Array Magazine - Spring 2016

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ALL THINGS KELLY Wearstler Wears it Well

SUSAN GALVANI

A Spruce Grows in Manhattan HOME SWEET HOTEL

Gachot Studios Transforms the Smyth FEB

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Display through MAY 2016

OM E N IN DESIGN I S S U E




MARCH 17–20, 2016

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Features

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A Spruce Grows in Manhattan By Cathy Whitlock Spruce Interior Design’s Susan Galvani.

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Home Sweet Hotel By Catherine McHugh Christine Gachot and friends transformed the Smyth hotel into “Tribeca’s Living Room.”

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All Things Kelly By Cathy Whitlock The designing world of Kelly Wearstler.

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STYLERADAR By Katie Doyle As the weather heats up, your parties should too. Tabletop highlights curated by world-famous designer Alexa Hampton and delicious seasonal cocktails created by master mixologist Jasper Soffer will raise the barometer on your springtime festivities. We'll drink to that!

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CULTURECALENDAR By Catherine McHugh Pondering beauty at the Cooper Hewitt, putting on fairy tales at FIT, appreciating the Gilded Age at the Met, and learning how to work better at the Guggenheim.

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BOOKS By Cathy Whitlock An array of illustrated tomes from female authors comprises our spring lineup. n ew tomes from Alexa Hampton and TROVE By Katie Doyle By women, for women... These products—designed, sold or curated by the fairer sex—promise to add a punch of panache, productivity, and prowess to a day in the life of a lady.

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EATS’N’SLEEPS By Katie Doyle From modern Jewish noms to centuries-old Chinese cuisine, from “micro-lifestyle” lodging in Hudson Square to the soaring Four Seasons set to crown downtown, New York’s pasticcio of new hot spots is as mercurial as the city’s spring weather.

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GALLERY A picture-perfect showroom exhibition. l FRESHPICKS The most current products in 200 Lex showrooms.

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STYLESPOTLIGHT Featured highlights of craft and design.

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DEFININGPIECES Items that sum up what a showroom is all about.

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NEWSHOWROOMS 2016 Fresh faces and new designs.

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SHOWROOMPORTRAITS Profiles of some of 200 Lex's most familiar names.

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EVENTSAT200LEX A look at a few recent celebrations.

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SHOWROOMDIRECTORY A complete list of who’s where in 200 Lex.

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BACKSTORY By Jim Lochner The New York School of Interior Design celebrates a century of influential design.

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Array Magazine, Inc. 115 West 18th Street Second Floor New York, NY 10011 (v) +1.212.929.2733 x103 arrayny.com

ARRAY editorial coverage@arrayny.com ARRAY advertising adinfo@arrayny.com ARRAY Magazine is produced three times per year. All submissions should be e-mailed to: coverage@arrayny.com

Array Magazine, Inc. Š 2016 All rights reserved The contents of Array Magazine, Inc., may not be reproduced without written permission from the publisher.

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Editorial Paul Millman Editor-in-Chief/Publisher Sheau Ling Soo Creative Director Ted Lambert Executive Editor Katie Doyle Managing Editor Cathy Whitlock Features Editor Jim Lochner Copy Editor Andrew French Photographer Adam Cohen IT Manager

Contributors Catherine McHugh Cathy Whitlock Jim Lochner Katie Doyle

New York Design Center James P. Druckman President & CEO Daniel M. Farr Director of Operations Alix M. Lerman Director of Marketing & Communications Leah Blank Senior Marketing Manager/Director of Special Events Claire Evans Design Services Manager/Public Relations Manager Brenna Stevens Marketing & Digital Content Manager on the cover Kelly Wearstler photographed by Mark Edward Harris. 6

Susan Lai Controller Vera Markovich Accounting Manager


letter from the editor Dear Readers, Welcome to a new year of ARRAY. As spring approaches, we look forward to a renewed celebration of nature as we rediscover the sun, the outdoors, and all things bright and beautiful. Bright and beautiful is also an apt description of the women profiled in this issue’s feature articles—and their work. Two of our three leading ladies are daughters of women in the design field, two currently collaborate with their husbands, and all three have made quite a name for themselves. Kelly Wearstler is a true design dynamo. Despite being one of the most recognizable faces in the industry thanks to her time as a TV star and her numerous high-profile clients, Wearstler continues to be fearless and experimental, refusing to be pinned down to any particular style or area of design. Get to know the woman that our own Cathy Whitlock describes as “a megaforce” and “a juggernaut” (All Things Kelly, p. 30). Christine Gachot, who runs Gachot Studios with husband John, says key elements of her success lie in being a good “conductor” and collaborating well with others. Gachot recently created a unique kind of boutique hotel experience when she oversaw the redesign of the Smyth in Tribeca. The result is a brilliant mix of comfy and spectacular (Home Sweet Hotel, p. 24). Susan Galvani, who launched Spruce Interior Design five years ago after stints with three leading designers and the Whitney Museum of American Art, likes to combine the lasting value of investment pieces with the fun and eclecticism that defines New York City living. Galvani’s reputation and her client list are expanding skyward with every season (A Spruce Grows in Manhattan, p. 18). These designers certainly inspired us, and we hope that this issue, along with the first signs of the changing season, do the same for you.

Paul Millman Editor-in-Chief

Photo by Andrew French

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Styleradar As the weather heats up, your parties should too. Tabletop highlights curated by world-famous designer Alexa Hampton and delicious seasonal cocktails created by master mixologist Jasper Soffer will raise the barometer on your springtime festivities. We'll drink to that!

By Katie Doyle

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AlexA hAmpton markhampton.com President of Mark Hampton LLC, designer Alexa Hampton has completed a wide range of designs for domestic and international projects. A perennial member of Architectural Digest’s AD100, House Beautiful’s Top Designer list, and a member of Elle Decor’s A-list, Hampton’s work is both classic and eclectic.

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A l e X A’ S P i C K S 1. Mysterious italian ice Bucket in Brass 1stdibs.com, $1,450 “I call this brass faux bois ice bucket the coolest ice bucket, bar none (wink wink). I like that the form is more sculptural and decorative than utilitarian.” 2. Maitland-Smith Faux Shagreen leather Tray hickorychair.com, $219 “Trays are the work horse (besides my husband Pavlos) in a bar set up. They make for easy clean up at the end of the night.”

4. georges Briard Name Your Poison glasses 1stdibs.com, $750 “These Georges Briard glasses shrug the formality that often surrounds entertaining. They remind us that we are all there to have a good time.”

3. global Views ice Tongs

5. Art Deco Silver Plated Cocktail Shaker 1stdibs.com, $2,770 “I am a huge James Bond fan, so naturally, I have an affinity for cocktail shakers—martinis should be shaken, not stirred. I enjoy the architectural nature of this deco form and the sparkle that silver brings to a bar setting.”

globalviews.com, $19 “These Ice Tongs from Global Views will complement my deco shaker. This piece combines utility with good design.”

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mulberryproject.com Master mixologist Jasper Soffer's lauded career includes hotspots in both London and Australia. In New York, Soffer has been head bartender at the SoHo House, manager at the Standard Hotel’s Boom Boom Room, collaborator with the Colibri Hotel Collection, and founder and co-owner of the Mulberry Project, which is rapidly becoming a fixture in the world of custom mixology.

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JASPeR'S ReCiPeS

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APeRol SPRiTZ In a wine glass, add ice, 1 oz. Aperol, and equal parts soda and Prosecco. Garnish with orange and lemon slices.

PiMS CUP In a highball glass, add 2 oz. Pims, 1/2 oz. Ginger Ale, and top with Sprite. Garnish with mint leaves, strawberry, and a slice of lemon and orange.

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Shake and strain 2 oz. Mezcal, 3 pieces of roasted or barbecued pineapple, 1/4 oz. Ancho Reyes liqueur, 1/2 oz. lime juice, 1/3 oz. simple syrup, and 1 slice of muddled jalapeño. Garnish with pineapple leaves and spice the rim of your rocks glass with salt, sugar, and chili powder.

BRAMBle

A R R AY P i C K S (Other items available at 200 Lex) 6. Jan Barboglio imari Tumbler available at Richard Cohen, $48 7. Jan Barboglio Pete's Bar Spoon $126, Strainer $146, available at Richard Cohen 8. Arteriors Nicholas Bar Cart available at Richard Cohen, $1650

Best served in a rocks glass, the Bramble comprises 2 oz. Gin, 4 blackberries, 3/4 oz. lemon juice, 3/4 oz. sugar syrup, and 1/4 oz. crème de mure. Shake, strain, and pour over crushed ice. Garnish with 2 blackberries.

FloRA De SANDiA Shake and strain 2 oz. Tequila Blanco, 2 oz. fresh watermelon juice, 1/4 oz. Saint Germain, 1/2 oz. simple syrup, and 3/4 oz. lime juice. Serve in a rocks glass and dust with cracked black pepper.

9. Zafferano Small Carafe (Transparent, Grey & Aquamarine) available at Richard Cohen, $88 each FEB MAR

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CultureCalendar

By Catherine McHugh

Pondering beauty at the Cooper Hewitt, putting on fairy tales at FIT, appreciating the Gilded Age at the Met, and learning how to work better at the Guggenheim. Storybook Ensembles

Shiva Ahmadi, Lotus (2014). Single channel animation, 8:44 minutes. Edition 1 of 5 Asia Society, New York. Gift of Anne and Joel Ehrekranz.

Out of Iran The Grey Art Gallery is presenting Global/Local 1960–2015: Six Artists from Iran at New York University. The exhibition showcases approximately 90 works, including paintings, sculpture, drawings, photographs, video, and a large mixedmedia installation, including works from the gallery’s own collection. This is the first major museum exhibition in the US to include both pioneering Iranian modernists and emerging artists working in Tehran and abroad. By featuring works from three generations of artists—Faramarz Pilaram (1937–1983), Parviz Tanavoli (b. 1937), Chohreh Feyzdjou (1955–1996), Shiva Ahmadi (b. 1975), Shahpour Pouyan (b. 1980), and Barbad Golshiri (b. 1982)—the exhibition sheds light on the delicate balancing acts required for those working outside the art world’s dominant North American-Western European axis. In particular, it illuminates how each of these six artists has participated in international art discourses, merging global awareness with local traditions over a 55-year span that was punctuated by the 1979 Iranian Revolution and the subsequent eight-year war with Iraq. Through April 2. Grey Art Gallery, New York University, 100 Washington Square East, 212.998.6780, nyu.edu/greyart.

With Fairy Tale Fashion, The Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT) is presenting a unique and imaginative exhibition in its special exhibitions gallery that examines fairy tales through the lens of high fashion. In versions of numerous stories by Charles Perrault, the Brothers Grimm, and Hans Christian Andersen, dress is often used to symbolize a character’s transformation, vanity, power, or privilege. The show features more than 80 objects placed within dramatic, fantasy-like settings designed by architect Kimberly Ackert. Since fairy tales are not often set in a specific time period, the exhibit includes garments and accessories dating from the 18th century to the present. There is a particular emphasis on extraordinary 21st-century fashions by designers such as Thom Browne, Dolce & Gabbana, Tom Ford, Giles, Mary Katrantzou, Marchesa, Alexander McQueen, Rick Owens, and Prada, among others. Fairy Tale Fashion uses some of the most extraordinary, beautiful, and luxurious examples of fashion to illustrate more than 12 fairy tales, including well-known tales such as “Cinderella,” “Sleeping Beauty,” and “Little Red Riding Hood.” Through April 16. Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology, Seventh Avenue at 27th Street, 212.217.4558, fitnyc.edu/museum.

Kirsty Mitchell, The Storyteller, from the Wonderland series. Photo: Kirsty Mitchell.

Golden Furnishings The Metropolitan Museum of Art is presenting the most sumptuous moment in America’s Gilded Age through the work of some of its most noted design firms with Artistic Furniture of the Gilded Age. The centerpiece of the three-part exhibition is the opulent Worsham-Rockefeller Dressing Room from the New York City house commissioned by art collector and philanthropist Arabella Worsham (later Huntington; ca. 1850–1924). A complete work of art, with its elaborate woodwork and decorations, it is a rare surviving commission by New York–based cabinetmaker and interior decorator George A. Schastey. An adjoining gallery will display works by Herter Brothers, which were created for the firm's most important commission, the William H. Vanderbilt House. Through more than three dozen examples of furniture from the Gilded Age, visitors will gain new insights into the luxurious and artistic interiors found in New York's wealthiest households in the late 19th century. Through May 1. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1000 Fifth Avenue, 800.662.3397, metmuseum.org. Worsham-Rockefeller Dressing Room, designed and executed by George A. Schastey & Co. (1873–97), New York City, 1881–82. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of the Museum of the City of New York. Photo: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. FEB MAR

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CultureCalendar Graffiti Trailblazer The Museum of the City of New York is showcasing Chris “Daze” Ellis: The City Is My Muse, a visual journey through the five boroughs as seen in the paintings of Christopher Ellis, best known by his street name, Daze, who gained notoriety and fame as a teenager painting trains in the late 1970s and early 1980s. The trail Chris Ellis blazed from subways to canvasses gives him a unique ability to bring the city, his lifelong home, to life. Ellis, as Daze, was a highlight of the City Museum’s 2014 exhibition, City As Canvas: Graffiti Art from the Martin Wong Collection. A work that he created on the Museum’s front terrace in 2013 was included in City as Canvas and appears again in this exhibition. The exhibit includes older work on canvas as well as his more recent paintings of iconic NYC scenes and settings including Times Square, Coney Island, the Staten Island Ferry, and the intricacies of the subway system. Through May 1. Museum of the City of New York, 1220 Fifth Avenue, 212.534.1672, mcny.org. Left: Marcel Broodthaers (Belgian, 1924– 1976), Armoire blanche et table blanche (White cabinet and white table, 1965). Painted furniture with eggshells, cabinet. 33 7/8 x 32 1/4 x 24 1/2 inches; table: 41 x 39 3/8 x 15 3/4 inches. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Fractional and promised gift of Jo Carole and Ronald S. Lauder. Right: Marcel Broodthaers (Belgian, 1924–1976), Untitled (General with cigar, 1970). Found oil painting and cigar. 15 3/4 x 11 13/16 x 2 3/4 inches. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Partial gift of the Daled Collection and partial purchase through the generosity of Maja Oeri and Hans Bodenmann, Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III, Marlene Hess and James D. Zirin, Agnes Gund, Marie Josée and Henry R. Kravis, and Jerry I. Speyer and Katherine G. Farley. Estate of Marcel Broodthaers / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / SABAM, Brussels.

