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CARRIER AND COMPANY Hits the Beach

KIT KEMP Manhattan Follies

MAN IN MOTION KGBL

Timothy Making Brown It Here Takes Off JUN OCT

JUL NOV AUG DEC SEP JAN 2017 2017-18 $6.50 $6.50

TREASURES DAVID ON 10 KORINS

Digging Showstopper 1stdibs Display through January 2018


Inside front cover

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INTERIOR DESIGN & FURNITURE COLLECTION

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DIXON CONSOLE

REPRESENTED AT THE NEW YORK DESIGN CENTER BY

DENNIS MILLER A S S O C I A T E S W W W. D E N N I S M I L L E R . C O M W W W. C H R I S T I A N G R E V S TA D . C O M OCT

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Timelessly designed, each piece of SA Baxter hardware and lighting carries the SA Baxter mark. It is our master artisans’ signature, attesting to the quality of the piece and certifying that it has not only been produced using the finest materials, but that it meets the highest standards of design. It is a promise of our unending commitment to produce the worlds most distinctive hardware and lighting in our foundry and atelier.

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Features Volume 14 Issue 3

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12 He'll Take Manhattan By Cathy Whitlock Meet David Korins, the Design World’s Everyman.

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20 Making It Here By Catherine McHugh David Khouri, Roberto Guzman and Christiaan Bunce of KGBL bring their Brooklyn-built furniture to 200 Lex.

24 Kit Kemp’s Folly By Cathy Whitlock The Colorful and Eclectic Whitby Hotel.

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Departments Volume 14 Issue 3

8 STYLERADAR By Katie Doyle We selected the season’s best hostess gifts so you don’t have to.

10 TROVE By Katie Doyle When it comes to gifting, it’s the thought that counts— but these unique finds are beautiful too.

32 BOOKS By Cathy Whitlock Designer retrospectives and a canine celebration are among the new books that will vie for space on your coffee table.

34 EATS’N’SLEEPS By Katie Doyle From upscale Korean barbecue to a famous diner revival, rooftop pools to gourmet pizzas, hot new restaurants and hotels are bringing life to NYC neighborhoods.

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36 GALLERY 44

A picture-perfect showroom exhibition. l FRESHPICKS The most current products in 200 Lex showrooms.

52 STYLESPOTLIGHT Featured highlights of craft and design.

60 DEFININGPIECES Items that sum up what a showroom is all about.

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68 NEWSHOWROOMS Fresh faces and new designs.

69 SHOWROOMPORTRAITS Profiles of some of 200 Lex's most familiar names.

72 SHOWROOMDIRECTORY A complete list of who’s where in 200 Lex.

75 CULTURECALENDAR By Catherine McHugh Taking the night air with Jack-o'lanterns, celebrating women’s suffrage, experimenting with the five senses and enjoying a Christmas classic.

78 EVENTSAT200LEX A look at a few recent celebrations.

80 BACKSTORY By Ted Lambert Town Hall, the 95-year-old performing venue and national landmark, has a rich history of letting every voice be heard.

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ARRAY MAGAZINE, INC. 115 West 18th Street Second Floor New York, NY 10011 +1.212.929.2733 x103 arrayny.com

ARRAY editorial coverage@arrayny.com ARRAY advertising adinfo@arrayny.com ARRAY Magazine is produced three times per year. All submissions should be e-mailed to: coverage@arrayny.com

Array Magazine, Inc. Š 2017-18 All rights reserved The contents of ARRAY Magazine, Inc., may not be reproduced without written permission from the publisher.

EDITORIAL Paul Millman Editor-in-Chief/Publisher Sheau Ling Soo Creative Director Ted Lambert Executive Editor Annette Rose-Shapiro Managing Editor/Copy Editor Cathy Whitlock Features Editor Andrew French Photographer Adam Cohen IT Manager

CONTRIBUTORS Catherine McHugh Cathy Whitlock Katie Doyle Ted Lambert

NEW YORK DESIGN CENTER James P. Druckman President & CEO Daniel M. Farr Director of Operations Alix M. Lerman Chief Marketing Officer Leah S. Blank Director of Special Events/Marketing Brenna Stevens Marketing & Digital Manager Susan Lai Controller Vera Markovich Accounting Manager ON THE COVER Kit Kemp photographed by Simon Brown Photography.

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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR Dear Readers, It’s showtime, folks! Summer has come to an end, and ‘tis the season to shift back into gear. This is always my favorite time of year in New York. As the days become shorter, creative juices start flowing again as we get down to business.

Fall is also when the entertainment world turns serious. New TV shows debut, Broadway begins a new season, and the “grown-up” movies vying for awards are released. The design world always includes a little show business razzle-dazzle too, and we’re about pull back the curtain on new ideas and projects as we make big plans for the coming year. Designer David Korins is a seasoned showman. Not only is David an Emmy Award winner and multiple Tonynominated scenic designer, he also designs restaurant and hospitality interiors, in addition to art gallery and auction house-curated art shows. Our own Cathy Whitlock got a backstage tour of Korin’s busy world (He’ll Take Manhattan, p.12). Hospitality is a show unto itself, but more often than not, today’s hotels are sleek, shiny and subdued. Not The Whitby Hotel. Designer Kit Kemp brings a whimsical, bright and playful eye to The Whitby’s public and private rooms (Kit Kemp’s Folly, p. 24). Her work is a delight for the eye and a welcome respite from the ordinary. New York is a showcase for the best and brightest, and having a showroom at 200 Lex is part of hitting the big time. That’s why David Khouri, Roberto Guzman and Christiaan Bunce of KGBL decided to move center stage. Earlier this year, the trio relocated their showroom to the 16th floor of 200 Lex, as they also expanded their production facilities to a larger factory in Brooklyn. Meet the three partners who are equally dedicated to a modern aesthetic and OldWorld local craftsmanship (Making It Here, p. 20). Here at ARRAY, we hope that you find inspiration within these pages to get back in the city swing, as you take one last look in the mirror before stepping into the limelight. Break a leg!

Paul Millman Editor-in-Chief

Photo by Andrew French

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StyleRadar

By Katie Doyle

e b s t s ' n g o ifts s a eS We s e l

ected the season’s best hostess gif ts s o yo u d o n ’ t h a ve t o .

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In giving, we receive, though during the holiday season the challenges and stress of selecting that perfect item can feel like they outweigh the very meaning of the ritual. Here at ARRAY, we wanted to change that for you. We selected some of our favorite items—that make the perfect host or hostess gift. 1. For the aspiring outdoors(wo)men… Moose Stack Mugs, $49.00 A&G Merch aandgmerch.com We’re eyeing these for friends with a Colorado ski cabin, Adirondack lake house or anywhere where fauna run freer than in the city. Made by A&G Merch in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, these stackable mugs make the most whimsical addition to any setting—we’re thinking coffee on Christmas morning or eggnog by the fireplace on Christmas Eve. 2. For the avant garde… Reactive Cocktail Shaker, $58.00 anthropologie.com Forget all that sleek silver; this is a cocktail shaker for those who like to think and act outside of the box, and we know one or two of them and bet you probably do too. Made with burnished steel and topped with agate crystal in Anthropologie’s private studio, due to the nature of the crafting process, no two shakers are alike (just as no one’s like that dear friend of yours). Bring ingredients for an exotic cocktail (like the ‘Velvet Slipper’ with oak-aged tequila, mezcal smoked paprika, clove, vanilla, egg whites, rosemary, orange bitters) to really turn on the charm. 3. For the discerning ‘decant-er’… Oxymore Square Decanter by Saint-Louis, $660 Les Ateliers Courbets ateliercourbet.com Both booze enthusiasts and glassware wonks will greatly appreciate this square decanter. Inspired by the Art Deco Movement, it adds instant sophistication to any tabletop. The decanter is made, of course, by Saint-Louis Crystal, which was founded in France in 1586 and is there one of the oldest cristallerie in Europe. If you’re looking for the statementmaking gift—this is it. 4. For the restaurant explorer… The New Brooklyn Cookbook, $40.00 Fish’s Eddy fishseddy.com We all know that guy or gal who stalks restaurant openings like they’re the NASDAQ. Whether or not they’re keeping an eye on Brooklyn buzz, they’ll appreciate this book, which packs in a bevy of recipes and stories from 31 restaurants (from Rose Water to Al Di Là, Saul to Convivium Osteria) that made Brooklyn a mover and shaker in the culinary world.

5. For the locavore… Glorious Gin: Oaked, $31.99 Breukelen Distilling astorwines.com Everyone loves a good bottle of spirit, but Breukelen Distilling is distinguished by the fact that it is made from scratch right in Brooklyn, using grains from New York farms. No coloring, additives or extracts—just good old grain, water, yeast and nutrient, enzymes, oak barrels for the whiskey, and juniper, lemon, rosemary, ginger and grapefruit for the gin. We love the Glorious Gin: Oaked, the second to the left, perfect to share around the fireplace on a cold winter’s night. 6. For the distinguished drinker… Pewter Pocket Flash and Funnel, shown together ($68 and $12, respectively) Modern Anthology modernanthology.com Let’s be real: winters are cold for those of us on the East Coast, and holidays can be hard to get through. What better way to tote a warming nip than in this gorgeous pewter flask? We’re sure your recipient will silently thank you for many swigs to come. And, so there should be no doubts about its quality or origin, this flask is stamped with all seals of authenticity and association: Wentworth initials, the coat of arms of Sheffield, the Pewter Craftsmen trade guild stamp, and a European Union authentication stamp. 7. For the sweettooth… Apricot Rieseling Spread, $10.00 Michele Varian michelevarian.com Made in Detroit with local ingredients, this spread is a sweet nod of fondness for a friend (and easy to carry to parties). A dash of semi-dry Michigan Riesling adds a surprising swirl of sweetness to this tart, 100% natural apricot jam. It pairs wonderfully with Brie and goat cheese, both of which make an excellent addendum to this gift, or if you’re making a morning appearance, warm croissants will do the trick. 8. For the lover of pretty things… Anemones Bud Vase, $850 Lalique lalique.com The Anemones Bud Vase is the perfect gift for the lady who likes a little sparkle, and can tell glitter from gold. The vase is an iconic Lalique piece, featuring the anemone flower that inspired René Lalique so much that he made it a centerpiece of many objects of his work. This vase is stunning to behold, made in France with satin-finished, re-polished crystal.

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Trove 01

By Katie Doyle

When it comes to gifting, it’s the thought that counts—but these unique finds are beautiful too.

CITY PET The pigeon might as well be Manhattan’s mascot, and this cast-iron, life-size pigeon is a charming nod to New York. Though pigeons might be seen as a nuisance in these parts of the woods, pigeons and humans have lived in close proximity for thousands of years, dating back to Mesopotamia in 3000 B.C., and the birds are in fact revered by many religions of the world. This pigeon will keep watch over your space, or, if you opt to put it to work, it can even stand as a door holder. Cast Iron Pigeon, $45 at michelevarian.com.

02 THE WAY OF TEA These days, tea is perhaps best known for its positive health benefits. But with its roots in Eastern traditions, tea has long since carried deeper meanings, symbolizing the art of consciousness and the joy of finding tranquility in the present moment, no matter what that moment bears. This mindfully-crafted teapot from Kikkerland is a beautiful way to imbue these qualities into your home. With double-walled glass that makes for safe and easy handling, its removable wire infuser allows you to brew the very best loose leaf tea while preventing the leaves from getting into your cup. Ora Teapot, $45 at kikkerland.com.

LEATHERBOUND
 Finally, protection for your iPhone that doesn’t detract from the beautiful design that made the product so famous in the first place. Indeed, this is the iPhone “case” for the anti-case folk, though this is not a “case” in the true sense of the word. It is a premium Argentinean leather backing that adheres to your phone; the adhesive will never leave a residue and is reusable. The leather back adds grip without bulk, and is available in a variety of vegetable-dyed shades. iPhone Leather Back
Vaja, $39 at vajacases.com.

03 SLIPPING INTO COMFORT

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The slipper’s been overdue for a 21st century re-design, and Mahabis is making it happen. Designed in London and made in Europe, these felt slippers are incredibly lightweight and lined with the softest lambswool with a balance of breathability and warmth. What sets these slippers apart, though, is the removable, interchangeable outer sole that allows for true indoor-outdoor wear, perfect for late-night dog walks or early morning latte runs. Mahabis Classic, $110 at mahabis.com.


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SERIOUS GLAMPING In such a high-strung city that is situated in an everconnected world, there can be great joy (and deep benefit) in getting back in touch with nature. The increasing popularity of “glamping”—where camping meets glamour, or luxury at the least—means that you can enjoy the outdoors without the various irritants that tend to be part of the package. Southern California’s El Capitan Canyon is the perfect place to do that, where you can choose from a cedar cabin, a safari tent or an adventure yurt, all located by the beach (and in proximity to wine country if you end up needing an escape from the woods). El Capitan Lodging, prices vary at elcapitancanyon.com.

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You can’t beat a leather camera strap. This gorgeous, rich mahogany leather boasts more than just good looks; it also features two adjustable straps at each end, and a substantive shoulder pad, thereby matching form with function. That’s true to Moore & Giles’ reputation—the leather supply company was founded during the Great Depression in Lynchburg, Virginia, where the shoe specialists broadened their focus to include accessories, furniture and more, all underscored by top-quality leather and meticulous craftsmanship. Moore & Giles Leather Camera Strap, $145 at modernathology.com.

