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INSIDE THE NEW YORK DESIGN CENTER

DESIGNER GENES McMillen’s Next Generation

KIPS BAY SHOW HOUSE

4O Years of Fabulous

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SISSY+MARLEY

No Kidding Around Display through SEP 2015


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A complete line of outdoor home furnishings available through Apropos, a fourth generation furniture showroom catering to the trade. Visit us and see what is possible for your home from the inside out!

New York Design Center 200 Lexington Avenue, Suite 710 NYC, 10016 212.684.6987 apropos-furniture.com

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ARRAY INSIDE THE NEW YORK DESIGN CENTER

SABAXTER.COM

LONDON

VOLUME 4 ISSUE 3

NEW YORK


©2015 Wood-Mode, Inc.

ARRAY INSIDE THE NEW YORK DESIGN CENTER

VOLUME 4 ISSUE 3

New York’s premier cabinetry showroom for kitchens, baths, and all of the rooms throughout your home. 200 Lexington Avenue, Suite 1511, New York, NY 10016 t. 212.686.2016 • f. 212.686.2048 • www.inhousekbh.com

Cabinetry • Appliances • Countertops • Decorative hardware


Features

Volume 12 Issue 2

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No Kidding Around By Catherine McHugh SISSY+MARLEY create designs for children that eschew traditional primary colors and embrace whimsy.

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40 Years of Fabulous By Cathy Whitlock The Kips Bay Show House celebrates four decades of dazzling design.

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Designer Genes By Cathy Whitlock Interior designer Elizabeth Pyne is the latest generation of McMillen royalty.

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Departments

Volume 12 Issue 2

8 STYLERADAR What's popping up on the screens of top designers.

11 CULTURECALENDAR By Catherine McHugh Honoring Hirschfeld, celebrating a landmark anniversary, struggling with envy, and seeking out a golden icon.

14 BOOKS&APPS By Cathy Whitlock

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Hotel design, the Tudor Home, and a new app to organize your house. d new tomes from Alexa Hampton and TROVE By Jim Lochner From bling to bubbly to brewed, ideas for whatever your mood.

38 EATS’N’SLEEPS By Jim Lochner From downtown to midtown, the French are storming their way through the Bastille of Manhattan.

40 GALLERY 48

A picture-perfect showroom exhibition. l FRESHPICKS The most current products in 200 Lex showrooms.

56 STYLESPOTLIGHT Featured highlights of craft and design.

64 DEFININGPIECES Items that sum up what a showroom is all about.

72 NEWSHOWROOMS 2015 Fresh faces and new designs.

73 SHOWROOMPORTRAITS Profiles of some of 200 Lex's most familiar names.

76 EVENTSAT200LEX A look at a few recent celebrations.

78 SHOWROOMDIRECTORY A complete list of who’s where in 200 Lex.

80 BACKSTORY By Jim Lochner The Landmarks Preservation Commission celebrates 50 years of saving historical New York—but not without its share of controversy.

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Array Magazine, Inc. 261 Madison Avenue 9th Floor New York, NY 10016 Phone 212.929.2733 Fax 212.929.0983 arrayny.com ARRAY editorial coverage@arrayny.com ARRAY advertising adinfo@arrayny.com ARRAY Magazine is produced three times per year. All submissions should be e-mailed to: coverage@arrayny.com

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Editorial Paul Millman Editor-in-Chief/Publisher Sheau Ling Soo Creative Director Ted Lambert Executive Editor Jim Lochner Managing Editor Cathy Whitlock Features Editor

Array Magazine, Inc. Š 2015 All rights reserved The contents of Array Magazine, Inc., may not be reproduced without written permission from the publisher.

Andrew French Photographer Adam Cohen IT Manager

Contributors Catherine McHugh

New York Design Center James P. Druckman President & CEO Daniel M. Farr Director of Operations Alix M. Lerman Director of Marketing & Communications Leah Blank Senior Marketing Manager/Director of Special Events Alana Moskowitz Design Services Manager Brenna Stevens Marketing Coordinator/Digital Content Manager Susan Lai Controller Vera Markovich Accounting Manager on the cover Elizabeth Pyne and mother Ann Pyne, photographed by Jay Ackerman. 6


letter from the editor Dear Readers, New York has always been, and will always be, a blend of the old and new. The Little Red Lighthouse still stands beside the Great Gray (George Washington) Bridge, and Trinity Church is just a stone’s throw from the new Fulton Center transportation hub and Freedom Tower. We respect our past while we build the future. This issue of ARRAY perfectly reflects that dual sensibility. A charitable event benefitting the Kips Bay Boys and Girls Club, the Kips Bay Show House has been America’s most prestigious interior design showcase for more than four decades. Every year, designers vie for the chance to pull together a room in record time, letting their imaginations run wild, unbridled by the constraints of client demands. Cathy Whitlock spoke with Steven Stolman, who literally wrote the book on it—an epic, illustrated volume that chronicles the history, the process, and the gorgeous results of this grand New York institution (40 Years of Fabulous, p. 24). Elizabeth Pyne naturally has one foot in the past and one in the future because it’s in her blood. Her grandmother, Betty Sherrill, founded the venerable McMillen design firm, and her mother, Ann Pyne, is one of its principals today (Designer Genes, p. 30). Being third-generation design royalty, history always informs Elizabeth’s decisions. When she shops, either for herself or for clients, she’s drawn to pieces that will stand the test of time, things that can stay with a client, be used in different rooms and even different homes, over a lifetime. Children represent the future, and everything we do influences them in one way or another. So why do we typically fill their environments with primary colors and garish clashes of styles? The mother and two daughters behind SISSY+MARLEY wondered the same thing before launching their firm, built on the idea that kids’ spaces deserve the same consideration and chic design as the rest of the home, while still embracing all the fun of being young (No Kidding Around, p. 18). While we can never be sure of what our future holds, we know one thing—the past will always be a part of it.

Paul Millman Editor-in-Chief

Photo by Andrew French

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StyleRadar

What's popping up on the screens of top designers.

Martin Horner (Soucie Horner, Ltd.) souciehorner.com “We once did a Marrakech-meets-Midwest lake house in Michigan and hung a flag very much like this. It adds a perfect touch of meaningful rusticity. No matter where in the world your house is, an American flag will always say home.” Folk Art American Flag available at 1stdibs® at The New York Design Center® http://bit.ly/1EVKMDz

Barry Goralnick (Goralnick Architecture & Design) barrygoralnick.com “This table is a perfect storm of things that I like—high style Italian ’50s design, Russian cobalt blue, eglomise, and a great chess set. The low profile makes it perfect for precocious kids to play games, and then soigné adults can throw them off so they can perch their martinis.” Reverse Painted Chess Table with all Game Pieces available at 1stdibs® at The New York Design Center® http://bit.ly/1dnUSRJ

JUDY FINCH (art1) art1nyc.com "What happens when the Queen of Cool ends up with a little paint on her face... She becomes a piece of art work! Peter Gee's '60s silk screen, 'Day Glow Ladies,' sheds a little color on fashion designer Betsey Johnson and London super model Penelope Tree. To quote John Lennon on Tree: 'Hot, Hot Hot, Smart, Smart, Smart.' With its vibrant pink, silver, and purple, the same could be said about this piece of art!" Peter Gee Pop Art Ladies available at 1stdibs® at The New York Design Center® http://bit.ly/1GK7F7Z 8


Suzanne Zises Green (Susan Zises Green Interior Design & Decoration) susanzisesgreen.com “This mid-century modern brass stool is ‘purr-fect’ near a sunny window. Mongolian goat hide… Catnip to a cat!” Mid-Century Modern Brass Stool with Natural Black Mongolian Goat Hide available at 1stdibs® at The New York Design Center® http://bit.ly/1DNQ38Y

Joy Moyler (Joy Moyler Interiors) joymoylerinteriors.com “Just because I can’t actually GO to Monaco doesn’t mean I can’t be surrounded by the beauty of all things luxe, sexy, and gold. This wallpaper from Flavor Paper (one of my many favorites) screams PASSION! for me. I would wear a burlesque feather head dress and lounge beside the pool as someone fed me grapes.” Monaco Wall Paper available at Flavor Paper http://bit.ly/1tWnOSK

Penny Drue Baird (Dessins LLC) dessinsllc.com “Sconces have become interior design jewelry. None more so than these fabulous vintage bronze sconces. These create a mood both with their style and the light itself, giving a wash of light to the wall behind. These would be posh in any room, and especially suited for a powder room or a mood enhancer.” Brass Sconces by Sven Aage available at 1stdibs® at The New York Design Center® http://bit.ly/1GK6u8i

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DENNIS MILLER ASSOCIATES Your resource for fine contemporary furniture, lighting & rugs


CultureCalendar

By Catherine McHugh

Honoring Hirschfeld, celebrating a landmark anniversary, struggling with envy, and seeking out a golden icon.

Nigel Van Wieck, Q Train (1990). Oil on canvas, 24 inches x 36 inches. Right: Under My Moon. Oil on panel, 24 inches x 18 inches. Photos by David Behl.

URBAN CONNECTIONS The Didier Aaron Gallery is hosting Connect, an exhibition of 35 paintings by Nigel Van Wieck. Known for his depiction of isolated subjects in desolate urban landscapes, Van Wieck considers his work to be a snapshot of American life, existing within a larger, complex narrative unknown to the spectator. Van Wieck’s completed compositions guide the viewer’s eye to provide psychological insights that are revealing or enigmatic, prosaic or allegorical. The duplicitous nature of Van Wieck’s work divulges the truth of modern American life while hiding it in plain sight. Through May 15. Didier Aaron Gallery, 32 East 67th Street, 212.988.5249, didieraaron.com.

Spencer Finch, A Certain Slant of Light (2014). The Morgan Library & Museum, Photography by Graham S. Haber,

Modern-Day Sundial This summer, American artist Spencer Finch will unveil a new, site-specific, large-scale installation at The Morgan Library & Museum—A Certain Slant of Light: Spencer Finch at the Morgan. The museum’s collection of medieval Books of Hours—beautiful, hand-painted works that served as personal prayer books for different times of the day and different periods of the year—serve as the inspiration for the work. Taking advantage of the Morgan’s four-story, glass-enclosed Gilbert Court, Finch will apply films of color to the windows and hang additional glass panes in the center of the Court to create a kind of calendar based on the movement of the sun. Finch grouped the panes of glass by month with each having a palette that suggests the time of the year. June 20 through August 23. The Morgan Library & Museum, 225 Madison Avenue, 212.685.0008, themorgan.org.

Adrien Broom, Envy and Temptation (2015).

Easy Being Green Envy, the most corrosive of the seven deadly sins, is rearing its ugly head at the Hudson River Museum in The Seven Deadly Sins:
Envy, An Installation by Adrien Broom. The multimedia artist interprets this emotion in photographs and life-sized scenes from fairy tales. Evil stepmothers, plotting kings, and vainglorious queens are alive with desire for what others have, just as alive as the tales themselves. Artistic signifiers of envy are seen throughout the exhibition—Snow White’s Evil Queen figures prominently—but an illuminated plinth that showcases a hand-blown glass apple is particularly notable. June 6–September 26. Hudson River Museum, 511 Warburton Ave, Yonkers, 914.963.4550, hrm.org. JUN

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CultureCalendar

Iwan Baan, “Washington Street with Manhattan Bridge” (2014).

Striking Likenesses The New York Historical Society is presenting The Hirschfeld Century: The Art of Al Hirschfeld, which marks the first time that nine decades of the artist’s work have been collected to document his life and career—as well as the history of the performing arts in the 20th century and beyond. The Hirschfeld Century examines his influences, his iconography, and his techniques, from his earliest works to his last drawings. Hirschfeld’s signature performance portraits, defined by a linear calligraphic style, made his name a verb. To be “Hirschfelded” was a sign that one had arrived. Through drawings, paintings, selections from sketchbooks, ephemera, and video, the exhibition traces this unique artist’s evolution. Through October 12. New-York Historical Society, 170 Central Park West, 212.873.3400, nyhistory.org.

Still Standing

Above left: Ella Fitzgerald (1993). Ink on board. Collection of Harvard University © The Al Hirschfeld Foundation. Above right: Tommy Tune in White Tie and Tails (2002). Ink on board. Collection of Harvard University © The Al Hirschfeld Foundation.

The Museum of the City of New York is hosting Saving Place: 50 Years of New York City Landmarks, a comprehensive exhibition that explores the roots and impact of the preservation movement that has transformed the city. Signed on April 19, 1965, New York’s pioneering landmarks law has fostered pride in neighborhoods and resulted in preservation in every borough, connecting and motivating residents, and bringing new economic life to older communities. The law was unprecedented in its scope and became a model for cities and towns around the world. Original documents, drawings, paintings, photographs, building pieces, and more show how the landmarks movement developed in New York. The exhibition looks at contemporary design in the city in the context of additions to landmarks, not only of building elements on individual landmarks but also new buildings in historic districts. Innovative preservation technology and ways to accomplish restoration are shown, and a timeline of the history of the preservation movement wraps around the gallery. Through September 13. Museum of the City of New York, 1220 Fifth Avenue, 212.534.1672, mcny.org.

