Page 1

CARRIER AND COMPANY Hits the Beach

MAN IN MOTION

Timothy Brown Takes Off JUN

JUL

AUG

SEP

2017 $6.50

TREASURES ON 10

Digging 1stdibs


Timelessly designed, each piece of SA Baxter hardware and lighting carries the SA Baxter mark. It is our master artisans’ signature, attesting to the quality of the piece and certifying that it has not only been produced using the finest materials, but that it meets the highest standards of design. It is a promise of our unending commitment to produce the worlds most distinctive hardware and lighting in our foundry and atelier.

2


NEW YORK

SABAXTER.COM

LONDON JUN JUL

AUG

SEP

2017

ARRAY

1


2

bolierco.com | 212.889.2060 | 200 lexington ave | suite 804 | new york | info@bolierco.com


JUN JUL

AUG

SEP

2017

ARRAY

3


Features

Volume 14 Issue 2

18

26

14 1st and 10 By Cathy Whitlock Antiques and artifacts await discovery at 1stdibs Gallery at 200 Lex.

18 Shelter Island Sophisticate By Cathy Whitlock Class meets comfort in a historic seaside manor designed by Carrier and Company.

55

26 Man in Motion By Catherine McHugh Designer Timothy Brown doesn’t like to stand still for long, as his two latest ventures attest.

ARRAY 10

4


Departments

Volume 14 Issue 2

41

10 STYLERADAR By Katie Doyle Mary McDonald picks the very best dog products for our stylish four-legged friends.

12 TROVE By Katie Doyle Go high end and high tech at your next summer gathering.

34 BOOKS By Cathy Whitlock Savor your summer with tales of seaside living, country entertaining and one of the world’s greatest designers.

80

36 EATS’N’SLEEPS By Katie Doyle Stay or dine in the shadow of the city's greatest landmarks (including 200 Lex).

38 GALLERY 46

A picture-perfect showroom exhibition. l FRESHPICKS The most current products in 200 Lex showrooms.

54 STYLESPOTLIGHT Featured highlights of craft and design.

62 DEFININGPIECES Items that sum up what a showroom is all about.

70 NEWSHOWROOMS Fresh faces and new designs.

71 SHOWROOMPORTRAITS Profiles of some of 200 Lex's most familiar names.

74 SHOWROOMDIRECTORY A complete list of who’s where in 200 Lex.

75 CULTURECALENDAR By Catherine McHugh Welcoming a friend at the Botanical Gardens and a centennial at the Met, and seeing eclipses—and light—in New Jersey.

69

78 EVENTSAT200LEX A look at a few recent celebrations.

80 BACKSTORY By Ted Lambert Now celebrating its 90th anniversary, Bendheim Glass looks to the future.

JUN JUL

AUG

SEP

2017

ARRAY

5


ARRAY MAGAZINE, INC. 115 West 18th Street Second Floor New York, NY 10011 +1.212.929.2733 x103 arrayny.com

ARRAY editorial coverage@arrayny.com ARRAY advertising adinfo@arrayny.com ARRAY Magazine is produced three times per year. All submissions should be e-mailed to: coverage@arrayny.com

Array Magazine, Inc. Š 2017 All rights reserved The contents of ARRAY Magazine, Inc., may not be reproduced without written permission from the publisher.

EDITORIAL Paul Millman Editor-in-Chief/Publisher Sheau Ling Soo Creative Director Ted Lambert Executive Editor Fred Albert Managing Editor/Copy Editor Cathy Whitlock Features Editor Andrew French Photographer Adam Cohen IT Manager

CONTRIBUTORS Catherine McHugh Cathy Whitlock Katie Doyle Ted Lambert

NEW YORK DESIGN CENTER James P. Druckman President & CEO Daniel M. Farr Director of Operations Alix M. Lerman Chief Marketing Officer Leah S. Blank Director of Special Events/Marketing Claire Evans Public Relations Manager/Design Services Manager Brenna Stevens Marketing & Digital Manager Susan Lai Controller ON THE COVER Mara Miller and Jesse Carrier photographed by Sang An.

6

Vera Markovich Accounting Manager


NYDC

SHOWROOM

|

SUITE

506

|

212.213.4900

See more pieces like this in our Dark Beauty style story at www.curreyandcompany.com/NEW

Atlanta

Dallas

High Point

Las Vegas • New York


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

Dear Readers,

IN

the design game, it’s important to keep moving—moving around town, between cities and countries, moving with trends and new products, moving to new spaces and new clients, and meeting new requirements.

In this issue of ARRAY, we’ll stop and freeze the picture for just a moment to introduce you to designers who are always on the go and several companies that never stop innovating—even if it’s to help you find that perfect item from the past. Timothy Brown goes with the flow, and that has led him to 200 Lex. Not only does he operate his own TIMOTHY BROWN STUDIO here, he’s also the proprietor of the t brown studio next door, which features a collection of furniture pieces he’s curated, and where he intends to launch his own line of products. His apartment, in an I.M. Pei–designed building, is just a stone’s throw away and even has a view of 200 Lex. Now he doesn’t even have to wait for transportation (Man in Motion, p. 26). Movement in our field also means finding ways to make spaces flow. For the husband-and-wife team of Jesse Carrier and Mara Miller, collectively known as Carrier and Company, taking on a 19th-century manor house on Shelter Island presented that exact conundrum. The couple beautifully transformed the landmarked home into a relaxed 21st-century family beach house that can also host an elegant evening for guests (Shelter Island Sophisticate, p. 18). Objects move, too, and 1stdibs Gallery at 200 Lex captures them in the wild and brings them home to the 10th floor of 200 Lex. The gallery’s constantly changing inventory assures that every time you stop by you can grab something that grabs your eye and that no one else has. Our own Cathy Whitlock interviews gallery manager Emily Collins for a little insight into what keeps their clients coming back and attracting new customers (1st and 10, p. 14). Cathy also spoke to three of the 1stdibs Gallery at 200 Lex dealers to get their thoughts on why it’s an innovative showcase (Dealer’s Choice, p. 16). And finally, turn to our last page to learn about an exciting impending arrival. After nearly a century downtown, Bendheim Glass, manufacturers and dealers of every kind of specialty glass from decorative to architectural, will open a showroom to serve the design community right here at 200 Lex. That’s one smart move. While you’re on the move, grab this issue and stuff it into your beach bag, your backpack or your carry-on luggage. When you stop for a moment to catch your breath (it is summertime, after all), you can also catch up with the designers and all the things in constant motion right here. Safe travels!

Paul Millman Editor-in-Chief

Photo by Andrew French

8


D A L L A S

|

N E W

Y O R K

|

P A R I S

|

S E A T T L E

INTERIOR DESIGN & FURNITURE COLLECTION

DIXON CONSOLE

REPRESENTED AT THE NEW YORK DESIGN CENTER BY

DENNIS MILLER A S S O C I A T E S W W W. D E N N I S M I L L E R . C O M W W W. C H R I S T I A N G R E V S TA D . C O M JUN JUL

AUG

SEP

2017

ARRAY

9


StyleRadar

By Katie Doyle

Mary McDonald

Mary McDonald picks the very best dog products for our stylish four-legged friends.

Mary’s Picks

1

2

3

4

10


Based in Los Angeles, Mary McDonald is an award-winning, internationally recognized designer and author of the best-selling Rizzoli book Mary McDonald Interiors. Her designs have been featured in numerous national publications and in multiple product lines, including acclaimed textile collections for F. Schumacher & Co., lighting for Robert Abbey, rugs for Patterson Flynn Martin and furniture for Chaddock. Well known for her appearances on Bravo TV’s Million Dollar Decorators and Property Envy, this tastemaker and loving dog mama is also the perfect person to curate a selection of the Top 10 canine accessories.

1. Andrea Collar & Leash max-bone.com, $85 for leash, $65 for collar The must-have leash and collar in Nantucket. 2. Signature Pet Carrier hartmanandrose.com, $369 This cognac leather carrier from Hartman & Rose looks like part of a fine Italian leather luggage set—which is wonderful if you are lucky enough to have a small dog that fits for travel, which I do!

5

3. Buffalo Check Envelope Bed harrybarker.com, from $110 Connecticut chic is all I have to say …

Mary McDonald Photo by Ninelle Efremova

4. Hemingway Classic Dog Coat bitchnewyork.com, $328 This dog coat with leather trim rivals a Gucci military coat of mine. Perfect for the dog/owner twinsy type!

6

5. Tartan Wool-Blend Dog Coat ralphlauren.com, $95 Tartan! Perfect for my gaggle of pugs at Christmas. 6. Zebra Biscuit Tin harrybarker.com, $17 The dogs like these treats, but I honestly want to buy these just for the tins and line then up on the counter. It is very doggie decorator.

8 9

7. Zebra Rug Canvas Toy harrybarker.com, $12 This is a no-brainer. It appeals to the “dogsigner” in all of us. 8. Rope Toy Trio max-bone.com, $43 Nothing better than chic doggie toys. 9. Desmond Walnut Bowl max-bone.com, $180 First of all, my brother and father’s names are Desmond, so the name itself had me sold. This double bowl in a chic square walnut frame is perfect for a summer beach or lake house. Easily removable and cleanable—which is a must.

10

7

10. Giant Grey Knit Blanket max-bone.com, $110 This chunky knit dog blanket rivals Barney’s knits. I could sew two together for a poncho and be perfectly happy. There is nothing doggie about it—except how snuggly it is. JUN JUL

AUG

SEP

2017

ARRAY

11


Trove 01

By Katie Doyle

Go high end and high tech at your next summer gathering.

THIS LITTLE PIGGY   Go hog wild with the Traeger Wood Pellet Grill, which gives you the versatility to smoke, bake, braise, grill and roast, all in one. Don’t be fooled by its whimsical design, curly tail and long lashes—this grill is a lot more than fun and games. Using 100 percent natural hardwood, it infuses your meats with the signature flavor that Traeger grills are known for. With 425 square inches of grilling area and an 11.5-pound hopper, the Traeger Wood Pellet Grill also features an auto-start controller and a digital controller, which allows you to adjust the temperature from afar. Traeger Wood Pellet Grill, $4,400.68 at orcharddepot.com.

02

BEAR NECESSITY 
 Low on tech but high on whimsy, this Bear Ice Shaver brings colorful cheer to any summer fête. With its wide eyes and winning smile, the bear is a pop culture icon in Japan, where it originated in 1976. Although there’s a lot of charm in its bright, novelty exterior (the eyes even move as the handle turns), inside is an industrialstrength grinder that produces shaved ice for the perfect snow cone filling. Just toss in some ice cubes, or fill the removable inner cup with water or fruit juice, then freeze. (Or use rosé, for a boozy take on a summertime classic.) Available in lemonade yellow, sky blue or tangerine orange. Bear Ice Shaver, $78 at moma.org.

03 HOT COOLER Coolers just got a lot cooler, thanks to Sovaro. Whether you pack a case of craft beer, several handles of your best tequila or a range of rosé (the cooler holds 18 bottles), you can trust your drinks will stay ice cold. In fact, this cooler can withstand up to 1,000 degrees Fahrenheit and blocks up to 97 percent of the sun’s radiant heat. Lined with cork, which is a natural insulator and resistant to mold and mildew, the cooler’s friction hinges allow for easy access. Its inner liner is transparent and easy to clean, while an airtight rubber gasket locks in cold air with a perfect seal. The unique white finish and gold accents make it a stylish centerpiece to any barbecue, pool party or beach day. Sovaro 70 Quart White Gold Cooler, $895 at sovaro.com. 

12

04 TAKE IT ALL IN Shockproof, waterproof and rustproof, this 360-degree camera will capture all of your summer festivities—from wild to whimsical—with its 4K capabilities. Going beyond high definition, the camera can operate in both a 360-degree and first-person perspective. It is Wi-Fi enabled and also contains the ability to record, edit and share directly to social media accounts, so you can capture the season’s best memories right as they happen. The camera pairs with an app and is entirely controlled by your smartphone. 360fly 360-Degree Camera, $499 at 360fly.com.


05

TIMBER TIMBRE This Baltic birch speaker is wireless in the truest sense. Forget battery power or cords—with this device, physics do the work. Sound from your smartphone’s speaker is harnessed and reflected down into a unique acoustic cone, which heightens and brightens audio quality, much like a classic megaphone or old-style phonograph horn. The device is handmade in High Ridge, Mo., and is as much an accessory as it is an amplifier, thanks to its sleek shape and vibrant natural birch finish. The amplifier is designed to accommodate most smartphones, even ones in cases. Timbrefone Acoustic Phone Amp, $100 at uncommongoods.com. 

SLICE OF HEAVEN

06 PUBLIC SPEAKER Elevate the (audio) quality of your summer parties with surround sound, which gets a sleek new look thanks to Bang & Olufsen’s Beoplay M5 wireless speaker. True360 omnidirectional sound ensures superior audio quality, no matter where the speaker is placed. The aluminum disc on top is touchsensitive, so you can adjust volume and play or pause with just a tap. With Bluetooth, Apple AirPlay, Ethernet and Wi-Fi enabled, your choice of music is truly unlimited. The speaker comes with a beautiful light-gray fabric cover which can be replaced to match your decor. Beoplay M5 by Bang & Olufsen, $599 at bhphotovideo.com.

Pizza, anyone? With this portable (yes, portable) tabletop Bull BBQ Pizza Oven, you can fire up pies in any backyard or outdoor space. The oven is made in Italy from electrogalvanized steel for solid welded construction and superior durability. The oven’s rock-based insulation and food-grade cooking stones guarantee even heat for a perfect pie, while its wood fire ensures a classic taste. The oven requires only 10–15 minutes of preheating, so you and your guests can enjoy homemade pies in a flash. BullBBQ Extra Large Pizza Oven, $2,837 at bullbbq.com. 

