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THE LIFESTYLE MANUAL FOR THE MODERN MOM

The

JUNE 2017 · THESAVVYMOMS.COM

REAL ANSWERS FROM STRUGGLING TEENS ON PAGE 29.

LostGeneration

PARENTING THROUGH THE OPIOID EPIDEMIC

BIRTHDAY PARTY PLANNER Themes, Decorations & Local Venues

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ADDICTION RESOURCE GUIDE


why should I feed my kids more fresh fruits and veggies? because obesity results from learning poor eating habits good nutrition helps them study harder I can have fun exploring the farmers market with them junk food is not fit for future geniuses I know how hard it is to lose excess weight I want to help them grow up strong and confident because together we’re healthier

As a parent, you want the best for your children. So do we. That’s why we are offering a free Well-Fed Me guide that features healthy recipes, tips for healthy living, and inspiration for lifestyle change that you and your family can use all year. Sign up to receive the Well-Fed Me guide at chistvincent.com

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JUNE 2017 MODERN MOM

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18 MAMA SAID PARENTING THROUGH THE TOUGH TOPICS

20 MIND, BODY & SOUL LIGHTEN UP THIS SUMMER

SAVVY FAMILY 13 BIRTHDAY PARTY PLANNER THROW A PARTY TO REMEMBER.

22 SAVVY STYLE FATHER'S DAY FINDS

24 PRESERVING SUMMER

26

MAKE PICKLES USING GARDEN FRESH INGREDIENTS

26 THE LOST GENERATION

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ARKANSAS'S CHILDREN ARE CAUGHT IN A NATIONWIDE OPIOID EPIDEMIC

30 ANY KID IN AMERICA SCOTT DOERHOFF SHARES HIS HEARTBREAKING LOSS OF A CHILD TO DRUGS

32 BEEN THERE, DONE THAT COUNSELOR USES FORMER ADDICTION EXPERIENCE TO HELP OTHERS

42 GUIDE TO SUMMER FUN

42 22

STAY BUSY ALL SUMMER LONG

IN EVERY ISSUE 6 EDITOR’S NOTE 10 NEWS & NOTES CALENDAR, CRAFTS & MORE!

46 BAG CHECK DAVID SLADE

SPECIAL SECTION 34 ADDICTION RESOURCE GUIDE LOCAL TREATMENT FACILITIES SHARE INVALUABLE INFORMATION

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ON THE COVER: ARKANSAS'S OPIOID EPIDEMIC. PHOTOGRAPHY BY LILY DARRAGH.


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THE WEIGHT OF PARENTING This issue of Savvy offers a wide array of valuable parenting nuggets ranging from light-hearted summer adventures to how to keep your kids safe from drugs in the midst of the opioid epidemic that’s sweeping the country. We love our kids, and we don't want to imagine them doing any of the things we’ve told them not to—but they will, and they do. It takes a strong parent to know when to intervene, when to ask questions, when to put their foot down and when to ask for help. Beginning on page 26, we go in depth with counselors, a DEA agent, treatment facilities, a parent who has paid the ultimate sacrifice of losing a child to an overdose, and we ask some teens in recovery for guidance and insight into their struggle. We hope you’ll read every page, absorb the information, pass it on to friends and keep it stored away in case one day, God forbid, you need to return to it. We have to keep our kids safe, but we are also tasked with the challenge of keeping them entertained, engaged, learning and developing over summer break. On page 42, we delve into our Guide to Summer Fun, which includes tons of local activities you can try with your kids. You’ll find everything from sporting activities to museums, arcades, berry picking and more! Hopefully you'll never hear the dreaded phrase, “I’m bored!” If you have a summer birthday party to plan, you’re in luck! Check out three easy themes along with recipes, DIY ideas, party favors and venues that will make a big impression and a memorable event. And don’t forget Father’s Day on June 18! We perused the wares at a few local shops to curate a selection of gifts that Dad will love. Dads play such an important role in children’s lives, and kids love getting a special opportunity to tell Dad just how much he means. That is why I'm taking this opportunity to share a photo of my Dad and me, at age 8, on our way to our first father/daughter dance. You can tell I’m excited about my one-on-one with Dad by the “I Love My Dad” button the size of my fist, and by how I’m shoving my sister (who got herself dolled up, too) out of the frame. Thanks, Dad, for being a strong parent and saying “no” to me when I needed it—and when it probably would have been much easier to give in and say “yes.” Be sure to thank your parents, if you are lucky enough to still have them around, for all their weighty parenting (it can be so heavy sometimes!), and pass it down to the next generation.

Amy Gordy Editor, Savvy @SavvyAR

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JUNE 2017 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM


3 2 y l u ugh J

o r h t y a l p s i d On

www.ClintonBugsExhibit.com

Little Rock, Arkansas • (501) 374-4242 Xtreme BUGS is produced by Dinosaurs Unearthed.

SATURDAY, AUGUST 18, 2017 Crystal Bridges Museum COME RUN, ROAD RIDE, WALK OR MOUNTAIN BIKE VISIT http://diabetes.org/arkansastour OR CALL DIRECTOR MALORIE MARRS AT 479.464.4121 X6856 FOR MORE INFO. THESAVVYMOMS.COM | JUNE 2017

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WHAT IS LIP SENSE

PUBLISHER BLAKE HANNAHS | blake@arktimes.com EDITOR AMY GORDY | amy@arktimes.com CREATIVE DIRECTOR MANDY KEENER | mandy@arktimes.com ART DIRECTOR KATIE HASSELL | katie@arktimes.com EDITOR AT LARGE REBEKAH LAWRENCE | rebekah@arktimes.com SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE LESA THOMAS | lesa@arktimes.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE SHERRIE BUTNER | sherrie@arktimes.com ADVERTISING TRAFFIC MANAGER ROLAND R. GLADDEN | roland@arktimes.com ADVERTISING COORDINATOR JIM HUNNICUTT | jimhunnicutt@arktimes.com GRAPHIC DESIGNERS BRYAN MOATS | MIKE SPAIN PRODUCTION MANAGER | CONTROLLER WELDON WILSON IT DIRECTOR ROBERT CURFMAN ACCOUNTS PAYABLE/OFFICE MANAGER KELLY JONES BILLING/COLLECTIONS LINDA PHILLIPS

A PLACE FOR FANS OF SAVVY TO DISCUSS, CONNECT AND GET ADVICE.

CIRCULATION DIRECTOR ANITRA HICKMAN

FIND US ON

talk.thesavvymoms.com A NEW, ONLINE COMMUNITY FOR MOMS AND PARENTS OF ARKANSAS. 8

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@SAVVYAR


contributors

KERRY GUICE is a food blogger and photographer living in Little Rock with her husband, two kids and their dog. When she’s not sharing her latest meal on Instagram, Kerry is planning her family’s next Arkansas adventure or crafting with her creative tots.

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501-315-4414 KD REEP is a writer and public relations practitioner in Little Rock. She owns Flywrite Communications, Inc., a public relations agency.

DWAIN HEBDA is a writer and editor living in Little Rock. He and his wife, Darlene, are the parents of four grown children. The empty-nesters spend their time traveling, working out and spoiling their two dogs.

Visit our website for information on services, upcoming events, and access to our resources! Kidsourcetherapy.com Services We Provide: •First Connections Early Intervention •Therapy Evaluations •Speech/Language Therapy •Occupational Therapy •Physical Therapy

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Benton • Little Rock • North Little Rock • Arkadelphia Malvern • Hot Springs LILY DARRAGH is a photographer in Little Rock. She studied photography at Parsons the New School of Design in New York. Currently working out of a photography studio in downtown Little Rock, Lily loves to shoot people and places unique to Arkansas.

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June 6-7

Nickelodeon’s beloved pups are coming to the stage at “PAW Patrol Live! Race to the Rescue,” at Robinson Performance Hall. The performance focuses on themes of citizenship, social skills and problems solving. This highenergy show is perfect for the wholefamily! robinsoncentersecondact.com.

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Celebrate Arkansas’s birthday at the Statehood Celebration on the grounds of the Old State House Museum. There will be living history demonstrations, food and fun for everyone. oldstatehouse.com.

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The Juneteenth Celebration Of Freedom is an annual, family-friendly commemoration of the end of slavery held at the Mosaic Templars Cultural Center. The event is rooted in history and focuses on the future. It’s a block party-style celebration with live music, children’s activities, food trucks and vendor booths. mosaictemplarscenter.com.

23 National Take Your Dog to Work Day!

10 JUNE 2017 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM

9-11

Enjoy deep discounts on family outings with Arkansas Family Fun Days, a weekend-long event that encourages parents and kids to get out of the house and have fun together. Participating organizations include Hiland, Hiland Youth Classic, Wild River Country, Little Rock Zoo, Arkansas Travelers, Big Rock Fun Park, Playtime Pizza, la Quinta Inns and Suites, Museum of Discovery and Arkansas Inland Maritime Museum. Visit arfamilyfundays.com for a list of specials.

Saturdays June 17- July 29 The Clinton Presidential Center invites guests for some fun-filled learning at Super Summer Saturdays from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., on Saturdays June 17 through July 29. Children get the opportunity to participate in a hands-on learning experience with live insects and create ladybugs and caterpillars with egg cartons, paint, googly eyes and pipe cleaners. clintonfoundation.org.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF VENDORS

news & notes


The Month of June

Enjoy a free movie night with the family at Movies in the Park. The films are family-friendly and begin at sunset. Arrive early at the First Security Amphitheatre in Riverfront Park to get a good spot, and feel free to bring a blanket and cooler. moviesintheparklr.net. June 7, “La La Land,” PG-13 June 14, “Maleficent,” PG June 21, “The Karate Kid,” PG June 28, “Creed,” PG-13

23-July 16 2017 LINEUP

RIVERMARKET.INFO

JUNE 7 – LA LA LAND (PG-13, 2016) JUNE 14 – MALEFICENT (PG, 2014) JUNE 21 – THE KARATE KID (PG - 1983) JUNE 28 – CREED (PG-13, 2015) JULY 5 – DADDY’S HOME (PG-13, 2015) JULY 12 – FINDING DORY (PG, 2016) JULY 19 – CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE FIRST AVENGER (PG 13, 2011) JULY 26 – THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN (PG-13, 2016)

The sun will come out tomorrow, and the whole family will enjoy this production of “Annie” at The Weekend Theater. The musical includes a cast of more than 30, and tells the classic story—set in the 1930s— of an orphan child who continually finds optimism. weekendtheater.org.

