Page 1

LEYDEN LEWIS

Art Tell Stories

AN UNEXPECTED MOMENT Jonathan Marvel’s Post-Pandemic World

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC 2021 $6.50

Display through December 2021

A HOME FOR ALL SEASONS WORKSHOP/APD Berkshires Getaway


D E S I R O N .CO M

|

NYDC SUITE 1316


curreyandcompany.com

Atlanta | Dallas | High Point | Las Vegas | New York


Contents

36 28 Features 22 Picture It Designer Leyden Lewis uses art to tell a deeper cultural story By Laura Hine

28 The Unexpected Moment Architect and urban planner Jonathan Marvel on the post-pandemic world By Cathy Whitlock

22

36 A Home for All Seasons Workshop/APD designs a getaway in the Berkshires By Cathy Whitlock

48 2


Volume 18 Issue 2 FALL 2021

14

54

71

Departments 6 STYLERADAR By Rebecca Parke

54

STYLESPOTLIGHT Featured highlights of craft and design.

62

DEFININGPIECES Items that sum up what a showroom is all about.

69

HIGH-TECH ANTIQUES SHOPPING IS HERE The Gallery at 200 Lex powered by Incollect.

72

EVENTSAT200LEX A look at recent virtual events from NYDC’s YouTube channel.

74

NEWSHOWROOMS Fresh faces and new designs.

79

SHOWROOMDIRECTORY A complete list of who’s where in 200 Lex.

80

BACKSTORY By Tom Scarcella Looking ahead with Jim Druckman.

What New York’s tastemakers envision for post-pandemic design.

10 BOOKS By Cathy Whitlock

12

14

Books on eco-minimalism, sustainable design, and green living are a few of our selections. . TROVE By Rebecca Parke Shop these innovative products for stylish and eco-friendly designs. . FRESHPICKS The most current products in the 200 Lex showrooms.

44 CULTURECALENDAR By Rebecca Parke New York is back with these immersive, forward-thinking cultural events.

46 EATS’N’SLEEPS By Tom Scarcella Make up for lost time with the latest and greatest restaurants.

48 GALLERY A picture-perfect showroom exhibition.

SEP OCT NOV DEC

2021

ARRAYNY.COM

3


ARRAY MAGAZINE, INC. 79 Madison Avenue 8th Floor New York, NY 10016 arrayny.com EDITORIAL ARRAY editorial coverage@arrayny.com ARRAY advertising adinfo@arrayny.com ARRAY Magazine is produced three times per year. All submissions should be e-mailed to: coverage@arrayny.com

Array Magazine, Inc. © 2021 All rights reserved The contents of ARRAY Magazine, Inc., may not be reproduced without written permission from the publisher.

Paul Millman Editor-in-Chief/Publisher Sheau Ling Soo Creative Director Ted Lambert Executive Editor Rebecca Parke Managing Editor/Copy Editor Cathy Whitlock Features Editor Andrew French Photographer

CONTRIBUTORS Cathy Whitlock Laura Hine Rebecca Parke Ted Lambert Tom Scarcella

NEW YORK DESIGN CENTER James P. Druckman President & CEO Daniel M. Farr Director of Operations Alix M. Lerman Chief Marketing Officer Madeleine Sherrington Marketing Manger Lauren Higgins Director of PR and Special Events John Douglas Eason Contributing Editor Susan Lai Controller ON THE COVER Leyden Lewis photographed by David A. Land.

4

Jennifer Lui Bookkeeper


LETTE R F ROM T HE E DI TOR There is no doubt that anyone interested in design, art, or architecture must necessarily at times reflect upon the past. All that has come before serves as both an inspiration and a guide to whatever comes next. This issue of ARRAY is dedicated to the future and those who dare to build it. A-list designer Leyden Lewis is interested in telling his clients’ stories through contemporary art and the cultural dialogue it fosters. Helping to found Black Artists + Designers Guild is just one of the ways Lewis looks toward creating a more inclusive profession that encourages new voices and viewpoints; teaching at Parsons and the New York School of Interior Design is another. As a collector himself, every work in his home is an intimate part of his life, only acquiring pieces from artists he knows personally (Picture It, p. 22). Architect and urban planner Jonathan Marvel transforms housing, public spaces, museums, and mixed-use developments around the world by always looking ahead. Marvel recognizes that due to the COVID-19 pandemic, society is in a state of transition and a key element to meeting those challenges is flexibility. With a varied portfolio of dazzling and disparate projects and a passion for innovation, Marvel believes that surprising collaborations between bold visionaries and corporate and government leaders can yield rich rewards for tomorrow’s cities (The Unexpected Moment p. 28). Workshop/APD is a global design firm that appreciates history, yet always strives to reimagine it for a new day. Design Director and Senior Associate Andrew Kline described a recent project, a retreat in the Berkshires as “the ultimate getaway” a space that not only celebrates the natural beauty that surrounds it, but is also was designed to meet the changing needs of its owners and their children, no matter the season, today and for many years to come. Their new line of lighting and accessories shares the same reverence for crafted details with a futuristic sensibility (A Home for All Seasons, p. 36). As Fleetwood Mac famously implored, “Don’t stop thinking about tomorrow.” Let’s all get there together.

Paul Millman Editor-in-Chief

Photo by Andrew French

SEP OCT NOV DEC

2021

ARRAYNY.COM

5


StyleRadar

THE

FUTURE of DESIGN What New York’s tastemakers envision for post-pandemic design

Keita Turner President and Creative Director of Keita Turner Design “If anything, I find that the pandemic has motivated me to revisit and embrace the overarching principles of my original design mission from when I first launched my business. Using the client’s lifestyle as my canvas, I am charged to continue creating environments that are clean and functional, warm and inviting, suitable and inspirational, but, most importantly, that uplift the human spirit. After the unsettling year that we experienced and are still going through, it is vital more than ever to design interiors that both adapt to and convey the motivations, ethos, and habitudes of my clients.” 6


By Rebecca Parke

Fernando Wong Landscape architect and co-founder of Fernando Wong Outdoor Living Design “The pandemic deprived people of so much, and I think that resulted in a greater appreciation for what was always there. Homeowners are making more green spaces for moments of tranquility during our busy days. Whether you’re adding large plants to your yard or a window box herb garden, you’re able to experience these multi-sensory micro-moments: little vignettes of destinations all within your home.”

David Sprouls President, New York School of Interior Design “At NYSID we’ve been successfully teaching online courses and programs for quite some time, but the past year forced us to accelerate ideas and implement others that we had been discussing. As we return to studios now equipped with the latest ‘pandemic’ technology, a student may be Zooming work with others in the room, or even to those across the country or around the world. “As our students evolve into designers, they know they can adapt, they know how to use technology to their advantage, and they know they can access practically everything online, hold meetings via screens, and develop and send projects via a variety of applications. While nothing will truly replace the experience of being in the room with clients or visiting showrooms where merchandise can be touched, many of the walls have come down and there is a willingness or expectation that technology will play a greater role in these experiences.”

SEP OCT NOV DEC

2021

ARRAYNY.COM

7


StyleRadar

Young Huh Founder of Young Huh Interior Design “I’ve always leaned more toward compartmentalization within the home as opposed to large, open rooms. With COVID-19, we saw a shift in this direction from our clients. People want areas to have space from the rest of the family, while still having places they can gather. This is more conducive to privacy and quiet for remote work in multiple locations throughout the home, not just the home office. Cleanability of materials also continues to be top of mind, and it is our job to educate our clients about beauty and function.” 8


Dr. Sue Stuart-Smith Author of The Well-Gardened Mind

“There is no question that we need to cultivate our connection with nature in order to thrive. As the pandemic recedes and the pace of life begins to speed up, it will be more important than ever to find ways to experience nature in everyday life. Some of this is about allowing time to make that inner mental shift, but the type of space we are in can help promote it in various ways. “In terms of our urban environments, I think that gardens need to be made more accessible through encouraging the cultivation of small unused plots of land that could become community gardens, workplace gardens, and school gardens. People could pause for a moment in an oasis of green and harvest their supper on their way home.”

Matt Berman

Founding principal at Workshop/APD “Surprisingly, there are a lot of positive things we’ll take forward from the pandemic. For one, an understanding of digital infrastructure and how to make use of it. We entered with a lot of assumptions about remote work: that we couldn’t present to a client over Zoom or form real connections over a digital interface. “We’ve emerged in a different headspace, less charged, with a sense of unity and humanity – after all, we’ve seen each other’s basements, pets, and crying toddlers – and felt that we are all in this together. We agreed to suspend judgment and work together toward the best result, and there’s something very empowering about that. I hope we won’t lose sight of that post-pandemic.”   “We were also given the gift of time, which ultimately produces better results. Time for exploration, studying, and dreaming produces better work, and I for one feel infinitely more productive and organized.”

SEP OCT NOV DEC

2021

ARRAYNY.COM

9


Books

Books on eco-minimalism, sustainable design, and green living are a few of our selections.

The Humane Home: Easy Steps for Sustainable & Green Living Sarah Lozanova Princeton Architectural Press April 2021 168 pages $25.95

Green Interior Design: The Guide to Sustainable High Style Lori Dennis Allworth Press June 2021 216 pages $24.99

The Naturally Beautiful Garden: Designs That Engage with Wildlife and Nature Kathryn Bradley Hole Rizzoli April 2021 240 pages $55

The dream home of the future will no doubt involve the concepts of sustainability, selfsufficiency, connectivity, and green living as we design habitats for what is known as the “new normal.”

For those who think the concept of green living is dull (or perhaps devoid of taste), award-winning author and eco-friendly designer Lori Dennis’ new book, Green Interior Design, dispels that outdated myth. An expert in green and luxury design that has filled the pages of California Home, Dwell, and The New York Times, Dennis offers the ultimate primer on designing environmentally friendly interiors with panache and style.