08

07

LIGHT FANTASTIC A light for the modern age, this next-generation sound lantern offers 360-degree sound and illumination. Designed by Carmine Deganello and Pablo Pardo, the lantern is portable, thanks to its premium leather strap, which is included in both a beige and a gray tone. The lantern integrates high-fidelity surround sound with a gorgeous warm light that can be controlled with a fullrange dimmer, adding a soft glow and sultry ambience to any outdoor or indoor gathering. The lantern has full Bluetooth connectivity, allowing playlist control via any Bluetooth-enabled mobile device. Volume can be controlled by touch. Pablo UMA Sound Lantern, $479 at 2modern.com. 

JUN JUL

AUG

SEP

2017

ARRAY

13


By Cathy Whitlock

1st and 1stdibs Gallery at 200 Lex

A

treasure trove of formal and modern antiques—coupled with an art gallery and items that can best be described as whimsical—may be found on the

10th floor at 1stdibs Gallery at 200 Lex. A go-to spot for discerning clients and the country’s top interior designers and architects, the gallery is a cross between a museum and an antiques showroom, with a little something for every taste.

14


ARRAY magazine recently chatted with Gallery Manager Emily Collins, who offered an inside look at this one-of-a-kind space. ARRAY: This is quite a destination for shoppers and art and antiques aficionados alike. What can you tell me about the space? EC: We at 200 Lex are in partnership with 1stdibs and house 54 dealers in a 33,000-square-foot space. We have a sales team of four who are here to help and know everything on the floor intimately. We have unique pieces ranging from high-quality museum-worthy items and Georgian furniture to beautiful sectional sofas to tiny little vases. There is a constant rotation of fresh things. Dealers bring in new items every single day, which pretty much contributes to having thousands of items on the floor.

What have been some of your most unusual sales? We just sold a life-size papier-mâché ostrich to someone who bought it as a present for her boyfriend. It’s like being a kid in a candy store here. You can literally fulfill your wildest design dreams in a day!

And what are some of the changes you have seen the past couple of years, trendwise? I think most people want their homes to reflect their personalities, rather than have their home decorated entirely in one design period or style. The more you mix things up, the more interesting and engaging your home becomes.

Lawton Mull

Since many of us are self-professed shopaholics, what is unique about the shopping experience here? You are not going to run into these pieces anywhere else. There is truly nothing else in New York City like this. Some may have a similar concept, but not the level and amount of vetting required for dealers to be on this floor. There is no parallel anywhere else, which really makes it unique. Also, customers can shop here with a lot of confidence—this is not a place where you have to come in and dig for items! We work with the biggest designers in the industry and are very good at helping people who come in and say, ‘We have purchased a home. Can you help us? This is what we need.’ We do the hand-holding and a lot of the legwork. Basically, we are a fine art and antiques show open Monday through Friday (and until 7 p.m. on Thursday evenings).

Solo Modern

“It’s like being a kid in candy store here. You can literally fulfill your wildest design dreams in a day!” Full Circle Modern JUN JUL

AUG

SEP

2017

ARRAY

15


DEALER’S CHOICE

“T

he great thing about the gallery is that you can sell such a wide array of things, from African art and Brutalist furniture to Italian art glass, 18th-century chairs and fine French Deco. We even sold a pair of Italian Baroque giltwood mirrors to Lady Gaga! The gallery also has a great team of salespeople that is very professional and knowledgeable about antiques and design. They are very creative and regularly create beautiful vignettes to inspire the clients as to how to mix great things together.”                                   —Francis Lord, Milord Antiques

Lawton Mull

You don’t just sell antique and vintage items. You have your own art gallery, too. We have an 11,000-square-foot gallery within the space that is constantly rotating shows. We just had artist Rochelle Udell, whose multimedia depictions of chairs addressed their role in raising humans off the floor above animals, their significance as cultural icons, and why sitting is never just sitting. Next up is the RISD Textile MFA 2017 exhibition, which is shown every year in the gallery.

How do you attract potential buyers? We advertise in the traditional ways, but we also try and cater our selection of merchandise to the needs of our clients. We want clients to keep coming back, so we work with dealers who only bring the best and most desirable items.

In terms of sales, what are some of the most popular categories? Midcentury is still going strong, as adding a couple of pieces makes a shorthand for chic or cool design, and it’s easy to plug in a couple of items to automatically achieve that look. The New York Times did an article a few months ago titled Why Won’t Midcentury Design Die? and I don’t think it is going to die anytime soon! We are finding, though, that people are appreciating more antiques and are going for an eclectic look that is not just an interior totally filled with midcentury pieces anymore.

16

Lova Creation coffee table from Belgium, c. 1980.


ARRAY recently asked three of the most prestigious dealers at the 1stdibs Gallery at 200 Lex to give us their take on shopping the 10th floor.

“T

he 1stdibs Gallery at 200 Lex is the only space of its sort in the city—the other two main design centers focus exclusively on new product. It is also most likely the highest concentration of vintage design and antiques under one roof in the city. So 200 Lex provides a one-stop shopping experience for designers and savvy retail buyers. There is a tremendous range to the offerings on the floor, in terms of period, style and price point.

I have been a dealer in this field since the early 1990s and have gotten to know a lot of people in the trade, but I continue to meet new designers and customers on the 10th floor, as well as in my showroom. I’ve had a number of notable sales on the 10th floor, including a massive Karl Springer goatskin-clad, knife-edge dining table sold to an internationally renowned photographer, and a rare Borge Mogensen teak shelving unit sold to an equally renowned product and furniture designer.” Victor Vasarely plate for Rosenthal Studio Line.

—Larry Weinberg, Weinberg Modern

Vladimir Kagan Contour Rocking Chair

Maelstrom Cabinet by Caleb Woodard

“A

s with artists and musicians—and I came to New York as a classical harpist 20 years ago—if you are inspired to build a great gallery and show interesting pieces, you have to be in New York! It is so great to see my vision appreciated by designers, architects and private individuals. The 10th floor is the only high-end antiques center of its kind in New York, and the sales staff is very professional and helpful. They do all the work. I could be in Paris, or sitting on the beach, and know my gallery is well attended and taken care of.” —Dobrinka Salzman, Collection 20C

JUN JUL

AUG

SEP

2017

ARRAY

17


By Cathy Whitlock Photographs by Zach Desart

Peconic Bay beckons outside the teenage daughter’s bedroom, which Carrier and Company furnished with a built-in captain’s bed and hanging Bubble Chair.

18


CLASS MEETS COMFORT IN A HISTORIC SEASIDE MANOR DESIGNED BY CARRIER AND COMPANY.

JUN JUL

AUG

SEP

2017

ARRAY

19


20


R

enovating a house that was built atop an ancient Indian burial ground could prove daunting for even the most intrepid designer. Fortunately, Carrier and Company’s recent design of just such a home managed to dodge any repercussions—either legal or otherworldly. The husband-and-wife design team of Jesse Carrier and Mara Miller worked with architect John David Rose on the design and revamp of a 19th-century Shelter Island manor complete with spectacular waterfront vistas and a lookout tower. Built in 1873, the national landmark is the vacation home for an active family of four. “The preservation of a national landmark presented challenges of its own kind,” notes Miller. “Since it was on an Indian burial ground, it had to be tested and dug, and there were places they weren’t allowed to touch.” The two main directives from the client were to maximize the turn-of-the-century shingle-style property’s view of the water, and to create a sophisticated yet family-friendly house. “The project morphed over time,” explains Miller. “Initially, this was the husband’s pet project, and was to be a very clubby, masculine, Ralph Lauren–style house. Over time, the wife became more and more enamored and had a more contemporary point of view. In the end, it became a very transitional interior.”

Photo by BFA

Opposite page: Top: A braided jute rug from Crosby Street Studios anchors the living room, which is divided by a contemporary center table encrusted with seashells, to reflect the waterfront setting. Bottom left: The semicircular sunroom doubles as a cabana for the neighboring pool and features a Jay Swivel Chair from Century upholstered in an all-weather fabric from Quadrille. Bottom right: The powder room’s Crezana wallpaper is from John Rosselli & Associates. This page: Above: Husband-and-wife designers Jesse Carrier and Mara Miller say their experience as parents helps them address the needs of families. Left: The sunroom’s window bay cradles a custom sofa covered in all-weather velvet.

JUN JUL

AUG

SEP

2017

ARRAY

21


22


Designing an open floor plan to accommodate the children and creating a personalized, casual atmosphere were other considerations. “This was a kind of grand home on a prominent point on the water—it has a beautiful arrival and also functions very well if the kids have wet feet,” says Miller. “The clients wanted to entertain at parties, and the design gives it an element of sophistication. It was important to have a place to serve drinks and a baby grand piano, as this house was meant to have a nightlife.” The resulting design scheme is comfortable, but feels more sophisticated than your typical beach house. Working with what they call “a kind of fresher, paler blue and white story,” the designers employed crème Belgian-style custom upholstery mixed with vintage touches and a bit of the unexpected. An attractive zinc-topped Belgian-style dining table adds an indoor/ outdoor feel, while accents such as a shell-encrusted table pay a nod to the sea. The home is classic Carrier and Company and represents the sensibilities of the designing couple: cool, measured rooms, understated patterns, attention to detail and neutral palettes with a hit of color—an approach celebrated in their 2015 book Carrier and Company: Positively Chic Interiors.

Top row, left to right: This end of the living room is dominated by Chuck Baker’s photograph of a beech tree on the property; the pair of 1940s Danish chairs are joined by a midcentury settee and a custom chair covered in a Malabar stripe. Rattan bistro chairs surround a Saarinen breakfast table from Knoll. Bottom row, left to right: The living room’s midcentury coffee table is covered in mosaic tile. A Large Glass Bubble Chandelier from Liza Sherman illuminates a set of Baker chairs in the dining room; a simulated nail head pattern adorns the Phillip Jeffries grasscloth on the wall. The kitchen’s Waterworks tile backsplash is paired with E.T. Raffel cabinets topped with Calacatta marble and zinc.

JUN JUL

AUG

SEP

2017

ARRAY

23


Jesse Carrier and Mara Miller Favorite Things This page: A Sam Glankoff painting echoes the master bath’s aquatic palette; the mosaic tile floor is set in a wave pattern. Opposite above: A sculpted iron canopy bed from Oly Studio surveys the view from the master bedroom. Opposite below: The bedroom’s sitting area features a custom sofa flanked by a vintage Bertoia chair; the built-in desk under the windows is from Tucker Robbins.

Carrier and Miller are partial to (from top): This beaded and top-stitched pillow from Global Views; a glazed ceramic Regina Lamp from Arteriors; Beachy HandKnotted Natural Rugs from Crosby Street Studios.

24


The pair met while students at the Fashion Institute of Technology and trained under some of the top talents in the country. Carrier studied with Thomas O’Brien’s Aero Studio and Jeffrey Bilhuber, while Miller worked with Sills Huniford and Marcy Masterson. Since that time, the AD 100 and Elle Decor A-list couple has designed residences for Vogue Editor-inChief Anna Wintour, fashion designer Jason Wu, photographer Annie Leibovitz and Oscar-winning actress Jessica Chastain, among others. “We definitely have strengths or affinities, as Jesse is more of a colorist and I am more interested in fabrics, schemes and furniture plans—the sculptural quality of making furniture and compositions,” says Miller. “We both enjoy both sides of it.” Miller also credits their success to the fact that they are an actual couple with two young children and know the ropes. “One thing people tell us over and over again is how accessible and livable our designs seem to be,” she says. “We are going to make things that actually function and last. People find that very appealing.” For a couple that practices classic decorating with livability and style, the Shelter Island project accomplished exactly what the designers and their clients wanted—without a single ghost.

JUN JUL

AUG

SEP

2017

ARRAY

25


By Catherine McHugh Photographs by Joshua McHugh Photography

M

A

N

IN MOTION DESIGNER TIMOTHY BROWN DOESN’T LIKE TO STAND STILL FOR LONG, AS HIS TWO LATEST VENTURES ATTEST.

26


Photo by Jeffrey Hirsch

Left: Timothy Brown’s Manhattan bedroom features a platform bed he built himself. For dressers, the designer pushed together two cabinets that have different details. “One I bought for $300 years ago,” he says. “Then I finally found another one at an antique store and it was $3,000, but I couldn’t pass it up.” Above: Brown at home in front of an abstract painting he did while in college. Above right: A vintage white marble lamp stands next to a pair of ceramic pieces created by a Hamptons artist. Right: Brown repurposed a 1970s French metal filing cabinet into a bedside table.

A few months ago, Timothy Brown made his big move, becoming one of the latest tenants of 200 Lex. Make that two of the latest tenants: His TIMOTHY BROWN STUDIO in Suite 1608 houses Brown’s design business and staff of five, while his t brown studio in Suite 1610 showcases a curated collection of home furnishings. “I talked to some friends who had moved their businesses and stores to the New York Design Center, and I thought, ‘Why not do that?’” he says. “You get a lot of foot traffic from people who are just walking the floors in this iconic building.” The majority of t brown studio’s inventory consists of vintage and antique items, but Brown has plans to add some new and unique pieces later this year. “We are going to be coming out with some lamps, side tables, consoles and other items of my own design,” he says. “We’re always designing furniture— though not as an official line. I’ve got some ideas, so we’re going to try to make them and see how people respond.” Trusting his instincts has certainly worked out well for the Tennessee native. Brown grew up on a farm about an hour south of Nashville, where he spent a lot of time building houses and furniture with his grandfather. “I don’t really know how I got into design,” he says. “I think we kind of found each other, in a way. When it was time to go to college, I settled on architecture and design, and then doing interior design.”