Belgian Retrospective The Museum of Modern Art is showcasing Marcel Broodthaers’s first retrospective in New York. Bringing together about 200 works in multiple mediums, the exhibition explores the artist’s critical place in the history of 20th-century art. During the transformative decades of the 1960s and 1970s, the artist’s extraordinary output across mediums placed him at the center of international activity. Setting a precedent for what we call installation art today, his work has had a profound influence on a broad range of contemporary artists, and his work remains truly relevant. The show will include his early objects, variously made of mussels, eggshells, and books of his own poetry to his most ambitious project, the Musée d’Art Moderne, Département des Aigles. It will finish with and the retrospective Décors, made at the end of his life. Often operating as both innovator and commentator, Broodthaers occupied a unique position in the art world. Through May 15. The Museum of Modern Art, The Joan and Preston Robert Tisch Exhibition Gallery, 11 West 53rd Street, Sixth floor, 212.708.9400, moma.org.

Chris “Daze” Ellis, Eastern Parkway (2014). Oil, spray paint, acrylic, and wood on canvas. Courtesy of the artist.

Deadly Blooms

Ebony G. Patterson, Swag Swag Krew (from the Out and Bad series, 2011–14). Ten embellished mannequins with custom-made clothing, including an adorned umbrella, alcohol, shoes, costume jewelry, toys, cell phones, silk flowers, cinder blocks, hats, backpack, accessories, cotton textilecovered plinth. Courtesy the artist and Monique Meloche Gallery, Chicago. 12

The Museum of Art and Design (MAD) is presenting Dead Treez, the first solo New York museum show by artist Ebony G. Patterson. Incorporating mixed-media installations and jacquard photo tapestries, Patterson explores visibility, in terms of class, gender, race, and the media. Patterson assembled five tapestries and a life-size figural tableau of 10 male mannequins, dressed in a kaleidoscopic mix of floral fabrics. Meant to present a complex vision of masculinity, the installation is a meditation on dancehall fashion and culture, regarded as a celebration of the disenfranchised in postcolonial Jamaica. In the Tiffany Jewelry Gallery, Patterson continues MAD’s new POV series with …buried again to carry on growing…, an installation of the permanent jewelry collection through the perspective of her own studio practice. Extending themes from Dead Treez, the artist turns the gallery into a garden-like environment of poisonous plants with three scenarios in which bodies sheathed in patterned fabrics have succumbed to violence often endemic to marginalized communities. Through April 3. Museum of Arts and Design, 2 Columbus Circle, 212.299.7777, madmuseum.org.


Nature Through a Lens

Top: The Haas Brothers (California, founded 2010) [Nikolai Haas (b. 1984) and Simon Haas (b. 1984)] with The Haas Sisters (Khayelitsha Informal Settlement, Cape Town, South Africa, founded 2014)—Al-Gorilla, Eye-sik Newton, Neil Tongue, Bill Nyeland, Isle Be Back, and Fungulliver from the Afreaks series (2015). Glass beads, wire, wood, mixed fiber stuffing, and cast bronze. Copyright: Joe Kramm/R & Company.

The Bronx Museum is presenting Michelle Stuart: Photographic Works. The artist is a pioneer of Land Art, and is also well known for her nature-based art dating back to the late 1960s and 1970s. Though her mesmerizing and transportive photographic works are comparatively less known, they constitute a crucial part of her oeuvre over the last few years. This exhibition concentrates on her production from 2008 to the present, but also includes important pieces from the early 1980s that can be seen as precursors. Stuart took most of the photographs, while others she culled from the Internet and television. She combines the images into remarkable gridded fields with abundant correspondences and connections. Travel is also at the heart of this art, with representations of California, New Zealand, the South Sea Islands, troubled post-war Paris, Machu Picchu in Peru, deserts around the world, and even the cosmos. Nature remains an ever-present component in her work—plants and planets, oceans and mountains, insects and skies. February 3—June 5. Bronx Museum of the Arts, 1040 Grand Concourse, 718.681.6000, bronxmuseum.org. Michelle Stuart, Sacred Solstice Alignment (1981–2014). Archival inkjet photographs from analog black and white photographs taken in 1981. Approx. 36.25 x 69.75 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Leslie Tonkonow Artworks + Projects. Photo: Bill Orcutt.

Left: Delfina Delettrez (Italian, b. 1987), single earring from Spring-Summer 2013 “Infinity” collection. Rubies, diamonds, pearl, gold. Image courtesy of Delfina Delettrez.

Working It

Eye of the Beholder Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum is presenting Beauty—Cooper Hewitt Design Triennial, the fifth installment of the museum’s popular contemporary design exhibition series. The exhibit will include more than 250 works by 62 designers from around the globe. The exhibition seeks to explore the concept of beauty through seven lenses. The first, extravagant, features designers using rich materials and shimmering, sometimes deceptive, surfaces to create an aura of luxury, glamour, seduction and excess. The second lense, intricate, includes voluptuous typography, textured garments, and work that features patterns that appear traditional at first glance yet give way to a jarring iconography of the everyday. Ethereal showcases designers who create forms that shape space, time, light, or air, sometimes defying permanence and weight in favor of ephemeral materials or fleeting effects. The transgressive lense shows designers who embracing androgyny, antiform, the grotesque, the formless, and the fantastic to blur established boundaries and definitions. In the fifth, emergent, designers emulating nature, and embracing code and mathematics create rules and processes that determine the final outcome of a project. The sixth, elemental, presents designers who draw energy and character from basic materials. The final lense, transformative, illustrates how designers can transform familiar materials into new and surprising identities. February 12–August 21. Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, 2 East 91st Street, 212.849.8400, cooperhewitt.org.

The Guggenheim Museum is presenting Peter Fischli David Weiss: How to Work Better, putting the spotlight on two artists who have collaborated for more than three decades to create a unique oeuvre that brilliantly exploits humor, banality, and a keen rethinking of the readymade to realign our view of the world. The exhibit offers the most thorough investigation to date of their joint production, revealing the ways they juxtaposed the spectacular and the ordinary in order to celebrate the sheer triviality of everyday life, while creating an open-ended interrogation of temporality, visual culture, and the nature of existence itself. The retrospective will demonstrate the intricate interrelationships among Fischli and Weiss’s seemingly discrete works in sculpture, photography, installation, and video, each of which they used to confront, examine, and lampoon the seriousness of high art. February 5–April 20. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 1071 Fifth Avenue, 212.423.3500, guggenheim.org.

Left: Peter Fischli David Weiss, The First Blush of Morning (1984) from Equilibres (A Quiet Afternoon) (1984–86). Chromogenic print, 30 x 24 cm. Jumex Collection, Mexico City. Right: Peter Fischli David Weiss, At the Carpet Shop from Sausage Series (1979). Chromogenic print, 24 x 36 cm. Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, Clinton and Della Walker Acquisition Fund, 1993.

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Books Brooklyn Interiors: From Burnished to Polished, From Modern to Magpie

Casa Mexico: At Home in Mérida and the Yucatán

The Gentleman’s Farm: American Hunt Country Houses

Past Present: Living with Heirlooms and Antiques

Kathleen Hackett Rizzoli March 2016 240 pages, $45

Annie Kelly Rizzoli April 2016 240 pages, $55

laurie ossman and Debra A. McClane Rizzoli March 2016 256 pages, $55

Susan Sully The Monacelli Press April 2016 224 pages, $45

Author and Elle Decor contributing editor Kathleen Hackett focuses on the design and style of one of the hottest real estate markets in the country with her new book Brooklyn Interiors: From Burnished to Polished, From Modern to Magpie. Once known as the second fiddle to Manhattan, the borough has become a symbol of authenticity, originality, international style, and trendsetting.

The charm, allure, and colorful beauty of Mexico have long captivated designers. Writer and designer Annie Kelly chronicles the residences of Mérida, one of the Yucatán’s most picturesque areas and the region’s capital since the sixteenth century. Featuring sumptuous photographs by Tim Street-Porter (who wrote the wonderful book Casa Mexicana), Kelly takes the reader on a tour of modern villas, rustic bungalows, and brilliantly colored town houses, with an eye on the unique craftsmanship, artistry, and bohemian aesthetic.

The country home has long been a bellwether of classical architecture, distinctive taste, stately elegance, and tradition. In this beautifully photographed and detailed volume, author and museum director Laurie Ossman and architectural historian Debra A. McClane chronicle the American treasure known as the “Gentleman’s Farm,” a term that denotes “extraordinary homes on landscapes of unparalleled beauty.”

Past Present: Living with Heirlooms and Antiques marks author Susan Sully’s twelfth design tome. (Her books on Charleston, New Orleans, and southern interiors are design library classics.) Sully focuses on the interiors of three types of homeowners—collectors (those with a passion for the art of acquisitions), curators (“those who have an eye for color and an ear for the stories things tell”), and inheritors (those who “cherish and integrate” heirlooms and antiques into their daily surroundings).

Hackett concentrates on “the heart of the Brooklyn lifestyle,” focusing on the distinctive interiors of private homes in Williamsburg, Greenpoint, Carroll Gardens, Park Slope, and everywhere in between. From brownstones and row houses to condos and carriage houses (and even the occasional houseboat), the book details the traditions and style that is uniquely Brooklyn.

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The work of architect Manolo Mestre, Los Angeles antique dealers Robert Willson and David Serrano, and the Coqui Coqui Hotel’s Nicolas Malleville are a few of the talents featured. The book is an excellent resource of all things Mexicana.

Detailing the hallmarks of a classically styled hunt country house (think wood-paneled libraries, screened porches, and hunt paintings), the book features a variety of interiors from a president’s centuries-old home to newly designed retreats in the Virginia hunt country. Designers who appreciate proportion, history, and classical architecture, in particular, will find this book a useful addition to their design library.

An architect’s neoclassical residence in Dallas, Parisian designer Florence de Dampierre’s Greek Revival in Litchfield, Connecticut, and a Charlestonian collector’s Federalist house are just a few of the 20 homes profiled. The book is an interesting take on how we live today with cherished items from the past and one that will make you rethink your own possessions.


By Cathy Whitlock

An array of illustrated tomes from female authors comprises our spring lineup.

Tiny Houses in the City

Simply Scandinavian: 20 Stylish and Inspirational Scandi Homes

Romantic Prairie Style: Homes Inspired by Traditional Country Life

The World of Charles and Ray Eames

Mimi Zeigler Rizzoli March 2016 208 pages, $29.95

Sara Norrman Ryland Peters & Small March 2016 160 pages, $29.95

Fifi o’Neill CiCo Books February 2016 160 pages, $29.95

Catherine ince Rizzoli February 2016 320 pages, $75

The notion of how we live (think “smaller, denser and smarter”) in a large city is the basis of journalist and critic Mimi Zeigler’s new book Tiny Houses in the City. Citing the tiny house movement in onceforgotten urban neighborhoods all over the world, the author compiles the spaces of more than 30 houses, apartments, and multi-family dwellings under 1,000 square feet. These studies in flexible living include hidden storage, a 344-square-foot studio in Hong Kong with moveable walls, and adaptable furniture in an ambitious London dwelling built in an alley between two stately homes. Unique, economical, creative, and practical, compact living via tiny houses may be the wave of the future. Zeigler is also the author of Micro Green: Tiny Houses in Nature.

Author and Houzz Sweden Editor Sara Norrman’s book Simply Scandinavian chronicles the elegance, minimalism, and simplicity that represents the beauty of the Nordic country designs of Sweden, Finland, Norway, and Denmark. The book features case studies of 20 homes of architects, fashion and jewelry designers, and antique dealers, whose interiors include furnishings from the who’s who of celebrated 20th century Scandinavian design—Hans Wegner, Poul Kjaerholm, Arne Jacobsen, and Marimekko, to name a few. Designers will find inspiration from a variety of themes—elegant simplicity, vintage-inspired, pared-down modern, and contemporary rustic—along with detailed ideas and insight into the design, planning, and execution.

It’s often been noted that Prairie Style is the new Shabby Chic. Similar in aesthetics and sensibilities, the style is one that embraces natural beauty, simplicity, and, as the author notes, “says ‘home’ where you may be because, more than anything else, it’s a mindset. [...] It’s the resilient spirit of ‘making do’ and above all, it’s real.” Thirteen beautiful homes from Illinois to Missouri, and rustic ranch, cabin, farmhouse, and cottage are featured. Influenced by the designs of European settlers, the style is filled with decorative details such as natural materials, bleached wood, weathered planks, woven blankets, and Navajo rugs.