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now open!

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Little Rock, AR 72201

www.museumofdiscovery.org

501.396.7050

THESAVVYMOMS.COM | JUNE 2017

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Everything You Need to Get the Party Started!

11218 N. RODNEY PARHAM RD. / LITTLE ROCK 501.223.4929

4822 N. HILLS BLVD. / NORTH LITTLE ROCK 501.978.3154

INVITATIONS • DECORATIONS • PARTY FAVORS • BALLOONS • PIÑATAS • CAKE SUPPLIES 12 JUNE 2017 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM


Birthday Party Planner

Pinterest has really taken the art of birthday party planning to a whole new level. From choosing the right theme, to decorations, snack ideas, desserts, party favors, trendy local venues and more— we’ve got some ideas to make planning your child’s next birthday a breeze BY AMY GORDY PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIAN CHILSON

S

ometimes the hardest part of planning a party is finding the right theme, but once you can settle on a central idea everything seems to fall into place. Your child may know exactly what he wants—maybe he has seen every episode of “Paw Patrol’’ a gazillion times, or maybe he knows every word of the “Moana’’ soundtrack by heart (lucky you, luaus are fun!). If your kid is having some trouble settling on something, offer a few broad ideas that can allow for some wiggle room and creativity.

Get Sporty!

Sports-themed parties are an easy way to get kids involved in an activity and having fun. Whether it’s setting up at a local soccer field, renting a basketball gym or scoring a few touchdowns at War Memorial Stadium, sports activities are a great way to get the whole party involved and playing together. Talk ahead of time with the birthday boy or girl to form teams and ask those guest to wear opposing colors, or pick teams the day of and bring colored sweatbands to help keep the teams straight. Everyone is a winner at a birthday party! Grab some plastic trophies, like these we snagged at Party City, and a few other sports-themed prizes to create a take-home goodie bag to make all party-goers feel like champs!

THESAVVYMOMS.COM | JUNE 2017

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LOCAL VENUES

There are lots of local venues that will help create a memorable birthday party for your little one. Many provide cake, food, drinks and decorations, which makes the host’s job a breeze. Here are a few ideas:

ARKANSAS CIRCUS ARTS

Learn the best moves under the big top at Arkansas Circus Arts. This unique venue offers two 40-minute instructional sessions chosen by the guest of honor, which can include trapeze, aerial silks, juggling, hula hooping, tumbling, balancing, aerial hammock, rope climbing or aerial hoops. Also included are ice cream, lemonade, tableware, party favors and a personal circus trainer. arkansascircusarts.com.

ARKANSAS SKATIUM

You can opt for public or private ice or roller skating parties at this venue. Options allow you to build your own party depending on how many guests you need to accommodate, and what bells and whistles you want—ice cream, invitations, cake, a personal host, soft drinks, pizza, balloons or decorations. arkansasskatium.com.

BIG ROCK FUN PARK

This venue offers a lot of choices to suit the guest of honor’s interests. Each packages includes use of the private party room, tokens, fountain drinks and a choice of one activity: go-karts, batting cages, bumper boats, mini-golf, Lazer Frenzy, Amazing Maze or Aerial Adventure. Add on to include extra tokens, more activities or food. bigrockfunpark.com.

INLAND MARITIME MUSEUM

Party-goers age 5 and older can explore the Inland Maritime Museum or make it a sleepover in the submarine if they’d like (minimum of one adult chaperon for every five minors at the sleepover). This party is perfect for the military-minded guest of honor and includes a guided tour of the submarine, a gift for the birthday boy or girl, soft drinks and paper goods. Fun upgrades include a Navy-themed birthday cake and goodie bags that include a custom dog tag. aimmuseum.org.

LITTLE ROCK ZOO

Wild out at the Little Rock Zoo and learn, create and play close to kids’ favorite animals. Parties include a private host, drinks, plates, forks, napkins, a train or carousel ride for everyone, a special zoo present for the birthday child and zoo goodie bags for the guests. Several animal themes are available. littlerockzoo.com.

MUSEUM OF DISCOVERY

This hands-on science and learning center keeps kids’ brains busy with several fun themes to choose from including the new Lego Engineering Party, Safari Party, Dinosaur Adventure, Do It Yourself Party and many more. Each party includes supplies, a personal host and electronic invitations. museumofdiscovery.org.

14 JUNE 2017 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM

Rainbows & Unicorns This theme can get pretty magical as it basically just involves glitter, rainbows and that mystical horned creature every child loves. Decorations are easy—just grab anything shiny and colorful. Rainbow confetti is an excellent touch! A unicorn piñata or a handcrafted pin‒the‒horn‒on‒the‒unicorn game provides an activity. Rock candy is an excellent party favor, and glitter candles on the cake are a must! Order some unicorn cookies from the local Anne Potter Baking, or make your own sweet treat! Rainbow Jell-O “cake’’ is fun, pretty and easy enough that the birthday girl or boy could help prepare it.


Rainbow Jell-O

(Adapted from MustHaveMom.com)

5 3-ounce packages of Jell-O in different colors (Remember Roy G. Biv!) 4 envelopes of unflavored gelatin 1 14-ounce can sweetened condensed milk Water Use a clear container so you can see the colors of the Jell-O. We grabbed this sturdy, plastic trifle container at Party City. Wash it and make sure it has room to sit level in the fridge. Measure the height of your container (subtract an inch or so for the white layers) and divide that by the number of colors you are using to determine how thick to pour the colored layers—you want to be sure it comes out even, and you have room for all the colors of the rainbow! Reverse your rainbow and begin with the last color in the spectrum. Boil one cup of water, then add in contents of colored Jell-O packet and stir gently (if you stir too hard you’ll get bubbles) until dissolved. Then add in half an envelope of unflavored gelatin and stir until dissolved. Pour in up to 1 cup of cold water, depending on how thick your layers need to be. The more water you use, the thinner the Jell-O will be, and the longer it will take to set. Pour into dish and pop it in the fridge to set. Do not pour the next layer until the previous layer is set. To make the white layer, mix 1 envelope of unflavored gelatin with a ½ cup of hot water. Stir until dissolved and add ½ the can of sweetened condensed milk and another ½ cup of hot water. Pour just enough into container to cover the layer of Jell-O below. Pop it back in the fridge and let it set. Repeat these steps until all layers are made. Setting time will move much faster if you pre-make the Jell-O and allow it to cool on the countertop before pouring.

Make your Birthday Party, a

SKATE PARTY!

Parties can be held on the ice side or the roller side, and be held during public sessions or as a private rental.

“ANYTHING ON WHEELS” PARTY

Bring your own scooters, tricycles, big wheels, bikes, etc. to cruise on our roller floor.

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ICE SKATING AND ROLLER SKATING

USS Razorback Submarine Come aboard the historic USS Razorback submarine. All-inclusive packages, can be combined with a group sleepover.

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Mention this ad for 10% off your party package! THESAVVYMOMS.COM | JUNE 2017

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Camp Out!

This theme is great for a sleepover or nighttime shindig. Setting up tents or homemade forts in the den is a fun option if you don’t have enough beds for everyone, and an outdoor scavenger hunt is a great activity to get everyone moving. Make a fake campfire with flameless candles and a bundle of sticks, then let everyone build a story together with Story Stones. Food options can be super fun and easy. Hot dogs are always a winner! Give everyone a metal pie plate and let them load it up with camp snacks like Ants on a Log (made with Twix bars, drops of peanut butter and raisins!), popcorn and a S’mores Cup. Send your happy campers home with a party favor knapsack! Just grab an assortment of rubber creepy crawlers and campy toys at Party City, then wrap them up in a bandana and tie them to a stick.

MAKE YOUR 4TH OF JULY

A STAR-SPANGLED SPECTACULAR!

INVITATIONS • DECORATIONS • PARTY FAVORS • BALLOONS • PIÑATAS • CAKE SUPPLIES • 16 JUNE 2017 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM


S’Mores Cup Chocolate pudding Graham cracker crumbles Marshmallows Teddy Grahams and Hershey’s chocolate for topping This treat is an easy crowd pleaser. Layer a clear plastic cup with graham cracker crumbles, chocolate pudding and marshmallows, and garnish with Teddy Grahams or Hershey’s chocolate bar pieces. No fire needed, and no sticky marshmallow hands to clean up afterward!

11218 N. RODNEY PARHAM RD. / LITTLE ROCK 501.223.4929

4822 N. HILLS BLVD. / NORTH LITTLE ROCK 501.978.3154

• INVITATIONS • DECORATIONS • PARTY FAVORS • BALLOONS • PIÑATAS • CAKE SUPPLIES THESAVVYMOMS.COM | JUNE 2017

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mama said...