JUN JUL

AUG

SEP

2017

ARRAY

27


Part of the curriculum at the University of Tennessee’s College of Architecture + Design requires a design internship, which prompted Brown’s first big move. “I wanted to do real design, so I figured why not start at the top and go from there? So I just went down the back of Architectural Digest and looked for firms that I recognized and whose work I liked,” he says. “I wrote to Victoria Hagan and she gave me a summer job!” Though Brown didn’t get to spend much time with Hagan herself, he helped her get to a presentation in front of I.M. Pei for the presidential suite at the Four Seasons. “I was helping her take all of her materials down to the car, and there was little Timothy asking Victoria Hagan: ‘Are you nervous?’ And she said, ‘I am a little bit.’ And I said, ‘Well, just remember: He puts his pants on one leg at a time, too.’ I still can’t believe I said that to her!” After finishing his degree, Brown moved back to New York in 2001 and went to work for Wayne Nathan. Two years later, he began working for Robert Stilin in the Hamptons. “I would help him when he needed it, and I was doing some other work at the time, as well,” Brown says. “It was good exposure to being able to work out there and learn my way around.” By 2004, Brown was taking on little jobs on his own. “When you start a business, you do it one job at a time,” he says. “You don’t make enough money at first to allow you not to work for somebody else.”

28

Top row: A vintage mushroom lamp sits atop a stack of books in the living room. The top two photographs are by Christina Dix; the bottom one is by Richard Pence. The opposite wall hosts a large photo by Elger Esser; the Milo Baughman velvet armchair below it was found at an antiques show about “a hundred years ago,” and is flanked by a Noguchi lantern. The imposing Joe D’Urso cocktail table was originally for a client, “but we changed our minds, so I ended up with it,” Brown says. “Which I’m very happy about.”


Brown also paid the bills by working as a decorative painter, which he had learned to do in college. In 2008, he started working for Eric Hughes, who was based in Los Angeles and needed someone in New York to help manage his projects. “I did that for a year or two. Then I went back to work for Wayne for a minute, and then I started my business in 2010,” Brown says. “It’s weird to say that it’s been that long! You feel like you’re never going to get this far, and then you are.” Brown and his team are currently working on 10–12 projects at various stages of development. Most are residential spaces and come through referrals from happy clients. But Brown’s Southern charm has sealed several deals as well. “Last year, we finished a house in the Hamptons which is totally different from what we normally do, but the lady liked me more than the other people she was interviewing, so we made it work,” Brown says. “It was extremely contemporary and had pops of color. Everything was brand-new and slick and colorful—this pink with that purple. It was all kinds of crazy and wild.” When pressed to describe his preferred design aesthetic, Brown says, “We tend to take a transitional/traditional approach, meaning that there are a few modern pieces with some traditional pieces and the architecture is thoughtful to the project, whether it’s a Sag Harbor house or an apartment on Park Avenue.

Bottom row, from far left: Brown framed an Ed Ruscha beach blanket from Works on Whatever (WOW) and hung it above another Baughman armchair. The designer’s ceramics collection includes a small hand-carved ashtray and a blueand-white bowl from Wyeth. A vintage ceramic piece sits atop a wood side table.

JUN JUL

AUG

SEP

2017

ARRAY

29


“We really just do what the client wants—within reason,” he continues. “We give them our version of what they want.” He finds that the most challenging part of the work is the second-guessing he goes through. “You are constantly doing that to yourself because of the editing you have to do to make sure that the pieces you choose are the right pieces for that project. You never want to do something just to finish it. We think about that with every client.” Brown moved into his own dream apartment more than three years ago: a one-bedroom apartment in Kips Bay Towers, a modern marvel of early-’60s architecture designed I.M. Pei. “While I have lived here, I have educated myself on how to better fill a space and still make it feel livable and inviting, but still spare in a sense,” Brown says. “That’s something I struggle with all the time: how spare to make things. “If I could get away with it, I would probably live with three things in my life: a sofa, a bed and a TV. And maybe a little table somewhere,” he continues. “But that’s not how people live, and that’s not how I live. Nobody would ever come to see me if they had to sit on the floor.” Brown’s own style tends to err on the modern side, with a mix of vintage and modern pieces, and what he calls “a little bit of an eclectic mix of weird café tables and end tables and wooden lamps.”

Left: Brown replaced the living room sofa’s metal arms with wooden ones; the marble-topped table was found at a flea market. Above: Brown picked up Yoko Ono’s book after seeing her perform at MOMA last year. “It was the oddest performance I’ve ever seen.” The bowl of erasers on top were part of a client’s art installation.

30


“I DON’T REALLY KNOW HOW I GOT INTO DESIGN—I THINK WE KIND OF FOUND EACH OTHER IN A WAY,”

Though he rents the place from a woman who is currently living overseas, he worked out a deal with her. “I renovated the bathroom and the kitchen,” he says. “Meanwhile, she has left my rent the same, so it’s been a win-win for both of us.”

Left: Brown found the Alain Bouchard rosewood dining table at a Paris flea market; the chairs are from a friend, Robert Altman. Below left: The Lego phone really works, and is one of Brown’s dearest possessions. “It was a gift from my mother for Christmas when I was a child,” he explains. “It’s something I hold onto.”

Brown gutted the bathroom, replacing nearly everything from the “terrible beige tile and bad brass fittings with the finish coming off of them” to the mismatched fixtures, toilet, sink and vanity. “We just ripped it out and I got the cheapest white marble 12-by-12 tiles I could get at Home Depot,” he explains. “I called in a few favors with my stone people to get a few slabs of white Carrara marble for the floor that matched the tiles we bought. Then we did a tiny mosaic on the shower floor. It was all as basic as you could find at Home Depot and make it look nice. I called in a favor and got a Waterworks showerhead and the faucet and controls for a big discount. I went for the least expensive way to make the bathroom look like it was worth a million dollars. And now it does.” The long, narrow kitchen posed an even bigger challenge in the form of a wall that just had to go. “There was a weird doorway to the kitchen, so we took down the wall and opened the room up to the rest of the apartment,” Brown says. “We replaced the appliances, and then took down the upper cabinets and put up shelves to open up the space. We did leave the bodies of the lower cabinets, but replaced the ugly laminate doors.

Below right: A stack of books is adorned with some Swedish ceramics.

JUN JUL

AUG

SEP

2017

ARRAY

31


“IF I COULD GET AWAY WITH IT, I WOULD PROBABLY LIVE WITH THREE THINGS IN MY LIFE: A SOFA, A BED AND A TV. AND MAYBE A LITTLE TABLE SOMEWHERE. BUT THAT’S NOT HOW PEOPLE LIVE, AND THAT’S NOT HOW I LIVE.”

Left: For a client’s home in Wainscott, N.Y., Brown sourced an old farm table and some Eames chairs, which he covered in different shades of vinyl from Maharam. Below: The couple's artwork is given a prominent place in the dining room.

32


Left: The living room of a residence on Halsey Lane in the Hamptons is dominated by a blackand-white drawing on powdercoated steel by Gary Swimmer. Below: The surfboard in the Wainscott home was a wedding gift for the clients; the art is by Ryan McGinley.

“I have a lot of kitchenware, but they don’t all need to go behind cabinet doors, so I just moved all of my dishes out. I leave some of my dry goods and glasses and mugs out— they’re all consistent, so there isn’t a Mickey Mouse mug next to an I♥NY mug or anything like that. I found containers to put my silverware in, and so they’re all neatly stacked on the shelves, as well.” Finally, Brown installed under-cabinet lights throughout. “It was very straightforward,” he says. “But it made such a difference in the apartment.” Brown applied a matte-finish plaster to the walls that takes advantage of all the light the apartment gets from its floorto-ceiling windows. It’s also the perfect foil for the home’s subtle colors, and provides a clean canvas for his Christina Dix and Dan Jones photographs, as well as a prized Ed Ruscha beach blanket that he framed. Though Brown is content with his home’s layout, he isn’t getting too comfortable. “I think the owner is planning to move back here next year, so I’m going to have to find a new apartment, which is not so bad,” he says. “My friends make fun of me because I move every three or four years, but I like projects. I like to move.”

JUN JUL

AUG

SEP

2017

ARRAY

33


Books The Seaside House: Living on the Water

Creating Home: Design for Living

The Well-Dressed Window: Curtains at Winterthur

House Style: Five Centuries of Fashion at Chatsworth

Nick Voulgaris III Rizzoli March 2017 240 pages, $55

Keith Summerour Rizzoli March 2017 240 pages, $50

Sandy Brown The Monacelli Press May 2017 208 pages, $50

Kimberly Chrisman-Campbell and Charlotte Mosley Skira Rizzoli April 2017 406 pages, $45

Whether you are fortunate enough to have an ocean view or are a designer working on a client’s beach house, The Seaside House: Living on the Water will not disappoint. Author Nick Voulgaris III captures the true essence of living by the water, be it ocean, lake, river or pond. Readers are offered a peek into a variety of properties—from Martha Stewart’s abode in Seal Harbor, Maine, and Donna Karan’s Zen-like oasis in East Hampton, to Tommy Hilfiger’s contemporary beach house in Miami and Giorgio Armani’s tranquil retreat in Antigua, West Indies. Homes in Block Island, Malibu, Greenport and Shelter Island are also showcased. Beautifully photographed by Douglas Friedman, The Seaside House features waterfront living at its best: modern monastic interiors to classic clapboard cottages that will inspire readers—no matter what part of the country they live in.

In his first book, acclaimed Atlantabased architect, designer and author Keith Summerour explores an array of residences that truly redefine what we think of as home today. Featuring nine distinct houses, the book explores his architectural collaborations with designers such as Liza Bryan, Barbara Westbrook, Circa Interiors, Jeremy Smearman and John Howard. Manor houses and rustic retreats are just a few of the styles represented, all of which reflect the author’s Southern heritage. From renovations to his own romantic rural home known as Towerhouse Farm (complete with a 70-foot stone tower), the architect’s reinterpretation of classical style is a welcome addition to the world of design.

If you have ever toured Winterthur, the former Delaware estate of Henry DuPont, you’ve seen how the show-stopping drapery treatments form the perfect backdrop for the historic architecture and impressive interiors. The WellDressed Window pays homage to the beauty, workmanship and design of one of the premier museums of American decorative arts. Dupont’s family home features 175 room settings filled with his extraordinary collection of American furniture, antiques and paintings. Forty of these rooms are described (with special attention to detail and trim) from both a technical and historical perspective. Archival photographs from the 1920s to the designs of today illustrate the evolution of draperies and upholstery in the past century and offer a fascinating study for those interested in decorative arts, design and textile history.

The Elizabethan-style home of the Cavendish family and the hereditary dukes of Devonshire since 1549, Chatsworth House is known not only for its architecture and design, but for its unique fashion history. So when Countess Laura Cavendish was in search of a christening gown among the estate’s many textiles, she discovered a fashion retrospective just waiting to happen. She collaborated with Vogue’s International Editor-at-Large, Hamish Bowles, on the exhibition, and it’s only natural that the publication of House Style would follow. House Style celebrates the fashions, jewels, designs and textiles of the Cavendish family, with a nod to the designs of Jean Phillipe Worth, Christian Dior, Gucci, Helmet Lang, Vivienne Westwood and Alexander McQueen. Coronation robes, evening gowns and even uniforms are just a few of the rare costumes featured in this lavish tale of five centuries of design.

34


By Cathy Whitlock

Savor your summer with tales of seaside living, country entertaining and one of the world’s greatest designers.

At Home at Highclere: Entertaining at the Real Downton Abbey

Villa Astor: Paradise Restored on the Amalfi Coast

Entertaining in the County: Love Where You Eat

David Hicks Scrapbooks

The Countess of Carnarvon Preface Publishing March 2017 288 pages, $37.50

Curt DeCamillo Flammarion May 2017 280 pages, $65

Joan Osofsky and Abby Adams Rizzoli March 2017 192 pages, $45

David Hicks and Ashley Hicks Vendome Press September 2017 336 pages, $75

While the beloved PBS series has ended, the fascination and love of Downton Abbey lives on in the book At Home at Highclere. Written by the estate’s current Countess Lady Carnavon, the book showcases the art of entertaining, Downton style. Divided into four separate weekends of real-life gatherings from 1866 to 1936, the book details everything from the invitations, menus, cocktails and table settings to the activities both upstairs and downstairs that made the show so popular. Going back in time, the book literally places the reader at the dinner table, hearing the latest conversation and gossip, sipping cocktails of the day and understanding the hows and whys of the perfect dinner party. Perhaps the keeper of the castle explains it best: “Highclere works hard to steer a steady course in today’s world, but the Castle was built for entertainment and pleasure, for convivial weekends. I hope this book gives a glimpse inside a great house, with mouth-watering recipes, eye-catching photographs and fascinating stories about some of the remarkable people who have stayed here.”

Perhaps nothing is more idyllic than the charming and picturesque town of Sorrento, Italy. It is also home to the majestic Villa Astor, an Italian landmark that dates back to the days of the Roman Empire. Owned by William Waldorf Astor of New York’s Waldorf Astoria fame, the 12,000-square-foot villa’s art, design, architecture and gardens are considered some of the most elegant in Italy. Astor, an ardent lover of the arts, spent a decade restoring and decorating the villa, which was eventually purchased and restored to its original splendor by the French decorator Jacques Garcia. Villa Astor is a spectacular history of the legendary house, shining a spotlight on one of the world’s most colorful and inventive tycoons.

Authors Joan Osofsky and Abby Adams present a guide to casual home entertaining complete with recipes, design ideas and tablescapes that run the gamut from breakfast and neighborly suppers to garden cocktail parties and harvest gatherings. Readers are invited to the homes of food stars Julia Turshen, Food & Wine’s Dana Cowin, Design*Sponge blogger Grace Bonney, and Erin French, the chef and owner of The Lost Kitchen in Freedom, Maine. The book follows the success of the authors’ 2013 volume, Love Where You Live: At Home in the Country. Easy-toprepare recipes include falafel with dipping sauces, savory chicken pie and ginger cookies, with ideas for colorful festive tables and details on creating a functional kitchen and well-stocked pantry. As famed chef Mario Batali comments, “The book captures the exact intersection between casual country living and sophisticated design.” It’s all about the ease of entertaining simply and with style.