WAX AND WANE
 This luxurious candle packs a pleasing element of surprise—it melts down into a rich massage oil, scented with Rose de Mai (the ‘provence Rose’ dating back to 17th century Dutch rose breeders) from the French Riviera. Essentially a delightful ‘2in-1’ gift, after five to 10 minutes of burn time, the wax can be applied to directly to the skin. Formulated with only the best ingredients, a natural, nourishing blend of beeswax, coconut and soybean, the wax can be used as a body oil, facial oil or cleanser, or message medium. Rose de Mai Massage, Body Oil & Treatment Candle, $55 at net-a-porter.com.

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MARBLE DOCK Cut from solid marble and hand-polished, this marble charging dock for your Apple Watch is not only a beautiful accessory for your nightstand, but also highly functional. Compatible with all Apple Watch models, sizes and strap styles, the dock features a weighted base that allows you to use your watch as an alarm clock, or even navigate its interface while it is charging. The dock is available in white marble with a rose gold arm, or black marble with a silver arm. Apple Watch Marble Charging Platform, $139 at amara.com.

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HE’LL TAKE MANHATTAN MEET DAVID KORINS, THE DESIGN WORLD’S EVERYMAN.

33 different versions of brick were used for the backdrop of the Tony Award-winning play Hamilton. 12


By Cathy Whitlock

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or David Korins, the neon lights shine a bit brighter on Broadway.

First, there are the Broadway and opera set designs (too numerous to list) followed by the back-to-back Tony nods (Hamilton and War Paint). Then there are the live performances and festivals (Mariah Carey, Bruno Mars and Kanye West, along with Bonnaroo and Grease Live! just to name a few). Add the restaurant designs for Manhattan’s Florian and the redesign and reopening of Bond 45, toss in gallery exhibits, commercials and film production design, and you have the multifaceted career of David Korins.

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Korins created two different worlds - Cleveland and New York City - for the hit Broadway musical Bandstand.

Korins’ design journey began with a precipitous and perhaps unusual “aha” moment at the age of 18 or so, when the soon-to-be designer was driving through a post-rain, puddle-filled parking lot in his hometown in Massachusetts. “I was driving through these massive puddles in a grocery parking lot and thought how everything in the world needs to be designed, from a parking lot to the landscape to the drainage systems— literally everything, however pleasing or not, needs to be designed. It was really a breakthrough moment!” Studies at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst followed where the college athlete found his passion, eventually graduating with a BA in theater and receiving the inaugural honors degree in theatre design. Korins honed his craft with an internship and resident design position at Williamstown Theatre Festival, along with a six-year stint as co-founder of a nonprofit Edge Theater Company in Manhattan. In 2004 he struck out on his own, establishing David Korins Design and the rest, as they say, is history.

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David Korins


For the War Paint sets, Korin’s task was to create a contrast between the worlds of Elizabeth Arden and Helena Rubenstein.

Korin’s created the scenic designs for the jukebox Broadway musical Motown.

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The designer created fantastical colorful sets for the hyperkinetic musical Pee Wee Herman Show on Broadway.

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Speaking of history, a subsequent meeting with producer and star Lin-Manuel Miranda led to the gig of a lifetime as the set designer of a then little known Off-Broadway play about the Founding Fathers and the people who built our country. The rapbased phenomena known as Hamilton went on to be a Broadway juggernaut, and while his designs for plays such as Stephen King’s Misery and Bandstand may have put Korins on the map, this was the proverbial game changer. Korins's designs for the show revolve around a circular concentric turntable that allows for the show’s dynamic choreography while the brick walls (attentive theatergoers will note it grows in Act Two) become a metaphor of the country’s progress. A stickler for detail, he went through 33 variations for the brick color before getting it just right.

For the recent Tony Award-winning Best Play Dear Evan Hansen, the performers are immersed in a cyber-landscape courtesy of “insular visual moments like one screen representing Snapchat or direct messages all the way to multiple screens in multiple layers and multiple heights,” detail Korins. “The show is a very successful kind of retelling and meditation of the experience of going onto the internet.” Four blocks away, Korin’s designs for the opulent and utilitarian world of cosmetic titans Helena Rubenstein and Elizabeth Arden appear nightly in War Paint. From the large pink staircase used in the opener to the laboratories and Fifth Avenue Right: The designs of the Tony Award-winning Dear Evan Hansen was created so the audience can be immersed in the cyber landscape of the Internet.

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Top: For inspiration Korins drove through Tuscany and Milan researching food, restaurants and sources for his ventures Florian (seen here) and Bond 45.

Left: The designer wanted to use authentic dĂŠcor that resulted in the shipment of tiles from Milan.

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Marble, tile, leather and bronze statues create an old world Tuscan feeling at the Florian.

apartments, the show spans forty years and represents a different type of period design. “The challenge was not to depict Arden’s world in direct contrast to Rubenstein’s,” the designer elaborates. “They were incredible trailblazers in their personal lives, style, power and the products they designed shaped a whole world. We couldn’t translate the incredible opulence and high style of their locations so we boiled it down to the essence of what those things would be, such as Arden’s patented pink floral arrangements and her decadence in regard to bows and boxes, etc. Rubenstein was really all about clean lines and utilitarian lab things and was a massive world-class art collector.“ For the 40-year-old visionary, it’s all about the creative process, one that is always rooted in entertainment. Working with a staff of ten illustrators, set designers, fabricators and project managers, Korins added restaurant design to his ever-expanding resume. “Doing a restaurant is like doing a piece of theater that never opens,” he says of his projects, Manhattan’s Italian trattoria Florian that

was recently closed to make way for the new venture, the upcoming landmark Bond 45 (located across the street from Hamilton’s home at the Richard Rodgers Theatre and opening in September). Working with restaurateur Shelly Fireman, Korins traveled to Tuscany on a reconnaissance mission of sorts where they literally “ate our way through Italy, researching décor, food and inspirations that was photographed and documented for ten days.” Diners will be able to view scenic vistas of Italy via a live installation taken over an eight to ten hour period that will run during different times of the day. “It is an artful relaxing experience and eventually we will have a stop motion video which will take you from the entire build to the first plate of pasta.” 2017 has been a very good year for Korins. With four plays running on the Great White Way along with an upcoming restaurant in the theatre district, can a hotel be far behind? Stay tuned.

Photo credits: Courtesy of David Korins Design

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By Catherine McHugh

Making It Here

DAVID KHOURI, ROBERTO GUZMAN AND CHRISTIAAN BUNCE OF KGBL BRING THEIR BROOKLYN BUILT FURNITURE TO 200 LEX

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uite 1616 of 200 Lex is a sleek, glass-walled showroom where its residents, David Khouri, Roberto Guzman and Christiaan Bunce of KGBL, display a wide selection of the unapologetically modern luxury furniture they make at their workshop in Brooklyn. 2017 has been a year of big moves for the trio. In January, they moved their workshop from Greenpoint to East New York. By the end of March, they had relocated their showroom from West Chelsea to the New York Design Center. Visitors may notice the company’s minimalist logo etched into the walls—KGBL framed in an expanded trio of diamonds. Those who look closely may notice that it is designed to invoke a boxing ring. Ah! But what does boxing have to do with modern luxury furniture? Here’s a hint: The Mayweather Sofa, covered in leaf green silk velvet, sits directly across from the quilted, sculpted Liston Sofa; between them rests the Duran Coffee Table. “None of us can ever seem to agree on anything, but that wasn’t the case when it came to naming our pieces,” Bunce explains. “I was really into boxing at the time, so I suggested using boxers’ names.” The Duran, one of their most popular pieces, is topped with borosilicate glass. “That material used to be sold under the brand name DURAN, which made me think of Roberto Duran,” Guzman says. “It made David think of Duran Duran, so his idea was to name everything after New Wave groups.” But Khouri concedes, “We would run out of names quickly, and I couldn’t really picture having a Boy George table in the collection.” In the Boxing Hall of Fame there are Japanese, Irish, English, Spanish names. “We will use

either first or last names,” Guzman says. “And because there are so many different nationalities, it makes it difficult for people to tie it together.” The partners had signed their first lease in July 2008—just before the housing market crashed. “It was like incorporating in November of 1929,” Khouri says. “But we survived!” They not only survived; they have thrived. By August 2009, they had moved to a space near the newly opened High Line Park in Chelsea. The trio officially opened KGBL in February 2010. None of them started out as high-end furniture designers. Both Khouri and Guzman grew up in California and then met at Columbia University while working on their masters degrees in architecture. Upon graduating, Khouri signed on with a small boutique firm in SoHo where he gained a broad range of experience—and the owner gave him all the furniture design work. He fell in love with that aspect of the business.

“Everything was so compromised on the client side of the job,” Khouri says. “But with furniture, it’s like instant gratification.” Meanwhile, Guzman had begun working at a series of well-known architecture houses where he absorbed how the business side of the profession works. In 1998, Khouri and Guzman formed Comma Inc., an architecture and furniture design company, and introduced a line of furniture at the ICFF (International Contemporary Furniture Fair) to wide critical praise. Unfortunately, that didn’t translate into big sales. Enter Christiaan Bunce. Though he initially planned on becoming a chef, Bunce ended up earning his Bachelor’s and Masters of Fine Arts degrees from the University of Washington. He then attended the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in Maine before moving to New York City. In 1995, he moved to Greenpoint, Brooklyn, where he worked restaurant jobs while pursuing his dream of becoming an artist—which eventually led him into furniture design as well.

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Friends sent him to Guzman and Khouri to get some advice ahead of his own ICFF showing in 1999. Soon they began collaborating on different projects and then sharing office space in SoHo. “My being more rooted in the physical aspect of creating items set up a good relationship for us,” Bunce says. “I had a shop and some experience and knowledge about working with various materials, so between us we covered broader bases.”

nobody else to make it for me. I knew I had to do it. So I just made a lot of mistakes while learning how to manipulate materials. “Roberto will say I’m obsessed with how a piece is put together but if you’re looking at the craft, then you’re not looking at the piece,” Bunce continues. “It has to be done just right so that the piece itself shines.” After a big developer bought the Hall Street manufacturing complex last year (which housed their Greenpoint facility), KGBL relocated the workshop to East New York. “It’s a nicely organized space and there are a lot of different types of manufacturers in that area— plus, more specialty shops are showing up,” Bunce says. “I also like being a little bit more remote and having a bit of grit around.” Conversely, their 200 Lex showroom is neither gritty nor remote, and the latter was a big attraction for the designers. “Where we were in Chelsea, there was zero street traffic,” Khouri says. “We wanted the gallery vibe because we want people to associate our furniture with art. But we realized that if we were ever going to grow the business in a significant way, then we needed to be where a lot of people could discover us.”

Initially, Bunce would build projects that Guzman and Khouri had designed. “But whether it was in interior design or architecture, or, now, our furniture, we take on different roles,” Guzman explains. “David has always concentrated more on the aesthetics while Christiaan pays the most attention to how everything is constructed. I am more about the practical side. I may agree a piece is beautiful, but I will always point out if it doesn’t work.” They spent five frustrating years doing mostly design and architecture jobs to pay the bills, before refocusing the business on making furniture. Bunce’s Brooklyn connections gave the designers an opportunity to control the process. “I know a lot of people and small manufacturers there,” Bunce says. “I always knew what I wanted to make and what I wanted it to look like—very precisely—but I had

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“Jim Druckman (the New York Design Center’s president and CEO) was very persuasive in convincing us to come here,” Bunce adds. “He has really championed our furniture as a highquality product and he brings people in to see us all the time.” Being adjacent to the Butterfield Café at 200 Lex has also helped with foot traffic. Many visitors are pleasantly surprised to learn all the furniture is made just across the East River. “It’s funny,” Guzman says. “They just assume it’s made in Italy or at least Europe.” KGBL has six employees at its Brooklyn workshop, as well as several regular freelancers. “David handles taking all of the orders and then they go to various people,” Bunce explains. “Multiple vendors are sometimes involved. Eventually, all the pieces come together.”

As the bulk of its clientele consists of interior designers, KGBL does make every piece to order. “No one is limited to buying the 8-foot sofa,” Khouri says. “So it not only justifies our price, but it also helps designers earn their fee because they can give their clients exactly what they want and not just the closest fit that they could get.”


While that might be a natural evolution for the business, right now, the partners maintain a strict vetting process for each piece of furniture. “How people perceive us is the important thing,” Khouri says. “We try to only do things that will enhance the brand.” KGBL offers nine different types of wood, four or five different metal finishes and COM (customer’s own material) for fabrics. “People rarely want to do things to your furniture that will ruin the piece,” Khouri says. “They want you to succeed because if you look good, they look good. We’re all kind of on the same team. That’s what I really like about this business.” Of course, each piece is originally designed to be exactly how the designer envisioned it. “There has been a strong evolution in our design work since we began working together,” Bunce says. “I always fall back on basic formal design principles and, though their training was different from mine, David and Roberto have those same strengths. We also choose fabrics to highlight and accentuate what we want to see—and we’re not afraid of color. We don’t dumb things down so people will buy them.” Guzman, who runs the website (kgblnyc.com), likens the vibrant color choices to red-carpet dresses because they photograph well. “I always say I don’t want the Oscar gown that the Fashion Police would say only looks good

in person,” he says. “If we are going to put something online or in a catalog, a bright color is better. People will often come in and ask us what our Instagram tag is so there definitely is an element of showbiz involved.” KGBL also sells its furniture through select dealers in Chicago, Dallas, San Francisco and Toronto, most of whom approached the company because they were fans. While the art of design is the heart of the business, paying attention to what sells well has become an important consideration. “We have started talking about ‘filling a hole’ in the line and tracking what types of pieces are trending,” Khouri says. “We have 52 pieces in the line now, so I think we really do cover the main areas.” Recently, their most popular item has been the Gavilan Barstool. “We get calls all the time with people wanting 20 or 30 of them,” Guzman says. “That made us consider whether we might want to do contract furniture because once they hear the price, we rarely get the order.”