At long last—the first comprehensive book in over a decade on the legacy of two of the most important 20th century designers, Charles and Ray Eames. The monograph charts the history of the pair’s prolific works and life from both a personal and professional perspective. Published in conjunction with the Eames Estate opening at London’s Barbican Art Gallery (the exhibit is expected to tour internationally), The World of Charles and Ray Eames explores the working laboratory of the Eames Office, where innovative ground-breaking architecture, furniture and product design, photography, film, and multi-media installations and exhibits were produced for four decades. Depicted through photographs, personal correspondence, drawings, and artwork, the book is expected to “influence future generations of designers of all descriptions for years” to come.

While the name may conjure images of simple living in the late 1800s, Romantic Prairie style merges organic with sophistication and authenticity with simplicity. The book is a wonderful look at the nostalgia, romance, and diversity of a fascinating style.

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Trove

By Katie Doyle

By women, for women... These products—designed, sold or curated by the fairer sex—promise to add a punch of panache, productivity, and prowess to a day in the life of a lady.

01 Ethical Taxidermy Here’s a trophy animal of an entirely different sort. With a nod to whimsy, these friendly felt creatures turn taxidermy on its head. Hang these three species, all mounted on matching wood plaques, as a trio to add a rustic touch of humor to your child’s playroom. The menagerie will surely delight children and adults alike, especially your vegan friends. After all, no animals were harmed in the making of this product. 3–4 inches in diameter x 4 inches deep. $32 each. michelevarian.com.

02 A Fresh Take on Jerky

03 To the Moon and Back Though smart phones these days can take exceptional photographs, sometimes there’s just nothing like being behind (or in front of) a real camera—especially when it’s as sexy as this one. And this camera is a genius balance of beauty and brains. Hasselblad cameras have been around since World War II, but shot to fame when the astronauts of the Apollo mission used them for almost all of their photography in space. This special edition is outfitted with wood detailing and an Italian leather wrist and neck straps. The Hasselblad Stellar also includes a custom-fit lacquered wood box and velvet-like bag, so your camera can get some beautiful beauty rest when it shutters down. 4.3 inches (W) x 2.3 inches (H) x 1.4 inches (D). $2,195. bhphotovideo.com.

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It will be a few months and many more temperature degrees until we see fresh, whole watermelons appear in grocery stores, but watermelon jerky is making the juicy pink fruit deliciously non-seasonal. Thanks to Sakara Life, purveyor of nutrition-packed raw vegan food favored by the likes of Gwyneth Paltrow, Chrissy Teigen, and the Victoria’s Secret Angels, this jerky is just a click away. There’s only one ingredient in that botanic beauty of a bag—100-percent pure, organic, dehydrated watermelon, leaving a chewy texture and a sweetly robust flavor. $11. sakaralife.com.

04 Flying First Class Though this Gold Tarmac stapler is stately enough to earn our admiration even without knowledge of its origins, its backstory is just as intriguing as its elegant contours and glam gold finish. The stapler arrives on your desk all the way from Cologne Mongeze, a city located just outside of Milan, but it’s more than just a gleaming globetrotting beauty. It’s also a product of excellence carefully assembled, inspected, and tested by specialists before flying out of Ellepi’s focused four-person factory. $60. shopthemansion.com.


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Bluetooth tracking tag Where’s the dog? Where’s the keys? Where’s the kids? On those days life leaps unstoppably into total chaos, Uncommon Goods’ Bluetooth tracking tag has (almost all) the answers. With its discreet, lightweight design and a wood finish, think of this as an intelligent charm to adorn your valuables and save you stress on even the most dizzying of days. The tag connects via Bluetooth and integrates with a free downloadable app for iOS. 1.5 inches diameter x .5 inches deep. $40. uncommongoods.com.

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Food for Cords Ladies on the move don’t have time to be held back by messy, crisscrossed cords. That’s even truer in a city that runs at a million miles per minute. As cute as the Cord Taco may be, it’s a rather useful way to tame a Medusa’s head of tangled wires, and perfectly sized to slip into your purse. The Cord Taco is available in plum, saddle tan, cobalt, turquoise, and coral, all crafted from premium, supple leather, and is recommended for smaller wires like USBs and ear buds. 3.5 inches x 1.75 inches. $29. flight001.com.

A Ring’s Best Friend The brainchild of German-born, London-based photographer and concrete artist Antje Nixdorf (remember that name), these diamonds will be a best friend to your diamonds. Use these concrete gems to hold your accessories—or to accessorize your dressing table with a modern, geometric touch. Hand cast out of real, raw concrete that is neither painted nor waxed, sets are available in shades of pale stone, dark pigmented grey, or an assortment of both. Approximately H 2.5 x W 2.5 x D 2.5 centimeters. $17. pasinga.com.

08 A Ceramic Sous Chef Marinara sauce splattered on the keyboard. Coconut oil smeared across the screen. Crumbs in the pages of your cookbook. While juggling all the trappings of a well-cooked, homemade meal is enough of an effort, fumbling with your devices to follow a recipe can make for a catastrophe in the kitchen. The Stak ceramic dock poses a sightly solution to keep your gadgets safe while you work some culinary magic. Already know your favorite recipes by heart? Bravo. Use this gorgeous mint green dock to cradle your tablet as it plays a podcast or a song. 6.75 inches tall x 7.75 inches in diameter at the base. $68. theshopinel.com.

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By Cathy Whitlock

For a staging project in Brooklyn Heights, Galvani referenced urban images of Manhattan’s Brooklyn Bridge and the Bibliothèque Sainte-Geneviève in Paris. Courtesy of Gachot Studios/Photographer Noah Fecks

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Spruce

Grows in Manhattan S p r u c e I n t e r i o r D e si g n ’ s S u s a n G a l v a n i

hile interior design school is a necessary tool, on-the-job training and mentors often prove to be just as valuable. Such was the case when Manhattan interior designer Susan Galvani hit the trifecta—working for interior design luminaries Eve Robinson, Eric Cohler, and Robert Couturier. “Robert is such a class act and so brilliant,” noted the New York School of Interior Design alum, who started her own firm Spruce Interior Design five years ago. “ I love how he was able to go between more traditional and more contemporary aesthetics. For example, he would use a lot of furniture tiebacks and opulence and then move effortlessly to contemporary design, applying modern pieces and spaces that combine the new with the old that is so uniquely his signature.” She also learned the valuable lesson of designing with investment in mind.

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Top right: A contemporary dining room cabinet from The New Traditionalists evokes an urban feel for the townhouse.

Right: A long tufted bench set against an urban brick wall reflects both the traditional and contemporary aesthetic of the townhouse.

The New Traditionalists

S u s a n G a l v a n i 2 0 0 LE X Pi e c e s

Cabinet no. 270.2

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Chair no. 29

Side table no. 33.


What I learned was how to combine pieces, juxtaposition, and integrating contrasting and high and low items, and determined where it is worthy to use investment pieces or mix in more reasonably priced ones.

ducduc

Tucker Robbins

Recognized for her “comfortable, warm, and sophisticated interiors that function and reflect the people who inhabit them,” Galvani’s work particularly appeals to families with children. “Almost all my clients have young kids,” she says. “One of my long-time clients has five children under the age of ten!” While designing for rambunctious youth can have its challenges, the designer details that “young families love pattern and color, and these are the traits throughout my projects.” Often avoiding the “pink is for girls, blue is for boys syndrome,” she also employs kid-friendly designs such as customized furniture from ducduc and laminating fabrics for furnishings, such as banquettes. “Clients these days are going for the unconventional and incorporating longevity into the design of kid’s spaces, so I don’t make it so juvenile.”

Round Coffee Table

Feather Headdress

Parker 6 Drawer Dresser

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Left: Galvani mixed colorful florals and geometrics for the Upper West Side project. Right: ducduc’s three-tone console provides both a colorful and utilitarian touch for a child’s bedroom.

Opposite page Top left: Made from exotic woods, the Pouf coffee table from Tucker Robbins is a unique focal point for an Upper West Side apartment. Top right: A wingback chair from The New Traditionalists adds a traditional note to this contemporary corner in the Brooklyn Heights townhouse. Bottom left: City Park wallpaper from Graber adds a whimsical touch to the townhouse bedroom. Bottom right: For this Upper West Side kitchen, Galvani notes, “I had the banquette constructed to take advantage of that corner spot that is flooded with light and has beautiful views of the Ansonia.” Nesting tables are from The New Traditionalists.

For an apartment on Manhattan’s Upper West Side (with the five children under ten), the young designer took the client’s directive and used “colorful patterns for a very comfortable, relaxed overall mood without any overly formal pieces in the space,” while keeping the parameters of family in mind. For an added design element, she sourced many of the furnishings and textiles through smaller production artisans. Another unexpected twist—combining sophistication and whimsy with a graffiti wallpaper from high-end French designer Pierre Frey’s line. The daughter of a former House Beautiful editor, Galvani credits her mother as another role model, no doubt learning through osmosis—“She had an amazing eye.” This trait has come in handy with the art consulting and styling arm of her firm. For a Brooklyn Heights townhouse, a developer who was converting a multiunit apartment building into a single-family townhouse contacted the designer. “I specified a combination of high and low-end furnishings to achieve a cohesive feel throughout, focusing on fairly neutral tones accented by colorful artwork and rugs.” Galvani looked to her former training at the Whitney Museum and her love of mixing vintage and modern elements. Furnishings from Ikea and West Elm comingle with Madeline Weinrib rugs and Tucker Robbins furniture (such as the unique linen and hide wingback chair on p. 22) in staging the space. “All of the art was on loan, and I tried to pick pieces and convey a sense of depth with the artwork because the rooms are not huge.”

As the old saying goes, “God is in the details.” Galvani made several nods to the city with the selection of Graber’s City Park wallpaper for the bedroom. The unique historic damask pattern paper looks traditional until a closer look reveals a touch of whimsy with urban images of a Cobble Hill fire hydrant complete with parking meters, pigeons—and rodents. Apparently the paper is so popular that it’s now a part of the permanent collection at the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum. Design appears to be a perfect fit for Galvani, who admits, “I was always drawn to art, architecture, and design.” While her firm is only in its five-year stage, clients appear to be drawn to her philosophy—“Each project is a separate and distinctive one as to who the client is and I make sure to express who they are as opposed to a particular signature look or style. I try and find a balance of color, texture, and pattern.”

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By Catherine McHugh

Visitors to the Smyth Living Room can relax on chairs upholstered in two custom Gachot-designed fabrics produced by ALT for Living, while enjoying artwork by Raymond Pettibon. The vintage rugs are from Woven Accents and the custom lighting is by L'Observatoire International.

H O M E S W E E T H O T E L CHRISTINE GACHOT AND FRIENDS TRANSFORMED THE SMYTH HOTEL INTO “TRIBECA’S LIVING ROOM.”

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Gachot Studios created the furnishings for the Suite Terrace (left top), while Harrison Green did the landscape design. A detail of the wallpaper mural (left bottom) produced by Flavorpaper and created by artist Matthew Benedict to evoke Tribeca’s history in the Evening Bar (below). Allied Maker produced the wall sconces that enhance the bar’s cozy vibe.

pon entering Gachot Studios’ annual holiday party and toy drive at the Smyth, revelers probably noticed the warmth first—from the physical heat emanating from the fireplace in the Evening Bar, sure, but also from hostess Christine Gachot’s beaming smile. Gachot runs SoHo-based Gachot Studios with her husband, John, and they took on the redesign of this Thompson hotel last year. In collaboration with the team at Tribeca Associates and the NoHo Hospitality Group—and with a little (perhaps a lot) of help from their friends—they completed project in a zippy 10 months, which owes much to Gachot’s self-described “conductor” skill set.

After college, Gachot was in New York working for artist Peter Max and planning to embark on a career in event planning, when a chance meeting changed her path. “I fell in love with interior design when I met Bill Sofield,” Gachot says. “It’s that simple. I got a job as his assistant through a friend of a friend and Bill took a real chance with me.” Gachot had been working for Sofield for about a year when he decided to part ways with Thomas O’Brien, leave Aero Studios, and strike out on his own. “Bill went on to open his own studio and do Gucci,” Gachot says “I went with Bill, and he told me I needed to study drafting at Parsons. He helped me do that and really inspired me. He has always been a great mentor to me.”

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Gachot also found inspiration from that era of interior design. “Design was just becoming more of a common language,” she says. “It seemed all of a sudden people were talking about interior design like they were talking about fashion, and I found all of that very interesting.” After working for Sofield for 10 years, Gachot decided to make a somewhat radical career change. “There was a moment when I thought, ‘Okay, I love business,’” she says. “‘I love branding and kind of the ‘30,000 feet up in a plane seat’ view and not so much the ‘3/16 of an inch’ perspective.’” Gachot interviewed for a job with hotelier André Balazs. “Like Bill, André took a risk with me because I was a designer,” she says. “I was not a developer in any way.” Gachot started working with Balazs, eventually becoming vice president of design development. “I was originally just going to oversee one hotel, and that led to a 10-year, very close relationship,” she says. “He taught me all about hotels and I fell in love with them. And not just the design aspect, but the business of it. So I was able to kind of span between acquisitions and development and branding. It was such a wonderful, broad education that I was able to take advantage of.” Timing again played a key part in her career as the hotel industry was having its own zeitgeist moment. “I was able to hit things at a moment, first with Bill and then with André and his vision of hotels. And then that led me to having my own firm,” Gachot says. “I had been travelling a lot and I could see that institutional financing was really opening up. I felt that if I didn’t do it then the opportunity was not going to present itself again for a while.” Gachot joined her husband John at Gachot Studios, which he had established in 2011. “It’s been wonderful,” she says. “Again, I feel I have somebody to work with who is extremely creative and talented. I am learning a lot. It is nice to be designing again—it’s nice to go back to the 3/16 of an inch.” Christine’s arrival did more than just double the size of the firm. “I called all the usual suspects and said, ‘I know that I can’t do it without you.’ I’m a very good conductor—I think that’s a great skill set that I have—but you need a great team,” she says. “I knew that in order to be able to capture what was happening in the market with the larger projects and be on par with other teams that were very established, we had to act fast. “It has turned out wonderfully,” she continues. “I literally sit at work next to my oldest and dearest best friend, and across from my other BFF, and I work with John. It’s a pleasure to come to work.” Having first met at Bill Sofield’s studio in the 1990s, the couple’s work style hearkens back to that experience. “People were very encouraged to speak up and participate and I give credit where credit is due always,” Gachot says. “Our people have a wide cross variety of disciplines—they are graphic designers, interior designers, architects— and all very creative.