One of the most legendary and influential designers of the 20th century, David Hicks was known for his geometric designs and bold prints coupled with a unique mix of antique and contemporary furnishings. His extraordinary life— his marriage to Lady Mountbatten (Prince Philip’s niece) and famous clientele such as Helena Rubenstein, Vidal Sassoon and the Prince of Wales (to name just a few)—placed him on the celestial map. The book David Hicks Scrapbooks documents a life well-lived through 24 scrapbooks. Details abound: photographs of Grace Kelly, Andy Warhol and Jackie Kennedy intermingle with party invitations, press clippings and sketches of signature textiles, all laid out in historic collage style. Edited by his son, Ashley, the book features more than 300 pages of one of the most talented designers the world has ever known.

JUN JUL

AUG

SEP

2017

ARRAY

35


Eats’N’Sleeps Butterfield Cafe at 200 Lex 200 Lexington Ave., 16th floor 212.772.8782 butterfieldmarket.com

Daily Provisions 103 E. 19th St. 212.488.1505 dailyprovisionsnyc.com

Tavo 615 Hudson St. 917.675.6454 tavonyc.com

abcV 38 E. 19th St. 212.475.5829 abchome.com/eat/abcv

Butterfield’s wholesome, homemade offerings are rooted in the cafe’s origins as a small grocery store dating back to 1915. At that time, its main focus was deliveries, with clients including Brooke Astor and John Rockefeller. With the opening of Butterfield Café on the 16th floor of the New York Design Center, patrons of 200 Lexington will be able to enjoy the likes of roasted tofu and summer quinoa, baked salmon topped with edamame over baby arugula, and chimichurri flank steak with roasted corn and watercress salad. Menu options will rotate along with the seasons, continuing Butterfield Café’s impressive legacy of fresh ingredients and a relentless commitment to quality.

Although Manhattan is awash with worthy dinner options, it can be a challenge to find breakfast and lunch spots that truly impress. For those who hold their daytime meals to a high standard, Danny Meyer’s Daily Provisions promises to delight. The neighborhood café opens early in the morning serving tempting, fresh-baked pastries, delicious egg sandwiches and, of course, premium coffee. (To satisfy your sweet tooth, try the maple cruller or the everything croissant with cream cheese.) Lunchtime offerings are equally appealing, with favorites that include the signature rotisserie chicken; the broccoli melt with manchego, lemon, chili and garlic; or the minestra with seasonal vegetables, malfatti and grant padano. Although the draft cold brew, steeped overnight, is a great way to jump-start your morning, lunchtime diners may enjoy the café’s minimal (though thoughtful) selection of French wine and craft beer.

Tavo was born as a collaboration between chef Julieta Ballesteros and managing partner Francisco Descrenzo, both natives of Monterrey, Mexico. Though the duo’s Latin roots remain, they’re augmented by French and Asian influences, producing a roster of exceedingly innovative (and tasty) flavor combinations. Must-try dishes include the “Smash Tower,” with three levels of avocado-wasabi smash topped with tuna tartare, bang bang duck and adobo pork; the Caribbean mofongo cakes with crispy plantains, pork, black beans and crème fraîche; and the magret Peking duck with lobster bisque, foie gras and a tart pomegranate reduction. The décor is just as fresh as the menu, with a palette of copper, green and gray punctuated with steel and wood accents, inspired by the contrast between industrial buildings and the green foothills in Ballesteros and Descrenzo’s homeland.

AbcV is finally here, offering a delicious selection of vegetarian ingredients that live up to ABC Carpet & Home’s lofty reputation. Led by Neal Harden, formerly of Pure Food and Wine, with ABC’s grand master chef Jean-Georges Vongerichten providing oversight, the pair elevate vegetables, legumes and grains to their maximum potential. “Worldly” is perhaps the best way to describe the menu, with breakfast options ranging from hemp protein shakes to Indian dosas. For lunch, the choices include a flavorful kabocha squash dish with tahini, sumac and mint; the hearty honey nut squash soup; or ancient grain pilaf with baby turnip, hazelnut, avocado, lemon and crunch sorghum. The restaurant is currently open for breakfast and lunch, with brunch and dinner coming soon.

36


By Katie Doyle

Stay and dine in the shadow of the city's greatest landmarks (including 200 Lex).

1 Hotel Brooklyn Bridge 60 Furman St. 347.696.2500 1hotels.com/brooklyn-bridge

LUMA Hotel Times Square 120 W. 41st St. 212.730.0099 lumahotels.com

The Carnegie Hotel 160 W. 56th St. 212.397.6000 thecarnegiehotel.com

MADE 29th St. at Broadway madehotels.com

1 Hotel Brooklyn Bridge proclaims itself a “waterfront retreat,” and although that’s not what you might expect to find in between DUMBO and Brooklyn Heights, the descriptor is not far off. Surrounded by expansive views of the East River, 1 Hotel abounds in native greenery, from the flora in the lobby to the large moss habitats in the guest rooms. The natural theme even extends to the Keetsa hemp-blend mattresses and the 100-percentorganic cotton sheets. Summer travelers will enjoy the rooftop pool and bar, as well as the opportunity to take a test ride in the hotel’s fleet of earth-friendly Tesla electric cars. For those who need an escape from the buzz of a Brooklyn summer, 1 Hotels’ Bamford Hayden Spa offers holistic, restorative treatments utilizing natural ingredients.

LUMA lights the way for a new level of fashion and function in midtown Manhattan. Blending convenience with contemporary design, LUMA raises the bar in terms of premium amenities. From luxurious Italian linens and crazy fast Wi-Fi to the latest smart TVs and floor-to-ceiling windows with electronic shades, LUMA is an ultramodern refuge in the heart of Times Square. For those with an eye for ambience, the hotel gives design as much attention as technology. Guest rooms are awash in natural light, while luminescent wall art and vibrant blue-green accents lend the interiors an energy fitting for a hotel just a stone’s throw from the city’s epicenter. Nice touches, like complimentary digital subscriptions to the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal, and daily servings of sangria in the lobby, will polish off your stay.

Fittingly, the decor at the Carnegie Hotel is inspired by the musical heritage of neighboring Carnegie Hall. Although the hotel was designed with the business traveler in mind, a sense of modern sophistication underscores everything about the establishment, with fine architecture, custom Italian fixtures and leather accents to match. Guest rooms boast plush bedding, glass-enclosed showers, Malin + Goetz bath products and sleek wood furnishings. Despite the nearby bustle of Broadway, the Carnegie Hotel is a place of peace and quiet, thanks to its soundinsulated windows, blackout curtains and limit of four rooms per floor. With its namesake hall, Central Park, Rockefeller Center and the Museum of Modern Art so close by, the Carnegie Hotel is an excellent, intimate home base for a summer stay in the city.

Coming soon to NoMad is the 18-story MADE Hotel, where the visitor’s experience is elevated by everything from the sensual design ethos to the airy lobby, with its seasonally-rotating selection of coffee by day and craft cocktails by night. Rich yet sustainably crafted interiors boast an eye-appealing contrast between natural fibers, stone and reclaimed wood—an aesthetic mirrored in the guest rooms, where woven accents pop against plush white linens. The project is driven by hospitality entrepreneur Sam Gelin, who made a name for himself as the producer of pop-up events focusing on craft brews and bites. When it opens, MADE will be an embodiment of the artisan, community vibe.

JUN JUL

AUG

SEP

2017

ARRAY

37


38


GALLERY A PI C T UR E -PE R F ECT SHOWROOM EXHIB ITION

Henredon’s Risdon Chaise available from Hickory Chair-Pearson-Henredon, 212.725.3776, hickorychairpearson.com Campaign Bar available from Studio A Home, 212.725.8439, studioa-home.com JUN JUL

AUG

SEP

2017

ARRAY

39


Gallery

Allée Outdoor Sconce available from The Bright Group, 212.726.9030, thebrightgroup.com

Rosenau Farbe Parsons Dining Table available from Bolier by Decca Home, 212.889.2060, bolierco.com 40


Plaza Bar Trolley available from Global Views, 212.725.8439, globalviews.com

Blades Ceiling Light available at SA Baxter Architectural Hardware, 212.203.4382, sabaxter.com

Frogmore Lantern available from Currey & Company, 212.213.4900, curreyandcompany.com/NYDC

Canterbury-style cabinetry graces a walnuttopped wet bar from Bakes & Kropp, 888.206.0015, bakesandkropp.com

JUN JUL

AUG

SEP

2017

ARRAY

41


Gallery

Vintage Persian Pelas Rug available from N A S I R I fine handmade carpets, 212.532.6777, nasiricarpets.comÂ

Studebaker Table available from Brueton, 212.838.1630, brueton.comÂ

42


Sheep by Downtown available at PROFILES, 212.689.6903, profilesny.com

Wallis Pendant from Hudson Valley Lighting available at Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co, 212.545.0032, metropolitanlightingny.com

Floral Fire available at Leftbank Art, 646.293.6694, leftbankart.com

Duet Sconce from Fuse Lighting available at Dennis Miller Associates, 212.684.0070, dennismiller.com

JUN JUL

AUG

SEP

2017

ARRAY

43


Gallery

Wolfgang Dining Table available from Mr. Brown London, 646.293.6622, mrbrownlondon.com 44


Fenlake Lounge Chair and Ottoman available from Munder Skiles, 212.717.0149, munder-skiles.com Dag rug available from WOVEN, 646.964.4838, woven.is

Darbar Kilim from Kooches Carpets available at Odegard Carpets, 212.545.0205, odegardcarpets.com

JUN JUL

AUG

SEP

2017

ARRAY

45


46


freshpicks THE MOST CURRENT PRODUCTS IN 200 LEX SHOWROOMS.

Twist and Shout Inspired by found twigs in a clear vase, the Gia Drinks Table from Currey & Company glimmers in a matte brass finish. It is hand-forged in solid brass with a shallow dish top. Gia is the perfect addition to a living room, bedroom or bathroom. Currey & Company, Suite 506, 212.213.4900, curreyandcompany.com/NYDC

Desert Classic Bolier’s Modern Desert Pier Oval Dining Table is distinguished by a warm gray finish and bronze accents. The collection, inspired by several overlapping midcentury cultural themes, includes case goods, upholstered seating and both dining and accent tables. This West Coast design sensibility is as relevant today as it was 40 or 50 years ago. Bolier by Decca Home, Suite 804, 212.889.2060, bolierco.com

JUN JUL

AUG

SEP

2017

ARRAY

47


freshpicks Just One Look One glance at the Mayfair Sofa from Casamilano, available at Lepere, and you can tell it’s built for comfort. Picture yourself cosseted within its deep, gently curved arms and back. The mix of high-density foam and goose feathers ensures that the The Flow comfort will Go last.With Choose a contrasting piping for a dramatic White sand and flowing waters inspired the effect. LEPERE, Suite 714, 212.488.7000, lepereinc.com George Kovacs Coastal Current series at Metropolitan Lighting. This fluid collection features an interior metal shade beneath an undulating white frame fitted with an etched-glass diffuser. The series utilizes the latest LED technology, and includes two pendants, a linear island light, a semiflush mount and a coordinating sconce. Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co., Suite 512, 212.545.0032, metropolitanlightingny.com

City Reflections Passage, a hand-knotted Tibetan wool carpet from Odegard, was inspired by postmodern architecture. It features bold and edgy elements in a clean and crisp colorway that reminds us of when the sun reflects off a building in just the right way. Odegard Carpets, Suite 1209, 212.545.0205, odegardcarpets.com

On Track The Atomic Age inspired Mr. Brown London’s quintessential midcentury modern Atlantis Oval Dining Table. The six-legged starburst base is finished in aged brass, the perfect mod pedestal for one of Mr. Brown’s new Racetrack Oval tops, finished here in dark walnut. Atlantis is part of Mr. Brown’s “tops and tails” dining options program. Julian Chichester, Suite 604, 646.293.6622, julianchichester.com

48


Brassy Writing The Natalia Writing Desk from The Bright Group pairs precision engineering and high style. Solid brushed brass clads the entire Just One Look base and frame interior, with recessed drawers and beveled edges. Shown at in the espresso walnut lacquer at One glance Mayfair Sofa with frompowder-white Casamilano, available drawers. drawer available. Lepere,Optional and you contrasting can tell it’s built for faces comfort. PictureMade yourself in cosseted Brooklyn within by Hellman Chang. Thecurved Brightarms Group, its deep, gently andSuite back.902, The 212.726.9030, thebrightgroup.com mix of high-density foam and goose feathers ensures that the comfort will last. Choose a contrasting piping for a dramatic effect. LEPERE, Suite 714, 212.488.7000, lepereinc.com

Madam I’m Adam Studio Woven is a contemporary collection comprising six series of rugs: Haptic, Terrain, High:Low, Rhythm, Pattern and Mutation—all of which were designed in-house at WOVEN. The Adam Rug, from the Terrain Series, was inspired by a mosaic tile floor made of Marmara marble located in a 14thcentury Turkish bath in Istanbul. WOVEN, Suite 805, 646.964.4838, woven.is

Just One Look One glance at the Mayfair Sofa from Casamilano, available at Rock Solid Lepere, and you can tell it’s built for comfort. Picture yourself SAcosseted Baxter’s within On The of rustic and cabinet itsRocks deep,Collection gently curved arms door and back. The hardware is the result of a collaboration with designer mix of high-density foam and goose feathers ensures that the Tony Ingrao. by the texture ofpiping the ceramic slurry shell comfort willFascinated last. Choose a contrasting for a dramatic that is part of SA Baxter’s unique metal casting process, Ingrao effect. LEPERE, Suite 714, 212.488.7000, lepereinc.com envisioned a collection that was enduring and timeless. SA Baxter Architectural Hardware, Suite 1205, 212.203.4382, sabaxter.com

JUN JUL

AUG

SEP

2017

ARRAY

49


freshpicks

Peaks and Valleys The Kyoto Media Cabinet from Studio A is painstakingly carved to bring out a different side of the natural beauty of gmelina wood, a cousin of beech. Painted in matte black, the surface mimics that of delicate charcoal. The peaks and valleys convey an abstract texture that is organic yet sculptural. Studio A Home, Suite 614, 212.725.8439, studioa-home.com

