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THE LIFESTYLE MANUAL FOR THE MODERN MOM

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JULY 2017 · THESAVVYMOMS.COM

MEET OUR AMAZING TODDLERS ON PAGE 24.

OF SON'S DIAGNOSIS

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WE ALL SCREAM FOR ICE CREAM EASY NO-CHURN RECIPES


EAT FREELY.

60 Days No Down Payments!

Dr . Br y a n C. Hi l l e r W ESTR O C KO RT H O.C O M | 84 4 - W R O R T HO New patients only. Treatment must start by August 31, 2017.


TAKE A

Zoofari

THE INTERACTIVE DAY CAMP FOR KIDS

Camps in July! Half-day and full-day options available

Sign up now littlerockzoo.com/zoofari

Meet the Zoo’s coolest animal ambassadors & discover how you can be a superhero for our planet and animals in the wild!


JULY 2017 MODERN MOM 14 MAMA SAID TEACHING A WORK ETHIC IS ONE OF PARENTS’ MOST IMPORTANT JOBS

16 MIND, BODY & SOUL HERE COMES THE SUN

18 SAVVY STYLE BEACH BUM CHIC

SAVVY FAMILY 20 WE ALL SCREAM FOR ICE CREAM

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20

SWEET, EASY NO-CHURN RECIPES

24 SAVVY'S AMAZING TODDLERS READER-NOMINATED KIDS DOING BIG THINGS

IN EVERY ISSUE 6 EDITOR’S NOTE 10 NEWS & NOTES CALENDAR, CRAFTS & MORE!

38 BAG CHECK CHRISTY BOURNS WARD

SPECIAL SECTION 30 FOCUSING ON ADHD ATTENTION DEFICIT HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER IS A WIDESPREAD ISSUE

32 THE MAN OF STEEL FIGHTS ADHD MOM SHARES HER STRUGGLE WITH A CHILD'S DIAGNOSIS

18 ON THE COVER: UPTON SIDDONS JR, ONE OF SAVVY'S AMAZING TODDLERS. PHOTOGRAPHY BY LILY DARRAGH.

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JULY 2017 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM

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Habitat-SavvyAd-DonatePickup-October2016.pdf

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10/18/16

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COMING UP...

amazing

Tweens & In Between

Do you have a special tween at home? In the August issue of Savvy, we'll highlight reader-nominated local kids ages 5-12 in this fun feature. We love showcasing kids' talents, which can range from excelling in sports and school to having excellent manners, showing exceptional kindness and more. To nominate your child, head to thesavvymoms.com and submit! ...September will highlight Savvy's Amazing Teens, ages 13-19, so nominate those scholars, artists and entrepreneurs today!

Build strength, stability and self-reliance through shelter

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BE THE FIRST TO KNOW! Sign up for Savvy's monthly e-newsletter and be the first to know about special events, giveaways and what's in each issue! Sign up at thesavvymoms.com.

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People in Central Arkansas, and all over the world, partner with Habitat for Humanity to build or improve a place they can call home. Habitat homeowners help build their own homes alongside volunteers and pay an affordable mortgage. With our help, Habitat homeowners achieve the strength, stability and independence they need to build a better life for themselves and their families. Foundation - Core Values

• Decent shelter is something we all need to thrive • Strong and stable homes help build strong and stable communities • With a little help, we all have the potential to stand on our own • Bold actions speak louder than words • Working together, side by side, promotes understanding and self-reliance

Want to Connect With Other Local Moms?

Your Donations Help Build Homes for Hardworking People in Central Arkansas. Donate and We’ll pick it up!

talk.thesavvymoms.com

Building materials, working household appliances, furniture, fixtures, home decor, clothing and books.

Check out Savvy's new forum where moms can come to share tips, advice and information with each other. Find out the best places to resell kid clothes, which children's books we can't live without and some hot spots for free fun this summer!

habitatcentralar.org/ReStore

501.771.9494

THESAVVYMOMS.COM | JULY 2017

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SUMMERTIME, AND THE LIVIN' IS (SORT OF) EASY This issue of Savvy is exploding with cuteness and a few parenting nuggets to hopefully help get you through the summer. On page 24, we introduce Savvy's Amazing Toddlers. These five tykes were chosen from reader nominations, and were a blast at the photo shoot! We met at the Museum of Discovery (an easy winner with every kid) and played, posed, laughed and cried (photo shoots can be stressful!). Tears, laughter and all, this feature is one of my absolute favorites. I love getting to meet these special kids and what their parents mean when they say their kids are amazing. Meet Ellie, Upton Jr., Michael II, Jace and Murrell in this issue, and look for our next round, Savvy's Amazing Tweens and In Between, in next month's issue. Head to thesavvymoms.com to nominate your kiddo! Kids can be a ton of fun, but they can also be really tough—and sometimes you have to reach out for help. This month, we take a look at attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, one of the most commonly diagnosed conditions in children, especially in Arkansas. We speak with professionals, a parenting counselor and a mom who is raising a superhero son diagnosed with ADHD and learning her way through the ups and downs. Above all else, summer is a season to have fun! Go on vacation, go to the pool, kick back and read a book—whatever you do, enjoy the sunshine but protect yourself! It's easy to fall into sun worshiping when you feel the sand between your toes or hear the kids splashing in the pool, but it's so important to protect your skin from harmful rays (and harmful sunscreens!). We talk with a local dermatologist and esthetician about which sunscreens are the best, how to get the most out of sun protection and ways we can reverse the damage that's been done. Read it on page 16! So now that you have some words of caution, go out and enjoy what's left of the summer—it goes by so fast! Before you know it we'll be back-to-school shopping. Hit the pool with our list of Beach Bum Chic essentials on page 18, make a batch of delicious no-churn ice cream from our recipe on page 20, and make every moment of the summer count!

Amy Gordy Editor, Savvy @SavvyAR

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JULY 2017 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM


Beautiful smiles, happy children ... that is our goal.

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THESAVVYMOMS.COM | JULY 2017

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PUBLISHER BLAKE HANNAHS | blake@arktimes.com EDITOR AMY GORDY | amy@arktimes.com CREATIVE DIRECTOR MANDY KEENER | mandy@arktimes.com ART DIRECTOR KATIE HASSELL | katie@arktimes.com EDITOR AT LARGE REBEKAH LAWRENCE | rebekah@arktimes.com SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE LESA THOMAS | lesa@arktimes.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE SHERRIE BUTNER | sherrie@arktimes.com ADVERTISING TRAFFIC MANAGER ROLAND R. GLADDEN | roland@arktimes.com ADVERTISING COORDINATOR JIM HUNNICUTT | jimhunnicutt@arktimes.com GRAPHIC DESIGNERS BRYAN MOATS | MIKE SPAIN PRODUCTION MANAGER | CONTROLLER WELDON WILSON IT DIRECTOR ROBERT CURFMAN ACCOUNTS PAYABLE/OFFICE MANAGER KELLY JONES BILLING/COLLECTIONS LINDA PHILLIPS CIRCULATION DIRECTOR ANITRA HICKMAN

FIND US ON

@SAVVYAR

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JULY 2017 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM


contributors

LOOKING FOR AUTISM SERVICES? At UP Therapy your goals are our priority

• Communication • Potty training • Decreasing tantrums • Attending school • Playing with friends KERRY GUICE is a food blogger and photographer living in Little Rock with her husband, two kids and their dog. When she’s not sharing her latest meal on Instagram, Kerry is planning her family’s next Arkansas adventure or crafting with her creative tots.