PARENTING THROUGH THE TOUGH TOPICS

T

his June Savvy issue is a little heavy, isn’t it? But as anyone who’s lived through tragedy or even a house-wide stomach bug knows, parenting isn’t all morning hugs and lemonade stands. It can be tough—on bodies, on budgets, on marriages, on psyches. Like life, one of the most important aspects of parenting is how we deal with the hard times, the tough topics. There has been a lot in the news lately about kids hurting themselves and each other. Like the rest of the country, Arkansas is faced with an epidemic of addiction to opioids. Every other day in the United States, a child under 10 is killed or disabled through an accidental shooting. From cyber bullying to teen addiction to preventable gun deaths, it’s easy to think the world is headed to hell in a handbasket. If it is, where does salvation lie? With us, the parents of the next generation. I’ve been talking to my 9-year-old a lot lately about bullying. When reading news reports about the horrific way some kids are treated by their peers, it’s easy to say, “Oh, my child would never do that.” But, isn’t that what every parent says? If no parent’s child would do such a terrible thing, whose is? I’ve discovered it’s important to distinguish between rude, mean and bullying when talking about the topic, because kids have trouble grasping the difference. Rude, author and educator Signe Whitson notes, is unintentionally doing or saying something that hurts someone. Mean is inflicting intentional damage once, or maybe twice. Bullying, though, is “intentionally aggressive behavior, repeated over time, that involves an imbalance of power.” Even though it’s difficult, I’m trying to navigate parenting with my eyes wide open. One way I’ve found to talk to my oldest child about how to stop or prevent bullying is with the concept of social currency. The term is often used when referring to a person or business’s online influence, but I think it works for the schoolyard, too. She has a network of friends who accept her, and

plenty of support at home. She is rich in social currency. She can afford to spend some of it if she notices a classmate alone in the lunchroom or on the playground. She has enough social currency that she can stand up to anyone at school who’s being mean to or bullying another, and her friends will not abandon her. As confident and experienced adults, we parents (hopefully) wouldn’t hesitate to stand up for someone being wronged. When I was a kid, though, it was hard to deviate from the group. I think it’s even harder now for children growing up in a social media “status like” world. Relatedly, cyber bullying is at an all-time high, but parents, unfamiliar with some social media and messaging sites, often don’t know it’s happening. According to CyberBullying.gov, 52 percent of teenagers reported being cyber bullied, though over half did not tell their parents. Twenty-five percent reported repeated bullying by cell phone, which over 80 percent of them use, making it the most common medium. What can we do to combat this? Take away their phones? Some parents may choose to. Others will hopefully take the approach of early and repeated education. Many of our state’s prescription drug abuses and accidental gun deaths are preventable, too. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration says misused prescription pills are often obtained by teens from parents or relatives without their knowledge. Do you have prescriptions you’d like to dispose of? This searchable map of drop-off locations is covered with options: artakeback.org/search-collection-sites. BeSmartForKids.org is a great resource for tips on talking about responsible gun storage. It’s easy to feel hopeless and helpless when faced with negative news. But as parents responsible for rearing little people, we must remember that we have choices, we have resources and we are in charge. A little proactive, hands-on parenting can go a very long way toward our children’s safety and our own happiness. And, hey, if we make the world a little better place to live in the process—bonus.

HANDS-ON PARENTING CAN HELP STOP BULLYING !

Jen Holman is determined to be a voice of reason in the cacophony of reality TV and momjudgment-gone-wild. She is often irreverent and frequently imperfect. But she’s happy, by God, and that’s what matters. She lives in Little Rock with her husband and three (im)perfect children.

18 JUNE 2017 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM


Beautiful smiles, happy children ... that is our goal.

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Yes, recovery may take 12 steps… But The BridgeWay has always been the first. As the first psychiatric hospital in the state of Arkansas, The BridgeWay has helped thousands of Arkansans recover from addictions. From legal to illegal substances, we have treated them all.

Under the care of a certified addictionologist, The BridgeWay was the first to offer multiple individualized treatment options: n Abstinence-based treatment n Medication-assisted outpatient treatment with Suboxone n Individualized goal-based recovery Whether you need inpatient care or outpatient treatment, The BridgeWay has always been the first place to call. We provide evidence-based services that treat addictions for adults, ages 18 and older, within a structured setting: n Pet-assisted therapy n Medical detoxification n Art therapy n Intensive Outpatient Treatment n Yoga n Support by AA and Al-Anon n Nutritional guidance n Computer access n Visitation

Let The BridgeWay be your first call. 1-800-245-0011 Our assessment and referral staff is available twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week. Assessments are provided at no charge and are always confidential. The BridgeWay is an in-network provider for Medicaid, up to 21 years of age, and all other insurance companies in Arkansas including Medicare and Tricare.

www.TheBridgeWay.com | THESAVVYMOMS.COM | JUNE 2017

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mind, body & soul

LIGHTEN UP THIS SUMMER Everyone deserves to enjoy the summertime, so lighten up and offload some of your chores to folks who can do it for you—and do it well BY KD REEP

R

emember when you couldn’t wait for summer? Plans to spend every sunny hour at the pool, bleaching your hair with sun-in, dreaming of the next school year. Sis, times have changed. Today, you dread when June arrives because that means your kids are out of school and prepared to destroy everything you’ve worked for in your life—a clean home, stocked fridge and a car all your own. Somewhere between these two lies survival. There is no shame in asking for help, and you can find it here. Whether you need help with meals, housework, tutoring, shopping, entertainment or a host of other essentials, you can find it locally and at a reasonable price.

20 JUNE 2017 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM

HOUSEWORK If you’re afraid your kids will do more damage than dusting, hire a home cleaning service to tidy your home once a week or once a month. There are several in Central Arkansas, including Merry Maids, RoRo Cleaning Service and Moppin’ Mamas, which are accredited by the Better Business Bureau. Another service is Molly Maids of Greater Little Rock, which is a national franchise located in Little Rock. You choose how and what you would like for the service to clean in your home, including using eco-friendly products or adding on laundry to overall house cleaning. The time and stress you save in deleting housework from your to-do list is invaluable to you and your family.


MEAL PREP If your kids are involved in so many activities that you can’t get everyone to sit down to a meal together, much less have time to shop, cook and serve meals, then consider hiring a meal prep service. There are local services that can help with preparing a complete meal your family will love, and most deliver. Fresh n’Lean, Clean Eatery, Health Chew and Dayjenay are local companies who deliver prepared food. If you need something last minute for a bigger crowd (like a sleepover), Chef Shuttle can pick up what you need and bring it to your home, church or backyard for a small delivery fee. If you’re still on the fence about hiring help for meals, consider doing it as a way to help someone in your community. The Dandy Line Kitchen is a food delivery service of freshly prepared, healthy, delicious and affordable meals made in part by the social enterprise program of Hope Rises. This nonprofit provides holistic services to previously incarcerated women to improve their health and well-being, and provide opportunities for personal growth and empowerment. All proceeds benefit the mission of Hope Rises.

LOVE YOUR LAWN Listen, it will be over 100 degrees soon enough. Do you really have the time and energy to yank the mower and edger awake and whack at your lawn? Let a professional do it. Clippers Lawns & Landscape, Fairway Lawns and Horticare are accredited by the Better Business Bureau and skilled at keeping your lawn's edges in line. If a lawn service isn’t what you need, but you do need some help around the yard, look for students in your neighborhood who are looking to make a few bucks between school years. You can keep an eye on them while they do the sweating.

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KICK YOUR KIDS TO CAMP Sometimes, mamas need a day (or week) off, too. Send your kids to a local camp at the Arkansas Arts Center, Ferncliff, Lake Nixon, the Clinton Presidential Center or any number of outlets that offer everything your little ones could desire.

PAMPER YOUR POOCH Letting your dog frolic with your kids in lakes or streams always seems like a good idea until it’s time for them to climb into the car or your home. Leave the washing and brushing to the pros. Visit Chenal Pet Palace, PAWSitive Reflections, The Doggie Spa, Bellevue Animal Clinic or Happy Days Groom & Board for grooming services for pets in Central Arkansas.

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ONLINE PERSONAL SHOPPER Maintaining your style can be daunting, especially when your free time and money goes to your kids. Put yourself back on your priority list and look like a million bucks when you subscribe to a personal shopping service. There are several online, including Stitch Fix, Trunk Club and Stylit, and they all work similarly, including free shipping and returns as well as high-quality clothes from which to choose. If you love to shop but don’t have the time, consider joining an online subscription service to keep you in style. Whether you have the time and funds to do one, some or all of these, the services will help you look forward to summer instead of dread it. And the one thing a kid loves more than his mother is a mom who’s relaxed.

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13000 Chenal Parkway STE 108 Little Rock , AR 72211 THESAVVYMOMS.COM | JUNE 2017

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savvy style

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FATHER’S DAY FINDS

Father’s Day is June 18, and you’ll want to let dear old Dad know how much you appreciate all his handyman work, camping trips, late night chats and life coaching with a Father’s Day gift he’ll love. Check out a few finds from local shops!

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1. “The Greatness of Dads” is filled with beautiful photography and quotes that capture the essence of being a dad. Get a glimpse into the fatherhood of celebrities like Mick Jagger, Muhammad Ali, Cary Grant and more, with sentiments and photos from their children. Available at Domestic Domestic, Little Rock. 2. If Dad’s perfect evening includes a ballgame then he’ll love this 47 Brand LR Travelers adjustable cap. Co-branded with—and only available at—Rock City Kicks or Old Heights Corner Store, Little Rock. 3. Stylish, handcrafted and quality items are hard to find. Help Dad accessorize with this handmade leather and brass belt by American Native of Fayetteville. Available at americannativegoods.com. 4. The outdoorsy dad will put this functional and beautiful handcrafted hatchet by Sanborn Canoe Company to good use. The feather etching and painted handle make it stand out in the tool shed. Available at Domestic Domestic, Little Rock. 5. Keep it hot, cold and classic in this Stanley stainless steel thermos. The timeless design is just like what Grandpa used to carry, and is a dad rite-of-passage. The double wall vacuum insulation keeps things hot for 24 hours, cold for 24 hours and iced for 120 hours. Available at Eggshells Kitchen Co., Little Rock. 6. Is Dad a coffee afficianado? He’ll be able to grind out the perfect cup with this hand-built Red Rooster coffee grinder. Grab a bag of his favorite whole beans to go with it. Available at Eggshells Kitchen Co., Little Rock.

