colour and structure depending on the time of day, the weather conditions as well as the view of the nearby Alps are reflected in the quirky shapes and ragged rhythms of Katia's designs. She also incorporates the zero-waste approach, which results in the authentic look of LABOUR OF ART. This is what eventually makes every piece unique and yet also makes them part of a cohesive and distinguished collection. Environmentally friendly materials Katia has always been intrigued by the whole design process from the initial idea, to creating the object: "I like to

focus on low emissions, short production distances and the maintaining of social standards." It certainly makes a difference using chemically untreated leather with the benefit of being allergy friendly. The leather she uses is robust and slightly distressed with minor imperfections: hides from the Bavarian Alps that are ecologically tanned with natural fibres such as Valonea or Tara. Not many suppliers can trace or guarantee the origin of the hides they are selling. Katia's search for new possibilities and the cooperation with new partners is ongoing. Put your childhood in a bag and run The appearance of sturdy leather, raw edges and the pure, unlined style appeal to men and women likewise. The big Hobo Bag is a real statement bag which can be used for work, as it fits books and a laptop, but can also be used as a market bag or even fit a football, simply all you need for an adventurous day out! As a versatile carry-all, it picks up evidence, or tracks, of the life you lead. The more you use it the more it becomes your own. LABOUR OF ART ship worldwide and your item is prepacked in a customized canvas bag for transport, storing and as a keep safe to carry with you.❖ labour-of-art.com etsy.com/shop/labourofart

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Is your design inspired by nature and do want to be in the next edition? a r t b y nat ur emag.c om ar t b y nat ur emaga zine ar t b y nat ur emag


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PARADIGM GALLERY + STUDIO Is established on February 2010, They exhibits contemporary artwork from around the world with a focus on Philadelphia-based artists, always keeping in mind the goa of curating accessible and diverse exhibitions to connect with a wide audience in a welcoming space. "We provide artists with individualized attention, strong promotional support, and a transformable gallery space to make their own."

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Paradigm has grown quite a bit over the years. We now sell artwork to people around the world both online (ParadigmArts.org) and through international art fairs such as SCOPE Miami Beach during Miami Art Basel Week. But we also still remain true to our original mission statement and roots. We have developed a program called the Community Arts Project, which involves presenting anyone that would like to show their work in the gallery

with an opportunity to take a free art class and then exhibit the work in a once a year exhibition (http://bit. ly/1v76M8t). This program also encourages people to begin collecting art at just $20 a piece, making collecting much more accessible to a larger audience.


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We have also started programming that brings artists from all over the world to Philadelphia to create work here in collaboration with HAHA Magazine (HAHAxParadigm.org). In more recent years, we have even seen many of our artists make the switch from balancing their full-time jobs and their art careers, to becoming full-time artists. Being part of that, whether a small or large part, is an incredible feeling! We feel lucky every day for the family

of artists that are a part of Paradigm Gallery + Studio, and are thrilled for you to learn more about three of these talented people here. ParadigmArts.org

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How it al got started Sara is originally from New Hope, Pennsylvania, USA and her gallery partner, Jason Chen, is originally from Guang Zhou, China. Jason and she both discovered our interest in art as a possible life path around high school. Jason, who is now fluent in three languages, but was still dealing with a language barrier at the time, was initially attracted to art as a means of communication through a universal language. My love for creating developed gradually, from crocheting next to nana as a small child, to discovering costume design in high school, to discovering fiber arts in college. Sara says. Jason and I both attended the University of the Arts in Philadelphia, where we first met. I began doing some of the styling and makeup design for Jason’s photo shoots, and we started collaborating frequently. When we both graduated, we wanted to find a way to continue to collaborate, and thought a shared studio space would be a great way to do that. I stumbled upon a place while searching for studios that happened to have a great storefront window, and really ran with Jason’s casual suggestion of “maybe we could even start a gallery space”. Before I knew it, I was hanging out in a bookstore reading “How to Form an LLC”. Running on an impulse and lots of faith, we picked up the keys, and began renovating. After pulling

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hundreds, maybe thousands, of staples out of the walls, figuring out what to do with the surprising amount of broken furniture in the basement, and conquering just a few additional fix-ups, we officially had our first home as a gallery and studio space. Today we are in a space about three times the size in a much better retail location, and have now both switched to making this our full-time job, with side jobs to make ends meet. It feels fantastic to have been able to make this our focus in our lives, and we are excited to continue to grow. saramccorriston.com thatchinesekid.com

< Of the Sea Garment: dyed, boiled & formed silk, rust on paper, rubber Dress form: aluminum, chicken wire, rubber coating, spray paint

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CROCHET ARTIST

CAITLIN MCCORMACK After my grandmother passed away, i inherited a large quantity of cotton thread that me and my sisters had once used to crochet doilies. When i found a small skull in a restaurant parking lot a few months later, i knew that i wanted to use it, along with the string i had acquired, to build an apocryphal skeletal addendum.