KD REEP is a writer and public relations practitioner in Little Rock. She owns Flywrite Communications, Inc., a public relations agency.

We teach life-changing skills in a fun, playful environment. Call us today to learn more about our unique 1 on 1 ABA program.

Full day ABA program • OT, PT, SLP

501.313.5973 · 2312 Durwood Rd. · Little Rock · www.uptherapyar.com

FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK AND INSTAGRAM! BE THE FIRST TO FIND OUT ABOUT GIVEAWAYS & CONTESTS @SAVVYAR

DWAIN HEBDA is a writer and editor living in Little Rock. He and his wife, Darlene, are the parents of four grown children. The empty-nesters spend their time traveling, working out and spoiling their two dogs.

LILY DARRAGH is a photographer in Little Rock. She studied photography at Parsons the New School of Design in New York. Currently working out of a photography studio in downtown Little Rock, Lily loves to shoot people and places unique to Arkansas.

THESAVVYMOMS.COM | JULY 2017

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news & notes

July The Month of July

Enjoy a free movie night with the family at Movies in the Park. The films are family-friendly and begin at sunset. Arrive at the First Security Amphitheatre in Riverfront Park early to get a good spot, and feel free to bring a blanket and cooler. moviesintheparklr.net. July 5, “Daddy’s Home,” PG-13 July 12, “Finding Dory,” PG

Tuesday

2017 LINEUP

RIVERMARKET.INFO

JUNE 7 – LA LA LAND (PG-13, 2016) JUNE 14 – MALEFICENT (PG, 2014) JUNE 21 – THE KARATE KID (PG - 1983) JUNE 28 – CREED (PG-13, 2015) JULY 5 – DADDY’S HOME (PG-13, 2015) JULY 12 – FINDING DORY (PG, 2016) JULY 19 – CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE FIRST AVENGER (PG 13, 2011) JULY 26 – THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN (PG-13, 2016)

10 JULY 2017 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM

4of July th

Watch the fireworks in the best seats in town at Easter Seals Arkansas Fireworks Frenzy at the Little Rock Marriott Grand Ballroom Terrance. Attendees get seated views of Little Rock’s biggest fireworks show as well as snacks, music and a cash bar. $25 for adults; $10 children ages 11-18; $5 children 10 and under. eastersealsar.com/ fireworksfrenzy.

July 19, “Captain America: The First Avenger,” PG-13 July 26, “The Magnificent Seven” PG-13

Thursday Heifer NOW

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Heifer International unveils its latest exhibit, “Heifer NOW,” at a grand opening party including kid crafts, seed starting, a farm-themed photo booth and a visit with some of Heifer’s best ambassadors (goats, alpacas and a mini-jersey calf). “Heifer NOW” is an interactive exhibit that showcases Heifer’s work both in the United States and abroad. The first 100 guests will receive a special surprise, and there will be giveaways throughout the day. heifer.org.


The Month of July Wiggle Worms The Museum of Discovery’s Wiggle Worms program introduces children to science in a hands-on environment. It's held every Tuesday and Saturday at 10 a.m. for ages 6 and under, and Thursdays at 3:30 p.m. for ages 10 and under. museumofdiscovery.org. July 6 and 8, “Rocket Science” July 11, 13 and 15, “Exploring Rocks” July 18, 20 and 22, “Marvelous Mammals” July 25, 27 and 29, “Food Discoveries with Whole Foods Market”

Thur-Sat 13-15 Library Book Sale

Find deeply discounted books, records, CDs and DVDs for the whole family at the FOCAL library book sale. Gently used items fill three floors of the Central Arkansas Library System River Market Books & Gifts resale store. The second part of the FOCAL sale takes place in the main library basement, where previouslychecked-out and heavily discounted items are sold. Thursday morning shopping is open only to FOCAL members. Nonmembers may buy a $5 wristband for entry on Thursday evening, and at 9 a.m. on Friday and Saturday. cals.org.

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Friday National Mac & Cheese Day

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Saturday Fundraiser

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Friday National Junk Food Day

Ante up for Youth Home’s 7th Annual Casino Night and Texas Hold’em Tournament at Next Level Events. This fundraiser supports Youth Home’s mental health programs for people of all ages. It’s a night of fun featuring craps, roulette, blackjack, slot machines and more, all staffed by experienced and knowledgeable dealers. youthhome.org.

THESAVVYMOMS.COM | JULY 2017

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savvy craft

UPCYCLED SOLAR CHANDELIER

Lazy summer days and lilting evenings draw us outside to spend time with our families and friends, grilling and watching the kids catch fireflies. Those long days inevitably bring about a degree of boredom that, in my opinion, is a great thing. Boredom forces kids to think of creative ways to fill the time, and for my kids, working on fun crafts together is part of the boredom cure—especially if hot glue guns are involved. Everyone is conscious of reusing, recycling and using renewable energy, so we thought of creating a solar garden light by upcycling an old chandelier. We couldn’t have been happier with the results! It puts off a lovely glow when the sun goes down, and keeps us outside just a little longer. To find our old chandelier we went to the Habitat ReStore, where all donations and purchases help build homes for people right here in Central Arkansas! Here’s what we used and how we created our project:

Make a Splash with a

Hawaiian Bash INVITATIONS • DECORATIONS • PARTY FAVORS • BALLOONS • PIÑATAS • CAKE SUPPLIES 12 JULY 2017 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM


YOU'LL NEED:

•• Used chandelier from the Habitat ReStore •• Solar pathway lights from Target (I found these on sale!) •• Hot glue gun and glue sticks •• White spray paint •• White chalk paint

BEFORE

AFTER

HOW TO:

1. Wash chandelier with soapy water so you’ll have a clean working surface. Let it dry. 2. Spray paint chandelier with your favorite color (we like all-white décor when it’s out of reach of sticky hands, as this will be!) 3. Remove the pole portion of the solar lights, so that only the solar bulb remains. 4. Hot glue the inside of the chandelier right where the light bulb would normally go. Place the solar light inside, making sure it sticks to the hot glue. 5. Wait a few minutes for it to dry, and take your chalk paint (or whatever acrylic paint you’d like to use) and paint over any metal portions, or any part you want to be the same color as the chandelier. 6. Let it dry, and then hang it outside so the bulb gathers the needed solar

energy. Watch as the soft light slowly appears when the sun sets! Lovely!