Far Eastern Fashion

Left: Evening dress, Valentino SpA, “Shanghai” collection (2013). Photo: Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Photography © Platon. Right: Evening coat (ca. 1925). Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of the Brooklyn Museum, 2009; Gift of Mrs. Robert S. Kilborne, 1958. Photo: Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Photography © Platon.

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The Metropolitan Museum of Art is hosting China Through the Looking Glass, an exhibition organized by The Costume Institute in collaboration with the Department of Asian Art to explore the impact of Chinese aesthetics on Western fashion. High fashion will be juxtaposed with Chinese costumes, paintings, porcelains, and other art, including films, to reveal enchanting reflections of Chinese imagery. The exhibition will feature more than 100 examples of haute couture and avant-garde ready-towear alongside Chinese art. Filmic representations of China will be incorporated throughout to reveal how narratives that draw upon popular culture frame our visions of China. Through August 16. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1000 Fifth Avenue, 7212.535.7710, metmuseum.org.


Freeze Framing Photographers Harry Shunk (German, 1924–2006) and János Kender (Hungarian, 1937–2009) worked collaboratively under the name Shunk-Kender from the late 1950s to the early 1970s. The Museum of Modern Art is now presenting Art on Camera: Photographs by Shunk-Kender, 1960–1971. The exhibition includes photographs from Pier 18, a series of ephemeral artworks that were executed at a derelict Hudson River pier in 1971. Also prominent are photographs of Yves Klein’s landmark work “Leap into the Void” (1960) as well as numerous photographs of Yayoi Kusama’s New York performances of 1968, including Mirror Performance and multiple iterations of The Anatomic Explosion, in which dancers stripped and posed in front of the New York Stock Exchange and other Wall Street– area locations in an unconventional artistic protest against the Vietnam War. Through October 4. Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53rd Street, 212.708.9400, moma.org.

Above: Shunk-Kender, “Untitled” from Pier 18 (1971). Gelatin silver print on board. 20 inches x 26 inches. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Right: Yves Klein, “Leap into the Void (Saut dans le vide)” (1960). Photograph by Shunk-Kender (Harry Shunk and János Kender). Gelatin silver print, 14 3/16 inches x 10 13/16 inches. The Museum of Modern Art, New York.

GOLDEN LADY The Neue Galerie New York is presenting Gustav Klimt and Adele Bloch-Bauer: The Woman in Gold, an intimate exhibition devoted to the close relationship that existed between the artist and one of his key subjects and patrons. Approximately 50 works, including the iconic Adele Bloch-Bauer I, paintings, related drawings, vintage photographs, decorative arts, as well as archival material are on display. This exhibition coincides with the opening of the film Woman in Gold, starring Helen Mirren as Adele Bloch-Bauer’s niece Maria Altmann, which is based upon the incredible true story of how she successfully sued the Austrian Government for the return of five Klimt paintings seized by the Nazis from the Bloch-Bauer family townhouse in Vienna during World War II. Through September 7. Neue Galerie, 1048 Fifth Avenue, 212.628.6200, neuegalerie.org.

Left: Doris Salcedo, Atrabiliarios (detail), 1992–2004. Shoes, animal fiber, and surgical thread. Courtesy Alexander and Bonin. Right: Doris Salcedo, Untitled (camisas), 2013. Cloth shirts, metal rebars, and plaster in 11 parts. Photo: Oscar Monsalve Pino. Courtesy Alexander and Bonin.

ActivisT ART The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum is hosting a major retrospective to survey the searing, deeply poetic work of Colombian artist Doris Salcedo. Over the past three decades, Salcedo has worked to address the traumatic, modern-day history of her native country, as well as wider legacies of suffering stemming from colonialism, racism, and other forms of social injustice. Originating in lengthy research processes during which the artist solicits testimonies from the victims of violent oppression, her sculptures and installations often transmute intimate domestic objects into subtly charged vessels that conjure up that which is tragically absent. The exhibition will feature the artist’s most significant series from the late 1980s to the present, as well as a video documenting her remarkable site-specific public projects and architectural interventions. From June 26–October 12. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 1071 Fifth Avenue, 212.423.3500, guggenheim.org. Gustav Klimt, Adele Bloch-Bauer I (1907). Oil, silver, and gold on canvas. Neue Galierie, New York.

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books&Apps Anouska Hempel

The Inn at Little Washington: A Magnificent Obsession

The Tudor Home

Saving Place: 50 Years of NYC Landmarks

Anouska Hempel and Marcus Binney Rizzoli March 2015 288 pages, $65

Patrick O’Connell Rizzoli April 2015 256 pages, $50

Kevin Murphy Rizzoli March 2015 272 Pages, $60

Donald Albrecht, Andrew Dolkart, and Seri Worden The Monacelli Press April 2015 208 Pages, $50

It’s not everyday a “Bond Girl” (On Her Majesty’s Secret Service) pens a book on interior design. The celebrated and influential British designer and decorator turned hotelier Anouska Hempel has at long last delivered a monograph of her incredible body of work. Known for her three groundbreaking boutique hotels—Blakes London (known as the world’s first), Blakes Amsterdam, and The Hempel—the designer’s signature look of high style and elegance with a “strong streak of romance” has garnered a loyal following over the past three decades. A typical Hempel interior will feature screens and Elizabeth portraits, fretwork and embossing, symmetry, layering, and almost always the color red. Anouska Hempel features an expansive look into the designer’s historic country house and meticulously manicured gardens (known as Cole Park) that was coined “an aesthetic tour de force” by Architectural Digest. Told through interviews and illustrated essays, the breadth of her range speaks to her incredible talents as one of the most unique designers of the century.

The history, architecture, and interior design of America’s most famous country inn and restaurant are chronicled in the new book The Inn at Little Washington. Legendary chef and owner Patrick o’Connell weaves the tale of the inn’s 36-year transformation from a country auto garage into a charming and sophisticated country house hotel. opening in 1978 with a single restaurant, the inn today includes a village of cottages, guesthouses, and gardens. Lauded as one of the most celebrated in hotel and restaurant design, the book features the design collaboration of Joyce Conwy Evans, a London stage and set designer who infused a colorful British ambiance to the room’s interiors. Told through lavish photographs and Conwy Evans’ watercolor renderings, tabletop vignettes, and recipes, there is something for everyone.

The under-celebrated Tudor House finally gets its due in The Tudor Home. Written by Kevin Murphy, author of The Houses of Greenwich Village and The American Townhouse, and art history chair at Vanderbilt University, the “keystone in American interiors and architecture” is showcased in all its glory. Since the Tudor’s inception in 16th-century England, its steeply pitched gables and roofs, paneled interiors, and half-timbered and stuccoed facades have long been a favorite style among homeowners. The Tudor Home showcases examples from coast to coast, including prairie-inspired Tudors in the suburbs of oak Park, Illinois, and Bronxville, New York, to Arts and Crafts mansions in Pasadena, with many designed by architects Frank Lloyd Wright and Henry Grant Morse. The book also tackles the history, development, hallmarks, and modern day state of Tudor styles, and why we adopt the look in our own homes. (Case in point—the asymmetry of the Tudor Home makes it easy for today’s family to add on additions.)

The world’s most recognizable city is filled with inimitable landmarks—the Cyclone roller coaster on Coney Island, the New York Public Library, and the fields of Central Park. Some 31,000-landmark properties are included in daily life—think lampposts and cast iron street clocks—and all protected by the New York City Landmarks Law. This year marks the 50th anniversary of the passage of the Landmarks Law (and coincides with an exhibition at the Museum of the City of New York) and is celebrated with the new book Saving Place: 50 Years of NYC Landmarks. Told in essays by architect Robert A.M. Stern and preservationists Adele ChatfieldTaylor, Françoise Bollack, Anthony C. Wood, and Claudette Brady (along with the book’s authors), the book covers the Hearst Tower, The Jewish Museum, Greenwich Village, the South Street Seaport, Metropolitan opera House, Astor Library, and Grand Central Terminal, to name a few. Landmarks that are preserved along with those that are sadly demolished are also featured. This book is a must-read for anyone who lives in and loves the city of New York.

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By Cathy Whitlock

Hotel design, the Tudor Home, and a new app to organize your house.

Rachel Ashwell: The World of Shabby Chic: Beautiful Homes, My Story & Vision

Barbara Westbrook: Gracious Rooms

Modern Mix: Curating Personal Style with Chic & Accessible Finds

Housepad App

Rachel Ashwell Rizzoli April 2015 272 pages, $45

Barbara Westbrook Rizzoli April 2015 240 pages, $50

Eddie Ross Gibbs Smith September 2015 208 pages, $45

housepadapp.com

Design aficionados will remember the Shabby Chic trend that interior designer Rachel Ashwell founded decades ago. You may recall the look—pastel colors, faded chintzes, well-worn objects, and furniture with age-old patinas in modern, comfortable pared-down interiors. Ashwell revisits an updated version of the look with her new book Rachel Ashwell: The World of Shabby Chic: Beautiful Homes, My Story & Vision. Beginning with her story, the designer turned retailer recalls the origins of her creativity and journey in bohemian London that led to the launch of washable slipcovers and a global business. She also delves into the heart of the Shabby Chic aesthetic where she explores the essence of flea market finds and objects, and how to incorporate the look into modern interiors, revisiting the vocabulary and style of a trend that became a worldwide phenomenon.

Atlanta-based interior designer Barbara Westbrook is one of the South’s most prominent designers. Studying under the tutelage of fellow Southerners Nancy Braithwaite and Gandy/Peace, Westbrook has designed some of the region’s best residences, spas, vacation homes, and offices for more than 20 years. Known for her “classically inspired homes filled with a European touch,” she was introduced to design at an early age by her mother in architecture- and design-rich Virginia. Gracious Rooms, her first book, features 12 stunning homes— from lake retreats to contemporary mansions—all with her penchant for American, English, and French modern looks with an elegant aesthetic. The designer also shares her tips for incorporating natural elements in a room, unifying spaces via color, and how to set a mood with the right materials.

As East Coast editor of Better Homes and Gardens, and decorating editor for House Beautiful, Martha Stewart Living, and The Food Network, designer Eddie Ross knows good design. Touted for his out-ofthe-box thinking when it comes to his design sensibilities, the editor and designer excels at designing on a budget. (His knowledge of flea markets resulted in sold-out tours across the country.) Ross shares his secrets in his new book Modern Mix: Curating Personal Style with Chic & Accessible Finds. Part design bible and part entertaining primer, he shares never-before-seen interiors of his own homes—an art-filled apartment in Manhattan and his Pine Hill Farm in Connecticut. Flea market finds fill the pages as Ross reflects on where to find, what to look for, and how to use both old and new treasures. With more that 300 full-color photographs, the eight chapters are uniquely divided and say it all—“Inspire,” “Discover,” “Acquire,” “Restore,” “Curate,” “Mix,” “Style,” and “Entertain.” His creed of living each day colorfully and creatively is backed up with timesaving tips and shortcuts. His legion of fans will not be disappointed.

Developed by the former founder of lstdibs, Michael Bruno, Housepad is the latest app designed to make our lives easier. Using the Japanese kaizen method—“the continual improvement philosophy”—the premise is you can immediately raise the standard of anything, in this case day-to-day living and maintaining your home as you want it to be. The app uses images as the primary form of communication to create household “lookbooks” (how you want your dishes stacked, towels folded, etc.), to-do lists, a master list of products used in your household (items can be fulfilled), and a personal catalog that stores serial numbers, invoices, and warranties. Housepad also works under the premise that every household needs an “Emergency Command Center” and stores all your important contact information. The app should be a godsend for those of us who are organizationally challenged.

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Trove

By Jim Lochner

From bling to bubbly to brewed, ideas for whatever your mood.

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CRATE EXPECTATIONS Brooklyn Bicycle Co.’s Willow unisex seven-speed bike offers a step-through frame that accommodates everything from your finely tailored suit to your comfy, faded sundress. The bike features internal gearing, cream tires, crown fork detailing, color-matched chain cover and fenders, dark walnut accents, and a cargo-ready rack, while their handsome handcrafted Rear Wood Crate is the perfect rack accessory to cart your life around. Made from stained and weather-sealed reclaimed timber, galvanized metal, and brass tacks, the crate is sturdy enough to carry your books or bubbly, a picnic or a parcel. Bike comes in medium or large and is available in Gloss Black or Columbia Blue. Crate: 15 inches x 10 inches x 8 inches. Bike: $749; crate: $79.99. brooklynbicycleco.com.