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In Nidum (2014; crocheted cotton string, glue, wood, velvet, steel pins; 20.25"x20.25"x1.75" framed


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2014 Exposition at Paradigm "Interhaven" (Photo's Jason Chen)


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"I INTENDED TO RELAY THE NOTION THAT THIS BEING HAD ONCE BEEN RESPONSIVE TO ITS EMPIRICAL SURROUNDINGS." Which may or may not have operated according to the same parameters as the world in which we exist. That it had been in some way transformed by the passing of time; specifically, that it had deviated from its original, authentic form. The way a memory becomes warped with each passing day. This practice felt very natural to me, and allowed me to make use of my grief. I began using the method to fabricate delicate animal skeletons, with the addition of glue as a stiffening agent.

The act of stiffening intricately crocheted cotton string with glue produces material that is structurally similar to delicate bone tissue. The string utilized in this process can be viewed as the basic cellular unit of fabrication. By utilizing media and practices inherited from my deceased relatives. I aim to generate emblems of my diminishing bloodline, embodied by each organismâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s skeletal remains. With a majority of my work, I employ pseudo­scientific principles and antiquated methods to generate material, in an attempt to impart a visual indication that something has transpired in a fabricated reality. I aim to construct the likenesses of creatures suspended in a state of perpetual dormancy.

Imparium (2015; crocheted cotton string, glue; 15" x 15" x 2.5" framed; created for "In Missa Interfectionis" at Stephen Romano Gallery, Brooklyn NY

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BY WAY OF CROCHETING - A PRACTICE THAT IS BASED UPON ACTIVE PROLIFERATION. Little by little, this process permits me to construct a very personal taxonomy of creatures symbolizing my memories and experiences. The material out of which my work is composed acts as an alchemical conduit between the garment and the clothesline; it acknowledges the latter as a symbol of the ancestry and familial bonds which have greatly informed my work. I wish to give the impression that a garment has disintegrated and reformed itself, warped by the pas­sing of time, in the image of a tenacious animalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s remains, a reflection on both the persistence of memory and the significance of cloth and thread in the realm of human experience. caitlintmccormack.com

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Supersymmetry I (2012; crocheted cotton string, glue, found skull remnant; 4" x 2.75" x 3.75"; photo by Jason Chen)


3D ARTIST HILARY WHITE I'm a maker. Making manifests in the concrete, the tangible, the “known”. Making in order to construct theories of reality stemming from science, psychadelia, and the study of theology. Making to depict an experience of reality expressed through pop culture, kitsch, and monument. The act of making is an investigation into components of existence, the end result is a shadow, globular and stretched thin in the attempt to mimic the completeness of it’s predecessor. …and this is herstarting point…the mystery of the “unmakable”… the contrast of the infinite and the finite, the spirit within the body.

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"Naming and expressing faith in the act of making is an important factor in the development of fresh dialog that investigates the subject of belief based on practice and research. This methodology provides the basis for the development of faith-related expressions within the sociological framework of â&#x20AC;&#x153;material cultureâ&#x20AC;?. Biblical symbolism, personal mythos, and the phenomenon of transcendence through visual psychedelia are utilized to produce narrative." The work pictured is from Hilary White's recent show "Ingress/Egress" with Hannah Stouffer at Paradigm Gallery in Philadelphia."


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The act of making for me is a study of faith, a wrestling within it’s framework. An awe developed from the history of Christ and his union of interdimensionality, humanity, and Spirit at work in the world. It is through making I attempt to express an eternal plane through the humble, electric, and whimsical artifact of “now”. Using symbolism exploring Biblical text, diagrams from scientific hypothesis, and visual psychedelia produced by an influx of cultural influence seemingly aimed at searching

for the “unknown” the work serves as a catalyst to further reflect upon topics of belief and wonder as intellectual and spiritual intersections between fact and faith. I am driven by the spiritual at work in the created world. My faith as a Christian is the main inspiration for the work. I believe the natural world reflects the glory of God and the beauty of humanity. When a community is healthy the natural world reflects this beauty in an interplay with all creation. Biblically symbols from nature are used to depict communities, people, and time.

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“I AM DRIVEN BY THE SPIRITUAL AT WORK IN THE CREATED WORLD.”