By Becky Pittman, communications consultant for Habitat for Humanity of Central Arkansas

11218 N. RODNEY PARHAM RD. / LITTLE ROCK 501.223.4929

4822 N. HILLS BLVD. / NORTH LITTLE ROCK 501.978.3154

• INVITATIONS • DECORATIONS • PARTY FAVORS • BALLOONS • PIÑATAS • CAKE SUPPLIES THESAVVYMOMS.COM | JULY 2017

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mama said...

S

TEACHING A WORK ETHIC IS ONE OF PARENTS’ MOST IMPORTANT JOBS

omeone’s always grumbling about millennials, people born after 1980—the first generation to come of age in the new millennium. No one under 30 wants to work for a living. They grew up in a participation medal world and they’re too entitled. They’re narcissistic. Cocky. Lazy. They think the rules don’t apply. Ouch. I think this is the very first time I’ve ever been glad I wasn’t born after 1980. That millennials are a bunch of worthless avocado toast-eaters is not a forgone conclusion, though. I would argue that this has always been the way of things—old-timers have accused young pups of lacking commitment and will since the Stone Age. Is all the generalized smack talked about millennials too broad and unfair? Does each generation have both its rock stars and flunkies? I think so. This is just the first time any of us has been on the side of the old-timers. (Yeah, I said it.) But if millennials were all entitled brats, did their parents create them? If my kids turn out to be unemployed 30-something gamers, is it my fault? I was reared on a working cattle ranch in southwest Arkansas. My father raised my sister and me like boys, hauling firewood and helping bale hay. I raised livestock from an early age through 4-H and FFA. My husband grew up working on his family’s cattle, chicken and hog farm in Johnson County. Strong work ethics? Yeah, we’ve got them. So, how do we instill those same life lessons in our children when we no longer live on farms? How do we show our kids the intrinsic value and worth of hard work inside the city limits? Here’s a sobering statistic: A survey by Braun Research in 2014 found that while 82 percent of parents had regular chores growing up, only 28 percent reported asking their children to do any. Their reasons? Increasing pressures on kids from school and extracurricular activities, and a reluctance to heap more responsibility on them. I’ve had those same thoughts, I admit it. My kids work so hard in school and on the soccer field, I’ve told myself. So what if they didn’t do anything productive today? They deserve a break. But while breaks and quiet, creative time are healthy and necessary, I

think there’s a happy medium to be found between free time and learning responsibility. Everything in my house came to a screeching halt last month as the summer break began. I introduced a plan that had my 9-yearold helping with the laundry and dishes, and the smaller two picking up their rooms and play areas on a regular basis. My God, you’d have thought I was sending them to a sweatshop. Oh, the gnashing of baby teeth! When the older one complained, I told her she was lucky I didn’t have her scrubbing toilets. You know what she said? That she didn’t need to know how to scrub a toilet; that she could always hire someone to do it. Even in her college dorm. Face. Palm. Parenting. Fail. According to experts, having children help with household chores (even as early as 3 or 4) is instrumental to their success in their twenties. Chores, they say, instill in kids the importance of contributing to their families, and help develop empathy as adults. Children who grow up doing chores are more likely to be welladjusted, have better relationships with friends and family, and to have more successful careers. Needless to say, things are changing at my house. Already I’ve given in-depth tutorials on the intricacies of toilet cleaning (with audience participation). And here’s a tip I learned pretty quickly: Have kids do tasks that benefit the whole family, like putting up dinner dishes or vacuuming the living room. A chore outside of their own bedroom squashes arguments that they prefer their space messy. Both among people I know, and from what I’ve read, opinions vary on tying monetary rewards to household chores. Some say an allowance gives kids an early understanding of money management, and the earlier the better. Others consider chores as partial payment of the privilege of living and eating rent-free. Some parents use a points system that can be cashed in for ice cream or special days. Methods, like people, vary. The important thing—at least for me—is that my kids aren’t lifting their noses above their iPads to watch me clean up their messes. The important thing is that I give them the tools necessary to be the rock stars of their generation. SOMETIMES CHORES JUST STINK!

Jen Holman is determined to be a voice of reason in the cacophony of reality TV and momjudgment-gone-wild. She is often irreverent and frequently imperfect. But she’s happy, by God, and that’s what matters. She lives in Little Rock with her husband and three (im)perfect children.

14 JULY 2017 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM


On display th

rough July 2 3

www.ClintonBugsExhibit.com

Little Rock, Arkansas • (501) 374-4242 Xtreme BUGS is produced by Dinosaurs Unearthed.

Champions for Children Arkansas Children’s Hospital earned Magnet® recognition — a symbol of excellence recognized all over the world. In fact, only 6% of all hospitals worldwide earn this honor.

Magnet® means your child gets better faster. Magnet® means nurses spend more time at your child’s bedside. Magnet® means your child receives compassionate care from a world-class team.

Safety. Teamwork. Compassion. Excellence.

That’s what you can expect when your child visits Arkansas Children’s Hospital. To find excellent, compassionate medical care for your child, or to learn more about what Magnet® recognition means for your family, visit archildrens.org/excellence

Magnet_ACH_Savvy Kids logo.indd 1

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THESAVVYMOMS.COM | JULY 7:30 2017PM 6/16/17


mind, body & soul

Here

the

Comes Sun BY KERRY GUICE

W

e’re in the thick of another hot Arkansas summer! As a kid, that means splashing around in the pool playing “Marco Polo” until their fingers look like raisins. As a parent, it means juggling pool toys and beach towels, wondering if the pool counts as a bath, and chasing the kids down to apply sunscreen before they jump in. We all know that protecting our skin from the sun is important, but with statistics that show that the country’s melanoma rates have tripled in the last 30 years, are we choosing the right sunscreens? Are we reapplying often enough? Are the ingredients in the typical sunscreen safe?

WHICH SUNSCREEN IS THE SAFEST? Dr. Lindsay Enns with Dermatology Group of Arkansas recommends choosing a “physical” sunscreen made with zinc oxide or titanium dioxide. “These minerals sit on top of the skin, forming a barrier against the sun’s rays, and start protecting right away. Chemical products, on the other hand, need to be applied 15-20 minutes in advance to give the skin time to absorb them. They may cause irritation or allergic reactions because the skin absorbs these active ingredients,” she said. Oxybenzone is a controversial active ingredient many brands are starting to avoid based on research that shows it may be a hormone disruptor, and that it can damage coral reefs when dispersed in the ocean. “You may have heard you should look for ‘broad spectrum’ products that protect against both UVA and UVB rays. Sunscreens made with zinc oxide or titanium dioxide will do this,” Enns said. When looking

16 JULY 2017 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM

for a sunscreen, many people base their choice solely on the SPF (Sun Protection Factor). The higher the better, right? Dr. Enns says not necessarily. “The SPF should be at least 15, but you generally don’t need to go higher than 30. Over that and you’re getting smaller and smaller amounts of added protection, which in a chemical sunscreen also means a higher dose of unwanted chemicals.”