During the pandemic, gardening became one of the most popular activities, setting off a global boom and a welcome balm during troubling times. Many gardening first-timers learned how to work with the basics of plant and soil selection, while seasoned gardeners looked to new ways to showcase their green thumbs.

Environmental journalist and sustainability consultant Sarah Lozanova’s new book, The Humane Home, helps the reader assess how to scale down their carbon footprint in ways that go far beyond downsizing and decluttering. Creating a green life involves various choices, from living in an apartment near transportation lines to joining a community solar farm for electricity. Offering tips, tools, and inspiration, the book helps readers learn how to use reclaimed and recycled materials and repurpose waste, how to make energy upgrades, and how to design a zero-waste kitchen. The chapter “Nurturing the Land” sheds light on building a relationship with the natural world, from attracting wildlife to growing native plants that support pollination. 10

Whether you are designing a small apartment or a dream house from the ground up, the book serves as an ideal reference guide, offering tips on everything from repurposing and recycling to classic DIY projects. Tackling the challenges interior designers face in “going green,” Dennis shares her impressive source list, solutions, checklists, and details, making this the ultimate encyclopedia on the subject of sustainable domestic interior design.

English Gardens best-selling author and former Country Life UK’s Garden Editor Kathryn Bradley-Hole’s latest book, The Naturally Beautiful Garden, takes the concepts of environmentally friendly gardens and creativity a step further. Diverse essays on supporting wildlife, selecting grasses and meadows, coping with heat and drought, and the challenges of seaside gardening cover just a few of the topics Bradley-Hole explores. At the core of the book is the new consciousness in gardening, as organic principles and natural resources are increasingly used to design ecologically sensitive methods that incorporate pollination and accommodate wildlife in a time of climate change.

Inspired by Nature: Château, Gardens and Art of Chaumont-sur-Loire Eric Sander and Chantal Colleu-Dummond Flammarion October 2021 320 pages $115 While many binge-watched endless hours of content during the pandemic, glamorous gardening books became a wonderful alternative for escape. A case in point is Inspired by Nature, showcasing the art of the garden in all its glory at the Domaine de Chaumont-sur-Loire a fifteenth-century UNESCO World Heritage site nestled in the Loire Valley, whose storied history is chronicled in print for the first time. Known for its luxurious gardens and as a retreat where kings and nobility enjoyed the view, today it is the home of the International Garden Festival. Part armchair travel and part resource, the beautifully illustrated volume features a variety of garden styles from Japanese, Korean, and Chinese to English and French. The author details the works through aspects that draw upon the five senses – light and shade, fragrance, sound, taste, and texture.


By Cathy Whitlock

Design a Healthy Home: 100 Ways to Transform Your Space for Physical and Mental Well-Being Oliver Heath DK August 2021 192 pages $19.99 Design a Healthy Home simply tells it like it is, offering ways to make your humble abode the best it can be. British author and sustainability architect Oliver Heath’s practical, no-nonsense guide will help both homeowner and interior designer create interiors filled with calm and comfort. Heath offers 100 research-based ideas on ways to support your well-being, such as the use of reflective surfaces to brighten your space, replenishing the air to remove pollutants, and designing a tech-free, sleep-enhancing bedroom. Based on biophilic design research, the book offers guidelines for designing a nurturing environment, whether you’re in an apartment on a budget or reside in a mammoth estate. The epitome of userfriendly, Design a Healthy Home is divided into topics of light, sleep, planting, activities and color, pattern, and texture, presented in a coffee-tablebook format.

The Secret Life of the Modern House: The Evolution of the Way We Live Now Dominic Bradbury Ilex Press April 2021 352 pages $34 Architectural design journalist and author Dominic Bradbury delves into the evolution of the homes we live in today in his new book, The Secret Life of the Modern House. Our lifestyles and homes have changed dramatically over the past century as triedand-true traditional styles have given way to clean, modern, open-plan interiors. Bradbury follows the journey of the house from the 19th century to the 21st through eighteen thematic chapters. The work of pioneers of Art Déco and the Arts and Crafts movement are detailed, as well as that of Modernist luminaries Le Corbusier and Frank Lloyd Wright, postwar innovators Eero Saarinen and Philip Johnson, and the practitioners of 21stcentury vernacular. Other themes include the works of Richard Neutra, Charles and Ray Eames, and John Lautner in chapters titled “California Dreaming” and “Houses of the Future.” The author does a deep dive into the progress of modernity and how we arrived at the style through the stories of 90 iconic houses and the architects who created them.

RETHINK Design Guide: Architecture for a Post-Pandemic World Edited by Nicola Gillen, Pippa Nissen, Julia Park, Adam Scott, Sumita Singha, Helen Taylor, Ian Taylor, and Sarah Featherstone RIBA Publishing February 2021 244 pages $34.95

Sustainable Minimalism: Embrace Zero Waste, Build Sustainability Habits That Last, and Become a Minimalist without Sacrificing the Planet Stephanie Marie Seferian Mango January 2021 320 pages $18.95 Becoming popular after World War II, the trend of minimalism gained major traction in the past decade. Credit the concept of eco-minimalism, whereby living with less goes hand in hand with saving the planet, and the rise of sustainable living for creating the lifestyle. Author Stephanie Marie Seferian, whose philosophy is one in which incremental minimalism is the key to sharing our planet, recommends that readers begin by “stepping back from the consumerist culture.” She believes that breaking the consumption cycle and stopping the addiction will result in the need for less storage. The book is an empowering and therapeutic holistic manual, offering a look at how to declutter and organize while saving the planet, ultimately improving one’s finances, and creating a stress-free, practical, zero-waste home. The result is a win-win proposition: a cleaner home and a healthier world.

Change is inevitable as architects and interior designers face the aftermath of life in a postpandemic world. Perfectly timed, RETHINK Design Guide pulls together experts in key architectural sectors of housing, workplace, hospitals, hospitality, education, and civic and cultural areas for insights on how to navigate the brave new world of design. The book also features client perspectives, looking at their needs as crucial for planning for the future. As the design world faces a new frontier in reinventing residential, hospitality, and workplace environments, the book offers a unique window to the future and is a must both for sole practitioners and for those working in large practices.

SEP OCT NOV DEC

2021

ARRAYNY.COM

11


Trove

1

Shop these innovative products for stylish and eco-friendly designs.

SPONGE WORTHY These 100 percent naturally biodegradable sponges are made from cellulose, wood pulp, and renewable cotton. Ditch your plain plastic kitchen sponge for these intricately designed, machinewashable wonders, made popular in Scandinavia. Available in dozens of designs and patterns, this sustainable alternative to sponges, dishcloths, and paper towels becomes soft and pliable when wet for easy cleanup. $13-14. Danicaimports.com

2

3 12

CLEAN EATING Caraway, a direct-to-consumer cookware brand, is all about chemical-free ceramics for your kitchen. Available piecemeal or as a complete set, the smartly packaged and tastefully colored pots and pans are available in navy, sage green, light grey, cream, and Perracotta. With aluminum and stainless steel handles and bottoms, this cookware boasts even cooking and durability and is oven-safe up to 650 degrees. $95-395. Carawayhome.com

BREAK IT DOWN Whether you’re a composting pro or just starting out, this cute little container with a breathable lid, odor-blocking filter, and slim bamboo handle makes the perfect countertop accessory. Turn your dinner scraps into garden soil in a compost bin made of renewable, biodegradable fibers. This dishwasherfriendly bin comes in graphite, natural, and terra cotta colors to match any kitchen’s finish. $40. Bamboozlehome.com


By Rebecca Parke

5 4

GREEN GRINDER The Hemson herb grinder was created as a quality-crafted tool fashioned from authentic heirloom-quality materials. This hand-turned, American walnut grinder is designed to be both durable and beautiful. With a solid aluminum core and magnetic closure, the Hemson grinder features an oversized storage bin and angled teeth to avoid unnecessary compression. Every grinder’s natural wood grain is unique and will acquire a warm patina with time. $120. Hemsongoods.com

7

6

MIXOLOGY ON THE MOVE For the bartender on the go and the drink aficionado with limited space, this compact yet comprehensive bar tool kit from Nappa Dori is ideal. After using the gorgeous brass tools, they snap neatly into place in a foldable leather pouch, which can then be stashed in a drawer or toted around on your travels. $157. Nappadori.com

TOSS THE PACKAGE The mission of the Package Free Shop is to provide access to sustainable products (from bathroom and cleaning supplies to office gear and clothing) that benefit people and the planet. The round shampoo and conditioner, sold package-free as part of the Unwrapped Life collection, are available in five different varieties and last for 50-75 washes. Save some money and some CO2 by purchasing as a bundle or individually. They’re cruelty-free, vegan, and work perfectly for travel. $14-24. Packagefreeshop.com

FASHION MEETS CONSCIOUS LIVING These lithe leather booties from Of ORIGIN repurpose leather hides from Spain (certified as byproducts of the food industry) to form sleek, handmade, and biodegradable footwear. The Dalt Negro bootie uses jute and natural crepe rubber soles, unlined soft leather, and a flat footbed for a unisex shoe that can be dressed up or dressed down. Available in European sizes 36-42. $243. Oforigin.ooo

SEP OCT NOV DEC

2021

ARRAYNY.COM

13


14


FreshPicks T H E M OST CURRE NT PR ODUCTS IN 2 0 0 L E X S H OWR OOMS.