“You design with ego but then you have to put ego aside and look at the piece as a product,” Bunce concurs. “Now that we’re looking at a potential contract or a hospitality line, we will have to do the same thing. “I take a certain point of pride in the fact that we came to New York City and we actually have a viable business now where we design furniture that is beautifully crafted,” Bunce concludes. “I have known a lot of legitimately creative and talented people who have come to New York to follow their dreams of expression and found that it’s really hard to succeed.” So, in his own way, each designer seems to have embraced his inner boxer. After all, boxing is called “the sweet science” because it requires finding the perfect balance between hitting and not getting hit. At KGBL, they are clearly comfortable punching above their weight class.

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By Cathy Whitlock

Kit Kemp’s Folly: The Colorful and Eclectic Whitby Hotel

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n a sea of oversized lobbies, impersonal restaurants and monochromatic and minimalistic suites, The Whitby Hotel is a welcome departure. A recent addition to Manhattan’s hotel landscape, the upper midtown hotel is owned by London’s Firmdale Group, whose ten properties are known for their whimsical, colorful and most importantly, individual surroundings. Designed by Creative Director and co-owner Kit Kemp (husband Tim is her co-partner), storytelling is at the essence of each hotel’s DNA. “Hotels should be living things, not stuffy institutions,” she notes, and stuffy is the one thing their hotels are not. Cases in point—London’s Ham Yard Hotel boasts a vintage bowling alley, while SoHo’s Crosby Street Hotel lobby prominently displays a steel sculpture human head made of letters of the alphabet.

High arched headboards are a signature note in a Kit Kemp designed hotel.

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Interior designer and co-partner of the Firmdale Group, Kit Kemp.

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Top: "52 Baskets of Britain" adorn the ceiling above the bar at The Whitby. Bottom left and right: Broad strokes of bold color for the artwork in the hotel’s bar add to the eclectic mix.

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The designer’s penchant for collections is displayed with a large collection of serving plates hung in Perspex boxes.

Kemp added two large custom chandeliers for the hotel’s restaurant The Orangery. “They look splendid but we added the parrots on perches to make them less grand.”

While the inspiration for the Crosby Street Hotel was “art inspired by the written word,” The Whitby pays homage to the practices of decorative design. Rooted in alliances with craftsman and artists, Kemp explains, “I love art and craft. Craft always seemed the ‘looked down upon’ little sister of art and I felt it needed a champion, especially as we are so near to MoMA.” Contemporary designs co-mingle happily with organic pieces in the sixteen-story hotel’s popular hospitality areas (the bar and restaurants are packed with locals) with many giving the term “conversation piece” new meaning. For example, the designer hung “52 Baskets of Britain” over the bar, each with its own label complete with provenance and authenticity. Artist Martha Freud’s porcelain commissions of 48 iconic New York landmarks grace an entire wall of the hotel’s eatery, The Orangery, while serving plates framed in Perspex boxes fill the other. “They become works of art in themselves. The more you hang, the more interesting they become.”

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Top: A mix of large and small-scale patterns comprises the décor in The Whitby Suite. Bottom left: An outdoor city terrace adds to the suite’s appeal. Bottom right: The designer used fabrics from her own collection for the hotel’s rooms.

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Clockwise from top left: “The rooms are like a jewel box of color and tone. Some are vivid and others tonal and calming,” Kemp details. Shown here is a bedroom in The Whitby Suite. Kemp likes to place one large pattern in each room as seen in the Terrace Suite’s living room. Each suite offers spectacular views of 56th Street via floor to ceiling windows and an outdoor terrace. Floral, stripe and geometric patterns at play in the furnishings of the Terrace suite.

The old adage “God is in the details” is also one Kemp takes to heart as she notes, “Traveling through The Whitby should be a little adventure and every time one visits a new little gem is found. The thought behind the hotel was ‘every room tells a story’ (also the title of her second book).” The hotel is comprised of 86 individually designed bedrooms and suites, each one more interesting than the next. “There are sometimes three different fabrics on a chair and there is a different colour scheme in every room,” she says. “My background is designing fabric so I love texture, weave and pattern. The rooms are like a jewel box of colour and tone—some are vivid and other tonal and calming.” Never one to shy away from color, Kemp often balances the scheme with plain curtains and walls and “only one large design repeat per room

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Pendants lights placed in a circular pattern mix with floral and stripe patterns in the hotel’s Reading Room.

with a smaller contrasting one in colour and tone. Ultimately the room should be one you wish to sit in for a long time and have a peacefulness about it. It is a fallacy to think you cannot achieve this by using strong colour.”

Opposite page:

The British boutique hotel’s hospitality rooms exhibit Kemp’s signature flair as well. Named after an artist working at the start of the early 20th century, the Anrep Room houses reproduction mosaics from London’s National Museum. “They depict farming, cricket, sports, astronomy, theatre, engineering and speed. It probably covers the careers of many of our guests that may use the room.” The Araminta room features a wall design of American folk art mixed with Mythical Beasts (the designer’s Mythical Creatures pattern also appear on the hotel’s china, commissioned by Wedgewood). And the Reading Room, doubling as a library and private party area, features a light fixture in the shape of a magic circle in the center of the room. “It reminds me of Alice in Wonderland,” Kemp says. And last but not least, a state-ofthe-art screening room that features a Weekend Film Club completes the mix.

Top: Reproduced mosaics adorn the walls of the Anrep Room. Bottom left: “The walls of the room are our take on American Folk Art mixed with Mythical Beasts,” notes Kemp. Bottom right: A driftwood table adds a note of interest in one of the public areas.

If the hotel experience is the next theater, Kemp clearly has a Broadway hit. The Whitby Hotel 18 West 56th Street, New York, NY 10019 | 212.586.5656 | firmdalehotels.com/hotels/new-york/the-whitby-hotel OCT

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Books Beth Webb: An Eye for Beauty

At Home with Dogs and Their Designers: Sharing a Stylish Life

Authentic Design: Lauren Rottet and Rottet Studio

A Place to Call Home: Tradition, Style and Memory in the House

Beth Webb Rizzoli September 2017 256 pages $50

Susanna Salk October 2017 176 pages $35

Lauren Rottet Rizzoli October 2017 336 pages $75

Gil Shafer Rizzoli 256 pages $55

Beth Webb’s new monograph Beth Webb: An Eye for Beauty marks the Atlanta-based interior designer’s first book, and with her legions of fans in the south, an eagerly anticipated one as well. A former art dealer at Sotheby’s, Webb’s elegant interiors have graced homes and magazine pages for the past twenty years. Eye for Beauty chronicles twelve residences from Atlanta and a Georgia lake house to homes in Greenwich and Costa Rica, dissecting the design process, history and homeowner’s considerations of each highly individualized interior. As a fellow southerner, the book gives new meaning to the term Southern Style, taking it to a new level. This is a must-read no matter what part of the country you live.

There is no greater love than that between a designer and his or her dog. Often permanent fixtures residing on a silk covered recamier, they are clearly some of the most elegant appointments in the house. Lifestyle author Susanna Salk chronicles the love affair between interior designers and their fourlegged companions in her unique book At Home with Dogs and Their Designers: Sharing a Stylish Life. Each chapter takes a look at the dogs’ privileged lives and the fabulous interiors and gardens they share with their owners. Charlotte Moss’ Cavalier King Charles Spaniels Daisy and Buddy, Mary McDonald’s five pugs and Alex Papachristidi’s Yorkie Teddy are just a few of the canines ready for their close-up. Salk offers clever tips on how owners can coexist and design in a dog-friendly world, making it a valuable resource for any animal lover. The foreword is written by ARRAY favorite interior designer Robert Couturier who perhaps sums it up best. “Like all the designers shown here, it is possible to be devoted not only to design at the highest levels, but all to the four-legged creatures who share our beautiful homes.”

Celebrated interior architect Lauren Rottet’s first book Authentic Design: Lauren Rottet and Rottet Studio features her stunning work from the past fifteen years. Showcasing the founding principal’s sophisticated Modernism and Beaux-Arts classicism designs of an array of houses, apartments, hotels and design studio offices, Rottet’s projects are truly works of art. While the author notes she is a “minimalist at heart and would happily live in a white box with beautiful light,” her carefully curated interiors are all about simplicity and attention to historic detail. The Houston-based Rottet is the only woman to be elevated to Fellow status by both the American Institute of Architects and International Interior Design Association. Her varied corporate, hotel and hospitality work includes Bernhardt Furniture and Paul Hastings showrooms, St. Regis, The Langham in Chicago, Beverly Hills Hotel and the James Royal Palm hotels in Miami.

Gil Shafer’s long anticipated follow-up to his best seller The Great American House will delight devotees of the esteemed architect. Known for his historic renovations and restorations, and love of old traditional and classical houses, the AD100 member explores the fundamentals—architecture, landscape and décor. Influenced by “the great American house architects of the Colonial Revival period, such as Charles Platt and William Lawrence Bottomley,” his designs (much like his favorite home, Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello) are timeless. Part one encourages the reader to apply classical and traditional principles that blend in with all sorts of styles, past and present. Part two details in depth the designs of seven homes, including a camp on the Adirondacks’ Lake Placid, a classic Connecticut Colonial, a hillside cottage in Northern California and a coastal A-frame in Maine.

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By Cathy Whitlock

Designer retrospectives and a canine celebration are among the new books that will vie for space on your coffee table.

About Decorating

Fabulous!: The Dazzling Interiors of Tom Britt

Journey by Design: Katharine Pooley

From Classic to Contemporary: Decorating with Cullman & Kravis

Richard Keith Langham and Sara Ruffin Costello Rizzoli September 2017 $60

Mitchell Owens October 2017 304 pages $75

Jennifer Goulding Assouline September 2017 264 pages $85

Elissa Cullman and Tracey Pruzan Monacelli Books September 2017 272 pages $65

With roots in the Alabama and Manhattan, interior designer Richard Keith Langham’s first book showcases his interiors—a superb mix of color, tailoring, tradition and whimsy. Projects ranging from Jupiter Island in Florida and a townhouse in New Orleans to city dwellings in New York, Washington, DC and Memphis, his signature rooms reflect a “pared-down elegance” and his love of classicism, as well as the influences from mentors Mark Hampton and Keith Irvine. Langham’s approach to design is at the heart of the book. “Rooms should be comfortable, layered, and appointed with furnishings and details that acknowledge the past, albeit with a fresh and clear approach.” His clientele is a who’s who—Hilary Swank, Jackie O and Pat Buckley just to name a few— and will be a staple for the design traditionalist library. The book is co-written with Sara Ruffin Costello, former creative director of Domino Magazine.

At long last, a book on one of my favorite designers, written by one of my favorite magazine editors. Fabulous! is a comprehensive tome on the legendary Manhattan designer Tom Britt and penned by Architectural Digest’s Decorative Arts Editor Mitch Owens. The book showcases Britt’s fifty-four years in the industry. Known for his opulent, bold and often theatrical looks that encompassed both traditional and contemporary, his strong and loyal following of clients spanned the globe. A peek in New York’s iconic Dakota and a palace apartment in Jaipur are just a few of the pleasures that await. From those who followed his career with great interest to the newly initiated, put this one on the top of your list. Former AD editor Paige Rense writes the foreword, and the exclamation point in the title is no doubt a nod to one of the wittier and more exuberant interior designers the profession has ever seen.

Known for her cool, sophisticated interiors, British designer Katharine Pooley’s work can be attributed to one word—wanderlust. The home furnishings and interior designer, and boutique owner has visited over 190 countries from Ethiopia and Japan to Kuwait and the North Pole, and each trip has contributed to the sensibilities of her interiors. Highly regarded for her work that marries luxury and innovative craftsmanship with a nod towards contemporary, the London-based designer’s projects range from the VIP Royal Suites at Heathrow and a millionsquare-foot hotel in Shaoxing, China to private residences in Africa and Dubai. Her first book Journey by Design features a range of residential designs including Forter Castle in Scotland, a beach villa in Dubai’s Palm Islands and a contemporary home in Doha, Qatar.

Interior designer Elissa “Ellie” Cullman recently told ARRAY magazine that her “early clients are looking at their interiors and want to modernize but do not want to throw out everything they love.” It’s a challenge many of us face. Thankfully she tackles the design dilemma in her second book From Classic to Contemporary (her first best-selling book The Detailed Interior is a classic). Heralded for her ability to infuse and marry a wide range of classical historical looks with an eye towards modern, the book surveys fourteen different projects from the ground-up. A New York City duplex, a Miami villa, oceanfront Palm Beach house, Brooke Astor’s former Westchester estate and the author’s own home provide just a few of the examples of how we can “renew, modernize and reinvigorate any project.”

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Eats’N’Sleeps Cote 16 W. 22nd St. 212.401.7986 cotenyc.com

Hemlock 65 Rivington St. 646.649.2503 hemlocknyc.com

Emily 35 Downing St. at Bedford St. 917.935.6434 pizzalovesemily.com

Empire Diner 210 10th Ave. 212.335.2271 empire-diner.com

If you have yet to try Korean cuisine, now is the time and Cote is the place. Simon Kim’s second restaurant (his first was the Michelinstarred Piora) debuts with this “Korean steakhouse.” Here, in the heart of Flatiron, you’ll find Korean classics as well as steakhouse staples (shrimp cocktail, steak tartare). Although delicious options abound, consensus is that the Butcher’s Feast is your best bet—it features the chef’s choice cuts straight from Cote’s dry-aging room downstairs. Then, it’s up to you to cook it to your liking on the tabletop Korean barbecue. The feast—and it truly is a feast—is complimented by a tart stew with kimchi, steamed egg, ban chan and scallion salad, as well as dessert, all included with the meal. Top-notch service, plus the selection of fine wines and creative cocktails tops it all off, and the high-vibe atmosphere makes Cote perfect for group dining.