WHAT ABOUT SPRAYS? Companies are constantly trying to come up with marketing techniques or formula changes that will give them a leg up on their competition. Sunscreen sprays have become increasingly popular because of the convenience, but in terms of safety and protection, Dr. Enns suggests to “Stay away from sprays!” They are generally chemical based, rarely provide the same protection from UV rays and it’s difficult to tell if you’ve used enough product. “There are some concerns about the safety of these sprays, since [the chemicals] can be inhaled while spraying,” she said. Reapply sunscreen often, even if the label reads “waterproof.” Dr. Enns warns not to trust a label that promises to protect you for eight hours. “That’s only accurate if your child stays perfectly still for the whole day! In the real world, he’ll need sunscreen every two hours, or every time he is dried off with a towel,” she said. Lather the sunscreen on thick, paying attention to burn-prone areas like the face, chest and shoulders. She also suggests keeping babies younger than 6 months out of the sun altogether. “When that’s not feasible, be sure to protect your young baby with sunscreen.”


JUST SAY ‘NO’ TO TANNING BEDS! It was only 2014 when the Food and Drug Administration finally required indoor tanning salons to display a notice on the tanning bed itself explaining the risks of UV exposure, and we’ve only started seeing a notable decline in tanning bed use in the last 10 years. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, a 2015 study found that 16 percent of female high school seniors were still using tanning beds. Fifteen states so far have passed legislation banning the use of tanning beds for children under the age of 18, yet Arkansas is not one of those states. In January of this year, State Rep. Stephen Magie (D-Conway) filed a bill (HB 1280) that would prohibit the use of indoor tanning salons for minors, even with parental permission. In February, the legislation failed to pass with 53 votes against, and 27 in support of the bill. The bill itself clearly stated it would exempt doctors licensed in the state of Arkansas who “use or prescribe phototherapy devices or equipment to a patient of any age.” Regardless, of all the information we currently have, we still have a long way to go to help prevent future skin cancer diagnosis here in our state.

“THE COUNTRY’S MELANOMA RATES HAVE TRIPLED IN THE LAST 30 YEARS.”

CAN WE REVERSE SUN DAMAGE? For those of us who are in our 30s or older, who remember applying baby oil rather than sunscreen, and for those young women described above who are still exposing themselves to potentially dangerous UV levels at the tanning salon, is there a way to reverse any of it? Natalie Sanderson, esthetician at Lasercare Skin Clinic in Little Rock, offers a few options that may help. “Depending on the individual patient’s skin condition, laser skin treatments are often the most effective at reversing sun damage,” she said. Pigmented Lesions Laser Treatment can help eradicate the damage the sun and the aging process it has created. Excess sun exposure contributes to a number of cosmetic problems, especially pigmented lesions, which appear as dark spots and sun spots. This laser treatment eliminates the sun damage and improves the skin tone. Sanderson recommends a minimum of four monthly sessions. However, she notes that laser treatments should be done in the fall or winter, as any treatment for sun damage, including over-the-counter skin lightening creams, can make your skin exponentially sensitive to the sun. Facial peels are another way to give your face a fresh start. “Again, we strongly advise against starting a treatment like this when you’re likely to be in the sun often,” Sanderson said. Though these procedures have the potential to reverse your current condition, they don’t prevent future damage. “We all know it’s impossible to avoid the sun, and vitamin D is good for us, but it’s important to stay in the shade as much as you can, and rehydrate your skin with aloe every time you come in from an extended period in the sun, whether you’ve gotten a sunburn or not,” she said.

SUNSCREENS We Love

Beautycounter

*Available in a lotion, a body stick and a small face stick (perfect size for purse/ sports bag). *Goes on smooth and sheer. *Free of potentially harmful ingredients— safe for the whole family. *Zinc Oxide active ingredient, SPF 30.

Blue Lizard

*Dermatologist recommended. *Specialized formulas for baby, sensitive skin and sports. *Zinc Oxide active ingredient.

THESAVVYMOMS.COM | JULY 2017

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savvy style

3

1 2 4 BEACH BUM CHIC

Whether you're vacationing at the beach, chilling poolside or on the lake, a beach bag filled with stylish essentials is a must!

1. Delve into the origin of this superhero who has made a recent comeback. "The Secret History of Wonder Woman" by Jill Lepore examines this comic book character, created in 1941, that jump-started American feminism with her strong roots in activism. Available at River Market Books & Gifts, cals.org. 2. You won't have to keep switching from glasses to shades with these stylish sun readers. The round, tortoise frames are ontrend, and the +1.25 prescription will help you see your favorite paperback clearly. Available at Box Turtle, shopboxturtle.com. 3. Tote it all in this handmade pom pom bag by Bohemia. It's large enough to carry all your essentials to the beach, pool or lake, and the cute pom poms make it stand out on the shoreline. Available at Box Turtle, shopboxturtle.com. 4. Stay hydrated in the heat with mineral-rich water bottled from the natural springs of the Spa City. Drinking it is about as close to nature as you can get. The still water is fantastic, but we love the sparkling varieties with flavor essence like blackberry pomegranate. Available at mountainvalleyspring.com. 5. Tell those creepy crawlers to "bug off" with this all-natural bug spray, locally made by Kind Folke. The delightful blend of witch hazel and essential oils is refreshing and repelling—but just to bugs. Available at Box Turtle, shopboxturtle.com. 6. Jot down ideas and notes in this "I'm Over It" journal. It's a fun, multicolored note pad with lined pages, sprinkled with fun surprise quotes and mantras to get the creative juices flowing. Available at River Market Books & Gifts, cals.org. 7. Protect your face with a stylish, floppy sunhat. This one by Four Buttons has a gorgeous white ombre effect that fades into a beachy, neutral shade. Available at Box Turtle, shopboxturtle.com.

18 JULY 2017 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM

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COME TRY OUR AMAZING MAZE! Fun for ALL AGES! Come have some fun searching through one of our newest attractions. Enjoy the twists and turns searching for the checkpoints. Adults: $8.00 Kids 6 & Under: $6.00

Plan A Party Now!