7. Traveling is hard on Dad. Upgrade him to first class with this Carry on Cocktail Kit. It comes with all the fixings to create the perfect Old Fashioned while he flies the friendly skies. Available at Eggshells Kitchen Co., Little Rock. 8. New Balance has the trendy “dad shoe” market cornered. The classic design is comfortable and sporty, and leather accents give them a “dayto-night” versatility. This pair is the 770 Model in the Lucem Hafnia color scheme. Available at Old Heights Corner Store, Little Rock. 9. Argyle has never looked so good as on this pair of Arkansocks. The blue and brown state pattern gives these socks a local flair. Available at Old Heights Corner Store, Little Rock.

THESAVVYMOMS.COM | JUNE 2017

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good eats

PRESERVING SUMMER

A delicious recipe to extend the fruits of your summer labor STORY AND PHOTOGRAPHY BY KERRY GUICE

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e are lucky enough to have a garden at my kids’ school, driven by our PTA and volunteers, and because a lot of the harvesting is done over the summer when the kids aren’t there, we've had to be creative with how we can still involve the kids in the fruits of their labor! We started a farmers market at the beginning of the school year, and because our cucumbers do so well, I decided to create a recipe for pickles, since we could also use the garlic, onion and dill we’d grown. At the market, we had our jars of pickles, basil pesto, pickled okra and whatever fresh veggies or flowers we could offer. Out of everything, though, the “Forest Park Pickles” were a major hit. When I started getting emails and texts from people trying to reserve their jars for the following week, I felt so happy to have landed on a recipe that might stick around the farmers market long after my own kids have completed elementary school. For me, every garlicky, tangy, crunchy bite is a reminder of summer. For this recipe, I use a mandolin so I can slice the cucumbers and onion almost paper thin, and I don't cook anything. The trick to bright green, crunchy pickles is to keep everything fresh! They have to be stored in the refrigerator this way (no cupboard), but it’s absolutely worth it, and saves a lot of time and (for a lot of people) intimidation surrounding the whole canning process. After slicing the cucumbers and onions, I soak them in the salt in a large bowl for at least 15 minutes before adding the vinegar so the salt can pull the water out of the cucumber. This way I don’t have to add any additional water to the brine, and what a punch of flavor that creates! I love that making pickles not only preserves the cucumbers, but it preserves memories surrounding hot Arkansas summers filled with an abundance of fresh veggies and evenings watering the garden while the kids steal turns with the hose to cool each other off. Those things are worth preserving!

(Above from left) Abby Whittaker, Caroline Lasley and Ava Walker. (Bottom from Left) Fiona Fisher and Jhordyn Rodgers.

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FOREST PARK PICKLES Makes 4 pint jars

8 cups thinly sliced cucumbers (I use the thinnest setting on a mandolin.) 2 tablespoons sea salt (Not table salt or fine sea salt! It will be too salty.) ½ cup sugar 3-4 tablespoons fresh dill, roughly chopped 1½ cups white vinegar 1 cup sliced onion

Per Pint Jar: 1 clove garlic, thinly sliced 3 peppercorns Small pinch (5-7) coriander seeds Small pinch (7-10) mustard seeds Add the cucumbers, onions, salt, sugar and dill to the bowl. Combine well and let sit 15 minutes. Add the vinegar and stir to combine. Add garlic and seeds to the bottom of each jar, then fill with cucumbers using tongs. Ladle pickling liquid over the cucumbers, then wipe the jar and secure the lid tightly. Ready to eat in 3-5 days. Keep refrigerated, they are not shelf-stable!

THESAVVYMOMS.COM | JUNE 2017

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The Lost Generation Arkansas and its children are caught in a nationwide opioid epidemic BY DWAIN HEBDA PHOTOGRAPHY BY LILY DARRAGH

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he late-morning traffic outside Matthew Barden’s office traced the line of windows anchoring one whole side of his building. Car after car whizzed past this nondescript office building, one of several clustered next to the busy off-ramp. Barden, all 6-foot-5-inches of him, coiled into a side chair, crossed one man-sized cowboy boot over his knee and glanced out the window. “If there were three school buses a day full of kids driving off a cliff or getting into accidents because the brakes went out and we lost 144 kids, we would absolutely riot over that,” he said. “If that went on every day, we as a people would sit there and light ourselves on fire to say, ‘enough is enough.’” That number—144—hangs in the air like summertime steam, the average number of people who die every single day in the U.S. of drug overdoses. It’s a lynchpin number, something to prime the pump of Barden’s energy, fueling the talks he gives to any group that will listen. As Arkansas’s top federal drug cop, head of the district DEA office in Little Rock, he wants all the outrage he can get. “There’s no greater cause of accidental death in the United States than drug overdoses, to the tune of about 52,400 people in 2015,” Barden said, his catcher’s mitt-sized hands clenching and unclenching. “And here’s the thing: The true story of this, I believe, is going to be much greater than the numbers show.” It’s a shocking statistic, this annual body count, one that easily surpasses Americans killed in Iraq or Afghanistan, those who die every year on U.S. highways or by gun homicide, and nearly matches the Americans killed in the bloodiest 10 years of Vietnam. Worse, drug deaths nationwide are growing: 2015’s toll was up 11 percent over 2014, and 137 percent since 2000. Opioid deaths, the leading tip of this trendline, have been bounding upward for more than a decade, up 200 percent overall since 2000. Opioids are a powerful, highly addictive class of drugs that include an array of legal-by-prescription painkillers (oxycodone, codeine, morphine, among others) and heroin, their pharmacological first cousin. Heroin is actually cheaper and easier to get than pills, though that’s hard to imagine given the clip at which they’re prescribed daily in America.

“One of the first patients I saw was

10 years old.”

In 2015, said Barden, there were 184 million opiate prescriptions written in the U.S. totaling 12.1 billion dosage units or roughly 97 doses per American household. In Arkansas alone, 1.7 million prescriptions were written last year for about 109 million dosage units of opiates. That works out to just under 38 pills for every man, woman and child in the state. “Last year, 2016,” Barden said grimly, “was a banner year.” Dealt with on a daily basis, such numbers tend to have a numbing effect, even on addiction specialists such as Dr. Nihit Kumar, assistant professor in the UAMS Departments of Child & Adolescent and Addiction Psychiatry. He’s seen so many tweens and teens in treatment that age becomes just another vital statistic. “I've seen 12-year-olds experimenting with drugs before,” he said. “One of the first patients I saw was 10 years old.” Opiates users get hooked early and fast, though they generally don’t start out here. More often, they work their way up from tamer substances, egged on by peers and supplied by unsuspecting relatives. “With teenagers in general, they start with something else, like marijuana or alcohol. Opioid is usually not the first thing they try,” Kumar said. “Lots of times they'll experiment with prescription painkillers they got from their parents, grandparents or from a friend at school. It’s very easily available.” The fact that many a young addict’s first opiates come out of an orange prescription bottle in a relative’s medicine cabinet, and not a plastic baggie scored in some back alleyway, is a psychological point in its favor. “For teenagers especially, one of the most important reasons they use something is because of what we call

“There's no greater cause of accidental death in the United States than drug overdoses." THESAVVYMOMS.COM | JUNE 2017

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In 2015, said Barden, there were 184 million opiate prescriptions written in the U.S. totaling 12.1 billion dosage units or roughly 97 doses per American household. In Arkansas alone, 1.7 million prescriptions were written last year for about 109 million dosage units of opiates. That works out to just under 38 pills for every man, woman and child in the state.

144

the average number of people who die every single day in the U.S. of drug overdoses 28 JUNE 2017 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM

perception of risk,” Kumar said. “The less kids perceive a substance to be harmful, the more likely they’re going to use it. When kids see their friends using opiates and their friends are getting high and they’re having the rush they feel like, ‘Oh, it’s a medicine prescribed by doctors, it must not be harmful.’” As for that high, opiates mimic endorphins, natural brain chemicals that deliver feelings of pleasure. The first high is always the best, driving addicts to try and replicate it, something known in drug circles as “chasing the dragon.” Addiction comes when the crash from these drugs becomes so severe that pills are used not to get high, but merely to get functional. This desperate cycle, the potency of today’s opiates and addicts’ common habit of mixing substances while impaired, keeps death by overdose well within arm’s reach. “Part of opiates’ pharmacological effects on your body is decreasing the respiratory center in the brain,” Kumar said. “If an addict switches to something more potent compared to what they’re used to, or starts mixing substances, their brain shuts down their breathing. That’s when people die.” Given the massive amount of opiates in circulation, preaching better parental oversight may seem like riding a tidal wave in a rowboat. Yet that’s precisely what experts like Megan Holt, director of clinical services at Bridgeway, say is the most effective way to steer children clear of such substances. “Kids, and especially adolescents and young adults, have a lot of tendencies to withdraw and be irritable and show poor judgment, and all of those things can be written off to age or adjusting to adulthood,” she said. “If parents aren’t spending much one-on-one time with them, they might not see as many of the specific symptoms until it’s to a point that it’s pretty dire straits and they have to get help.” Holt said most adults today grew up in an era where information on the dangers of drugs was common and easy to get. But intellectual understanding tends to take a back seat to emotion when it centers on one’s child, and this denial can delay seeking help, sometimes with disastrous consequences. “Most parents have had a sensible education about drugs but still have the attitude that it can't be happening to my kid. It shouldn't be happening to my family,” Holt said. “I can say, ‘Do you know what an opioid is?’ and the response I usually get is, ‘Well, yeah, I know that's a painkiller, but I can’t believe my kid was abusing it. I taught them better than that.’ “A lot of that also might be because of the shame and stigma that’s still related to substance use disorders and all mental health conditions, to be quite frank,” Holt said. Even once those barriers are cleared, there still remains the long road of treatment. Popular media has painted a picture of rehab as a place to which addicts retreat and stay until they achieve a breakthrough that enables them to face the challenges of living. While in part that’s not entirely inaccurate, it’s by no means the only path to getting well. “Some people may need to start with a medical detox and then go to rehab,” said Misty Juola, director of clinical services for Rivendell Behavioral Health Services. “Some