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This aspects of theology is woven into the work. As people I believe it is imperative to avoid disconnecting ourselves with the natural or spiritual world, they go hand in hand. The temptation at this point in history is to build our identities through virtual realities and a belief in no belief. The work I do is a call to see the world in all it’s wonder, to reflect upon the spiritual and to bring the topic of faith and God back into our cultural conversation. By doing this in a loving way my hope is that people can grow in understanding and make informed decisions for themselves based on direct and personal interaction and less on misinformation, stereotypes, and extremism. hilarywhiteart.com

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PARADIGM

Kelly Franklin & Carol Jarvis’s show, "Poor Richard", is an ode to the writings of Benjamin Franklin in his published work “Poor Richard’s Almanac” from the early to mid 1700’s. Many of these sayings about life and practical living have survived in everyday use, and just as many have been forgotten. Kelly Franklin and Carol Jarvis have given visual life to a choice few favorites from both of these categories. Working on pieces separately and collaboratively via post, the artists translate the text with symbolism and a deep-rooted love of nature. They invite you, the viewer, to reflect on these tropes with modern eyes, and enjoy their naturalistic and crisp artistic representations.

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PARADIGM

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KELLY FRANKLIN Nature inspires me in a multitude of ways. I draw from its beauty, its diversity, its depth of color, its perfect systems, its exchange of energy, its unpredictability, its vastness and its intricate detail, to name a few specifics.

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Nature is full of wonder and I will never run out of inspiration when I look outdoors. All of the love that I have for the natural world is put into every piece of work that I create; it is something that flows through my life and effects every aspect of my existence. In many of my pieces there are themes of appreciation and conservation of nature, some focus on excitement and adventure in the wilderness, but all are a tribute to this incredible planet that we are all fortunate enough to inhabit - our own personal wonderland. My goal is always to inspire others to appreciate nature and to incite curiosity for the world around us. What other artists inspire you? Well, there would be far too many to name! I’m inspired

ART BY NATURE

Vicente’s Poison Frog, Graphite & White Pastel on paper, 9”x 9”

by all people who put time and care into the things that they create, in a wide variety of media. I am constantly having tiny artistic epiphanies when I see other artists work. I like this quote from the author Chuck Palahniuk, “Nothing of me is original. I am the combined effort of everyone I’ve ever known.” and my art is the combined effort of everything I’ve ever absorbed. Obviously some artists and pieces are more influential to my specific style of art than others but overall the influence comes from all sides. I have a folder of bookmarks on my computer titled artists, within that there are local philadelphia artists, American artists, foreign artists, illustrators, painters, muralists, street artists, photographers, sign painters, designers, carpenters, wood workers, etc. That list goes on and on. I find inspiration in places I wouldn’t have even expected myself to when it comes to other creative types. Generally, I enjoy having some realistically painted or drawn element in most of my pieces, though the material itself can often vary. I generally paint with acrylic and draw with graphite, charcoal and white pastel. In


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“ MY ART IS THE COMBINED EFFORT OF EVERYTHING I’VE EVER ABSORBED.” addition to those materials I utilize wood burning, staining and carving, various photo transfer techniques, pen & ink drawing, and occasionally embroidery. I’m sure that more will be added to that list as I continue to make work. I often keep myself interested by working in different mediums on the same piece

and generally like the result better when I have a variety of texture and style on an individual piece. What is your history? I grew up in a suburb of Philadelphia. Nature comprised a large part of my childhood since I was always outside and loved animals from day 1. When I was 10, I actually wrote & illustrated a book for our school’s library about tree frogs and in the ‘about the author’ section I said that when I

ART BY NATURE


grew up I wanted to be a book illustrator or a vet. I’d like to think that the work I’m making now honors my career desires as a 10 year old. Though I was always making things throughout my childhood, I think I really first developed a love of art in middle school. This was the first time that we had the option of after school clubs, and as soon as I was given the opportunity, I involved myself in as many art groups as possible. From then on, I took advantage of as many art classes and programs as I had knowledge of. At that point I was starting to visualize a career in art and looked into art colleges. After high school, I attended the Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA) in Baltimore for 4 years and graduated with my Bachelors of Fine Art in Illustration. I started in the painting department and switched to illustration my Junior year from my perspective this gave me both the painterly practice and the practical knowledge to go into business for myself. After college I worked for Whole Foods Market as an in-store chalkboard artist at 2 different locations for 4 years. I left Whole Foods in 2012 and started freelancing in chalkboard art and sign-making, though all the while I was producing my own artwork for various shows and clients. Though I still do a large amount of signage, I am focusing my energy more on the paintings and murals that I have been creating recently. My show with Carol Jarvis at the Paradigm Gallery called “Poor Richard” was a step in the right direction and I am planning on continuing that line of work that is so inspired by nature.

kellypfranklin.com From the “Poor Richard” “The sleeping fox catches no poultry. Up! Up!” Graphite, Pastel & Acrylic on wood panel, 36”h x 12”w

ART BY NATURE


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From the “Poor Richard” show: “If your head is wax, don’t walk in the sun” Graphite & acrylic on wood panel, 8” diameter


Don't Think to Hunt Two Hares With One Dog- Acrylic Painting on Wooden Panel


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VISUALARTIST

CAROL JARVIS Yūgen (幽玄- Japanese) : An awareness of the Universe that triggers emotional responses too deep and powerful for words. I find this is often why i create art.