High Performance Perennials Luxury Performance Fabrics by Vincent Van Duysen were born out of the idea to embed the mood of Vincent’s house in Antwerp into the textiles. The outcome is an eclectic mix of fabrics deriving not only from Vincent’s diverse influences and travels, but also from the choice of unexpected and diverse patterns. Perennials, Suite #117, 214-389-4277, perennialsandsutherland.com

Color Me Innovative

The Benjamin Moore Color Portfolio app for Apple® and Android™ mobile devices features virtual fan decks, photo and video visualizers, and renderings, so you can “try on” colors and save and share images. The Benjamin Moore ColorReader device (Standard and Pro models) is available at select Benjamin Moore retailers and online at benjaminmoore.com/ colorreader. Benjamin Moore, Suite #814, 646-293-6626, benjaminmoore.com

SEP OCT NOV DEC

2021

ARRAYNY.COM

15


FreshPicks

What to Wear The Kimono Chaise by Thomas Pheasant for McGuire is inspired by the mixed materials in Japanese gardens – where plants, stone, and wood come together in harmony. The barklike texture on its brass feet is handcrafted by McGuire artisans, and its square mesh cane ends feature oak blossom detail. McGuire Furniture, Suite #300, 212-689-1565, mcguirefurniture.com 16


Support Group The Marino Dining Chair by Barbara Barry for Baker Furniture is destined to become a new classic. With a supportive back rimmed in solid walnut and tapered conical legs with bronze sabots, the chair welcomes you in style. Shown here in nougat. Baker Furniture, Suite #300, 212-779-8810, bakerfurniture.com

Glimmer Twins The Glimmer Rug by Merida, from the Portfolio 2021 Collection, is a new take on their popular Marmaris Rug. This inventive dobby weave blends two colors of mohair yarn with undyed wool in the pattern repeat to create a subtle interplay of color and texture. Merida, Suite #1605, 646-293-6681, meridastudio.com

SEP OCT NOV DEC

2021

ARRAYNY.COM

17


FreshPicks

Pop Artisan The Bubbled Vase from Global Views is made in a small art glass factory in southeast Poland. Artisans form the smoke gray glass and use a round tool to push the interior bubbles outward through the wall of the vase. Each piece is unique, so shape and color may vary. Global Views, Suite #612, 212-725-8439, globalviews.com 18


Rise and Shine Waking Up III & IV from Leftbank Art is a pair of tall giclée prints on gallery-wrapped, museum-quality canvas, with handembellished textured paint to replicate the original. They are mounted in float frames. Multiple sizes and frame options are available. Leftbank Art, Suite #609, 646-293-6694, leftbankart.com

Bend Me, Shape Me

Uniquely versatile, the Davids Modular Sofa from The Bright Group can be customized to create original modular configurations. The Davids comes standard as a straight, curved, corner, or snake modular or as a stand-alone lounge chair. The Bright Group, Suite #902, 212-726-9030, thebrightgroup.com

SEP OCT NOV DEC

2021

ARRAYNY.COM

19


FreshPicks

Dressed to Thrill

A stunning Geometric Vanity and Matching Stool by Maison Jansen is part of the Elle W Collection at The Gallery at 200 Lex. This modernist-style gem in steel and brass brings a streamlined deco look to a seventies jewel. A flip top reveals a concealed mirror and compartment, and the stool fits neatly beneath it. Gallery at 200 Lex, 10th Floor, 646-293-6633, email antiques@nydc.com

20


Higher Ground A statement piece to freshen up any contemporary interior, Odegard’s geometric Pangden Plateau design is hand-woven and knotted in Nepal from Himalayan wool with various shades of gray. Odegard Carpets, Suite #1209, 212-545-0205, odegardcarpets.com

Saintly Simplicity Dennis & Leen’s Saint Honoré Coffee Table is a beautifully minimalist modern squareleaf ivory parchment table with a waterfall frame, defined lines, and a floating shelf. Shown here in a faux ivory parchment finish, custom sizes and finishes are available. Dennis & Leen, Suite #903, 212-706-9030, dennisandleen.com

SEP OCT NOV DEC

2021

ARRAYNY.COM

21


PICTURE I T D E SI G N E R L E YD E N L E W I S USE S ART TO TE L L A D E E P E R CULTURAL S TO RY

Lewis says, “My collection is very personal and has been developed over years... and continues.” Photographed by David A. Land

22


By Laura Hine

Lewis sits in front of a torso painting by Clarity Haynes. Photographed by David A. Land

F

or designer Leyden Lewis, art is about the future just as much as it is about history. The art he collects tells his story, and he’s passionate about helping clients tell their own stories through their art. “I have many clients who are serious travelers,” he says. “And when I look at their art, I want to know the story it’s telling about the person who has traveled and brought something back to include in their world.” Lewis’ appreciation of art comes from a lifetime immersion. Not only is he an artist himself but his father, Lionel Lewis, is a painter, and Leyden’s first job working for designer Joan Regenbogen brought him into the world of art collectors. “I was a ‘guy Friday’ at the office and as a 17-year-old kid, from my first day, I went into collectors’ houses,” he says. “I really got started with contemporary art and the spaces we make to hold contemporary art.”

SEP OCT NOV DEC

2021

ARRAYNY.COM

23


The dining room walls are upholstered in an iridescent silk fabric. The blue pottery on the table is by Brooklyn-based KleinReid.

After working with Barbara Hauben Ross and at Knowles Architecture, Lewis launched his Brooklynbased Leyden Lewis Design Studio. It has become a celebrated interior and architectural firm that draws on his Caribbean heritage as well as classical European Modernism, but art remains at the center of his practice. “Design and art are in such an ephemeral and emotional space,” he says. “It’s a cultural conversation with individuals educating themselves on what triggers positive and aesthetic responses from their body and their spirit.” To help facilitate these foundational conversations about race, representation, and art, Lewis helped found the Black Artists + Designers Guild, through which he curated the 2019 exhibit Beyond the Mask: Storytelling in Black Art and Design. “I’m glad the

24

Top right: In this hallway, Lewis channeled inspiration from 1920s and '30s French design. Bottom: Dark and light elements set moods throughout the apartment that complement both day and evening environments.


needle has moved over the past year,” he says, talking about the social justice inroads made in 2020. “But I don’t want to be forgotten again, I don’t want to move back into the shadows.” As a member of the Elle Décor A-List, 1stDibs 50, and the 2021 AD100, there is little chance that the future will forget Lewis, but he also wants to elevate young designers and artists of color who haven’t yet achieved his recognition. He teaches at his alma mater, Parsons School of Design, as well as at New York School of Interior Design. “It’s about seeing people who look like you,” he says. “If this guy from Crown Heights, Brooklyn, can operate in this world, maybe I can join him on some of that.” For his own work, the accolades signal that he is

Top left: Lewis curated the 2019 exhibit, Beyond The Mask: Storytelling In Black Art And Design.Lisa Hunt’s artwork hangs on the anchor wall with Baughaus Design Studio’s Dancehall Queen Salt ‘n’ Peppa Shakers in the forefront. Photographed by Keith Isaacs Top right: Jomo Tariku’s suite of furniture is visible through the Roman arch. Photographed by Keith Isaacs Middle: In front of Sheila Bridges’ Harlem Toile de Jouy wallpapers sits a sculpture and coffee table by Marlin Darbeau. Photographed by Keith Isaacs Bottom: In the exhibition space, matte gold cubist plinths set the stage for the artists' work while the cutout Islamic and Roman arches symbolize the expanse of black culture. Photographed by Keith Isaacs

SEP OCT NOV DEC

2021

ARRAYNY.COM

25


Top Left: Lewis’ apartment is home to his extensive and personal art collection, including a life-size sculpture by Martin Sjöberg. Photographed by David A. Land Bottom Right: A coffee table display includes a porcelain jockstrap sculpture by Tony Whitfield next to glass penetrative devices. Photographed by David A. Land

a force to be reckoned with. “Those lists ensure that my voice is heard discussing design and talking about design,” he says. “It does help me engage in robust conversations as an equal.” Lewis’ clients perhaps care about these honors, but he believes they choose him for his skill at creating thoughtful, art-filled living spaces. For a recent client – he started on her apartment when she moved in at the age of 92 – much of the fun was in talking to her about her life and the art movements she

26


Top Middle: Lewis helped found the Black Artists + Designers Guild, through which he curated Beyond the Mask: Storytelling in Black Art and Design. Photographed by David A. Land Top right: In the main living area, a large canvas by Ricardo Gonzalez hangs over a West Elm sofa and Tony Whitfield coffee table. Photographed by David A. Land

experienced over the years. “She was one of the most adventurous clients I’ve ever had, because she lived through all these periods that we’re now starting to collect,” Lewis says. “She really understood craft and the diaspora of design.” In his own home, Lewis is an eclectic collector but also a personal one. “I tend to not own work from people I don’t know,” he says. “If I find something I really love and have to have, I will call that artist up and have a discussion with them about the work.” His apartment is full of art and books; it’s a calling card for his philosophy of living with the objects and things that one loves.

When Lewis talks about what he sees in the future for the worlds of art and design, his vision is one of authenticity and inclusion. “I don’t love trends and I don’t love the word style, so I would hope we avoid those things when thinking of moving the industry forward,” he says.

“The only trend I hope is sustainable is that we are finally addressing inequity – that is long overdue.”

SEP OCT NOV DEC

2021

ARRAYNY.COM

27


THE UNEXPECTED MOMENT A RC H I T E C T AN D UR BAN P L ANNE R JON ATH A N MA RVE L O N T HE P O S T - PA ND E MI C WORLD

28


By Cathy Whitlock

T

he Great Disruptor – otherwise known as the coronavirus – undoubtedly changed everything in our world as we know it, leaving its impact on health and the economy, human interaction, and the way we live. As we face the challenges of living in these post-pandemic times, we must adapt to both present and long-term realities – but how does that look? Designing workplaces with well-being in mind, establishing new ways for individuals and communities to interact, and creating healthy urban areas will require out-of-the-box thinking as we enter a brave new world.

SEP OCT NOV DEC

2021

ARRAYNY.COM

29


Top and middle left: Designs for the lobby of 1 Hotel that is located south of the Brooklyn Bridge.