“I've seen 12-yearolds experimenting with drugs." people may not be that addicted, but they know they have a developing issue that they want to be more preventative about. That kind of treatment might be handled on an outpatient basis.” The need for the full-on detox, rehab and therapy that most people think of comes down to a variety of other factors. Even here, Juola said, there’s no one approach that works for everyone. “All the different levels of care really work together in any type of addiction problem because the patients are all at different levels,” she said. “They may move through the different levels; they may go through a higher level of care, then relapse while they’re an outpatient and need to go back. All the different resources that we have intertwine and work together depending on where that particular patient is at.” Outside, traffic has picked up considerably and, bumper-tobumper, the cars move more slowly under Barden’s window, a sluggish river flow of steel and glass streaming unendingly into the neighborhood. “I know we all fall short,” he said quietly. “I know there are people out there that have used drugs and have become addicted to drugs. I reach out to them and tell them they need to raise their hand. If there’s a family out there and you know that your loved one is using, they need to go and find help. “As a society, we need to take away the stigma of this being dirty, trashy, no-self-control, shame-on-you, I can't believe that you allowed yourself to become addicted—that has absolutely nothing to do with it. It’s a disease.” Barden’s spent 30 years in law enforcement starting with Orlando, Florida’s Miami Vice-Pablo Escobar era. It doesn’t take much imagination to know he’s kicked down his share of doors, looked over his share of crime scenes, called his share of victim’s families. But he’s never seen anything like what’s currently flooding the streets and countryside of Arkansas. “As an agency, as law enforcement as a whole, we’ve realized we're not going to arrest our way out of this problem,” he said. “We need to collectively come together: law enforcement, rehabilitation, prevention, the medical community, the faithbased community, schools, education. We need to get back to where parents are parents and we tell our kids that there really are things in this world that are truly just not acceptable. “Whatever the reason is, what all the factors are and all the people that want to point fingers, it’s time to knock it off. The point is that we have to stand up. You have to say enough is enough.”

LISTEN TO YOUR KIDS

Quapaw House, Inc. of Hot Springs specializes in comprehensive behavioral health prevention, treatment and education services. Teens participating in the adolescent residential services anonymously offered these snippets from their own journeys. How old were you and what were the circumstances the first time you were introduced to the drug or alcohol?

How did you hide your addiction from family?

What treatment method helped you the most?

What are signs your family could have noticed if they knew what to look for?

WHAT IS ONE THING YOU WANT PEOPLE TO UNDERSTAND ABOUT ADDICTION?

THESAVVYMOMS.COM | JUNE 2017

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Any Kid In America

After losing his 20-year-old son, William, to an overdose, Scott Doerhoff is speaking up to show the opioid epidemic can affect any family, and any kid, in America BY DWAIN HEBDA

Will Doerhoff with his beloved 16th birthday present, a Mustang.

S

cott Doerhoff stood at the front of the room, bracing himself to tell total strangers the details of his family’s worst nightmare. Was he ready for this? What was he doing here? Outside his cocoon of thought, he could hear the room filling up with indestructible-minded college kids. Many, he knew, were already taking pills or smoking pot or doing heroin. Those who didn’t knew who did. What if they didn’t listen? What if he saw a smirk or heard a muted chuckle? Could he handle that? Suddenly, the presentation was called to order and his last window of escape slammed shut. Clawing back cobwebs of doubt, Scott glanced at the assembly and was astonished to see not strangers’ faces but his late son’s, broad grin, bright eyes and all. “Tell ‘em Dad,” Will nodded, “Tell them my story.” “The best way I can honor my child and his life is to help save another kid from the perils that cost Will his life,” said Scott, executive director of the William Christian Doerhoff Foundation which uses the story of its namesake’s drug indoctrination, addiction and fatal overdose at age 20 to educate other students.

30 JUNE 2017 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM


“That’s what I tell them. I’m there to say, ‘Hey, William did drugs less than four months of his life. He did drugs one night and it killed him.’” Despite ample evidence that narcotics have seeped into every neighborhood, society still wraps itself in comforting mental pictures of who uses and who’s beyond addiction’s reach. It’s a fantasy ripped apart by kids like Will Doerhoff, who with a loving family, top grades at a prestigious Little Rock high school and endless future opportunities, checked none of the standard “junkie” boxes. “Will was a beautiful, beautiful kid,” Scott said. “He was the absolute best kid you would ever want in your life. If this happened to William Christian Doerhoff, honey, it can happen to any kid in America.” Will’s straight-laced life before drugs makes him an effective and compelling cautionary tale of the darkness that followed, a story Scott tells unflinchingly. The honor student and wide-eyed college freshman looking to fit in. The wealthy, older fraternity brother who gave him a startling crash course in drugs that went at breakneck speed from ingesting prescription pills, to crushing and snorting them, to the heroin that killed him. “Think about what happened,” Scott said. “This kid, who I literally strapped into a life vest when he sat on the bank fishing because I was so concerned for him, never let him ride motorcycles, any of that stuff. Then four months of using drugs and he’s dead.” As powerful as all that is on its face, the moral to Scott’s talk is a layered one. Will didn’t use in a vacuum, he tells audiences, he was surrounded by peers who didn’t know or care enough to say something to intervene.

“That’s where our awareness slogan came from. We tell people to speak up and speak out when they know someone’s taking prescription drugs,” he said. “We’re trying to teach those kids that it's OK when your buddy’s doing stuff to say something to him and to speak up and speak out about it. If you see your friend doing drugs and you don’t say something to them that night, you may not ever get another chance to say something again.” With time and repetition, telling Will’s story has become less of a fresh gash and more a way to memorialize who he was at his core, warts and all. It isn’t always enough emotional salve, Scott admits, but it feels worse to not tell it at all. “I’m not always this straight-faced, but I’m getting better,” he said. “Will used to tell me, ‘Dad, things always work out like they’re supposed to.’ That’s why I have to believe that in the strange way that God works, he took our son for this purpose right here. God couldn't have picked a more perfect child to tell the story about this.” For more information on The William Christian Doerhoff Foundation, log on to willswork.org. (From top) The Doerhoff family, Shannon, Will, Nicholas and Scott, at Panama City Beach in 2013; Will with his 16th birthday cake; Will, 9, and his brother, Nicholas, 4, at a pumpkin patch; (left) FBI Special Agent in Charge, Diane Upchurch and DEA Assistant Special Agent in Charge, Matt Barden. THESAVVYMOMS.COM | JUNE 2017

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Been There, Done That Counselor J.G. Regnier dishes simple, hard truths to addicts and parents BY DWAIN HEBDA PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIAN CHILSON

I

t’s been more than 40 years since J.G. Regnier sat in his high school parking lot getting loaded at the height of the so-called War on Drugs, with “Just Say No” commercials in regular rotation. “I was a teenager when ‘Here’s your brain on drugs’ came out; we’re all sitting around drinking and smoking weed,” he said. “We’re making fun of that stuff, you know, we’re laughing.” Regnier would eventually find his way to harder substances, hit bottom and pull himself out to become a drug counselor. His Little Rock practice, Counseling & Psychology Services, is considered a preeminent resource for families of young addicts. And when he says young, he means young. “For alcohol, it was a 6-year-old one time,” he said. “I was working at Children's Hospital in the late '90s and I had a 5-year-old that was drinking and smoking weed with his parents. With opiate addiction, I’ve had kids that have been taking the oxys and the roxys as early as 10 and 11. I’ve had a couple kids we’ve had to send off to residential care at age 12 for shooting heroin.” You’d think the 61-year-old would seem as square as those bygone commercials, but such is not the case. A combination of life experience and refined communication techniques has shaped him into a unique animal, at once highly skilled and highly approachable.

J.G. Regnier

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“I’m just an old guy, but I got into recovery when I was young,” he said. “I relate almost like a friendly grandfather to kids in recovery. I facilitate a lot of them through friends into the 12-step groups, and I get other young people to help them out, too.” Nearly 20 years ago, Regnier discovered emerging treatment protocols that were effective without compromising his authenticity. “Years ago, everything was very confrontational, and that never went along with my style,” he said. “I was part of a research project in 1998 using empathy-based practices, in particular, a style called motivational learning technique. It’s all about respecting the client and client’s choice and getting them to elaborate on the process of change. “If you get somebody to talk about change they’re 10 times more likely to do it than if you sit there in your ivory tower and tell them, ‘You’re going to have to do this,’ and ‘You’re going to have to do that.’ It's a more respectful approach.” Respect equals trust, which is a hard commodity with addicts. Regnier said societal changes and technology have both forced and enabled kids to become more self-reliant. Thus, finding a steady drug connection is only slightly more complicated than ordering off Netflix, which helps explain why 85 percent of Regnier’s clients are addicted to opiates. “Social media is an ally to the drug dealers and the drug culture more than anything else,” Regnier said. “The kids, because of their networking and ability to manipulate, seem to be more sophisticated. They'll sneak out of the house, get an Uber and go get drugs in some cases. I mean, this bunch is creative.” Regnier has seen some positive trends, such as peers being more willing to speak up to the family of a friend who’s using. What happens from there, though, isn’t always what you’d expect. “No parent wants to think their child’s doing it, so they put up this wall of, ‘Oh my kid wouldn’t do that,’ at least initially,” he said. “With opiates, it’s not as easily detectable in the early stages. Kids can still be high-functioning, make decent grades, hold down jobs and do their chores. [Parents] might think resistance and not wanting to pay attention to authority are as much adolescence issues as drugs. “At the same time, good parenting means being involved, and what I've seen in too many situations is there are too many parents that aren’t involved. They don’t want to do the right thing and they make exceptions for their kids too many times. Parents need to stand up for themselves, go back to more traditional values and toe a firm line on this deal.”