Turn Signal The Seibert Curved Sofa from Munder Skiles is an extension of their existing outdoor sectional sofa. The four-piece curved iron sections interlace with the straight pieces to form new and interesting possibilities. The curved chaise open-end section brings innovation to garden seating design. Munder Skiles, Suite 436, 212.717.0149, munder-skiles.com 50


Light Cuisine The special color and texture of Bakes & Kropp’s signature pearl walnut finish help create this kitchen’s fresh coastal vibe. Utilized on the center island and on the double refrigerator door panels, this matte, soft-colored cabinetry perfectly complements the light Carrara-colored quartz countertops and beveledtile backsplash to give the room a sophisticated, breezy feel. Bakes & Kropp, Suite 430, 917.512.4853, bakesandkropp.com

Florentine Finery The Argento Bed and Bedside Chest are inspired by finely textured, intricate Florentine silverwork, mixing soft shine and modern silhouettes. Each piece in the Argento Collection combines silvered raffia coverings with pewter metal trim. Global Views, Suite 613, 212.725.8439, globalviews.com

JUN JUL

AUG

SEP

2017

ARRAY

51


freshpicks Canyon Contemporary The Sedona Club Chair, from Anees Upholstery’s newest collection at Dennis Miller Associates, exemplifies modern comfort. Inspired by the canyons surrounding Sedona, Ariz., this chic seat adds a touch of relaxed attitude to any space, providing a serene sanctuary that everyone should experience. Dennis Miller Associates, Suite 1210, 212.684.0070, dennismiller.com

Arms and Legs Swivel around and have a drink on the handsome Fanny Bar Stool from Brueton. Fanny has four glittering stainless-steel legs and two arms. Available upon request in an array of opaque colors and acid-washed steel. Brueton, Suite 910, 212.838.1630, brueton.com

52

Raise a Glass Bob’s Bar by Brett Design at PROFILES presents an innovative take on the lacquer trend. This collection in back-painted glass brings upbeat personality to high-end interiors and features luxe metal and wood trim options like copper and silver, gray eucalyptus and black limba woods. Brett’s pieces play well with others—even your best antiques. PROFILES, Suite 1211, 212.689.6903, profilesny.com


Minimalist Luxury The Mid-Century Modern Collection at N A S I R I includes the flatweave wool and cotton Persian Pelas rugs shown here in white with subtle gray and brown accents. This collection embodies the minimalist sophistication that emerged over half a century ago and has had such a strong revival. Custom colors and sizes available. N A S I R I fine handmade carpets, Suite 714, 212.532.6777, nasiricarpets.com

Winning Silver As neutral palettes continue to dominate, color is introduced through art. This giclée reproduction of Still Life #13 by Kelly O’Neal at Leftbank Art is printed on acrylic with silver leaf added for luminescence. Also available on canvas. Leftbank Art, Suite 609, 646.293.6694, leftbankart.com

Indulgence and Gilt Jean-Louis Deniot’s keen architectural eye and timeless spirit inform his debut collection for Baker. The Jasper Arm Chair, featuring gilded front legs and a meticulously composed structure, embodies the balance struck between serene and bold in Deniot’s designs. Frame available in chocolate, black or gray mink; gilding in antique bronze, oil-rubbed bronze or antique silver. Baker, Suite 300, 212.779.8810, bakerfurniture.com

JUN JUL

AUG

SEP

2017

ARRAY

53


54


STYLESPOTLIGHT F E ATUR E D HI GHLIGHT S OF CR AFT AND D ES IG N .

1. Casting Call (opposite) Each side table from Julian Chichester’s Bronze Collection is unique. Dante, Carlo, Max and Roman appear to be metal cast, but are actually produced using a variety of hand-applied and highly textural metal finishes.  2. My Verona The Verona Table at Dennis Miller Associates features a tapered base formed with modern, fluid lines connecting the legs and crisscrossing stretchers. The top’s beveled profile complements the divergent angles of the base. JUN JUL

AUG

SEP

2017

ARRAY

55


StyleSpotlight

3

56


4

5

3. Spring Fling With winter a distant memory, what’s better to complement summer entertaining than a beautiful flower garden? In Thinking of Spring at Leftbank Art, this woman would clearly agree. 4. Sing The Blues Kooches Obi Pway from Odegard Carpets is an exceptionally fine woven textile in various shades of indigo dyes. Handwoven from the finest Himalayan vegetal dyed wool by supremely skilled artisans in Nepal.  5. Island Oasis Munder Skiles’ Harbour Island Chair was based on a pair of antique French chairs which were reengineered by adding a curved seat, crest panel and stainless steel nails. This outdoor chair is extremely comfortable without cushions.

JUN JUL

AUG

SEP

2017

ARRAY

57


StyleSpotlight

6 7

58

8


9

10

11

6. Sitting Pretty  This sophisticated sitting room is anchored by a custom built-in cabinetry unit by Bakes & Kropp. Handsome, texture-heavy pieces showcase two new cerused Bakes & Kropp Signature Finishes, bristle (walnut) and carbon (oak). 7. Monumental Meals Four massive mahogany corbels with an aged finish form the base of the Capital Dining Table from Studio A Home. Select glass or wood-trimmed tops, or purchase the base separately. 8. Party Nuts The charming Global Views Chestnut Collection is crafted from solid cast brass finished in nickel. These enchanting pieces exploit the sculptural beauty of natural forms, making them a captivating addition to any party. 9. Frayed Beauty The Sumo Rug, from the WOVEN Studio Mutation Series, replicates the fraying of traditional Japanese indigo—with bits and bobs of the underlying weave starting to emerge from the fabric. 10. Water Line Cascading panels of handblown glass evoke the flow of water in the Waterfall  Chandelier at Metropolitan Lighting. The glass is available in a sea of colors. 11. Tribal Custom Available in four distinct shapes, in both light oak and walnut, the Bolier Tribal Stools combine sculptural form and transitional design. Shown in light oak with a bronze frosted glass inset.   JUN JUL

AUG

SEP

2017

ARRAY

59


StyleSpotlight

12

13 14

12. Soft Glow The Massimo Chandelier by Downtown at PROFILES is modern and clean, but not cold. Made by hand in steel and rubber, it gives off a warm, frosted glow. 13. Take Root The captivating faux bois Elwynn Bench from Currey & Company appears to be a rooted, sprouting tree, growing up from the ground. The heavy concrete bench makes a fantastic addition to any garden or indoor/outdoor space. 14. Tray Chic With its crisp, tailored lines, the Valencia Tray at The Bright Group adds an exquisite touch to a credenza, bar, ottoman or end table. Each tray is a one-of-a-kind handcrafted textured glass design.

60


16 15 17

15. Pillow Talk The quilted metal back of SA Baxter’s Pillowed Wall Sconce creates a soft, gentle appearance. The glass hurricane sheds a subtle light that plays with the pillowed creases, creating a delicate, sophisticated ambience. 16. Move Ahead Inspired by cantilevered steel chairs of the 1930s, Brueton’s Romero Chair has subtle curves and crisp corners that give the impression of forward movement. In polished, high-grade stainless steel with svelte, comfortable upholstery. 17. Undyeing Love N A S I R I’s Mazandaran Collection demonstrates unmatched craftsmanship through revered traditional techniques. Contrasting undyed wool with pops of color make these Mazandarans perfect for summer entertaining, beautifully setting the tone of any room.  

JUN JUL

AUG

SEP

2017

ARRAY

61


62


De. FIN.ingPieces I T E MS THAT SUM U P WHAT A SHOWROOM IS AL L AB OUT.

Odegard Carpets The Bamboo III carpet is hand-knotted in Nepal using only vegetal dyes. The nuanced color is the result of complete hand processing, producing a resonance and depth that is an Odegard trademark. Odegard Carpets, Suite 1209, 212.545.0205, odegardcarpets.com

Bolier by Decca Home The Cube Chair, designed by Michael Vanderbyl for Bolier’s Domicile Collection, is a design that has endured the test of time. The chair is in the permanent collection of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and has been a consistent part of the Bolier line since its introduction in 2006. Bolier by Decca Home, Suite 804, 212.889.2060, bolierco.com

JUN JUL

AUG

SEP

2017

ARRAY

63


DefiningPieces

Bakes & Kropp

CURREY & COMPANY The frosted pieces of glass that hang from the wrought-iron Vintner Blanc Chandelier are made of recycled wine bottles individually selected for quality and clarity. The hand-applied silver leaf finish is a cool complement to the white hue of the glass. It is also available with green bottle glass. Currey & Company, Suite 506, 212.213.4900, curreyandcompany.com/NYDC

64

Outfitted with crisp white Bakes & Kropp cabinetry, this expansive L-shaped kitchen hits all the right notes in terms of enduring seainspired style. Coastal vibes are highlighted with signature pearl walnut cabinetry accents on the island, back wall and custom range hood, as well as the rich blue wall color and simple beach decor. Bakes & Kropp, Suite 430, 917.512.4853, bakesandkropp.com


Currey & Company Stunning workmanship is highlighted in Currey & Company’s Grand Lotus Chandelier, a modern interpretation of the classic blossom with a touch of Moorish inspiration. Stylish curves, made from wrought iron and sheet metal, are skillfully finished in antique gold leaf. Currey & Company, Suite 506, 212.213.4900, curreyandcompany.com/NYDC

Leftbank Art Abstract art can take on many interpretations, which makes it appealing for many design environments. The color burst in I’ll Keep It with Mine I exemplifies how energy can be transformed into a piece of art. Giclée on canvas with a gold float frame. Multiple size and finish options available. Leftbank Art, Suite 609, 646.293.6694, leftbankart.com

SA Baxter Architectural Hardware SA Baxter’s world-renowned investment casting capabilities allow for the creation of design motifs with fine detail, such as the whimsical Endless Circles Door Knob. This handcrafted “jewelry for the home” takes on a restrained elegance when finished in burnished bronze. For a dazzling impression, polished nickel is a stunning finish choice. SA Baxter Architectural Hardware, Suite 1205, 212.203.4382, sabaxter.com

Munder Skiles The Almodington Bench dates from 1790 and is known as America’s oldest wooden garden bench. This four-panel deep-seat bench has alternating diagonal slats that look like shutters across the high back. You can customize the size and the back of your bench and choose from painted mahogany or teak for natural weathering. Munder Skiles, Suite 436, 212.717.0149, munder-skiles.com

JUN JUL

AUG

SEP

2017

ARRAY

65


DefiningPieces

PROFILES The Bel Air Sofa by William Haines Designs is iconic in its silhouette and legacy. Known worldwide by connoisseurs of his vintage pieces, the Bel Air is faithfully reproduced for modernday collectors who want chic, effortless glamour. Shown in a COM fabric and leather trim. Made by hand in Los Angeles using eight-way hand-tied construction. PROFILES, Suite 1211, 212.689.6903, profilesny.com

66


Brueton Brueton’s Born Table is an open cube with a mirrored lower shelf and a glass upper shelf that seem to float above the recessed matte black plinth base. Square tubular stainless steel is welded, ground and polished into a seamless unit. Concealed casters add mobility. Brueton, Suite 910, 212.838.1630, brueton.com

Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co Whether you’re greeting friends at the front door, relaxing on the terrace or grilling on the deck, you can light your outdoor spaces with the angular geometric design of the Pitch Exterior Sconce by George Kovacs. Offered in two sizes with a black or sand silver finish, Pitch combines the energy efficiency of LED with modern form. Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co., Suite 512, 212.545.0032, metropolitanlightingny.com

The Bright Group The Matteo Sofa reveals the luxurious simplicity of comfort, impeccable quality and modern forms that the Bright Group is known for. The Matteo series boasts tailored upholstery and a beautiful cantilevered back. Available in all Bright finishes. The Bright Group, Suite 902, 212.726.9030, thebrightgroup.com Studio A Home (opposite right) Stunning in its simplicity, the Dante Table from Studio A Home has a two-tiered tempered-glass top resting on an attractive natural iron base. This is a perfect space-saving, functional end table. Also available in antique gold finish. Studio A Home, Suite 614, 212.725.8439, studioa-home.com    

Global Views (opposite left) Iron curves in crescent moon shapes look delicate, but are far from it in Global View’s French Curve Chair. This pretty seat is a neutral knockout that will complement a wide range of looks with its natural iron finish and muslin upholstery that is ready to be re-covered to your heart’s desire. Global Views, Suite 613, 212.725.8439, globalviews.com

JUN JUL

AUG

SEP

2017

ARRAY

67


DefiningPieces

Baker Baker expands its traditional business with Baker Fabric House, a new offering of textiles including more than 1,300 fabrics. The new patterns focus on foundational textures, saturated colors and decorative designs. This addition (which includes wall coverings and trims) will assist designers as they create relevant, cohesive interiors. Baker, Suite 300, 212.779.8810, bakerfurniture.com  

N A S I R I fine handmade carpets N A S I R I is the leading innovator of Mazandaran flatweaves. Woven for centuries, these rugs reflect a minimalist sophistication that existed long before the beginning of the modern era. N A S I R I’s Mazandaran Collection evokes modernist paintings, architecture and music. This example, in black and white wool, is produced using the same ancient techniques of weaving and dyeing. N A S I R I fine handmade carpets, Suite 714, 212.532.6777, nasiricarpets.com

68


Julian Chichester The Percy Chest is essentially a neoclassical form, smartly scaled with a concave front and updated for the 21st century. Percy is wrapped in high-gloss lacquered vellum, available in black or ivory. The top and open shelf are finished with aged mirror insets, while two drawers are lined in sycamore and the tapered legs are wrapped in brass. Julian Chichester, Suite 604, 646.293.6622, julianchichester.com

Dennis Miller Associates The Powell & Bonnell Nobi Swivel Stool now offers even more comfort with the addition of a higher inset upholstered backrest, while the pivoting upholstered seat ensures the conversation keeps flowing in all directions. With a slim silhouette that is stunning from every angle, Nobi is available in bar and counter heights. Dennis Miller Associates, Suite 1210, 212.684.0070, dennismiller.comÂ

WOVEN The Won Rug, from the Haptic Series, features a circle in a square traced in a very thin high-pile silk that spills in different directions depending on the movement of the person walking on it. The square rug allows for myriad seating and in situ options, including center of the universe. WOVEN, Suite 805, 646.964.4838, woven.is

JUN JUL

AUG

SEP

2017

ARRAY

69


NEW Showrooms F R E S H FACE S A ND NEW D ESIGNS.