“It’s important to focus on abilities because I have learned that there is always somebody else who does something better than you—and that’s great,” she continues. “Don’t be intimidated by that. Have confidence in yourself to allow others to excel around you. I think that’s important in mentoring and it’s a good business practice. Hire people smarter than you! It’s definitely the way to go.”

“Have confidence in yourself to allow others to excel around you. I think that’s important in mentoring and it’s a good business practice. Hire people smarter than you! It’s definitely the way to go.”

All of the Gachot Studio’s collective talents worked to transform the formerly minimalist Smyth into the owners’ vision for more of a living room feel. Though they had received many offers to do hotels, this was a first for the Gachots. “We said no a lot,” Christine says. “A hotel is a wide church. You do it all. You’re creating a home for potentially hundreds of people, so it takes quite a bit of imagination and function.” Discussions with Bill Brodsky of Tribeca Associates convinced her about the living room narrative. “Philosophically, I thought that there was a need for something in Tribeca that was just easy,” Christine says. “It doesn’t have to compete with the exclusives.” The designer also points to the diversity of the neighborhood’s residents. “There is such a wide variety of people there,” she says. “So I thought it would be great if we could create a space that was easy and friendly enough for everybody—like you were being invited into somebody’s home in Tribeca.” And when NoHo Hospitality Group signed on, Gachot knew it would be a good fit. “A large component of what makes a hotel successful is the service and the offering,” she says. “When I heard that we had gotten Josh Pickard, Luke Ostrom, and chef Andrew Carmellini, I knew this was a no-brainer. It was such a friendly, talented, dynamic group of people—no airs or egos. Everyone was on the same page from day one. It’s incredible how if you look at our original hand drawings, the sketches look exactly like it looks now. It was really fun.” Working from the living room narrative, the team strived to give all of the rooms a homey feeling. They also changed the location of reception and the entry to the restaurant. “There had been a revolving door there and we wanted it to feel almost as if you were entering a residential building in Tribeca,” Gachot says. “It’s also nice when you come into a hotel to know where you are going—there is reception welcoming me home. We made some functional modifications so that the guest experience would be more clear and inviting.”

Facing page, top: Another view of the Smyth Living Room, for which Gachot custom designed a coffee table that was made locally by Woodworks. For the hotel’s Little Park bistro (middle left), Gachot created custom mosaic marble fan tile (bottom left) and husband-and-wife team Jacqueline and Damien Harrison of Harrison Green designed the landscape elements (middle), which expands when the restaurant has outdoor seating in the warmer months. The hotel shares the neighborhood with the iconic Woolworth Building (bottom right). FEB MAR

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Gachot was also passionate about putting in the fireplace. “There is something so nice in New York when you have a fireplace in the living room. It’s such a special thing,” she says. “This is New York City, so they are very few and far between.” The interior design aesthetic gave the hotel a more day-to-evening feeling than its previous evening/club-like atmosphere. Gachot brought in her long-time friend Hervé Descottes of L'Observatoire International to help facilitate this goal. “The lighting played such an important part in the design and Hervé’s work is always outstanding,” she says. “The idea was for the space being able to transition easily from breakfast to late-night cocktails—and that’s the magic that he brings. “It really changes an environment,” she continues. “The lighting just makes it. He knew that we wanted a residential feel with kind of a hierarchy of lighting—low, medium, high. He was able to capture that so smoothly. The lighting is a warm beacon that he was able to create throughout the entire hotel.”

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Gachot also shopped locally for the furnishing and artwork. “We called all of our buddies in the neighborhood and bought from them,” she says. “The furnishings are pretty eclectic. There are definitely some Scandinavian/mid-century modern layered looks. There is a great art curation we did in partnership with the Picture Room in NoHo.” Simone Shubuck did a big piece (Super Future Shoob) for the Little Park restaurant and Gachot commissioned her friend Matthew Benedict to create the wonderful mural in the Evening Bar that evokes Tribeca’s history. “The Evening Bar was about all these different ideas about discovery in a hotel and there is a little something for everybody,” Gachot says. “I love the idea of the affair bar—that little secret space that you know that if you’re meeting your best friend and you say, ‘I’ll be at the bar,’ they know exactly where you’re going to be. Everybody has that spot. It’s a beautiful little space.” This beautiful little space in this eminently welcoming hotel is open to the public as well—you don’t even have to live in the neighborhood. So, who wants a cocktail?


Facing page: Patrons of the Evening Bar can unwind with a superbly mixed cocktail while admiring the custom wallpaper mural created by artist Matthew Benedict and produced by Flavorpaper. Thomas Hayes designed the stools, vintage chairs, sofas, and coffee tables. Gachot designed the custom-made rug for the space, which Creative Matters produced. Top: Loungers in the Smyth Den can relax on a sofa by Casamidy in a custom Gachot-designed fabric. The coffee table is by Thomas Hayes and Gachot curated the artwork. Bottom: The hotel’s clean lines and comfortable furnishings extend to patrons’ individual rooms, welcoming visitors with their relaxed charm. Gachot Studios designed the custom-made desks, which Woodworks fabricated in Brooklyn. Stone and Sawyer supplied the bedside table lamps and ALT for Living produced the bed pillows in a custom fabric designed by Gachot.

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All Things

Kelly The Designing World of Kelly Wearstler

Right: Wearstler’s penchant for glamour is evident in her designs for an apartment in Soho.


By Cathy Whitlock

N

o doubt you have heard of the mega-force in the design industry known as Kelly Wearstler. Known for her Old-World Hollywood glamour, dramatic signature style, and global branding presence, she is indeed a juggernaut. As an author, interior, hotel and resort, product, furniture, and clothing designer, retailer, blogger, former television star, and a mother and wife, she wears many hats (but has no plans for a millinery line‌yet).

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From Wearstler’s early childhood in South Carolina to her current digs in Southern California, design courses through her veins. “Growing up near the beach helped inform my love of natural materials, textures, and colors. There is always an element of nature in my design,” she says. “Mother nature is the best designer.” She credits her mother, also a designer, as a major influence in her life. “My mother took me to antique shows and auctions, which educated my eye from a young age. Design is largely intuitive for me.” Never one to shy away from bold color, plays on pattern and texture, and wit and whimsy, her discerning eye results in memorable designs. The mother of two has managed to keep her style fresh and constantly evolving over the years. “My aesthetic is a juxtaposition of so many different passions and loves. Design is like falling in love over and over again,” Wearstler details. “Each project is a unique exploration of curiosity and experimentation that leads to a constant evolution. Clients are my greatest muse. Finding the

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Left: The dining room of Bergdorf Goodman’s BG restaurant receives an update with cool blue and white tones. Right: A quatrefoil shaped coffee table is front and center in a 1946 cottage-style house in Mercer Island, Washington.

Melange Table Lamp Furniture available in showroom.

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Cleo Table Lamp

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“I have always been intrigued by the tension of opposites— juxtaposing masculine and feminine, raw and refined, edgy and organic. It creates a vibrancy and soul.”


harmony in many different voices and influences is what makes design interesting, propels it forward. Taking risks is the ultimate luxury.” Perhaps it was the designer’s risks with her Modern Colonialism and Hollywood Regency designs for the Viceroy Group’s boutique resort hotels that helped put Wearstler on the map. Today she is placing her signature on the designs of Proper Hotels with husband and founder Brad Korzen, noting a change from her past work. “Each hotel will be a showcase for what’s happening in its neighborhood, with the essence of each hotel’s design, all high-end and creative, informed and influenced by the character of its distinctive location. We’re partnering with individuals, brands, and institutions in each of the cities, who can use the hotel space to create, collaborate, and share art, music, and technology.” Her goal is to “create an amazing vibe” and each area will do double duty—a rooftop will function as a spot for yoga classes by morning and a lively rooftop bar in the evening.

Left: A living room vignette in Wearstler’s Los Angeles home. Middle: The Mercer Island house. Right: Synchronicity in the form of matching chairs and plaster busts is at play in the designer’s home.

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Left: A scholar’s retreat receives a contemporary mix of materials and interplay of patterns. Middle: Wearstler is well known for her game-changing designs for resorts and boutique hotels, like the Viceroy Anguilla shown here. Right: The mid-century laid-back vibe of Avalon Beverly Hills’ Viviane Restaurant reflects the lifestyle of Wearstler’s hometown of Los Angeles.

And what is next in this indefatigable designer’s repertoire? Based on her trademark essence that includes her “aesthetic about mixology and materiality—pairing contemporary and vintage, raw and refined, masculine and feminine”—Wearstler’s latest venture includes the launch of a furniture collection at EJ Victor, located at the New York Design Center. Consisting of more than 75 designs, the line showcases the designer’s love of exotic materials, ranging from “heirloom woods in combed, ribbed, and ebonized walnut [and] lightly brushed oak to hand applied mixed metal patinas, white Calcutta marble, and artisanal quality hand-cast glass.” With a nod to Los Angeles landmarks, key pieces in the collection include the Larchmont chair, Hillcrest sofa, Griffith bar cabinet, Trousdale dining table, and Laurel chair. “I have always been intrigued by the tension of opposites—juxtaposing masculine and feminine, raw and refined, edgy and organic. It creates a vibrancy and soul.” Her portfolio also includes an eponymous fine linen bedding collection, wall covering, furniture indoor/ outdoor fabric, and leather and hide collections

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with Lee Jofa, an upcoming tile and stone line with Ann Sacks, and new rug designs with Rug Company. The Kelly Wearstler flagship boutique in Los Angeles and in-store boutique on Bergdorf Goodman’s Decorative Home Floor also feature her product line. In addition, residential interior design remains an integral part of her firm known as KWID. With an enviable roster of A-list clientele from the worlds of film and music, her recent projects include a recently completed large loft for a couple in Soho, a historic 1920s townhouse for a family on Manhattan’s Upper East Side, and two residences in Los Angeles. And what design worlds are left to conquer? A new design book is in the offing for 2017 (she is the author of four best-selling coffee table books—Rhapsody, HUE, Domicilium Decoratus, and Modern Glamour: The Art of Unexpected Style) as well as more commercial, hospitality, and residential projects. “I have not yet designed a boat or a plane—those would be dream projects, ” she concludes. Stay tuned.

Pickfair Floor Mirror

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Eats’N’Sleeps Sadelle’s 463 West Broadway (212) 254-3000 sadelles.com

Broken Spoke Rotisserie 439 3rd Avenue (212) 889-6298 broken-spoke-rotisserie.myshopify. com

UrbanSpace Vanderbilt 230 Park Avenue (646) 747-0810 urbanspacevanderbilt.com

La Chine 540 Lexington Avenue (212) 872-4913 lachinenyc.com

The yentas of New York’s food scene won’t stop blabbering about Sadelle’s, but the gossip is for good reason. The SoHo hot spot is a hybrid, a self-identified bakeryslash-cafe that does dinner as well as it does brunch, with fresh decor comprising ombré blue saltshakers, mismatched metal chairs, and starburst chandeliers. A multifarious, “new school Jewish” menu lists pigs in a blanket, foie gras toast, and paprika-spiced chicken all on the same page. Russian potatoes are rampant on the menu, as is their fermented counterpart—vodka, that is, served frozen. While Thomas Waugh reigns over the libations, Melissa Weller, a chemist turned expert baker, whips up Sadelle’s famous bread and bagels. If you’re feeling adventurous, try the Everything 2.0—everything you’d expect, plus fennel and caraway seeds.

This rotisserie gets an upgrade by way of Latin influences and gourmet touches. Though almost as surprising is a menu that’s not all about meat. Of course, there are staples like free-range chicken (available half or whole, and flavored with chimichurri sauce), Duroc pork belly, and short ribs complemented by quinoa and spicy peanuts. But the vegetarian pickings are a large part of what makes Broken Spoke’s menu so intriguing—crispy Brussels sprouts adorned with walnut puree; kale and avocado salad with smoked paprika vinaigrette, paprika almonds, and pickled red onion; “mac and chilaca” baked with cheese and poblano chilis. Though portions can be small, chefs compensate with fresh ingredients and harmonious spices. Don’t expect to dine in glamorous quarters—the place is outfitted industrially with exposed brick, backless metal stools, and high-top tables—but do expect savory dishes forthcoming in flavor and friendly staff generous in their service.

Situated steps from Grand Central Terminal, UrbanSpace Vanderbilt is a portal of another sort—a culinary portal, where findings from boroughs far and wide are available in one convenient location. With over 20 booths and a centralized seating area, the only trouble you might face (aside from navigating weekend crowds) is choosing where to eat. There’s the authentic Israeli dips from Mimi’s Hummus in Ditmas Park, the famous fried chicken sandwich from Delaney Chicken in Williamsburg, the colorful summer rolls from the nomadic Two Tablespoons, pizza from Roberta’s in Bushwick, and the list goes on. Whether you’re aiming to grab a quick meal or want to experience the city’s foodie delights all under one roof, UrbanSpace Vanderbilt deserves a visit.

James Beard once said, “In all the world, there are only really two great cuisines: the Chinese and the French. China’s was created first, untold centuries ago, and is judged to be the greater when executed by superb chefs. It is the most complicated cuisine. It uses ingredients no other employs, and it is distinctive. In that, for the most part, it is cuisine a la minute.” That philosophy orchestrates La Chine’s upscale Asian fare. Indeed, the restaurant, located in the Waldorf Astoria, has big shoes to fill. Aside from living up to Beard’s words, it’s also portended as the city’s finest Chinese restaurant. Fortunately, the executive team at La Chine has taken their calling seriously. They traveled to provincial China to source original recipes, then returned to reinterpret the dishes with a French flair and a sense of excellence inherent to the Waldorf Astoria. The decor, by Studio Gaia, offers subtle clues to the restaurant’s worldly culinary influences, by way of a centerpiece of cherry blossoms, a rich palette of gold and lavender, and gleaming travertine floors.

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By Katie Doyle

From modern Jewish noms to centuries-old Chinese cuisine, from “micro-lifestyle” lodging in Hudson Square to the soaring Four Seasons set to crown downtown, New York’s pasticcio of new hot spots is as mercurial as the city’s spring weather.

Riu Plaza Times Square 305 West 46th Street (646) 864-1100 riu.com/en/Paises/usa/new-york/ hotel-riu-plaza-new-york-timessquare

tommie Hudson Square 231 Hudson Square (212) 342-7000 tommiehotels.com

Riff Hotels Downtown 102 Greenwich Street (212) 766-8888 riffdowntown.com

Four Seasons NYC Downtown 27 Barclay Street (800) 819-5053 fourseasons.com/newyorkdowntown

With locations in Guadelajara, Panama City, Miami Beach, and Berlin, Riu has finally arrived in the Big Apple. Billed as urban, trendy, and elegant, Riu Plaza Times Square is bold in style, and distinguished by bright pops of color and oversized, avant-garde wall decor inspired by pop art prints and fashion photography. Riu’s buzzy look mirrors the flashy, eye-popping landmark it calls home, with Broadway theaters, Fifth Avenue shops, and “Restaurant Row” just steps away. And though the hotel is an oasis from the frenzy of the Theater District, it still draws on the energy of the city that never sleeps, making it an ideal setting for a highoctane weekend of business or pleasure. With a staff that will speak Spanish and English, Riu Plaza plans for inauguration this winter.

Channeling the community element of Airbnb, the entrepreneurial energy of a coworking space, the efficiency of a hostel, and the aesthetic of a boutique hotel, tommie Hudson Square stands out among the crowd. And it’s looking to host guests who also stand out, catering to youthful, creative travelers looking for a cool, comfortable place to work and play. The “micro-lifestyle” rooms are white-walled but accessorized with natural wood and industrial materials, with expansive windows and a large bed that occupies the bulk of the room in true New York style. Fortunately, the remaining space is smartly outfitted to maximize square footage—a flip-down creative workstation that you can put away at the end of the day and a peg board closet system for flexible storage. It’s modern and ergonomic, but don’t think tommie is all about efficiency. Guests can unwind in the Lobby Bar or on the Rooftop, where signature cocktails are served.

Riff hotels were inspired by New York’s party scene in the 1980s, but don’t expect an overload of flash at this Riff location. Its 36 rooms are tastefully decorated, perhaps with a few nods to the era in the accessories, like sequined accent pillows, vintage portable radios, and a cheeky bed guest book. And though the brand was inspired by loud music and late nights, the hotel itself caters nicely to guests’ everyday needs. Coffee and Wi-Fi are both complimentary, and each room includes a flat-screen TV, a kitchenette, and an eat-work-play space. Riff is pet-friendly too, in case the pup wants to come along. The downtown spot is the hotel’s second location after Chelsea, and will be open in early 2016.

Truth be told, the Four Seasons needs no introduction. And now, South Tribeca will be the latest neighborhood to house this luxury hotel brand. Just a stone’s throw from the iconic Woolworth Building, Four Seasons Downtown was designed by the iconic Robert A.M. Stern, and will be one of the city’s tallest residential towers. The first 22 floors will comprise 185 guest rooms, designed by Yabu Pushelberg, in a style that’s humble in its glamour—a soothing palette of muted greys, greens, blues, and beige, mirrored in a plaid couch, blonde wood furniture, marble countertops, and touches of bronze, suede, and leather. The warm and welcoming rooms might be called “homey,” which befits the hotel’s 157 private residences, with separate entry at the namesake 30 Park Place. No surprise, the apartments are gorgeous. Features include 11-foot ceilings, grand bay windows, and formal dining rooms. Residents will have access to all of the hotel’s perks, including an indoor pool, a luxurious, full-service spa, 24-hour fitness facilities, and corner meetings rooms with floor-to-ceiling windows. Doors are set to open mid-2016.

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GALLERY A picture-perfect showroom exhibition .

Grand Lotus Chandelier available at Currey & Company, 212.213.4900, curreyandcompany.com

J Banks Tanzania Fabric Collection available at Kravet Inc., 212.725.0340, kravet.com

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Gallery

KEK Side Table available at LEPERE, 212.488.7000, lepereinc.com

Kinon Royal Collection Pattern 349 available at Kinon速 Surface Design Inc., 561.600.2500, kinon.com

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The Kerkyra Sconce by Marjorie Skouras available at Dennis Miller Associates, 212.684.0070, dennismiller.com Étendue and Penseur Copper Wall Nudes available at Christopher Guy, 212.684.2197, christopherguy.com

Brute Sofa available at Baker Furniture, 212.779.8810, bakerfurniture.com

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Alecia’s Necklace available at Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co., 212.545.0032, minka.com

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Perfume, hand-knotted wool carpet available at Stephanie Odegard Collection, 212.545.0205, stephanieodegard.com

Chest with Stone Top available at Louis J. Solomon, 212.545.9200, louisjsolomon.com

COSMOS Table by Hélène Aumont available at PROFILES, 212.689.6903, profilesny.com

Rene Console Table available at Julian Chichester, 646.293.6622, julianchichester.com

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Hill Tribe Pillow (black and white) available at Studio A Home, 212.725.8439, studioa-home.com

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Watermark-Style Cabinetry available at Bakes & Kropp, 917.885.9650, bakesandkropp.com

Plateau Buffet available at Apropos Furniture Showroom, 212.684.6987, apropos-furniture.com

Tycho Table designed by Alyssa Coletti available at Brueton, 212.838.1630, brueton.com

City Bench available at The Bright Group, 212.726.9030, thebrightgroup.com

Nonla Box - Claret available at Global Views, 212.725.8439, globalviews.com

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freshpicks T H E M O S T C U R R E N T products in 2 0 0 L E X showrooms .

Best Foot Forward A design born in New York City but crafted in the mountains of Utah, the Mott Credenza by Gabriel Dean is a salute to geometry and ingenuity with a slight sense of humor, making every inch of interior space a place for the important things. PROFILES, Suite 1211, 212.689.6903, profilesny.com

Folk Fabrics The fifth Museum of New Mexico Fabric Collection for Kravet tells the story of its unique place as a crossroads of international trade and culture. Inspiration for these modern interpretations of traditional designs was drawn primarily from small-scale patterns and embroideries in the 25,000-piece textile and dress collection at the Museum of International Folk Art. Kravet Inc., Suite 401, 212.725.0340, kravet.com

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freshpicks make it a double The Barrow Bar Cabinet from DESIRON is more than a standard liquor cabinet—it doubles as a bar counter. Shown in drift oak with matte brass accents, the Barrow is fully customizable in all aspects, from the wood finishes to the metal pulls of your desire. Designed and handcrafted in the US. DESIRON, Suite 702, 212.353.2600, desiron.com

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Plot Twist Like pieces of a puzzle, the dark wood frames of the Twist Trapezoid Pendant from Metropolitan Lighting easily move to create a cage-like effect or a more closed shape. Pendants come in square and hexagonal shapes. This piece adds an interesting twist to an entry hall or kitchen. Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co., Suite 512, 212.545.0032, minka.com

Lit By Hand Mr. Brown is so switched on—with an amazing lineup of handcrafted Table Lamps at Julian Chichester. He’s got short, tall, skinny, or bulbous—and they’re all fabulous. With an intriguing array of materials sizes and styles, all you’ve got to do is choose. Will you have a light bulb moment? Julian Chichester, Suite 604, 646.293.6622, julianchichester.com

Elegant Perch Powell & Bonnell’s Ava Stool at Dennis Miller Associates features a simple, tight upholstered seat and diminutive back—perfect for a quick bite or impromptu meeting. The cross stretcher and stainless steel footrest add decorative interest and significant strength, while remaining conveniently lightweight. Available in lacquer and wood options, and in bar and counter heights. Dennis Miller Associates, Suite 1210, 212.684.0070, dennismiller.com

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freshpicks

bewitching mist Stephanie Odegard’s Midnight Fog is one of many new carpet designs from her Artists Collection, a collaboration with multimedia artist Mira Lehr. Made of 100% hand-spun, hand-dyed, and hand-knotted Himalayan wool, it is manufactured in Nepal. Custom colors are available. Stephanie Odegard Collection, Suite 1209, 212.545.0205, stephanieodegard.com

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Light Tornado The Sprocket Chandelier from Global Views has a definite flair for the dramatic. Nine oval tiers display 1,200 sheet-brass-stamped sprockets creating a virtual tornado of metal and light. Sixteen full-size light bulbs illuminate this stunning piece. Wow factor? At over 15 feet in height, this piece has it and then some! Global Views, Suite 613, 212.725.8439, globalviews.com

Bare Essentials LEPERE’s elegantly spare and sculptural Perigallo Stool has a solid ash structure that’s available in klein, silk grey, mango, malachite, yellow, anthracite, or a natural matte finish. The seat is covered in high-resilience foam, available in various fabrics. LEPERE, Suite 714, 212.488.7000, lepereinc.com

Garden Glow The sumptuous Galapagos Pendant Cluster, available from The Bright Group, is made from individually hand-formed and raised bronze shells that are combined into deconstructed flower-like shades. Highly burnished and reflective on the inside with a warm patina on the outside, this piece glows with a pleasant golden light. Groupings and arrangements are highly customizable. The Bright Group, Suite 902, 212.726.9030, thebrightgroup.com

Cane Is Able A new take on the traditional caned chair, the geometric shape and wrapped metal details of Baker Furniture’s Cane Arm Chair create a different, sumptuous presence. This piece is a part of the new Kara Mann for Milling Road collection, and exemplifies the collection. Bakes & Kropp, Suite 430, 917.885.9650, bakesandkropp.com

Silver Linings Kinon’s newest Decorative Surface Panels add a bold impression and new perspective to luxury interiors. This striking vanity piece from the Elite Collection is presented in charcoal with a silver accent. Linear orientations in metals and decorative, handcrafted resins are currently trending on feature walls, furniture pieces, and architectural millwork. Kinon® Surface Design Inc., Suite 1315, 561.600.2500, kinon.com

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six shooter Hexagons have always been a user-friendly form, and the symmetry of the six-sided Hexto Coffee Table by Stanley Jay Friedman at Brueton makes it comfortable with almost any sofa configuration. The top surface pops over six outwardly angled stainless steel legs while stainless base stretchers hug the floor, creating a dramatic modern appeal. Brueton, Suite 910, 212.838.1630, brueton.com

raise the bar In addition to an expansive kitchen, Bakes & Kropp was commissioned by a Hamptons bachelor to transform the adjoining space into this stunning Wet Bar and Butler’s Pantry. A stark departure from the ever-popular Bakes & Kropp white, the black Meridian Custom Cabinetry coordinates handsomely with the stunning black subway tile. Bakes & Kropp, Suite 430, 917.885.9650, bakesandkropp.com 54


Rock Show Delicate panels of quartz slide into the substantial multi-faceted iron and brass frame of the Quartz Pendant from Studio A Home. The light cast through the translucent stone is unsurpassed in the warm glow it emits. Studio A Home, Suite 614, 212.725.8439, studioa-home.com

Top Tier Beyond the Fringe Looking at the Fringe Chair, one of Lee Industries’ latest market introductions, it’s no surprise where the name comes from. Shown here in a nature linen leather and fringe with topstitching. It is available in a variety of buckskin, harness, and nature leathers. Proudly made in the US. Apropos Furniture Showroom, Suite 710, 212.684.6987, apropos-furniture.com

A true showstopper, with a height of seven feet and width of nearly five feet, Currey & Company’s Havana Grande Chandelier pays homage to both majestic plants and the splendor of old Cuba. For something a little less palatial, they also offer two smaller pendants with the same hand-shaped metal leaves and gold finish. Currey & Company, Suite 506, 212.213.4900, curreyandcompany.com

French Vine Vigne Pour Deux by Christopher Guy is a sumptuous hand-carved loveseat inspired by the vineyards in the Provence region of France. It is also available as a left-hand version and a matching occasional chair. Choose from six finishes and numerous fabrics and leathers. Christopher Guy, Suite 1601, 212.684.2197, christopherguy.com

The Space Between The sleek style and dimensions of Louis J. Solomon’s Metal End Table with Travertine Stone Top fit easily into any space and with any existing décor. The creamy Travertine stone contrasts with the rich antique brass base to beautifully frame more space than the airy footprint claims. Louis J. Solomon, Suite 911, 212.545.9200, louisjsolomon.com

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STYLESPOTLIGHT F eatured highlights of craft and design .

1. Open Relationships (opposite) The Tjerk Cabinet at LEPERE is display storage with a solid oak frame and glass doors. A special stainless steel hinge mechanism allows secure closure, tight, side-by-side positioning and stacking. 2. Fire When Ready Set a room alight with Christopher Guy’s fiery Feu Metal Decorative Screen. Beautifully crafted with a double flame design, this piece adds glamour to any fireplace setting.

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3. Step Lightly (opposite) Barbara Barry’s Beautiful Broadloom Collection for Kravet Carpet is marked by delicate patterns and a soft, tonal color palette that act as a sophisticated canvas for the overall design scheme. 4. Joy Underfoot Stephanie Odegard’s soft Mohair Textures carpets, including this piece, Shadows in the Forest, have a lush feel and a luxurious sheen. Take off your shoes and let your toes sink in. 5. Somewhere to Hide The Bright Group’s Cooper Single Drink Table has a shagreen top encased in clear epoxy that creates a jeweled surface. Slim and sturdy, it easily tucks away anywhere. 6. Rolling Art The rolling Studebaker Coffee Table recalls Moderne bar carts from the 1930s-1950s. For Brueton, Stanley Jay Friedman adapted this concept into a low table, adding a distinctive extended handle/leg configuration. 7. Shelf Life Simple. Authentic. Functional. The Oldknow Bookcase Lamp from Currey & Company is made of wrought iron and polished concrete and will illuminate books and displayed treasures on almost any bookshelf.

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8. Drop-Down Gorgeous Studio A Home's Vienna Secretary is cloaked in bleached walnut veneer over an African mahogany frame. The matchbook technique on the doors and drawers emphasizes the beauty of the grain. 9. Copper Heads The backbone of DESIRON’s 18-year history is rooted in metal work. Their new finish on the Charles Side Table combines rich burnt elm wood and the deep rosy warmth of copper. 10. Plush de Luxe Visual appeal rivals comfort and function in the Hamilton Club Chair at Dennis Miller. The deep seat is cradled by a rounded upholstered back support encouraging luxe lounging. 11. Forge Ahead This beautiful hardware collection is the Bakes & Kropp Custom Range of Cabinet Knobs and Pulls. Designed by Robert Bakes, they’re made from solid brass forgings and expertly hand finished in polished nickel.

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12. Abstract Dancers Inspired by artist/choreographer Oskar Schlemmer's 1922 Triadisches Ballett, Global Views’ Bauhaus Figure Collection comprises five unique sculptures that display the human body as abstract art. 13. Square Cut Jewels The Quartz End Table by Salvations at PROFILES uses a little bit of glass, a little bit of gold, and a little bit of jewelry for just the right amount of glitz.

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14. Island Modern Open acrylic panels set into intersecting polished nickel frames create the Crystal Clear Island Light from Metropolitan Lighting. The rectangular configuration is perfect for a kitchen light or over a dining table. 15. Rockstar Meets Runway Interesting angles and excellent materials make a striking impact in the Wrap Console Table by Kara Mann for Baker Furniture. The piece was inspired by jewelry, hardware, and fashion. 16. Mad About Dorothy Mr. Brown’s Draper Sofa pays homage to the designer, not the ad man. Swank and sophisticated, it has a sleek bench cushion, a scoop back, and sculpted arms. Shown in mahogany velvet with persimmon welt. 62


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17. Rustic Media This Media Cabinet from Louis J. Solomon combines contemporary and rustic elements, with a sleek, dark oak base, a live-edge mahogany shelf, and beautiful gold accents. 18. Keep That Edge Sustainable, locally sourced, and hand made, Long Branch Consoles at Apropos are sophisticated, one-of-a-kind pieces that anchor a room. Live edge walnut slab with a Danish oil rub and a bronze base. 19. Struck Gold Organically applied veins of vibrant gold laced with espresso sit within a field of ivory in this stunning pattern from Kinon Surface Design’s Elite Collection of luxury decorative panels.

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De. FIN.ingPieces items that sum up what a showroom is all about.

Julian Chichester The new Pollock Drink Cabinet by Julian Chichester features stunning black vellum paneled doors and a gilded metal base for a modish feel. The cabinet is lined with ĂŠglomisĂŠ mirror and gilt bottle racks to the rear of the doors. Julian Chichester, Suite 604, 646.293.6622, julianchichester.com

LEPERE The softly curved Belle Lounge Chair and Belle Loveseat from LEPERE have varnished oak bases, offered in various finishes. Seat cushions are fire-retardant, high-resilience foam with a top layer of goose down. The seats and backs are available in various fabrics and leathers for you to mix, match, or contrast. LEPERE, Suite 714, 212.488.7000, lepereinc.com FEB MAR

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DefiningPieces

Bakes & Kropp The timeless white kitchen is alive and well in the Hamptons! This functional L-shaped kitchen designed for a prominent homebuilder features a smart arrangement of Bakes & Kropp’s Meridian Custom Cabinetry. The walnut drawers and island base help warm the space and contribute to its signature coastal feel. Bakes & Kropp, Suite 430, 917.885.9650, bakesandkropp.com

BRUETON This beautiful Contemporary Stainless Steel Bed, designed by Stanley Jay Friedman, combines the latest technology with Old-World craftsmanship. Components are cut with high-pressure water jets and hand finished with Brueton’s orbital grain brushing techniques. Attention to detail and meticulous finishing are evident in the upholstered headboard and footboard, with optional quilted coverlet and pillows. Brueton, Suite 910, 212.838.1630, brueton.com

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Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co. Metropolitan Opera fans will recognize the similarity of the Opera Starburst Pendant to the grand fixtures adorning the famed performing venue. Radiating from a center orb are spokes of crystal sprays and faceted balls. The light and brilliance reflect off a polished chrome frame. Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co., Suite 512, 212.545.0032, minka.com

The Bright Group The Sylvester Sofa, designed by Douglas Levine, draws on classic 1980s forms. The two-piece style is shown here, but it is also available as a larger, three-piece unit and custom sizing is also offered. In all Bright finishes. The Bright Group, Suite 902, 212.726.9030, thebrightgroup.com

Dennis Miller Associates Modern planes and a continuous form are the key elements of Altura’s Contour Console. The see-thru design has an airy, contemporary composition. Softly rounded corners smoothly connect the horizontal and angled elements. Contour Consoles are available in a wide range of standard or custom sizes and finishes. Dennis Miller Associates, Suite 1210, 212.684.0070, dennismiller.com

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Stephanie Odegard Collection While traveling through Belo Horizonte, Brazil, Stephanie Odegard was inspired by a church altar she saw there. The result was her design for Ganten, a hand-knotted carpet made of 100% Himalayan wool. The bright and intense color is reminiscent of a stunning Brazilian sunrise. Stephanie Odegard Collection, Suite 1209, 212.545.0205, stephanieodegard.com

Christopher Guy Truly spectacular in scale and execution, the hand-carved wood La Flamme Headboard has a flame-inspired volcanic rock effect. It makes a stunning centerpiece for any contemporary or classic bedroom. Available in Italian silver or renaissance gold finishes. The base is supplied separately. Christopher Guy, Suite 1601, 212.684.2197, christopherguy.com

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DESIRON The Charles Credenza exemplifies DESIRON’s capabilities of customization that designers can utilize to create a piece to match their own aesthetic—whether with wood, metal, or upholstery. Shown in black walnut with a Dani leather rustico nubuck top and doors with a gunmetal finish base. Over 12 wood finishes and countless fabric options available. DESIRON, Suite 702, 212.353.2600, desiron.com

Apropos Furniture Showroom The beauty of the Tristan Sofa is in its clean mid-century modern details—the buttonless tufted bench seat cushion, foam back cushions, and delicate track arms. The warmth of a wood base contrasts with the coolness of a metal leg, creating an unexpected mix. Available in an array of covers and configurations. Apropos Furniture Showroom, Suite 710, 212.684.6987, apropos-furniture.com

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studio A home Studio A Home crafts the Teton Table from hand-forged iron. The unique double threeleg design is seen here in antique gold with a 60-inch diameter tempered glass top. Teton is also available with a 48-inch diameter top, as a large rectangular dining table with dual bases, and as small accent tables. Studio A Home, Suite 614, 212.725.8439, studioa-home.com

krAvet inc. Through transitional prints and weaves, the Constantinople Fabric Collection for Kravet celebrates Turkey’s rich history of textile arts and craftsmanship. Ottoman damasks, global batiks, and ikat techniques are translated into a fresh modern story, while weaves and embroideries offer dimension and texture that replicate basket weaves, mosaic tiles, and handcrafted stitching. Kravet Inc., Suite 401, 212.725.0340, kravet.com

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Kinon® Surface Design Inc. A blend of art and science, Kinon’s signature surface panels enhance any interior. This pattern, from their Elite Collection, is shown as fireplace paneling and cabinetry surfacing. Carefully crafted by hand, and available in over 400 patterns, this organically cast product allows you to add real impact to your designs. Kinon® Surface Design Inc., Suite 1315, 561.600.2500, kinon.com

Currey & Company The Crystal Bud Chandelier is an updated classic design from Currey & Company, now in a silver leaf finish. A free-form arrangement of crystal buds on delicate metal stems gives this chandelier its distinctive appearance. Currey & Company, Suite 506, 212.213.4900, curreyandcompany.com

PROFILES Louis J. Solomon Part of their contemporary collection, this Contemporary Lounge Chair displays the high-quality upholstery that Louis J. Solomon is known for. A wonderful accent chair, the unique design of the arms on this piece is sure to get noticed. Make this chair your own with customized upholstery and more than 10 different finish options. Louis J. Solomon, Suite 911, 212.545.9200, louisjsolomon.com

The Jewel Coffee Table by James Magni makes a monumental statement. Each unique tabletop is formed with molten glass, poured to size, and polished to perfection on five sides, leaving the bottom in wavy, ad-lib patterns. Available with a leafed bottom or clear, with several metal finishes for the base. PROFILES, Suite 1211, 212.689.6903, profilesny.com

GLOBAL VIEWS The Liberty Lamp conveys the exuberance of life and the pure joy found in just being. In solid cast iron with a gold leaf finish, Liberty sits atop a white marble base on iron spheres also finished in gold leaf. The clip-on round chintz white hardback shades feature a self-fold trim. Global Views, Suite 613, 212.725.8439, globalviews.com

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NEW Showrooms. 2016 F resh faces and new designs. AERO, 15th Floor aerostudios.com Celebrating its 20th year, AERO is a fixture in New York City’s design community. Thomas O’Brien continually puts forth his latest finds and ideas in a revolving, imagined interior. The store houses O’Brien’s hand-picked, ever-changing selection of refurbished vintage modern furniture and lighting, antiques, fine art, tableware, accessories, and collectibles. In addition, AERO stocks the most complete offering of Thomas O’Brien brand home furnishings, both ready-made and made to order. It is the only place to find O’Brien’s custom AERO-label goods, from handcrafted, luxury upholstery, and lighting to trays, bedding, and favorites like the perennially popular AERO leather tote bags. BRADLEY, Suite 802 bradley-usa.com BRADLEY is an innovative, to-the-trade luxury furnishings company specializing in artisancrafted, American-made furnishings, lighting, and accessories. Distinguished by a range of materials and customized finishes—reclaimed wood, concrete, hand-forged metal, antiqued mirror, painted glass— BRADLEY is sold through major design centers and by design trade professionals around the world. In addition to its signature furnishings line, the Atlanta-based design and manufacturing company offers an extensive fabric library of custom-printed textiles, classic linen, silk, chenille, and bouclé, as well as fabric and wall coverings from established and emerging artisans. BRADLEY represents a growing roster of artists, positioning the company as a one-stop source for the design community. Jiun Ho, Suite 1208 jiunho.com Celebrated San Francisco-based interior and home furnishings designer Jiun Ho will debut his luxury lifestyle line in a new showroom at 200 Lex this spring. In collaboration with Dennis Miller Associates, the new space will showcase Jiun Ho’s collections of furniture, lighting, and accessories, as well as pieces curated from selective complimentary collections. The showroom will highlight the Jiun Ho V Collection, created in celebration of his 15th Anniversary, as well as classic pieces that have become favorites of designers and architects. A global nomad with an extraordinary eye, Jiun Ho has traveled to 108 countries. His designs are inspired by elements of nature, architecture, and art. “I am so pleased to be opening a showroom in New York. My dream is to create a total design experience.” 72

new showroom new location opening soon

Kelly Wearstler, Suite 816 kellywearstler.com Global interior designer and tastemaker Kelly Wearstler is renowned for her signature brand of unexpected, bold, and sophisticated design, and has revolutionized the look, feel, and meaning of modern American living. This season marks the debut of Kelly’s New York Design Center showroom. The showroom highlights her extensive furniture, lighting, and decorative home accessory collections inspired by her masterful mix of diverse materials, artisanal craftsmanship, and classic forms. Heirloom woods, mixed metal patinas, and hand-cut stones combine with a cultivated palette, clean lines, and sculptural forms to create a collection with Kelly’s distinct vision. A collection of modern classics, marrying form and function with unrivaled artistry and enduring quality. Leftbank Art, Suite 609 leftbankart.com For over 40 years, Leftbank Art has provided the latest in art to the design world. They are bringing their line of over 8,000 pieces to the New York Design Center, including Original Hand Paintings, Giclees, Prints on Canvas, Plexi, Outdoor, Glass Framed, Shadow Box Art, and Murals. All of their work is hand embellished, bringing a realistic painted look to each image, offering a one-of-a-kind representation of their artwork. Their attention to detail and quality drive the manufacturing and creation of the artwork. Custom size options are available for most of the products to make sure that the artwork fits any size you may need. Their line is updated seasonally, ensuring the availability of the latest trends and styles. SEGUSO, Suite 431 seguso.com The Seguso family has been dedicated to the art of Murano glass since 1397, with 23 generations passing down knowledge, art, and passion at the highest level. MoMA, the Victoria and Albert Museum, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art are among 100 museums around the world that have Seguso glass in their permanent collections. Today Seguso brings together both tradition and modernity, offering the most comprehensive range of authentic Murano glass artworks. Lighting, furniture, accessories, and a wide range of custom capabilities inspired from the rich creative heritage of Seguso glass, for the finest residential and commercial interiors.

AMQ, Suite 1316 amqsolutions.com Expectations for budgets and project timelines are changing. As six- to eight-week lead times become less tenable, AMQ meets the growing demand for fast, contemporary spaces with five-day shipping on all products. From our ICON benching to ACTIV sit-to-stand tables and benching, and ILINE beam system, come to AMQ for the fastest set up of your open plan office. Plexi-Craft, Suite 914 plexi-craft.com Plexi-Craft, the oldest and leading acrylic furnishings company, is proud to announce the opening of their new flagship showroom in the New York Design Center. Plexi-Craft was founded over 50 years ago in Manhattan and is excited to bring their exclusive Signature Collection back to the borough’s premier design showcase. The new showroom includes unique custom capabilities and collaborative collections with New York-based designers Alan Tanksley, Coffinier Ku, and Timothy Whealon. Plexi-Craft further tapped Alan Tanksley’s creative mind in the design of this new showroom.


ShowroomPortraits

Profiles of Some of 200 Lex's Most Familiar Names

APROPOS FURNITURE Suite 710

BAKER FURNITURE Suite 300

BAKES & KROPP Suite 430

THE BRIGHT GROUP Suite 902

Since 1985, Apropos has consistently proven to be a resource for the design industry. With an extensive line ranging from classical period pieces to contemporary designs, the showroom also offers custom work at production pricing. From design concept through execution and installation, Apropos meets your most demanding client’s needs. Apropos Furniture Showroom, Suite 710, phone 212.684.6987, fax 212.689.3684, apropos-furniture.com

Founded in 1902, Baker Furniture remains one of the largest wholesale distributors in the industry with 16 showrooms located in major design districts throughout the United States and at the Chelsea Harbour Design Centre in London. Product assortment spans from historic reproductions dating back to the 17th century to modern designs from today’s most recognized independent designers. Baker Furniture, Suite 300, phone 212.779.8810, fax 212.689.2827, bakerfurniture.com

Founded by designer Robert Bakes and craftsman Paul Kropp, Bakes & Kropp is a luxury cabinetry firm combining elegant design and expert craftsmanship to create spectacular kitchens, vanities, libraries, and closets. Their new flagship showroom at the New York Design Center is the much-anticipated extension of their original Sag Harbor location. Bakes & Kropp, Suite 430, phone 917.885.9650, fax 631.725.1710 bakesandkropp.com

The Bright Group is a unique collection of handcrafted, American-made furnishings, combining the extensive product range of Bright Chair Company with artisan designers and manufacturers, showcasing a coordinated environment for the design community. Whether the focus is seating, case goods, or lighting, The Bright Group searches the country for quality product lines with great new design. The Bright Group, Suite 902, phone 212.726.9030, fax 212.726.9029, thebrightgroup.com

BRUETON Suite 910

CHRISTOPHER GUY Suite 1601

Currey & Company Suite 506

DENNIS MILLER ASSOCIATES Suite 1210

Brueton, a US manufacturer based in New York, manufactures a full line of contemporary furniture, including sofas, tables, chairs, casegoods, and accessories catering to residential and commercial clients. In addition, Brueton offers vast custom capabilities, including fabricating the simplest to the most complicated stainless steel products and architectural metals for architects and designers. Brueton, Suite 910, phone 212.838.1630, fax 212.838.1652, brueton.com

Christopher Guy’s new 20,000-squarefoot penthouse showroom showcases his latest collections and design philosophy within three suites, each portraying varying lifestyles. The new Mademoiselle Collection internationalizes Parisian chic for the 21st century. The showroom also features the state-of-the-art Christopher Guy Design Lab, an ideal working environment for interior designers to complete entire design projects. Christopher Guy, Suite 1601, phone 212.684.2197, fax 212.684.2123, christopherguy.com

For more than 25 years, Currey & Company has fulfilled customers’ need for distinctive chandeliers, wall sconces, lamps, rugs, and furniture. The company’s perspective on product design is one of a lively interest in historical influences, correct materials for the design and a keen interest in product integrity. Every detail is executed with clarity and finesse. Products show the touch of the human hand meticulously crafted of natural materials. Currey & Company, Suite 506, phone 212.213.4900, curreyandcompany.com

Since 1983, Dennis Miller Associates has offered innovative furniture and lighting collections designed by architects, interior designers, and artisans. Its showroom provides a continually evolving showcase of contemporary and 20th century classic design excellence. Its popularity with top designers speaks for itself. Come see the newly expanded collections to the Dennis Miller lighting, rugs, and furniture lines. Dennis Miller Associates, Suite 1210, phone 212.684.0070, fax 212.684.0776, dennismiller.com FEB MAR

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ShowroomPortraits DESIRON Suite 702

DUNE Suite 100

GLOBAL VIEWS Suite 613

HICKORY CHAIR–PEARSON– HENREDON, Suite 102

Desiron, designed by Frank Carfaro, is a highly celebrated luxury furniture design company with a focus on benchmade, fully customizable home furnishings. The company’s 4,000-square-foot showroom concentrates on a contemporary clean aesthetic with strict attention to detail and finishing. Desiron manufactures its pieces in Kenilworth, New Jersey, at their state-of-the-art facility, just 19 miles from downtown NYC. DESIRON, Suite 702, phone 212.353.2600, fax 212.353.0220, desiron.com

Dune is an American contemporary design company focused on the development and manufacture of innovative interior products. Since 1998, Dune has built an internationally recognized design brand with its award-winning furniture collection and collaborations with the world’s most cutting-edge designers and architects. Dune’s exclusive American-made furniture collection is only available through their showroom on the ground floor of the New York Design Center. Dune, Suite 100, phone 212.925.6171, fax 212.925.2273, dune-ny.com

Global Views is expanding its showroom space. Global Views is a home décor wholesale company with collections that blend various styles to make pieces that are elegant, exotic, refined, and casual. They offer a wide assortment of fashion-forward products from furniture to accessories that fit every price range. Global Views, Suite 613, phone 212.725.8439, fax 212.679.4927, globalviews.com

The mission of Hickory Chair–Pearson– Henredon is to service the design trade at the highest possible level, while offering a fashion-forward shopping experience. The showroom represents Henredon, Barbara Barry Realized by Henredon, Celerie Kemble for Henredon and Maitland-Smith, Lane Venture, Maitland-Smith, LaBarge, and Taracea. The company offers hundreds of beautiful wood and upholstery designs for every room. Hickory Chair–Pearson–Henredon, Suite 102, phone 212.725.3776, fax 212.725.3763, henredon.com, hickorychairpearson.com

In House Kitchen Bath home Suite 1511

JULIAN CHICHESTER/ MR. BROWN LONDON, Suite 604

Kinon® Surface Design Inc. Suite 1315

KRAVET INC. Suite 401

In House Kitchen Bath Home is New York’s premier showroom offering distinctive cabinetry from custom manufacturers Wood-Mode and Brookhaven for all rooms throughout the home. In House Kitchen Bath Home, Suite 1511, phone 212.686.2016, fax 212.686.2048, inhousekbh.com

Julian Chichester reinvents the great designs of the 19th and 20th centuries to create eclectic, transitional furniture perfect for how we live today. Julian Chichester is pleased to offer the inimitable, irrepressible, and always edgy Mr. Brown London in their New York showroom with a beautifully edited assortment of furniture, lamps, and accessories. Julian Chichester, Suite 604, phone 646.293.6622, fax 917.591.2413, julianchichester.com

Kinon® Surface Design has developed the world’s most unique and luxurious decorative surface panels. Their custom, hand-made patterns and colors have been featured in high-end residential, hospitality, retail, and commercial design projects. Applications include wall paneling, cabinetry, tables, furniture, doors, shelving, wall units, architectural woodwork, and more. Over 400 patterns available, including this example in ivory, showcasing wide-grid geometry with a fractal twist. Kinon® Surface Design Inc., Suite 1315, phone 561.600.2500, fax 561.600.2491, kinon.com

Kravet Inc., established in 1918, distributes fabrics, furniture, wall coverings, trimmings, carpets, and accessories to the interior design trade. Kravet Inc. owns Kravet, Lee Jofa, Groundworks, GP & J Baker, and Brunschwig & Fils, all high-end fabric houses that specialize in style, luxury, and exceptional design. Kravet Inc., Suite 401, phone 212.725.0340, fax 212.684.7350, Kravet.com.

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LEPERE Suite 714

LOUIS J. SOLOMON Suite 911

METROPOLITAN LIGHTING FIXTURE CO., Suite 512

PROFILES Suite 1211

LEPERE showcases a contemporary collection of innovative designs from Belgium, Italy, the Netherlands, and Spain. LEPERE has developed a strong and loyal following in both the residential and contract design community with its warm, minimalist aesthetic, featuring the best-in-class in furniture, outdoor, carpets, and lighting. LEPERE, Suite 714, phone 212.488.7000, fax 212.488.7006, lepereinc.com

Since 1930, Louis J. Solomon has had a reputation in the industry for fine traditional furniture. Over the past 10 years the company has introduced more than 200 new transitional and contemporary styles that complement the quality styles it has always been known for. Please visit the company’s showroom to see the latest additions. Louis J. Solomon, Suite 911, phone 212.545.9200, fax 212.545.9438, louisjsolomon.com

Metropolitan Lighting has been illuminating the finest interiors for many years. Their New York showroom offers one of the most comprehensive selections of designer-oriented lighting in the industry. Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co., Suite 512, phone 212.545.0032, fax 212.545.0031, minka.com

Serving the design profession since 1980, PROFILES’ workrooms in the US and in Europe create pieces of uncommon beauty and imagination for both residential and contract customers, offering a full spectrum of furniture in a variety of woods, metals, and finishes, as well as finely tailored upholstery—all to the designer’s specifications. PROFILES, Suite 1211, phone 212.689.6903, fax 212.685.1807, profilesny.com

SALADINO FURNITURE, INC. Suite 1600

STEPHANIE ODEGARD COLLECTION Suite 1209

STUDIO A HOME Suite 614

Established in 1986 by renowned designer John F. Saladino, the Saladino Furniture collection currently has over 75 original designs of upholstery, casegoods, and lighting. The line is available exclusively through its New York showroom among select antiques and accessories. A 75-page catalog may be purchased online at saladinostyle.com. Saladino Furniture, Inc., Suite 1600, phone 212.684.3720, fax 212.684.3257, saladinostyle.com

The Stephanie Odegard Collection is a leader in bold design and color innovation in the production of high-end, hand-knotted carpets. The collection also features handcrafted furniture, lighting, antiques, and decorative accessories from across the globe. In all of her products, Stephanie Odegard requires strict adherence to social responsibility, raising standards of living for thousands of craftspeople in developing countries. Stephanie Odegard Collection, Suite 1209, phone 212.545.0205, fax 212.545.0305, stephanieodegard.com

Studio A Home’s unique mix of organic, design-driven accessories, furniture, found objects, and textiles is rich in texture and elemental in composition. Cutting-edge design, unexpected materials, and handcrafted finishes form the foundation of their product mix. The eclectic blend of textures, classic silhouettes, and timeless design will transform any interior. Studio A Home is a partner company and harmonious complement to Global Views. Studio A Home, Suite 614, phone 212.725.8439, fax 212.679.4927, studioa-home.com FEB MAR

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Events at 200 Lex A look at a few recent celebrations.

What’s New, What’s Next The New York Design Center presented the record-breaking seventh annual “What’s New, What’s Next” on September 17, 2015. Over 6,500 guests filled the building for what has become the design industry’s most anticipated event. The benchmark event celebrated over 70 participating showrooms’ new products and the best names in design. 200 Lex partnered with 21 esteemed media publications and editors from 1stdibs, Apartment Therapy, Architectural Digest, Dering Hall, domino, Elle Decor, House Beautiful, interiors, Interior Design, Lonny, Luxe Interiors + Design, Metropolis, MyDomaine, New York Cottages & Gardens, New York Magazine Design Hunting, New York Spaces, Town & Country, Traditional Home, Veranda, Wallpaper, and The Wall Street Journal, who hosted engaging designer conversations, presentations, and panels throughout the day. Attendees gained insight into the industry’s latest trends while mingling with top editors, manufacturers, and designers.

Sophie Donelson, House Beautiful Editor in Chief, with Ellie Cullman, Cullman & Kravis; Jason Phillips of Phillips Collection moderated a panel with Young Huh, Ashlina Kaposta, Carlton Varney, Anthony Baratta, and Michael Fischer; 200 Lex President & CEO Jim Druckman with designer Charlotte Moss and Clinton Smith, Veranda Editor in Chief; DESIRON’s Frank Carfaro with designers Bennett Leifer and Jon Call; Mariette Himes Gomez, Celerie Kemble, and Suzanne Kasler; Design Consultant Jill Cohen and Connecticut Cottages & Gardens’ Editorial Director DJ Carey with designers Jessie Carrier, Mara Miller, Ray Booth, and Greg Tankersley; Sarah Medford, WSJ Magazine contributing Design Editor, with designer Reagan Hayes and artist Bradley Theodore; Editorial Director of Hearst Design Group Newell Turner with Eleanor Niermann of Niermann Weeks; Editor at Large interviews Betty Halbreich of Bergdorf Goodman; Amy Fine Collins with Elle Decor’s Mieke ten Have and Michael Boodro, and Baker Furniture’s Melanie Turner; Michael Vanderbyl and Cindy Allen, Editor in Chief of Interior Design; designer Jay Jeffers, Arteriors founder Mark Moussa, and Mat Sanders, Editorial Director of MyDomaine; designers Christopher Coleman, Kathryn Scott, Kati Curtis, and Neal Beckstedt; Brad Ford in new showroom FAIR. Photos by Social Shutterbug/Matthew Carasella and Will Ragozzino. 76


10th Annual Masquerade Ball On October 28th, 2015, the New York Design Center sponsored the 10th Annual Masquerade Ball benefiting The Alpha Workshops Studio School. The design industry channeled their inner Saints & Sinners in HAUS to support this worthy cause. This year’s Masquerade Ball, often touted as the most fun event on the design community calendar, drew over 300 interior designers, architects, manufacturers, members of the shelter press, and others who dressed in creative costumes and danced the night away.

The Traditional Home team as Saints of Toile; Mercedes Desio and Alberto Villalobos (far right) of Villalobos Desio with 200 Lex’s Alix Lerman, Leah Blank, and Brenna Stevens as Andy Warhol and his Polaroids; Architectural Digest’s Saints & Sinners sports teams; Hearst Design Group as characters from The Hunger Games. Photos by Lev Avery-Peck.

Holiday Live On Monday, December 7, 2015, in the Christopher Guy showroom at 200 Lex, the Kips Bay Boys & Girls Club celebrated Holiday Live. This year the Hearst Design Group—Elle Decor, House Beautiful, and Veranda—and the New York Design Center joined together as hosts. New York City’s most distinguished and creative designers presented a one-of-a-kind silent auction of wreaths. Each of these unique items showcased the special talent of the individual designer and collectively transformed the room into a pre-holiday wonderland. The night also included a performance by the Kips Bay Boys & Girls Club members. Proceeds from the wreaths and tickets sales benefited Kips Bay’s education and afterschool programs.

Designer wreaths for auction; Lora Yoon, Kathryn Davis, Dayle Wood, Barbara Saget, and Jon Walker from Hearst Design Group; Libby Langdon, Michelle Slovak, and Lisa McMahon; Christina Juarez and Robert Rufino; Virginia Toldeo, Lydia Marks, Lisa Frantz, and Jessica Geller; Kips Bay Boys & Girls Club members perform carols; Ed Ku, Antonino Buzzetta, and Daniel VanHall. Photos by Megan Swann for Editor at Large. FEB MAR

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ShowroomDirectory A Complete List of Who’s Where In 200 Lex

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SH OWROOM 1stdibs at NYDC Access To Design Alea AMQ ANDREU WORLD Apropos Inc. Arc|Com Fabrics, Inc. Aristeia Metro Arteriors Atelier Atlas Carpet Mills Baker Furniture Bakes & Kropp Bograd Kids Bolier Boyce Products Ltd BRADLEY The Bright Group Brueton Brunschwig & Fils Calger Lighting Inc. Century Furniture CF Modern Christopher Guy CityScapes NYC Clickspring Design CLIFF YOUNG LTD. Colombo Mobili USA Côté France Crosby Street Studios Currey & Company DARRAN Furniture Industries, Inc. Decca Contract Furniture Delivery By Design (DBD) Dennis Miller Associates

S uite 10th Fl 424 1509 1316 1111 710 1411 1416 608 202 1314 300 430 433 804 1405 802 902 910 401 434 200 510 1601 1106 1405 505 809 1201 1303 506 1116 1414 Dock 1210

PHON E 646.293.6633 212.679.9500 305.470.1200 212.685.1077 212.679.0300 212.684.6987 212.751.1590 646.761.4711 646.797.3620 212.696.0211 212.779.4300 212.779.8810 917.885.9650 212.726.0006 212.889.2060 212.683.3100

FA X 646.293.6687 212.447.1669 305.470.9070 212.685.1078 212.679.5996 212.689.3684 212.751.2434

212.726.9030 212.838.1630 212.725.0340 212.689.9511 212.479.0107 917.699.6024 212.684.2197 212.961.6984 212.220.0962 212.683.8808 212.683.3771 212.684.0707 212.486.0737 212.213.4900 212.961.6984 646.761.4711 212.213.1691 212.684.0070

212.726.9029 212.838.1652 212.684.7350 212.779.0721 212.479.0112

DesignLush DESIRON DIFFA DIRTT Environmental Solutions Dorothy Draper & Co., Inc. ducduc Dune EJ Victor ENRICOPELLIZZONI FAIR Flourishes GIBSON INTERIOR PRODUCTS Giorgio USA Global Views Good Design Gordon International Grange Furniture Groupe Lacasse Halcon Harbour Outdoor Hickory Chair-Pearson-Henredon In House Kitchen Bath Home Interior Crafts NY IFDA Jasper Group Julian Chichester Karkula

415 702 707 1516 806 715 100 814 1304 601 414 1510 502 613 423 1401 201 1109 1304 1301 102 1511 916 417B 1514 604 419

212.532.5450 212.353.2600 212.727.3100 973.454.6282 646.293.6649 212.226.1868 212.925.6171 212.679.4341 212.683.7272 212.352.9615 212.779.4540 212.685.1077 212.684.7191 212.725.8439 212.722.1110 212.532.0075 212.685.9494 212.689.0300 212.683.7272 646.692.4227 212.725.3776 212.686.2016 212.696.4400 212.686.6020 212.685.1077 646.293.6622 212.645.2216

646.786.4818 212.696.0299 212.779.0838 212.689.2827 631.725.1710 212.726.0061 212.683.5005

212.684.2123 212.683.5005 212.683.9286 212.684.0559 212.684.8940 917.591.4373 212.213.4911 212.951.7070 212.213.9843 212.684.0776 212.532.5360 212.353.0220 212.727.2574 646.293.6657 212.226.5504 212.925.2273 212.683.7011 212.779.4542 212.685.1078 212.725.2683 212.679.4927 212.722.1115 212.779.0147 212.685.7312 212.689.7143 212.683.0711 212.725.3763 212.686.2048 212.686.4408 212.686.6258 812.771.4641 917.591.2413

S H OW RO O M Kasthall Rugs USA Inc. Keilhauer Kenneth Cobonpue KI and Pallas Textiles Kindel Furniture

S uite 611 1101 427 1313 806 Korts & Knight, Kitchens by Alexandra Knight 716 Kravet Inc. 401 Krug 1415 LaCOUR 1412 Lee Jofa 401 Leftbank Art 609 LEPERE 714 Levine Calvano Furniture Group 1406 Lexington Home Brands 212 Louis J. Solomon Inc. 911 Luna Textiles 1410 McGuire Furniture 101 Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co. 512 Milano Smart Living LLC 711 M|n Modern Living Supplies 408 Mr. Brown London 604 Napier + Joseph + McNamara, Ltd. 1304 The New Traditionalists 701 Niermann Weeks 905 PALECEK 610 Paoli 1110 Pennoyer Newman LLC 416 Phillips Collection 603 Porcelanosa 609 Primason Symchik, Inc. 1101 Pringle Ward 1109 Prismatique 1101 Profiles 1211 Raul Carrasco NYC 511 Reagan Hayes 903 RENAISSANCE CARPET & TAPESTRIES 912 Richard Cohen Collection 801 Rooms by Zoya B 433 SA Baxter Architectural Hardware 1205 Saladino Furniture Inc. 1600 SANFORD HALL 400 Sedgwick & Brattle 815 Skyline Contract Group 1106 Smart 1115 Stephanie Odegard Collection 1209 Studio A Home 612 Sun Decor Fabrics 417A Theodore Alexander 515 Thom Filicia Inc. 815 TK Collections 410 Todd Hase 425 Townhouse Kitchens 421 transFORM 708 Tucker Robbins 504 Versteel 1106 Wall Goldfinger 1304 Weinberg Modern 407 Wood & Hogan, Inc. 812 Wood-Mode, Inc./T.O. Gronlund Co. 1515 Woodwrights Wide Plank Flooring 436 NYDC Café 1st Floor New York Design Center 426

P H O NE 212.421.0220 212.679.0300 212.532.5450 212.337.9909 646.293.6649 212.3924750 212.725.0340 212.686.7600 212.213.6600 212.725.0340

FA X 212.421.0230 212.679.5996

212.488.7000 212.686.7600 212.532.2750 212.545.9200 212.251.0132 212.689.1565 212.545.0032 212.729.1938 646.486.3272 646.293.6622 212.683.7272 212.226.1868 212.319.7979 212.287.0063 212.683.2232 212.839.0500 336.884.9271 212.252.7370 212.679.0300 212.689.0300 212.679.0030 212.689.6903 212.966.6112 212.658.1922 212.696.0080 212.696.4938 212.726.0006

212.488.7006 212.686.7686 212.532.2875 212.545.9438

212.337.1090 646.293.6657 212.684.7350 973.227.3544 212.684.7350

212.689.1578 212.545.0031 212.729.1939 646.349.5619 917.591.2413 212.683.7011 212.226.5504 212.319.6116 212.287.0066 212.683.1297 212.839.0501 336.882.7405 917.289.1228 212.679.5996 212.689.7149 212.679.5996 212.685.1807 212.966.6113

212.696.4248 212.696.5333 212.726.0061 212.203.4382 888.713.6042 212.684.3720 212.684.3257 212.684.4217 212.545.8376 212.685.0600 212.244.9131 212.961.6984 212.696.9762 212.696.2729 212.545.0205 212.545.0305 212.956.0030 212.956.0031 212.213.2703 212.231.2708 646.293.6628 336.885.5260 212.736.6564 212.244.9131 212.213.2470 212.213.2464 212.871.9075 212.871.9085 212.684.8696 212.684.8696 212.584.9580 212.355.3383 212.355.3116 800.876.2120 212.683.7272 212.683.7011 646.291.2059 212.532.7440 212.532.6440 212.679.3535 212.725.3847 212.390.8944 646.616.0584 212.679.9500 212.447.1669


ARRAY INSIDE THE NEW YORK DESIGN CENTER

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VOLUME 4 ISSUE 3

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backstory Sketch Artists

By Jim Lochner

T he New York School of I nterior D esign celebrates a century of influential design .

his year a venerable design institution celebrates its 100th anniversary—the New York School of Interior Design. The school began as a Home Study Course in the Decorative Arts in 1915, the brain child of architect Sherrill Whiton. When home study students kept visiting Whiton’s professional office expecting to find a school, he decided to open the New York School of Interior Decoration. In 1951, the name was changed to the New York School of Interior Design (NYSID) to reflect changes in teaching not only about “the details and finishes of a space but the architecture of the interior.” Over the last century, NYSID has grown from only a handful of students the first year to more than 600 students and nine programs. The school occupies two tandem buildings on East 69th and 70th Streets, plus the LEED-Plantinum Graduate Center at 28th Street and Park Avenue South, which houses faculty, staff, and more than 150 graduate students.

Top to bottom: NYSID, past and present; NYSID 1969 graduation reception (Mariette Himes Gomez, far left); NYSID building at 155 East 56th street, circa 1962.

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From the beginning, women have been at the forefront of NYSID, not only as graduates, but also as faculty, administrators, and advisors, often for decades. For instance, Lucy Taylor, who studied under Albert Munsell, the creator of the Color System, served on the faculty from 1928 to 1964, lecturing on Color and Room Composition, while also serving as contributing editor of House Beautiful, House & Garden, and Art & Decoration. Nancy McClelland, one of the “grande dames” of interior design and the first woman president of what is now the American Society of Interior Designers, was a member of the faculty and Advisory Committee from 1927 to 1955. Mary L. Brandt, known for her Home Furnishings Training Course, which taught salespeople the fundamentals of interior design in order to better sell their merchandise, taught courses in Salesmanship, Material Selection and Ordering, Buying, and Drapery Making and Upholstery Work from 1938 to 1962. For over 40 years (1934–1979), Inez Croom, whose wallpaper designs are still in production today, taught courses in

Wallpapers, Room Composition, Sources of Supply, and Decorating Procedures. And Anne Korman, who received an NYSID Design Diploma and specializes in Design Presentation, has been a faculty member since 1976. Today, students can take part in eight sequential design studios, learning residential, hospitality, retail, workplace, and healthcare design, with courses such as Environment & Behavior, Arts of China and Japan, and Professional Practice. Though NYSID still emphasizes a foundation in hand drawing and drafting skills, it keeps up with technology, offering courses in AutoCAD, Revit, SketchUp, 3DMax, and more. And the idea of Whiton’s original home study course lives on in the 21st century with a number of online courses. A major change occurred during the tenure of former NYSID president Inge Henkel (1996–2008) when she created a 60-credit Masters in Fine Arts program, for which DesignIntelligence ranked the school number one in the country. “The greatest strength of the New York School of Interior Design is its focus on interior design,” says Henkel. “All its attention and resources are invested in interior design as a profession and has resulted in a roster of stellar alumni, including Mariette Himes Gomez, Mica Ertegun, Alexandra Stoddard, Rick Shaver, Anne Eisenhower, and so many, many more respected interior designers.” “When I attended NYSID,” says designer Mariette Himes Gomez (class of ’69), “I remember a rather equal women to men ratio of graduates.” Today, the percentage of female students is 88 percent, with an equal number of the overall student body from New York City and internationally, followed by the Tri-State area and a small percentage from the rest of the country. For the last century, NYSID graduates— women and men—have made the interiors of the world a more beautiful place. Here’s to an even more beautiful next 100 years!


SALADINO FURNITURE INC. SUITE 1600 TEL (212) 684-3720 FAX (212) 683-3257 SALADINOSTYLE.COM


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