An Approach that Works

What’s Wrong with Traditional Adolescent Substance Abuse Treatment: • Rushes abstinence • Uses Fear-based methods, emphasizing the harm and danger of drugs • Drugs are treated as a stand-alone issue, separate from all the underlying and co-occurring problems • Promotes unrealistic expectations and timelines • Isolates adolescents from counselors

Why Seven Challenges® is More Successful: • Focus is on comprehensive life counseling that incorporates work on drug problems

The journey to complete wellness begins with a healthy mind. For more than a decade, children, adolescents and adults across Northeast, North Central and Central Arkansas have learned to enjoy healthier lifestyles through our therapeutic services.

LIFE IS MEANT TO BE ENJOYED! Toll-free: 877.595.8869 • familiesinc.net

• Works within an adolescent’s development timeline and promotes logical thinking • Includes preparation for adulthood • Counselors listen and empathize, promoting a patient relationship built on trust and honesty, not fear or judgment • Helps people become aware of their options, expand their options and make their own choices • Follows evidence based methods on how people change

Who is a Candidate for our Seven Challenges® program?

Individuals, ages 13-24, who struggle with drug and alcohol-related problems.

501-954-7470 | BHSArkansas.org 10 Corporate Hill Drive, Suite 330 Little Rock, AR 72205 THESAVVYMOMS.COM | JUNE 2017

33


Addiction Resource Guide: Advertorial

elp.

100 Rivendell Dr, Benton (800) 264-5640 rivendellofarkansas.com

1-800-264-5640

www.rivendellofarkansas.com 34 JUNE 2017 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM


Addiction Warning Signs and Treatment Options S

tatistics show teenagers have easier access to more kinds of drugs and alcohol than ever, and they can be the hardest addicts to spot, particularly in the early stages of addiction. This makes a parent’s job tougher, and underscores how critical it is for them to educate themselves on the process of treatment and recovery. “Rehab could last from anywhere from 30 to 90 days, and should assess and evaluate how that person is doing—if they are ready to go back into the world and cope,” said Misty Juola, director of clinical services with Rivendell Behavioral Health Services of Arkansas. “The length of stay, or the length of treatment needed, totally depends on how intense, how frequent and how strong the drug use is, and how many years it’s been going on.” The first step for parents is recognizing the warning signs that a child may be struggling with a drug problem. “Parents definitely need to look for changes in behavior in general,” Juola said. “Watch for significant changes in school or academic performance, maybe changes in the types of crowd or peer group that they’re with. “Any type of dramatic mood changes can be a warning sign, but of course, that can also be signs of many different things in teenagers because they’re hormonal. But if you notice dramatic mood changes, that should always be something to take note of.”

Juola said there are several other physical and behavioral signs that can also point to a child who’s dabbling in drugs, although not all addicts respond the same way to the same substances. “They may have some confusion, they may seem sedated or drowsy. But they affect everybody differently, so they could also have noticeable elation or euphoria, too,” she said. “Sometimes they’ll make people really euphoric and sometimes they’ll make people really sleepy.” Other physical attributes parents can look for include constricted pupils, slowed breathing and instances of nodding off intermittently or loss of consciousness. Opiates also tend to cause constipation, Juola said. Equally important to recognizing the warning signs of addiction is to understand the various treatment options available in order to get the appropriate help. Drug treatment is not a one-size-fits-all science, but must be tailored to individuals according to a number of variables. “I think we all have in our heads what we’ve seen on TV and treatment isn’t necessarily like that. It’s a very individual kind of decision,” she said. “It really depends on the severity of the addiction. If you’re hooked on pills, there are many different kinds of opiates that you can be hooked on. Some you can detox from and recover from much more quickly, some it takes longer to even start the withdrawal process.”

THESAVVYMOMS.COM | JUNE 2017

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Addiction Resource Guide: Advertorial

4260 Stockton Drive North Little Rock (501) 916-9129 Other Locations: Hot Springs (501) 319-7963 | Northwest Arkansas (479) 282-2992 Jonesboro (870) 520-6313 | Texarkana (870) 260-7997 stocktonmedgroup.org 36 JUNE 2017 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM


Moving Forward After Opioid Dependence D

espite recent claims made by the newly appointed Health and Human Service Secretary—other organizations such as the DEA, National Institute on Drug Abuse, SAMHSA and WHO (World Health Organization) have cited evidence-based studies that show medicationassisted treatment to be the gold standard of treatment for opioid use disorder. Suboxone which was approved for the treatment of opioid dependence by the FDA in 2000, is a medication that binds to the brain's opiate receptors. And it’s one of the key components of the treatment program offered by Stockton Medical Group. Michael Casillas, a Licensed Clinical Social Worker, serves as Director of Operations for Stockton Medical Group (SMG), a company that specializes in the treatment of opioid use disorder. “Suboxone blocks opioids from entering the brain’s receptor sites, which essentially keeps the drugs from working. People who take Suboxone appropriately don’t feel craving or withdrawal symptoms, their health and well-being improves. With stabilization, they are ready to begin the psychological treatment process.” Casillas said. He pointed out that Arkansas State Opioid Treatment Authority officials take the regulation of Suboxone and medications like it very seriously. “ They make sure the regulation of the drug, as well as the counseling component of treatment, is followed,” he said. In fact, patients who receive Suboxone cost reimbursement through Arkansas Medicaid are required to enroll in counseling. According to Casillas, Suboxone is ideal for patients who are well stabilized and do not require the same level of support as those who are prescribed methadone. Patients who use Suboxone typically participate in a monthly maintenance program.

“Patients typically visit our facility once per month. Every visit they are screened, participate in counseling and consult with their doctor. The medication and counseling together are both important to success,” Casillas said. “We require all participants to take part in group counseling. We also offer individual counseling, and unlike many other programs, we offer unlimited sessions. So, individuals can come in every day and participate in a counseling session, if they choose.” During the sessions, counselors address patient specific life situations and work with patients on practical life skills along with psychological counseling, such as developing resumes and setting goals, like obtaining a college education. “We help patients retake ownership of their lives and do things they previously believed they couldn’t,” Casillas said. They are taught to develop healthy coping skills and address topics such as interpersonal relationships. Casillas said SMG professionals also conduct cognitive behavior, dialectical behavior and family systems therapies. This includes learning emotional regulation in which patients learn how to “turn down” emotions, and how to "respond versus reacting" in stressful situations. Suboxone helps make this possible. “We screen patients to determine if they need daily support, or if they can successfully overcome their addiction through monthly care,” Casillas said. “Suboxone allows patients to not feel sick, to function normally, to go to work and to care for their families, and with counseling, to return to their lives.” “Suboxone is like training wheels on a bicycle—counseling helps push the bike forward.” SMG has five treatment facilities that offer outpatient, office-based, medication-assisted treatment programs. For more information, log on to stocktonmedgroup.org.

THESAVVYMOMS.COM | JUNE 2017

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Addiction Resource Guide: Advertorial

! ! !

CATAR CLINIC! ! ! 4260 Stockton!Drive

North Little Rock (501) 664-7833 | nlr@catarclinic.org catarclinic.org

38 JUNE 2017 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM


R

Methadone Saves Lives

ecovering from opiate and opioid addiction is not an overnight process. Lee Manns, Licensed Alcohol and Drug Abuse Counselor and clinic administrator for CATAR Clinic, describes opioid addiction as the proverbial “slippery slope.” “Many people start out using opioids, such as hydrocodone, for pain relief. However, months or years down the road, we often find they’ve become addicted and transition into heroin use. It’s a slippery slope,” he said. CATAR Clinic specializes in quality treatment for individuals who are opiate dependent. The clinic offers pharmacotherapy and individual and group therapy to treat patients, addressing their physical and mental health needs. “We help people recover from their opiate addiction, including prescription addictions to opioids such as hydrocodone and oxycodone. We use methadone, which stops withdrawal symptoms and, with the appropriate dose, reduces and eliminates drug dependence,” Manns said. He emphasized that methadone does not “fix lives.” Patients must participant in individual and group counseling sessions. “Methadone helps with withdrawal symptoms, but patients must do the work, and recovery is a multifaceted process.” Counseling is a big part of that recovery, according to Manns. He said the use of methadone without counseling is not enough to help patients fully recover. “Patients who are withdrawing from opiate addiction get sick every six to eight hours. It’s like having a permanent case of the flu—this is why relapse is so common. Heroine and drugs like hydrocodone rewire the circuits of the brain to think the drug is life-supporting. So, the drug becomes ‘natural,’ like breathing,” Manns said. Often people who have experienced addiction have destroyed their support networks. They may have disappointed their loved ones, lied to them or even stolen from them to support their habits.