501-455-3750

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6

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•Go-Karts•Mini Golf•Lazer Frenzy •Batting Cages•Bumper Boats•& More

www.bigrockfunpark.com

•1411 Baseline Road, Little Rock (near Bass Pro Shops)

501-315-4414

Visit our website for information on services, upcoming events, and access to our resources! Kidsourcetherapy.com Services We Provide: •First Connections Early Intervention •Therapy Evaluations •Speech/Language Therapy •Occupational Therapy •Physical Therapy

Supportive Programs: •Sensory Integration •Feeding & Swallowing •Hippotherapy •Aquatics •Special Olympics

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13000 Chenal Parkway STE 108 Little Rock , AR 72211 THESAVVYMOMS.COM | JULY 2017

19


good eats

We all Scream for

Ice Cream Ice cream is the unofficial treat of summer, but for so many of us it’s an intimidating task to think about making it at home! STORY AND PHOTOGRAPHY BY KERRY GUICE

20 JULY 2017 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM


I

remember my friends’ moms growing up having those big wooden barrel ice cream churners, and well into adulthood I didn’t even look up recipes to see if it was something I could do. Once I did finally look into making it, I was hooked on that flavor of creamy, rich homemade ice cream! Even still, it took several steps and was something you had to keep an eye on for a long period of time. Fast-forward to two summers ago when we spent a week at the beach with my husband’s family. My sister-in-law brought a recipe for no-churn ice cream and I was skeptical that only a couple of ingredients would be able to taste anything like real ice cream! I just grinned and took a bite, hoping I could fake a compliment for her, as she was excited to see what I thought. It was some of the creamiest ice cream I’ve ever had, and the kids all got to mix in their favorite flavors and come up with their own “recipe.” It’s been a huge hit every time I’ve made it since then, and it’s too easy! There’s just something about licking a melting ice cream cone on a hot day that makes it impossible not to smile! I hope you and your family love my version of this simple recipe!

THESAVVYMOMS.COM | JULY 2017

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No Churn

Ice Cream VANILLA BEAN

Ice Cream (THE BASE RECIPE)

1 quart heavy whipping cream 2 cans sweetened condensed milk ½ teaspoon vanilla extract 1 vanilla bean, split and scraped (add scraped insides to ice cream and discard bean pod) ¼ teaspoon fine sea salt In a large mixing bowl, whip heavy cream until soft peaks form, then add salt, vanilla extract and vanilla bean. Beat until stiff peaks form and then carefully fold in condensed milk. Transfer to a freezer-safe container overnight (or around 10-12 hours).

Add chocolate or fresh fruit to customize your cone!

Archer and Violet love making their own homemade ice cream flavors!

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Blend in extra ingredients to create your own original ice cream flavors! Here are two delicious ideas:

TRIPLE CHOCOLATE

Ice Cream

BASE OF VANILLA BEAN ICE CREAM

VANILLA BERRY

Ice Cream

BASE OF VANILLA BEAN ICE CREAM 1 cup chopped strawberries 1 cup raspberries ¼ cup blueberries ¼ cup jam

2 tablespoons cocoa powder ½ cup chocolate chips ½ cup chocolate sauce Add cocoa powder to base ingredients when you add the vanilla. When you transfer to the freezer container, carefully fold in the chocolate chips and swirl in the chocolate sauce, leaving visible chocolate swirls.

Gently mash the strawberries and raspberries. Stir in the jam and blueberries. Swirl the mixture into the base ice cream after you transfer to the freezer container.

THESAVVYMOMS.COM | JULY 2017

23


amazing

Toddlers

Central Arkansas has some pretty amazing kids! This crew of Amazing Toddlers was nominated by proud parents for their stellar work in achieving milestones, making friends, minding manners and more. PHOTOGRAPHY BY LILY DARRAGH SHOT ON LOCATION AT MUSEUM OF DISCOVERY

24 JULY 2017 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM


amazing

ELLIE WARD

Ellie is a girl who knows what she likes—anything pink! This sweet 2-year-old is full of love and silliness that infects all around her! She and Mom, Brittany Paul, live in Maumelle. Here’s what Mom had to say about her little ray of sunshine: “Ellie is a breath of fresh air to everyone she comes into contact with. Although she is only 2, she has a personality that can capture everyone’s heart! She’s not only smart, funny and silly, but she has a remarkable way of making you feel special, loved and needed that not many people can accomplish easily. Ellie is amazing, I am so proud to call her my daughter.”

THESAVVYMOMS.COM | JULY 2017

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amazing

JACE KENT

This dapper guy is smart, funny and a real team player! At only 4 years old, Jace has impressive manners, can count to 40 and has learned the Hebrew alphabet. At tee ball games, you’ll find him cheering for all of his teammates. Jace and parents Abbie and Danny live in Bryant. Here’s what Mom had to say about her little gentleman:

“Jace is so full of personality, joy and is just plain funny. He’s very outgoing to both kids and adults. He’s already a gentleman—almost always holding the door open for others. His middle name, Asher, means “happy” and he’s always been just that. Even as a baby, always smiling and happy. His tee ball coach nominated him for player of the week for being ‘the perfect example of what a league should teach and represent to our children. His gentle spirit is observed every week as he waits patiently to bat, and waits for each of his teammates at home plate to congratulate them after running the bases.’”

26 JULY 2017 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM


amazing

UPTON SIDDONS JR.

This 3-year-old is a friend to everyone, and a handyman-in-the-making! He loves to explore and build with his dad and grandpa, and is quick to introduce himself and make new friends anywhere he goes! Upton, nicknamed ‘Little Up,’ and parents Laura and Upton Sr. live in Little Rock. Here’s what Mom had to say about her friendly guy: “‘Little Up’ is a fantastic kid who has never met a stranger and loves blazing trails through the wilderness of the Greater Little Rock area. He leads his family on treacherous expeditions through Allsopp Park, often insisting the group take the creek bed instead of the path so that he might discover new exotic mushroom or crawdad specimens. While he does enjoy adventure, he is a cautious and wise leader, and is vigilant about making sure his little brother stays safe. He wastes no time introducing himself to other children we encounter, and promptly declares them ‘friends.’ He never hesitates to reach out to someone who needs a friend, and for that, we are so very proud of him.”

THESAVVYMOMS.COM | JULY 2017

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amazing

MICHAEL DOAN II

This 2-year-old social butterfly lives for greeting his friends each day at daycare with a fist bump, and knows every kid’s name—and their parents. He’s a fast learner and loves to sing and leap around the house. Michael and his parents, Brandi and Michael, live in Little Rock. Here’s what Mom had to say about her “King of the Fist Bump”: “We have been blessed to have three super-cool kids. Michael Vincent Doan II is our ‘rainbow’ baby whom we call the ‘King of the Fist Bump.’ His dad and I sometimes jokingly refer to Michael II as ‘The Governor of Daycare’ because he knows his ‘constituents,’ greets most anyone with the fist bump, and has an attention to detail that is amazing! He hugs every parent that comes in his classroom and knows which parent belongs to which child! We are so proud of our son and it’s nothing but an honor to watch our terrific toddler do more, be more and love more each and every day!”