Architect and urban designer Jonathan Marvel. 30


By Cathy Whitlock

ARRAY recently asked architect, urban designer, and founding principal of his namesake firm Jonathan Marvel to gaze into his crystal ball and share his insights on the future. Named among Fast Company’s Most Creative People of 2019 and no stranger to urban development, he has transformed everything from public spaces, libraries, and museums to housing and large-scale mixed-use developments worldwide.

find a balance.” Marvel finds that it all translates into a revisit of the 40-hour-a-week concept, offering flexibility in terms of workplace and home and establishing a common space where people can celebrate being together. Creating open spaces with big high-top tables on wheels to arrange and rearrange also comes into play, allowing employees to experience the balance of working in “isolation mode” at their workstations.

“The pandemic loosened up our daily routine in such a radical way that it freed us to think differently,” Marvel notes about how COVID-19 has impacted his own workplace. “I’m very excited about the new world of choices and flexibility. We just finished an in-house survey of 115 people on life pre- and post-pandemic – where we work, how we get to work, what our hours are like, how is our productivity – and it’s fascinating to see the openings being made as we start to assess how we want to conduct ourselves in our practice and try to

“Our work is about bouncing creative ideas, so we want a lot of interaction, dialogue, and stimulation – it’s all about celebrating the ability to create your own group of people you want to work with.”

Marvel restored a US Navy machine shop for New Lab, a think tank for forward-thinking entrepreneurs.

All the spaces are divided between individual offices, shared workspaces and meeting rooms, and equipped with working windows and lots of daylight.

SEP OCT NOV DEC

2021

ARRAYNY.COM

31


Top left: For a 5,000 square-foot weekend residence in the Long Island, the designers created an open staircase that connects all three levels and provides a view of the Great Peconic Bay. Top right: The residence features an open plan kitchen, outdoor living room and infinity pool, all designed to maximize the location of forest and water. Middle: The kitchen, dining and living room open plan design showcases a board-formed concrete fireplace. Bottom: A view of the house from the woods.

32


Based in New York and San Juan, Marvel is a firm with an impressive portfolio reflecting its commitment to effective urban planning that will play a role in reimagining the future of our cities through improved infrastructure and sustainable design. Located in the Brooklyn Navy Yard, its project New Lab provides space where forward-thinking entrepreneurs partner with corporate and city leaders in search of innovation. “It is an incubator space for curated companies to be together and share info and public areas with private think-tank areas set aside,” says Marvel, who was inspired by the idea of repurposing historical buildings (New Lab was originally a turbine factory for the Navy in World War II). “I think people are realizing that teamwork is the most valuable part of our creative capacity and sitting by oneself is far less productive than engaging with like-minded individuals. The unexpected moment happens when groups of people come together with their own ideas, giving a chance for brilliant new ideas to emerge.” Ten years plus in the making, the project to renovate Marvel’s 1909 Battery Maritime Building revitalized New York’s waterfront. The historic – and sadly neglected – Beaux Arts-design ferry terminal is a study in adaptive reuse, transformed into Casa Cipriani housing a wellness center, hotel, jazz café, private club, and dining areas. “This is an amazing opportunity to do more, to bring people together and inspire them to respect historic buildings,” notes Marvel.

International interior designer Joy Moyler

Top: The 25,000 square-foot pre-Civil War building boasts an open-air triangle garden. Middle: Located in Brooklyn Bridge Park, St. Ann’s Warehouse. The state-of-the-art theater was designed as a theatre space that houses different configurations for theater and music programming and large-scale festivals. Bottom: St. Ann’s also provides a multi-use studio for local artists and community groups.

SEP OCT NOV DEC

2021

ARRAYNY.COM

33


Top Left: Marvel’s redevelopment of the landmark 1909 Battery Maritime Building includes the reconstruction of the historic cupolas and spires from the 1930s. Top Right: The open design allows for the building's natural light to accentuate its dark wood features. Middle Left: The building houses an elegant hotel, restaurant, jazz café, wellness center and private club. Middle Right: Shown here is an impressive double-vaulted loggia.

34


His plans for the future include charter schools, the restoration of recreation spaces at Orchard Beach, a new YMCA in the northeast Bronx complete with a wellness center and basketball courts, and a landscape project connecting LaGuardia Airport to the New York City subway system. “We’re redesigning and rebuilding pedestrian areas underneath the rail line. It’s a wonderful chance to design space for people to have shade, be alone, gather for passive and active recreation, and celebrate nature.” The firm’s reach, says Marvel, also extends to the Caribbean and Puerto Rico: Top: The building features fantastic views of the New York waterfront and views of the Brooklyn Bridge.

“We’re bringing life back to postearthquake, post-hurricane, and post-pandemic cities that are bursting with new ideas and excitement. It’s all about being outside again.”

The west façade was never completed so the designers adapted the Beaux Arts designs and added a modern glass rooftop.

SEP OCT NOV DEC

2021

ARRAYNY.COM

35


By Cathy Whitlock

36


A H O M E FO R A LL SE ASO NS WOR KS HO P / APD D E S IG NS A G E TAWAY I N TH E BE RKSH I RE S

A

s the saying goes, timing is everything. Such was the case with a Manhattan family who wanted to build a family getaway on their property in the Berkshires. As luck would have it, they finished just in time before the pandemic arrived. Spearheading the project was Design Director and Senior Associate Andrew Kline of New York’s Workshop/APD, who began with a simple starting point: “If you could imagine the best possible weekend with your family and best friends, what would that look like?” Designing for a family with three active children was paramount, along with incorporating spaces for entertaining and the occasional weekend guests, with a seamless connection between the indoors and outdoors.

SEP OCT NOV DEC

2021

ARRAYNY.COM

37


38


Views of the Berkshire Mountains provide a scenic backdrop for the interiors and seamlessly integrate the landscape.

Top Left: A burnt orange accent wall becomes a focal point in the contemporary billiard room. Top Right: Housed in the field house, a sleek basketball court is a unique amenity for this active family. Bottom Left: A custom three-tiered bunk bed provides additional space for guests and their children. Bottom Right: A ski lift chair is both whimsical and functional in the mudroom.

“The goal was to create a fun, casual space for the family who wanted an all-season house. It’s about defining spaces for the lighter side of life,” says the designer. “They needed a place where different families could come together and have cool spaces for the kids to hang out.” Kline decided early in the process that the design direction would be light and bright; they would bring in contrast through the architecture with dark windows and black metal accents and choose interesting light fixtures to give it a modern feel. Whimsy meets function and order where a ski-lift chair becomes seating in a mudroom and a field house features a basketball court and a media room. Custom three-tiered built-in bunk beds provide multiple sleeping areas for the kids, and a sleek upstairs billiard room offers more recreational activity.

SEP OCT NOV DEC

2021

ARRAYNY.COM

39


40


Clockwise from top left: Workshop/APD kept the spaces light with a modern minimalist feel. Kline sourced building materials locally from the area. The overall design aesthetic is timeless, modern and most importantly functional. The furnishings were a mix of purchase and custom as Design Director Andrew Kline notes, “One of the cool things is we have architects, product and interior designers working across various project types.”

Kline also sourced local materials, designing with the environment and the climate in mind. “The joy of designing something appropriate for a unique spot is an aesthetic experience born out of a feeling for the site. It’s also important when you think of greenhouse gases and shipping. You have to ask yourself if using a stone from Turkey that is beautiful is worth it.” As a result, slate from Vermont and landscape boulders from the local area were used, and foam on the windows helped with solar heat. The design of the house is also a blueprint for the future. “It speaks to the way people have learned to live during COVID-19. The idea is, you have these spaces where families can be separate and be together, as the kids can play in the field house and dad can get a moment of peace with his golf simulator,” says Kline. “The sunroom is suitable for all seasons, and we created private spaces across dad’s office with a lounge and media space.” Kline feels that the house provides one of the biggest takeaways from the pandemic. “Take a moment to be outside, and your heart rate goes down.” He also feels that design in the future will be about the need for space for private work conversations.

“As spaces collapse, the dinner table has become an office, the bedroom a conference room, and there is the need to get outside and get a break, for your sanity.”

SEP OCT NOV DEC

2021

ARRAYNY.COM

41


Workshop/APD is a multidisciplinary global design firm known for its one-of-a-kind amenities and projects that celebrate both location and history. With a staff of 70, they have created residences, hotels, clubs, and restaurants from Nashville and Aspen to Pebble Beach and Cape Cod. The design firm also recently launched a new line of lighting and accessories with Arteriors. Built out of a need for lighting that works in both residential and commercial, the designs are classic-meetscontemporary. “We took old-school cut crystal and modernized it. It’s a crafted modern that isn’t cold and allows you to see the hand of the maker. There is a thread that pulls together our work; it can be very diverse but always a blend of craft and modern,” the designer notes. Like all of the firm’s projects, the designs have an eye toward the future.

Clockwise from top left: Arteriors, the design firm's new light of lighting an accessories, debuted this year. Bold lighting accessories compliment both residential and commercial designs. Cut crystal is modernized in a classic-meetscontemporary design.

42


NEW YORK

SABAXTER.COM

LONDON SEP OCT NOV DEC

2021

ARRAYNY.COM

43


CultureCalendar

New York is back with these immersive, forward-thinking cultural events.

American Mosaic Over the course of the pandemic, internationally renowned pianist Simone Dinnerstein took solace in long walks through Brooklyn’s historic Greenwood Cemetery. This fall, Dinnerstein brings reflections on that time to The Angel’s Share: a unique performance that is part concert, part guided tour. During each evening of her performance, Dinnerstein guides her audience across the cemetery, pausing to play on several pianos scattered along her route. Each movement of Dinnerstein’s newly composed piece, entitled An American Mosaic, commemorates different segments of the American population that has been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. September 15-17. Green-wood.com/event/an-american-mosaic. $100.

A Fresh Perspective The Metropolitan Museum of Art is celebrating being open to the public with an assortment of dazzling new exhibits. In The New Women Behind the Camera, the Met is featuring over 120 photographers from 20 countries who embraced the expressive artform of photography from the 1920s through the 1950s. This exhibition is the first to take an international approach to the topic, and highlights work in studio portraiture, experimentalism, street photography, ethnogrophy, and photo journalisim. July 2-October 3. metmuseum.org/ exhibitions/listings/2021/new-woman-behind-thecamera. $25.