“Counseling helps them rebuild their lives and their relationships. The individuals who fare the best in our program participate in counseling,” he said. “Individual sessions give them the opportunity to talk about personal, intimate issues, and group sessions allow patients to share their stories and get feedback and motivation from others who understand firsthand what it is to have destroyed relationships and careers, and they hear how they can do better and get better. That’s valuable.” While recovering with CATAR Clinic, patients are closely monitored through drug screenings. If staff members find the patients are taking medications that interact with methadone, such as Xanax, they will inform the prescribing physician, and adjust and/ or limit methadone doses. “While methadone is an opiate, it does not have mood-altering effects whatsoever. Primarily, it eliminates withdrawal symptoms and cravings, and blocks the effects of opioids. It does not produce a high. It does not have the same effect as heroine or other opiates,” Manns explained. He and many experts nationwide were disheartened by a recent statement from Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price, in which he said that medicationassisted addiction treatment was simply “substituting one opioid for another.” Manns has worked in addiction treatment for 15 years, and said the public would be surprised to find that the “typical” drug-dependent person is not what is depicted in movies. “They are often parents who are just working to get their lives back on track. Just a few months ago, they may have had needles in their arms, getting high. Today, they don’t. Today they’re working and caring for their families,” Manns said. “I see firsthand everyday examples of how therapy along with methadone helps individuals who were once addicted to opiates and opioids turn their lives around. Bottom line: methadone saves lives.” THESAVVYMOMS.COM | JUNE 2017

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Addiction Resource Guide: Advertorial

Talk to Your Kids Now and Monitor Medications P

rescription painkillers are everywhere in the U.S. today, which has given rise to an epidemic of drug abuse and overdoses from coast to coast. But, unlike previous eras where criminals had to stay one step ahead of law enforcement to get their product to the street, today’s permissive prescription culture is putting many addicts as close to their source as their medicine chest. “Opioids have become more accessible than we sometimes consider in our homes,” said Megan Holt, director of clinical services at The BridgeWay. “We don’t lock them up because we know we have them from a prescription. “Most of the young adults that we are treating, their misuse of the drug began initially with a legitimate prescription for pain that they had from an actual injury.” The scope of pills floating around America’s neighborhoods is hard to comprehend. Overall, the U.S. consumes about 80 percent of the world’s prescription opioid supply. The National Institute on Drug Abuse reported prescriptions rose from 76 million in 1991 to 219 million in 2011, a 200 percent increase in just 20 years. A 2014 report by the Centers for Disease Control was even more sobering, as it found a dozen states wrote more prescriptions than they had people in 2012. Arkansas, at 116 prescriptions for every 100 people, was eighth on that list.

“One of the things that comes to mind immediately is that prescription pain medications are much more common with young athletes than you might think,” Holt said. “They usually get them by very benign means where they truly have an injury, and they’re provided a prescription and then they misuse that prescription. “Another thing that parents forget about, especially with our older teens or young adults, is we’re almost lackadaisical in how we administer those medications. Most of the time we start letting them self-administer, but you should control those medications because it alerts them to how serious that medication is.” Holt said the highly addictive nature of these medications means it doesn’t take much deviation from the prescription to develop into a problem. “Parents need to take that pain medication seriously, and be quite frank with teens about how quickly they can become addicted to the drug,” she said. “It’s misleading because the withdrawal symptoms include some pain. To a person who is addicted, that pain feels like pain from the injury and so they think they still need that opiate medication.” Leftover pills or pills from prescriptions made out to someone else in the home for legitimate purposes are also situations parents should monitor closely.

21 Bridgeway Rd, North Little Rock (800) 245-0011 TheBridgeWay.com 40 JUNE 2017 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM


Champions for Children Arkansas Children’s Hospital earned Magnet® recognition — a symbol of excellence recognized all over the world. In fact, only 6% of all hospitals worldwide earn this honor. Magnet® means your child gets better faster. Magnet® means nurses spend more time at your child’s bedside. Magnet® means your child receives compassionate care from a world-class team.

Safety. Teamwork. Compassion. Excellence.

That’s what you can expect when your child visits Arkansas Children’s Hospital. To find excellent, compassionate medical care for your child, or to learn more about what Magnet® recognition means for your family, visit archildrens.org/excellence

We champion children by making them better today and healthier tomorrow

Magnet_ACH_Savvy Kids.indd 1

4/16/17 9:51 PM

PUBLIC EDUCATION: PROVIDING OPPORTUNITIES

Pulaski County Special School District

Choose PCSSD schools for– Certified teachers with advanced degrees Test scores higher than other local districts Millions awarded in college scholarships Talented and Gifted programs State-winning sports teams 1;1 tech program providing iPads, Chromebooks Facilities upgrades and new schools underway pcssd.org

501.234.2000 THESAVVYMOMS.COM | JUNE 2017

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to Guide

Summer Fun

Arm yourself with this list of fun things to do around Central Arkansas, and be ready to battle that dreaded summertime boredom BY AMY GORDY Clinton Presidential Center

Be a Tourist

Central Arkansas has tons of museums and cultural activities that tourists travel to enjoy. Take some time this summer to experience the Natural State like a newcomer with the whole family. Many of these attractions are free (or have free days) and they all provide hours of fun! Learn about Pres. Bill Clinton’s time in the oval office then take a stroll through the museum’s kid-friendly temporary exhibit, “Xtreme Bugs,” through July 3 at The Clinton Presidential Center. The exhibit features larger-than-life animatronic bugs from around the world and gives visitors the chance to learn all the interesting facts about them. Don’t miss Super Summer Saturdays each Saturday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., June 17-July 29, with special hands-on programming and educational activities for kids; clintonfoundation.org.

42 JUNE 2017 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM


PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF THE VENUES AND LITTLE ROCK CONVENTION AND VISITORS BUREAU

Visit the Museum of Discovery’s new exhibit, “Human Plus,” and enjoy interactive opportunities to explore and create a range of low-tech and high-tech tools that extend human abilities. Exhibits include the experience of riding a mono-ski in a simulated ski race, controlling a DJ station using the wheels of a wheelchair and more; museumofdiscovery.org. The Witt Stephens Nature Center is a cool, naturethemed retreat on a hot day. Exhibits highlight fish and wildlife native to the Natural State and projects by Arkansas Game and Fish Commission; centralarkansasnaturecenter.com. Climb aboard one of North Little Rock’s biggest attractions, the Arkansas Inland Maritime Museum, and explore exhibits on the submarine USS Razorback (SS394), the tugboat USS Hoga (YT-146), the battleship USS Arkansas (BB-33), and the missile cruiser USS Arkansas (CGN-41); aimmuseum.org. Museum of Discovery

Wild out any day of the week at the Little Rock Zoo! Little ones will love the Arkansas Heritage Farm where they can touch, feed and groom animals; littlerockzoo.com. Enjoy the sights of downtown Little Rock and North Little Rock aboard the trolley! Buy a day pass and ride to your favorite destinations, or take advantage of the Youth Summer Pass Program, which offers unlimited rides for $30 for students enrolled in Greater Little Rock elementary and secondary schools. The pass is good for three months, June 1-Aug. 31, 2017. To purchase the pass, students must present a current report card to the River Cities Travel Center at 310 Capitol Ave., as proof of enrollment . Little Rock Zoo

Heifer Village is home to interactive exhibits that provide a stimulating educational experience for all ages. Kids love the scavenger hunt (grab a list at the front desk) and the on-site farm animals. heifer.org. Delve into Arkansas’s rich history at the Historic Arkansas Museum, which utilizes artifacts and living history to tell the story of the state’s beginnings on a site that includes the oldest building in Little Rock, the Hinderliter Grog Shop, built in 1827; historicarkansas.org. Kids will love the temporary exhibit “Cabinet of Curiosities” at the Old State House Museum through Dec. 31. Explore this collection of fascinating artifacts from around the globe, from dinosaur bones to Ming Dynasty pottery to a machine gun taken from Bonnie and Clyde’s car; oldstatehouse.com.

Heifer Village

Old State House Museum

THESAVVYMOMS.COM | JUNE 2017

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Road Trip!

Hop in the car and head to Hot Springs to enjoy attractions like the renovated Mid-America Science Museum or fun-filled amusement and water park Magic Springs and Crystal Falls. Save some money on food and beverages at Cooler Sundays through Aug. 13, when families are invited to pack what they can and bring a cooler to the theme park.

Arkansas Arts Center Mid-America Science Museum

Water Fun

When temperatures rise you’ll need to cool things off, and luckily there are several nearby options for water fun! Make a day of it at Wild River Country in North Little Rock, and let the big kids attempt the thrilling rides while the littles chill in the Tad Pool. There’s also a smaller-scale water park that’s great for little kids in the Splash Zone Water Park in Jacksonville. Local pools are a great option for cooling off, and there are plenty of public swimming spots including the Jim Dailey Fitness and Aquatic Center; the North Little Rock Parks and Recreation pools at the Sherman Park and North Heights community centers; and the Leawood Pool, which opens membership up to nearby neighborhoods. Lake swimming is always a great idea, and luckily The Natural State has tons of family-friendly lakes to enjoy, like Lake Sylvia in Perryville or DeGray Lake near Bismarck. Take sprinkler fun to another level at a free local splash pad like the one at War Memorial Park and Riverfront Park in Little Rock, or at Tyndall Park in Benton.

Play Hard

Need to get out of the house and burn off some energy? There are tons of places where kids can move, climb, roll and play! Test your courage at Big Rock Fun Park’s new attraction, The Amazing Maze and Aerial Adventure maze and high-ropes course are now open. Take the kids to climb above the park or enjoy a game of mini-golf, go-karts, bumper boats or the arcade; bigrockfunpark.com. Roll or glide for hours at the Arkansas Skatium, which houses a roller rink and ice skating rink. Don’t miss Cheap Skate Family Nights from 6 to 8 p.m. every Thursday, admission is $7 and includes skate rental; arkansasskatium.com. The littlest ones can play, learn and explore at The Wonder Place, which caters to ages 8 and younger with and indoor play area of 5,700 square feet. Children ages 2-12 can bounce for hours within the walls of Jump!Zone, a playcenter in North Little Rock featuring massive inflatables, mazes and slides. Older kids can burn some energy bouncing through Altitude Trampoline Park with offers more than 200 interconnected trampolines, a foam pit, dodge ball and kids zone.