Bendheim Glass. Suite 1602 Bendheim Glass is one of the nation’s foremost resources for specialty architectural glass. Founded in New York City in 1927, the fourthgeneration, family-owned company offers more than 2,000 types of architectural glass in stock, as well as unlimited custom design solutions. Bendheim develops, imports and distributes its products worldwide. The company maintains production facilities in New Jersey and an extensive showroom in New York City. Circa Lighting, Suite 103 Circa Lighting’s new location at the New York Design Center will feature a Visual Comfort lighting studio. For nearly 30 years, Visual Comfort & Co. has produced decorative lighting collections with the most influential names in the design industry, including Ralph Lauren Home, Kelly Wearstler, E.F. Chapman, Alexa Hampton, Thomas O’Brien and more. The new lighting studio will showcase Visual Comfort’s ever-growing assortment of interior and exterior lighting, and will incorporate interactive digital displays for a state-of-the-art shopping experience. Cosulich Interiors & Antiques, Suite 509 Cosulich Interiors & Antiques is distinguished for its international presence within the design and arts community. Working together in Italy, France and England, Fabienne and Franco Cosulich gained access to one-of-a-kind pieces from prestigious Italian villas and European estates. Their Upper East Side boutique offered 20th-century Italian statement pieces and exclusive Venetian Murano glass creations noted for their artistry and rarity. Now they’re bringing their reputation and discerning eye to 200 Lex, where their history, education and travels will continue to attract respected designers and collectors worldwide. Guy Regal Decorative and Fine Art, Suite 425 Guy Regal’s New York Design Center showroom represents the culmination of decades of work in the field, offering one of the most innovative decorative arts experiences in New York. “I have always felt it’s important to show my collections in styled vignettes,” says the art and antiques collector and decorative arts tastemaker. The fourth-floor showroom will feature newly acquired inventory and never-before-seen favorites presented in the curated collections for 70

NEW SHOWROOM

NEW LOCATION

OPENING SOON

which Regal is known. Fine art will be a central facet, with revolving shows of both established and emerging artists, as well as a constantly rotating inventory so the space always has a fresh, updated feel. KGBL, Suite 1616 KGBL designs and produces handcrafted American furniture. The line, built in their shop in Brooklyn, is unapologetically modern, but executed in materials and utilizing methods associated with older levels of craftsmanship. Working in fumed white oak, silicon bronze and borosilicate glass (to cite a few examples), KGBL fashions sophisticated pieces that employ marquetry, leather molding, stone carving and nonferrous metal techniques. The showroom is open to the public. LEPERE, Suite 1207 LEPERE showcases a meticulously curated collection of contemporary designs from Belgium, Italy, the Netherlands and Spain. The company has developed a loyal following in the residential and contract design communities with its warm, minimalist furniture, outdoor, carpets and lighting. Dominic Lepere’s collection embodies his core design principles of beauty, quality, functionality and refinement, while reflecting the sophistication of New York. With degrees in art history and economics, and leadership roles at design powerhouses like Bulthaup and Cassina, Lepere brings a well-rounded knowledge and experience to the interiors community. N A S I R I fine handmade carpets, Suite 714 N A S I R I began nearly two decades ago as a dealer of antique carpets, later translating its knowledge of ancient weaving techniques into the creation of unique Persian Ziegler Sultanabad, Tabriz and Bakshaish rugs. The company now offers complete custom recreations of all varieties of carpets, with endless options for size, color, weave, texture and design, utilizing organic dyes and materials. N A S I R I is a leading source of both vintage flatweaves and modern re-creations (as demonstrated by their Midcentury Modern and Mazandaran collections), and offers an inspiring library of carpets and samples.

Saelger Shading. Suite 417A Saelger Shading is a sales and marketing company specializing in architectural window treatments and technology. Their innovative product lines provide an infinite variety of inspiring designs, and represent some of the industry’s leading manufacturers, both in Europe and Australia. These outstanding brands contribute key strengths and core capabilities that have resulted in a cohesive and highly synergistic product offering. Saelger is excited to bring these outstanding products to the New York Design Center, and to provide the A&D community with the resources needed to ensure exceptional outcomes to even the most complex projects! Skram Furniture Company, Suite 427 Skram Furniture Company’s new showroom will offer an exclusive destination for distinctive seating, tables, case goods, lighting and accessories. Founder and designer A. Jacob Marks believes that enduring design and fine workmanship are inextricable. The company’s manufacturing merges advanced technologies with traditional craftsmanship in a variety of natural materials like timber, hardwood veneer, steel, bronze, leather and stone. Skram’s products are crafted in a solar-powered facility in North Carolina, and are intended for design-driven residential and contract environments. t brown studio. Suite 1610 TIMOTHY BROWN STUDIO, a full-service New York–based interior design firm with over 15 years of experience, is proud to announce the opening of its new shop, t brown studio, at the New York Design Center. Located in Suite 1610, t brown studio will offer a carefully curated inventory of antique, vintage and contemporary furnishings. WOVEN, Suite 805 WOVEN is a full-service, independent contemporary rug gallery specializing in a carefully curated inventory of antique and vintage rugs sourced and hand-selected from around the world. In 2016, WOVEN debuted Studio Woven, a series of in-house-designed contemporary handwoven rugs for the 21stcentury home. The new collection is comprised of six series of rugs inspired by the modern nomad and informed by the antique and vintage masterpieces within the WOVEN collection.


SHOWROOMPORTRAITS

Profiles of Some of 200 Lex's Most Familiar Names

1stdibs Gallery at 200 Lex 10th Floor

Baker Suite 300

Bakes & Kropp Suite 430

Bolier, a Decca Ltd. Company Suite 804

1stdibs and the New York Design Center have joined forces to create 1stdibs Gallery at 200 Lex, a 33,000-squarefoot shopping destination that features more than 54 1stdibs dealers specializing in 20th-century design and antiques. Located on the 10th floor, this one-of-a-kind space offers an elegant environment and a knowledgeable sales staff, and is open to both the design trade and consumers weekdays from 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. (7 p.m. on Thursdays). 1stdibs Gallery, 10th Floor, phone 646.293.6633, email antiques@nydc.com 

Founded in 1902, Baker remains one of the largest wholesale distributors in the industry with 16 showrooms located in major design districts throughout the United States and the United Kingdom. Product assortment spans from historic reproductions dating back to the 17th century to modern designs from today’s most recognized independent designers. Baker, Suite 300, phone 212.779.8810, fax 212.689.2827, bakerfurniture.com

Founded by designer Robert Bakes and craftsman Paul Kropp, Bakes & Kropp is a luxury cabinetry firm combining elegant design and expert craftsmanship to create spectacular kitchens, vanities, libraries and closets. Its new flagship showroom at the New York Design Center is the much-anticipated extension of the original Sag Harbor location. Bakes & Kropp, Suite 430, phone 917.512.4853, fax 631.725.1710, bakesandkropp.com

With furniture inspired by tradition and designed for modern lifestyles, Bolier is committed to using only the finest materials and traditional craft techniques to produce a wide portfolio of furniture designs. Through collaboration with the world’s foremost furniture designers, each piece is developed with a commitment to protecting the environment through the responsible use of the earth’s natural resources.  Bolier & Co., Suite 804, phone 212.889.2060, fax 336.887.0195, bolierco.com

The Bright Group Suite 902

Brueton Suite 910

Cosulich Interiors & Antiques Suite 509

Currey & Company Suite 506

The Bright Group is a unique collection of handcrafted, American-made furnishings, combining the extensive product range of Bright Chair Co. with artisan designers and manufacturers, showcasing a coordinated environment for the design community. Whether the focus is seating, case goods or lighting, The Bright Group searches the country for quality product lines with great new contemporary design. The Bright Group, Suite 902, phone 212.726.9030, fax 212.726.9029, thebrightgroup.com

Brueton, a US manufacturer based in New York, produces a full line of contemporary furniture, including sofas, tables, chairs, casegoods and accessories catering to residential and commercial clients. In addition, Brueton offers vast custom capabilities, including fabricating the simplest to the most complicated stainless steel products and architectural metals for architects and designers. Brueton, Suite 910, phone 212.838.1630, fax 212.838.1652, brueton.com

Fabienne and Franco Cosulich have traveled throughout Italy, France and England, gathering one-of-a-kind pieces from prestigious Italian villas and European estates. Now they’ve brought their reputation and discerning eye to 200 Lex, attracting respected designers and collectors worldwide with their 20th-century Italian statement pieces, exclusive Venetian Murano glass creations, and contemporary, customizable Made in Italy line. Cosulich Interiors & Antiques, Suite 509, phone 646.293.6680, cosulichinteriors.com

For more than 25 years, Currey & Company has fulfilled customers’ need for distinctive chandeliers, wall sconces, lamps, rugs and furniture. The company’s perspective on product design is one of a lively interest in historical influences, correct materials for the design and a keen interest in product integrity. Every detail is executed with clarity and finesse. Products show the touch of the human hand, and are meticulously crafted of natural materials. Currey & Company, Suite 506, phone 212.213.4900, curreyandcompany.com/NYDC

JUN JUL

AUG

SEP

2017

ARRAY

71


SHOWROOMPORTRAITS Dennis Miller Associates Suite 1210

Global Views Suite 613

Hickory Chair–Pearson–Henredon Suite 102

In House Kitchen Bath home Suite 1511

Since 1983, Dennis Miller Associates has offered innovative furniture and lighting collections designed by architects, interior designers and artisans. Its showroom provides a continually evolving showcase of contemporary and 20th–century classic design excellence. Its popularity with top designers speaks for itself. Come see the newly expanded collections in the Dennis Miller lighting, rugs and furniture lines. Dennis Miller Associates, Suite 1210, phone 212.684.0070, fax 212.684.0776, dennismiller.com

Global Views is expanding its showroom space. Global Views is a home décor wholesale company with collections that blend various styles to make pieces that are elegant, exotic, refined and casual. They offer a wide assortment of fashion-forward products from furniture to accessories that fit every price range. Global Views, Suite 613, phone 212.725.8439, fax 212.679.4927, globalviews.com

The mission of Hickory Chair–Pearson– Henredon is to service the design trade at the highest possible level, while offering a fashion-forward shopping experience. The showroom represents Henredon, Barbara Barry Realized by Henredon, Celerie Kemble for Henredon and Maitland-Smith, Lane Venture, Maitland-Smith, LaBarge and Taracea. The company offers hundreds of beautiful wood and upholstery designs for every room. Hickory Chair–Pearson–Henredon, Suite 102, phone 212.725.3776, fax 212.725.3763, henredon.com, hickorychairpearson.com

In House Kitchen Bath Home is New York’s premier showroom offering distinctive cabinetry from custom manufacturers Wood-Mode and Brookhaven for all rooms throughout the home. In House Kitchen Bath Home, Suite 1511, phone 212.686.2016, fax 212.686.2048, inhousekbh.com

Julian Chichester/ Mr, Brown London Suite 604

Leftbank Art Suite 609

Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co. Suite 512

Munder Skiles Suite 436

Julian Chichester reinvents the great designs of the 19th and 20th centuries to create eclectic, transitional furniture perfect for how we live today. Julian Chichester is pleased to offer the inimitable, irrepressible and always edgy Mr. Brown London in his New York showroom, with a beautifully edited assortment of furniture, lamps and accessories. Julian Chichester, Suite 604, phone 646.293.6622, fax 917.591.2413, julianchichester.com, mrbrownlondon.com

Leftbank Art creates original artwork and manufactures it at its facility in Southern California. The company’s goal is to bring to market images that look as though commissioned or oneof-a-kind, but at a price point for the design and retail trade. Leftbank Art’s very interactive website allows trade customers to select finish, size and frame options. Leftbank Art, Suite 609, phone 646.293.6694, fax 646.293.6695, leftbankart.com

Metropolitan Lighting has been illuminating the finest interiors for many years. Its New York showroom offers one of the most comprehensive selections of designer-oriented lighting in the industry. Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co., Suite 512, phone 212.545.0032, fax 212.545.0031, metropolitanlightingny.com

Munder Skiles offers 153 wood and metal designs for garden furniture, in styles ranging from historical to ultramodern. For 25+ years the company has been recognized for its standards of comfort, craft and proportion. John Danzer’s ergonomic, modernist Taconic Chair™ received the 1994 Roscoe Award for “Best American Chair”—the first garden seat ever to have been so honored.  Munder Skiles, Suite 436, phone 212.717.0149, munder-skiles.com

72


N A S I R I fine handmade carpets Suite 714  

Odegard Carpets Suite 1209

PROFILES Suite 1211

SA Baxter Architectural Hardware Suite 1205

N A S I R I has been a strong presence in the New York design industry for nearly two decades, translating their knowledge of ancient weaving techniques into the creation of unique pieces. They now offer complete custom re-creations of all varieties of carpets, including midcentury modern and Mazandaran collections. N A S I R I recently opened a new showroom on the seventh floor of 200 Lex. N A S I R I fine handmade carpets, Suite 714, phone 212.532.6777, fax 212.532.6776, nasiricarpets.com  

Since 1987, Odegard Carpets has been an innovative leader in the production of sophisticated high-end, hand-knotted carpets. Recently partnered with Kooches Handmade Carpets, Odegard has greatly expanded its distinctive carpet offerings and production capabilities. Odegard Carpets requires strict adherence to social responsibility, raising the standard of living for thousands of artisan weavers in developing countries. Odegard Carpets, Suite 1209, phone 212.545.0205, fax 212.545.0305, odegardcarpets.com

Serving the high-end design community for over 37 years, PROFILES’ workrooms in the USA create midcentury modern and transitional pieces with a commitment to the highest quality and innovation. PROFILES, Suite 1211, phone 212.689.6903, fax 212.685.1807, profilesny.com 

SA Baxter designs and manufactures bespoke architectural hardware and lighting for high-end residential and commercial projects. Products are cast in brass, bronze and white bronze base metals and finished with one of the most comprehensive palettes in the industry. SA Baxter’s architectural hardware is handmade to order in their eco-friendly foundry located in New York State’s Hudson Valley.   SA Baxter Architectural Hardware, Suite 1205, phone 212.203.4382, fax 888.713.6042, sabaxter.com  

Saelger Shading Suite 417A

Saladino Furniture Suite 1600

t brown studio Suite 1610

WOVEN Suite 805

Saelger Shading specializes in architectural window treatments and technology. Their innovative product lines provide an infinite variety of inspiring designs, and represent some of the industry’s leading manufacturers (both in Europe and Australia). Saelger is excited to bring these outstanding products to 200 Lex, offering the A&D community exceptional outcomes to even the most complex projects. Saelger Shading, Suite 417a, phone 212.298.8980, saelger.com

Established in 1986 by renowned designer John F. Saladino, the Saladino Furniture collection currently has more than 75 original designs of upholstery, casegoods and lighting. The line is available exclusively through its New York showroom among select antiques and accessories. A 75-page catalog may be purchased online at saladinostyle.com. Saladino Furniture, Inc., Suite 1600, phone 212.684.3720, fax 212.684.3257, saladinostyle.com

The new t brown studio offers a carefully curated inventory of antique, vintage and contemporary home furnishings. In the coming months, offerings will expand to include new and unique pieces—including lamps, side tables, consoles and other items— designed by Timothy Brown himself. t brown studio, Suite 1610, phone 212.255.4899, fax 212.255.4861, timothybrownstudio.com

Established in 1965, WOVEN is a vibrant company, offering the finest handwoven rugs in the market today. Their carefully curated inventory of antique, vintage and contemporary pieces is sourced and hand-selected from around the world. WOVEN actively engages in conversations and collaborations with artists and designers to explore and expand upon the notion of rug as place, where rugs ground the idea of home. WOVEN, Suite 805, phone 646.964.4838, woven.is

JUN JUL

AUG

SEP

2017

ARRAY

73


ShowroomDirectory A Complete List of Who’s Where In 200 Lex SH OWR OOM 1stdibs Gallery at 200 Lex Access to DesignTM AERO Alea AMQ ANDREU WORLD Apropos Inc. Arc|Com Fabrics, Inc. Archetypal Imagery Corp. Aristeia Metro Arteriors Atelier Atlas Carpet Mills Baker Bakes & Kropp Bendheim Bograd Kids Bolier Boyce Products Ltd BRADLEY The Bright Group Brueton Brunschwig & Fils Calger Lighting Inc. Century Furniture CF Modern Christopher Guy CityScapes NYC Circa Lighting Clickspring Design CLIFF YOUNG LTD. Colombo Mobili USA Cosulich Interiors & Antiques Côté France Crosby Street Studios Currey & Company DARRAN Furniture Industries, Inc. Decca Contract Furniture Delivery By Design (DBD) Dennis Miller Associates DESIGNLUSH DESIRON DIRTT Environmental Solutions Dorothy Draper & Co., Inc. ducduc Dune Elle W Collection EJ Victor ENRICOPELLIZZONI FAIR Flourishes GIBSON INTERIOR PRODUCTS Giorgio USA Global Views Good Design Gordon International Grange Furniture Groupe Lacasse Guy Regal Decorative & Fine Art Halcon Harbour Outdoor Hickory Chair-Pearson-Henredon In House Kitchen Bath Home Interior Crafts NY IFDA Jasper Group Jiun Ho at Dennis Miller 74

S UITE 10th Fl 424 1500 1509 1316 1111 710 1411 419 1416 608 202 1314 300 430 1602 433 804 1405 802 902 910 401 434 200 510 1601 1106 103 1405 505 809 509 1201 1303 506 1116 1414 Dock 1210 415 702 1516 806 715 100 420 814 1304 601 414 1510 502 613 423 1401 201 1109 425 1304 1301 102 1511 916 417B 1514 1208

PHON E 646.293.6633 212.679.9500 212.966.4700 305.470.1200 212.685.1077 212.679.0300 212.684.6987 212.751.1590 646.602.3455 646.761.4711 646.797.3620 212.696.0211 212.779.4300 212.779.8810 917.512.4853 212.547.2946 212.726.0006 212.889.2060 212.683.3100 646.766.1011 212.726.9030 212.838.1630 212.725.0340 212.689.9511 212.479.0107 917.699.6024 212.684.2197 212.961.6984 212.725.2500 212.220.0962 212.683.8808 212.683.3771 646.293.6680 212.684.0707 212.486.0737 212.213.4900 212.961.6984 646.761.4711 212.213.1691 212.684.0070 212.532.5450 212.353.2600 973.454.6282 646.293.6649 212.226.1868 212.925.6171 212.472.0191 212.679.4341 212.683.7272 212.352.9615 212.779.4540 212.685.1077 212.684.7191 212.725.8439 212.722.1110 212.532.0075 212.685.9494 212.689.0300 212.447.7717 212.683.7272 646.692.4227 212.725.3776 212.686.2016 212.696.4400 212.686.6020 212.685.1077 212.684.0070

FA X 646.293.6687 212.447.1669 212.966.4701 305.470.9070 212.685.1078 212.679.5996 212.689.3684 212.751.2434

S H OW RO O M Julian Chichester Kasthall Rugs USA Inc. Keilhauer Kenneth Cobonpue KGBL KI and Pallas Textiles Kindel Furniture Kooches Carpets Korts & Knight, Kitchens by Alexandra Knight

646.786.4818 212.696.0299 212.779.0838 212.689.2827 631.725.1710 212.726.0061 212.683.5005 212.726.9029 212.838.1652 212.684.7350 212.779.0721 212.479.0112 212.684.2123 212.725.5900 212.683.5005 212.683.9286 212.684.0559 212.684.8940 917.591.4373 212.213.4911 212.951.7070 212.213.9843 212.684.0776 212.532.5360 212.353.0220 646.293.6657 212.226.5504 212.925.2273

212.683.7011 212.779.4542 212.685.1078 212.725.2683 212.679.4927 212.722.1115 212.779.0147 212.685.7312 212.689.7143 212.683.0711 212.725.3763 212.686.2048 212.686.4408 212.686.6258 812.771.4641

Kravet Inc. Krug LaCOUR Lee Jofa Leftbank Art LEPERE Levine Calvano Furniture Group Lexington Home Brands Lobel Modern Louis J. Solomon Inc. Luna Textiles McGuire Furniture Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co. Milano Smart Living LLC M|n Modern Living Supplies Mr. Brown London Munder Skiles Napier + Joseph + McNamara, Ltd. NASIRI The New Traditionalists Niermann Weeks Odegard Carpets PALECEK Paoli Pennoyer Newman LLC Phillips Collection Plexi-Craft Primason Symchik, Inc. Pringle Ward Prismatique PROFILES Reagan Hayes

SUITE 604 611 1101 410 1616 1313 806 1209 716 401 1415 1412 401 609 1207 1406 212 915 911 1410 101 512 711 408 604 436 1304 714 701 905 1209

610 1110 416 603 914 1101 1109 1101 1211 903 RENAISSANCE CARPET & TAPESTRIES 912 Richard Cohen Collection 801 Rooms by Zoya B 433 SA Baxter Architectural Hardware 1205 Saelger Shading 417A Saladino Furniture Inc. 1600 SANFORD HALL 400 Sedgwick & Brattle 815 Seguso Murano 431 Skyline Contract Group 1106 SMART 1115 Studio A Home 612 Theodore Alexander 515 Thom Filicia Inc. 815 Timothy Brown 1608 Townhouse Kitchens 421 transFORM 708 Tucker Robbins 504 Versteel 1106 Visual Comfort Studio 103 Wall Goldfinger 1304 Weinberg Modern 407 Wood & Hogan, Inc. 812 Wood-Mode, Inc./T.O. Gronlund Co. 1515 WOVEN 805 New York Design Center 426

P H O NE 646.293.6622 212.421.0220 212.679.0300 212.532.5450 212.420.4866 212.337.9909 646.293.6649 212.545.0205 212.3924750 212.725.0340 212.686.7600 212.213.6600 212.725.0340 646.293.6694 212.488.7000 212.686.7600 212.532.2750 212.242.9075 212.545.9200 212.251.0132 212.689.1565 212.545.0032 212.729.1938 646.486.3272 646.293.6622 212.717.0149 212.683.7272 212.532.6777 212.226.1868 212.319.7979 212.545.0205 212.287.0063 212.683.2232 212.839.0500 336.884.9271 212.924.3244 212.679.0300 212.689.0300 212.679.0030 212.689.6903 212.658.1922 212.696.0080 212.696.4938 212.726.0006 212.203.4382

212.298.8980 212.684.3720 212.684.4217 212.685.0600 212.686.1133 212.961.6984 212.696.9762 212.956.0030 646.293.6628 212.736.6564 212.255.4895 212.684.8696 212.584.9580 212.355.3383 800.876.2120 212.725.2500 212.683.7272 646.291.2059 212.532.7440 212.679.3535 646.964.4838 212.679.9500

FA X 917.591.2413 212.421.0230 212.679.5996 212.420.7865 212.337.1090 646.293.6657 212.545.0305 212.684.7350 973.227.3544 212.684.7350 646.293.6695 212.488.7006 212.686.7686 212.532.2875 212.242.9078 212.545.9438 212.689.1578 212.545.0031 212.729.1939 646.349.5619 917.591.2413 212.683.7011 212.532.6776 212.226.5504 212.319.6116 212.545.0305 212.287.0066 212.683.1297 212.839.0501 336.882.7405 212.679.5996 212.689.7149 212.679.5996 212.685.1807 212.696.4248 212.696.5333 212.726.0061 888.713.6042 212.684.3257 212.545.8376 212.244.9131 212.696.9757 212.696.2729 212.956.0031 336.885.5260 212.244.9131 212.255.4861 212.684.8696 212.355.3116 212.725.5900 212.683.7011 212.532.6440 212.725.3847 212.447.1669


CultureCalendar

By Catherine McHugh

Welcoming an old friend at the Botanical Gardens, celebrating a centennial at the Met, and staring into the eclipse—and seeing the light—in New Jersey. Musée des Beaux-Arts de Brest métropole.

TOTAL ECLIPSE OF THE ART Timed to the first total solar eclipse visible in the continental United States this century (on August 21), the Princeton University Art Museum is presenting Transient Effects: The Solar Eclipses and Celestial Landscapes of Howard Russell Butler. Historically a source of mystery and fascination, solar eclipses have been seen at some times as a foreboding omen, and at others as a key means of understanding the scientific concept of general relativity. In 1918, Howard Russell Butler, a portrait and landscape artist and graduate of Princeton University’s first school of science, painted a new kind of portrait: the total solar eclipse. With remarkable accuracy, he captured those rare seconds when the moon disappears into darkness—crowned by the flames of the sun, whose brilliant colors had eluded photography. This exhibition brings together experts from art history and the sciences to present the story of Butler’s unique paintings and the artist who created them. It also opens up a broader historical exploration of experiments at the intersection of art and science. July 22 through October 15. The Princeton University Art Museum, McCormick Hall, Princeton, N.J., 609.258.3788, artmuseum.princeton.edu/art. Howard Russell Butler, Solar Eclipse, 1932, 1932. Oil on canvas. Princeton University Art Museum. Gift of David H. McAlpin, Class of 1920.

Henri Martin. Young Saint (Jeune Sainte), 1891. Oil on canvas, 66.4 x 49.3 cm. Musée des Beaux-Arts de Brest, France.

MYSTIC PIECES The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum is presenting Mystical Symbolism: The Salon de la Rose+Croix in Paris, 1892–1897, the first museum exhibition devoted to this revelatory and significant series of six annual exhibitions. Eccentric Joséphin Péladan organized the first Salon de la Rose+Croix at the Galerie Durand-Ruel in Paris. Cosmopolitan in reach, the salons gathered the work of artists from Belgium, Finland, France, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain and Switzerland. Images of femmes fragiles and fatales, androgynous creatures, chimera and incubi were the norm, as were sinuous lines, attenuated figures and anti-naturalistic forms. This exhibition will include approximately 40 works by a cross section of artists, and invites a fresh look at and new scholarship on the legacies of late-19th-century Symbolist art. Drawing from extensive research to identify artworks shown in the original exhibitions, the show will encompass paintings, works on paper and sculptures by artists such as Antoine Bourdelle, Jean Delville, Ferdinand Hodler, Fernand Khnopff, Alphonse Osbert, Armand Point, Jan Toorop, Ville Vallgren and Félix Vallotton. June 30 through October 4. The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 1071 Fifth Avenue, 212.423.3500, guggenheim.org.

ARTISTIC ROOTS With CHIHULY, the New York Botanical Garden is spotlighting world-renowned artist Dale Chihuly’s bold innovation and experimentation. Several new handblown glass sculptures, created especially for the NYBG, will complement the Garden’s landscape and architecture while highlighting the connections between artwork and the natural world. The exhibition features 20 installations, as well as drawings and early works that reveal the evolution and development of Chihuly’s artistic process. Chihuly has reimagined the Artpark installation he created in the summer of 1975 specifically for this exhibition, and several dramatic neon sculptures pay homage to the artist’s pioneering use of that technology in his early work. April 22 through October 29. The New York Botanical Garden, 2900 Southern Boulevard, Bronx, N.Y., 718.817.8700, nybg.org. Left: Fire Orange Basket Set, 2013, 27” x 21” x 21”. Right: Chihuly Drawings exhibition. Museum of Glass, Tacoma, Wash.