Photoville The Photoville festival, NYC’s premier photo destination, returns this fall for its ten-year anniversary with a free community day, virtual online storytelling events, artist talks, workshops, and community programming. Photoville’s 70+ outdoor exhibitions, typically on display at Brooklyn Bridge Park, will be scattered this year throughout 25 different public spaces. Highlights include portraits of NYC’s spring graduates in Pandemic Class of 2020 and Asian Americans on Race and the Pandemic. For those who can’t make it to an in-person showing, there are plenty of hybrid and online events. September 18-December 1. Photoville.nyc. Free. 44


By Rebecca Parke

Return of the Drive-In While many events are geared toward hybrid audiences and virtual reality , some classic venues around town are reinventing the past with made-for-NYC drive-in experiences. It’s not too late to revel in the nostalgic joy of drive-in movies throughout Brooklyn and Queens: at rooftop venues, restaurant walls, and good old drive-in spots. With an assortment of classic and brand-new movies, plus the best theater snacks the city has to offer, several venues are keeping their drive-ins open through fall. Skylinedriveinnyc.com (Greenpoint), queensdrivein.com (Flushing Meadows), and syndicatedbk.com (Bushwick). Through September 30. Free.

Lincoln Center Restart Stages To help kick-start the performing arts sector and New York City’s revival, Restart Stages at Lincoln Center invites you to enjoy performances by cultural and community arts partners and guest curators from across the five boroughs and ten outdoor performance and rehearsal spaces. Tickets are made available through an online lottery, with shows geared toward audiences of all ages. The iconic Josie Robertson Plaza has been reimagined for the event as the centerpiece of Restart Stages, with public art installations and pop-up performances. July 30-August 28. Todaytix.com/nyc/category/Lincolncenter-restart-stages-program. Free.

Little Island’s Dance Festival The statewide NY PopsUp initiative, designed to revitalize the arts and entertainment sector, will culminate this summer with a park-wide festival of percussive music and dance. The festival will celebrate National dance day (September 18) with performances from tap artists, classic and contemporary Indian Kathak dance, African drumming, and more. Hudson River Park’s nearly three-acre island off Pier 54 boasts an array of events this summer that incorporate an immersive experience with nature and art. A full schedule of events and ticket reservations for the September Festival is live now. September 15-19. Littleisland.org/events-in-the-amph. Free.

SEP OCT NOV DEC

2021

ARRAYNY.COM

45


Eats'N'Sleeps

46

Make up for lost time with the latest and greatest restaurants.

Cafe China 13 E. 37th St. 212-213-2810 cafechinanyc.com

Sisters Caribbean Cuisine 47 E. 124th St. 212-410-3000 sisterscuisineharlem.com

Maison Pickle 2315 Broadway 212-496-9100 maisonpickle.com

Sushi Noz 181 E. 78th St. 917-338-1792 sushinoz.com

Amid the bustling office landscape of Midtown East, Cafe China is a stylish dining oasis that dazzles with all the glamour of 1930s Shanghai. This delightful gem is replete with paneled screens, portraits of Chinese starlets, and advertisements from years past, as well as Eastern furnishings. The striking yet welcoming setting creates an electric, escapist mood for patrons to indulge in exceptional Sichuan cuisine. Here you’ll find an abundance of spicy and surprising fare, with graceful flavor profiles and a long, wideranging menu that has something for every palate. And that’s good, because big, family-style meals work best here: share the exquisite dan dan noodles with explosive bits of fried pork, the true-to-its-name Mouth Watering Chicken with a satisfying shock of peanuts, sumptuous eggplant in garlic sauce, and myriad other dishes showcasing the wonders of garlic and peppercorns and chili and sesame oils. Rounding out Cafe China’s exuberant atmosphere are thoughtfully glitzy cocktails, including house concoctions like Paper Moon and Flowers of Shanghai that complement the food nicely and help transport your spirit out of midtown.

Experience the full breadth of Caribbean cuisine without leaving New York City at one of East Harlem’s culinary staples. Sisters Caribbean Cuisine has been serving up delectable island bites since 1995 when it was opened by Guyana native Marlyn LawrieRogers after she and her sister had an unpleasant meal in the neighborhood that inspired them to get into the restaurant game. Her son, RanDe Rogers, has taken over as head chef in recent years, and he’s keeping the tradition strong. You’ll find a mixture of Caribbean and American South classics here, including a piquant jerk chicken, succulent curried goat, and tender oxtail stew in a caramelized gravy, plus a range of tantalizing roti dishes and fabulous sides such as coconut rice and peas and collard greens. Neighborhood locals, tourists, and city foodies alike flock here to enjoy these complex, authentic flavors – and the spot has only gotten hotter since its inclusion in several high-profile food festivals.

Maison Pickle offers some of the best Americana eats in the whole city, most notably, several variations of the French Dip sandwich. A century-old crowdpleaser with Los Angeles origins, it consists of roast beef on a hero roll with an au jus dipping sauce. This retro-chic restaurant, which quickly became an Upper West Side favorite after it opened in 2017, is the second brainchild of Jacob Hadjigeorgis, one of the neighborhood’s biggest tastemakers. Hadjigeorgis found great success in the wildly popular Jacob’s Pickle, a nearby Southern-style spot that helped revitalize the UWS dining scene when it opened in 2011 with a focus on beer and comfort food. In addition to elevating the humble culinary invention that is the French Dip, this eatery specializes in sophisticated dishes like roasted bone marrow on a baguette with pickled pearled onions and radishes, steak or salmon tartare, and various unassailable takes on moulesfrites (and, of course, lots of pickles). Cocktails are a must here – try the killer seasonal negroni or tequila-and-blood-orange-based El Segundo Wallet.

Michelin-starred Sushi Noz has perfected the Japanese concept of omakase, roughly translating to “I leave it up to you,” in which chefs are the ones deciding your order. This radical departure from the traditional American dining experience is thrilling, and maybe even a little scary, but you’re in masterfully good hands with the renowned chefs here. As with most omakase restaurants, you’ll sit at a counter watching the preparation of each meticulously crafted course, consisting of superlative nigiri and all manner of elegant small plates like tilefish broth with mozuku seaweed. Dishes are set for the day based on the freshest available ingredients, most imported from Japan, which are alchemized into sublime little works of art born from Sushi Noz’s limitless creativity and expertise. At the Hinoki Counter option – where the visionary Chef Nozomu Abe himself takes center stage behind a stunning 200-year-old hinoki-wood bar – patrons will relish the traditional Edomae tasting menu with five to six appetizers followed by a sampling of seasonal nigiri. It’s sublime. From the marvelous Japanese decor to the captivating chef performances to each transcendent bite, Sushi Noz provides truly unparalleled omakase.


By Tom Scarcella

SoHo Grand Hotel 310 W. Broadway 212-965-3000 sohogrand.com

Mandarin Oriental, New York 80 Columbus Cir. 212-805-8800 mandarinoriental.com/new-york

The St. Regis New York 2 E. 55th St. 212-753-4500 marriott.com/hotels/travel/nycxrthe-st-regis-new-york

Moxy NYC East Village 112 E. 11th St. 212-288-6699 moxyeastvillage.com

Among the hippest hotels in one of the world’s coolest neighborhoods, SoHo Grand Hotel bursts with luxury and liveliness. The boutique outpost made waves when it opened in 1996 – then the first new hotel to open in SoHo in over a century – and quickly became one of the city’s top high-energy, highprofile lodgings. You may have even spotted it in The Sopranos or Sex and the City. The rooms are upscale, with a full range of amenities, and many feature extraordinary views. But you won’t want to stay in your room for long when you can lose yourself dancing in the Club Room, enjoy a perfect cocktail at the famed Grand Bar & Lounge (the whiskey selection is vast), or take in the city – you’ll be steps away from some of Manhattan’s best attractions, and seven subway lines are within four blocks. Oh, and bring Fido along for the ride, as this spot is known for its pet-loving amenities.

Overlooking Central Park at its southwest corner is Mandarin Oriental, New York, a stunning five-star hotel that simply oozes opulence. Tucked into floors 35 through 54 of the Deutsche Bank Center (formerly the Time Warner complex), Mandarin Oriental has some of the most remarkable views in Manhattan, coupled with world-class amenities and gorgeous, Asianinspired aesthetics. A major standout is the full-service spa, complete with a sauna and massage rooms as well as a tea lounge for pre- or post-treatment relaxation. Total luxury is the goal at this distinguished hotel. Each room has floor-to-ceiling windows and a beautifully understated luxe decor, including marble bathrooms with soaking tubs. Although the Mandarin Oriental feels like a destination unto itself, you’re in an incredible location with high-end retail and restaurants at your fingertips and Central Park as your backyard.

Founded in the early 20th century by famed business magnate John Jacob Astor IV, the St. Regis New York is a luxe hotel packed with history. This storied facility was the center of sensational conflicts between New York City’s wealthy elite early in its life, served for many years as a summer home for Salvador Dali, and is purported to be the birthplace of the Bloody Mary cocktail. As the flagship St. Regis property and a perennial Manhattan classic, this Upper East Side gem has top-notch staff, 24/7 butler service, and grand décor, including Italian marble bathrooms. Guests rave about the swanky and renowned cocktail lounge, the fantastic restaurant with charming afternoon tea service, and the famous hair and nail salon. There’s a reason why the St. Regis is one of the highestrated hotels in the city and has endured for more than a century: unrestrained luxury matched by a distinctive timelessness. Come see Astor’s magnificently realized vision flourishing all these years later and you’ll be in for one of Manhattan’s most memorable hotel experiences.