One-part all-natural wine bar, onepart small-plate hot spot, Hemlock is the type of place you might want (or need) to try more than once. Its diverse range of dishes are made for sharing, and are distinguished by innovative ingredients and novel pairings, the most unique of which include eggplant, cumin and chamomile; or striped bass, grilled leeks and creme fraiche, for example. Come with a daring palate, though if you’re the indecisive type, our favorites include the braised lamb ribs, accented by cherries and anise hyssop. The sweet potato bread and burned leaf butter is also a very good choice, as is the sweet cream ice cream on the dessert menu, served with buttermilk and malt. Note the menu is seasonal, so dishes may change to ensure only the freshest ingredients.

Some of the best things come from Brooklyn, Emily included. The popular joint, with its second location opening in the West Village, has been called “over-achieving” for its ability to make rave-worthy comfort food. Hamburgers, pizza, chicken wings—Emily, which is owned by Matt Hyland his wife Emily, does it all really, really well. That’s no coincidence, as there’s a lot of thought that goes into the menu at this Brooklyn-style neighborhood pizza joint, from the dough (slightly updated for this location, “between New York and New Haven style) to the famous Emmy burger (made with dry-aged beef, topped with Vermont cheddar and served on a pretzel bun). Upgrade to the horseshoe fries (topped with chorizo, cheddar cheese, salsa verde, slow poached egg and cilantro) and if you have room, add the Nguyen’s hot wings, made with gochujang, radish and ranch.

Re-opened thanks to the tour-deforce of the team behind Cafeteria, Empire Diner is back, and hopefully here to stay. Though the vibe may be vintage and the cuisine distinctly American, don’t think you’ll find basic burgers and pancakes here. If that’s what you’re after, don’t worry—you’ll find classics like the Empire special blend burger, the New York pastrami sandwich, or the crispy buttermilk waffle. But, under the purveyance of Chef John DeLucue, you’ll also find some unique interpretations of similar classics, like the sourdough pretzel fried chicken, the tuna “poke bowl,” the prime hanger steak with mizuna, bing cherries, and tomatillo salsa verde, or fresh baked pastries that include an apricot ginger scone. This is New York, after all, so in addition to the indulgent diner fare, you can also grab a pressed juice (and not the Tropicana-sort; we’re talking kale, apple, ginger, cucumber and parsley) or avocado toast.

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By Katie Doyle

From upscale Korean barbecue to a famous diner revival, rooftop pools to gourmet pizzas, hot new restaurants and hotels are bringing life to NYC neighborhoods.

Life Hotel 19 W. 31st St. 212.615.9900 lifehotel.com

Hyatt House Manhattan Chelsea 815 6th Ave. 212.513.0001 newyorkchelsea.house.hyatt.com

Ravel Hotel 8-08 Queens Plaza South 718.289.6101 ravelhotel.com

Hotel 50 Bowery 50 Bowery 212.508.8000 jdvhotels.com/hotels/new-york/newyork-city-hotels/50-bowery

If you’re looking for that “wow” factor, you’ll find it here. The Life Hotel, in the buzzy NoMad district, is based in the building once home to LIFE magazine. Its rich heritage is not lost here, with iconic touches like wrought iron bed frames, brass fixtures and high ceilings. Yet the 98 rooms have been recently renovated, and although their historic charm remains, guests will certainly enjoy the modern touch: including free high-speed WiFi, Carrara marble vanities and a full bath with a 7-inch rain shower head, socially conscious LATHER toiletries, and access to a 24/7 fitness facility complete with Peloton stationary bikes. The stylish, minimalist allwhite design scheme is accented by unique art and lighting, as well as subtle touches of wood and leather. The exterior of the building is equally as beautiful, with a gold cherub guarding the door and the word “Life” above it, dating back to the building’s earliest days.

Just blocks from Madison Square Park, the Hyatt House Chelsea is a home away from home in the heart of the city. Although weekend warriors are always accommodated, with a residential-style layout and modern, fully-equipped kitchens, the Hyatt House caters to guests who want to stay awhile—and gives them plenty of room to breathe. High-floor rooms offer spectacular views of the skyline, the Empire State Building included, from its floor-to-ceiling windows. Additional amenities include access to an 11th floor Outdoor Terrace that offers equally spectacular views, as well as state-of-the-art gym (or, if you’re so inclined, a House Host who can direct you to nearby jogging paths on Madison Square Park or Central Park). The Hyatt House offers complementary grocery shopping as well as breakfast with in your stay. If you’re coming to town with your (furry) best friend, rest assured that pets are welcome here.

Things start to look a little different when you explore the boroughs outside Manhattan. When it comes to the Ravel Hotel in Long Island City, that means you’ll find things like space… a lot of it. Think massive rooftop access that includes a lounge with a fire pit and D.J. booth, a 9,500-square-foot penthouse restaurant, and a rooftop pool—all with stunning city views, of course. The guests rooms are also especially spacious, with high ceilings (up to 11 feet) as well as ultra-luxe amenities, including a glass-enclosed shower with a rain shower head, an 18-inch pillow top mattress fitted with a hypoallergenic down comforter, and 400-count Egyptian cotton sheets. The open-style rooms are tastefully decorated in a color scheme of ivory and ochre, with rustic accessories such as a cow and sheep skin rugs, natural wood, and mahogany leather.

Luxury in Chinatown is no joke. Hotel 50 Bowery captures the vibe of the surrounding neighborhoods: the energy of Chinatown, the cheeky romance of Little Italy, the swag of the Lower East Side. With hip decor featuring tones of grey and white that are interrupted by colorful, surprising art pieces curated by Exhibition A, and unique modern accessories, Hotel 50 Bowery is a beautiful space to truly chill out in after you’ve had your share of the city. You’ll be pleased with the luxe linens and bathrobe, the Lefroy Brooks rain shower head, Jonathan Adler toiletries, and the Scroll Vintage bluetooth wireless speakers. The cherry on top is the wonderful rooftop bar and lounge, The Crown, featuring creative Asianinspired cocktails and small bites by the talented Chef Dale Talde. Hotel 50 Bowery is pet-friendly for those looking to bring along their pups.

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GALLERY A PI C T UR E -PE R F ECT SHOWROOM EXHIB ITION

Antler Chandelier available at Dennis Miller Associates, 212.684.0070, dennismiller.com

Won Rug in Charcoal available at WOVEN, 646.964.4838, woven.is OCT

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Gallery

Ice Crystal Sconces available at PROFILES, 212.689.6903, profilesny.com 38


Montana available at Verellen, 646.293.6695, verellen.biz Winged Chair available at Brueton, 212.838.1630, brueton.com

Byrd Arm Chair available at The Bright Group, 212.726.9030, thebrightgroup.com

Mazandaran Flatweave available at NASIRI, 212.532.6777, nasiricarpets.com

Alto tray available at Fermob USA, 678.267.2029, fermobusa.com

Albany Buffet available at Henredon, 212.725.3776, henredon.com

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Showroom kitchen available at Bakes & Kropp, 888.206.0015, bakesandkropp.com 40


Wish Paperweight available at Studio A Home, 212.725.8439, studioa-home.com Pomegranate and Hibiscus Pillow available at Global Views, 212.725.8439, globalviews.com

Alecia’s Necklace available at Metropolitan Lighting, 212.545.0032, metropolitanlighting.com

Vinton Chair available at Currey & Company, 212.213.4900, curreyandcompany.com/NYDC

Belmont Small/Tall Bar Cabinet available at Mr Brown London, 646.293.6622, mrbrownlondon.com Gucci Ice Bucket available at 1stdibs Gallery at 200 Lex, 646.293.6633, email antiques@nydc.com

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Jean-Louis Deniot Iron Eye Table Lamp available at Baker Furniture, 212.779.8810, bakerfurniture.com

Glynwood Bench available at Munder Skiles, 212.717.0149, munder-skiles.com

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Noor Block Kilim available at Odegard Carpets, 212.545.0205, oedgardcarpets.com

Diamond Party II at Leftbank Art, 646.293.6694, leftbankart.com

Ember Lounge Chair at Pearson, 212.725.3776, hickorychairpearson.com

Laucala Channeled Upholstered Bed at Hickory Chair, 212.725.3776, hickorychairpearson.com

Snowflake Door Lever available at SA Baxter Architectural Hardware, 212.203.4382, sabaxter.com

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freshpicks THE MOST CURRENT PRODUCTS IN 200 LEX SHOWROOMS.

Winning Laurels

A companion to the ever-popular Laurel Sofa, the lovely flowing Laurel Skirted Chair from Pearson beautiful chair has broad appeal. Available skirted or legged and with nail trim. Hickory Chair– Pearson–Henredon, Suite 102, phone 212.725.3776, henredon.com, hickorychairpearson.com

Outside Pitch

Fermob’s three-seater Ultrasofa is the masterpiece of a bold collection designed by Frédéric Sofia. This sumptuous, generous sofa won the Best Outdoor Lounge Product at NYCxDesign Awards in May 2017. Check out its six color combinations and the rest of the collection for a complete set of 100% outdoor, 100% comfortable garden furniture. Fermob USA, Suite 414, 678.267.2029, fermobusa.com OCT

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freshpicks

Balanced Light

Described by designer John Pomp as “a glassblower’s reinterpretation of Alexander Calder’s famous mobile sculptures,” the Calla Mobile, available from BRIGHT, features seven weighted glass crystal pieces balanced from a satin brass mobile. The handblown glass pieces are inspired by one of John’s favorite flowers, the calla lily. The Bright Group, Suite 902, 212.726.9030, thebrightgroup.com

Rise to the Occasion

The Pop-Up Table from Munder Skiles is a perfect addition to your terrace or garden, engineered for space-saving practicality. You can lower it for serving drinks or pop-up to dining height in seconds. Made of beautiful and durable teak, and offered in three shapes and sizes. Munder Skiles, Suite 436, 212.717.0149, munder-skiles.com

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Deco Diva Avintage-inspired luster adds an Art Deco feel to the luxe Paola Lamp at Global Views. Its totem shape, finished with a crackled, mercury glass effect, rests on a polished nickel base. Unique in form, this striking lamp doubles as a glamorous accent piece. Global Views, Suite 613, 212.725.8439, globalviews.com

In The Pink Dusty rose, blush, peony—whatever you call it, pink is trending in home and fashion lines. The Arden Lingerie Chest, part of Currey & Company’s Arden Collection, is constructed of solid hardwood with a reversepainted glass exterior edged with solid satin brass. This piece was inspired by a 1930s nightstand, spotted at Clignancourt in Paris. Currey & Company, Suite 506, 212.213.4900, curreyandcompany.com/NYDC

That ‘70s Seat The Harper Swivel Chair by Michael Berman Ltd. for PROFILES is a modern twist on a classic 1970s style tub chair. Its chic metal base swivels, and its gentle curves and angles are right on trend. PROFILES, Suite 1211, 212.689.6903, profilesny.com

To Dye For This Ziegler Sultanabad Carpet from NASIRI is made of 100% hand-carded, hand-spun and hand-knotted Persian wool and features beige, orange and blue organic vegetal dyes. Ziegler refers to the innovative Anglo-Swiss company that first brought Western touches to the traditional designs of Iran’s Sultanbad region in 1875. N A S I R I fine handmade carpets, Suite 714, 212.532.6777, nasiricarpets.com Style and Substance Verellen’s new Cooper Sofa is a perfect balance of luxury and enduring quality. Bench-crafted to clients’ specifications with a sustainably harvested hardwood frame and eightway, hand-tied seat construction, the mark of quality seating in the furniture industry. Available in three standard sizes with a tight upholstered deck, down seat pad, and copper finish metal base. Verellen, Suite 804, 646.293.6695, verellen.biz

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freshpicks Six and The City Brueton’s new Hexto Table is a stylish, clean and crisp hexagonal cocktail table with six angled vertical legs supporting a six-sided top and bottom frame. The exquisitely crafted, polished stainless steel base holds a set-in, sparkling plate glass top. The Hexto is available in custom sizes for residential, contract or hospitality markets. Brueton, Suite 910, 212.838.1630, brueton.com

Farm Fresh The Kips Bay Show House served as the perfect venue to unveil Bakes & Kropp’s new Revelane Transitional Cabinetry Collection. The cabinetry features modern silhouettes with an emphasis on clean lines and symmetry, but select parts are creatively finished in traditional “farmhouse” textures, including this signature warm gray, called fossil walnut. Bakes & Kropp, Suite 430, 917.512.4853, bakesandkropp.com 48


Float on Blue Blue Thoughts, from Leftbank Art is a giclée reproduction of a watercolor original printed on textured artist paper. Hand-applied gold leaf embellishments give the image a one-of-a-kind look. The image is floated over a linen-wrapped board and encased in an acrylic box. Also available as a gallery wrapped canvas with multiple frame options. Leftbank Art, Suite 609, 646.293.6694, leftbankart.com

Depth Charge Duvera, a new indoor/outdoor LED wall sconce by George Kovacs available at Metropolitan Lighting, captivates with its rich combination finish. Soft illumination gleams through etched white glass while the crisscrossing sand-silver and sandblack patterns give this sconce depth and allure. Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co., Suite 512, 212.545.0032, metropolitanlightingny.com