02 Bottle Neck This exquisite Louxor lead-crystal bottle stopper crafted by Baccarat is mouth blown and hand cut in Baccarat, France, in a glassworks chartered by King Louis XV more than 240 years ago. The stopper fits any bottle of wine or champagne and the silicone ring creates an airtight seal that keeps it fresh once opened. 3 1/4 inches high. $140. williams-sonoma.com.

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Ice, Ice, Baby Though the winter was seemingly never-ending, this summer still brings a hankering for iced coffee. Grady’s Cold Brew Bean Bags offers a DIY cold brew kit that makes a week’s worth of fresh cold-brewed iced coffee at home. Their special recipe of ground coffee beans, chicory, and spices is packaged in “bean bags” you can soak overnight in water and easily dispose of (or compost) the next day. The bags can be brewed in just about anything—a pitcher, bowl, stainless-steel pot, Tupperware, Ziploc bag, or one of Grady’s collectible cans. Available in singles ($4), loose bags ($11), the collectible can ($12), packs of 12 ($100), by the case ($120), or through their monthly Brew-It-Yourself subscription club ($30–$300). gradyscoldbrew.com.


04 Dough the Line The euro is falling and the cronut’s 15 minutes of fame is up. So now is the perfect time to visit the City of Light with this delightful Paris Croissant Map. Written, researched, and photographed by pâtissière and European pastry researcher Yuriko Yamamoto, the map features 34 of the best Paris croissants, a brief history of this delectable baked good, and a special glossary of Viennoiserie. Ooh la la! 7.5 inches x 3.5 inches (folded); 15 inches x 21 inches (open). $8. allyoucaneatpress.com.

Top Brass Bring a bit of the beach into your home sans the fishy smell. This beautiful solid brass seashell makes an elegant holder for keepsakes and jewelry, or let it rest as a decorative addition to any dresser, bookshelf, or table. 3 inches x 4 inches. $198. michelevarian.com.

05 Watch ME Pimp your new Apple Watch—and your wrist—with a luxurious setting of perfect diamonds and plating in yellow gold, pink gold, or platinum. The Lux Watch is available in two models—Deluxe and Omni. The Deluxe watch features a gray or black leather strap, and covers the sides, buttons, and strap clasp with 2.0–2.3 carats of diamonds. With the Omni watch, the sides, buttons, and entire steel strap are set with 11.0–12.3 carats of diamonds. Deluxe models start at $48,995; Omni watches at $109,995. brikk.com.

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Cover Band Sometimes you really can judge a book by its cover! This real wood MacBook cover fits every angle of your laptop like a glove. Precision-cut with lasers and finished by hand, the cover goes on with a simple peel-and-stick application. A matching wood bottom cover can be added for extra protection. Available in walnut, ash, bamboo, and ebony. Macbook Air includes top cover; Macbook Pro includes top cover and side wraps. Bottom cover and etching available as well. Starting at $59. toastmade.com.

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Written By Catherine McHugh Photography by Marco Ricca

No Kidding Around SISSY+MARLEY create designs for children that eschew traditional primary colors and embrace whimsy.

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Above: For three-year-old Adrienne’s room, the designers chose a dramatic color palette for a concept that is black, white, and chic all over. Elements include wallpaper from SISSY+MARLEY for Jill Malek, a Kalon Studios toddler bed, a house closet from This Is Dutch, a rug from Madeline Weinrib, and the window treatment from The Shade Store.

Facing page: For Catarina’s Nursery, the designers layered lots of different patterns and texture to create interest. The Jess Brown doll sits atop a twin bed from West Elm, while the wallpaper is from the SISSY+MARLEY for Jill Malek collection.

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ith the rallying cry “Primary colors are not for everyone!,” sisters Chelsea Reale, Rachel Geisler, and their mother Diana Rice have set out to redefine what it means to have your existing décor and children co-exist. Raised in Brooklyn by their “uber-stylish and creative mother,” the three had always dreamed of starting a business together. Before launching SISSY+MARLEY in January 2011, Diana was a private chef, Rachel was a pediatric physical therapist, and Chelsea was an executive in the fashion industry, specializing in shop design and visual merchandising. “We were also busy designing our own personal spaces, and helping our friends and family to create drool-worthy spaces of their own, all while juggling other

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Top: FERM Living pillows, toy baskets, and tent surround a plush Madeline Weinrib rug. Facing page: A stylish Kalon Studio dresser nests in between a Little Nest chair and a FERM Living toy basket.

careers,” Reale explains. “Designing for friends and family was something we did for love of interior design and for free, of course.” When they officially launched SISSY+MARLEY, “we got a ton of press on my son Sebastian's nursery that we had had professionally photographed,” Reale continues. “It ended up in magazines and blogs across the world. So maybe he was our first official client. From there, the phone calls and clients started coming in, and we were on our way to making our dream a reality.”

that instead of the traditional Aunt Chelsea,” Reale explains. “It just seemed old fashioned and strange to us at the time. Rachel's daughter's name is Ryan Marley, so when we were thinking of a name for our business (which we came up with way before the business started and before my son Sebastian and Rachel's son Logan were born) that we would one day have, we came up with SISSY+MARLEY and it just stuck with us.” The trio hews to an aesthetic that is clean, modern, simple, and always chic. “we love adding layers of pattern and texture to create luxurious spaces that

But who exactly is Sissy and who is Marley? “Growing up, Rachel called me Sissy. So when she was expecting, we decided her children would also call me 20

our clients (Big and little) will enjoy and find to Be their favorite rooms in the house,”

reale says. “finding

gorgeous goodies from near and far is something that


we are a Bit oBsessed with.

designing for little ones is especially

fun as we get to Be playful and whimsical with our approach, all while Being sure the space is functional, stylish, and a place that will grow with the child.”

Before beginning a project, the designers work with their clients to define a direction and budget, but they are generally given free rein after that. “We have been very lucky to work with clients who wholeheartedly trust us to design and curate the space on our own,” Reale says. “This allows us to dream big and be super creative.” Their rewards for passing the trust test are beautiful spaces that they can now live, dream, and play in. For instance, Adrienne’s Room, located in a New York City loft, “is packed with tons of personality,” Reale says. “The layers of graphic pattern and the bold monochromatic scheme give it an uberchic and dramatic feel.” Black and white and chic all over is the concept for this lucky three-year-old’s enclave.

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Left: A built-in bookcase showcases Catarina’s parents’ love for animals. Bottom: The rocker from Monte Design Group offers a cream-colored corner to rest. Far right: A West Elm bed, a dresser from oeuf, and a Stokke crib provide the focal points for Catarina’s room. An Ugg rug, a deer head from Tamar Mogendorff, and a Kalon Studios wooden stump provide charming accents.

The designers admit to being “a bit obsessed with black and white spaces in general,” but find using this palette for kids particularly exciting. “it's modern, playful, stylish, not so serious—everything a Kids space should Be. this palette also allows you to add in your child's favorite color of the moment to add a nice pop to the space. adding all of the gorgeous goodies at the end is our signature. for each project, we search for uniQue pieces that will maKe the space feel special.” Some of these pieces include the Striped Rug from Madeline Weinrib and furniture from Kalon Studios, while the dollhouse/teepee and other pieces are from designers across the world that the trio admires. In 2013, the trio collaborated with designer Jill Malek and launched SISSY+MARLEY for Jill Malek, a collection of modern wall coverings for children's spaces. The print they used here is DRoP, which is from their newest collection.

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Children’s Furniture

at 200 Lex

Bograd Kids (Suite 433) bogradkids.com Designer Zoya Bograd (Rooms by Zoya B) launched Bograd Kids to bring top tier luxury baby and children’s furniture to the retail market. Zoya also offers custom finishes and fabrics that until now were only available through professional interior designers.

ducduc (Suite 701) ducduc.com

over in Brooklyn’s trendy DUMBo neighborhood, Catarina’s Nursery is warm, natural, and soothing, perfect for this newborn. “We filled it with gorgeous creatures, yummy textures, layered pattern, and a color palette that would make anyone melt,” Reale says. The beautiful white sheepskin rug from Ugg “creates a lovely soft texture in the space.”

ducduc has been designing consciously constructed and eco-friendly quality modern and traditional children’s furniture since 2005. From toddlers to their youth line, each ducduc piece is designed in NYDC and made-toorder in the company’s 1890’s restored production facility in Connecticut.

“Catarina's mommy and daddy travel a lot and love animals,” Reale continues. “It was important for these themes to be a part of the nursery as I am sure she will be a world traveler too one day. The stunning deer was handmade for our client by designer Tamar Mogendorff. Her pieces are all handmade, one-of-a-kind and dripping with gorgeousness.” The wooden animals that adorn the built-in shelves come from Norman & Jules in Brooklyn—“They always have a beautiful selection of goodies that we cannot resist.” The SISSY+MARLEY for Jill Malek collection provides the wallpaper and ZEE print. A white leather rocking chair from Monte Design, a platform bed from West Elm, Jamie Young’s Hide Mirror, and an oval Crib from Stokke round out the space. “we are passionate aBout children's interior design and creating inspired spaces that are magical,” reale concludes. “doing this is a dream come true for us.”

Dune (Suite 100) dune-ny.com Dune customizes kids’ rooms in collaboration with the client’s architect or interior designer. Utilizing the space to its maximum potential, light, color, and storage needs are taken into consideration to design a functional cohesive program that results in a bedroom that the child grows into, not out of.

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0 4Fabulous Years of

The Kips Bay Show House celebrates four decades of dazzling design.

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By Cathy Whitlock

t’s been called the crown jewel of decorator show houses and for good reason. As one of the first major decorator show houses in the United States, the venerable Kips Bay Show House has showcased the talents of hundreds of interior designers for over four decades. Benefitting the Kips Bay Boys and Girls Club, the Manhattan event raises over half a million annually, aiding some 2,500 children with after-school programs. Started in 1973 by supporters of the organization, it was a time where everyone rolled up their sleeves and got the task at hand done. Interior designer and participant Sandra Nunnerly once noted that it was not uncommon to “see one of the Duponts in rubber gloves cleaning!” Today, the glitter has not worn off. It still remains the gold standard, setting trends and excellence in the world of décor. Each spring, over 15,000 visitors flock to see talented interior designers and architects transform empty, bare bones rooms into sophisticated and memorable interiors of beauty.

Artwork plays a dominant role in this Kips Bay sitting room/study created by interior designers Kirsten Fitzgibbons and Kelli Ford of Kirsten Kelli.

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Capturing these 40 years of memorable interiors became the job of designer, author, style raconteur, and former president of renowned fabric house Scalamandre, Steven Stolman, who has recently penned the ultimate celebratory bible—40 Years of Fabulous: Kips Bay Show House (Gibbs Smith). The enormous illustrated volume provides an insider’s look at the history, process, and rooms that have made the event the Oscars of interior design. As a member of the Junior Committee since the mid-’80s, Stolman gives credit to the housemother of the Kips Bay Show House, Rella MacDougall—“She was one of the Park Avenue ladies who basically manned the door for twenty years. As President of the Women’s Committee, it was not uncommon to see her sweeping the doorstep. She was the heart and soul of the volunteer.” As brand strategist to interior design companies, Stolman is an expert on all things show house, noting that these days they are either organization-driven or sponsored by the shelter magazines. “Both are viable and valid ideas with different personalities,” he says. “For the magazines, the show houses are a business. If it’s unaffiliated then it is more of a pure exercise in design. While today we have shop houses, holiday houses, and idea houses, Kips Bay is still the granddaddy of them all.” He also notes that “show houses have gone through tough times due to the downturn in the economy. Builders, contractors, and, of course, interior designers have suffered. Fortunately, Kips Bay has been able to endure while show houses in other cities have disappeared.” Designers vie yearly for the coveted spots that can literally propel their career to the next level. “Kips Bay is traditionally covered extensively by the great shelter magazines and it’s too extraordinary an event to go unnoticed,” explains Stolman. And how does one get chosen? “The selection process is still shrouded in secrecy and continues to be as it’s done by jury and portfolios are submitted to a committee. Kips Bay is the most challenging of them all as the house is usually secured late in the process. The real estate market in Manhattan is so volatile and on fire—there is no assuring the house selected will remain available and there is such a shortage of potential houses. It’s not uncommon for the house to be secured in mid-March and the show house

May.” As a result, designers have the Herculean task of creating an interior—from soup to nuts—in an astounding six weeks, relying on relationships with vendors and artisans to get the job done on time.

opens in

Top: Designer Katie Ridder’s whimsical pagoda printed wallpaper brightens a Kips Bay entryway. (Opposite) Top: Carrier and Company create instant glamour with touches of gold accents. Bottom: Glazed bright orange walls are a standout in this Geoffrey Bradfield interior.