Embrace your inner rock star at the Moxy NYC East Village, right across the street from iconic music venue Webster Hall. Moxy pays homage to the gritty glory days of the East Village: The ground-floor public areas have unadorned concrete walls, lounge areas are filled with vintage record players and boomboxes, and evocative avant-garde works of art (including trippy shattered mirrors) are peppered throughout. What’s more, each floor reflects a different era of this venerated, society-shifting neighborhood, from the earliest arrivals to the rebellious punk scene and all the way through to the counterculture of today. This theme is continued at the various eating and drinking spots here that reflect both the classic dive bars of yesteryear and today’s trendy haunts – the refined rooftop bar in particular is just exceptional. The rooms are fairly small at this modestly priced lodge, but comfort is not sacrificed when you have relaxing rain showerheads, smart storage solutions, and the standard spate of upscale amenities like smart TVs. Plus, you’ve got all the area’s current jewels within easy reach, and you’re only a short walk to the transit hub at Union Square.

SEP OCT NOV DEC

2021

ARRAYNY.COM

47


48


Gallery A P ICT URE-PERFE C T SHOWR OOM E XHI BI TI ON

Cubist Side Table, available at McGuire, Suite #300, 212-779-8810, mcguirefurniture.com

Tressage Woven Box, available at Dennis & Leen, Suite #903, 310-652-0855, dennisandleen.com

SEP OCT NOV DEC

2021

ARRAYNY.COM

49


Gallery Dew Drop Mirror available at Baker, Suite #300, 212-779-8810, bakerfurniture.com

50


Swatches of Color, available at Leftbank Art, Suite #609, 646-293-6694, leftbankart.com

Ethereal, available at Odegard Carpets, Suite #1209, 212-545-0205, odegardcarpets.com

Kantha Abstract Designs, available at Global Views, Suite #612, 212-725-8439, globalviews.com

SEP OCT NOV DEC

2021

ARRAYNY.COM

51


Gallery

Windmill Wings, Oxford Gray, Crystalline, and Cushing Green, available at Benjamin Moore, Suite #814, 646-293-6626, benjaminmoore.com

Moonglow Rug, available at Merida, Suite #1605, 646-293-6681, meridastudio.com

52


Sculptural Chandelier by James Devlin, available at Gallery at 200 Lex, 10th floor, 646-293-6633

The Davids, available at The Bright Group, Suite #902, 212-726-9030, thebrightgroup.com

Rusty Black by Vincent Van Duysen for Perennials, Suite #117, 214-389-4277, perennialsandsutherland.com

SEP OCT NOV DEC

2021

ARRAYNY.COM

53


54


StyleSpotlight F E ATURED H IGH LI GHTS OF CR AF T AND D E S I G N .

1. Spiral Twist (left) Merida’s Stella Rug is a modern monochromatic design that highlights the natural variation of layered yarns to create a rug of luminous color. A spiral motif of plied thin-felted and twisted wool shadowed by crimped wool floats across a textural ground of plied thin-felted wool yarn. 2. Mahogany Marvel This U-shaped Regency-Style Mahogany Carlton House Desk, from Hyde Park Antiques at The Gallery at 200 Lex, is fitted with a central prospect door, sloping side doors, and drawers.

SEP OCT NOV DEC

2021

ARRAYNY.COM

55


StyleSpotlight

3

3. Holding Sway The striking Sway Bench by Thomas Pheasant for McGuire draws attention in any room with its subtle, sweeping shape that is finished in organic cane texture.

56


4 5

4. Feeling It The Zigg Rug, from Odegard’s Modern Comfort Collection, focuses on yarn texture, density, and softness to create this visually dynamic design. Handcrafted in India. 5. Hearty Welcome Formations’ Timber Bench is a cutting-edge piece that will complement any entrance hall. Available in three standard finishes – ash, walnut, and dark gray – with custom finishes available upon request.

SEP OCT NOV DEC

2021

ARRAYNY.COM

57


StyleSpotlight StyleSpotlight

6

6. Doors of Perception The shimmering églomisé (silver leaf on glass) doors of Baker Furniture’s Bohemia Buffet are rimmed in brass, and the top and sides are wrapped in quartered figured walnut. It all rests atop two curved brass bases.

58


7 8

7. Font of Inspiration The Fountain Console by Hellman Chang at The Bright Group features a “woven” veneer patterned top with rounded corners and unique curved legs. Customize this piece with contrasting finishes, lacquer, or stone. 8. Beauty and Strength Perennials Luxury Performance Fabrics by Vincent Van Duysen are beautiful enough to live indoors yet tough enough to withstand the elements.

SEP OCT NOV DEC

2021

ARRAYNY.COM

59


StyleSpotlight

9

9. Go Forward in Neutral Benjamin Moore is renowned for its expansive collection of over 3,500 colors. Among the most popular colors are gray, beige, white, and neutrals, beloved for their versatility and livability.

3 60


10

11

10. Over the Hills and Far Away Sherwood I & II are giclée reproductions of an original printed on museum-quality paper, floated over a white mat and framed under glass. 11. Radiant Style The Gypsum Bar Cabinet at Global Views features an intricate sunburst pattern of selenite minerals and a base covered in brass metal sheeting. The interior has a mirrored back and glass shelves.

SEP OCT NOV DEC

2021

ARRAYNY.COM

61


62


De.FIN.ingPieces I T E MS T H AT SUM UP WHAT A SHOWR OOM I S A L L A BO U T.

Leftbank Art Another Instinct is a giclée on gallery-wrapped, museumquality canvas with a portion of the face printed on acrylic and layered on the canvas. It comes in a light-textured finish and silver floater frame. Choose from multiple size and frame options. Leftbank Art, Suite #609, 646-2936694, leftbankart.com

Baker Furniture The Peplum Dining Table by Barbara Barry features two scalloped pedestals, each crafted in quartered figured walnut veneer atop shimmering brass inlays. With generous scale and gentle radius, the table will become an instant gathering place. Made from solid walnut, quartered figured walnut veneer, and brass. Baker Furniture, Suite #300, 646-779-8810, bakerfurniture.com

SEP OCT NOV DEC

2021

ARRAYNY.COM

63


DefiningPieces

Benjamin Moore Benjamin Moore ADVANCE® offers the application and performance of traditional oil paint in a waterborne formula that cleans up with soap and water. ADVANCE provides a furniture-like finish that’s ideal for cabinets, trim, doors, crown molding, and baseboards. Available as a primer and in four premium finishes – matte, satin, semi-gloss, and high gloss – as well as in thousands of Benjamin Moore colors. Benjamin Moore, Suite #814, 646-293-6626, benjaminmoore.com

64


Odegard Carpets The design of the Brick Rug features a delicate border of a wool and silk blend, giving a shimmer from every angle. This hand-knotted rug is made in Nepal with custom colors and sizes available. Odegard Carpets, Suite #1209, 212-545-0205, odegardcarpets.com

The Bright Group The Radiant Mobile by John Pomp comprises hand-poured, rippled glass crystal puddles suspended on custom-machined hardware in a rigid, linear structure, illuminated by integrated refracting light. The Bright Group, Suite #902, 212-726-9030, thebrightgroup.com

FORMATION The round Bastille Dining Table is shown here in an antique walnut finish, aged to perfection and ready for any type of gathering. Custom sizes and finishes are available. Formations, Suite #903, 212-706-9030, formationsusa.com

SEP OCT NOV DEC

2021

ARRAYNY.COM

65


DefiningPieces

McGuire Furniture Refined for the modern era, the Script Arm Chair by Barbara Barry makes its comeback with a new look and an allrattan form. The chair is handcrafted with a lyrical back for a romantic touch (shown here in mica). McGuire Furniture, Suite #300, 212-689-1565, mcguirefurniture.com

66


Merida Novalis Rug by Merida celebrates color and contrast. Part of their Portfolio 2021 Collection, Novalis features a striated motif that evokes a painterly sunset, rendered with plied yarns of thin-felted and twisted wool over a ground of undyed light gray wool. Manufactured in Fall River, Massachusetts. Merida, Suite #1605, 646-293-6681, meridastudio.com

Gallery at 200 Lex This pair of circa-’70s swiveling club chairs by Milo Baughman for Thayer Coggin is offered by Quotient. These iconic chairs with tufted backs sit on brushed aluminum Saarinen-inspired bases and are newly outfitted in boucle/chenille, ivory/tan upholstery. Gallery at 200 Lex, 10th Floor, 646-293-6633, email antiques@nydc.com

SEP OCT NOV DEC

2021

ARRAYNY.COM

67


DefiningPieces

Global Views This striking Twist Sculpture is a large, elegant statement piece made from cast aluminum then given a nickel-plated finish and set on a black granite base. Also available in a polished brass finish with a white granite base. Global Views, Suite #612, 212-725-8439, globalviews.com

Perennials The Perrenials range of luxury performance textiles by Vincent Van Duysen instills a sense of home and coziness for outdoor environments. These 100% solutiondyed acrylic fabrics are made in Mexico. Perennials, Suite #117, 214-389-4277, perennialsandsutherland.com

68


THE GALLERY AT 200 LEX POWERED BY INCOLLECT

1

1. French Aesthetic Movement Neoclassical Style Ebonized Oak Cabinet

The Gallery at 200 Lex has created a new way to shop using an innovative digital technology. The 33,000-square-foot space on 200 Lex’s 10th floor houses antiques and vintage pieces from over 55 dealers. With Incollect—the online marketplace for furniture and design—designers can shop the 10th floor using their iPhones®, with merchandise appearing on both the Incollect mobile app and Incollect.com, making shopping a 24/7 experience.

SEP OCT NOV DEC

2021

ARRAYNY.COM

69


2

6

10

3

4

7

8

11

70

The Gallery at 200 Lex powered by

12


5

2.

Rare and documented pair of Charles II Long-Joined Oak Benches, c. 1674

3.

Pair of round emerald green Murano Glass and Brass Martini Tables, Italy, 2021

4.