Diamond in the Tuft The generous Carlyle Chair from Hickory Chair is an updated, up-sized Klismos design as stylish as it is shapely. With an exposed wood back and a diamondtufted seat and back, it is destined to become the next neo-traditional icon. Hickory Chair–Pearson– Henredon, Suite 102, phone 212.725.3776, henredon. com, hickorychairpearson.com Mindful Meditation The Sen Indigo Rug, from the Mutation Collection at WOVEN, celebrates the beauty of the unfinished, the soulfulness of the imperfect and the artisan’s skill to create a versatile rug for a variety of settings. A Japanese asymmetry is achieved via hand-drawn design and muted color combinations, delivering a subtle mood of restraint and respite. WOVEN, Suite 805, 646.964.4838, woven.is

Base Texture Jeffrey Bilhuber’s Abingdon Chair is the perfect ladies chair with deep tufting on the inside tight back, English arm, and scalloped waterfall skirt under optional fringe. It also comes with one relax down toss pillow. Choose from 700+ fabrics in the Henredon line. Hickory Chair– Pearson–Henredon, Suite 102, phone 212.725.3776, henredon.com, hickorychairpearson.com OCT

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freshpicks

Brass and Blue The elegant new Briance Love Seat is a companion piece to 1st Dibs’ popular Briance Chair. It has five cast brass legs and a distinctive curved back. The beauty of the tapered legs and their graceful feet add a sophisticated touch to any room. This piece has been upholstered in a vibrant blue velvet. 1stdibs Gallery at 200 Lex, 646.293.6633, email antiques@nydc.com

Foundry Find

The intricate detail of the Rectilinear Mosaic Wall Sconce from S.A. Baxter is a nod to Frank Gehry’s use of utilitarian materials. The juxtaposition of clean lines and negative space draws the eye toward the glow emitted from the sleek glass case. SA Baxter Architectural Hardware, Suite 1205, 212.203.4382, sabaxter.com

Sleeping On The Moon Luna, was the Roman goddess of the moon, will ensure a celestial sleep. The Luna Bed at Dennis Miller Associates features tapered side return wings that enfold its lavish upholstered headboard. The headboard and bed frame ensemble are elevated by a thin hardwood base, that transitions into delicate legs. Dennis Miller Associates, Suite 1210, 212.684.0070, dennismiller.com

Wrap Star

Surfaced by hand in fine Belgian linen then given a multi-layered grey-toned glaze, the Toile Linen Chest from Studio A Home features oak-lined drawers and custom brass hardware with antique nickel finish. Fabric-wrapping furniture is an exacting art, revived with the help of one of the industry's leading manufacturers of accent furniture. Studio A Home, Suite 614, 212.725.8439, studioa-home.com 50


Arms to Hold You Barbara Barry’s new 70-piece collection for Baker Knapp & Tubbs represents a departure, with a more relaxed “warm modern” stance. “A favorite piece in the collection is the OBI Chair with it voluminous arms and deep seat,” remarked Barry. “It just says, “Come sit and relax,” and that is what we all want now…comfort with style.” Baker, Suite 300, 212.779.8810, bakerfurniture.com

Soft Step

Calico, at Odegard, is woven in a marvelous new structure from the prolific Kooches Carpets. It is hand-knotted in Nepal with softly spun two-ply Himalayan yarn and woolen weft. Its soft, organic pile is comfy enough to forgo the furniture. Odegard Carpets, Suite 1209, 212.545.0205, odegardcarpets.com

Minimal Ming

Classic and modern meld in the new Ming Console from Julian Chichester. The simple, sophisticated silhouette is a contiguous elegant line with an updated chow base, finished entirely in Chichester’s innovative new zinc metal shagreen—a hand-applied and highly textural metal finish—which mimics cast metal. Julian Chichester, Suite 604, 646.293.6622, julianchichester.com

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STYLESPOTLIGHT F E ATUR E D HI GHLIGHT S OF CR AFT AND D ES IG N .

1. ‘Round Again (opposite) Inspired by 12th-century Italian cathedral glass, John Pomp’s Rondelle Credenza from The Bright Group features handblown glass rondelles, an oxidized brass top, light oil-rubbed blackened steel frame, medium walnut wood, and brass details.   2. Get Closer Mr Brown’s new Beatrix Loveseat, a thoughtful modernization of classic spindle design is outfitted here in a monochromatic palette of autumnal brown-on-brown, featuring the company’s rustic oak finish and tactile mahogany velvet. OCT

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StyleSpotlight

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5 3. Hands of Time Clockmaking was a highly esteemed craft in the 18th century. The Burnished Time Sculpture Collection at Global Views celebrates that artistry, bringing to life the sculptural clock hands that adorn timepieces in the Colonial Williamsburg archives. 4. Graceful Bird Fall’s crisp air and an outdoor fire pair well with Munder Skiles’ Swan Lounge Chair & Ottoman. With its curved seat and slightly reclined back, it is great for relaxing or entertaining. In seven solid colors and eight multicolor finishes. 5. Sparkling Beverages Gorgeous golden hues pair handsomely with warm walnut for this Bakes & Kropp wet bar. The custom-finished matte walnut cabinetry features glass panels on top and high-gloss center panels below.

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6. Line Reading Welko Patina, from Studio Woven’s Pattern Collection, combines pale coloring with a lower pile weave, so lines run in a straight fashion, creating a cultured and orderly vintage feel. 7. Bridle Path With warm wood and the soft glow of frosted glass, the Equazione Chandelier by Pagani Studio at PROFILES brings a refined equestrian vibe to your clients’ homes. Available to be made to your custom specifications. 8. Channel Changer This Fluted Cabinet Pull from S.A. Baxter is a thoroughly contemporary reinterpretation of the narrow channels that were engraved in pillars in ancient Greece, typically in temples. 9. Golden Age These Lacquered Arm Chairs at 1stdibs were designed by Ezio Longhi in the 1950s. They were reupholstered in a sumptuous gold velvet that contrasts beautifully against the black lacquered frame. 10. Fireside Chats A graceful crescent shape with bench cushion and three loose knife-edge back pillows, Pearson’s Lilous Sofa is a great choice to pair up flanking a fireplace. Standard with two throw pillows.

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11. Tibetan Touch In the Pema Rug, available at Odegard, Kooches Carpets has recreated the perfect yarn texture, density, softness, and knotting techniques to reproduce the visually dynamic carpets of Tibet. 12. Be Happy The endearing Happy Hours Pedestal Table from Fermob is a resolutely sociable item. It boasts a bottle-shaped form (a nod to the brand’s Beaujolais home), a removable top, and a perforated shelf that holds up to six bottles. 13. Spanish Sanctuary Anees Upholstery’s chic and serene Barcelona Sofa, available at Dennis Miller Associates, is upholstered in a combination of leather and fabric, adding just a touch of relaxed attitude to any space. Available in 24 finishes.

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14. Sit, Stay Contoured Brueton’s stylized Comfy Chair has form-fitting contours and uniquely shaped wooden legs. As the name suggests, comfort is paramount in a classic style with modern appeal.  15. Tangerine Dream The Bolton Road Chair at Henredon, dressed here in exquisite tangerine velvet, has a tight back and seat with a mini welt trim on the bolsters and arms. 16. Light Waves As lights plays on the curvaceous, precision-carved waves of the Minuet Buffet from Studio A Home, it is subtly transformed, giving it an aura of fluid energy and dimension. 17. A Walk in the Woods Evoking gracefully falling leaves, the Autumn Pendant at Metropolitan Lighting is part of the Four Seasons collection from Hubbardton Forge. This hand-forged piece combines sculptural artistry with LED technology. OCT

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18. Marriage Material NASIRI’s Mazandaran Collection highlights a minimalist design aesthetic that existed hundreds of years before the modern era. These vintage flatweave kilims were created in the Mazandaran Province in northwest Iran to be included in bridal dowries. 19. Classic Bunny Designer Bunny Williams was inspired by a 1940s Italian fixture to create the Bainbridge Chandelier for Currey & Company. Its midcentury accents are highlighted by its antique brass finish and clear polished glass. 20. More Than Enough Verellen’s Grant Chair and a Half shown here is fully upholstered in luxurious, hazelnut Italian mohair with super soft, faux wolf fur toss pillows. Comes standard with upholstered legs.

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21. She’s a Gem The new Barbara Barry Collection from Baker includes glimmers of luminous hand-blown Murano glass lighting and vases, including the Gemstone Vases in nature-inspired colors. 22. Polish and Shine A giclée on canvas, Golden Marble, from Leftbank Art, has been enhanced with glass crystals and gold leaf. The multi-medium process adds texture and dimension to the canvas. 23. Masculin/Féminin You can add more distinctive detail to Hickory Chair’s romantic Athena Sofa with optional wood detail in American dark walnut to give this elegant original a more masculine air.

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De. FIN.ingPieces I T E MS THAT SUM U P WHAT A SHOWROOM IS AL L AB OUT.

Hickory Chair–Pearson–Henredon The Eden Barrel Back Chair is a staple of Pearson’s with its inviting channeled, button back. Available as a stationary chair or swivel chair, Eden is at home in any living space. Hickory Chair–Pearson–Henredon, Suite 102, 212.725.3776, hickorychairpearson.com

Global Views Chic-meets-industrial in this thought-provoking take on wall décor. Crafted in solid cast iron and finished in brass, nickel, and our famed iron, the Climbing Man Sculpture is a reminder of everyday triumphs and represents the rewards of working hard to get to that next level—be it in life, work or passion. Global Views, Suite 613, 212.725.8439, globalviews.com OCT

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DefiningPieces

N A S I R I fine handmade carpets The Mid-Century Modern Collection by N A S I R I embodies the minimalist sophistication that first emerged in the 20th century and has enjoyed a widespread revival. Pictured here is the Vintage Pelas Flatweave, in heathered grey with maroon accents. NASIRI also offers custom recreations to accommodate your design aesthetic. N A S I R I fine handmade carpets, Suite 714, 212.532.6777, nasiricarpets.com

Bakes & Kropp Bakes & Kropp continues to bring the luxury transitional kitchen to new heights. In this texturally rich space, a hand-painted, glosswhite finish on inset cabinetry pairs with a custom pearl ash finish on the drawer fronts and island. The glimmering metals of the hood and hardware provide a contemporary edge. Bakes & Kropp, Suite 430, 917.512.4853, bakesandkropp.com

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Studio A Home Sturdy and sculptural, the Serpa Brutalist Cocktail Table at Studio A Home is cast of solid iron and finished in brassaccented bronze. The table rests on a five-legged base that highlights a tempered glass top. Studio A Home, Suite 614, 212.725.8439, studioa-home.com

Currey & Company The Biddulph Semi-Flush Mount Ceiling Light is part of the Bunny Williams Collection. Inspired by nature, this traditional design features gold leaf-finished flourishes and a frosted glass diffuser. The metal leaves are hand-cut and formed, making each leaf distinctive. Currey has long been recognized for this type of meticulous handiwork. Currey & Company, Suite 506, 212.213.4900, curreyandcompany.com/NYDC

Baker Superb in design and execution, the Westminster Wing Chair has been part of the part of the Baker Classics Upholstery Collection for decades. The collection represents some of the pieces that have come to define the quality of Baker’s workmanship and creativity. Baker, Suite 300, 212.779.8810, bakerfurniture.com

SA Baxter Architectural Hardware The faceted Trousdale Door Knob matches perfectly with the points on the coordinating rosette, creating an almost optical illusion as the knob is turned. It is the sensible, yet playful nature of the suite that combines sophistication and glamour with seamless function. Available in various finishes. SA Baxter Architectural Hardware, Suite 1205, 212.203.4382, sabaxter.com

Leftbank Art Beau is a beautiful example of chiaroscuro with tonal contrasts between light and dark. The effect brings the horse to life in a three-dimensional form. Multiple size and finish options are available. Leftbank Art, Suite 609, 646.293.6694, leftbankart.com

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Munder Skiles The Taconic Collection, Munder Skiles’ first product line, has received praise from architects, designers, and clients alike. The sleek ergonomic design of the Taconic Lounge is contoured to the body, and comfortable with or without cushions. A cleverly hidden wheel makes it easily moveable to the optimum lounging spot. Munder Skiles, Suite 436, 212.717.0149, munder-skiles.com

Fermob USA Fermob’s classic Bistro Folding Chair with curved slats is made of anti-UV, powdercoated lacquered steel. This outdoor chair is comfortable, portable and incredibly durable. Originally designed in Europe at the end of the 19th Century, the Bistro Chair is a modern twist on a classic, seen in places like Times Square, Bryant Park, and Governor’s Island. Fermob USA, Suite 414, 678.267.2029, fermobusa.com

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Dennis Miller Associates With a bisected elliptical cone base in a range of finishes, the Powell & Bonnell Oval Fuego Dining Table is both stylish and adaptable. A choice of several table top options, coupled with the individually hand-formed base, means Powell & Bonnell can offer exceptionally accommodating solutions, tailored to your client’s needs. Dennis Miller Associates, Suite 1210, 212.684.0070, dennismiller.com

Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co The rotating arms and articulating LED panels on the Stacked Pendant allow for your own custom configurations. Stack the tiers in line, spread them like a helicopter rotor, or control a combination of up and/or down light. Stacked is perfect for kitchen, dining, and family room applications, as well as reception and conference rooms. Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co., Suite 512, 212.545.0032, metropolitanlightingny.com

PROFILES Undulating curves, like ocean waves, define the Lara Sofa by Robert Marinelli. It takes its inspiration from Vladimir Kagan’s iconic serpentine sofa. PROFILES consistently searches for and presents the latest additions and the most enduring modern pieces for high-end interiors. PROFILES, Suite 1211, 212.689.6903, profilesny.com

WOVEN The rug as landscape leads to new horizons. In Sima Natural, from the Terrain Collection, a rolling field of soft ridges with high pile, intermixed with a dense flat weave, invites us to stretch out and become part of the scene. 100% hand-knotted wool, available in various sizes. WOVEN, Suite 805, 646.964.4838, woven.is