28 JULY 2017 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM


amazing

MURRELL CRAIGLOW

Murrell is a fun-loving, 3-year-old traveler who trekked across the country with his parents on a four-month, 20,000-mile road trip last year. He had a blast, and still insists on sleeping in his sleeping bag at home. Murrell and his parents, Wes and Emily, live in Conway. He was nominated by his aunt, Ashley Vickers, and here’s what she had to say about her ramblin’ nephew: “Murrell is living life big! This past year, he adventured from Conway to Alaska and back, and explored more than 47 national parks and forests. He spent countless nights under the stars and even laid eyes on several glaciers. This trip was the perfect match for Murrell's adventurous spirit. His parents are world-travelers, and wanted to instill a love of travel in him from a young age. And, to make their experiences even more special, they returned from their travels just in time to send Dad off for a year-long deployment to Kosovo. Luckily, they have pictures and memories from a once-in-a-lifetime trip to keep Murrell feeling close to Wes until he returns in April.”

THESAVVYMOMS.COM | JULY 2017

29


Focusing on

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is a widespread issue for many Arkansas families BY DWAIN HEBDA

S

carcely even heard of 20 years ago, attention deficit hyperwere considerably higher than the national average over that same activity disorder (ADHD) has grown to become one of the period, growing from 10.9 percent in 2007 to 14.6 percent in 2011. most commonly diagnosed conditions, towing with it an But the chasm between the state and national diagnosis rates entire cultural shift in treatment, terminology, institutional awarehas widened in recent years. Arkansas’s instance of ADHD was 3.7 ness and accommodation. percent higher than the national average in 2007; by 2011 that gap “ADHD is sort of a diagnosis in self-regulation,” said Dr. Adam had ballooned to 5.8 percent and the state’s rank had risen from Benton, co-founder of Arkansas Families First in North Little Rock. fifth in the country to second. “It’s the brain’s ability to regulate attention, behavior and other Yet despite the prevalence of the executive functioning skills.” condition, science is still at a loss to Benton said common beexplain exactly what causes it. Even the Did you know? haviors associated with ADHD National Institute of Mental Health, a The Journal of the American Medical include an inability to follow federal agency that is part of the U.S. through on multistep tasks, disDepartment of Health and Human Association reported last month that tractibility and impulsivity. DiagnoServices, can only suggest contributing young drivers with ADHD are 36 persis tends to be more common after factors such as genetics, low birth rate, cent more likely to experience an autoa child starts school, as it is there brain injuries and poor prenatal care. mobile accident. they are being asked to sit still, pay Preliminary diagnosis can, and often attention and follow a fairly narrow is, made in the pediatrician’s office, set of behavioral rules. commonly followed up by a formal “Most of the time that’s when it comes out. In fact, most people evaluation by a psychiatrist, counselor or psychologist. In many who evaluate for ADHD tend to delay diagnosis until kindergarten, cases children exhibit the classic fidgety, hyperactive symptoms, first or second grade,” Benton said. “In severe cases, certainly, you while others are more subtle. can do psychological testing and have the diagnosis earlier but it’s “Inattentive-type ADHD is more commonly overlooked because not as likely.” it gets less attention in the classroom,” Dr. Benton said. “It is often The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports 8.8 discovered later when school is more difficult and the child can’t percent of U.S. children ages 4-17 had the condition in 2011, up keep up with demand.” from 7.2 percent just four years earlier. Arkansas’s diagnosis rates Once a child is diagnosed with ADHD, parents should imme-

30 JULY 2017 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM


diately work with their school administration to arrange for learning accommodations. Typically, a letter from the pediatrician, psychologist or psychiatrist verifying the diagnosis is required, and it has to be shown ADHD is disrupting the child’s adjustment in school, be it academic, behavioral or social. “Children whose ADHD impairs their functioning, in a school that receives federal funds, have a legal right to academic accommodations through what’s known as a 504 Plan,” Dr. Benton said. “Once a parent requests that a child receive a 504 evaluation, the school is obligated to consider if the child meets criteria.” School accommodation, while crucial for the student’s success, can be a double-edged sword. Preferential seating, alternate testing arrangements or reduced workload are essential for the child to succeed academically. But they also unavoidably shine a light on their condition, which some students may start to view as a crutch or excuse. Parents need to educate themselves, Dr. Benton said, to be able to walk the line between the two. “There are still a lot of myths about ADHD,” Dr. Benton said. “A lot of times I’ll hear things like, ‘Why can my child pay attention to video games, but they can’t pay attention in class?’ Well, video games are really, really interesting. There’s lots going on, they’re constantly changing, they’re pretty stimulating. Parents need to be educated about what [the condition] really means.” One local source for that education is the Centers for Youth and Families, which offers a class, “Parenting the ADHD Child.” Beth McAlpine teaches the six-hour course, spread out over three evenings. She said the range of those in attendance shows the scope of the issue in Arkansas. “We have parents, grandparents, teachers, sometimes we have therapists and tutors that work with kids who have ADHD,” she said. “All sorts of people who want to come and get more information about what’s going on in the child’s brain, how to handle that, the ways that they’re thinking. They are looking for different techniques to make it easier to communicate, but also to give the child coping skills.” “When a child has ADHD, their brain works 95 percent differently than their peers’ and probably from the way that teachers and other people are communicating with them. They process everything differently, they think about everything differently. They’re not using all the same executive functions, that impulse control, empathy and decision-making.” When most people think of treatment options, they automatically think of medication and with good reason—almost 5 percent of all U.S. children were taking medication, for ADHD in 2007, a number that rose slightly by 2011. In Arkansas, 7.5 percent were taking ADHD meds in 2007, and just four years later, nearly one in 10 were. While in many cases medication is the best course of treatment, McAlpine said behavior therapy can also be used effectively, depending on circumstances. Parents should be sure to examine all of their options and not automatically assume pills are the answer. “There are seven types of ADHD and there are some other conditions that go along with ADHD,” she said. “If you walk into a doctor’s office and they want to immediately come in and put the child on medication before they give you all the information about what’s causing it, I tell parents to stop right there. Find some other resources, get a second opinion, go see a psychiatrist or a behavior therapist or a counselor that has more information and can take a better look and do some more diagnostic testing. “Try some of these other things, because medicine only makes the behavior go away while you’re on it. It also takes a lot of repetition and a lot of practice, and these kids don’t have that. Plus, if you take the child off the medicine, the behavior comes back. So, along the way you have to be teaching them how to cope and how to find that self-control.”

Did you know?

Estimates put boys anywhere from two to four times more likely than girls to be diagnosed with ADHD. Symptoms can also manifest differently by gender; boys tend to display textbook fidgety behavior while girls may be more daydreamy.

Did you know?

Fidget spinners were originally invented as a therapeutic device for children with ADHD. Advocates believe the spinners help some children regulate attentiveness.

Did you know?

ADHD doesn’t equate to low intelligence, however school is often difficult because of a child’s inability to concentrate or follow through on assigned tasks.