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Kips Bay has all the makings of a Broadway play, where extraordinary talent, manpower, preparation, behindthe-scenes drama, and opening night pressure make for a one-of-a-kind interior. The beauty of designing a room with no client demands coupled with artistic freedom to create the ultimate interior is a designer’s dream. “There is also a sense of camaraderie with


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interior designers, who often do not have little egos,” Stolman details of the show house experience. “They seem to all check their egos at the door and it’s a sort of ‘hey, let's put on a show in the barn’ type of aesthetic.” For those who have attended the show house, you always remember your first time as a visitor. “I definitely remember the first time I saw Chessy Rayner and Mica Erteguns’s room—it was incredible,” notes Stolman. “I also recall Mariette Himes Gomez’s living room that was serenely beautiful. It wasn’t gimmicky and it wasn’t showy.” 40 Years of Fabulous features show-stopping standout rooms of over 150 designers, from the modernists, traditionalists, and classicists to legends and up-and-comers. With a roster reading like a “Who’s Who of Interior Design,” the book is part historical tome and an essential design reference.

(Opposite) Markham Roberts designed a cozy corner sofa in this timeless and richly colored sitting room. Top: Black and white silhouettes against an apple green backdrop form both drama and whimsy in this dining room designed by Irvine & Fleming. Bottom Left: An elite group of participating interior designers pose on a Kips Bay stairway in the late 80s.

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By Cathy Whitlock

Interior designer Elizabeth Pyne’s Manhattan apartment is a mix of Old World traditional with contemporary. (Photo: Gavin Ashworth) 30


De sign er GENES Interior designer Elizabeth Pyne is the latest generation of McMillen royalty.

T

o prove there is truth in the old adage that “talent is in the genes,” one needs to look no further than interior designer Elizabeth Pyne. A descendant of interior design royalty—her late grandmother Betty Sherrill was founder of McMillen, one of the oldest American design firms, and her mother Ann Pyne remains a principal of the firm today—Pyne represents the firm’s new generation of Sherill women.

While essentially growing up in the business, interior design was not a clear-cut path. After majoring in art history, the Trinity College graduate began her career at the esteemed Sotheby’s auction house, specializing in Old Master paintings. “I found I loved beautiful objects, paintings, and furnishings, and wanted to create an environment and not just sell,” Pyne says of the experience that led her to becoming an interior designer at the age of 28. “Sotheby’s was a great training ground, and I learned how to tell if something has intrinsic value and how something beautiful is made. I love to work with people, and make them excited about buying and why they need something,” which are useful tools in the interior design profession.

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Learning at the foot of the master, Pyne’s grandmother Betty Sherrill taught her the importance of longevity in design, a principle she uses with her own clients. “Whenever I look for a client or buy something for myself, I try and think of the long term. Will I get tired of it or can it be reused in another space? This is useful for many of my (younger) clients who are in rentals or smaller apartments. I encourage them to invest in things now that they can see themselves with for a long time and that could be transferred to other spaces.” “What I also admired about my grandmother was how flexible she was,” Pyne says of the design icon that was one of the first of her generation to study and make a successful business of interior design back in 1924. “She would change her mind and never get locked into any ideas. She always made the client happy, no matter what. I realize that you can’t enforce your own will or vision, ultimately you have to be flexible. She didn’t always have the answer right away and was never scared to say, ‘I have to think about it.’” The process of osmosis also became an important teaching tool as her grandmother didn’t necessarily school her on the basics. “It was a very fluid

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procedure. Through her interiors, I learned the importance of seating groups (a Sherrill trademark), as she had many in her living room.” Ushering in a new generation of clients to the firm became the basis of the concept McMillen Plus, which was started by her mother Ann. “While the commission structure remains the same, we take on smaller projects and attract a younger generation in their twenties and thirties,” the designer says of the process that should be a smooth and painless one for clients where the starting budget is not a major consideration. “Lately I have been getting new clients in their fifties and sixties, and no job is too small, such as reupholstering a sofa.” Clients have access to the same services as any McMillen client and benefit from the firm’s “white glove service,” as the designers always meet personally with the vendors, offer great support, and even instill a “no coffee” rule. (They don’t walk around the showrooms or enter a client’s home with coffee in hand as “it looks sloppy,” perhaps a remnant from her grandmother’s past.) Some things have changed as designers now wear jeans to work as opposed to white gloves in Sherrill’s day.


Left: Three generations of designing women—Elizabeth with her mother Ann Pyne and grandmother Betty Sherrill. (Photo: Jay Ackerman) Right: Pyne took a page from her grandmother and added lots of seating options via the use of ottomans in her Manhattan living room. The Louis XV velvet chairs provide a nice contrast to the paneled floor to ceiling curtains made with a Nina Campbell fabric by Anthony Lawrence-Belfair. (Photo: Gavin Ashworth)

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Butterfly-patterned wallpaper forms a whimsical backdrop in this modern dining room. (Photo: Gavin Ashworth)

Left: Pierre Frey covered dining chairs from Hickory Chair center this dining room in Richmond, Virginia. (Photo: Tony Giammarino)

As a designer in her 30s (34 years of age to be exact), Pyne knows the needs and tastes of her audience. “I think people my age want everything immediately. They do not want to wait. My clients think about investments and they are willing to spend money on lamps, sofas, and artwork rather than lacquered walls.” As a designer, she also feels the need to educate people her age on the importance of working with a professional. “Many have never had an interior designer before. I tell them that where you live sets the stage for your whole life. You need to wake up and be happy where you are and feel proud of it.

Some people my age put their emphasis on a handbag People need to realize that interior design does make a difference in their lives.” over design.

reflects the style of a generation who wants classic design but with a less formal bent. A whimsical Osborne & Little butterfly-patterned fabric, “Papillon,” forms the backdrop of her apartment—“It’s graphic, not trendy, black and white with touches of gold that packs a lot of punch.” Instead of a formal dark mahogany table and an Oriental rug combination for the dining area, the designer selected a contemporary iron and glass by Mathieu Matégot with chairs by René Prou sitting atop a white sheepskin area rug. And keeping her legendary ancestor’s spirit alive, Pyne’s love of Old Master paintings and charcoal drawings coexist with decorative yellow elephants and Jansen bucket chairs from her grandmother.

While one traditionally thinks of McMillen as formal, Pyne’s work represents a mix of traditional furnishings with contemporary art, decorative objects, and pops of color. Pyne’s own apartment

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Pyne was named one of House Beautiful’s 2015 New Wave designers. And as the baton is passed, there is no doubt her grandmother would be proud.

Pyne created a soothing open and airy interior for a young Manhattan couple with soft blues and brown as an accent. (Photo: Marco Ricca)

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Eats’N’Sleeps Happy Ending happyending-nyc.com 302 Broome Street (646) 998-3184

Santina santinanyc.com 820 Washington Street (212) 254-3000

Pier A Harbor House piera.com 22 Battery Place (212) 785-0153

Le District ledistrict.com 225 Liberty Street (212) 981-8588

On a grubby Chinatown-accented block near Sara D. Roosevelt Park, restaurateur Oliver Stumm (of Café Select and Rintintin) partnered with Teddy Perweiler and Marlborough Chelsea gallerist Max Levai to bring a casual French bistro to the neighborhood. The new proprietors chose to keep the name of this former massage-parlor-turnednightclub, ditching its infamous reputation but not its funky vibe. In the kitchen, executive chef Jasmine Shimoda whips up traditional French dishes like gratin dauphinois, while other nationalities spice up the menu. The steak tartare is peppered with Mediterranean and Japanese flavors, the lamb is cooked Tandoori style, and the salmon a la vapeur is topped with green curry sauce and a side of yams. As for the design, the team decided early on they didn’t want brick and raw beams. Using the Carlyle Hotel’s bar from The Shining as inspiration, the upstairs design contains a working piano, leather banquettes, art by Tony Matelli and Andrew Kuo, and tunes from the likes of Frank Sinatra, Henry Mancini, and Al Green. Downstairs features funky, fuzzy furniture and a checkerboard floor, with a DJ spinning from a booth with a private urinal stall.

Major Food Group—better known as Mario Carbone, Rich Torrisi, and Jeff Zalaznick, the guys behind Carbone, Dirty French, Parm, and ZZ’s Clam Bar—has opened its latest restaurant in a prime location. Situated under the High Line park, Santina is a coastal Italian restaurant featuring a menu that highlights vegetables and fish, or what Carbone calls “palm cuisine.” Appetizers such as the Giardinia Crudité comes in a terra cotta pot bursting with bright greens surrounded by three sides that mimic the colors of the Italian flag—Ligurian pesto, anchovy sauce, and a peppadew pepper emulsion. If you want to skip the bread service, order the cecina, a Tuscan chickpea crepe that comes in five different choices of fillings. The fish-centric mains feature dishes swimming with bass, lobster, swordfish, and porgy. The restaurant is housed in a glass structure designed by renowned architect Renzo Piano, who also designed the new Whitney Museum next door. The slat wooden ceilings and the gleaming Venetian chandelier provide rich warmth that offsets the bright, colorful blues and pinks. (Photo: Daniel Krieger)

Open to the public for the first time in 128 years, the Pier A Harbor House brings food that celebrates the history, heritage, and bounty of the Hudson Valley to the tip of Lower Manhattan. The landmarked building spans three floors, each with a different experience. The casual first floor Mix features a beer hall and oyster bar, sharable menus, and curated craft beers and cocktails. Seating spills out onto the pier’s promenade, the perfect location for drinking and dining alfresco this summer. Experience fine dining in the second floor’s appropriately named Dine, encompassing a honeycomb of intimate rooms with a Gilded Ageinspired feel, featuring heritage fruits and vegetables that might have been common a century ago. Two bars flank the dining space—The Harrison Room’s “power bar” boasts birds-eye views of the Financial District, while The Commissioner’s Room aperitif bar offers cocktails in an intimate salon-like setting. The third-floor event space, The Loft, is available to book for private events. Furnishings made from reclaimed wood reference the pier’s nautical past, and oversized windows accentuate picture-perfect views of the Statue of Liberty, Ellis Island, Governor’s Island, and the Verrazano Bridge.

The latest Eataly-style marketplace recently opened in Brookfield Place, and should prove a haven for nearby office workers and visitors to Lower Manhattan. The space is divided into four distinct “districts”. The Café District offers La Cure Gourmande’s savory crepes and made-to-order Belgian waffles, as well as pastires, café au lait, housemade glace, and sorbet from the Ice Cream Parlor. The Gallic flavor of the Market District includes a French wine bar, frommagerie, charcuterie, boulangerie, rotisserie, and poissonnerie. The Garden District houses specialty groceries, a coffee kiosk, and “Delice du Chef” prepared food bar. In the Restaurant District, Beaubourg Brasserie offers casual and classic French cuisine like escargots and moules frites, fine wines and Belgian beers can be sipped on comfy banquettes at le Bar, and L’Appart offers an intimate chef’s table concept. Make sure you cap off your visit with some buds from local Tribeca florist Flowers by Yasmine, whose stand brings a pop of fresh color to the space.

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By Jim Lochner

From downtown to midtown, the French are storming their way through the Bastille of Manhattan.

El Original eloriginaltxmx.com 735 10th Avenue (917) 382-5512

Chevalier chevaliernyc.com 20 West 53rd Street (212) 790-8869

Baccarrat Hotel & Residences baccarathotels.com 20 West 53rd Street (844) 294-1764

The Knickerbocker theknickerbocker.com 6 Times Square (212) 204-4980

As new midtown Manhattan residential real estate continues to spread further west, the need for more restaurants past 9th Avenue continues. Enter El Original, a new Tex-Mex restaurant from James Beard Award-winning Lisa Fain, author of The Homesick Texan book series and blog. Fain’s mission of bringing the oft-derided traditionalist Tex-Mex cuisine to the masses via a large-scale restaurant concept utilizes recipes from her seventh-generation Texan family, using key ingredients like making tortillas out of fresh nixtamalized masa dough instead of dry masa flour and cooking with small-batch local lard from Dickson’s Farmstand instead of shelf-stable fats. All the signature Tex-Mex classics are here— chile con queso, crispy picadillo beef tacos, enchiladas smothered in chili gravy, and the legendary “combo plate”. The Lone Start State extends its reach north by serving up regional gems like San Antonio-style Puffy Tacos, Houston-borne sizzling fajitas, and Dallas-favorite Sour Cream Chicken Enchiladas. And this former Texan is particularly pleased to see anti-ballpark nachos (housemade chips, individually topped) and classic Texas-style chicken fried steak within walking distance of my Hell’s Kitchen abode. Yeehaw!

The 250-year-old French crystal company Baccarat made waves this spring when it opened its first luxury hotel (see right). For gourmands, the primary pleasure of that endeavor may be the opening of the hotel’s modern French restaurant, Chevalier. Named after Baccarat’s beloved longtime creative director, Executive Chef Shea Gallante (of Ciano and Cru) redefines the French brasserie by reinterpreting classics like bouillabaisse and roasted duckling, while the Carpentras white asparagus goes perfectly with the white and crystal interior. The charcuterie is made in-house, and so are the breads and sweets, like old-school chocolate soufflé. Plush banquettes line the main dining room where the ceilings soar to a height of 24 feet, allowing the pale elegance of the space (interrupted by a bold splash of vermilion on one wall) to breathe and Chef Gallante’s food to take center stage.