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Hickory Chair–Pearson–Henredon The new Colonnade Row Table from the Jeffrey Bilhuber collection at Henredon has an impressive golden strie pedestal, brass accents and a beautiful swirl mahogany top. Designed to create a luxurious dining experience, the top extends with two leaves to graciously accommodate all of your guests. Hickory Chair– Pearson–Henredon, Suite 102, phone 212.725.3776, henredon.com, hickorychairpearson.com

Julian Chichester A simply elegant Danish aesthetic prevails in every aspect of Julian Chichester’s Chagal Settee. The handsomely sculpted wood frame is sublime in its proportions with a sensibility that works in contemporary or traditional settings. The white distressed oak frame is hand-rubbed to a soft lustre. Available in a choice of linens, velvets, or COM, as shown here. Julian Chichester, Suite 604, 646.293.6622, julianchichester.com

Verellen The Bright Group

BRIGHT’s Miry Sofa, designed by Douglas Levine, features sleek curves and faceted wood leg details that give warmth to the entire piece. Each design element provides a comfortable experience that looks and feels fresh. Available in all BRIGHT finishes. The Bright Group, Suite 902, 212.726.9030, thebrightgroup.com

The Stella Sectional Sofa’s unique shape gives a nod to midcentury styling with a modern upgrade. A bullnose seat cushion eliminates seams across the front and its shorter seat depth fits beautifully in more scaled-down, intimate environments. A variety of upholstery options, including leathers, hides, and fabrics, are available. Verellen, Suite 804, 646.293.6695, verellen.biz

Hickory Chair–Pearson–Henredon The Carlton Dining Table from David Phoenix has an extraordinary Macassar and ebonized marquetry border representative of Hickory Chair’s heritage of artistry and craftsmanship. Standing on refined tapered, twisted legs with brass ferrules, this showstopper features a racetrack top that expands with two leaves. The decorative apron design is indicative of David’s attention for detail. Hickory Chair– Pearson–Henredon, Suite 102, 212.725.3776, hickorychairpearson.com  

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Odegard Carpets Hallo Metok is a classic Odegard design inspired by the Tibetan lotus flower. Available in standard pile or their popular high/low cut pile, giving the classic design a modern sensibility with dimension and depth. Custom colors and sizes available. Odegard Carpets, Suite 1209, 212.545.0205, odegardcarpets.com

Brueton A composition of pure forms that challenges preconceptions about structure, the Ginger Table offers a refreshingly different approach to the pedestal high table. A stainless steel cylinder with a stepped base is capped by a conical form that terminates on a sphere, that, in turn, supports a closed shallow bowl upon which rests a glass top. Brueton, Suite 910, 212.838.1630, brueton.com

1stdibs Gallery at 200 Lex Designed by Lawton Mull and handbuilt in New York City, the Daedalus Table was inspired by the clean lines of mid-20th-century French furniture and the legend of Daedalus, who designed the wings that carried Icarus too close to the sun. In blackened steel or unlacquered brass, with a range of materials for the top. 1stdibs Gallery at 200 Lex, 646.293.6633, email antiques@nydc.com OCT NOV DEC

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NEW Showrooms F R E S H FACE S A ND NEW D ESIGNS.

NEW SHOWROOM

NEW LOCATION

OPENING SOON

Fermob USA, Suite 414 phone 678.267.2029, fermobusa.com Fermob USA is a French outdoor furniture manufacturer that combines the traditional skill of metalworking with technical innovation and design creativity to create inspiring, colorful outdoor furniture.

Verellen, Suite 804 phone 646.293.6695, verellen.biz Verellen conceives, designs, and creates objects of desire for the home. The story began in Tom and Sabine Verellen’s hometown of Antwerp, Belgium, where the old and the new—modern and traditional—are in natural harmony. Fast forward to High Point, NC, where the Verellens recruited a team to bring life to their unique ideas, building an extensive collection of 5000+ SKUs. From casegoods to lighting to upholstery, Verellen has it all.

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Profiles of Some of 200 Lex's Most Familiar Names

1stdibs Gallery at 200 Lex 10th Floor

Baker Suite 300

Bakes & Kropp Suite 430

Bolier, a Decca Ltd. Company Suite 804

1stdibs and the New York Design Center have joined forces to create 1stdibs Gallery at 200 Lex, a 33,000-squarefoot shopping destination that features more than 54 1stdibs dealers specializing in 20th-century design and antiques. Located on the 10th floor, this one-of-a-kind space offers an elegant environment and a knowledgeable sales staff, and is open to both the design trade and consumers weekdays from 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. (7 p.m. on Thursdays). 1stdibs Gallery, 10th Floor, phone 646.293.6633, email antiques@nydc.com 

Founded in 1902, Baker remains one of the largest wholesale distributors in the industry with 16 showrooms located in major design districts throughout the United States and the United Kingdom. Product assortment spans from historic reproductions dating back to the 17th century to modern designs from today’s most recognized independent designers. Baker, Suite 300, phone 212.779.8810, fax 212.689.2827, bakerfurniture.com

Through their exquisite cabinetry, Robert Bakes and Paul Kropp are building a legacy of fine design and craftsmanship in some of the country’s most beautiful homes. Bakes & Kropp’s commitment to exceeding the expectations of homeowners, designers, architects, and builders is evident in their extensive portfolio of luxury kitchens, vanities, libraries, closets, bars, and media rooms. Bakes & Kropp, Suite 430, phone 917.512.4853, fax 631.725.1710, bakesandkropp.com

With furniture inspired by tradition and designed for modern lifestyles, Bolier is committed to using only the finest materials and traditional craft techniques to produce a wide portfolio of furniture designs. Through collaboration with the world’s foremost furniture designers, each piece is developed with a commitment to protecting the environment through the responsible use of the earth’s natural resources.  Bolier & Co., Suite 804, phone 212.889.2060, fax 336.887.0195, bolierco.com

The Bright Group Suite 902

Brueton Suite 910

Cosulich Interiors & Antiques Suite 509

Currey & Company Suite 506

The Bright Group is a unique collection of handcrafted, American-made furnishings, combining the extensive product range of Bright Chair Co. with artisan designers and manufacturers, showcasing a coordinated environment for the design community. Whether the focus is seating, case goods or lighting, The Bright Group searches the country for quality product lines with great new contemporary design. The Bright Group, Suite 902, phone 212.726.9030, fax 212.726.9029, thebrightgroup.com

Brueton, a US manufacturer based in New York, produces a full line of contemporary furniture, including sofas, tables, chairs, casegoods and accessories catering to residential and commercial clients. In addition, Brueton offers vast custom capabilities, including fabricating the simplest to the most complicated stainless steel products and architectural metals for architects and designers. Brueton, Suite 910, phone 212.838.1630, fax 212.838.1652, brueton.com

Fabienne and Franco Cosulich have traveled throughout Italy, France and England, gathering one-of-a-kind pieces from prestigious Italian villas and European estates. Now they’ve brought their reputation and discerning eye to 200 Lex, attracting respected designers and collectors worldwide with their 20th-century Italian statement pieces, exclusive Venetian Murano glass creations, and contemporary, customizable Made in Italy line. Cosulich Interiors & Antiques, Suite 509, phone 646.293.6680, cosulichinteriors.com

Inspired by the beauty of nature and the legacy of the past, Currey & Company strives to create furnishings of timeless style and exceptional quality. Handcrafted from natural materials and enhanced with historical details, their work reflects a commitment to meaningful design. Currey & Company, Suite 506, phone 212.213.4900, curreyandcompany.com/ NYDC

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SHOWROOMPORTRAITS Dennis Miller Associates Suite 1210

Global Views Suite 613

Hickory Chair–Pearson–Henredon Suite 102

In House Kitchen Bath home Suite 1511

Since 1983, Dennis Miller Associates has offered innovative furniture and lighting collections designed by architects, interior designers and artisans. Its showroom provides a continually evolving showcase of contemporary and 20th–century classic design excellence. Its popularity with top designers speaks for itself. Come see the newly expanded collections in the Dennis Miller lighting, rugs and furniture lines. Dennis Miller Associates, Suite 1210, phone 212.684.0070, fax 212.684.0776, dennismiller.com

Global Views is expanding its showroom space. Global Views is a home décor wholesale company with collections that blend various styles to make pieces that are elegant, exotic, refined and casual. They offer a wide assortment of fashion-forward products from furniture to accessories that fit every price range. Global Views, Suite 613, phone 212.725.8439, fax 212.679.4927, globalviews.com

The mission of Hickory Chair–Pearson– Henredon is to service the design trade at the highest possible level, while offering a fashion-forward shopping experience. The showroom represents Henredon, Barbara Barry Realized by Henredon, Celerie Kemble for Henredon and Maitland-Smith, Lane Venture, Maitland-Smith, LaBarge and Taracea. The company offers hundreds of beautiful wood and upholstery designs for every room. Hickory Chair–Pearson–Henredon, Suite 102, phone 212.725.3776, fax 212.725.3763, henredon.com, hickorychairpearson.com

In House Kitchen Bath Home is New York’s premier showroom offering distinctive cabinetry from custom manufacturers Wood-Mode and Brookhaven for all rooms throughout the home. In House Kitchen Bath Home, Suite 1511, phone 212.686.2016, fax 212.686.2048, inhousekbh.com

Julian Chichester/ Mr. Brown London Suite 604

Leftbank Art Suite 609

Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co. Suite 512

Munder Skiles Suite 436

Julian Chichester reinvents the great designs of the 19th and 20th centuries to create eclectic, transitional furniture perfect for how we live today. Julian Chichester is pleased to offer the inimitable, irrepressible and always edgy Mr. Brown London in his New York showroom, with a beautifully edited assortment of furniture, lamps and accessories. Julian Chichester, Suite 604, phone 646.293.6622, fax 917.591.2413, julianchichester.com, mrbrownlondon.com

Leftbank Art creates original artwork and manufactures it at its facility in Southern California. The company’s goal is to bring to market images that look as though commissioned or oneof-a-kind, but at a price point for the design and retail trade. Leftbank Art’s very interactive website allows trade customers to select finish, size and frame options. Leftbank Art, Suite 609, phone 646.293.6694, fax 646.293.6695, leftbankart.com

Metropolitan Lighting has been illuminating the finest interiors for many years. Its New York showroom offers one of the most comprehensive selections of designer-oriented lighting in the industry. Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co., Suite 512, phone 212.545.0032, fax 212.545.0031, metropolitanlightingny.com

Munder Skiles offers 153 wood and metal designs for garden furniture, in styles ranging from historical to ultramodern. For 25+ years the company has been recognized for its standards of comfort, craft and proportion. John Danzer’s ergonomic, modernist Taconic Chair™ received the 1994 Roscoe Award for “Best American Chair”—the first garden seat ever to have been so honored.  Munder Skiles, Suite 436, phone 212.717.0149, munder-skiles.com

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N A S I R I fine handmade carpets Suite 714  

Odegard Carpets Suite 1209

PROFILES Suite 1211

SA Baxter Architectural Hardware Suite 1205

N A S I R I began as dealers of antique carpets and have translated this knowledge of ancient weaving techniques into the creation of unique handmade pieces, including Persian Ziegler Sultanabad, Tabriz, and Bakshaish rugs. They now offer complete custom recreations of all varieties of carpets, and designers receive bespoke service with endless options for size, color, weave, texture, and design. N A S I R I is also the leading source of vintage flatweaves. N A S I R I fine handmade carpets, Suite 714, phone 212.532.6777, fax 212.532.6776, nasiricarpets.com  

Since 1987, Odegard Carpets has been an innovative leader in the production of sophisticated high-end, hand-knotted carpets. Recently partnered with Kooches Handmade Carpets, Odegard has greatly expanded its distinctive carpet offerings and production capabilities. Odegard Carpets requires strict adherence to social responsibility, raising the standard of living for thousands of artisan weavers in developing countries. Odegard Carpets, Suite 1209, phone 212.545.0205, fax 212.545.0305, odegardcarpets.com

Serving the high-end design community for over 37 years, PROFILES’ workrooms in the USA create midcentury modern and transitional pieces with a commitment to the highest quality and innovation. PROFILES, Suite 1211, phone 212.689.6903, fax 212.685.1807, profilesny.com 

SA Baxter designs and manufactures bespoke architectural hardware and lighting for residential and commercial projects. Cast in brass, bronze and white bronze, their products offer one of the most comprehensive finish palettes in the industry. SA Baxter’s hardware is handmade in their foundry located in the Hudson Valley. The ancient process of lost wax casting and modern, green technology allows for limitless design capabilities. SA Baxter Architectural Hardware, Suite 1205, phone 212.203.4382, fax 888.713.6042, sabaxter.com

Saelger Shading Suite 417A

Saladino Furniture Suite 1600

Verellen Suite 804

WOVEN Suite 805

Saelger Shading specializes in architectural window treatments and technology. Their innovative product lines provide an infinite variety of inspiring designs, and represent some of the industry’s leading manufacturers (both in Europe and Australia). Saelger is excited to bring these outstanding products to 200 Lex, offering the A&D community exceptional outcomes to even the most complex projects. Saelger Shading, Suite 417a, phone 212.298.8980, saelger.com

Established in 1986 by renowned designer John F. Saladino, the Saladino Furniture collection currently has more than 75 original designs of upholstery, casegoods and lighting. The line is available exclusively through its New York showroom among select antiques and accessories. A 75-page catalog may be purchased online at saladinostyle.com. Saladino Furniture, Inc., Suite 1600, phone 212.684.3720, fax 212.684.3257, saladinostyle.com

Verellen conceives, designs, and creates objects of desire for the home. The story began in Tom and Sabine Verellen’s hometown of Antwerp, Belgium, where the old and the new— modern and traditional—are in natural harmony. Fast forward to High Point, NC, where the Verellens recruited a team to bring life to their unique ideas, building an extensive collection of 5000+ SKUs. From casegoods to lighting to upholstery, Verellen has it all. Verellen, Suite 804, phone 646.293.6695, verellen.biz

WOVEN is a leading full service contemporary rug gallery, specializing in a carefully curated inventory of antique and vintage rugs sourced and hand-selected from around the world. Introduced in 2016, the Studio Woven Collection, a series of in-house designed contemporary hand-woven rugs for the 21st century, is made up of six series of rugs, inspired by the modern nomad and antique and vintage masterpieces. WOVEN, Suite 805, phone 646.964.4838, woven.is

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ShowroomDirectory A Complete List of Who’s Where In 200 Lex 72

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1stdibs Gallery at 200 Lex Access to DesignTM AERO Alea AMQ ANDREU WORLD Apropos Inc. Arc|Com Fabrics, Inc. Archetypal Imagery Corp. Aristeia Metro Arteriors Atelier Atlas Carpet Mills Avery Boardman Baker Bakes & Kropp Bendheim Benjamin Moore Bograd Kids Boyce Products Ltd BRADLEY The Bright Group Brueton Brunschwig & Fils Calger Lighting Inc. Century Furniture CF Modern Christopher Guy CityScapes NYC Circa Lighting Clickspring Design CLIFF YOUNG LTD. Colombo Mobili USA Cosulich Interiors & Antiques Côté France Crosby Street Studios Currey & Company DARRAN Furniture Industries, Inc. Decca Contract Furniture Delivery By Design (DBD) Dennis Miller Associates DESIGNLUSH DESIRON DIRTT Environmental Solutions Dorothy Draper & Co., Inc. ducduc Dune Elle W Collection EJ Victor ENRICOPELLIZZONI FAIR Fermob USA GIBSON INTERIOR PRODUCTS Giorgio USA Global Views Good Design Gordon International Grange Furniture and Viking Groupe Lacasse Guy Regal Decorative & Fine Art Halcon Harbour Outdoor Hickory Chair-Pearson-Henredon In House Kitchen Bath Home IFDA Jasper Group Jiun Ho at Dennis Miller Julian Chichester Kasthall Rugs USA Inc.

10th Fl 424 1500 1509 1316 1111 710 1411 419 1416 608 202 1314 916 300 430 1602 814 433 1405 802 902 910 401 434 200 510 1601 1106 103 1405 505 809 509 1201 1303 506 1116 1414 Dock 1210 415 702 1516 806 715 100 420 816 1304 601 414 1510 502 613 423 1401 201 1109 425 1304 1301 102 1511 417B 1514 1208 604 611

646.293.6633 212.679.9500 212.966.4700 305.470.1200 212.685.1077 212.679.0300 212.684.6987 212.751.1590 646.602.3455 646.761.4711 646.797.3620 212.696.0211 212.779.4300 212.688.6611 212.779.8810 917.512.4853 212.547.2946

646.293.6687 212.447.1669 212.966.4701 305.470.9070 212.685.1078 212.679.5996 212.689.3684 212.751.2434

212.726.0006 212.683.3100 646.766.1011 212.726.9030 212.838.1630 212.725.0340 212.689.9511 212.479.0107 917.699.6024 212.684.2197 212.961.6984 212.725.2500 212.220.0962 212.683.8808 212.683.3771 646.293.6680 212.684.0707 212.486.0737 212.213.4900 212.961.6984 646.761.4711 212.213.1691 212.684.0070 212.532.5450 212.353.2600 973.454.6282 646.293.6649 212.226.1868 212.925.6171 212.472.0191 212.679.4341 212.683.7272 212.352.9615 678.267.2029 212.685.1077 212.684.7191 212.725.8439 212.722.1110 212.532.0075 212.685.9494 212.689.0300 212.447.7717 212.683.7272 646.692.4227 212.725.3776 212.686.2016 212.686.6020 212.685.1077 212.684.0070 646.293.6622 212.421.0220

S H OW RO O M Keilhauer Kelly Wearstler Kenneth Cobonpue KGBL KI and Pallas Textiles Kindel Furniture Kinon Surface Design Kooches Carpets Korts & Knight, Kitchens by Alexandra Knight

646.786.4818 212.696.0299 212.779.0838 212.838.9046 212.689.2827 631.725.1710

212.726.0061 212.683.5005 212.726.9029 212.838.1652 212.684.7350 212.779.0721 212.479.0112 212.684.2123 212.725.5900 212.683.5005 212.683.9286 212.684.0559 212.684.8940 917.591.4373 212.213.4911 212.951.7070 212.213.9843 212.684.0776 212.532.5360 212.353.0220 646.293.6657 212.226.5504 212.925.2273

212.683.7011

212.685.1078 212.725.2683 212.679.4927 212.722.1115 212.779.0147 212.685.7312 212.689.7143 212.683.0711 212.725.3763 212.686.2048 212.686.6258 812.771.4641 212.684.0776 917.591.2413 212.421.0230

Kravet Inc. Krug LaCOUR Lee Jofa Leftbank Art LEPERE Levine Calvano Furniture Group Lexington Home Brands Lobel Modern Louis J. Solomon Inc. Luna Textiles McGuire Furniture Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co. Milano Smart Living LLC M|n Modern Living Supplies Mr. Brown London Munder Skiles Napier + Joseph + McNamara, Ltd. NASIRI The New Traditionalists Niermann Weeks Odegard Carpets PALECEK Paoli Pennoyer Newman LLC Phillips Collection Plexi-Craft Primason Symchik, Inc. Pringle Ward Prismatique PROFILES Reagan Hayes

SUITE 1101 816 410 1616 1313 806 1315 1209 716 401 1415 1412 401 609 1207 1406 212 915 911 1410 101 512 711 408 604 436 1304 714 701 905 1209

610 1110 416 603 914 1101 1514 1101 1211 903 RENAISSANCE CARPET & TAPESTRIES 912 Richard Cohen Collection 801 Rooms by Zoya B 433 SA Baxter Architectural Hardware 1205 Saelger Shading 417A Saladino Furniture Inc. 1600 SANFORD HALL 400 Sedgwick & Brattle 815 Seguso Murano 431 Skram 427 Skyline Contract Group 1106 SMART 1115 Studio A Home 612 Theodore Alexander 515 Thom Filicia Inc. 815 Timothy Brown 1608 Townhouse Kitchens 421 transFORM 708 Tucker Robbins 504 Verellen 804 Versteel 1106 Visual Comfort Studio 103 Wall Goldfinger 1304 Weinberg Modern 407 Wood & Hogan, Inc. 812 Wood-Mode, Inc./T.O. Gronlund Co. 1515 WOVEN 805 New York Design Center 426

P H O NE 212.679.0300 212.679.4341 212.532.5450 212.420.4866 212.337.9909 646.293.6649 561.600.2500 212.545.0205 212.3924750 212.725.0340 212.686.7600 212.213.6600 212.725.0340 646.293.6694 212.488.7000 212.686.7600 212.532.2750 212.242.9075 212.545.9200 212.251.0132 212.689.1565 212.545.0032 212.729.1938 646.486.3272 646.293.6622 212.717.0149 212.683.7272 212.532.6777 212.226.1868 212.319.7979 212.545.0205 212.287.0063 212.683.2232 212.839.0500 336.884.9271 212.924.3244 212.679.0300 212.689.0300 212.679.0030 212.689.6903 212.658.1922 212.696.0080 212.696.4938 212.726.0006 212.203.4382

212.298.8980 212.684.3720 212.684.4217 212.685.0600 212.686.1133 336.222.6622 212.961.6984 212.696.9762 212.956.0030 646.293.6628 212.736.6564 212.255.4895 212.684.8696 212.584.9580 212.355.3383 646.293.6695 800.876.2120 212.725.2500 212.683.7272 646.291.2059 212.532.7440 212.679.3535 646.964.4838 212.679.9500

FA X 212.679.5996 914.679.4935 212.420.7865 212.337.1090 646.293.6657 561.600.2491 212.545.0305 212.684.7350 973.227.3544 212.684.7350 646.293.6695 212.488.7006 212.686.7686 212.532.2875 212.242.9078 212.545.9438 212.689.1578 212.545.0031 212.729.1939 646.349.5619 917.591.2413 212.683.7011 212.532.6776 212.226.5504 212.319.6116 212.545.0305 212.287.0066 212.683.1297 212.839.0501 336.882.7405 212.679.5996 212.689.7149 212.679.5996 212.685.1807 212.696.4248 212.696.5333 212.726.0061 888.713.6042 212.684.3257 212.545.8376 212.244.9131 212.696.9757

212.696.2729 212.956.0031 336.885.5260 212.244.9131 212.255.4861 212.684.8696 212.355.3116

212.725.5900 212.683.7011 212.532.6440 212.725.3847 212.447.1669


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CultureCalendar

By Catherine McHugh

Taking the night air with Jack-o'lanterns, celebrating women’s suffrage, experimenting with the five senses and enjoying a Christmas classic. UNFOLDING THE AMERICAN DREAM At the Museum of Chinese in America (MOCA), FOLD: Golden Venture Paper Sculptures takes on the ambitious goal of actively engaging visitors in a conversation about immigration issues by presenting the story of the passengers of the Golden Venture, a ship carrying undocumented Chinese immigrants that ran aground in New York City in 1993. While the 282 undocumented Chinese immigrants and asylum seekers were detained at York County Prison, they practiced the traditional Chinese folk art of paper folding and made more than 10,000 meticulously folded paper sculptures, including caged birds, American eagles, and the Statue of Liberty. More than 40 of these sculptures, selected from MOCA’s collection, will be on display. The organizing principle for the exhibition’s content and design is a focus on the “fold” as a form, action and metaphor. Although the pieces are Chinese folk art, their subject matter is uniquely American. In addition, recently recorded oral history interviews with many of the immigrants and their supporters will also be played on overhead speakers to provide multiple perspectives on the attainment of the American Dream. October 05, 2017 through March 25, 2018. Museum of Chinese in America, 215 Centre Street New York, NY 10013, 855-955MOCA. www.mocanyc.org. Left: Detail shot of bonsai tree with two eagles and dog (My Dream of New Life), 1995, cut magazine pages, cardboard, liquid glue, papier-mâché and colored marker. Right: Trio of sailboats (Love, Beauty and Fortune), 1995, folded legal pad paper, graph paper, white paper, cardboard, thread, liquid glue and colored marker. Museum of Chinese in America (MOCA) Collections.

Charles E. Burchfield (1893-1967). Day in Midwinter, 1945, Gouache on paper Montclair Art Museum, Museum purchase; Lang Acquistion Fund.

LIKE THE WEATHER The Montclair Art Museum is presenting Charles Burchfield: Weather Event, which showcases more than 40 of the artist’s lyrical landscape watercolors and drawings of the weather south of Lake Erie where he lived for most of his life. The exhibition is organized around themes that inspired Burchfield: the sky, changing seasons, haloed moons, sunbursts and cloudbursts, heat waves, and wild weather. The works convey the artist’s emotional responses to the weather and his desire to portray the invisible aspects of nature, such as sounds and heat waves, by means of visible signs and symbols. His works invite the viewer to personally experience these environments. Through January 7. Montclair Art Museum, 3 South Mountain Avenue, Montclair, NJ 07042, 973.746.5555, montclairartmuseum.org.

BENDING PERCEPTIONS Visitors to the exhibition will explore 11 interactive galleries designed to test our perceptions. One room (rendering on the left) will allow visitors to discover what happens when our senses disagree: affecting our balance; while another room (rendering on the right) with changing lights will reveal a series of different images depending on the color of light. ©AMNH/D. Finnin

The American Museum of Natural History is getting experimental with its upcoming exhibit: Our Senses: An Immersive Experience. The exhibition will explore how our brains work with our sight, smell, hearing, touch, and taste to shape our perceptions. Highlights include a virtual garden to explore through the eyes of a bee or a snake; an audio-collage challenging visitors to test their skill at tracking individual sounds; illusions that make flat surfaces seem rippled; a variety of tactile experiences that activate different kinds of nerves; and a smell test inviting visitors to guess the ingredients in a complex scent. A live presenter will examine how the senses and world views of other species differ from ours and what’s truly unique about human perception, including sensory integration and appreciation of art and music. November 20, 2017 through January 6, 2019. American Museum of Natural History, Gallery 3, third floor, Central Park West & 79th St, New York, NY, 10024, 212.769.5100, amnh.org. OCT

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CultureCalendar ONE ARTIST, TWO VENUES

Left: Josef Hoffmann (1870-1956). Tobacco case for Otto Primavesi, 1912. Execution: Wiener Werkstätte. Gold; lapis lazuli, pearl, turquoise, coral, opal, carnelian and other semi-precious stones. Private Collection. Middle: Josef Hoffmann (1870-1956). Flower basket, 1905. Execution: Wiener Werkstätte. Silver; glass insert. Neue Galerie New York. Gift of Harry C Sigman. Right: Detail of a photograph taken by the Atelier d’Ora studio of Emilie Flöge wearing a dress designed by Eduard Josef Wimmer-Wisgrill and jewelry from the Wiener Werkstätte, 1910.