Did you know?

ADHD medicine includes stimulants and non-stimulants, administered as pills, patches or in liquid form. Serious side effects such as suicidal thoughts or stunted growth can occur, but are considered uncommon.

Did you know?

Persons with ADHD are up to six times more likely to abuse drugs and alcohol. Other potential problems and destructive behaviors include impulsive spending and overspending, difficulty maintaining relationships, self-harm (such as cutting) and risky sexual behaviors. THESAVVYMOMS.COM | JULY 2017

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The Man of Steel (and His Super Mom)

Fight ADHD

Elizabeth McGee and son Hunter work hard to get focused BY DWAIN HEBDA, PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY ACCESS AND MCGEE

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ike all mothers of sons, Elizabeth McGee was prepared for the noise and high-revving engine that little boys generally bring with them into the world. But it didn’t take long to realize that her son Hunter’s behavior went beyond your typical ball of energy. “I understood that little boys are very active, but this seemed to go above and beyond what I thought was normal activity,” she said. “He had a really hard time listening and paying attention, and would veer off course easily. Something as simple as being asked to get dressed would turn into we’re going to bring five toys to the breakfast table.” When corrective action such as timeouts and the occasional spanking didn’t help, Elizabeth decided there was something else at work with Hunter, now 5. She confided in one of Hunter’s teachers who suggested he go in for an observation, which she did a year ago.

The resulting diagnosis—attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)—didn’t come as a particular shock to her. “He was more manageable when it was just the two of us; more manageable at home than in the grocery store, for example,” she said. “But if there was a space to fill up he would physically fill it, verbally fill it, just a constant live wire. “If he were buckled in his carseat he would be fine. Then in class he could be working on one project, but somebody could enter the room and it would totally disrupt what he was doing because he would then sprint over to whatever might seem like more fun, or if there was somebody he wanted to talk to.” The diagnosis started a new chapter in Hunter and Elizabeth’s relationship, one that she’s made as personal to her as it is to him. “Our pediatrician, Dr. Sarah Bone, at Arkansas Pediatric Clinic was extremely supportive and provided all the referrals that we needed for our journey. We went through cognitive behavioral therapy at the UAMS Child Study Center,” she said. “The doctors that we worked with were fantastic and it was really about my learning different techniques and ways to more effectively—I don't want to say ‘handle’ him, but work with him on behaviors. That seems to have really worked well,” Elizabeth said. So well, in fact, that mother and son graduated through all the levels of the course in about six months. Elizabeth would like to say that the behavioral training took the place of medication, but such is not the case. “The most difficult part [of Hunter’s ADHD] was probably coming to terms with the fact that he probably needed to take medicine, sooner than later,” she said. “I'm interested in mental health and think everyone doing a continuing program of mental health is good, so the learning of that was easy and I'm open and receptive to that. “The hard part is thinking and feeling—overcoming, I guess— the guilt of putting your child on

(This page) Elizabeth McGee and her son, Hunter, love time learning in the classroom at Access, and watching the Arkansas Travelers play. (Opposite page) Hunter enjoyed his first train ride in 2015 on vacation in Santa Fe.

32 JULY 2017 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM


medication at a young age. I don’t think you should medicate, but if you can’t get through the day and be a part of society? If the behaviors prevent him from being the best that he can be and he needs some help, then it’s really about the child and not about you.” The decision was made harder by the fact that despite improvements in medications, they are not a one-size-fits-all proposition. “We have tried several medications,” Elizabeth said. “We’re on our fourth medication and it is working a lot better than the first three. The first two he was just an emotional wreck, as in crying and super-sensitive. If somebody in the class looked at him he might burst into tears. We went from that to one just not seeming to work at all,” she said.

ADHD Resources ACCESS

10618 Breckenridge Drive, Little Rock 501-217-8600, accessgroupinc.org

Arkansas Children’s Hospital 1 Children's Way, Little Rock 501-364-4000, archildrens.org

Arkansas Families First

4004 McCain Blvd., Ste. 203, North Little Rock 501-812-4268, arfamiliesfirst.com

Arkansas Therapy Outreach

1306 Military Road, Ste. 1, Benton 501-481-8930, artherapyoutreach.com Other locations in Hot Springs and Sheridan

Behavioral Health Services of Arkansas

10 Corporate Hill Drive, Ste. 330, Little Rock 501-954-7470, bhsarkansas.org

Centers for Youth and Families

6601 W. 12th St., Little Rock 501-666-8686, centersforyouthandfamilies.org Other location in Monticello

Families, Inc.

1507 E. Race, Searcy 501-305-2359, familiesinc.net Offers 11 locations across Northeast, North Central and Central Arkansas

Integrated Psych Solutions

1100 N. University Ave., Ste. 139, Little Rock 501-416-1019, integratedpsychsolutions.com

Methodist Family Health

1600 Aldersgate Road, Little Rock 501-661-0720, methodistfamily.org

Pediatrics Plus The latest version seems to be working well, but like all ADHD drugs, it comes with the challenge of consistency in taking them. “They’re short-acting medications at his age,” Elizabeth said. “So you administer them every three to four hours during the day.” Elizabeth has also learned certain environmental stimuli affects Hunter, who also has developmental delays, differently than others, even with his medication. She keeps tabs on these and encourages the flow of information by bringing all affected parties into the loop of his ongoing symptom management. “I involve the physical therapist, occupational therapist and his teacher, all at Access, in regular communication with what we’re doing in therapy or any updates on medicines and whatnot so that we all have a good partnership in looking out for his well-being,” she said. “We’ve stayed in pretty consistent communication with each other on how he was doing, how the medicine was working, what I might try at home, what they might need to try at school. “The four of us have an open-door policy so we share back and forth and observe back and forth. He’s got a good team looking out for him.”