Gaming

If your kids are hooked on video games they’ll love the Z82 Retrocade in Sherwood filled with refurbished, retro arcade games including Tron, Galaga, Ms.Pacman, Frogger, Donkey Kong, Dig Dug and more. A single admission price allows unlimited gaming. If you like pizza and singing animatronics with your games, Chuck E. Cheese never fails to entertain, and Playtime Pizza combines gaming with go-karts, laser tag, mini-golf and more.

44 JUNE 2017 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM


Chill Out Indoors

At some point every summer, the heat is just too much to handle. Escape to some air-conditioned bliss and catch a movie with the kids. Riverdale 10 offers reclining electric seats, tons of food options and wine and beer for Mom or Dad. The Ron Robinson Theater downtown offers ample kid-friendly movie screenings at low admission prices or free. Check their website for showings; cals.org/ronrobinson. The Central Arkansas Library System offers a full calendar of events to keep kids busy and reading this summer. Visit the main branch for storytime, crafts, movie screenings, music, magic shows and more. Ron Coleman Mining

Sporty Fun

If your household loves all things sports related then grab your gear and head to the batting cages at D-Bat Little Rock, or the driving range at North Shore Golf Range. The Little Rock Climbing Center offers hours of active fun to challenge kids’ strength and courage, and auto-belay stations make it easy for first-time climbers to jump right in. All young athletes need balance and strength, and Barefoot Studio offers a class just for tweens (ages 7-12) on Wednesday afternoons. Exercise doesn’t get any more fun than learning acrobatics at Arkansas Circus Arts. Check out youth classes in cirque skills and aerial arts that will send them back to school in the fall with a whole new set of impressive skills.

Cool Off With A Chill Treat

There’s nothing like a frozen treat to take the heat out of summer. Grab a snow cone at any local stand (we love Cozy’s near Burns Park in North Little Rock); get a scoop or two at Kilwin’s or Loblolly Creamery; mix anything you want into a concrete at Scoop Dog; or cool off with a gourmet frozen pop or shaved ice at Le Pops.

Outdoor Adventures

Kids love any excuse to get dirty and will come home with a loot of shiny crystals after a trip to Ron Coleman Mining just outside of Hot Springs. Bring a sturdy shovel, bucket, gloves and a treasurehunting spirit with you! Arkansas State Parks offer tons of opportunities for outdoor exploration. Climb the hard or less hard side of the D-Bat Little Rock mountain at Pinnacle Mountain State Park, or take the kids on a nature walk around the base trial and enjoy the playground. Petit Jean State Park has ample hiking opportunities and a fantastic waterfall after a heavy rain. Stay the night at Mather Lodge or book a cabin or campsite and make a weekend of it! Teach kids where food comes from at any of the great U-pick sites in Central Arkansas. Fill a bucket with fresh blueberries, blackberries or raspberries at Wye Mountain Flowers and Berries in Wye, then take them home and invite the whole family to make a pie or delicious berry ice cream.

Create

North Shore Golf Range

Get their creative juices flowing at the Arkansas Arts Center Junior Arts Camp, a two-week day camp dedicated to art and theater. Pop into the Painted Pig Studio and learn how to DIY pottery, jewelry, mosaics, glass and more. The options are endless at Argenta Bead Co., when it comes to designing jewelry. Choose from thousands of beads, then sit down to create your own jewelry design. The Arkansas Regional Innovation Hub offers a long list of creative opportunities in multiple mediums including pottery, painting, drawing, illustration, graphic design, printmaking and more. They have several youth day camps available throughout the summer.

Volunteer

Get your kids involved in helping the community at an early age! There are many opportunities that are great for kids. Raise money together selling lemonade and baked goods in the neighborhood and let them pick their charity of choice to give the proceeds. Get hands-on with Habitat for Humanity of Central Arkansas and pitch in to help build a home for a family in need; habitatcentralar.org. Head to your local animal shelter and volunteer to love on the animals until they find a forever home. THESAVVYMOMS.COM | JUNE 2017

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I CARRY ZIPLOC BAGS FULL OF KID BRIBERY THINGS. THAT'S LEGOS FOR JACK, AND DUM DUMS FOR JANE. SHE LOVES THEM AND CAN NOW SAY, "LOLLIPOP, PLEASE." I CAN'T RESIST IT!

I ALWAYS HAVE A FOLDER WITH REPORTS, CORRESPONDENCE AND THINGS THAT NEED TENDING TO WHEN I HAVE DOWNTIME.

CHARGERS ARE CRITICAL! IF A KID'S IPAD DIES, IT'S NOT GOOD FOR ME, SO I ALWAYS KEEP A BATTERY PACK.

WHEN WE WANT TO GIVE THE IPAD A REST, JANE LOVES THIS BIRD ART KIT FILLED WITH CRAYONS AND PAPER.

I TRIED FOR A YEAR TO FIND A BAG I COULD TAKE TO A HEARING AND FIT ALL THE KIDS' STUFF. IT'S AN ACCORDION BAG, SO IT HOLDS A TON!

46 JUNE 2017 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM

DAVID SLADE AS HIS BAG ATTESTS, DAVID SLADE PULLS DOUBLE DUTY AS A LAWYER AND A DAD TO TWO. HE'S BEEN IN LITTLE ROCK ON AND OFF (MOSTLY ON) SINCE 1993. HIS HOBBIES HAVE BECOME SUBSUMED BY KIDS AND CAREER, AND NOW EXCLUSIVELY CONSIST OF RETRIEVING SMALL LEGOS, POURING MILK, BUCKLING AND UNBUCKLING SEATBELTS, APPLYING STAIN REMOVER TO BASICALLY EVERYTHING AND CONFERENCE CALLS. HE LIVES WITH HIS WIFE, KELLY, THEIR KIDS, JACK AND JANE, AND DOG, LUCY.

PHOTOGRAPHY: LILY DARRAGH/STYLING: MANDY KEENER

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THESAVVYMOMS.COM | JUNE 2017

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through compassionate healing!

with one or more of the following issues:

o Cost Confidential Assessments  Private Pay/Insurance Certified  Monday-Friday ADHD/ADD Impulsive Be Anger Aggression Anger Aggression 4 Hour Emergency Admissions Monday-Friday  9:00am-12 noon Depression Suicidal Thoughts  24/7 Emergency Admissions  24/7 Emergency Admissions Grief/Trauma Sexual Abu Trauma DepressionHomicidal Threats Suicidal Thoughts ndell’s acute FAST care hospital offers a safe & Referral oc to Doc/ER TRAK 9:00am-2:30pm  15 Hours of Treatment/Week Please call our Assessment department Mood Disorder Anxiety  ShortPhysical Term Stabilization Program Please call Assessment & Referral department ase call our&our Assessment & Referral department  Short Term Stabilization Program Abuse PTSD ng forEligibility children and adolescents struggling 25 Hours Traumaat Impulsive Homicidal Threats enefit Financial Counseling ADHD/ADD Behavior of Treatment/Week  3 Sessions Daily to schedule a confidential assessment no Sexual Abuse  7 Day AverageAbuse Length of Stay to schedule a confidential assessment at no charge, chedule aofconfidential assessment atof&Grief/Trauma no charge, Substance Relationship  7 Dayissues: Average Length Stay one or more the following ychiatric Evaluation Mood Disorder Anxiety  24/7 Group Individual Sessions  Medication Management Physical Abuse PTSD (5/day) charge, available at the hospital. www.rivendellofarkansas.com www.rivendellofarkansas.com urt Individual Therapy available 24/7 at the hospital. are here for you. Substance Abuse Relationship Conflict Group ailable 24/7 at the hospital. WeWe here for you. edication Management  Aggression Group & Individual Therapy are Medication Management & Local Transportation Provided ADHD/ADD Impulsive Behavior er We are here for you. Fax: 501-794-4277100 Rivendell Dr. - Benton, AR 72019 Fax: 501-794-4277100 Rivendell Dr. - Benton, AR 72019 etox/Dual Diagnosis Program  Recreational Activity Therapy  Continue 10 Phases of Recovery  Substance Abuse Counseling  Suicidal Psychiatric Evaluation Grief/Trauma Sexual Abuse pression Thoughts Please&call our Assessment & Referral department ounseling Education &Lunch & Refreshments Provided Screen/History Relapse Prevention call our Assessment Referral department Physical Abuse PTSD  Drug &Classes Physical uma Please Threats  Homicidal Special Education Certified to schedule a confidential assessment at no charge, n Site AA/NA Support  Guided Journaling  Recreational Therapy www.rivendellofarkansas.com available 24/7 at thea We are here for you. to schedule confidential assessment at no charge, Substance Abuse Relationship Conflict od Disorder Anxiety hospital. Medication Management Fax: 501-794-4277- 100 Rivendell Dr. - Benton, AR 72019  Psychiatric Evaluation iend & Family Visitation  Life Skills Seminar led by MD www.rivendellofarkansas.c Refreshments Provided HD/ADD Behavior available at the hospital. We are here for you.  Special Education Certified  Impulsive Lunch Refreshments Included tercare Planning for24/7 Next Level of&Care  Outpatient Referrals Arranged  Local Transportation Provided Fax: 501-794-4277100 Rivendell Dr. - Benton, AR

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 Recreational Therapy Change a Life. Life. Abuse & Referral PTSD department sessment dsical Life.  Recreational Therapy Confidential Assessments  History & Physical Abuseassessment Relationship Conflict Call Today. Call Today. Call Today. fidential at no charge, tstance us help you take the next step toward recovery! ions Admissions Family Therapy & Visitation  available Family Therapy 24/7&atVisitation charge no24/7 Emergency www.rivendellofarkansas.com JUNE 2017 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM the hospital. We are here for you. 48 awww.rivendellofarkansas.com Aftercare Planning ease call our Assessment & Referral Team to Change  Aftercare Planning Fax: 501-794-4277100 Rivendell Dr. - Benton, AR 72019

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Savvy | JUNE 2017