The Dia Art Foundation will present a dual exhibition of works by the French artist François Morellet, which is the first in-depth examination of the artist’s work to be mounted in the United States in more than 30 years. Presented at Dia’s exhibition spaces in New York City and Beacon, NY, François Morellet offers a focused exploration of the artist’s wideranging practice. He was also one of the founding members of the Groupe de Recherche d’Art Visuel, an artist’s collaborative that emerged in France in the early 1960s. The Dia:Chelsea installation includes a large selection of early abstract geometric paintings, key examples from Morellet’s later series and neon works, and his first intégration architecturale, titled Trames 3°87°-93°-183° (1971/2017). Meanwhile, Dia:Beacon’s lowerlevel gallery features a new site-specific installation titled, NoEnd Neon (1990/2017), which was configured for the venue in close collaboration with the Morellet estate and studio. October 28, 2017 through June 2, 2018. Dia:Beacon, 3 Beekman Street, Beacon, New York 12508, 845.440.0100, and Dia:Chelsea, 535, 541 and 545 West 22nd Street, New York, New York 10011, 212.989.5566, diaart.org.

VIENNA WAITS FOR YOU Neue Galerie New York will present, Wiener Werkstätte 1903-1932: The Luxury of Beauty, a major retrospective exhibition devoted to the Wiener Werkstätte (Vienna Workshops), an artists’ and craftsmens’ collective. The exhibit’s more than 200 objects show the entirety of the firm’s extensive output in a variety of media, including ceramics, drawings, fashion, furniture, glass, graphic design, jewelry, metalwork, textiles, and wallpaper. Special highlights of the show will include iconic examples of furniture by Josef Hoffmann and Koloman Moser. Also represented will be less well-known designers and their rare and often unique works crafted in silver, gold, and semiprecious stones that convey the Wiener Werkstätte’s luxurious aesthetic. The show is divided into three main chapters: “Founding Years, 1903-05”; “Harvesting Years, 1906-14”; and “Years of Reinvention, 1915-32.” October 26, 2017 through January 29, 2018. Ronald S. Lauder Neue Galerie, 1048 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10028, 212.994.9493, neuegalerie.org.

François Morellet, Trames 3°-87°-93°-183°, 1971. © Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris. Courtesy Estate of François Morellet.

MODERNIST DESIGN AMBASSADORS

Warren Noble and Emil Hubert Piron. Electrochef Stove, Model No. B-2, designed c. 1930. Enameled and chromiumplated steel, Bakelite, and ceramic, 45 7/8 x 39 3/8 x 25 5/8 in. (116.5 x 100 x 65 cm). Produced by Electromaster, Inc., Detroit. The Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, the Liliane and David M. Stewart Collection, gift of Eric Brill, 2010.1219. Photograph by Denis Farley. 76

Marcel Breuer. B32 Chair, designed 1928. Chromium-plated steel, beech, and cane, 32 x 18 x 21 3/8 in. (81.3 x 45.7 x 54.3 cm). Produced by Gebrüder Thonet, Frankenberg, Germany. George R. Kravis II Collection, Tulsa, Oklahoma, Photograph courtesy Sotheby’s, New York.

Partners in Design: Alfred H. Barr Jr. and Philip Johnson is the first exhibition to focus on the groundbreaking collaboration between Barr, the Museum of Modern Art’s first director, and Johnson, its first curator of architecture. Now on view at New York University’s Grey Art Gallery, the show illuminates how these two pioneers of international modernism used their revolutionary vision to inspire generations of museum professionals to encourage visitors to look at everything around them, not only paintings and sculpture, but also the products of everyday life. The exhibit features about 70 objects, which include furniture, decorative arts, textiles, industrial products, exhibition catalogues, and ephemera that illustrate how this duo promoted a radical new aesthetic within modern American material culture. September 7 through December 9, 2017. Grey Art Gallery, New York University, 100 Washington Square East, New York, NY 10003, 212.998.6780, nyu.edu/greyart.


SUFFERING UNTIL SUFFRAGE The Museum of the City of New York is presenting Beyond Suffrage: 100 Years of Women & Politics in New York. The exhibition begins with the long battle for women’s voting rights that were finally established statewide in 1917 and nationally in 1920 and examines how women navigated New York politics in the 1920s through 1940s. Via rare artifacts, documents, costumes, photographs and audio-visual materials that span more than a century, the exhibit shows how activists both familiar and lesser known were often working behind the scenes for health care, labor practices and good government. It also examines the central role of New York in the women’s liberation movement of the 1960s and its redefining of women’s roles in politics and government as well as continued campaigns for women’s political power and grassroots mobilizations that demand equal gender rights today. This ongoing exhibit opens October 11, 2017, Museum of the City of New York, 1220 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10029, 212.534.1672, mcny.org.

Above: Tickets for Readings by Charles Dickens, 1867-1868, printed ephemera, John Forster, The life of Charles Dickens: annual tickets, The Morgan Library & Museum, MA 7800. Photography, Graham Haber, 2011. Left: Charles Dickens public reading at desk, c. 1867, engraving, John Forster, The life of Charles Dickens: Charles Dickens, The Morgan Library & Museum, MA 7800. Photography, Graham Haber, 2011.

GOD BLESS US, EVERYONE To mark the 150th anniversary of Dickens’s famous reading tour of the United States in 1867, the Morgan Library and Museum is presenting Charles Dickens and the Spirit of Christmas; it assembles, for the first time, all five manuscripts of Dickens’s Christmas books: A Christmas Carol (1843), The Chimes (1844), The Cricket on the Hearth (1845), The Battle of Life (1846), and The Haunted Man (1848). The exhibit explores Dickens’s method of composition, and his motivations behind writing one of the most famous, enduring and widely adapted stories in all of literature. During his life, Dickens acquired the kind of celebrity accorded only to international film stars today; this show will highlight his late-in-life career as a performer. His public readings of A Christmas Carol, which he began in the 1850s, played a pioneering role in what is now commonplace in the marketing of fiction: the reading tour. November 3, 2017 through January 14, 2018. The Morgan Library and Museum, 225 Madison Avenue, 212.685.0008, www.themorgan.org.

Left: "Twelve Reasons Why Women Should Vote" published by the Woman Suffrage Party, 1915, Museum of the City of New York, F2011.16.2. Right: Men stand outside the National Anti-Suffrage Association headquarters, c. 1911, Courtesy of the Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, LC-USZ62-25338.

TRULY GREAT PUMPKINS The sixth annual Rise of the Pumpkins: Garden of Gourds event will returns to Westbury, Long Island in plenty of time for Halloween. About 75 people, over a two-day period each week, will carve and place 5,000 new pumpkins along a scenic walking path each weekend. Highlights will include multi-pumpkin structures made of dozens of illuminated jack-o-lanterns and assembled into life-sized pieces of art, as well as 3-D sculpted pumpkins and intricately carved 100+ pound pumpkins. Live carving demonstrations will be available in the main tent for those who want to see how the magic happens. A new, one-weekend only event, Night of 1,000 Jack O’Lanterns will take place on Governor’s Island in front of a backdrop of centuries old buildings. Special ferry service will bring visitors to the island who will then take a short walk to the trail—passing the spooky Castle Williams, a former military fort and prison built in the early 1800s along the way. October through early November 2017. Rise of the Pumpkins, Garden of Gourds, Old Westbury Gardens, 71 Old Westbury Road, Old Westbury, NY 11590, 516.252.3392, therise. org; October 26-29, 2017, Night of 1,000 Jack-O'Lanterns, Governor’s Island, 10 South Street, New York, NY 10005, therise.org.

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Events at 200Lex A LO OK AT A F E W RECENT CELEB R ATIONS.

AD Loves Amy Astley, Editor in Chief, AD and the New York Design Center hosted AD LOVES on Monday, June 26, 2017. The annual event featured custom vignettes by guest designers and AD editors. In the Arteriors showrooms, designer Caleb Anderson and Alison Levasseur, Interiors & Garden Director incorporated art, accessories and interesting lighting pieces that married rich blues with brass accents. The Studio A Home showroom featured a vignette from designer Vicente Wolf and Parker Bowie Larson, Market Director which played with pattern and texture. Mitchell Owens, Decorative Arts Editor and designer Sara Story’s fun space in the WOVEN showroom combined their beautiful rugs with pink balloons and select furniture from KGBL and the 1stdibs Gallery at 200 Lex. In Baker, designer Antonino Buzzetta and Jane Keltner de Valle, Style Director, lounged in a moody living room. AD LOVES brought the industry’s best together to celebrate great design and toast to a fabulous summer.

Mitchell Owens and Sara Story; Jane Keltner de Valle, Antonino Buzzetta, and Amy Astley; Samuel Amoia and Stephen Sills; AD Editors› Hadley Keller, Kathryn Given, Parker Bowie Larson, and Madeline O'Malley; Alison Levasseur with Mario Buatta and Jamie Drake; Jessie Carrier and Mara Miller; Alison Levasseur and Caleb Anderson; Bruce Budd with Mitchell Owens and Bjorn Wallander; Vicente Wolf and Parker Bowie Larson. Photographs by Matthew Carasella/Social Shutterbug. 78

“Where Do You Sit In Life?” Rochelle Udell Exhibition Opening On Thursday, April 20, 2017, Luxe Interiors + Design, Editor in Chief Pamela Jaccarino and Jim Druckman, President & CEO, New York Design Center hosted an opening reception for “Where Do You Sit In Life?”, the latest exhibition from fine artist Rochelle Udell in the 1stdibs Gallery Space at 200 Lex. The exhibition explored chairs, their role in raising humans off the floor above animals, and why sitting is never just sitting. Each wall of the exhibition featured a theme: Udell’s biography told in three chairs, everyday icons, Pablo Neruda’s “Ode to the Chair,” Adirondack Chair, an exploration of sketches and inspired wallpaper. The curated layout created a unique experience to view this in-depth analysis of the chair.

Pamela Jaccarino and Rochelle Udell; Brad Ford, Joan Michaels, and Larry Weinberg; guests viewing Udell’s work. Photographs by Matthew Carasella/ Social Shutterbug.


RISD Textiles New Talent Exhibition On June 23, 2017, the 1stdibs Gallery exhibition space on the 10th floor was transformed by six upcoming MFA graduates of Rhode Island School of Design’s [RISD] Textile Department and six entering their second year in the fall. Each student presented their individual selections of work. Three students, Anastasia Onegina, Alicia Oas, and Yan Zeng were awarded the Sherri Donghia Award of Excellence by Sherri Donghia and Jim Druckman, President and CEO of the New York Design Center, for their outstanding textile work.

The beautifully displayed works of RISD MFA Textiles students; Sherri Donghia with student award winners Alicia Oas, Yan Zeng, and Anastasia Onegina; RISD Student Khalid Mezaina with Tucker Robbins. Photographs by Karen Cattan.

13th Annual first LOOK The thirteenth annual first LOOK™ with Interior Design took place on July 19, 2017. Twenty-six top contract showrooms participated, showcasing new products to over 1,500 design professionals, including principals, architects, and designers from NYC’s established and emerging A&D firms. The importance of first LOOK™ is not only revealed through the broad spectrum of attendees but also through the innovative products.

Andreu World’s Eric Hall and Joe Davis with Cindy Allen, Editor in Chief of Interior Design; New products from Keilhauer; the Gibson Interior Products team; first LOOK New Product Tag in Arc-Com Fabrics; new products from The Bright Group; Kevin Glynn, Groupe Lacasse Executive Vice President of Sales. Photography by Erik Bardin.

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BACKSTORY SUFFRAGETTE CITY

B y Te d L a m b e r t

T HEY CAL L I T “ T HE P EO P LE ’ S H A LL, ” F O R G O O D R E A S O N .

Left: Town Hall interior view from the balcony. Top right: Town Hall exterior. Bottom right: Town Hall, circa 1933.

T

he Town Hall New York, a National Historic Landmark, and a cultural jewel of the city, is currently preparing its 96th season. Apart from being one of the most storied concert venues in the world, this 1500seat auditorium one block from Times Square has a history of standing for equality and civic participation. You might have visited the Hall, perhaps even many times, but you may not know the story behind it. The Hall was commissioned by the League for Political Education, a group of wealthy and influential women whose fight for the passage of the 19th Amendment to the United States Constitution gave them the idea to build a meeting place where people of all classes, races and genders could meet to educate themselves on the important issues of the day. They hired the most renowned architectural firm in America, McKim, Mead & White, to design the building in such a way as to demonstrate the democratic principals they held dear. There are no box seats, no obstructions, and, as they say, “there isn’t a bad seat in the house.” The Hall’s superior acoustics are legendary. Shortly after its doors opened on November 13th, 1921 Margaret Sanger was arrested on the stage for daring to speak about contraception to a mixed audience.

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The attendees immediately marched from the auditorium over to the police station, and Sanger was quickly released. The Hall welcomed African-American artists at a time when they were not permitted to perform elsewhere. Contralto Marion Anderson made her New York debut there. Langston Hughes, Paul Robeson and Nina Simone also found a home on West 43rd Street. The names of all the musical stars who have graced the Hall’s stage are too numerous to mention, but among them are classical artists Sergei Rachmaninoff, Richard Strauss, Pablo Casals, Isaac Stern and Yehudi Menuhin. Jazz greats such as Duke Ellington, Louis Armstrong, Sarah Vaughn, Billie Holiday, Dizzy Gillespie, Charles Mingus and Charlie Parker also trod the same boards, and many best-selling live recordings were made there as well. The socially conscious folk movement of the fifties and sixties also found voice at the Hall, with Bob Dylan giving his first major concert there in 1963. From 1935 to 1956 the Hall hosted America’s Town Meeting of the Air, a nationwide weekly radio broadcast that consisted of a panel of four speakers addressing an important societal topic. Audiences were always welcome participants in the discussion. Today, Town Hall is still a showcase for progressive ideas and artists. As they prepare for the centenary of the women’s right to vote and the hall’s opening, they continue to present speakers and events that ensure that at “The People’s Hall,” every voice will always be heard.


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