Danish Tile Top and Oak Side Table, c. 1940-1950

5.

Large Pommery Champagne Grape Harvest Baskets, Reims, France, c. 1920-30

6.

Thonet Bentwood Side Table, manufactured by J. & J. Kohn

7.

Pair of resin Lily-form Lamps attributed to Rougier

8.

Paul Laszlo Basketweave Chest of Drawers for Brown Saltman, oak, 1950s

9.

1960s modernist French Lounge Chairs

10. 11.

Very fine carved and gilt wood George III Mirror in the manner of John Linnell, 1770

9

13

Gabriella Crespi, large bamboo and brass “Fungo” Table Lamp

12.

“Exoskeleton” Nightstands by William Hinn for Urban Furniture Company

13.

Carlo Mollino Armchair for the Rai Auditorium, Turin, Italy, c. 1951

14.

Pair of large Green Glass Lamps by Orrefors, 1960s

14

Products available at The Gallery at 200 Lex powered by Incollect, 10th Floor, 646-293-6633, nydc.com/antiques

SEP OCT NOV DEC

2021

ARRAYNY.COM

71


Eventsat200Lex Behind the Pages On May 18, 2021, the New York Design Center introduced a new video series offering an inside look at a recently published project. Titled Behind the Pages, it brings together the people who bring our favorite stories to life and takes a deeper look at the design process, history, and unpublished story behind the pages of truly unique homes. In the series’ debut episode, New York Magazine’s Wendy Goodman, award-winning interior designer Keita Turner, and apartment homeowner Cassandra Bromfield discuss the recent renovation of Bromfield’s 1960s Brooklyn co-op. The story of her home, written by Goodman, was originally published in New York Magazine.

A look at recent virtual events from NYDC’s YouTube channel.

Rosemary Hallgarten and FBC London Spring Open House Event On April 7 and 8, Rosemary Hallgarten and FBC London hosted a spring open house event in their adjacent showrooms in the New York Design Center, previewing the new spring 2021 Kupala Collection. Celebrating the promise of summer, long days and warm nights, sun-kissed skin, and sandy toes, the collection of rugs and fabrics in warm golds and soft neutrals brings texture and luxury indoors and out. Notable members of the architecture and design community previewed the collection and experienced the sumptuous feel of the fabrics, accessories, throws, and more.

A recording is available here:

Fiona Barratt-Cambell, FBC London

Rosemary Hallgarten

View from the Veranda with Jinny Blom As part of the New York Design Center’s ongoing View from the Veranda lecture series presented in partnership with Design Centre Chelsea Harbour and The Horticultural Society of New York (The Hort), renowned British garden and Steele Marcoux, Veranda landscape designer Magazine's editor-in-chief Jinny Blom sat down with Veranda editorin-chief Steele Marcoux. They discussed sparking creativity, how Jinny defines her work, and why, although styles may change, the principles of Jinny’s work in landscape architecture remain the same.

72

Gently pushing the boundaries of creative and intelligent design, Blom is an award-winning landscape designer who works on both public and private projects. She has designed five RHS Chelsea Flower Show gardens, including ones for HRH The Prince of Wales and Prince Harry. What defines her work is her skill with planting and her ability to create gardens, from romantic and naturalistic to more formal, that are tailored to their environments. View from the Veranda invites experts from London, New York, and beyond to share their perspectives on global design as it relates to the outdoors and to the intersection of indoor and outdoor living. The series will include lectures throughout 2021, hosted virtually via Zoom. Watch the conversation online:

Panelst Jinny Blom, award-wining landscape designer


1

2

3

Design Days at 200 Lex

4

5

6

In celebration of NYCxDESIGN’s Design Days (held May 13-18, 2021), the New York Design Center hosted, virtually and in person, a series of programming highlighting the building’s showrooms, new product introductions, and rich 95-year history. Bringing together the design community local and globally, the series included intimate Instagram Live conversations, interactive panel discussions, exhibition previews, open house events, and more. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

7

New York Design Center Palecek Pindler Hearst Castle Collection Global Views Julian Chichester Grove Sofa, Miro and Gio Side Tables Julian Chichester Toby Desk, Flamenco Chair, Palazzo Mirror New York Design Center Wexler Gallery Exhibition

8

200 Lex Outdoor Floral Activation To celebrate the launch of the New York Design Center’s new digital registration system, the building displayed a bold and bright outdoor floral installation on the exterior façade during the months of May and June. Upon entering the building, visitors were canopied under striking greenery, wisteria vines, and bursts of beautiful tropical foliage. The new nydc.com registration system offers a simple and intuitive way for visitors to register to visit the New York Design Center. Completely integrated with the building’s 100+ showrooms, the system allows visitors to fully plan their visit via an interactive form on nydc.com and to schedule planned dates with multiple showrooms simultaneously. Designers who frequent the building can now also create dedicated profiles that allow them to save showroom contact information, favorite products, and upcoming events. The new system seamlessly integrates with the Digital Product Catalog, allowing designers to connect with showrooms and place orders or request additional information directly from their profiles. Go to nydc.com to explore the new tool, and register today to visit the building. New York Design Center Floral Install SEP OCT NOV DEC

2021

ARRAYNY.COM

73


NewShowrooms

Fresh faces and new designs.

Arnold Collective Suite #1315, 908-303-8640 | arnoldcollective.com

As representatives of contract grade manufacturers, Arnold Collective brings American-built appeal with uniquely engineered solutions. Visitors to their showroom are easily drawn to the pod and stadium seating, while also appreciating the refinement of choice office seating, textured wallcoverings, conference tables, reception desks, and more. Manufacturers in the showroom include: Arnold Contract, CB15 Furniture, Parete Wallcoverings, Wyatt Seating.

74


de Le Cuona Suite #1618, 646-293-6634 | delecuona.com

de Le Cuona is thrilled to announce the opening of a second Manhattan trade showroom at the New York Design Center. Designers will be able to touch, experience, and be inspired by the full range of textiles in the boutique studio space. Reflecting the brand's own aesthetic evolution, the contemporary airy space will embody the light, fresh, natural look and feel of their signature textiles. Designed for how professionals source today, there will be a color wall, workspace, and always something new to see.

SEP OCT NOV DEC

2021

ARRAYNY.COM

75


NewShowrooms

ESI Trendway Suite #429, 646-983-1185 | trendway.com

The combined showrooms of ESI and Trendway highlight the use of architectural wall product to define and delineate the space. Utilizing the compact size of the showroom, the working space reflects modern arrangements and a full range of the office furniture products within the context of its environment.

76


Garnier & Linker Suite #419, 646-886-0039 | garnieretlinker.com

Garnier & Linker's collections are a contemporary reinterpretation of rare materials and traditional craftsmanship. Inspired by the decorative arts and sculpture, the two Paris-based interior architects create pure-shaped forms that effortlessly reveal their materiality. Given their background in interior design, Garnier & Linker's lighting, furniture and accessories readily meet all demands of modern interiors, with bespoke options available according to architects' and decorators' needs. Clockwise from top left: Interior design by Jaune Architecture Picture by Yannick Labrousse Interior design by Jaune Architecture Picture by Gaëlle Rappelled Tronquit Interior design by Emilie Bonaventure Picture by Asa Liffner

SEP OCT NOV DEC

2021

ARRAYNY.COM

77


NewShowrooms

Liora Manné Suite #603, 212-989-2732 ext.1 | lioramanne.com Liora Manné designs and produces handmade rugs, wall and ceiling coverings, upholstery fabric, pillows, and artwork with her patented Lamontage technique, which fuses the ancient art of felting with modern technology to produce an incredibly versatile textile. At their new showroom, shop both the Lamontage (hand-felted) and LUSH (handtufted) Collections and select from myriad colors, patterns, and textures – or customize from start to finish – discovering highly artistic yet practical indoor or outdoor solutions for commercial and residential projects.

Nightingale Suite #1114, 914-646-3967 | nightingalechairs.com Nightingale’s showroom, created in collaboration with Huntsman, was inspired by the greenery and architecture of Central Park and features a selection of its award-winning chair models ranging from its task, lounge and conference seating categories. Incorporating colors of the seasons, along with earth tones in various shades of green, brown, white and beige, the use of seasonal hues and foliage creates a natural and organic atmosphere that highlights the distinctive quality and design of Nightingale products.

78


ShowroomDirectory A Complete List of Who’s Where In 200 Lex

SHOWROOM Gallery at 200 Lex Access to DesignTM AERO Amuneal ANDREU WORLD Ann Gish & the Art of Home Apropos Inc. Arc|Com Aristeia Metro Arnold Collective Arteriors Avery Boardman Baker Furniture Bakes & Kropp Bendheim Benjamin Moore Bograd Kids Boyce Products Ltd The Bright Group Brunschwig & Fils Calger Lighting Inc. Castrads Century Furniture Circa Lighting C.L. Sterling Clickspring Design CLIFF YOUNG LTD. Cosulich Interiors & Antiques Crosby Street Studios Currey & Company David Sutherland Showrooms Davis Furniture de Le Cuona Decca Contract Furniture Delivery By Design (DBD) Dennis & Leen Dennis Miller New York DESIGNLUSH DESIRON DIRTT Environmental Solutions Donzella ducduc, kids Dune ENRICOPELLIZZONI ESI | Trendway FAIR FBC London Fermob USA Formations Fromental Giorgio USA Global Views Groupe Lacasse GUY REGAL Halcon Harbinger Harbour Outdoor Hickory Chair IFDA Ike Kligerman Barkley Interlude Home JD Staron Jiun Ho at Dennis Miller JSI/ Pringle Ward Julian Chichester Kasthall Rugs USA Inc. Keilhauer Kenneth Cobonpue KGBL KI and Pallas Textiles