It should be crystal clear that the first hotel and global flagship for the 250-year-old Baccarat brand just raised the bar on bling in the city. Situated directly across from the Museum of Modern Art, the hotel occupies the first 12 floors of the split-level tower that rises 50 stories above 53rd Street. French design duo Gilles & Boissier designed the hotel’s interiors to combine the elegance of a Parisian hôtel particulier with midtown’s contemporary aesthetic. The lobby features a 20-by-25-foot wall adorned with more than 2,000 of Baccarat’s most iconic glasses, the Harcourt, lit by LED lights to create a 24-hour light show, while the lower levels of the hotel are veiled by a 125-foot wide corrugated crystal-like curtain. The 114 guest rooms feature a custom-designed Baccarat red enamel mini bar and even a button on the phone marked “Champagne,” which will deliver your favorite vintage accompanied by signature Baccarat fluted glasses. After an exquisite dining experience at the hotel’s French restaurant, Chevalier (see left), guests can relax in the luxurious day beds that surround the 50-foot indoor pool or at skincare brand La Mer’s first spa in the U.S.

Built by John Jacob Astor IV in 1906, The Knickerbocker only served as a hotel for 15 years. The martini was rumored to have been invented there, George M. Cohan was one of its famous residents, and Enrico Caruso sang “The Star-Spangled Banner” from the window of his suite on Armistice Day in 1918. But the hotel at the corner of 42nd Street and Broadway has served as office space since 1921. Now “the Knick” is back in the knick of time with 330 rooms and suites. Keeping the hotel’s landmark BeauxArts exterior intact, architectural and interior design firm Gabellini Sheppard oversaw the design of the interiors. The hotel lobby mixes sleek metallic grays with alternating bands of light and medium-toned marble, while the dining venues pay homage to the hotel’s historical moniker, “The 42nd Street Country Club”. The 7,500-square-foot rooftop bar gives guests a bird’s-eye view of bustling midtown.

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GALLERY A picture-perfect showroom exhibition .

Bob’s Bar by Brett’s Design available at PROFILES, 212.689.6903, profilesny.com

Modern Luxe drapery hardware for the Kravet Furniture Collection available at Kravet Inc., 212.725.0340, kravet.com JUN

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Gallery

Elegant and sophisticated Gramercy Bar Cabinet from the Robert A.M. Stern Collection available at Kindel Furniture, 646.293.6649, kindelfurniture.com Bamboo Cast Brass Bar Cart available at Henredon Interior Design Showroom, 212.725.3776, henredon.com

Modernist Dining Table in Kumbuk wood and brushed stainless steel available at Tucker Robbins, 212.355.3383, tuckerrobbins.com

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Bakes & Kropp Fine Cabinetry designed for Scott Conant’s Culinary Suite, 212.779.8810, bakesandkropp.com (Photo: Mick Hales Photography)

META seating project by Richard Shemtov available at Dune, 212.925.6171, dune-ny.com

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Devo Footed Ice Bucket available at Global Views, 212.725.8439, globalviews.com

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Lab Barware Collection available at Studio A, 212.725.8439, studio-home.com

Marble Goblets available at Stephanie Odegard Collection, 212.545.0205, stephanieodegard.com

Wooster Dining Table available at DESIRON, 212.353.2600, desiron.com

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Ebonized Bar Cabinet with engraved eglomise glass door panels with honeycombed fretwork available at Apropos Inc., 212.684.6987, apropos-furniture.com

Z Dining Table by Hellman Chang available at The Bright Group, 212.726.9030, thebrightgroup.com

Cordova Console by Christian Grevstad available at Dennis Miller Associates, 212.684.0070, dennismiller.com

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Chez Harrods Drink Cabinet available at Christopher Guy, 212.684.2197, christopherguy.com

Dakota Table from the Colourist Collection available at Julian Chichester, 646.293.6622, julianchichester.com

COM-5292 Four-Door Cabinet available at Louis J. Solomon, 212.545.9200, louisjsolomon.com

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freshpicks T he most current products in 2 0 0 lex showrooms .

Panes and Pleasure The delightful Monolith Mirror by Christopher Guy features intricately designed, individually hand-cut panes inset alongside elegant tiles inside a hand-wrought metal frame. Christopher Guy, Suite 1601, 212.684.2197, christopherguy.com

Clearly Adler Potter, designer, and author Jonathan Adler is dedicated to bringing modern American glamour to your life. His latest collection of performance fabrics for Kravet, Clarity, is filled with shapes inspired by his pottery—retro geometrics, flame stitches and color combinations—that reflect his spirit of irreverent luxury. Kravet Inc., Suite 401, 212.725.0340, kravet.com

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freshpicks

Message in a Mottle The Sari Lights Collection of rugs from Stephanie Odegard is made from handknotted Indian raw silk. The mottled effect is the result of a proprietary technique that makes each piece a stunning piece of art. Pictured here is the Lapis Agate Rug in 100% hand-spun, hand-dyed silk. Custom colors available. Stephanie Odegard Collection, Suite 1209, 212.545.0205, stephanieodegard.com

Under Played Richard Shemtov’s striking Rhapsody Dining Table at Dune adds a pop of high-gloss polyurethane color on the underside of its honeycomb wood top with metal leaf. The solid, inset tapered wood legs give it a quiet power. Clients can choose any Pantone color for the underside of the top. Dune, Suite 100, 212.925.6171, dune-ny.com

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Made For Each Other Mr. Brown London’s biomorphic-shaped Figaro Coffee Tables at Julian Chichester can be used in concert, coming together to form a perfect unified pair, or individually. Like your favorite couple at a cocktail party, Figaro can work the room. Beautifully clad in antique brass. Julian Chichester, Suite 604, 646.293.6622, julianchichester.com

Mod Dane Inspired by Danish modern influences and manufactured in the USA, the Aaron Chair from Apropos Inc. can be paired with several different interior styles. The solid walnut base cradling the contoured, comfy frame strikes a breathtaking pose at every angle. Available in a wide range of fabric and leather. Apropos Inc., Suite 710, 212.684.6987, apropos-furniture.com

Moorish Medallion Inspired by a rare, 17th-century British garden design book in Colonial Williamsburg’s collections, the bold medallion pattern on the Spotswood Rug from Global Views offers a hint of Moorish mystique. This rug is a fresh new take on the age-old color combination of oxblood red and celadon. Global Views, Suite 613, 212.725.8439, globalviews.com

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freshpicks

Reflections in 3-D A new addition to Studio A’s Crimp Collection, the layered frame of the Crimp Mirror is hand-crimped steel in a beautiful antique nickel finish, giving it its three-dimensional character. A round beveled mirror is anchored in the center. Also available in a bronze finish. Studio A, Suite 614, 212.725.8439, studioa-home.com

Local Grower The Creekside Table/Bench from Currey & Company is made for the outdoors but also works beautifully in an entryway or a sunroom. The traditional technique of faux bois, hand-applying concrete over a metal mesh frame, makes it appear to sprout and grow right out of the ground. Currey & Company, Suite 506, 212.213.4900, curreyandcompany.com

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Seize the Grey The classic Bakes & Kropp white kitchen takes a dark and elegant deviation in this recent project. At the center, a Bakes & Kropp custom-designed range hood features a contemporary linear profile and polished nickel banding. Calcutta Marble coordinates the backsplash and countertops, particularly atop the island, surrounded by kerfed panels. Bakes & Kropp, Suite 430, 917.885.9650, bakesandkropp.com

Diva Digs

Solid as a Rocker The Cooper Rocking Chair is a new addition to the DESIRON collection. The unique curved silhouette adds a playful and slightly feminine addition to their line as they continue their foray into more solid wood pieces. Shown in natural walnut, Spinneybeck belting leather, with dark brown and brass details. DESIRON, Suite 702, 212.353.2600, desiron.com

Designed by Dorothy Draper, the original of this chair was made for the great opera diva, Maria Callas. Petite and stylish, Kindel’s Vanity Chair adds elegance to any bedroom or dressing area. This example is exquisitely tailored and upholstered in Hampshire Grand Stripe, Dior Gray fabric by Carleton Varney. Kindel Furniture, Suite 806, 646.293.6649, kindelfurniture.com

Self Storage Don’t let the simple elegance of Louis J. Solomon’s Two-Door Cabinet fool you—it offers four drawers, removable partitions, and hooks, and a mirror graces the backs of the doors. Gold leaf grasscloth doors and recessed brass hardware add soft beauty, while the inset stone top adds an unexpected modern flair. Louis J. Solomon, Suite 911, 212.545.9200, louisjsolomon.com

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freshpicks

Color Me Barbara Award-winning designer Barbara Barry, internationally known for her streamlined interiors and elegant home furnishings, has updated her collection at Baker Furniture. Now available in four new low-sheen finishes, this iconic collection offers more options than ever before. Shown are the Modern Sofa, California Lounge Chair, Cocktail Ottoman, and Tableau End Table. Baker Furniture, Suite 300, 212.779.8810, bakerfurniture.com

Creative Cuts During a four-month journey in the Middle East, Tucker Robbins gained a fascination for the repeating geometric forms found in Arabian architecture and design. Using his Pierced Cube as a starting point, he cut the corners to create the Geodesic Side Table/Stool with a multitude of new angles and facets. Tucker Robbins, Suite 504, 212.355.3383, tuckerrobbins.com

First-Class Compartments Maxine Snider’s award-winning Library Credenza at The Bright Group is a minimalist’s dream. It is the consummate companion to her Library Desk, with a spare architectural profile, just barely floating on bronze (or stainless) legs. Versatile storage options transform it into an entertainment console. Customized and compartmentalized, it moves to the dining room or bedroom with ease. The Bright Group, Suite 902, 212.726.9030, thebrightgroup.com 54


Native Mademoiselle Born in Brooklyn, but decidedly speaking French, the Marie Side Table by Emmanuel Delalain at PROFILES is a wood carver’s dream. It is hand made and finished either in a rainbow of color or clear stained wood. The three drawers make this piece of art a staple of storage for the stylish home. PROFILES, Suite 1211, 212.689.6903, profilesny.com

Serving Suggestion This Classic Smaller Scale Bar Cabinet from Maitland-Smith enhances everything you serve. The cabinet has a light mahogany finish with an eglomise, reverse-painted glass top. The fretwork is gold stained and the hardware on the doors is custom-made mother-of-pearl. Inside, a brass rack holds wine glasses and stores the wine. Henredon Interior Design Showroom, Suite 102, 212.725.3776, henredon.com

Club Sanctuary Slip into the Linea Club Chair from Anees Upholstery’s newest collection, now at Dennis Miller Associates. With its exposed sleek solid walnut frame and luggage-stitch seams, this chair exemplifies modern comfort. Available in 16 finishes, Linea is a chic sit that adds just a touch of relaxed attitude to any space. Dennis Miller Associates, Suite 1210, 212.684.0070, dennismiller.com

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STYLESPOTLIGHT F eatured highlights of craft and design .

1. Enduring Lines (opposite) Inspired by the subtle and beautiful striations found in nature, Barbara Barry introduces Tonal Textures, a selection of in-stock area rugs for Kravet Carpet. 2. Brassy Rhythm The Mondrian Bookcase from Julian Chichester pays homage to the Dutch master of the De Stijl movement. The horizontal and vertical lines of eight brass, oak, and vellum compartments are arranged with rhythmic calculation.

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StyleSpotlight

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3. Wave Hello The quarter-sawn oak and leather Pico Chest at The Bright Group combines soft, clean lines and tailored seams juxtaposed by a hand-carved base influenced by Jean-Michel Frank. 4. Lattice is Back Stephanie Odegard’s Jour Jali Chair is modern yet retains a raw quality due to its handcrafted production. The solid teakwood frame is clad in hammered white bronze with a rosewood jali back. 5. Water Feature The base of Louis J. Solomon’s Metal and Wood Console Table with Rippled Glass is an elegant contrast of wood legs in a rich, dark finish and a beautiful gold stretcher. The rippled glass top is made to resemble moving water.

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6. Eye Music The Octave Console at Dennis Miller Associates features a rhythmic composition of tapered wood staves forming a three-dimensional faรงade. Optional claro walnut doors enhance the visual order with its exotic graining and color. 7. Triple Twist The swirling base of the Trinity Table by Randolph & Hein at PROFILES defies gravity. The wood graining of the legs and the starburst pattern in the top are spectacular from any angle.