JUN JUL

AUG

SEP

2017

ARRAY

75


CultureCalendar LUMINOUS STAGE

Clifford Ross Studio

Grounds for Sculpture is hosting Daniel Clayman: Radiant Landscape. This exhibition marks a first for the museum, as its main building will house two interior glass installations that Clayman conceived specifically for the space. Drawing on his background as a theater designer, the artist has created a stage for filtered light, utilizing hundreds of glass tiles strung together to form transparent 3-D color fields. These glass “curtains” act as a lens, projecting and bending light, while the color of the glass acts as a filter, changing the color of the space and projecting pattern onto the “stage.” Three of Clayman’s glass boulders will also be on view outdoors. Through February 25, 2018. Grounds For Sculpture, 80 Sculptors Way, Hamilton Township, N.J., 609.586.0616, groundsforsculpture.org. Courtesy of the Artist / photo by Mark Johnston

Above: Clifford Ross, Wave LIV (Wood), triptych, 2015. Cured inkjet print on wood 148 × 225". Left: Clifford Ross. Digital Wave Installation.

Courtesy of the Artist / photo by Mark Johnston

SURF’S UP The Parrish Art Museum’s Platform series invites artists to consider the entire Parrish Art Museum as a potential site for works that transcend disciplinary boundaries, encouraging new ways to experience art, architecture and the landscape. In Platform: Clifford Ross — Light|Waves, multimedia artist Ross uses several areas of the museum for his project, which features two distinct elements. Hurricane Waves on Wood includes six large-scale photographs that the artist captured during storms off the Long Island coast while he was tethered to an assistant on land. Ross recently applied a new method of digitally printing the images directly onto sheets of maple veneer using ultraviolet-cured ink and a commercial printer. Digital Waves creates an extremely highresolution, computer-generated 3-D world. A massive LED screen enables the viewer to observe artificially re-created, moving waves from different directions, and to immerse themselves into a virtual ocean. July 16 through October 1. The Parrish Art Museum, 279 Montauk Highway, Water Mill, N.Y., 631.283.2118, parrishart.org. Galerie Chave © Estate of Eugen Gabritschevsky EG_78_Chave

Untitled Haar, Germany 1949 Gouache on paper 8 1/4 x 11 5/8" Collection Chave, Vence, France, no. 5074. 76

Above: Dan Clayman, Dispersion, 2014, glass, steel wire, 16 feet x 32 feet x 15 feet. Left: Daniel Clayman, North 41.47˚ West 71.70˚ Gold, 2015, glass, gold leaf 34 x 32 x 35 inches.

TROUBLED MIND The American Folk Art Museum is hosting the first major retrospective in the United States of the work of Eugèn Gabritschevsky (1893–1979). Described as the “convergence of science and art explored by an art brut master,” Eugèn Gabritschevsky: Theater of the Imperceptible contains 83 works—gouaches, watercolors and ink-and-pencil drawings—by the Russian-born artist and scientist. The show chronologically charts the journey of an artist whose promising scientific career was interrupted by severe mental illness. Institutionalized for much of his life, he turned to art, and this exhibition presents a diverse selection of his stylistically varied output. He employed a number of techniques, including frottage (rubbing), grattage (scraping) and stamping. Some of the works reflect a dark and troubled mindscape, while others explore ambiguous, imaginary realms that could be transcendent. Gabritschevsky’s interest in genetics is perceptible in his subjects: fantastic beasts and hybrid creatures that emerge from mystic realms and point to the role of random mutation in our evolution. Through August 20. The Folk Art Museum, 2 Lincoln Square, 212.595.9533, folkartmuseum.org.


© Jonas Bendiksen / Magnum Photos

© Marc Riboud / Magnum Photos

FEMINIST FOUNDATIONS With Making Space: Women Artists and Postwar Abstraction, the Museum of Modern Art is shining a spotlight on the stunning achievements of women artists between the end of World War II (1945) and the start of the Feminist movement (around 1968), when societal shifts made it possible for larger numbers of women to work professionally as artists. Unfortunately, their work was often dismissed in the male-dominated art world, and few support networks existed for them. Abstraction dominated artistic practice during these years, as many post-war artists sought an international language that might transcend national, regional and gender-related narratives. Drawn entirely from the museum’s collection, the exhibition features more than 100 paintings, sculptures, photographs, drawings, prints, textiles and ceramics by some 50 artists. It includes works from Lee Krasner, Helen Frankenthaler, Joan Mitchell, Sheila Hicks, Louise Bourgeois and Eva Hesse. Also on display will be collages by Anne Ryan, photographs by Gertrudes Altschul, and recent acquisitions by Ruth Asawa, Carol Rama and Alma Woodsey Thomas. Through August 13. The Museum of Modern Art, 11 W. 53rd St., 212.708.9400, moma.org. Joan Mitchell (American, 1925–1992). Ladybug. 1957. Oil on canvas, 6' 5⅞" x 9' (197.9 x 274 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Purchase, 1961. © Estate of Joan Mitchell.

Top: Villagers collecting scrap from a crashed spacecraft, Altai Territory, Russia, 2000. Middle: A young girl confronts the American National Guard outside the Pentagon during the 1967 anti-Vietnam march, Washington DC, USA. Bottom: Holy week, Moratalla, Murcia, Spain, 1980. © Cristina Garcia Rodero / Magnum Photos

LEGENDARY LEGACY

PORTRAIT GALLERY With Irving Penn: Centennial, the Metropolitan Museum of Art is marking what would have been the great American photographer’s centennial with the most comprehensive retrospective of his work to date. Over the course of his nearly 70-year career, Penn mastered a pared-down aesthetic of studio photography that is distinguished for its meticulous attention to composition, nuance and detail. In 2015, the Irving Penn Foundation gave the Met more than 150 photographs by Penn, who died in 2009. This gift forms the core of the exhibition, which will feature over 200 photographs, including iconic fashion studies of Lisa Fonssagrives-Penn, the artist’s wife; exquisite still lifes; Quechua children in Cuzco, Peru; portraits of urban laborers; female nudes; tribesmen in New Guinea; and color flower studies. Also featured are the artist’s beloved portraits of cultural figures such as Truman Capote, Picasso, Colette, Ingmar Bergman and Issey Miyake. Through July 30. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1000 Fifth Avenue, 212.535.7710, metmuseum.org.

The International Center of Photography (ICP) Museum, in a co-production with Magnum Photos, is presenting a landmark exhibition celebrating Magnum’s 70th anniversary. Robert Capa, Henri Cartier-Bresson, and Chim (David Seymour) created the renowned photo agency in May 1947. Tracing the ideas and ideals behind its founding and development, the exhibition surveys the second half of the 20th century through the lenses of 75 masters, providing a new and insightful perspective on how these photographers’ contributions have shaped our collective visual memory. The exhibition includes more than 200 prints, as well as books, magazines, videos and rarely seen archival documents. Photos by the three founders will be featured, alongside works by such notables as Christopher Anderson, Cornell Capa, Raymond Depardon, Elliott Erwitt, Martine Franck, Paul Fusco, Cristina Garcia Rodero, Joseph Koudelka, Sergio Larrain, Chris Steele-Perkins and Alex Webb. Through September 3. The ICP Museum, 250 Bowery, 212.857.000.

Irving Penn (American, 1917– 2009) Naomi Sims in Scarf, New York, ca. 1969. Gelatin silver print, 1985. 10 1/2 x 10 3/8 in. (26.7x26.4 cm). Promised Gift of The Irving Penn Foundation to The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York © The Irving Penn Foundation

JUN JUL

AUG

SEP

2017

ARRAY

77


Events at 200Lex A LO OK AT A F E W RECENT CELEB R ATIONS.

“The Gallery After Dark” presents Literary Night On February 2, 2017, the New York Design Center celebrated the launch of “The Gallery After Dark” with a literary night presented in collaboration with Pointed Leaf Press. The event featured book signings by five design icons: William Hefner with Chateau des Fleurs, Jack Lenor Larsen with Learning from Longhouse, Barbara Ostrom with Curtain Up!, David Scott with Outside the Box, and Gary McBournie with Living Color. “The Gallery After Dark” is an ongoing series of extended shopping hours and exclusive programming at 200 Lex.  

Authors Gary McBournie, David Scott, Jack Lenor Larsen, William Hefner and Barbara Ostrom; Michael Adams, Carolyn Sollis, Janice Langrall, Alberto Villalobos and Mercedes Desio; Larry Weinberg and Jack Lenor Larsen. Photos by Karen Cattan.

Housing Works’ Design on a Dime NYC Kick-off Party On March 8, 2017, the New York Design Center hosted Design on a Dime NYC’s Kickoff Party in DESIRON. The festive evening of cocktails and conversation celebrated this year’s Design on a Dime benefit. Guests raised a glass with participating designers to support Housing Works’ lifesaving mission.  The party anticipated the 13th Annual Design on a Dime, which took place April 26–29 at the Metropolitan Pavilion. The three-day benefit and sale featured more than 60 top interior designers, who created unforgettable room vignettes with new merchandise, which was then donated and sold for 50 to 70 percent off retail pricing. Proceeds funded Housing Works’ wraparound services and supportive programs for New Yorkers living with and affected by HIV/AIDS

The 2017 Design on a Dime designers; Marvin Miller, Leslie Rinehardt and Kara Ingraham; Yetta Banks and Julien Alkensandres; Elle Decor Editor-in-Chief Michael Boodro; Amy Purcell and George Oliphant; Christopher Trujillo and Matthew Bernardo, COO of Housing Works; James Huniford, founding chair of Housing Works, and Andrew Greene, SVP of Housing Works. Photos by Gary Gershoff for Getty Images. 78


DIFFA’s Dining by Design 2017 Brad Ford, owner of the New York Design Center’s FAIR showroom, brought a taste of his modern makers craft fair, Field + Supply, to this year’s Dining by Design. 200 Lex joined forces with Ford to showcase and support local artisans, creating a dining experience that truly celebrated the industry’s makers. The FAIR showroom and F+S have become destinations to discover innovative craftsmanship and to support all things handmade. 200 Lex is proud to sponsor F+S, and was thrilled to bring the outstanding event to DIFFA’s Dining by Design.  

The New York Design Center table designed by Brad Ford of FAIR; designer Brad Ford; Neal Perbix Artwork from Bicycle Fine Art/Lee Calicchio Ltd. at 1stdibs Gallery at 200 Lex; Edward Wormley for Dunbar Credenza from Quotient at 1stdibs Gallery at 200 Lex; Shelter Collection by The Commons ceramics and glassware; Coal Dining Table by Sawkille and Dinnerware by Felt+Fat; Drink Stools by Sawkille; Wall Hanging by Michele Quan, Penn Dining Chair and Rabbit Bench by Sawkille, and Jupiter Dining Table by Casey Dzierlenga. Wood Paneling by the Hudson Company and Structural Fabrication by DCM Fabrication. Photos by Michael Paniccia. JUN JUL

AUG

SEP

2017

ARRAY

79


BACKSTORY SMOOTH MOVE

B y Te d L a m b e r t

NOW CEL EBR AT I N G I T S 9 0 T H A N N I V E R S A RY, B E N D H E IM GL A S S LO O KS TO THE FU TU RE .

Photo by Iwan Baan

Photo by Dorian Shy

Clockwise from above left: The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City, Mo., by Steven Holl Architects. The exterior is made of channel glass from Bendheim Wall Systems. The original Bendheim storefront on Horatio Street in Greenwich Village. The Bendheim Building on Hudson Street in Tribeca. Vibrant yellow laminated glass in the stairwells of City Market on O Street in Washington, DC, by Shalom Baranes Architects.

1927

was an auspicious year in New York. Charles Lindbergh flew The Spirit of St. Louis from New York to Paris in the first nonstop transatlantic flight, and was welcomed home with a tickertape parade. In Times Square, Al Jolson lit up movie screens in The Jazz Singer, the first feature-length film with synchronized sound, ushering in the era of the “talkie” with the immortal line, “You ain’t heard nothin’ yet.” The Holland Tunnel opened after five years of construction, connecting New York and New Jersey, and permanently tying up traffic on Canal Street. Not far from the mouth of the tunnel, at a storefront in Greenwich Village, Sem and Margaret Bendheim founded their business as importers and distributors of European specialty glass. From those humble beginnings, Bendheim has grown to become a global leader in the manufacture and sale of specialty architectural glass. In the 1950s, joined by son-in-law Fred Jayson, the Bendheims moved their business down to Hudson Street in Tribeca, which at the time was still a major manufacturing neighborhood. While the area changed in the ensuing years and most businesses closed or moved away, Bendheim stayed put. The Bendheim Building—an architectural gem itself—houses more than 2,000 samples of glass products for every kind of design taste.

80

The company is still run by third- and fourth-generation members of the Jayson family. Bendheim now fabricates their glass in a stateof-the-art facility in New Jersey, allowing for shorter lead times and lower costs for clients. Their wares range from handmade Restoration Glass® with built-in imperfections for historical projects such as the White House and Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello, to award-winning U-shaped architectural glass panels and products for public projects like airports and train stations. Yes, they still distribute the specialty colored glass that Sem and Margaret first imported from Europe’s most renowned glassmakers, but the future is limitless, bound only by your design imagination. Whether a designer wants etched, engraved, painted, polished, grooved, beveled, tempered, safety laminated or any combination of glass, Bendheim’s staff will work closely with them to create the colors, shapes and textures that express their unique tastes. We’ve saved the best news for last. 2017 will mark the opening of Bendheim’s new showroom at 200 Lex, which means you can now coordinate all of your designs—furniture, lighting and more— in concert with Bendheim’s experts without ever having to step outside. That should help keep any project running as smoothly as glass.


SALADINOSTYLE.COM

JUN JUL

AUG

SEP

2017

ARRAY

81


82

New York

Paris

London

Brunschwig & Fils Š 2017 brunschwig.com

Array Magazine Summer 2017  

Array Magazine - Summer 2017 ARRAY Magazine brings the most interesting people, places and ideas in interior design into the homes and offic...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you