SUITE 10th Fl 424 1500 1314 1111 402 710 1412 1112 1315 202 916 300 430 1602 814 433 1405 902 210 434 417 200 101 408 1405 505 509 1303 506 117 1304 1618 1414 Dock 903 1210 415 1316 1516 1510 1201 100 1304 429 1601 401 414 903 427 502 612 1113 806 1304 601 713 1600 417B 1410 608 510 1208 1116 604 611 1101 411 1616 1313

PH O NE 646.293.6633 212.679.9500 212.966.4700 215.516.5020 212.679.0300 212.727.2122 212.684.6987 212.751.1590 646.761.7411

FA X 646.293.6687 212.447.1669 212.966.4701

646.797.3620 212.688.6611 212.779.8810 917.512.4853 212.547.2946 646.293.6626 212.726.0006 212.683.3100 212.726.9030 212.725.0340 212.689.9511 917.599.9951 212.479.0107 212.725.2500 212.355.5355 212.220.0962 212.683.8808 646.293.6680 212.486.0737 212.213.4900 212.590.6200 212.683.7272

646.786.4814 212.838.9046 212.689.2827 631.725.1710

646.293.4711 212.213.1691 212.726.9030 212.684.0070 212.532.5450 212.353.2600 646.812.5444 212.965.8919 212.226.1868 212.925.6171 212.683.7272 212.352.9615 917.485.2201 212.651.4389 212.726.9030 347.625.1838 212.684.7191 212.725.8439 212.689.0300 212.447.7717 212.683.7272 646.737.7910 646.692.4227 212.725.3776 212.686.6020

212.679.5996 212.689.3684 212.751.2434

212.726.0061 212.683.5005 212.726.9029 212.684.7350 212.779.0721 212.479.0112 212.725.5900 212.683.5005 212.683.9286 917.591.4373 212.213.4911

212.213.9843 212.684.0776 212.532.5360 212.353.0220

S HOW R O O M KIFU PARIS Kips Bay Boys and Girls Club Korts & Knight, Kitchens by Alexandra Knight

Kravet Workspace Krug LaCOUR CONTRACT Lee Jofa Leftbank Art LEPERE Levine Contract Furniture Group Lexington Home Brands Liora Manné Lobel Modern LORIN MARSH Lost City Arts Luteca Markilux McGuire Furniture Merida Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co. Milano Smart Living LLC Mr. Brown London Munder Skiles Napier + Joseph + McNamara, Ltd. NASIRI New Traditionalists new traditionalists, residential | commercial

Ngala Trading Co. Nightingale Odegard Carpets Okamura PALECEK Patrick Coard Paris Pennoyer Newman LLC Pindler Primason Symchik, Inc. Prismatique PROFILES R & Y Augousti Paris Ralph Lauren Home

1209

RENAISSANCE CARPET & TAPESTRIES

212.266.5504 212.925.2273 212.683.7011

Roberta Schilling Rooms by Zoya B Rosemary Hallgarten Royal Botania, Belgian Outdoor Luxury SA Baxter Architectural Hardware

212.725.2683 212.679.4927 212.689.7143 212.683.0711 646.737.7911 212.725.3763 212.686.6258

646.293.6692 212-203-9113x127 212.684.0070 212.684.0776 212.689.0300 812.771.4641 646.293.6622 917.591.2413 212.421.0220 212.421.0230 212.679.0300 212.679.5996 212.532.5450 212.532.5360 212.420.7866 212.420.7865 212.337.9909 212.337.1090

S U IT E 410 418 716 210 1415 1401 210 609 1207 1406 212 603 915 809 909 423 407 300 1605 512 711 604 436 1304 714 1201 701 412 1114

SALADINO Sedgwick & Brattle Seguso Murano The Shade Store The Sherrill Furniture Companies Skram Sonneman-A Way of Light Sossego Studio A Home The Rug Company Theodore Alexander Thom Filicia Inc. Timothy Brown Timothy Oulton Townhouse Kitchens Verellen Visual Comfort Studio Voutsa Wall Goldfinger Wexler Gallery Wood & Hogan, Inc. WOVEN New York Design Center

1110 610 410 416 615 1101 1104 1211 410 700 912 802 433

P H O NE 646.293.6679 212.755.5733 212.3924750 212.725.0340 212.686.7600 212.213.6600 212.725.0340 646.293.6694 212.488.7000 212.686.7600 212.532.2750 212-989-2732x1 212.242.9075 212.759.8700 212.375.0500 646.510.5244 917.327.7940 212.689.1565 646.293.6681 212.545.0032 212.729.1938 646.293.6622 212.717.0149 212.683.7272 212.532.6777

FAX

212.684.7350 973.227.3544 212.684.7350 646.293.6695 212.488.7006 212.686.7686 212.532.2875 212.242.9078

212.689.1578 212.545.0031 212.729.1939 917.591.2413 212.683.7011 212.532.6776

212.226.1868 212.226.5504 646.422.7317 914.646.3967 212.545.0205 212.545.0305 646.644.5934 212.287.0063 212.287.0066 646.293.6679

212.839.0500 212.829.0152 212.679.0300 212.679.0030 212-689-6903 646.293.6679

212.839.0501 212.679.5996 212.679.5996 212.685.1807

212.696.0080 212.696.4248 347.981.9377 212.726.0006 212.726.0061

409 400

917.767.6483 212.812.9852

1205 1512 815 431 210 808 816 201 1301 612 1515 515 815 1608 801 421 804 101 420 1304 413 504 805 426

212.203.4382

212.684.3720 212.685.0600 212.696.1133 212.726.0006 212.464.7060 646.293.6615 914.922.7216 773.551.6259 212.956.0030 646.762.0701 646.293.6628 212.736.6454 212.255.4895 646.705.0131 212.684.8696 646.293.6695 212.725.2500 212.689.3419 212.683.7272 646.293.6603 212.532.7440 646.964.4838 212.679.9500

SEP OCT NOV DEC

2021

888.713.6042 212.684.3257 212.244.9131 212.696.9757

212.956.0031 336.885.5260 212.244.9131 212.255.4861 212.684.8696 212.725.5900 212.683.7011 212.532.6440

ARRAYNY.COM

79


Backstory

NYDC’s CEO Discusses his Vision for the Future.

By Tom Scarcella

LOOKING AHEAD

with Jim Druckman

W

ith eyes toward the future, the New York Design Center is proudly celebrating its rich 95-year history. What many don’t know is that the vaunted institution has roots going back even further than the 1926 genesis, when 200 Lexington Avenue was first constructed. “The building is 95 years old, but the company is certainly older,” explains Jim Druckman, president and CEO of the New York Design Center. A trailblazer since the very beginning, the company can trace its origins to its forebearers in 1896: creating the first national wholesale furniture market in America. Certainly, a whole lot has changed since then. This ambitious, late-20th-century furniture market would undergo key transformations before it became the design-focused epicenter that it is today. But through all these changes, one thing has remained constant: The New York Design Center’s story is all about adaptability and forward thinking.

“We’ve been evolving since we were built,” Druckman says. 200 Lex was originally erected as a vast furniture mart -- then called the New York Furniture Exchange -- by descendants of those same visionaries who organized the country’s first national furniture market. Previously, these pioneers were just renting space, but history was made when the Furniture Exchange got its dedicated temple at Lexington Avenue. During this roughly 50-year incarnation, the building’s tenants comprised famous national furniture manufacturers like Bassett and Lane. Eventually, though, the New York Furniture Exchange was eclipsed by competitors in Chicago and High Point, NC. In the late 1970s, mass manufacturer tenants started leaving en masse, thereby putting 200 Lex at a crossroads. But the company leaders took this crisis as an 80

opportunity. As Druckman tells it, “The Board of Directors at the time, including my father, decided that we should become a design center. That was the first part of the evolution.” In 1981, the New York Design Center was born. Despite the daunting difficulties of legitimizing a radical rebranding, 200 Lex succeeded in its mission -- transforming from a manufacturer’s wholesale marketplace to a cutting-edge showroom building for designers, decorators, and architects. When Druckman took the reins in 1995, he spearheaded the effort to actively market the building as a bonafide design destination with the perfect mix of high-end vendors. The trend of progressive changes continues to this day, as evidenced by 200 Lex’s response to COVID-19 and plans for the future. The advent of COVID-19 accelerated the company’s expansion of its virtual programming, and it is internalizing the needs of a profoundly changed world.

“Living at home during the pandemic made people appreciate and enhance their homes, and I think we have to take advantage of that,” Druckman says. For 2022, the New York Design Center has thrilling plans involving a refined combination of virtual and in-person programming. As showrooms increase their virtual presence, the company deeply understands how important it is for the industry to grow. This growth depends on marketing and education -- the cyber education of social media and advertising, the traditional word-of-mouth marketing, the expertise of designers and salespeople, and the importance of people feeling and touching the products they’re buying. “We try to take the best

Built in 1926 as the New York Furniture Exchange, this historic, 16-story, 500,000-square-foot building was designed by Ely Jacques Khan.

of everything and put it together, and I think that’s a marketing evolution,” Druckman opines. The future is always uncertain, but the New York Design Center benefits greatly from having over a hundred years’ worth of lessons learned, a successful record of changing with the times, and a crystal-clear understanding of what it is today. “In one respect, yes we’re a landlord,” Druckman says. But 200 Lex is not simply an old-fashioned real estate project. “We just create an environment, and it’s our job to market that environment so that the people leasing space from us can sell their products. As far as going forward is concerned, we must be on top of every change and every important development, both physically and virtually.” The New York Design Center plans to always be ahead of the game, just as its ancestors did in 1896.


JULIANCHICHESTER.COM NEW YORK | ATLANTA | HIGH POINT | LONDON

Profile for Array Magazine, Inc

Array Magazine  

Array Magazine - Fall 2021. ARRAY Magazine brings the most interesting people, places and ideas in interior design into the homes and office...

Array Magazine  

Array Magazine - Fall 2021. ARRAY Magazine brings the most interesting people, places and ideas in interior design into the homes and office...

Advertisement

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded