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NEW YORK DESIGN CENTER

ALL IN THE FAMILY

Legacies at 200 Lex ANDREW BASEMAN

Reimagining Bruce Wayne’s Gotham FEB MAR

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CHARLOTTE MOSS Design Dynamo

2015 $6.50

Display through May 2015

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ARRAY INSIDE THE NEW YORK DESIGN CENTER

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Features

Volume 12 Issue 1

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All in the Family By Catherine McHugh Six family-run New York Design Center showrooms with design in their DNA offer singular legacies of style.

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Reimagining Bruce Wayne's Gotham By Cathy Whitlock Set decorator Andrew Baseman.

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Design Dynamo By Cathy Whitlock The creative life of celebrated Manhattan designer Charlotte Moss.

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Departments

Volume 12 Issue 1

26 8 STYLERADAR What's popping up on the screens of top designers.

11 CULTURECALENDAR By Catherine McHugh Making a Bronx escape, embracing silence at the Guggenheim, transforming at the Rubin, and tooling around at Cooper-Hewitt.

14 BOOKS By Cathy Whitlock

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A retrospective of the Kips Bay Show House and an architect’s take on the design process are a few of the books featured this spring. d new tomes from Alexa Hampton and TROVE By Jim Lochner Spring into the season with goodies for your garden, living room, and kitchen.

38 EATS’N’SLEEPS By Jim Lochner Slurp, sup, and slumber your way from SoHo to Harlem.

40 GALLERY 48

Speeding in neutral. l FRESHPICKS The most current products in 200 Lex showrooms.

56 STYLESPOTLIGHT Featured highlights of craft and design.

64 DEFININGPIECES Items that sum up what a showroom is all about.

72 NEWSHOWROOMS 2015 Fresh faces and new designs.

73 SHOWROOMPORTRAITS Profiles of some of 200 Lex's most familiar names.

76 EVENTSAT200LEX A look at a few recent celebrations.

78 SHOWROOMDIRECTORY A complete list of who’s where in 200 Lex.

80 BACKSTORY By Jim Lochner The Martha Washington Hotel spent most of the 20th century catering exclusively to single women.

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Array Magazine, Inc. 261 Madison Avenue 9th Floor New York, NY 10016 Phone 212.929.2733 Fax 212.929.0983 arrayny.com ARRAY editorial coverage@arrayny.com ARRAY advertising adinfo@arrayny.com ARRAY Magazine is produced three times per year. All submissions should be e-mailed to: coverage@arrayny.com

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Editorial Paul Millman Editor-in-Chief/Publisher Sheau Ling Soo Creative Director Ted Lambert Executive Editor Cathy Whitlock Features Editor Jim Lochner Copy Editor

Array Magazine, Inc. Š 2015 All rights reserved The contents of Array Magazine, Inc., may not be reproduced without written permission from the publisher.

Andrew French Photographer Adam Cohen IT Manager

Contributors Michele Keith Catherine McHugh

New York Design Center

on the cover Charlotte Moss photographed by Jason Dewey. 6

James P. Druckman President & CEO Daniel M. Farr Director of Operations Alix M. Lerman Director of Marketing & Communications Leah Blank Senior Marketing Manager/Director of Special Events Alana Moskowitz Design Services Manager Brenna Stevens Marketing Coordinator/Digital Content Manager Susan Lai Controller Vera Markovich Accounting Manager Erica McTurk Concierge


letter from the editor

Dear Readers, What’s in a name? Shakespeare suggested that it makes no difference what we call something. And while we understand what the Bard was getting at, I can’t help but point out that the man who expressed that sentiment has inarguably enjoyed the greatest name recognition of any writer who’s ever lived. It’s also very likely that we heard his name before we knew his work. My point is that reputation is important. Within the New York Design Center there are so many recognizable showroom names, and many of them span several generations of the same family. We profile just a few of these multi-generational companies that have called 200 Lex home for decades (All In The Family, p. 18). Charlotte Moss is one of the industry’s most recognizable names. With nine books, and collections of everything from furniture to fragrances under her purview, this Wall Streeterturned-designer has cemented her place at the top. Just don’t call her a brand. That’s just not her style (Decorating Dynamo, p. 32). Here are a few more well-known names: Bruce Wayne, The Penguin, Catwoman, and the Joker. These characters and others, made famous in the pages of DC Comics and in numerous blockbuster movies, are part of more than a brand, they’re pieces of a multi-billion-dollar franchise. Their world has been brought to new life in the hit TV series Gotham, a prequel to the Batman saga. Set decorator and interior designer Andrew Baseman sets the stage for their exploits, with locales that run the gamut from glitzy penthouses to grimy lairs—all with style and panache. Join Andrew for a behind-the-scenes tour (Reimagining Bruce Wayne’s Gotham, p. 26). I hope you enjoy viewing the work behind all the monikers to be found here in the pages of ARRAY. And if you don’t know them all yet, you surely will. In New York, everyone is making a name for themselves.

Paul Millman Editor-in-Chief

Photo by Andrew French

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StyleRadar

What's popping up on the screens of top designers.

Christopher Coleman (Christopher Coleman Interior Design) “Accessories that pack a punch. Bold, playful, and inspiring.”

Barry Goralnick (Goralnick Architecture & Design) “When styling a job, last minute accessorizing can turn into a bit of a zoo, but these clever ceramic animals from Bronsen have been a huge hit with my clients without taking a huge bite our of their wallets. Designed by young talented designers Justin Johnsen and Pilar Romero Bruno, they are designed in Brooklyn and hand-made in Portland, Oregon.”

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Vanessa Deleon (Vanessa Deleon Associates) “Loving the new color snap app from Sherwin Williams. It's time for spring renewal in your space and this is the perfect sidekick! Never struggle to find the right paint palate again. Color Snap matches, synchs, and stores all your favs!” Laura Kirar (Laura Kirar Design) “Knock knock. Who's there? Who cares who's there! Have you seen our doorknob?!"

DENNIS MILLER (Dennis Miller Associates) “No need to bug out with the change of the season! These classy, creepy crawlers add a touch of edgy elegance to any drawer or cabinet with ease. Marjorie Skouras crafted these beautiful beetles as handpicked hardware that can be found scurrying around at Dennis Miller Associates.”

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CultureCalendar

By Catherine McHugh

Making a Bronx escape, embracing silence at the Guggenheim, transforming at the Rubin, and tooling around at Cooper-Hewitt. A Tale of Two Coastlines In Maryland to Murano: Neckpieces and Sculptures by Joyce J. Scott, the Museum of Arts and Design brings together the artist’s neckpieces and blown glass sculptures for the first time. Showcasing Scott's prolific career, this exhibit examines the relationship between the beaded and constructed neckpieces created in her Baltimore studio and her more recent blown glass sculptures crafted in the Berengo Studio on Murano Island in Venice, Italy. This exhibition demonstrates the interplay between these two bodies of work and reveals the range of Scott’s technique and skill. The exhibition features 34 of Scott’s neckpieces, including a collaboration with noted jeweler Art Smith, three beaded wall hangings, and 13 glass sculptures, most of which were created since 2009. Navigating controversial themes including hunger, rape, and racial stereotypes, Scott’s jewelry transcends the typical function of adornment and embellishment. Through March 15. Museum of Arts and Design, 2 Columbus Circle, 212.299.7777, madmuseum.org.

Jeffrey Spencer Hargrave, Nails, 2014. Acrylic on paper, 12 x 16 inches.

GREAT ESCAPE The Bronx Museum of the Arts is hosting Escape Route: Paintings and Drawings by Jeffrey Spencer Hargrave, featuring a selection of works created by the New York-based artist from 2011 to 2014. Since 1998, Hargrave has produced a compelling, deeply personal body of work incorporating painting, drawing, sculpture, and video that explores the dynamics between race, sexuality, and religion in relation to his upbringing in the south and early adulthood as an African American gay male coming to terms with racial and sexual identity. February 12– May 31. Bronx Museum of the Arts, 1040 Grand Concourse, 718.681.6000, bronxmuseum.org.

Left: Joyce J. Scott, White Tongue, 2013. Hand-blown Murano glass processes with beads and thread, 30 x 8 x 13 inches. Courtesy of Goya Contemporary. Photo: Michael Koryta. Right: Joyce J. Scott, Eve Became the Apple, Serpent Impressed Swallowed Adam. Glass beads and thread. Courtesy of Mobilia Gallery, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

It’s Only Everything From the Museum of the City of New York, Everything Is Design: The Work of Paul Rand features more than 150 advertisements, posters, corporate brochures, and books by this master of American design. Rand believed that visual language should integrate form and function, and he creatively brought European avant-garde art movements such as Cubism and Constructivism to U.S. graphic design. Born in Brooklyn, he launched his career in the 1930s with magazine cover design and then worked as an art director on Madison Avenue, where he helped revolutionize the advertising profession. He later served as design consultant to leading corporations such as IBM, ABC, United Parcel Service, and Steve Jobs' NeXT, and many of his logos are still in use today. His visually stimulating, yet problem-solving, approach to graphic design attracted devoted admirers during his own lifetime and he remains influential today. February 25–July 19. Museum of the City of New York, 1220 Fifth Avenue, 212.534.1672, mcny.org. Left: Sparkle and Spin: A Book About Words, book designed by Paul Rand and written by Ann Rand, 1957. Private Collection. Right: Coronet Brandy magazine advertisement, 1948. Private Collection. FEB MAR

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CultureCalendar Early Transformers

The gallery’s north terrace with Pedro S. de Movellàn’s Ecliptic.

In Becoming Another: The Power of Masks, the Rubin Museum of Art is delving into their significance to peoples across the globe. The exhibit highlights masks and costumes from across the globe, including Siberia, the Himalayas, Mongolia, Japan, and the Northwest Coast of America. Featuring nearly 100 masks ranging from the 15th through 20th centuries, the showcase is organized around three predominant cultural practices—shamanism, communal ritual, and theatrical performance. The shaman medium uses a mask to communicate with or take on the identity of a supernatural entity. Masks are also an important aspect of storytelling, whether in oral tradition or theatrical performance. The exhibition will explore the juxtapositions created by these diverse functions, and guide visitors through a geographic and function-focused narrative. Several small groupings of masks explore cross-cultural similarities and differences in both form and type. The exhibition also features a shaman’s costume, an oracle costume, and a Cham dance costume, each paired with corresponding masks. March 13, 2015–February 8, 2016. Rubin Museum of Art, 150 West 17th Street, 212.620.5000, rubinmuseum.org.

Getting Kinetic Maxwell Davidson Gallery and Davidson Contemporary opened their new bi-level Chelsea gallery in early November. Designed by Murdock Solon Architects, the space features a classic gallery on the ninth floor, which is uniquely filled with natural light from a skylight 20 feet above. One of its inaugural exhibitions is Contour: New Kinetic Sculpture, by Pedro S. de Movellàn. With indoor and outdoor work on display, the exhibition shows why De Movellàn has been one of the greatest contemporary kinetic sculptors in the world for over 20 years. Through March. Davidson Gallery, 521 West 26th Street, 212.759.7555, davidsongallery.com.

Raven Mask. Kwakwaka'wakw, 1801–1900. Wood, pigment, cedar bark. Collection of the Brooklyn Museum.

Tooling Around

Above: Hansen Writing Ball (Commercial), designed by Rasmus Malling-Hansen (Danish, 1835–1890), 1878. Brass, ferrous alloy, and paper, 9 x 8 3/4 x 8 inches. On deposit from Wyckoff, Seamans & Benedict, Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of American History, Washington, D.C. Photo: Hugh Talman, Smithsonian Institution.

Right: Sextant and Case, ca. 1865, manufactured by Charles Frodsham & Company (Liverpool, England). Sextant: brass, silver, glass (10 11/16 x 12 1/2 x 4 3/16 inches); case: mahogany, brass, felt (11 3/16 x 13 x 4 3/4 inches). Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of American History, Washington, D.C. Photo: Hugh Talman, Smithsonian Institution.

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One of the Cooper–Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum’s post-renovation opening exhibits is About Tools: Extending Our Reach. This full-floor showcase includes objects that span 1.85 million years of tool use and design. The exhibit explores how we all use tools—to work, measure, communicate, observe, and survive. Tools extend the human body—augmenting our ordinary grasp and power, extending the limits of our senses, sometimes even serving as substitutes (in the case of prostheses). Some tools break into our lives as radical innovations, whereas many others have remained almost unchanged in form and function for centuries. Selected from 10 Smithsonian collections, the 175 objects in the exhibit span diverse cultures, places, and time periods. Highlights on view include an artificial heart, a Braille typewriter, a WWII escape map, Eskimo snow goggles carved from fossil ivory, a hand chopper made from volcanic rock, a live feed of the sun transmitted by an orbiting satellite, and a 3-D printer that can operate in zero gravity. Through May 25. Cooper–Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, 2 East 91st Street, 212.849.8400, cooperhewitt.org.


Digital Enclosures The New Museum’s Triennial is the only recurring international exhibition in New York City devoted to early-career artists from around the world. Using issues around social media to provide a point of departure for the exhibition, the event’s third iteration is titled Surround Audience, which will feature 51 artists and artist collectives from more than 25 countries. Many of the works were commissioned specifically for the show. The exhibition encompasses a variety of artistic practices, including sound, dance, comedy, poetry, installation, sculpture, painting, video, and one online talk show. Together these works speak to a newfound elasticity in our understanding of what mediums constitute contemporary art. February 25–May 24. New Museum, 35 Bowery, 212.219.1222, newmuseum.org.

Mabel Dwight,
Danse Macabre, 1934.
Lithograph,
11 3/8 x 15 3/4 inches.
Mary and Leigh Block Museum of Art, Northwestern University.

Turn to the Left Presented by the Grey Art Gallery at New York University, The Left Front: Radical Art in the “Red Decade,” 1929–1940 is devoted to American art in the decade following the stock market crash of 1929. With 100 works by 40 artists, the exhibit examines the crucial moment in American history when artists took to their printing presses (and brushes and cameras) amid the economic and social devastation brought on by the Great Depression. Joining forces with writers and intellectuals, these men and women—who came together at the progressive John Reed Club, founded in New York City directly after the crash— were dedicated to creating work that tackled a range of socially conscious themes, including class struggle, labor organizing, immigration, socialist mysticism, utopian communities, racial justice, and the Spanish Civil War. The show features primarily prints, as well as drawings and watercolors, paintings, posters, photographs, books, film footage, and ephemera by artists ranging from Mabel Dwight to Louis Lozowick, Reginald Marsh, John Sloan, and Raphael Soyer. Through April 4. Grey Art Gallery, New York University, 100 Washington Square East, 212.998.6780, nyu.edu/greyart.

Left Top: Geumhyung Jeong, 7 Ways, 2009. Performance: Festival Bo:m 2009, Seoul, Korea. Courtesy the artist. Photo: Woonshik Lee. Left Bottom: Shreyas Karle, He-She Object from the “Museum Shop of Fetish Objects” series, 2012. Silicon object, dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Project 88, Mumbai, India. Right: Verena Dengler, Laura 1 & Laura 2, 2013. Two parts—wooden plinth, metal plate, Laura Ashley wallpaper, and embroidery, 78 3/4 x 11 7/8 x 11 7/8 inches and 39 3/8 x 7 5/8 x 10 5/8 inches. Courtesy the artist and Galerie Meyer Kainer, Vienna, Austria. Photo: Marcel Koehler.

FEMALE PERSPECTIVEs The Brooklyn Museum is presenting Chitra Ganesh: Eyes of Time, which centers on a monumental mural that takes Kali, the Hindu goddess of destruction and rebirth, and other figures from Judy Chicago’s The Dinner Party as starting points for portraying female power and plurality. The Brooklyn-based artist expands on this theme by showcasing works from the museum’s Egyptian, Indian, and contemporary collections. For more than a decade, Ganesh has used the iconography of mythology, literature, and popular culture to bring to light feminist and queer narratives. For this contemporary meditation on Kali, Ganesh will bring together her surreal compositional style with the fearsome physical embodiment of the multi-limbed, three-eyed, wild-haired goddess who has long stood in contrast to norms of ideal femininity. She has also selected works from the Brooklyn Museum’s encyclopedic collection that expand on the theme of female power and multiplicity. Through July 12. Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art, Herstory Gallery, 4th Floor, Brooklyn Museum, 200 Eastern Parkway, 718.638.5000, brooklynmuseum.org. Chitra Ganesh, Eyes of Time, 2014. Mixed-media wall mural. Courtesy of the artist and Gallery Wendi Norris, San Francisco. Photo: Jonathan Dorado, Brooklyn Museum.

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Books Charlotte Moss: Garden Inspirations

Geoffrey Bennison: Master Decorator

Ian Schrager: Design

40 Years of Fabulous: The Kips Bay Decorator Show House

Charlotte Moss Rizzoli April 2015 288 pages, $50

Gillian Newberry Rizzoli March 2015 208 pages, $60

Ian Schrager Rizzoli April 2015 288 pages, $75

Stephen Stolman Gibbs Smith May 2015 256 pages, $75

Garden Inspirations marks the ninth book for Array Magazine cover girl and interior designer Charlotte Moss. The garden is both a muse and place of refuge for the decorating doyenne and she details the many ways readers can find inspiration both indoors and out. Providing a firsthand tour of her own gardens in East Hampton, Moss gives tips on how to bring your own outdoor surroundings into the home. Flower arrangements directly from the garden, table settings, garden seating, and color schemes drawn from nature are just a few of the lessons she details. A seasoned traveler, Moss also shares insights from the many private and public gardens she has visited all over the world. Gardens of inspirational stylemakers past and present are also showcased. The book is a beautiful visual tour of objects and elements, and blossoms and bouquets, plus decorating tips accompanied by the designer’s personal narrative.

The work of the late English design legend Geoffrey Bennison is honored in this aptly named tome, Geoffrey Bennison: Master Decorator. Best known for his opulent yet comfortable interiors that evoke a touch of drama, the painter and stage designer turned interior designer and antiques dealer designed for a very tony international clientele who loved his theatrical sensibilities. The book represents the first monograph for the acclaimed designer who passed away in 1984 and gave the design world the inventive colors Prussian Blue and Red Riding Hood. From his early days at the Slade School of Art and the heady days of London in the swinging ’60s to his later career as a designer and dealer, Bennison’s interiors from country estates, townhouses, and apartments are lavishly featured.

Entrepreneur, hotel, and real estate developer Ian Schrager is perhaps best known as the co-founder of the legendary Studio 54, the ’80s mythical playground of the rich and famous. Also known as a visionary, the designer’s unique touch on the Delano, Morgan, Mondrian, and Gramercy Park Hotels (the latter in collaboration with painter Julian Schnabel) are also part of his legacy as the creator of the boutique hotel. His hotel work leaves an indelible impression on visitors and his concept of hotel-as-lifestyle continues with his partnership with Marriott International. Ian Schrager: Design covers four decades of the acclaimed designer’s work that also includes restaurants, clubs, and residential buildings such as 40 Bond Street and 50 Gramercy Park North. Never-before-seen images from his hotels along with stories from designers he has collaborated with—John Pawson, Philippe Starck, and Jacques Herzog—make this a must-read.

Perhaps Charlotte Moss summed it up when she said, “Kips Bay is the pinnacle of showhouses.” For interior designer and architects, it’s the Academy Awards of design, and for design aficionados a mustsee New York City event that benefits the Kips Bay Boys and Girls Club. Each year, talented interior designers and architects transform a luxury Manhattan mansion into some of the most beautiful rooms ever conceived. 40 Years of Fabulous: The Kips Bay Decorator Show House celebrates these spectacular spaces, providing an insider’s look at the history while presenting the best of the best. Penned by designer, style maker, and former president of Scalamandré Stephen Stolman (author of Scalamandré: Haute Décor), the book revisits some of the standout interiors that set the trends and the gold standard in interior design.

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By Cathy Whitlock

A retrospective of the Kips Bay Show House and an architect’s take on the design process are a few of the books featured this spring.

What If…?: The Architecture and Design of David Rockwell

Dreamhouse: Interiors by Penny Drue Baird

India Hicks: Island Style

Windsor Smith Homefront: Designs for Modern Living

David Rockwell and Justin Davidson Metropolis Books January 2015 352 pages, $45

Penny Drue Baird The Monacelli Press April 2015 200 pages, $50

India Hicks Rizzoli March 2015 224 pages, $45

Windsor Smith Rizzoli April 2015 256 pages, $50

Founder of the Rockwell Group, David Rockwell is one of the leading architects, interior, and theatrical set designers working on the scene today. For the past 30 years, his award-winning designs have redefined the worlds of Broadway (Kinky Books and Hairspray), Hollywood (set designs for the Academy Awards), restaurants (Nobu 57 and TAO Downtown), TED theater (Vancouver), and Jamie Oliver’s traveling Food Revolution truck, to name a diverse few. Driven by a continual curiosity (hence the name of the book What If?), Rockwell posts questions such as “What if you could step inside a crystal goblet?” “What if your ultimate escape fantasy was real?” “What if the bellhop was a robot?” Through images and backstage details, the celebrated architect provides ingenious, highly creative solutions, revealing his outside-thebox thought process—exactly what we have come to expect from this unique, one-of-a-kind designer.

Dreamhouse marks designer and Francophile Penny Drue Baird’s third book following the highly successful Bringing Paris Home and The New French Interior. The internationally renowned designer is known for her sophisticated Europeaninfused interiors influenced by her travels (she divides her time between her firm Dessins in New York and her outpost in Paris) and has been a fixture on Architectural Digest’s Top 100 Architects and Designers for the past 20 years. The beautifully illustrated book features a wide array of Baird’s work from an elegant pied a terré in Palm Beach, a Mediterranean style estate in Beverly Hills, and a modern contemporary abode on Park Avenue to various city, country, classic, historical, and suburban styled interiors. The legendary designer Mario Buatta penned the book’s foreword.

Former Array Magazine cover girl India Hicks explores the bohemian decorating style that made her famous in her latest book India Hicks: Island Style. Born into British and design royalty (Lady Pamela Mountbatten and designer David Hicks were the former model’s parents), Hicks renovated several plantation style houses and opened a hotel in the Caribbean with partner David Flint, and a style was born. Her carefree look is both timeless and notably understated and has drawn a legion of fans. Combining British colonial formality with the colors and light-handed touches of the Caribbean, Hicks shares her thoughts on a variety of decorating subjects in the book’s ten chapters. From a primer on how to live with collections, repurposing, and creating a sanctuary to tablescaping, designing porches, and making the bedroom a place of “self-expression,” there is something for everyone.

Named one of Veranda Magazine’s “Top 25 Influencers,” California interior designer Windsor Smith’s Homefront marks her first foray into publishing. Founder and creator of Windsor Smith Home, the designer’s casually elegant yet modern sensibilities have garnered a following of the elite in the business and entertainment worlds along with a fabric and rug collection with Kravet and Arteriors Home, and a furniture collection at Century. Smith is coined as a traditionalist whose look is often described as “unbuttoned elegance, like a taffeta dress worn with bare feet.” The designer shares her unique philosophy on the art of creating a Windsor Smith interior with ideas on how to combine belongings with treasures from the past to reflect where we came from to repurposing often unused dining rooms. Actress Gwyneth Paltrow wrote the book’s foreword.

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Trove 01

By Jim Lochner

Spring into the season with goodies for your garden, living room, and kitchen.

Deer Me Nothing says spring like a crimped garden hose lying on the ground collecting dirt. And though winter has passed, you can still spruce up your garden with this sleek Reindeer Garden Hose Set. Made from brass, aluminum, and plastic, the golden hose, nozzle, and wall mount are all dirt-repellent. Hose: 130 feet, nozzle: 5 inches, mount: 9.25 inches H x 30 inches W. $898 anthropologie.com.

03 02 Say Cheese Decorative and educational, this charming Charted Cheese Wheel Platter will make you and your dinner party guests frommage experts. Made from scratch-resistant melamine, the platter is adorned with 65 hand-illustrated cheeses from around the world, sorted by parent animal and texture. 16 inches diameter. $36 popchartlab.com

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Fruit Loop Who says bowls have to be perfectly round? Inspired by the Fibonacci curve seen throughout nature, this unique fruit bowl is made from a single piece of freeflowing chromed steel wire that has been welded together in a seamless, invisible way so that there is no beginning and no end. 5.12 inches H x 10.43 inches D. $56 thestore.madmuseum.org.


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Snap Shot Whether you’re looking to be the next Ansel Adams or Margaret Bourke-White, real shutterbugs wear leather—leather straps that is. This Moore & Giles Leather Camera Strap is made of supple leather that is dyed a rich color that achieves a beautiful patina as it ages. The contrasting leather adjustable straps and substantially sized shoulder pad conform to your dimensions, while the aged hardware gives the entire piece an earthy, vintage feel. $145 modernanthology.com

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Old Flame The first thing you notice about these candles is the unique vintage tin can container, which uses a special aging process to give it that distressed look. The candles themselves are made of 100 percent soy wax, hand-poured in Mississippi. They burn 50 hours and use pure cotton wicks. A variety of scents are available, but we’re partial to the sea cottage smells mixed with geranium and amber in Calone 17. $60 lelabofragrances.com

Cook the Books While there are numerous solutions on the market to keep your tablet out of harm’s way in the kitchen, we’re partial to the iPrep Tablet Holder. Made of BPA-free plastic, the iPrep has four viewing angles and a stable weighted base. You can use your tablet in portrait or landscape mode and the stylus keeps the screen clean from messy hands. When you’re done, the iPrep folds down and the stylus slides into the hinge for easy storage. Available in white or black. 6.69 inches D x 5.76 inches W x 1.2 inches H. $24.99 prepara.com.

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Bottled Up These charming handmade apothecary bottles are simplicity itself—and simply beautiful. Finished with a thick clear glaze that allows the porcelain to shine through, the design has been applied with gold luster. The ceramic stopper, also glazed with a matte metallic black, keeps things watertight. The bottle is food and dishwasher safe, though hand washing is recommended because of the gold luster. 5 inches tall. $48 michelevarian.com

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By Catherine McHugh

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A L L IN THE FAMILY six family-run New York Design Center showrooms with design in their DNA offer singular legacies of style

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he stately building at Lexington Avenue was originally built in 1926 by industry visionaries as the New York Furniture Exchange to serve as a wholesale outlet. A model of efficiency, it offered a revolutionary new way of shopping for busy professionals by putting everything only an elevator ride away instead of having to traipse all over town. In 1981, to reflect the industry’s evolution to more comprehensive interior design, the building was renamed the New York Design Center. Today, its 100-plus showrooms feature more than 300 lines of furniture, lighting, floor and wall coverings, fabrics, and decorative accessories. Six of these—Apropos, Cliff Young Ltd., Dennis Miller Associates, Kravet, Louis J. Solomon, and the Saladino Group—are at the Design Center’s roots. Representing avant-garde, contemporary innovations as well as classic creations, these multi-generational names help anchor the Design Center’s commitment to remaining at the forefront of design. As New York-based designer John Lyle notes: “I have shopped all of these showrooms for many years. The New York Design Center is a destination for every design project I do, and it just gets better and better.”

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Kravet & Sons begins selling fabric Samuel Kravet opens trimming shop

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1921

Hal Meadoff opens White Fine Furniture showroom (Apropos)

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1926

Kravet opens first warehouse on the Lower East Side

KRAVET

Family of Fabrics

Since its founding nearly 100 years ago, Kravet has remained family owned and operated. The company is currently in its fourth generation of leadership, which includes Samuel Kravet’s great grandchildren—Cary Kravet (along with wife Lisa), Ellen Kravet, and Scott Kravet— who oversee all aspects of the business. The family’s commitment to innovation and strategic acquisitions have helped the company transform from a small fabric house to a global leader, representing brands and designers from all over the world. Of course, as Kravet’s Director of Brand Marketing Victoria Corea notes, the world of manufacturing has changed in many significant ways throughout the decades. Digital printing 20

1930

New York Furniture Exchange opens

Samuel Kravet of S. Kravet & Sons.

Samuel Kravet started off his career as a tailor to New York City’s wealthy community. In 1918, he opened Kravet, Inc., where he began selling trimmings and eventually fabric out of his shop on New York City’s Lower East Side.

Louis J. Solomon, Inc., opens in Harlem

and computer technology have transformed the way fabric is created and produced, which leads to cost savings for the customer and much quicker turnaround time. Although design trends come and go, Kravet has certainly been around for several cycles of each style. “The company essentially began as a trimmings shop,” explains Corea. “The declining popularity of decorative tassels and trims through the years led the company to diversify its product offerings, adding fabric, furniture, carpet, wall coverings, and more.

However, every decade or

so, designers rediscover their love of decorative trimmings and we are delighted to expand our offerings to accommodate them.

The same thing

is happening currently with wallpaper.”

Today, in addition to its showroom in the New York Design Center, Kravet has more then 100 domestic and international showrooms, as well as corporate offices in Bethpage, New York, and Canada.


Louis J. Solomon warehouse moves to Gramercy Park

Kravet Fabrics, Inc., establishes showrooms nationwide and distribution becomes worldwide

Leonard Weisbrot and Ralph Atkinson purchase Louis J. Solomon when Solomon retires

1964

1968

1970

Young musician Albert Azzolina founds Cliff Young Ltd.

Cliff young ltd. Born to Design

Founded in 1968 by young Italian musician Alberto Azzolina, Cliff Young Ltd. has been designing award-winning furniture and interiors for more than 46 years. After serving in the army, Azzolina’s show business background prompted him to change his name to Cliff Young.

The changing—and enduring—look of the New York Design Center.

“He simplified its lines and detailing while adding sophistication; he was always experimenting with new finishes and unexpected combinations of materials.”

Since she was five years old, Leslie Azzolina has been constantly at her father’s side in the showroom, practically growing up amid design presentations, furniture sketches and renderings. She formally joined the firm in 1988 and started making her mark by infusing a higher sensibility in terms of the changing lifestyle trends impacting the furniture business. Cliff’s retirement and Leslie’s takeover of the company in 2001 was hampered by the tragic events of 9/11. But Cliff Young Ltd. became known for establishing a hot new trend in custom home theater cabinetry, the epitome of hand-made luxury in home furnishings, and the ultimate in marrying contemporary design with function, comfort, luxury and constant innovation.

Young’s early furniture collections featured a vibrant take on the art-deco style, with highgloss exotic veneers, opulent curves, and an overall dramatic flair that came through his otherwise simple, minimal designs.

In 2011, as the industry was struggling to regroup after the recession, Leslie undertook a major renovation of the showroom, completely renewing and refreshing the showroom look and the Cliff Young Signature Collection.

“From the early ’70s through the late ’90s, Young constantly refined the collection’s style,” explains Marketing Director Iliada Bass.

Today, Isabella, Leslie’s and Chris Zarra’s daughter, is establishing the company’s third generation of stylish leadership. FEB MAR

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Louis J. Solomon launches a successful line of antique reproduction hand-carved wood dining and occasional chairs, done mostly in Louis XV and Louis XVI styles

1971

New York Furniture Exchange becomes New York Design Center Dennis Miller Associates founded

1980s 1981

1984

John F. Saladino designs the Saladino Lamp, an essential piece in design for its elegance and similarity

Saladino Group

Like Father, Like Son

John F. Saladino established Saladino Furniture, Inc., in October 1987, and the company’s Design Center showroom is currently run by Graham Saladino. Often referred to as the designers’ designer, John Saladino’s timeless work continues his philosophy of mixing “old with new” and appeals to both traditional and modern clients. As early as 1968, he created rooms with brown coat plaster walls juxtaposed with polished surfaces, such as stainless steel ceilings. Saladino also created furniture collections for Dunbar, Bloomingdale’s, and Baker Knapp & Tubbs. His innovative use of couture details, such as channel and harlequin quilting, ruching, and exquisite production continue to attract clients and interior designers. “We opened with 60 pieces of furniture, sofas, chairs and love seats, as well as tables and lamps,” says Jane Seamon of the Design Services division. “Saladino Furniture was in 1987.”

is timeless and is as relevant today as it

Saladino Furniture’s tufted Cube Sofa makes its debut this spring.

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Kravet Inc. opens showroom at 200 Lex

White Fine Furniture becomes Apropos Cliff Young Ltd. opens showroom at 200 Lex

1985

ca.

1986 Apropos

1920s to 2020s and Beyond Apropos is a fourth-generation showroom that has made catering to the design industry its business for decades. The company is run by President Jordan Greenberg, whose great grandfather Hal Meadoff represented White Fine Furniture when the New York Furniture Exchange was built. “When my grandfather took over the business, my mother, Gail Meadoff, moved the family up from Florida to help out and she worked for White Fine Furniture for many years,” Greenberg explains. After the building became the New York Design Center and Greenberg’s grandfather had passed away, she created Apropos, Inc., over 30 years ago.

Hal Meadoff (right) awards Bill Flogel (left) with the 28th recipient of the A.S. Meadoff Award for Sportsmanship. Named for Hal’s father, the award is still presented at the annual GMFA golf outing and represents fair play, social consciousness, and support of humane and philanthropic causes.

1987

1988

Saladino Furniture, Inc. established

John F. Saladino designs the Tripod Pull-Up Table, one of four in the Tripod Series

“Apropos was the first of its kind as it had an eclectic product offering without everything being a ‘set,’” Greenberg says. “We carried all products for the home—living room, dining room, lighting, etc. Our roots were a combination of country French and country English antique reproductions with true antiques in the mix.” The showroom has evolved to a more transitional mix of today’s “contemporary” design. “We have partnered with leaders in the furniture business such as Lee Industries and American Leather, both of which are certified ‘green’ manufacturers as we are concerned with our carbon footprint’s effect on future generations. We also offer custom installations as well as designers on staff who can draft layouts or floor plans—the works.” “Certainly business has changed and even our location from the main floor has moved,” Greenberg concludes, “but we keep the same family values in our business.”

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Steven and Michael Weisbrot purchase Louis J. Solomon from their father

1991

1992

Dennis Miller begins working with Wendell Castle

1994

1995

ca.

Dennis Miller introduces the Gibby Lounge Chair by T.H. Robsjohn-Gibbings Kravet Fabrics, Inc., develops Kravet Furniture


The Harley Chair, designed by John F. Saladino, is one of many chairs from Saladino Furniture

Dennis Miller Associates Art Meets Architecture In 1984, Dennis Miller founded Dennis Miller Associates. Today, both designers and consumers are welcomed at the elegant 7,000-square-foot showroom in Suite 1210 of the Design Center. Miller, an architect, began by opening his own small “family business,” offering handcrafted furniture by artisans— also known as art furniture. “I was in a partnership with an interior designer and since I was always interested in industrial, product, and furniture design, I wanted to present hand-crafted furniture to the interior designers,” Miller explains. The company is dedicated to providing trendsetting, luxurious design created by the best of today’s designers, as well as specific

The classic Madame X Bench, designed by Craig Jackson, has been a favorite at Dennis Miller Associates since 1992.

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20th-century design classics. The company also represents a bigger family of cutting-edge contemporary American designers whose works are nationally known for their innovative materials and design concepts. The company’s product line has evolved from a very limited number of art/craft furniture and production to residential and contract furniture, lighting, and rugs. “We have always maintained a high degree of designer-driven and artisan-made products,” Miller says. “Evaluating new furniture designs and collections is an ongoing process for me.”


Dennis Miller introduces furniture by Morris Lapidus, including the Lincoln Chair designed for Miami Beach’s Sans Souci Hotel (1949) Louis J. Solomon warehouse moves to Hauppage, New York

1995 2001

Dennis Miller introduces the Sizzle Coffee Table by Wendell Castle

2005 2006

2015

Louis J. Solomon showroom opens in New York Design Center and warehouse moves to Plainview, New York

Louis J.Solomon

Carving a Path to the Finish

Louis J. Solomon first opened the eponymous Louis J. Solomon, Inc., in 1930 in Harlem. Solomon was an Italian furniture manufacturer’s representative who travelled the country selling unfinished, hand-carved wooden residential furniture frames to furniture trade companies, finishers, and upholsterers. In 1964, Solomon moved the warehouse to Gramercy Park. In 1995, the warehouse moved again to Plainview, New York, while the showroom opened in the New York Design Center. In 2001, the warehouse moved once again to Hauppauge, New York, and both of these locations remain open today. The firm has changed hands from one family to the next. Leonard Weisbrot and Ralph Atkinson, who began working with Louis J. Solomon in the late 1950s, purchased the company in 1964 when Solomon retired. In 1992, when Weisbrot and Atkinson retired, Weisbrot’s sons—Steven and Michael—purchased the company and remain the current owners. “For

most of its history,

Louis J. Solomon, Inc.,

“In 1992, Louis J. Solomon, Inc., began finishing and upholstering furniture in-house. Each piece is fully customized according to the client’s specifications. All finishes and upholstery are applied by hand, utilizing hand-tied coil springs for the upholstery. In the past 10 years, Louis J. Solomon, Inc., has greatly expanded to include many transitional and contemporary offerings in the line, in addition to retaining the traditional styles.”

Today, the New York Design Center continues to provide more than just convenience; it provides continuity and community, with manufacturers and designers able to meet, exchange ideas, and come together to support both the industry and many worthwhile charities, year after year. And that is an even larger family legacy.

Antique reproduction hand-carved wood dining and occasional chairs, like this Louis XVI Armchair (show here in a Tuscany finish), have been part of the Louis J. Solomon line since the 1980s.

has

been known for traditional, antique reproductions of hand-carved wooden residential furniture,” explains customer service representative Jessica Pond.

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By Cathy Whitlock

reimagining BRUCE WaYNE's

gotham Set decorator Andrew Baseman

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The design of the three-story Gotham Police precinct was influenced by London’s St. Pancras train station as well as old cathedrals and prisons.

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M

anhattan is one of the most inimitable and clearly identifiable film sets to ever grace the silver screen. Whether it’s portrayed as the urban setting of Rear Window, the mean streets of Taxi Driver, or the mythical surrounds of Ghostbusters and Batman, the glamour and grit of the city presents a unique challenge in film design. The Big Apple gets another screen interpretation as the fictional city known as Batman’s Gotham in the hit Fox television drama of the same name. The popular series takes a new twist on the age-old story of the origins of a young Bruce Wayne, an idealistic rookie detective James Gordon, and the rise of the archvillains Catwoman, the Joker, the Riddler, and the Penguin against the backdrop of a dark, decayed, and crime-riddled city. Decorating the stylized settings of this timeless universe fell to set decorator Andrew Baseman (who worked with production designer Doug Kraner). “The overall look of Gotham is dark and gloomy, with gray tones and rich saturated colors. You will see very little bright or pastel colors on the show,” he explains. “We have purposefully left the period vague, hovering somewhere between the late 1970s and early 1980s but incorporating elements of Fritz Lang’s 1920s Metropolis, 1940s film noir, and [Martin] Scorcese’s iconic 1970s NYC-based films. Contemporary cars and electronics are not seen, nor are current design fads or trendy color palettes. Our show has a responsibility to provide a new and exciting interpretation of iconic characters and their environments, seen and loved by the public since the late 1930s.” One of the most iconic sets is the young Caped Crusader’s childhood home, Wayne Manor. Built in 1914, the neo-Jacobean-style country estate of Standard Oil’s Herbert L. Pratt (now the home of the Webb Institute) in Long Island’s Glen Cove was featured in the show’s pilot and later constructed on a soundstage (as is often the case). “Wayne Manor has been my favorite set to work on, as I love decorating upscale, classic rooms filled with beautiful antiques and rich details,” says baseman. “The room itself is exquisitely designed with tall ceilings, warm wood tones, intricate carvings, and a grand stone fireplace. The furnishings are a mix of English, French, and American pieces, which have been in the Wayne family for generations. I grew up watching and loving the original Batman series on television so I added a few iconic items as an homage, including a suit of armor and a bust of Shakespeare above the mantle. The bust (as seen on the original show) sits on a desk and is the means for accessing the Bat-Poles by tilting the head back and pushing a red button. As a young boy, I always wanted one of those in my room!” Much of the drama’s action takes place at the impressive three-story Gotham City Police Precinct and was influenced by the designs of modern-day police headquarters, London’s St. Pancras station, decayed cathedrals, and defunct prisons made of cold iron and stone. “As large as the set is, we are constantly adding to it in almost every episode,” notes Baseman. “There are over one dozen desks throughout the vast space and I try to give a unique personality to each. Some desks are neat and orderly, such as Gordon’s, and others are not, as reflected by Bullock’s mess and clutter.” While the set decorator often represents the more glamorous industry counterpart to the interior designer, both fields apply many of the same disciplines and business practices yet they could not be more different. The hours are often long, the work is stressful and hard, and the client is a producer with often inflexible deadlines and a limited budget. “The biggest design challenge I have is to get all of the work done within the confines of a demanding schedule, finding very specific items in a short amount of time,” Baseman says. “Luckily, we get the outlines and scripts early enough so we have an idea of what sets there will be for the upcoming episodes. But many things, like having custom drapery made, cannot be started until locations are found or sets are built, which sometimes results in my fabricators doing the work overnight.

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Baseman used antique finds and tufted leather sofas for the wood-paneled library of Wayne Manor.


While the methodology and tasks are often the same, “hurry up and wait” is the order of the day as a set is quickly constructed for a scene that may take hours or days to shoot and then is immediately dismantled. Working with a team that includes a production designer, art director, set dressers, and artisans, Baseman concludes, “Oftentimes I only have a couple of days to create the same look that I would have up to six months time creating for an interior design project. In both cases, the rooms have to be functional and filled with furniture, lighting, rugs, wallpaper, artwork, hardware, drapes, and accent pieces. The main difference is that the work I do as a set decorator is ephemeral, whereas my interior design projects

are longer lasting. Nothing gives me greater joy than to visit one of my client’s homes to see that they are still living in and enjoying the environment I helped create for them. And nothing makes me sadder than to see a film set that I worked so hard on end up in a dumpster soon after the director yells, ‘CUT!’” Film aficionados have no doubt seen a Baseman-designed interior on his various film and television projects, which include The Americans, HBO’s The Normal Heart, Kinsey, and The Nanny Diaries, to name a few.

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It’s not easy to make the move from working as an interior designer to set decorator, as you must first become a member of a union to do so. The best way to make the move is to work as an art department PA (production assistant) on a film or television series and make connections. If you are talented, you will be noticed.

” Top left: Set decorator and interior designer Andrew Baseman. Photographed by Kelly Campbell. Top right: French artist Jacques-Louis David’s Oath of the Horatii was replicated for the Wayne Manor library. Bottom: Crime boss Fish Mooney’s nightclub (originally designed for the pilot by set decorator Regina Graves) was decorated in the character’s red signature color with lots of dramatic lighting.

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For Baseman, the road to interior design and set decoration began at the age of 11 when he was allowed to choose new furnishings and update an entire bedroom. “I had lived with drab Johnny Appleseed patterned curtains for five years and enough was enough. I was surrounded with lovely old things starting at an early age, as my parents collected, and eventually dealt in, antiques. As far as I knew, everyone grew up with antiques. Until one day I visited a friend’s split-level house, completely furnished in Danish Modern—I suddenly realized there was a world out there beyond Chippendale and Queen Anne. But even at an early age, my taste was more The Addams Family and less Brady Bunch.”

and create asymmetrical burgundy velvet drapes for a 15-foot-wide window. It was my first interior design project and photos of my work ended up in The World of Interiors, which was exciting for me.”

Armed with a background in theater design (set design apprentice at the Berkshire Theatre Festival in Stockbridge, Massachusetts) and a BFA from Carnegie Mellon in set and costume design, Baseman moved to New York after college and found work assisting Broadway designers, commercials, and non-union television shows. His first big break came when he landed a job as assistant set decorator on Rocket Gibraltar (notable as actor Burt Lancaster’s last film role). Work as a set decorator on the film Jeffrey soon followed. “The screenwriter, Paul Rudnick, asked me to help decorate his home, which I was thrilled to do,” the Manhattan-based designer says. “His taste was pure Gothic so I proceeded to order hand-printed Pugin wallpaper, design faux heraldic banners with antique fabrics,

Writing is also a talent that grew out of a synchronistic film moment when he purchased a 1950s silk scarf that was signed by Charles Addams and decorated with characters from The Addams Family. “I hung it as a painting in my dorm room and it later became the inspiration for my first book, The Scarf [Stewart, Tabori & Chang, 1989]. I soon realized [I needed] to keep my eyes and mind open at all times, as you never know when inspiration will strike!” Baseman’s childhood passion for antiques and collectibles proves the old adage that all things come full circle with his unique blog Past Imperfect: The Art of Inventive Repair, which covers the world of antiques brought back to life before the time of Krazy Glue.

Like many set decorators, Baseman did double duty and eventually opened up his own interior design business in Manhattan in 2004. “It grew out of producers asking me to work on their own homes and I realized I enjoyed designing environments for ‘real people’ as much as for scripted characters,” he says. “Although after a few projects, I discovered that many of the fictitious characters were more ‘real’ than some of my clients!”

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By Cathy Whitlock

Chinoiserie wallpaper and mirrored fretwork bring life to a dining room designed by Charlotte Moss.

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Design THE CREATIVE LIFE OF CELEBRATED MANHATTAN DESIGNER CHARLOTTE MOSS

he seeds of a successful interior design career are planted in a variety of places. For Charlotte Moss, her fertile ground just happened to be Wall Street. In 1985 Moss faced the proverbial fork in the road. Her career on Wall Street was in jeopardy when her firm was acquired by another financial institution. Fielding job offers in companies that were low on female executives, she realized she would have to prove herself all over again in the “boy’s club.” So the southern-bred Moss headed to the beach, wrote a business plan, and “plotted her escape.” Possessing an incurable case of curiosity fueled by a passion for design (so much so that it became the title of her interior design book decades later), Moss promptly headed for England, loaded up a container of antiques, opened up a shop in her townhouse, and a career was born. “One of my old bosses on Wall Street hired me followed by Sue Bloomberg (now the ex-wife of the former New York Mayor Michael). I designed the top two floors of her town house (Jamie Drake designed the bottom) and that is how it all started,” she says of those heady Bonfire of the Vanities days. “It was all good timing. It was the eighties, everyone was flush and the times were in sync with my look.” For Moss, best known for her unique blend of American, European, and Classical sensibilities, design and retail represented new challenges. Eventually Moss settled her shop and design business on the Upper East Side where her hand-painted canopy beds, sea coral-patterned trays, and chintz-covered slipper chairs found a loyal following. Interior and product designer and author Charlotte Moss.

I am a merchant at heart and pretty sure I was on the tour with Marco Polo in a former life. It’s in my blood.

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Opposite page: A classic Moss interior signifies a use of refined glamour. Moss is known for adding couture touches, as seen with the passementerie and embroidered panels on the dressing table.

Top left: A striking blue and white tapestry and a symmetrically placed pair of urns form the focal point of a living room.

Top right: Hand-carved bookcases house the designer’s beloved collection of books in her townhouse library. “My library is informed, informal, intimate— exactly how I would want all my rooms to be described,” Moss says.

On juggling both a retail shop and interior design projects, “the challenge was how to keep the monster rolling and how to morph into the next big thing,” Moss says. “In the beginning it’s learning how to connect the dots—it’s such an important thing in design. It’s important to understand what is happening in the world at large and how it’s affecting my clients. What makes people design and do what do they do? I am a very curious person.” Wall Street also taught Moss valuable lessons in marketing. This came in handy in the development of her product lines, a well-rounded list that includes fabrics at Brunschwig & Fils and Fabricut, carpeting and scenic mural wallpapers at Stark, Pickard china, decorative framed art with Soicher Marin, and a furniture collection from Century (New York Design Center, Suite 200). “Ninety percent of everything I learned about business was on Wall Street, where I worked in marketing. It’s the way I think and it’s all about leverage and due diligence.” Having your own signature is a great way for designers to diversify but, as Moss notes, it’s important to think of how to support your business. “Licensing takes time! Launching a new collection takes you away from your business and the payback is on the back end. It’s not the greatest business model. You have to be a good marketing partner, as manufacturers have to invest a boatload of time, money, staff, and production to put it in the showrooms. It costs millions and they have to have a payback.” And in this brand conscious society, a designer’s business identity often comes into play. “I hate the word brand,” Moss says. “I am not Cheerios! You have to think it terms of what supports your aesthetic.” Being a good businessperson is also an important trait and make sure the terms of your contract work for all parties involved. “You are not just putting your name on a project, you are a partner. I think vertically as it’s all about research, marketing, and merchandising. When I design a product, I think where will it be in the store or a house and how will I pitch it to the magazines?”

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The use of paisley patterns upholstered on the walls, canopy, curtains, and bed coverings creates a glamorous and cozy refuge.

Much like Dorothy Draper, the legendary interior design doyenne who put diversification on the industry map, Moss’s design tentacles reach into the world of publishing. Charlotte Moss: Garden Inspirations (Rizzoli), her ninth book, debuts this spring, encapsulating a dominant theme of all her design books—the topic of inspiration. “It began as a book on gardens and expanded into living, entertaining, and the women who inspired me,” she notes. Her own garden in East Hampton is the perfect muse as a spot where she can detach, be inspired, and “allow good ideas bubble to the surface.” The designer’s articles have also appeared in The Wall Street Journal Magazine and she is a noted speaker on the museum and show house circuit. With two stores and countless interior design projects around the globe, Moss feels the Internet—both good and bad—has certainly affected the industry. “The Internet has been both a blessing and a curse, and a great enabler,” she explains. “It has really enhanced how we’ve been able to connect with people not in our own back yard and it’s good for resources, but on the other hand it has created some laziness.” She advises it’s important that designers pound the pavement, a practice common in the days before mouse pads and 1stdibs. “I’m a monster

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when it comes to that.

I

like to be able to tell my client we have looked

high and low for that commode, etc.

You have to smell the fabrics, feel No great decorator on the planet became great by tapping on the keyboard!” the furniture, and be informed.

What does the future hold? Moss may get back into the fragrance and candle business (her license with Agraria ended and she is a selfprofessed fragrance freak), and her chic classic taste has fueled a desire to design a clothing line someday. Her philanthropic activities remain at the forefront. She is a trustee at Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello in her native Virginia and sits on the Board of The Bone Marrow Foundation and The Elsie de Wolfe Foundation, the Couture Council of the Fashion Institute of Technology, and the Advisory Board of the New York School of Interior Design, where she received an Honorary Doctorate degree. And from the decorating dynamo who shares a birthday with Edith Wharton, more books might be on the horizon for Moss. “It’s a good sign. I want to continue to write books and have been messing around with a novel for years.”


Photo credits

Moss’s creed that “every space, no matter the size, is an opportunity for self-expression” is exemplified in this strié paneled powder room.

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Eats’N’Sleeps Marta martamanhattan.com 29 East 29th Street (212) 651-3800

Dirty French dirtyfrench.com 180 Ludlow Street (212) 254-3000

BTH (By the Hudson) bythehudson.com 712 West 125th Street (212) 222-2841

Bowery Meat Company bowerymeatcompany.com 9 East 1st Street (212) 460-5255

Friends, Romans, countrymen… Thin, Roman-inspired, crackly-crusted pizzas are being served at Danny Meyer’s latest, which is housed next door to the lobby of the Martha Washington Hotel. (See this issue’s Backstory on p. 80 for a historical look at this once women-only hotel.) Executive Chef/Partner Nick Anderer and Chef de Cuisine Joe Tarasco’s pizza selections embrace traditionals like the Capricciosa with artichokes, olives, prosciutto, and a coddled egg, and more interpretive and market-driven fare like the Cavolini’s Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, pickled chili, and parmigiano. Open embercooked alla brace selections include herb-rubbed pork spare ribs and an herb-brined half chicken. Selldorf Architects designed the space with classic Italian flare, including banquette seating, butcher block tables, and a blackened-copper bar. While you sip your choice of local craft beers on draft, Italian-inspired cocktails, or from a full list of Italian wines, you can watch the pizzaolos in action as they whip up thincrust yumminess in two black-tiled Mugnaini wood-fired ovens.

One of the biggest openings of the fall was this French bistro located in the Ludlow Hotel. The name, which preceded the menu and even the concept, evolved into simple bistro classics spiced with the eclectic flavors of the lands most influenced by French cooking and culture. This took the team of Mario Carbone, Rich Torrisi, and Jeff Zalaznick from Paris’ North African neighborhoods to Morocco’s spice doctors and the culinary institutions of New Orleans. The raw bar consists entirely of East Coast oysters, which are opened on the half shell and, in a unique twist, taken to your table for inspection before ordering. The menu keeps things simple with limited selections in classic fish and rotisserie dishes, as well as select hors d’oeuvres and salads. You’ll find evidence of the team’s travels in the Moroccan ras el hanout spicing the duck à l’orange, the crêpe indochine served with tuna tartare, and New Orleans-inspired takes on dirty rice and Creole relish. Hotelier Sean MacPhereson designed the space with banquettes made of ostrich skin, a giant salvaged French carnival mirror, and chandeliers salvaged from a chateau in the French countryside.

Nestled under the West Side Highway at the bottom of a punishing hill (at least when biking south) sits this new addition to the West Harlem dining scene. Behind the scenes are first-time restaurant owners Fernando Reynoso and Giulio Tata, who met while working in real estate finance, and Executive Chef Lusianie Otero, who puts her own colorful spin on American favorites. The signature seafood tower is built of chilled and purified oysters on the half shell, crab legs, lobster tail, little neck clams, and jumbo shrimp. Appetizers include fresh catch-of-the-day citrus mango ceviche and guava crab cakes paired with a bright pomegranate chutney. The main course menu contains a healthy selection of meat and fish dishes such as the veal osso buco served with escalivada, a smoky grilled vegetable sauce of roasted tomato, eggplant, garlic, and onion; and flame shrimp orzo with riceshaped pasta, sautéed asparagus, and shrimp flambéed in Triple Sec. Every seat features unobstructed views of the Hudson River and West Harlem Piers, giving diners a relaxing view day or night.

This ode to all-thing meat recently opened in the East Village from restaurateur John McDonald (Lure Fishbar, B&B Winepub, El Toro Blanco), along with partner Josh Capon and executive chef Paul DiBari. The menu features lighter starters such as cripy polenta with mushroom ragout and shaved parmesan, and roasted cauliflower steak served with almonds, capers, and raisins. There’s a raw oyster bar and even pasta dishes such as duck lasagna for two, but Bowery’s menu is rightfully all about the meat. Everything from traditional cuts such as Cote du Boeuf for Two and a dryaged New York Strip with roasted shaloots to more unusual fare such as a Bone-in Fliet Mignon Au Poivre. Meyer Davis Studio designed the 140-seat space as an homage to the classic steakhouse. The bar and lounge area is outfitted with vintage seating and lighting, while the 85-seat main dining room features leather banquettes and butcher block-topped tables.

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By Jim Lochner

Slurp, sup, and slumber your way from SoHo to Harlem.

Cosme cosmenyc.com 35 East 21st Street (212) 913-9659

Gansevoort Market gansmarket.com 52 Gansevoort Street No phone

The Paul thepaulnyc.com 32 West 29th Street (212) 204-5750

The Broome thebroomenyc.com 431 Broome Street (212) 431-2929

Named after a market in Mexico City where chef Enrique Olvera’s grandfather took him as a child, Cosme brings contemporary Mexican-inspired cuisine to the Flatiron District. Olvera uses fresh local ingredients sourced from the Hudson Valley and surrounding regions to complement the menu, and he imports heirloom corn from Mexico to nixtamalize and grind inhouse for tortillas and other dishes. For appetizers, the octopus cocktail is already a favorite, as is the cobia al pastor with pineapple and cilantro. Main courses consist of traditional Mexican fare such as enfrijoladas and chilaquiles, as well as mackerel, lobster, and steak. Cosme offers sustainability produced spirits, beers, and wines, including a carefully chosen selection of mezcals and tequilas. The wine list of over 70 varieties also includes some Mexican labels. There are two agua frescas, a Mexican specialty, made in house and BUNA coffee in Mexico has created a single-origin, direct trade blend specifically for the restaurant. Architect Alonso de Garay and interior designer Micaela De Bernardi designed the airy space with sleek horizontal lines, vertical black poles, wall-length banquettes, and wire chairs.

Food halls are all the rage these days. The latest entry is located at the foot of the High Line in the Meatpacking District. The 8,000-square-foot Gansevoort Market dates from the mid-1800s when it was the most popular trading post in the country. Partner Manny Del Castill was inspired by markets he saw in Barcelona and Brazil, and the design, organic food, and merchandise at other food halls like Chelsea Market. From lobster rolls at Ed’s Lobster Bar and salted caramel-filled crêpes at Crêpe Sucre to Donostia’s Basque tapaps bar and barbecued pork at Pig Guy NYC, the market features 21 food purveyors that cater to everyone’s taste. Del Castillo actually grew up in Queens with coffee roaster Juan Pablo Martin of Champion Coffee and florist Denise Porcaro of Flower Girl NYC. An elaborate, handcrafted “living wall” vine installation by local sculpture artist Charlie Baker of Baker Structures enwraps the 60-seat sky-lit dining area. The project features 2,000 feet of vines harvested from Long Island, which crawl up the market’s 18-foot exposed brick walls.

Nestled between Madison Square Park and the Flower District, The Paul honors the mercantile history of the NoMad neighborhood while creating a new oasis in midtown. The brand new 122-room hotel was designed by Matt Markowitz Architects, the firm behind The Marlton, the Bowery Hotel, and The Maritime Hotel. The decision to set the hotel back from the sidewalk creates a protected front plaza which will be home to a variety of pop-ups and a lobby bar. The rooms feature loft-style airy windows that allow unobstructed views of the Empire State Building and the Freedom Tower. There are also several apartment-style “Mods”— modular adjoining rooms with both queen size beds and bunk beds— while some rooms feature expansive private outdoor terraces. Graphic artist Brendan Dawes delivered custom elevator installations and James Zwadlo provided the in-room art. There is a dramatic open-ceiling cellar-level restaurant space as well as a rooftop bar set to open in the spring, which will provide panoramic views of NoMad and beyond. One of The Paul’s most distinctive features is a variety of “famous Paul quotes” scattered throughout the hotel from the likes of McCartney, Newman, and Cézanne.

Housed in an 1825 Federal Revivalstyle building, this new boutique hotel has certainly upscaled from its previous incarnation as an artist loft populated with SoHo’s bohemian graffiti vandals. After seven years of renovation, owners Vincent Boitier, Damien Jacquinet, and brothers Jean Claude Iacovelli and Stephane Iacovelli infused The Broome with a combination of European charm and Manhattan chic. Visitors looking for a quiet getaway will appreciate the hotel’s mere 14 rooms, all of which surround a five-floor open-air atrium in which vines droop over the balconies above. Top-of-the-line furnishings by Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams and Bellino Fine Linens enhance the sleeping experience, while large soundproof windows frame your views of the city and block out the street noise. Certain rooms feature terraces and rooftop patios where you can relax stories above the cobblestone streets below. The common spaces are decorated with artwork from the owners’ private collections, alongside Basquiats and Keith Harings. The ground floor café is infused with French provincial flavor, complete with an antique foosball table and vintage coffee bar.

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GALLERY S P EE DI N G I N NE UTR AL.

Pebble Beach Mirror available at Christopher Guy, 212.684.2197, christopherguy.com

Barten Chaise from the Modern Luxe for Kravet Furniture Collection available at Kravet Inc., 212.725.0340, kravet.com FEB MAR

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Dolce available at Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co., 212.545.0032, minka.com Room shot with a variety of Currey products available at Currey & Company, 212.213.4900, curreyandcompany.com

Mr. Brown London’s Everett Table Lamp available at Julian Chichester, 646.293.6622, julianchichester.com

Twig Nightstand available at Stephanie Odegard Collection, 212.545.0205, stephanieodegard.com

Mirrored Dresser available at Louis J. Solomon, 212.545.9200, louisjsolomon.com

Frosted Zebrawood Cabinetry and polished nickel hardware available at Bakes & Kropp, 917.885.9650, bakesandkropp.com

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Spinnaker Chair available at Studio A, 212.725.8439, studioa-home.com

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Evers Pendant available at Arteriors, 646.797.3620, arteriorshome.com

Tukuro Armoire available at Tucker Robbins, 212.355.3383, tuckerrobbins.com

Del Mar Lamp by Downtown available at PROFILES, 212.689.6903, profilesny.com

Rhinelander Sideboard from the Robert A.M. Stern Collection available at Kindel Furniture, 646.293.6649, kindelfurniture.com

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Teeter Totter Console Table available at Global Views, 212.725.8439, globalviews.com

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Vreeland Chandelier by Fuse Lighting available at Dennis Miller Associates, 212.684.0070, dennismiller.com

NIGHT Wallpaper by Calico x DESIRON available at DESIRON, 212.353.2600, desiron.com

Eggshell Finish available at Dune, 212.925.6171, dune-ny.com Renzo Elliptical Coffee Table available at The Bright Group, 212.726.9030, thebrightgroup.com

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freshpicks T he most current products in 2 0 0 lex showrooms .

Regal Recline The simply serene Isabella Chaise by Anees Upholstery, available at Dennis Miller Associates, comes in a variety of natural and cerused wood finishes with either bun or diamond tufting. Dennis Miller Associates, Suite 1210, 212.684.0070, dennismiller.com

Marks the Spot As relaxed and tailored as the designer himself, the Jeffrey Alan Marks for Kravet Collection expresses Jeffrey’s love of color and bold patterns. Signature watery blues, palm greens, brilliant yellows, and vibrant corals coordinate beautifully through a variety of prints that are accented with embroidery on white, crisp linens and cottons. Kravet Inc., Suite 401, 212.725.0340, kravet.com

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Pieces of Piaf Piaf is an original work of mosaic wall art from Christopher Guy that captures the gaiety, passion, and energy of Paris’ burlesque nightlife. Thousands of handcrafted pieces are assembled by a team of six, cut to size, painted in their own unique colors, and enhanced by a sprinkle of semi-precious stones. Christopher Guy, Suite 1601, 212.684.2197, christopherguy.com

Black & Brass The toasty, autumn-inspired colors of the Alexis Table Lamp from Currey & Company are on full display in this hand-painted piece. Gold and burnt orange patterns adorn the black porcelain body of this classically shaped design, embellished with warm antique brass accents. Alexis is part of the Winterthur Collection. Currey & Company, Suite 506, 212.213.4900, curreyandcompany.com

All About That Base This season, DESIRON’s exploration was a foray into more solid wood pieces, and the new Charles Sofa base is a prime example of that. The unique curved silhouette adds a playful and slightly feminine addition to their existing sofa offerings. All DESIRON furniture is designed and handcrafted in the U.S. DESIRON, Suite 702, 212.353.2600, desiron.com

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Tropical Light The use of rattan is as old as human inhabitation of tropical forests. Used by the Toraja women of Sulawesi, Indonesia, to create fishing baskets, the material is now repurposed in the Votive Petal Pendant Light at Tucker Robbins. These baskets continue to provide for Sulawesi families by catching light instead of fish. Tucker Robbins, Suite 504, 212.355.3383, tuckerrobbins.com

Pitch Perfect Julian Chichester’s Turin Chair offers both comfort and good looks. Perfectly pitched, this beautifully contoured chair is set on cast brass legs. A nod to Italian craftsmen of the last century, Turin is available in Julian Chichester velvets, linens, and COM. Julian Chichester, Suite 604, 646.293.6622, julianchichester.com

Bowling With Style With a rosy copper finish, the hand-hammered brass Indira Wall Bowls from Studio A make a statement that is sure to brighten up any space. Also available in antique brass and nickel finishes, these wall bowls come complete with wall plate mounts and a threaded hanging mechanism. Studio A, Suite 614, 212.725.8439, studioa-home.com

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freshpicks Sea Seat Designed by Laura Kirar, the Narwhal Chair at Baker Furniture takes design cues from nautical furniture, the mythical unicorn, and the very real narwhal that meanders in our oceans. This versatile chair flows seamlessly from desk to dining room. Baker Furniture, Suite 300, 212.779.8810, bakerfurniture.com

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Bathed With Light Mid-Century Modern meets LED technology in Alecia’s Necklace II, a bath bracket inspired by the jewelry designs of Alecia Wesner. The geometric pattern of satin bronze rectangles and mitered white glass blocks enhance any powder room or bath spa. From George Kovacs available at Metropolitan Lighting. Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co., Suite 512, 212.545.0032, minka.com

Painted Floor Plum Patch is part of Stephanie Odegard’s Artist Collection, a rug collection that consists of a melding of media. Stephanie takes the artist’s work and reinterprets it into art for the floor, in this case a painting by Mira Lehr. Made in Nepal of 100% hand-spun, hand-dyed, Himalayan vegetal-dyed wool. Stephanie Odegard Collection, Suite 1209, 212.545.0205, stephanieodegard.com

Organic Light The Brutalist style is often characterized by abstracted organic forms with rough textures and a dark, earth-toned palette. The slight irregularities of the Naomi Lamp at Arteriors suggest a connection to nature and handcrafting rather than the sharp precision of machine production. Cast aluminum finished in a dark antique bronze. Arteriors, Suite 608, 646.797.3620, arteriorshome.com

Modern Hammer Influenced by the clean lines of the Araignée table by Ruhlmann, the Amalfi Console at Bright combines a hand-hammered nickel frame with a high-polished walnut top and floating drawers. A classically inspired piece that combines traditional manufacturing techniques with modern design, it is available in a variety of custom finishes and sizes. The Bright Group, Suite 902, 212.726.9030, thebrightgroup.com

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Bienvenidos a Miami The Hamptons have arrived in Miami Beach! One of Bakes & Kropp Fine Cabinetry’s recent projects is a gorgeous kitchen installation in a luxurious apartment overlooking South Beach. The kitchen features classic white and bleached oak cabinets, walnut-trimmed drawers, a custom oak and stainless steel range hood, and designer Robert Bakes’ polished nickel hardware. Bakes & Kropp, Suite 430, 917.885.9650, bakesandkropp.com

Da Sofa Dune’s Da Bomb Sofa, designed by Richard Shemtov, is upholstered with a coil spring platform. The cushions have hand-rolled edges and are lightly tufted throughout, with contrast neon thread stitching, and the base and legs are antique bronze. Many finishes, custom sizes, and sectional options are available. Dune, Suite 100, 212.925.6171, dune-ny.com

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Store More This Two-Door Contemporary Cabinet from Louis J. Solomon may be small, but it offers numerous drawers, trays, and hooks for endless storage options. Even the top opens up to reveal two storage cubbies with built-in electrical outlets for easy access charging. Shown in a dual finish of pure rich black and distressed cream with mother-ofpearl hardware. Louis J. Solomon, Suite 911, 212.545.9200, louisjsolomon.com

Frond of You Contrasting bleached and carved panels of mango and sheesham wood inspired by the shape of a frond leaf create the handsome Frond Media Cabinet at Global Views. The cabinet features removable shelves and open slats on the back to accommodate for ventilation and wiring components. Global Views, Suite 613, 212.725.8439, globalviews.com

Recommended Reading The collar of the pedestal and the lion's paw feet on its Oak Library Table are distinguishing elements that define Kindel’s superior execution and hand craftsmanship. The cerused oak finish adds a fresh take to this classic form. White painted accents are standard. Made of white oak solids and flat cut veneer. Kindel Furniture, Suite 806, 646.293.6649, kindelfurniture.com

Keys to Nesting The Chiavi Nesting Tables by Sara Wise are cool, smooth metal tempered with the warmth of wood. Brass legs, forming three sizes of tables, nest together or can be used separately, all finished with a slab of claro walnut. Choose stainless steel or bronze with oak or wenge, in a wealth of finishes. PROFILES, Suite 1211, 212.689.6903, profilesny.com

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STYLESPOTLIGHT F eatured highlights of craft and design .

1. Sleep Patterns (opposite) The Laura Kirar Milpa Bedside Chest at Baker Furniture is composed of beautiful veneer that forms unique geometric patterns of converging fields, with an x-base stretcher and frame in steel. 2. Inner Beauty Inspired by Brancusi’s pure forms, the Peace Stool by Tucker Robbins splits a solid sphere of acacia and flips the pieces, exposing the hidden beauty of the inner grain.

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3. Gravity Defied Seemingly defying physics, the beautifully sculptural Cone Cantilever Table at Global Views has a solid white marble base completely clad in semi-precious lapis stones.

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4. Curve and Twist This McQueen Sofa by Christopher Guy is an extravagantly long curved sofa that draws company together. A contemporary twist on a classic design, it is also available in shorter versions. 5. Color Eruption The explosive nature of volcanic glazes produces multiple color-filled, crust-like layers on the base material. The Italian ceramic Vesuvius Vase Collection at Studio A perfectly exemplifies these rich textured finishes. 6. Among the Treetops DESIRON’s Cooper Canopy Bed was inspired by tall wooded areas in the Adirondacks. The entire piece is hand joined, a mixture of black and natural walnut with brass inlay at the joints.

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7. Stone Flowers A striking piece of organic modernism, Powell & Bonnell’s Lotus End Table at Dennis Miller Associates calls to mind the simple beauty of its namesake flower. Shown in white stoneware clay with satin white glaze. 8. Rustic Modern Industrial materials are brilliantly repurposed in the Lone Star Pendant at Currey & Company, a design emblematic of the rough luxe style. 9. You Tubes Slim, bright, and modern bath art, the LED-lit Tube by George Kovacs at Metropolitan Lighting comes in a variety of finishes to match your fixtures and bathroom accessories. 10. Waterloo Met Dune’s innovative Waterloo Coffee Table is constructed of wood, cast fiberglass, and hand-applied cement with bronze metallic powder. Crafted at Dune’s factory in Jersey City, New Jersey.

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11. In Clover The Irish Chair by Kindel is a classic design with hand-carved decoration on all four legs and a fully upholstered back. Shown in vintage stripe (platinum) fabric with a silver leaf finish. 12. Laughing in the Rain From Mr. Brown London’s Weather or Not collection, the Spider Table at Julian Chichester, with its steel base and lava rock top, is perfect for interior or exterior design plans.

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13. Contrast Ratio The beauty of this Metal and Wood Cocktail Table from Louis J. Solomon comes from the stark contrast between the rich dark wood finish and soft gold metal accents. 14. Vertical Drama The McKinley Fixed Chandelier at Arteriors seems to float through the air as seven seeded glass spheres spiral downward from a large, round, polished brass canopy. 15. Lush Life The sumptuous, deep, and plush Kimber Chair by Dragonette at PROFILES has a solid hardwood frame, lacquered base and a deep, loose cushion seat with a tufted back and open arms.

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16. Float with Me Beveled by hand, Hellman-Chang’s Mercer Cocktail Table at The Bright Group features their unique styling and “floating” silhouette. Shown here with a lacquer white top and solid brushed brass cladding enveloping the base. 17. Take a Stand The Stephanie Odegard Collection has highly skilled craftsmen that use centuries-old methods to carve the intricate Floral Jali Umbrella Stand from white or black marble. 18. Tops in Tops Bakes & Kropp, LTD., makers of fine cabinetry, also produce high-end custom wood countertops. This water and stain resistant solid maple and walnut end grain butcher block is a kitchen connoisseur’s dream. 19. Road to Morocco Kravet Carpet introduces the new Modern Moroccan Collection of hand-knotted patterns from pure wool that are woven in India. These rugs portray softly defined Moroccan designs in subtle natural tones. FEB MAR

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De. FIN.ingPieces items that sum up what a showroom is all about.

KINDEL FURNITURE The Baltimore Settee by Kindel features rich hand-painted decoration and a sweeping silhouette built from raw lumber in Grand Rapids, Michigan. With attention to detail and flawless execution, Kindel upholds a commitment to hand craftsmanship. Kindel remains true to classic design and possesses limitless capabilities to create custom furniture. Kindel Furniture, Suite 806, 646.293.6649, kindelfurniture.com

BAKER FURNITURE An elegant addition for the home office or study, the Laura Kirar Carta Desk from Baker Furniture showcases a cast metal panel and a geometric lattice made of brass with a polished bronze finish. Baker Furniture, Suite 300, 212.779.8810, bakerfurniture.com

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BAKES & KROPP In this bright Hamptons kitchen, classic white cabinetry provides an elegant foundation of storage and structure. The custom ceramic backsplash design, sea glass-colored Viking appliances, Carrera marble countertops, and coordinating polished nickel hardware all contribute to its coastal, yet sophisticated feel. This kitchen serves as an interior extension of the homeowner’s incredible oceanfront view. Bakes & Kropp, Suite 430, 917.885.9650, bakesandkropp.com Dennis Miller Associates The Octave from Altura Furniture has a faceted facade featuring a rhythmic arrangement of tapered, solid wood staves. Horizontal dark bronze pulls notched into the staves create a striking visual counterpoint. Octave is offered in a variety of subtle and exotic wood tones. Available with center drawer configuration and in four standard sizes. Dennis Miller Associates, Suite 1210, 212.684.0070, dennismiller.com 66


Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co. In Koi by Corbett, scalloped iron scrollwork in a fish scale pattern with a richly textured leaf finish over a cream linen shade suggests the seaside. Perfect for a beach setting, the mother of pearl accents on the rings and upper canopy evoke memories of searching for shells along the shore. Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co., Suite 512, 212.545.0032, minka.com

Louis J. Solomon This lounge chair is immensely comfortable, but not immensely large. The solid wood frame is available in any of Solomon’s transitional line of finishes (shown here in Java) and upholstered in any fabric you choose. Louis J. Solomon, Suite 911, 212.545.9200, louisjsolomon.com

Christopher Guy Celebrated as a truly spectacular achievement in carving, the Cosmopolitan Headboard by Christopher Guy is sure to create a stir everywhere. A radiant, richly detailed design, it represents an explosion of monumental proportions. Manufactured in two pieces for ease of installation in any location. Shown finished in 18th Century Gold. Christopher Guy, Suite 1601, 212.684.2197, christopherguy.com

Tucker Robbins Influenced by the Japanese geta, Tucker Robbins’ iconic Japanese Table captures the sophisticated functionality of its inspiration. Constructed from solid slabs of wood using locking keyed joints that allow the wood to breathe, each one of these tables, with their undulating edges and varying wood grains, is truly unique. Tucker Robbins, Suite 504, 212.355.3383, tuckerrobbins.com

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Arteriors The Dallas Chandelier, one of Arteriors’ most popular designs, is now available in a vintage brass finish. This 18-light, mid-century-inspired design features seeded glass spheres and 12 of the 18 arms are adjustable. Arteriors, Suite 608, 646.797.3620, arteriorshome.com

PROFILES The DeCarlo Coffee Table by Michael Berman breaks four-leg convention. The elegant, simple design echoes the shape of last-century modern, but with 21st-century aesthetics. Available in lacquers (if you can think of a color, you can have it), oaks, mahoganies, and walnuts. PROFILES, Suite 1211, 212.689.6903, profilesny.com Stephanie Odegard Collection Blooming is a minimal design from the Stephanie Odegard Collection using soft and subtle color combinations, a signature Odegard feature. Made in Nepal of 100% hand-spun, hand-dyed, and hand-knotted Himalayan wool. Custom colors are available. Stephanie Odegard Collection, Suite 1209, 212.545.0205, stephanieodegard.com

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KRAVET Kravet, well known for its vast selection of multipurpose solids, presents a book of brushed cottons in a rainbow of available hues. These casual and super-soft cottons are part of the Perfect Plains program, which brings together their best solids by category to make the designer’s search for the perfect color easier than ever. Kravet Inc., Suite 401, 212.725.0340, kravet.com

GLOBAL VIEWS Inspired by one of their best-selling classic designs, the Marilyn Acrylic Arm Chair juxtaposes a tufted mohair velvet cushion with a stunning clear acrylic frame molded into a traditional French silhouette. This chair is available with or without arms, with cushions in five richly saturated colors. Global Views, Suite 613, 212.725.8439, globalviews.com

DESIRON DESIRON has always been known for their exceptional metal pieces. The Chrysler Cocktail Table is a classic example, with its elegant structural elements and strong, architectural look. Available in 12 metal finishes, it is shown here in polished steel and clear glass. All DESIRON furniture is designed and handcrafted in the U.S. DESIRON, Suite 702, 212.353.2600, desiron.com

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STUDIO A The Brentwood Collection is made of two different forms of sustainably farmed eucalyptus with distinctive organic details. The mahogany frame of this TV and Media Cabinet is covered in figured eucalyptus veneer and the front panels are strips of eucalyptus burl that are hand-woven between solid brass rods. Studio A, Suite 614, 212.725.8439, studioa-home.com

CURREY & COMPANY Bisecting tapering lines and bold brass accents give the Anthology Chandelier an eloquent modern quality. This streamlined transitional fixture, finished in antique brass, displays quiet dignity with a light beige Shantung shade. Currey & Company, Suite 506, 212.213.4900, curreyandcompany.com

Julian ChichesteR While the Vadim Cabinet’s striking oak and ivory vellum three-door cabinet with undulating waves of overlaid brass is a new introduction, it is quintessentially Julian Chichester. Set on brass feet, which mirror the door design, it has a sycamore interior with six adjustable shelves. Julian Chichester, Suite 604, 646.293.6622, julianchichester.com

The Bright Group The Egan Sofa series, designed by Douglas Levine, is a classic example of the kind of attention to detail, style, and quality that Bright is known for. Faceted and tapered legs highlight this new classic. Made in Middletown, New York, the Egan series is available in all Bright finishes. The Bright Group, Suite 902, 212.726.9030, thebrightgroup.com

DUNE The Landscape Sectional is a low-profile integrated design where the seat becomes the back to create a very sleek, streamline effect. Landscape is cutting edge lounge seating that works in various types of environments. A large selection of fabrics and colors are available. Manufactured in the Dune factory in Jersey City, New Jersey. Dune, Suite 100, 212.925.6171, dune-ny.com FEB MAR

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NEW Showrooms. 2015 F resh faces and new designs.

Alea, Suite 1509 aleaoffice.com Alea, a leader in the office furniture industry in Italy, has grown worldwide, opening their first New York showroom at 200 Lex. Alea’s extensive knowledge of manufacturing processes and design has created durable furniture that pairs function with aesthetic. Their products include tables, systems, reception, storage, and bookcases.

Crosby Street Studios, Suite 1303 crosbystreetstudios.com Crosby Street Studios is the trusted source of custom luxurious textiles and carpets to the trade. Collaboration and exploration set the company apart, with childhood friends and principals Tony Mott and Jim McFadden combining their considerable talent and industry to offer architects, designers, and contractors exclusive access to innovative and timehonored materials, technologies, and artisans from discrete sources around the globe. Crosby Street Studios provides dynamic, full-service research, and technical and creative capabilities, allowing the team to create one-of-a-kind, dream carpets and textiles with its clientele.

ducduc, Suite 715 phone 212.226.1868, fax 212.226.5504 ducducnyc.com ducduc, founded in 2005, designs quality modern and traditional children’s furniture that is consciously constructed and eco-friendly. Each ducduc piece is designed in NYC and custom made to order in the company’s 1890s restored production facility in Connecticut. Finishes, dimensions, hardware, even drawer interiors are all customizable, letting parents champion their family’s sense of style. The company’s high quality standards mean that cribs often stay within the family as it grows, toddler beds become big kid beds, and changing tables transition to dressers. For older children, ducduc has a youth line with larger and more mature options including bunk, canopy, platform, and day beds, desks, armoires, vanities, and play tables.

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Julian Chichester/Mr. Brown London, Suite 604 phone 646.293.6622, fax 917.591.2413 julianchichester.com, mrbrownhome.com Julian Chichester’s newly expanded showroom grows the British influence at the New York Design Center. Interpreted in a distinctively contemporary way, Julian Chichester channels the great designs of the 19th and 20th centuries to create eclectic, transitional furniture. The larger showroom features Julian Chichester’s line, Mr. Brown London. The pieces are more accessible, giving classic English formality a knowing twist.

Kindel Furniture, Suite 806 phone 646.293.6649, fax 646.293.6657, kindelfurniture.com Since 1901 the Kindel Furniture Company has preserved an enduring heritage of craftsmanship, scholarship, and authenticity. Whether to the exacting standards of the Winterthur Museum, the iconic designs of Dorothy Draper, or the architectural precision of Robert A.M. Stern Architects, Kindel’s exceptional team of designers, engineers, and artisans are dedicated to uncompromising craftsmanship. Relevant design has fostered Kindel’s ability to create custom furniture. Their bench-made workshop and “made to order” practices allow for adaptation of dimensions, wood species, and functionality of their entire product line. Their custom capabilities are limitless and define Kindel as a true American luxury brand.

Phillips Collection, Suite 603 phone 336.884.9271, fax 336.882.7405 phillipscollection.com Phillips Collection expands their presence at the New York Design Center with a larger showroom. Starting in Southeast Asia and continuing on to Africa, Latin America, Europe, and the Pacific Rim, they’ve searched the world for exciting products for their design-oriented customers. Today, Phillips Collection continues to define global style for the contemporary market. With the same spirit of innovation, they discover designs and designers, and match them with an incredible range of production resources developed over decades of travel. Combining exciting concepts, talented designers, skillful producers, and a dedicated support staff, Phillips Collection is a creative collaboration that mixes concept, craftsmanship, and marketing to bring beautiful home furnishings and accessories into sophisticated homes around the world.

Raul Carrasco NYC, Suite 511

phone 212.966.6112, fax 212.966.6113 raulcarrasco.com Blending his own designs with pieces procured from around the world, Raul Carrasco NYC’s showroom offers a mix of modern furnishings, vintage objects, glass art, and metalwork. For over 15 years, Raul Carrasco NYC has adorned South Florida’s finest homes and businesses with a distinct mix of contemporary yet warm and timeless furnishings. His customers, who range from interior designers to collectors to private clients, have come to appreciate his disciplined approach to scale, form, and proportion. The pieces in the Raul Carrasco NYC showroom are timeless with a flair for the international.

Theodore Alexander, Suite 515 phone 646.293.6628, fax 646.293.6629 theodorealexander.com Theodore Alexander is one of the leading manufacturers of fine furniture. Their comprehensive collections consist of several thousand designs, providing eclectic, traditional, and modern classical furniture and accessories to our clients. Theodore Alexander has become renowned as a unique brand embodying quality in design. They strive for innovative designs and create furniture to last lifetimes. Founded in 1996 by the enigmatic Paul Maitland Smith, an industry legend who has pioneered high-end furniture production throughout Asia for the past 25 years, Theodore Alexander is now one of the largest furniture manufacturers in South East Asia.

Todd Hase Furniture Inc., Suite 425 phone 212.871.9075, fax 212.871.9085 toddhase.com New York-based designer Todd Hase has opened his newest showroom on the 4th floor of the New York Design Center. Todd has created a streamlined showcase for Todd Hase Furniture’s popular blend of modern and vintage home furnishings. The 200 Lex location offers Todd’s full collection of custom upholstery, tables, case goods, lighting, and textiles as well as his hand-selected fine art, and antiques from Paris and the regions near his chateau in Normandy. The blend of American-manufactured, exclusive, custom furniture and the French antiques in which he finds his inspiration has been a favorite of celebrity designers, clientele, and trendsetters since 1995.


ShowroomPortraits

Profiles of Some of 200 Lex's Most Familiar Names

ARTERIORS Suite 608

BAKER FURNITURE Suite 300

BAKES & KROPP Suite 430

THE BRIGHT GROUP Suite 902

Founded by Mark Moussa in 1987, Arteriors is a Dallas-based company that specializes in decorative accessories, furniture, and lighting that appeal to design lovers with up-to-date sensibilities. Launched with a focus on traditional accessories in classic materials, the company collaborates with experienced artisans and manufacturers around the world, producing a full spectrum of styles in luxury materials and finishes. Arteriors, Suite 608, phone 646.797.3620, fax 646.786.4818, arteriorshome.com

Founded in 1902, Baker Furniture remains one of the largest wholesale distributors in the industry with 16 showrooms located in major design districts throughout the United States and at the Chelsea Harbour Design Centre in London. Product assortment spans from historic reproductions dating back to the 17th century to modern designs from today’s most recognized independent designers. Baker Furniture, Suite 300, phone 212.779.8810, fax 212.689.2827, bakerfurniture.com

Founded by designer Robert Bakes and craftsman Paul Kropp, Bakes & Kropp is a luxury cabinetry firm combining elegant design and expert craftsmanship to create spectacular kitchens, vanities, libraries, and closets. Their new flagship showroom at the New York Design Center is the much-anticipated extension of their original Sag Harbor location. Bakes & Kropp, Suite 430, phone 917.885.9650, fax 631.725.1710 bakesandkropp.com

The Bright Group is a unique collection of handcrafted, American-made furnishings, combining the extensive product range of Bright Chair Company with artisan designers and manufacturers, showcasing a coordinated environment for the design community. Whether the focus is seating, case goods, or lighting, The Bright Group searches the country for quality product lines with great new design. The Bright Group, Suite 902, phone 212.726.9030, fax 212.726.9029, thebrightgroup.com

CHRISTOPHER GUY Suite 1601

Currey & Company Suite 506

DENNIS MILLER ASSOCIATES Suite 1210

DESIRON Suite 702

Christopher Guy’s new 20,000-squarefoot penthouse showroom showcases his latest collections and design philosophy within three suites, each portraying varying lifestyles. The new Mademoiselle Collection internationalizes Parisian chic for the 21st century. The showroom also features the state-of-the-art Christopher Guy Design Lab, an ideal working environment for interior designers to complete entire design projects. Christopher Guy, Suite 1601, phone 212.684.2197, fax 212.684.2123, christopherguy.com

For more than 25 years, Currey & Company has fulfilled customers’ need for distinctive chandeliers, wall sconces, lamps, rugs and furniture. The company’s perspective on product design is one of a lively interest in historical influences, correct materials for the design and a keen interest in product integrity. Every detail is executed with clarity and finesse. Products show the touch of the human hand meticulously crafted of natural materials. Currey & Company, Suite 506, phone 212.213.4900, curreyandcompany.com

Since 1983, Dennis Miller Associates has offered innovative furniture and lighting collections designed by architects, interior designers, and artisans. Its showroom provides a continually evolving showcase of contemporary and 20th century classic design excellence. Its popularity with top designers speaks for itself. Come see the newly expanded collections to the Dennis Miller lighting, rugs, and furniture lines. Dennis Miller Associates, Suite 1210, phone 212.684.0070, fax 212.684.0776, dennismiller.com

Desiron, designed by Frank Carfaro, is a highly celebrated luxury furniture design company with a focus on benchmade, fully customizable home furnishings. The company’s 4,000-square-foot showroom concentrates on a contemporary clean aesthetic with strict attention to detail and finishing. Desiron manufactures its pieces in Kenilworth, New Jersey, at their state-of-the-art facility, just 19 miles from downtown NYC. DESIRON, Suite 702, phone 212.353.2600, fax 212.353.0220, desiron.com FEB MAR

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ShowroomPortraits DUNE Suite 100

GLOBAL VIEWS Suite 613

HICKORY CHAIR–PEARSON– HENREDON, Suite 102

Julian Chichester Suite 604

Dune is an American contemporary design company focused on the development and manufacture of innovative interior products. Since 1998, Dune has built an internationally recognized design brand with its award-winning furniture collection and custom collaborations with the world’s most cutting edge designers and architects. Dune’s exclusive furniture collection is only available through their showroom on the ground floor of the New York Design Center. Dune, Suite 100, phone 212.925.6171, fax 212.925.2273, dune-ny.com

Global Views is expanding its showroom space. Global Views is a home decor wholesale company with collections that blend various styles to make pieces that are elegant, exotic, refined, and casual. They offer a wide assortment of fashion-forward products from furniture to accessories that fit every price range. Global Views, Suite 613, phone 212.725.8439, fax 212.679.4927, globalviews.com

The mission of Hickory Chair–Pearson– Henredon is to service the design trade at the highest possible level, while offering a fashion-forward shopping experience. The showroom represents Henredon, Barbara Barry Realized by Henredon, Celerie Kemble for Henredon and Maitland-Smith, Lane Venture, Maitland-Smith, LaBarge, and Taracea. The company offers hundreds of beautiful wood and upholstery designs for every room. Hickory Chair–Pearson–Henredon, Suite 102, phone 212.725.3776, fax 212.725.3763, henredon.com

Julian Chichester reinvents the great designs of the 19th and 20th centuries to create eclectic, transitional furniture perfect for how we live today. Julian Chichester is pleased to offer the inimitable, irrepressible, and always edgy Mr. Brown London in their New York showroom with a beautifully edited assortment of furniture, lamps, and accessories. Julian Chichester, Suite 604, phone 646.293.6622, fax 917.591.2413, julianchichester.com

Kindel Furniture Suite 806

KRAVET INC. Suite 401

LEPERE Suite 714

LOUIS J. SOLOMON Suite 911

Luxuriously crafted in Grand Rapids, Michigan, since 1901, Kindel Furniture Company creates timeless design for today’s homes. Kindel’s broad range of product offerings are all made to order and include the Dorothy Draper Collection, Robert A.M. Stern Collection, Winterthur Collection, and the Tudor Place Collection. Kindel Furniture, Suite 806, phone 646.293.6649, fax 646.293.6657, kindelfurniture.com

Fall 2014 marked the opening of the Kravet showroom at the new Washington Design Center, located in Franklin Court. This showroom features Kravet as well as Lee Jofa and Brunschwig & Fils. Kravet Inc., Suite 401, phone 212.725.0340, fax 212.684.7350, kravet.com

LEPERE showcases a contemporary collection of innovative designs from Belgium, Italy, the Netherlands, and Spain. LEPERE has developed a strong and loyal following in both the residential and contract design community with its warm, minimalist aesthetic, featuring the best-in-class in furniture, outdoor, carpets, and lighting. LEPERE, Suite 714, phone 212.488.7000, fax 212.488.7006, lepereinc.com

Since 1930, Louis J. Solomon has had a reputation in the industry for fine traditional furniture. Over the past 10 years the company has introduced more than 200 new transitional and contemporary styles that complement the quality styles it has always been known for. Please visit the company’s showroom to see the latest additions. Louis J. Solomon, Suite 911, phone 212.545.9200, fax 212.545.9438, louisjsolomon.com

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METROPOLITAN LIGHTING FIXTURE CO., Suite 512

PROFILES Suite 1211

SALADINO FURNITURE, INC. Suite 1600

STEPHANIE ODEGARD COLLECTION Suite 1209

Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co. has been illuminating fine interiors since 1939. Now part of the Minka Group, the Metropolitan showroom represents lighting from all Minka companies, including George Kovacs, as well as products from other quality lighting manufacturers. Its large showroom offers one of the most comprehensive selections of designer-oriented lighting in the industry. Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co., Suite 512, phone 212.545.0032, fax 212.545.0031, minka.com

Serving the design profession since 1980, PROFILES’ workrooms in the U.S. and in Europe create pieces of uncommon beauty and imagination for both residential and contract customers, offering a full spectrum of furniture in a variety of woods, metals, and finishes, as well as finely tailored upholstery—all to the designer’s specifications. PROFILES, Suite 1211, phone 212.689.6903, fax 212.685.1807, profilesny.com

Established in 1986 by renowned designer John F. Saladino, the Saladino Furniture collection currently has over 75 original designs of upholstery, casegoods, and lighting. The line is available exclusively through its New York showroom among select antiques and accessories. A 75-page catalog may be purchased online at saladinostyle.com. Saladino Furniture, Inc., Suite 1600, phone 212.684.3720, fax 212.684.3257, saladinostyle.com

The Stephanie Odegard Collection is a leader in bold design and color innovation in the production of highend, hand-knotted carpets. The collection also features handcrafted furniture, lighting, antiques, and decorative accessories from across the globe. In all of her products, Stephanie Odegard requires strict adherence to social responsibility, raising standards of living for thousands of craftspeople in developing countries. Stephanie Odegard Collection, Suite 1209, phone 212.545.0205, fax 212.545.0305, stephanieodegard.com

STUDIO A Suite 614

Theodore Alexander Suite 515

TUCKER ROBBINS Suite 504

Studio A’s unique mix of organic, design-driven accessories, furniture, found objects, and textiles is rich in texture and elemental in composition. Cutting-edge design, unexpected materials, and handcrafted finishes form the foundation of their product mix. The eclectic blend of textures, classic silhouettes, and timeless design will transform any interior. Studio A is a partner company and harmonious complement to Global Views. Studio A, Suite 614, phone 212.725.8439, fax 212.679.4927, studioa-home.com

Theodore Alexander has become renowned as a unique brand embodying quality in design. Founded in 1996 by the enigmatic Paul Maitland-Smith, an industry legend who has pioneered high-end furniture production throughout Asia for the past 25 years, Theodore Alexander is now one of the largest furniture manufacturers in South East Asia. Theodore Alexander, Suite 515, phone 646.293.6628, fax 646.293.6629 theodorealexander.com

For the past 25 years, Tucker Robbins’ passion has been bringing the spirit and craft from traditional artisans to contemporary life. He has created thriving artisan workshops in Guatemala, the Philippines, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, and Cameroon, working with sustainably harvested or reclaimed materials and incorporating sustainable methods that have been practiced by local people for centuries. Tucker Robbins, Suite 504, phone 212.355.3383, fax 212.355.3116, tuckerrobbins.com

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Events at 200 Lex A look at a few recent celebrations. What’s New, What’s Next

The New York Design Center presented the sixth annual “What’s New, What’s Next” on September 18, 2014. The event, which has become a benchmark for introducing new products and celebrating the very best in design, welcomed over 5,500 guests to view thousands of new product introductions from over 60 participating showrooms. Guests attended designer conversations, book signings, presentations, and panels with the industry’s top editors and manufacturers. 200 Lex was proud to partner with esteemed shelter publications and editors from Architectural Digest, Dering Hall, domino, DuJour, Elle Decor, House Beautiful, Interior Design, interiors, Lonny, Luxe Interiors + Design, New York Cottages & Gardens, New York Magazine Design Hunting, New York Spaces, Traditional Home, Veranda, and The Wall Street Journal.

Aerin Lauder with President and CEO of 200 Lex, Jim Druckman; Christiane Lemieux presents in Global Views; Jill Cohen with Veranda Editor in Chief Clinton Smith; Marisa Marcantonio moderates a discussion with designers Lindsey Lane and Eddie Lee; Robert Verdi, Ginny Hilfiger, Robert Passal, and Stacey Bewkes; Jeffrey Alan Marks; designer Robert Couturier, Leslie Young, Hearst Design Group’s Karen Marx, and Michael Boodro, Editor in Chief of Elle Decor in Cliff Young; Palecek highlights the Strings Attached Lounge Chair; Michelle Smith, Jeanine Hays, Samuel Masters, and Lonny’s Irene Edwards presented in Arteriors; a light fixture in Metropolitan Lighting; David Scott, New York Spaces Editor in Chief Jason Kontos, Laura Kirar, and Kerry Delrose; Tucker Robbins poses with Clodagh; Dana Wolter, Traditional Home’s Tori Mellott, Chad Graci, and Katie Lydon; Sydney Wasserman and Natasha Wolff from DuJour, Christopher Guy’s Paul Watson, and designer James Rixner; Sara Gilbane, Amanda Nisbet, Gary McBournie, and Susanna Salk. Photos by Social Shutterbug/Matthew Carasella, John A. Hudetz, Will Ragozzino. 76


9th Annual Masquerade Ball

Sponsored by

On October 30, 2014, the New York Design Center sponsored the 9th Annual Masquerade Ball benefiting The Alpha Workshops Studio School, the only school in the nation that trains people living with HIV/AIDS as decorative artists. The design industry channeled their inner Heroes & Villains in the Prince George Ballroom to support this worthy cause. Now in its 9th year, The Masquerade Ball, often touted as the most fun event on the design community calendar, drew over 400 interior designers, architects, manufacturers, members of the shelter press, and others who dressed in creative costumes and danced the night away.

Stephen Symonds

Nancy Boszhardt Jonathan Raiola

Matthew Patrick Smyth

media sponsors

The Architectural Digest team as 101 Dalmatians; Ken Wampler, Executive Director of The Alpha Workshops and Jim Druckman; New York Design Center’s Brenna Stevens, Alix Lerman, Leah Blank, Alana Moskowitz, and Sara Marsh as femme fatales; designer Kati Curtis and Patty Savoie; the New York Spaces team; the Luxe team as classic ’20s gangsters; Dennis Miller Associates dresses as Disney villains; Traditional Home as the cast of Orange is the New Black; Marks & Tavano Workroom Team as characters from Despicable Me Photos by Heysha Nameri Photography and Luis Flores.

Our Favorite Things with Traditional HomE

On November 12, 2014, the New York Design Center celebrated Our Favorite Things with Traditional Home. Each year, Traditional Home’s editors assemble their list of on-the-rise talents—dubbed “New Trads”. Traditional Home and the New York Design Center teamed up with eight of these New Trad designers to highlight some of their Favorite Things from the Sixth Floor showrooms, including Arteriors, Global Views, John Richard, Julian Chichester, Kasthall, Palecek, Phillips Collection, and Studio A. The New Trad picks were raffled to benefit Housing Works.

Dakota Williams, Becca Galbraith, Jenny Wolf, and Sarah Hayden from Jenny Wolf Interiors; Kevin Isbell and Patrik Lonn; Suysel dePedro Cunningham and Anne Maxwell Foster of Tilton Fenwick; Sarah Hyland speaking to guests in Studio A. Photos by Garrett Ewald. FEB MAR

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ShowroomDirectory A Complete List of Who’s Where In 200 Lex

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SHOWR OOM 1stdibs at NYDC Access To Design AERIN Alea ANDREU WORLD Apropos Inc. Arc|Com Fabrics, Inc. Aristeia Metro Arteriors Atelier Atlas Carpet Mills, Inc. Baker Furniture Bakes & Kropp Bograd Kids Bolier Boyce Products Ltd The Bright Group Brueton Brunschwig & Fils Calger Lighting Inc. Century Furniture CF Modern Christopher Guy CityScapes NYC Clickspring Design CLIFF YOUNG LTD. Colombo Mobili USA Côté France Crosby Street Studios Currey & Company DARRAN Furniture Industries, Inc. Decca Contract Furniture Delivery By Design (DBD) Dennis Miller Associates

S uite 10th Fl 424 816 1509 1111 710 1411 1416 608 202 1314 300 430 433 804 1405 902 910 401 434 200 419 1601 1106 1405 505 809 1201 1303 506 1116 1414 Dock 1210

PHON E 646.293.6633 212.679.9500 212.679.4341 305.470.1200 212.679.0300 212.684.6987 212.751.1590 646.761.4711 646.797.3620 212.696.0211 212.779.4300 212.779.8810 917.885.9650 212.726.0006 212.889.2060 212.683.3100 212.726.9030 212.838.1630 212.725.0340 212.689.9511 212.479.0107 917.699.6024 212.684.2197 212.961.6984 212.220.0962 212.683.8808 212.683.3771 212.684.0707 212.486.0737 212.213.4900 212.961.6984 646.761.4711 212.213.1691 212.684.0070

DesignLush DESIRON DIFFA DIRTT Environmental Solutions Dorothy Draper & Co., Inc. ducduc Dune EJ Victor ENRICOPELLIZZONI Flourishes GIBSON INTERIOR PRODUCTS Giorgio USA Global Views Good Design Gordon International Grange Furniture Groupe Lacasse Halcon Harbour Outdoor Hickory Chair-Pearson-Henredon In House Kitchen Bath Home Interior Crafts NY IFDA Jasper Group Julian Chichester Kasthall Rugs USA Inc.

415 702 707 1516 806 715 100 814 1304 414 1510 502 613 423 1401 201 1109 1304 1301 102 1511 916 417B 1514 604 611

212.532.5450 212.353.2600 212.727.3100 973.454.6282 646.293.6649 212.226.1868 212.925.6171 212.679.4341 212.683.7272 212.779.4540 212.685.1077 212.684.7191 212.725.8439 212.722.1110 212.532.0075 212.685.9494 212.689.0300 212.683.7272 646.692.4227 212.725.3776 212.686.2016 212.696.4400 212.686.6020 212.685.1077 646.293.6622 212.421.0220

FA X 646.293.6687 212.447.1669 305.470.9070 212.679.5996 212.689.3684 212.751.2434 646.786.4818 212.696.0299 212.779.0838 212.689.2827 631.725.1710 212.726.0061 212.683.5005 212.726.9029 212.838.1652 212.684.7350 212.779.0721 212.479.0112 212.684.2123 212.683.5005 212.683.9286 212.684.0559 212.684.8940 917.591.4373 212.213.4911 212.951.7070 212.213.9843 212.684.0776 212.532.5360 212.353.0220 212.727.2574 646.293.6657 212.226.5504 212.925.2273 212.683.7011 212.779.4542 212.685.1078 212.725.2683 212.679.4927 212.722.1115 212.779.0147 212.685.7312 212.689.7143 212.683.0711 212.725.3763 212.686.2048 212.686.4408 212.686.6258 812.771.4641 917.591.2413 212.421.0230

S H OW RO O M Keilhauer KI and Pallas Textiles Kindel Furniture

S uite 1101 1313 806 Korts & Knight, Kitchens by Alexandra Knight 716 Kravet Inc. 401 Krug 1415 La Bastille 1305 LaCOUR 1412 Lee Jofa 401 LEPERE 714 Levine Calvano Furniture Group 1406 Lexington Home Brands 212 Louis J. Solomon Inc. 911 Luna Textiles 1410 McGuire Furniture 101 Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co. 512 Milano Smart Living LLC 711 M|n Modern Living Supplies 408 Mr. Brown London 604 M. Topalian, Inc. 802 Napier + Joseph + McNamara, Ltd. 1304 The New Traditionalists 701 Niermann Weeks 905 PALECEK 610 Paoli 1110 Pennoyer Newman LLC 416 Phillips Collection 603 Porcelanosa 609 Potterton Books 431 Primason Symchik, Inc. 1101 Pringle Ward 1109 Prismatique 1101 Profiles 1211 Raul Carrasco NYC 511 RENAISSANCE CARPET & TAPESTRIES 912 Richard Cohen Collection 801 Rooms by Zoya B 433 SA Baxter Architectural Hardware 1205 Saladino Furniture Inc. 1600 SANFORD HALL 400 Sedgwick & Brattle 815 Skyline Contract Group 1106 Smart 1115 Stephanie Odegard Collection 1209 Studio A 612 Sun Decor Fabrics 417A Theodore Alexander 515 Thom Filicia Inc. 815 TK Collections 410 Townhouse Kitchens 421 transFORM 708 Tucker Robbins 504 Versteel 1106 Wall Goldfinger 1304 Weinberg Modern 407 Wood & Hogan, Inc. 812 Wood-Mode, Inc./T.O. Gronlund Co. 1515 Woodwrights Wide Plank Flooring 436 NYDC Café 1st Floor New York Design Center 426

P H O NE 212.679.0300 212.337.9909 646.293.6649 212.3924750 212.725.0340 212.686.7600 866.570.9690 212.213.6600 212.725.0340 212.488.7000 212.686.7600 212.532.2750 212.545.9200 212.251.0132 212.689.1565 212.545.0032 212.729.1938 646.486.3272 646.293.6622 212.684.0735 212.683.7272 212.226.1868 212.319.7979 212.287.0063 212.683.2232 212.839.0500 336.884.9271 212.252.7370 212.644.2292 212.679.0300 212.689.0300 212.679.0030 212.689.6903 212.966.6112 212.696.0080 212.696.4938 212.726.0006

FA X 212.679.5996 212.337.1090 646.293.6657 212.684.7350

973.227.3544 212.684.7350 212.488.7006 212.686.7686 212.532.2875 212.545.9438 212.689.1578 212.545.0031 212.729.1939 646.349.5619 917.591.2413 212.725.2185 212.683.7011 212.226.5504 212.319.6116 212.287.0066 212.683.1297 212.839.0501 336.882.7405 917.289.1228

212.679.5996 212.689.7149 212.679.5996 212.685.1807 212.966.6113 212.696.4248 212.696.5333 212.726.0061 212.203.4382 888.713.6042 212.684.3720 212.684.3257 212.684.4217 212.545.8376 212.685.0600 212.244.9131 212.961.6984 212.696.9762 212.696.2729 212.545.0205 212.545.0305 212.956.0030 212.956.0031 212.213.2703 212.231.2708 336.885.5005 336.885.5260 212.736.6564 212.244.9131 212.213.2470 212.213.2464 212.684.8696 212.684.8696 212.584.9580 212.355.3383 212.355.3116 800.876.2120 212.683.7272 212.683.7011 646.291.2059 212.532.7440 212.532.6440 212.679.3535 212.725.3847 212.390.8944 646.616.0584 212.679.9500 212.447.1669


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backstory Working Girl

By Jim Lochner

T he Martha Washington H otel spent most of the 20th century catering exclusively to single women.

Left to right: Vintage postcard for the hotel; 1940s screen siren Veronica Lake found work as a barmaid at the hotel in the ’50s; the hotel’s new lobby incorporates the building’s historic architectural elements (photo: Jonathan Chelsey).

At the turn at the 20th century, an 1899 New York Tribune article reported that there were 60–70,000 “self-supporting women in the city, many with nowhere to live.” Increasing numbers of women were entering the workforce and, outside of living with their parents or in boarding houses, residential options for single, working women were few. While it was acceptable for single men to live in a residential hotel, public concerns for their protection and lack of supervision made it difficult for women. Many New York hotels would not accept a single woman traveler after 6 p.m. unless accompanied by a trunk, proving she was a guest in the city. In 1903, the Martha Washington Hotel opened on East 29th Street, becoming the first residential hotel catering exclusively to women. The Women’s Hotel Company was founded in 1897 for the express purpose of building high-grade hotels exclusively for business and professional women. In 1901 the company purchased two lots through the block on East 29th and 30th Streets, 100 feet west of Madison Avenue. They paid $200,000 to the American Female Guardian Society, which owned the property, and demolished the school the Society ran on the site. Prominent architect Robert W. Gibson won a competition for the commission to design the 12-story hotel. Gibson, known for his ecclesiastical and commercial designs in Manhattan and upstate New York, designed

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the building in the Renaissance Revival style. Cornices divide the brick and limestone exterior horizontally, and projecting or grouped bays give it a vertical emphasis. Ornamental details such as quoins, splayed lintels, and balconettes with iron railings highlight various parts of the facade. Inside, there were apartments, single and en suite, for 500 permanents residents (at $3–$17 per week) and 75 transient guests (from $1–$3.50 a day). The original tenants consisted of teachers, bookkeepers, writers, nurses, physicians, and other professional women. While men served as elevator operators, the “fronts,” a mail and key clerk, and headwaiter, the assistant room clerk, cashier, and bookkeeper were women, as well as 50 waitresses and 30 chambermaids. The building housed a drug store, a ladies’ tailor shop and millinery store, a manicurist and chiropodist, a ladies’ shoe polishing parlor, and a newspaper stand. During its first few years of existence, sightseeing tours often stopped at the hotel to gawk at the strange sight of women living alone. However, by 1911 the concept was more accepted. A publication that year from the New York Edison Company proclaimed: “No matter how unprotected a young girl may be who comes alone to town, with ‘Martha Washington’ for a chaperone, she is considered as safe as in her own home.” Famous residents of the hotel included Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Sara Teasdale and actress Louise Brooks, who moved there after being

evicted from the Algonquin Hotel. In the 1950s, screen siren Veronica Lake, divorced and drifting among a string of cheap hotels, finally found work as a barmaid at the hotel. The building served as the location for the movie Valley of the Dolls and from 1907 it was the headquarters for the Interurban Women’s Suffrage Council. The Martha Washington Hotel continued as a women-only hotel until 1998. After several name changes in the new millennium, the hotel returned to its most famous namesake in 2014, becoming a full-service hotel for the first time. The new, 265-room Martha Washington has over 4,000 square feet of state-of-the-art meeting and event space, and multiple public spaces. Selldorf Architects turned to the spirit of the original building for their redesign of the interiors, modernizing the fluted columns and coffered ceilings, and using the turn-of-thecentury large, open spaces to incorporate both the hotel lobby and restaurants. Adjacent to the front lobby, Marta, the latest restaurant from Danny Meyer’s Union Square Hospitality Group, is already a popular spot for pizza lovers. (See p. 38 for more on Marta.) While guests unfortunately can no longer find a room for a dollar a day, the hotel now caters “exclusively to everyone.” The first First Lady would be proud.


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ARRAY Magazine brings the most interesting people, places and ideas in interior design into the homes and offices of both design professiona...

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