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8. See My Point (opposite) Part sculptural, part functional, the hand-cut, faceted Loverboy Mirror Series that Joe Doucet designed for Dune provides all kinds of new perspectives of the room where they’re placed. 9. Elevated Edge The new Charles Credenza at DESIRON features a beveled front detail that adds a dramatic and elevated effect. Shown in black walnut and Dani Leather Rustico Nabuk in creta, with a gunmetal base. 10. Baby, I’m a Maze A floating carved maze motif frames an opaline white Murano glass panel to create the Maze Wall Sconce from Global Views. Available in nickel, brass, or copper finishes. 11. More Demi Gentle feminine curves augmented by distinctive hand-carved mahogany detailing sets the Montpellier Demi-Sofa by Christopher Guy apart. This settee mingles well in period or contemporary settings.

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12. Bathed in White This Bakes & Kropp master bath is simply radiant with brilliant white cabinetry set against a creamy eggshell backdrop. Matching molding profiles and the white tile floor blend harmoniously with the design, and simple polished nickel hardware completes the look. 13. Long and Short of It Sleek yet bold, the Anna Extension Table by James DiPersia at Apropos Inc. has two hidden side drawers that conceal folding leaves that, at your convenience, can be in place in seconds.

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14. Baroque Pediments Originally designed by Dorothy Draper on a much larger scale as a clock for The Greenbrier Hotel, the American Baroque Mirror from Kindel features a broken pediment and elaborate sculptural swags. 15. Fine Vine Morning Glory vines inspire this graceful collection of solid cast brass candleholders from Studio A. The five-vine set may be scattered across a tabletop or arranged into a sensuous tangle. 16. Grass Light Rattan, originally used by the Toraja women of Sulawesi, Indonesia, to create fishing baskets has been repurposed here in the Votive Petal Chandelier by Tucker Robbins.

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De. FIN.ingPieces items that sum up what a showroom is all about.

Henredon Interior Design Showroom This Occasional Table with hand carving on the fluted post and base is a fine example of inlaid marquetry. A heraldic lion is inlaid over a parquetry background. Maitland-Smith is known for handcrafted specialties including carving, inlaid stone and wood, lost wax cast metal mounts, and reverse-painted eglomise glass. Henredon Interior Design Showroom, Suite 102, 212.725.3776, henredon.com

Stephanie Odegard Collection Inspired by Japanese peasant and workers’ garments and textiles of the past, Stephanie Odegard created the Sashiko Collection. The ancient craft of sashiko traditionally involves extensively stitching together several layers of used cloth to produce one-of-a-kind work garments and sleeping blankets. Pictured here is Silk Futon II, a hand-knotted wool carpet. Stephanie Odegard Collection, Suite 1209, 212.545.0205, stephanieodegard.com JUN

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DefiningPieces

Kravet Inc. Echo Design presents Heirloom India, a new collection of wallpapers for Kravet inspired by India’s rich history of color and textile patterns. Full of verve and versatility, these distinctive designs include paisley, ikat, and small geometric motifs in colors ranging from hot vibrant orange and pink to deep indigo, soft aqua, refined calm grey, and yellow. Kravet Inc., Suite 401, 212.725.0340, kravet.com

DeSIRON Since DESIRON’s humble beginnings at 1970s flea markets, they have always been known for exceptional metal pieces. The Wooster Cocktail Table has elegant structural elements and a clean, architectural look. Shown here in stainless steel, grey glass, and clear glass, it is available in over 12 metal finishes and several glass finishes. DESIRON, Suite 702, 212.353.2600, desiron.com

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TUCKER ROBBInS Originally derived from the Mayan church columns of Chajul, Guatemala, the zig-zag form was reinterpreted, first in wood by the carvers of the Oku tribes of Cameroon, and then by ceramic artisans in Peru to create the Porcelain Hollow Zig Zag Side Table/Stool. The zig-zag can be found throughout the world’s ancient cultures. Tucker Robbins, Suite 504, 212.355.3383, tuckerrobbins.com

Currey & Company Inspired by the 1920s, the era of jazz and The Great Gatsby, the silhouette of Currey’s Bevilacqua Chandelier is pure Art Deco. Graduated tiers of wrought iron are hand-finished with muted silver leaf. The 18 lights shine through recycled glass bud vases that can actually be removed, used as champagne flutes, then cleaned and replaced. Currey & Company, Suite 506, 212.213.4900, curreyandcompany.com

Louis J. Solomon The luxury spring seat cushions and soft loose back cushions of this Transitional Sofa offer immense comfort, while the hint of an English arm and curved back add style and flair. The simple form pairs easily with any décor, from traditional to contemporary. Choose from completely customizable fabric options and nine finishes. Louis J. Solomon, Suite 911, 212.545.9200, louisjsolomon.com

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DefiningPieces

Julian Chichester The Taj Mahal inspired the tessellated hexagon pattern on Mr. Brown London’s Angeline Chandelier, and the entire Angeline series. This homage to a carved sandstone panel at the Taj Mahal, shown here in serrated Aztec gold, is also available in other finishes. Julian Chichester, Suite 604, 646.293.6622, julianchichester.com

Bakes & Kropp Clean and crisp with a twist, this Bakes & Kropp kitchen showcases a creative balance between linear and curved elements. In an inspired take on classic white cabinetry, subtly curved oak columns flank the marble-topped double islands and draw your eye to the room’s centerpiece— the spectacular range hood. Bakes & Kropp, Suite 430, 917.885.9650, bakesandkropp.com

Christopher Guy Composed of 160 cubes in a myriad of complexity, the dramatic Carrée Headboard is a stunning centerpiece for any bedroom. The headboard, supplied in two seamless sections for ease of installation, is able to hang both vertically and horizontally, and it fits all base sizes. The partially upholstered base is supplied separately. Christopher Guy, Suite 1601, 212.684.2197, christopherguy.com

Dennis Miller Associates The Powell & Bonnell Alto Stool is where high style meets true comfort. The lightweight metal frame forms a sleek, sculptural silhouette while the comfy seat and curved cushioned backrest lends gentle support. The Alto is available in bar or counter height and in an extensive range of metal finishes and textiles. Dennis Miller Associates, Suite 1210, 212.684.0070, dennismiller.com

STUDIO A Fluid, elegant kidney shapes are the hallmark of the sophisticated Adelaide Collection. Made of figured eucalyptus with a soft grey finish over a mahogany frame, the Adelaide Desk features custom-designed antique nickel hardware and sabots as well as a light grey leather top. The collection also includes a matching chest. Studio A, Suite 614, 212.725.8439, studioa-home.com 68


Dune The Dash Side Chair, designed by Richard Shemtov, offers superior comfort in a small footprint. Upholstered with polyurethane foam, the solid wood frame is available in ash, oak, or walnut. Choose from a large selection of fabrics and colors. Custom sizes are also available. Dune, Suite 100, 212.925.6171, dune-ny.com


DefiningPieces

PROFILES The Facet Side Table by Gary Hutton comes in three, four, and five facet versions—that is, the number of sides of this occasional bronze table that brings sparkle to any room. But the facets would number in the thousands if we counted the colored Austrian crystals that form the top. PROFILES, Suite 1211, 212.689.6903, profilesny.com

Global Views The stunning grain of santos and acacia wood are matchbooked to create the top of the Santos Oval Dining Table which also features a double-groove diamond decoration. The table, which sits on a beautiful, polished stainless steel, tulip-like base makes a highly original addition to contemporary and traditional dining rooms alike. Global Views, Suite 613, 212.725.8439, globalviews.com

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Kindel Furniture Kindel celebrates over a century in hand craftsmanship with heirloom-quality furniture representing iconic design that transitions through generations. In the Empire Side Chair, the down-turned back supports seamlessly connect the top rail to the front rail to create a form that is both modern and timeless. Kindel Furniture, Suite 806, 646.293.6649, kindelfurniture.com

APROPOS INC. Comfort and durability with a sleek, defined style, this Upholstered Sectional is one of Apropos Furniture’s best sellers. The design conforms to many interior styles with its wide range of fabric or leather options on an oak frame. Manufactured in the USA using environmentally friendly materials. Many sizes and configurations available. Apropos Inc., Suite 710, 212.684.6987, apropos-furniture.com

The Bright Group The Gosha Series, designed by Douglas Levine, now features a side chair and a pull as the latest additions to this iconic series from The Bright Group. Shown with distinctive channeling, it is also available with plain upholstery. Available in walnut oak or cherry wood finished to your specification. The Bright Group, Suite 902, 212.726.9030, thebrightgroup.com

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NEW Showrooms. 2015 F resh faces and new designs.

Aero, 15th Floor aerostudios.com

new showroom new location

opening soon

Crosby Street Studios, Suite 1303 phone 212.486.0737, fax 917.591.4373 crosbystreetstudios.com

Celebrating its 20th year, Aero is a fixture in New York City’s design community. Thomas O’Brien continually puts forth his latest finds and ideas in a revolving, imagined interior. The store houses O’Brien’s handpicked, ever-changing selection of refurbished vintage modern furniture and lighting, antiques, fine art, tableware, accessories, and collectibles. In addition, Aero stocks the most complete offering of Thomas O’Brien brand home furnishings, both ready-made and made to order. It is the only place to find O’Brien’s custom Aero-label goods, from handcrafted, luxury upholstery and lighting to trays, bedding, and favorites like the perennially popular Aero leather tote bags.

Raul Carrasco, Suite 515 phone 212.966.6112, fax 212.966.6113 raulcarrasco.com

Crosby Street Studios is the trusted source of custom luxurious textiles and carpets to the trade. Collaboration and exploration set the company apart, with childhood friends and principals Tony Mott and Jim McFadden combining their considerable talent and industry to offer architects, designers, and contractors exclusive access to innovative and time-honored materials, technologies, and artisans from discrete sources around the globe. Crosby Street Studios provides dynamic, full-service research, and technical and creative capabilities, allowing the team to create one-of-a-kind dream carpets and textiles with its clientele.

Blending his own designs with pieces procured from around the world, Raul Carrasco’s showroom offers a mix of modern furnishing, vintage objects, glass art, and metalwork. For over 15 years, Raul Carrasco has adorned South Florida’s finest homes and businesses with a distinct mix of contemporary, yet warm and timeless furnishings. His customers, who range from interior designers to collectors and private clients, have come to appreciate his disciplined approach to scale, form, and proportion. The pieces in the Raul Carrasco showroom are timeless with a flair for the international.

Alea, Suite 1509 aleaoffice.com

Kenneth Cobonpue, Suite 427 kennethcobonpue.com

Reagan Hayes, Suite 903 reaganhayes.com

Alea, a leader in the office furniture industry in Italy, has grown worldwide, opening their first New York showroom at 200 Lex. Alea’s extensive knowledge of manufacturing processes and design has created durable furniture that pairs function with aesthetic. Their products include tables, systems, reception, storage, and bookcases.

Kenneth Cobonpue is a multi-awarded furniture designer and manufacturer from Cebu. Integrating locally sourced materials with innovative handmade production processes, Cobonpue's brand is known around the world for its unique designs and roster of clientele that include Hollywood celebrities like Brad Pitt and members of royalty. Kenneth is a leader of a new movement incorporating technologies with crafts and was recently named the Designer of the Year in the first edition of Maison et Objet Asia held in March 2014 in Singapore.

Reagan Hayes, Inc. designs and manufactures high-end furniture for interior design and architecture firms. Each piece in the company’s collection is hand made in Los Angeles with the finest materials, craftsmanship, and attention to detail. Upholstered products are built with solid hardwood, eight-way, hand-tied springs and the highest grade, down-wrapped cushions. Tables are made with grain-matched, quartersawn veneers and masterfully worked metal features. Whether casting molten metals for sculpted table legs or spending hours preparing and applying bleached walnut veneers, Reagan Hayes products are built to stand the test of time.

AMQ, Suite 1316 phone 212.685.1077, fax 212.685.1078 amqsolutions.com AMQ offers open-plan solutions, including benching systems, sit-to-stand tables, and power/data beams. Expectations for budgets and project timelines are changing, and as 6-8 week lead times become less tenable, AMQ meets the growing demand for fast, contemporary spaces with 5-day shipping on all products. From their ICON benching to ACTIV sit-to-stand tables and new ILINE power beam, AMQ offers the fastest set up for your open-plan office.

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ShowroomPortraits

Profiles of Some of 200 Lex's Most Familiar Names

APROPOS FURNITURE Suite 710

ARTERIORS Suite 608

BAKER FURNITURE Suite 300

BAKES & KROPP Suite 430

Apropos is a fourth-generation furniture showroom in NYC catering to the design trade for over 30 years. The Apropos team provides friendly, professional services in custom furniture design, interior design, and consultations. Their goal is to provide clients with furniture that serves as a perfect fit for every project. The collections are manufactured in the USA and are environmentally conscious in design. Apropos Inc., Suite 710, phone 212.684.6987, apropos-furniture.com

Founded by Mark Moussa in 1987, Arteriors is a Dallas-based company that specializes in decorative accessories, furniture, and lighting that appeal to design lovers with up-to-date sensibilities. Launched with a focus on traditional accessories in classic materials, the company collaborates with experienced artisans and manufacturers around the world, producing a full spectrum of styles in luxury materials and finishes. Arteriors, Suite 608, phone 646.797.3620, fax 646.786.4818, arteriorshome.com

Founded in 1902, Baker Furniture remains one of the largest wholesale distributors in the industry with 16 showrooms located in major design districts throughout the United States and at the Chelsea Harbour Design Centre in London. Product assortment spans from historic reproductions dating back to the 17th century to modern designs from today’s most recognized independent designers. Baker Furniture, Suite 300, phone 212.779.8810, fax 212.689.2827, bakerfurniture.com

Founded by designer Robert Bakes and craftsman Paul Kropp, Bakes & Kropp is a luxury cabinetry firm combining elegant design and expert craftsmanship to create spectacular kitchens, vanities, libraries, and closets. Their new flagship showroom at the New York Design Center is the much-anticipated extension of their original Sag Harbor location. Bakes & Kropp, Suite 430, phone 917.885.9650, fax 631.725.1710 bakesandkropp.com

THE BRIGHT GROUP Suite 902

CHRISTOPHER GUY Suite 1601

Currey & Company Suite 506

DENNIS MILLER ASSOCIATES Suite 1210

The Bright Group is a unique collection of handcrafted, American-made furnishings, combining the extensive product range of Bright Chair Company with artisan designers and manufacturers, showcasing a coordinated environment for the design community. Whether the focus is seating, case goods, or lighting, The Bright Group searches the country for quality product lines with great new design. The Bright Group, Suite 902, phone 212.726.9030, fax 212.726.9029, thebrightgroup.com

Christopher Guy’s new 20,000-squarefoot penthouse showroom showcases his latest collections and design philosophy within three suites, each portraying varying lifestyles. The new Mademoiselle Collection internationalizes Parisian chic for the 21st century. The showroom also features the state-of-the-art Christopher Guy Design Lab, an ideal working environment for interior designers to complete entire design projects. Christopher Guy, Suite 1601, phone 212.684.2197, fax 212.684.2123, christopherguy.com

For more than 25 years, Currey & Company has fulfilled customers’ need for distinctive chandeliers, wall sconces, lamps, rugs and furniture. The company’s perspective on product design is one of a lively interest in historical influences, correct materials for the design and a keen interest in product integrity. Every detail is executed with clarity and finesse. Products show the touch of the human hand meticulously crafted of natural materials. Currey & Company, Suite 506, phone 212.213.4900, curreyandcompany.com

Since 1983, Dennis Miller Associates has offered innovative furniture and lighting collections designed by architects, interior designers, and artisans. Its showroom provides a continually evolving showcase of contemporary and 20th century classic design excellence. Its popularity with top designers speaks for itself. Come see the newly expanded collections to the Dennis Miller lighting, rugs, and furniture lines. Dennis Miller Associates, Suite 1210, phone 212.684.0070, fax 212.684.0776, dennismiller.com

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ShowroomPortraits DESIRON Suite 702

DUNE Suite 100

GLOBAL VIEWS Suite 613

HICKORY CHAIR–PEARSON– HENREDON, Suite 102

Desiron, designed by Frank Carfaro, is a highly celebrated luxury furniture design company with a focus on benchmade, fully customizable home furnishings. The company’s 4,000-square-foot showroom concentrates on a contemporary clean aesthetic with strict attention to detail and finishing. Desiron manufactures its pieces in Kenilworth, New Jersey, at their state-of-the-art facility, just 19 miles from downtown NYC. DESIRON, Suite 702, phone 212.353.2600, fax 212.353.0220, desiron.com

Dune is an American contemporary design company focused on the development and manufacture of innovative interior products. Since 1998, Dune has built an internationally recognized design brand with its award-winning furniture collection and collaborations with the world’s most cutting-edge designers and architects. Dune’s exclusive American-made furniture collection is only available through their showroom on the ground floor of the New York Design Center. Dune, Suite 100, phone 212.925.6171, fax 212.925.2273, dune-ny.com

Global Views is expanding its showroom space. Global Views is a home decor wholesale company with collections that blend various styles to make pieces that are elegant, exotic, refined, and casual. They offer a wide assortment of fashion-forward products from furniture to accessories that fit every price range. Global Views, Suite 613, phone 212.725.8439, fax 212.679.4927, globalviews.com

The mission of Hickory Chair–Pearson– Henredon is to service the design trade at the highest possible level, while offering a fashion-forward shopping experience. The showroom represents Henredon, Barbara Barry Realized by Henredon, Celerie Kemble for Henredon and Maitland-Smith, Lane Venture, Maitland-Smith, LaBarge, and Taracea. The company offers hundreds of beautiful wood and upholstery designs for every room. Hickory Chair–Pearson–Henredon, Suite 102, phone 212.725.3776, fax 212.725.3763, henredon.com, hickorychairpearson.com

JULIAN CHICHESTER/ MR. BROWN LONDON, Suite 604

Kindel Furniture Suite 806

KRAVET INC. Suite 401

LEPERE Suite 714

Julian Chichester reinvents the great designs of the 19th and 20th centuries to create eclectic, transitional furniture perfect for how we live today. Julian Chichester is pleased to offer the inimitable, irrepressible, and always edgy Mr. Brown London in their New York showroom with a beautifully edited assortment of furniture, lamps, and accessories. Julian Chichester, Suite 604, phone 646.293.6622, fax 917.591.2413, julianchichester.com

Kindel celebrates over a century in American craftsmanship and classic furniture design. Made to order in Grand Rapids, Michigan, Kindel has extensive abilities to create custom furniture. Kindel Furniture, Suite 806, phone 646.293.6649, fax 646.293.6657, kindelfurniture.com

Fall 2014 marked the opening of the Kravet showroom at the new Washington Design Center, located in Franklin Court. This showroom features Kravet as well as Lee Jofa and Brunschwig & Fils. Kravet Inc., Suite 401, phone 212.725.0340, fax 212.684.7350, kravet.com

LEPERE showcases a contemporary collection of innovative designs from Belgium, Italy, the Netherlands, and Spain. LEPERE has developed a strong and loyal following in both the residential and contract design community with its warm, minimalist aesthetic, featuring the best-in-class in furniture, outdoor, carpets, and lighting. LEPERE, Suite 714, phone 212.488.7000, fax 212.488.7006, lepereinc.com

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LOUIS J. SOLOMON Suite 911

METROPOLITAN LIGHTING FIXTURE CO., Suite 512

PROFILES Suite 1211

SALADINO FURNITURE, INC. Suite 1600

Since 1930, Louis J. Solomon has had a reputation in the industry for fine traditional furniture. Over the past 10 years the company has introduced more than 200 new transitional and contemporary styles that complement the quality styles it has always been known for. Please visit the company’s showroom to see the latest additions. Louis J. Solomon, Suite 911, phone 212.545.9200, fax 212.545.9438, louisjsolomon.com

Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co. has been illuminating fine interiors since 1939. Now part of the Minka Group, the Metropolitan showroom represents lighting from all Minka companies, including George Kovacs, as well as products from other quality lighting manufacturers. Its large showroom offers one of the most comprehensive selections of designer-oriented lighting in the industry. Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co., Suite 512, phone 212.545.0032, fax 212.545.0031, minka.com

Serving the design profession since 1980, PROFILES’ workrooms in the U.S. and in Europe create pieces of uncommon beauty and imagination for both residential and contract customers, offering a full spectrum of furniture in a variety of woods, metals, and finishes, as well as finely tailored upholstery—all to the designer’s specifications. PROFILES, Suite 1211, phone 212.689.6903, fax 212.685.1807, profilesny.com

Established in 1986 by renowned designer John F. Saladino, the Saladino Furniture collection currently has over 75 original designs of upholstery, casegoods, and lighting. The line is available exclusively through its New York showroom among select antiques and accessories. A 75-page catalog may be purchased online at saladinostyle.com. Saladino Furniture, Inc., Suite 1600, phone 212.684.3720, fax 212.684.3257, saladinostyle.com

STEPHANIE ODEGARD COLLECTION Suite 1209

STUDIO A Suite 614

Theodore Alexander Suite 515

TUCKER ROBBINS Suite 504

The Stephanie Odegard Collection is a leader in bold design and color innovation in the production of highend, hand-knotted carpets. The collection also features handcrafted furniture, lighting, antiques, and decorative accessories from across the globe. In all of her products, Stephanie Odegard requires strict adherence to social responsibility, raising standards of living for thousands of craftspeople in developing countries. Stephanie Odegard Collection, Suite 1209, phone 212.545.0205, fax 212.545.0305, stephanieodegard.com

Studio A’s unique mix of organic, design-driven accessories, furniture, found objects, and textiles is rich in texture and elemental in composition. Cutting-edge design, unexpected materials, and handcrafted finishes form the foundation of their product mix. The eclectic blend of textures, classic silhouettes, and timeless design will transform any interior. Studio A is a partner company and harmonious complement to Global Views. Studio A, Suite 614, phone 212.725.8439, fax 212.679.4927, studioa-home.com

Theodore Alexander has become renowned as a unique brand embodying quality in design. Founded in 1996 by the enigmatic Paul Maitland-Smith, an industry legend who has pioneered high-end furniture production throughout Asia for the past 25 years, Theodore Alexander is now one of the largest furniture manufacturers in South East Asia. Theodore Alexander, Suite 515, phone 646.293.6628, fax 646.293.6629 theodorealexander.com

For the past 25 years, Tucker Robbins’ passion has been bringing the spirit and craft from traditional artisans to contemporary life. He has created thriving artisan workshops in Guatemala, the Philippines, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, and Cameroon, working with sustainably harvested or reclaimed materials and incorporating sustainable methods that have been practiced by local people for centuries. Tucker Robbins, Suite 504, phone 212.355.3383, fax 212.355.3116, tuckerrobbins.com

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Events at 200 Lex A look at a few recent celebrations.

Where’s Wendell Exhibition Opening On February 10, the New York Design Center hosted the opening of Where’s Wendell?, a photography exhibition by Felicia M. Gordon, which featured pieces from avant-garde fashion designer Wendell Headley and antiques from 1stdibs at the New York Design Center styled by interior designer Sasha Bikoff. The photographs are Gordon’s homage to Headley and his spirit of individual expression. The exhibition married fashion, furniture, and art to create a truly unique experience of color and playful elegance.

The exhibition featured garments made by Wendell Headley; Cicely Tyson and Faye Wattleton; designer Sasha Bikoff and Felicia M. Gordon; Hearst Design Group’s Andi Henke and Paige Alexus; Linda Fairstein, Wendell Headley, and Lesley Stahl; Keith Bernard, Felicia Gordon, and Charlotte Druckman; vignette styled by Sasha Bikoff; Somers Farkas and Muffie Potter Aston. Photos by Darren Ornitz.

Garden Party at 200 Lex On March 26, the New York Design Center continued Outdoor Month at 200 Lex with The Garden Party on the second floor. Century Furniture, Grange, and Lexington Home Brands hosted a festive open house with a presentation on Outdoor Entertaining Trends in Grange, featuring Bella Meyer of Fleurs Bella, floral and event designer Laura Clare, and event and design production by Ron Wendt. The panel was moderated by Alejandro Saralegui, director of the Madoo Conservancy. The event was held in conjunction with Luxe Interiors + Design and The Horticultural Society of New York.

Panelists Bella Meyer, Ron Wendt, and Laura Clare, with moderator Alejandro Saralegui; Ben Knox and Christopher Spaulding of Reclaim Design; designer Thomas Burak and Century Furniture’s Dane Anderson.

Designing Outdoors with Celerie Kemble and Lela Rose The New York Design Center kicked off Outdoor Month at 200 Lex on March 5 with Celerie Kemble, principal at Kemble Interiors, and fashion designer Lela Rose. The lively discussion on outdoor décor, entertaining, and fashion was moderated by Sophie Donelson, editor in chief of House Beautiful. Guests mingled in the Hickory Chair-Pearson-Henredon showroom, enjoying seasonal fare and browsing Kemble’s new outdoor furniture line with Lane Venture.

Celerie Kemble, Sophie Donelson, and Lela Rose; designers Michael Tavano and Lisa Frantz; House Beautiful Next Wave 2015 designers Ashley Darryl, Joshua Smith, and Max Sinsteden; Hearst Design Group’s Sabine Rothman with The New Traditionalists’ Philip Erdoes. Photos by Darren Ornitz. 76


DIFFA’s Dining by Design 2015 The New York Design Center was thrilled to support DIFFA at the 18th annual Dining by Design event, held March 19–March 23, in conjunction with the Architectural Digest Home Design Show. Dining by Design brings together celebrated designers and local talent to create three-dimensional dining installations that awe, inspire, and delight. This year’s table, designed by Lydia Marks and Lisa Frantz of Marks & Frantz Design, was a glittering homage to Hollywood’s Golden Age, with an on-stage dinner furnished entirely by 200 Lex showrooms. In a sophisticated and pattern-rich tableau, Marks & Frantz crafted a glamourous dining pavilion.

A full view of the table featuring chairs by Celerie Kemble for Henredon and floor lamps by Amanda Nisbet for Niermann Weeks; New York Design Center’s table designers Lisa Frantz and Lydia Marks of Marks & Frantz; gold dinnerware by Lenox and Annieglass, flatware by Nambé, glassware by Michael Wainwright, and votives by Orrefors Kosta Boda through Richard Cohen Collection; the show-stopping Hanley Chandelier by Arteriors; the backstage make-up mirror with a lipstick message; Currey & Co.’s Baron Wall Sconce; drapery fabric by Kravet; table runner fabric by Diane von Furstenberg for Kravet on the Mark Double Pedestal Table by Kindel; Metro Wall Sconces by Currey & Co. hang on foil gold and black wallpaper by GP & J Baker at Lee Jofa, floor covering by Cole & Son for Kravet. Photos by Darren Orntiz.

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ShowroomDirectory A Complete List of Who’s Where In 200 Lex SH OWROOM

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1stdibs at NYDC Access To Design AERIN Alea AMQ ANDREU WORLD Apropos Inc. Arc|Com Fabrics, Inc. Aristeia Metro Arteriors Atelier Atlas Carpet Mills, Inc. Baker Furniture Bakes & Kropp Bograd Kids Bolier Boyce Products Ltd The Bright Group Brueton Brunschwig & Fils Calger Lighting Inc. Century Furniture CF Modern Christopher Guy CityScapes NYC Clickspring Design CLIFF YOUNG LTD. Colombo Mobili USA Côté France Crosby Street Studios Currey & Company DARRAN Furniture Industries, Inc. Decca Contract Furniture Delivery By Design (DBD) Dennis Miller Associates

10th Fl 424 816 1509 1316 1111 710 1411 1416 608 202 1314 300 430 433 804 1405 902 910 401 434 200 419 & 510 1601 1106 1405 505 809 1201 1303 506 1116 1414 Dock 1210

646.293.6633 212.679.9500 212.679.4341 305.470.1200 212.685.1077 212.679.0300 212.684.6987 212.751.1590 646.761.4711 646.797.3620 212.696.0211 212.779.4300 212.779.8810 917.885.9650 212.726.0006 212.889.2060 212.683.3100 212.726.9030 212.838.1630 212.725.0340 212.689.9511 212.479.0107 917.699.6024 212.684.2197 212.961.6984 212.220.0962 212.683.8808 212.683.3771 212.684.0707 212.486.0737 212.213.4900 212.961.6984 646.761.4711 212.213.1691 212.684.0070

646.293.6687 212.447.1669

DesignLush DESIRON DIFFA DIRTT Environmental Solutions Dorothy Draper & Co., Inc. ducduc Dune EJ Victor ENRICOPELLIZZONI Flourishes GIBSON INTERIOR PRODUCTS Giorgio USA Global Views Good Design Gordon International Grange Furniture Groupe Lacasse Halcon Harbour Outdoor Hickory Chair-Pearson-Henredon In House Kitchen Bath Home Interior Crafts NY IFDA Jasper Group Julian Chichester Kasthall Rugs USA Inc. Keilhauer

415 702 707 1516 806 715 100 814 1304 414 1510 502 613 423 1401 201 1109 1304 1301 102 1511 916 417B 1514 604 611 1101

212.532.5450 212.353.2600 212.727.3100 973.454.6282 646.293.6649 212.226.1868 212.925.6171 212.679.4341 212.683.7272 212.779.4540 212.685.1077 212.684.7191 212.725.8439 212.722.1110 212.532.0075 212.685.9494 212.689.0300 212.683.7272 646.692.4227 212.725.3776 212.686.2016 212.696.4400 212.686.6020 212.685.1077 646.293.6622 212.421.0220 212.679.0300

305.470.9070 212.685.1078 212.679.5996 212.689.3684 212.751.2434 646.786.4818 212.696.0299 212.779.0838 212.689.2827 631.725.1710 212.726.0061 212.683.5005 212.726.9029 212.838.1652 212.684.7350 212.779.0721 212.479.0112 212.684.2123 212.683.5005 212.683.9286 212.684.0559 212.684.8940 917.591.4373 212.213.4911 212.951.7070 212.213.9843 212.684.0776 212.532.5360 212.353.0220 212.727.2574 646.293.6657 212.226.5504 212.925.2273 212.683.7011 212.779.4542 212.685.1078 212.725.2683 212.679.4927 212.722.1115 212.779.0147 212.685.7312 212.689.7143 212.683.0711 212.725.3763 212.686.2048 212.686.4408 212.686.6258 812.771.4641 917.591.2413 212.421.0230 212.679.5996

S H OW RO O M Kenneth Cobonpue KI and Pallas Textiles Kindel Furniture

S uite 427 1313 806 Korts & Knight, Kitchens by Alexandra Knight 716 Kravet Inc. 401 Krug 1415 La Bastille 1305 LaCOUR 1412 Lee Jofa 401 LEPERE 714 Levine Calvano Furniture Group 1406 Lexington Home Brands 212 Louis J. Solomon Inc. 911 Luna Textiles 1410 McGuire Furniture 101 Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co. 512 Milano Smart Living LLC 711 M|n Modern Living Supplies 408 Mr. Brown London 604 M. Topalian, Inc. 802 Napier + Joseph + McNamara, Ltd. 1304 The New Traditionalists 701 Niermann Weeks 905 PALECEK 610 Paoli 1110 Pennoyer Newman LLC 416 Phillips Collection 603 Porcelanosa 609 Potterton Books 431 Primason Symchik, Inc. 1101 Pringle Ward 1109 Prismatique 1101 Profiles 1211 Raul Carrasco NYC 511 Reagan Hayes 903 RENAISSANCE CARPET & TAPESTRIES 912 Richard Cohen Collection 801 Rooms by Zoya B 433 SA Baxter Architectural Hardware 1205 Saladino Furniture Inc. 1600 SANFORD HALL 400 Sedgwick & Brattle 815 Skyline Contract Group 1106 Smart 1115 Stephanie Odegard Collection 1209 Studio A 612 Sun Decor Fabrics 417A Theodore Alexander 515 Thom Filicia Inc. 815 TK Collections 410 Townhouse Kitchens 421 transFORM 708 Tucker Robbins 504 Versteel 1106 Wall Goldfinger 1304 Weinberg Modern 407 Wood & Hogan, Inc. 812 Wood-Mode, Inc./T.O. Gronlund Co. 1515 Woodwrights Wide Plank Flooring 436 NYDC Café 1st Floor New York Design Center 426

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212.337.9909 646.293.6649 212.3924750 212.725.0340 212.686.7600 866.570.9690 212.213.6600 212.725.0340 212.488.7000 212.686.7600 212.532.2750 212.545.9200 212.251.0132 212.689.1565 212.545.0032 212.729.1938 646.486.3272 646.293.6622 212.684.0735 212.683.7272 212.226.1868 212.319.7979 212.287.0063 212.683.2232 212.839.0500 336.884.9271 212.252.7370 212.644.2292 212.679.0300 212.689.0300 212.679.0030 212.689.6903 212.966.6112

212.337.1090 646.293.6657 212.684.7350

973.227.3544 212.684.7350 212.488.7006 212.686.7686 212.532.2875 212.545.9438 212.689.1578 212.545.0031 212.729.1939 646.349.5619 917.591.2413 212.725.2185 212.683.7011 212.226.5504 212.319.6116 212.287.0066 212.683.1297 212.839.0501 336.882.7405 917.289.1228 212.679.5996 212.689.7149 212.679.5996 212.685.1807 212.966.6113

212.696.0080 212.696.4248 212.696.4938 212.696.5333 212.726.0006 212.726.0061 212.203.4382 888.713.6042 212.684.3720 212.684.3257 212.684.4217 212.545.8376 212.685.0600 212.244.9131 212.961.6984 212.696.9762 212.696.2729 212.545.0205 212.545.0305 212.956.0030 212.956.0031 212.213.2703 212.231.2708 336.885.5005 336.885.5260 212.736.6564 212.244.9131 212.213.2470 212.213.2464 212.684.8696 212.684.8696 212.584.9580 212.355.3383 212.355.3116 800.876.2120 212.683.7272 212.683.7011 646.291.2059 212.532.7440 212.532.6440 212.679.3535 212.725.3847 212.390.8944 646.616.0584 212.679.9500 212.447.1669


200 Lexington Avenue, Suite 423, New York, NY 10016 212.722.1110

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backstory COMMISSION ACCOMPLISHED

By Jim Lochner

T he L andmarks P reservation C ommission celebrates 50 years of saving historical N ew York—but not without its share of controversy.

Whenever I walk by the monstrosity that is Madison Square Garden or have to travel through the black hole transportation hub beneath it, I bemoan the destruction of the original Penn Station in 1963. But there is some consolation in the obliteration of its fallen Beaux-Arts beauty. Rising out of the ashes, Mayor Robert F. Wagner, Jr. established the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) to ensure that the city’s landscape would be preserved. Comprising a panel of 11 commissioners appointed by the Mayor, and supported by a staff of approximately 67 preservationists, researchers, architects, historians, attorneys, archaeologists, and administrative employees, the LPC is the largest municipal preservation agency in the country and considers designations in all five boroughs. The four designations—individual, interior, scenic, and historic—encompass everything from the iconic main branch of the New York Public Library and the interior of the ornate Loew’s Paradise Theater in the Bronx to Central Park and a street in Brooklyn Heights. This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Commission, whose task to safeguard the city’s historic, aesthetic, and cultural heritage has certainly had its ups and down. At the LPC’s first hearing in September 1965, the city’s first major public library was proposed for landmark designation. The 19th-century Astor Library in the East Village opened in 1854, and later merged with the Tilden and Lenox collections to become the New York Public Library. When the library moved, the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society (HIAS), a charitable organization founded to help the exodus of Jewish emigrants from Imperial Russia, bought the Romanesque revival building at 425 Lafayette Street. But in 1965, HIAS no longer needed the building, five new uses had been proposed and rejected, and the structure was scheduled for demolition to make way for the construction of an apartment house. (Sound familiar?) Enter theatrical producer Joseph Papp, who had founded The Shakespeare Workshop in 1954. The enterprising and persuasive Papp successfully negotiated with the apartment

developers and acquired the property, giving birth to what eventually became The Public Theater. But other buildings weren’t so lucky. On April 16, 1966, conductor Leopold Stokowski addressed the audience at the old Metropolitan Opera—“I beg you to help save this magnificent house.” The Met had leased the property at Broadway and 39th Street to architectural firm Keystone Associates, with the explicit requirement that the building be demolished. At the LPC’s first meeting, the building had lost by a vote of six to five, when the LPC caved in to pressure from the Met, which feared that a rival opera company would put them out of business. Though Leonard Bernstein, Marian Anderson, Mayor John Lindsay, and even Governor Nelson Rockefeller intervened, the building was razed in 1967. Today, an undistinguished corporate skyscraper stands on the site, with yet another ubiquitous Chase Bank branch on the ground floor. Imagine Christmas in New York without the Rockettes… It almost happened. Radio City Music Hall had been an economic failure from the start and, in 1978, Rockefeller Center announced plans to tear down the iconic structure. The public ran to the theater’s defense and a hearing attracted more than 100 speakers, including a kick line of Rockettes dancing on the steps of City Hall. The LPC granted the theater’s interior landmark status, thankfully preserving its beautiful 1932 Art Deco design and charming retro bathrooms. Today, there are more than 31,000 landmark properties in New York City, located in 111 historic districts and 20 historic district extensions in all five boroughs. The total number of protected sites also includes 1,338 individual landmarks, 117 interior landmarks, and 10 scenic landmarks. While the LPC’s decisions have not always met with widespread approval, I shudder to think what the landscape of the city would look like if the Landmarks Preservation Commission didn’t exist. On their 50th anniversary, let’s raise—not raze—a glass in appreciation.

Top to bottom: The Public Theater, formerly the Astor Library; the Beaux-Arts beauty of the former Penn Station prior to demolition; the Gilded Age glamour of the former Metropolitan Opera House.

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ARRAY INSIDE THE NEW YORK DESIGN CENTER

VOLUME 4 ISSUE 3

Photograph by Antoine Bootz

SALADINO FURNITURE INC. 200 LEXINGTON AVENUE, SUITE 1600, NEW YORK, NY 10016 TEL 212 684 3720 FAX 212 683 3257 SALADINOSTYLE.COM TO THE TRADE


2015 TM

C U R A T E D K R AV E T. C O M

THE THRILL OF THE HUNT. -THOM FILICIA

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Array Magazine - Summer 2015  

ARRAY Magazine brings the most interesting people, places and ideas in interior design into the homes and offices of both design professiona...

Array Magazine - Summer 2015  

ARRAY Magazine brings the most interesting people, places and ideas in interior design into the homes and offices of both design professiona...

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