ART BY NATURE


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we have an opportunity as living creatures in this universe to observe it. And an even more unique experience as humans to share and express those impressions. The ideas of interaction between beings and life with the cosmos are ideas that I find endlessly captivating and influence my work greatly. Every person’s unexplainable observations of this life are fundamentally, in terms of our perceptions, singular encounters with nature. I like to think of my art work as snapshots of experiences I’ve had, or inspired by the thought provoking shared memories of others. There is also a deep symbolism that humanity has assigned to most aspects of nature which I really enjoy exploring. The show, Poor Richard, that I did

ART BY NATURE

with Kelly Franklin, was a testament to that notion. Outside of using images of flora and fauna as an analogy to our own lives, I use many detailed and repetitive textures in my work that are directly inspired by the night sky and the shapes of cosmic anomalies because that is where I often where I pick up the thread to this overwhelming sense of awe. If I can channel any small part of that intensity which nature has in it’s simply being, then I feel like I’ve done a good job." What other artists inspire you? Every artist I’ve met and spoken to at length has influenced me. It’s impossible not to be inspired by people who love what they do. Major landmark artists strike close to home for me. For as far back as I can remember I drew daily with my Mom. She is an amazing artist, habitual sketcher and appreciator of the outdoors. We went into nature, traversed museums, and just generally explored life visually. I can quite earnestly say she was the first and is the most inspiring artist of my life. Similarly, she introduced me to many artists she


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Clean Your Finger Before You Point At My Spots- Acrylic Painting on Wooden Panel


TRAVELS WITH

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ART BY NATURE


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"THIS IS A LIFE LONG PROJECT WHICH I AM THRILLED TO BE LIVING." knew in Philadelphia at the time, like Arlene McGuire, and artists she admired (John R. Neill, Gustave Doré, William Morris, Frank Lloyd Wright and Helen Dryden) all of whom are deeply rooted in my esthetic. There could be notebooks full of names of artists I have never met who have been artistically significant to me. I spent half a year studying one painting of symbolist painter George Frederic Watts, entitled ‘Hope’. My focus in college was primarily centered around old masters studies, which is the practice of learning the pallet and techniques of an accomplished artist from history. When you spend that much time with any one artist’s work it’s very easy for color preferences, composition and movement to become assimilated into your own artistic choices.

My Professors Andrew Winship and Bonnie Klehr, my Phantom Hand co-contributors Sam Heimer and Alex Eckman-Lawn, my fellow artist and show partner Kelly Franklin; all of these people and so many more have shaped the way I approach, appreciate and produce my own work. They say it takes a village to raise a child. After meeting so many people and spending a lot of time with the visual manifestations from people long since gone, I think it’s fair to say that it takes hands from antiquity to the hereand-now, and a community of nations to build an artist. This is a life long project which I am thrilled to be living. What is your history? The greater Philadelphia area is full of artists and craftsmen which is perfect for someone like me where there has always been a fascination for the hand wrought. I grew up watching my family make fiber art, stained glass, painting, drawing, metal working and generally creating.

Left page: Wanderer Reduction Block Print

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Small as a mouse, Large as the sky - Copper Plate etching.

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"I GREW UP IN PHILADELPHIA AND SPRING CITY, PENNSYLVANIA, SKETCHBOOK IN HAND." In high school my chosen path towards being an artist was cemented when I was offered studio classes at Moore College of Art as a part of their YAW (Youth Artist Workshop) program and when I did some travel abroad spending time at the Blue Riderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Museum in Munich. I left Philadelphia for Illinois to study Painting and Printmaking at Barat College in Lake Forest, and Printmaking at the Art Institute of Chicago. After

ART BY NATURE

school I had the amazing experience of working with Lonni Rossi learning fabric printing and processes, and started working as a Resident Store Artist for Whole Foods Market. Having left my position at Whole Foods three years ago, I continue to paint chalkboards and signs from the Pacific North to the Mid-Atlantic. I have also expanded on my painting, printmaking, and a litany of illustration making up the body of my page a day sketchbook project, which I often post online. â?&#x2013; carolpaist.com


Striking a Chord- Reduction Block Print


Abyss Table “AND WHEN YOU GAZE LONG INTO AN ABYSS, THE ABYSS ALSO GAZES INTO YOU.” - FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE.

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Number 1 Art by Nature Magazine  

Nature inspires. An independent magazine dedicated to creativity inspired in any way or form by nature.

Number 1 Art by Nature Magazine  

Nature inspires. An independent magazine dedicated to creativity inspired in any way or form by nature.

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