2740 College Ave., Conway 501-329-5459, pediatricsplus.com Locations in Little Rock, North Little Rock and Russellville

Rivendell Behavioral Health Services

100 Rivendell Drive, Benton 501-316-1255, rivendellofarkansas.com

The Bridgeway

21 Bridgeway Road, North Little Rock 501-771-1500, thebridgeway.com

UAMS James L. Dennis Developmental Center

1301 Wolfe St., Little Rock 501-364-1830, uamshealth.com THESAVVYMOMS.COM | JULY 2017

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ADVERTORIAL

p. 100 Rivendell Dr, Benton (800) 264-5640 rivendellofarkansas.com

1-800-264-5640

www.rivendellofarkansas.com


CORRECTLY DIAGNOSING ADHD PROFESSIONAL EVALUATION CAN IDENTIFY UNDERLYING ISSUES

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is the most commonly diagnosed childhood condition for children under the age of 18, but is it always the right diagnosis? That’s the question hounding parents and professionals alike as a growing body of evidence points out other cooccurring conditions that mimic ADHD symptoms and complicate the diagnostic process. “If you diagnose someone with ADHD and you’re treating it and medicating it as such, but that isn’t the problem, you could be making the real problem worse,” said Misty Juola, director of clinical services at Rivendell Behavioral Health Services. According to the Centers for Disease Control, just under 6.5 million children are currently diagnosed with ADHD, and of these, 50 to 80 percent have co-occurring conditions representing a range of learning and mental health problems. Part of the challenge of diagnosing ADHD is that many symptoms look like extreme forms of normal behavior, the same behaviors that are symptomatic of other conditions. ADHD diagnosis, therefore is a deductive process of eliminating other possible conditions first. “The condition can be anxiety, it can be depression, it could be medical conditions,” said Juola. “It could be post traumatic stress, like what you might see with abuse or trauma. These are just a few of the things that can be misdiagnosed as ADHD.” Among those issues that most closely mirror classic symptoms of ADHD, bipolar disorder is one of the most difficult to distinguish. According to healthline.com, the list of symptoms is very similar including mood instability, restlessness, impatience and talkativeness. The differences, meanwhile, are subtle such as bipolar usually emerging later and featuring outbursts that are episodic rather than chronic. What’s more, different stimuli within the same environment can trigger either condition, making it very hard to discern if it was sensory overstimulation (common trigger for ADHD) or corrective action by an authority figure (common trigger for bipolar disorder) that was the root cause of a given behavioral episode. Autism, sensory processing disorders and sleep disorders are other conditions that can also directly mimic, or cause behavioral actions that resemble that of a child suffering from ADHD. “It used to be the symptoms had to begin before the age of 7; now they’ve broadened it more to the age of 12 to be considered ADHD,” Juola said. “That opens things up to so many different factors that could be playing a role in a child looking like they have ADHD, when it’s really a learning problem or a developmental disability that’s causing frustration in the classroom. “Even not getting enough sleep at night can cause concentration problems and an inability to focus, but then, that’s obviously something that would affect any of us.” Perhaps the most startling diagnosis doesn’t identify any condition at all, but explains poor classroom performance or lack of attention span to much more benign factors. In 2010, a study by Michigan State University researchers estimated up to 1 million students could be misdiagnosed as

having ADHD simply because they were the youngest in their class and therefore the most immature. A 2015 study from York University in Toronto produced similar results, noting specifically that the youngest boys in their study of kindergarten classes were 30 percent more likely to be diagnosed and 41 percent more likely to be treated for ADHD, and the youngest girls were 70 percent more likely to be diagnosed and 77 more likely to be treated than their older classmates. Diagnosis is a complex process that requires trained professionals using a variety of tools, working together with parents. Fortunately there is good news on this front, Juola said. First and foremost is many families are taking the time to educate themselves on ADHD, which has helped make them far more willing to discuss the condition than in past years. “The subject of ADHD is not as taboo, I would certainly say that,” Juola said. “People talk about it so much now it’s not something that has to be a huge secret. Now, some parents are more comfortable with it than others, of course, just because they are more private by nature. But ADHD doesn’t have nearly the stigma attached to it that it used to, or that other conditions seem to have.” Diagnostic tools and techniques are also improving all the time, and even general pediatric doctors are receiving specialized training in medical school that makes them more adept at spotting symptoms and making preliminary diagnosis. “There are definitely better tools to diagnose ADHD or rule it out,” Juola said. “Primary care physicians have a broad enough knowledge base now to say, ‘You know, I think you need to have your child evaluated further.’ Others may have more specialized training that will also help in managing these conditions as well.” Parents should be aware at all times that they can ask for a second opinion or seek a specialist such as a counselor, psychiatrist or psychologist for a more in-depth evaluation. In fact, this is the recommended course of action to get to the heart of the real problem and assign the appropriate level of treatment for the appropriate condition accordingly. Juola said families should make the time and effort to ensure they have all the information necessary to make informed management decisions. “It really could be that the child isn’t able to sit still because they’re extremely anxious and that’s causing them difficulty in focusing, which makes the anxiety look like something else,” Juola said. “In instances of anxiety or abuse or depression, it may be the case that the child never had an environment where they felt comfortable talking to anyone and that’s where seeing an objective therapist or psychiatrist can be really helpful. “In many cases, medication is the most effective treatment, but you certainly don’t want to treat them with the wrong medication because you don’t understand the real problem,” she said. “Parents definitely shouldn’t try to make that decision without talking to a professional, and until they are comfortable they have all the facts.”


ADVERTORIAL

LOCAL EXPERT EXPLAINS WHY CHILDREN WITH ADHD NEED MORE THAN MEDICATION Kimberly A. Newton, MS, LPE-I Licensed Psychological Examiner ACCESS Group, Inc. | (501) 217-8600

The pediatrician prescribed ADHD medication for my child. Why does my child need a comprehensive evaluation? A comprehensive clinical evaluation is necessary to diagnose ADHD. Since a variety of other disorders can look like ADHD, including anxiety, learning disorders, conduct problems, depression, and even past traumatic experiences, this assessment should include a detailed developmental, medical, educational, and social background history; clinical interview; and observation. Approximately 20% to 30% of children with ADHD have coexistent learning disabilities in the area of reading, spelling, or math, so it is imperative that intellectual ability and achievement are assessed to rule out a possible learning disorder.

I got my child tested, now what? You should meet with the examiner to discuss the results of the evaluation and receive a detailed evaluation report which includes results, impressions, and recommendations. If your child has ADHD and attends public school, she will be eligible for a 504 plan (e.g. modification plan, designed and implemented in the regular classroom), but approval cannot be based solely on a single source of data (i.e. a doctor’s diagnosis or grades). It will be important to share the results of the evaluation with your child’s school and request a conference with appropriate school personnel. A plan should be developed which includes appropriate accommodations, evidence-based interventions, and/or related services that are also research-based. A good comprehensive evaluation report will have these listed in the recommendations.

So why isn’t medication enough? Medication alone will not address all of the issues associated with ADHD. These can include problems at school, self-esteem or anger management issues, co-occurring disorders such as anxiety or depression, learning difficulties, and peer and family relationships. Research shows that a comprehensive treatment approach for children and adolescents with ADHD ensures the greatest opportunities for success. Best practice includes cognitive behavioral therapy, along with medication maintenance. The ACCESS Evaluation and Resource Center in Little Rock offers parents and educators onstaff experts for developmental, psychological, and psycho-educational evaluations. To learn more about how to schedule a comprehensive evaluation for your child, contact an Admissions Specialist at ACCESS. (501) 217-8600 www.accessgroupinc.org

ADVERTORIAL

Don’t be fooled; an interview and brief screener is not sufficient to diagnose Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and here’s why. At its core, ADHD is a neurodevelopmental delay. Problems with working memory (the ability to hold information, manipulate and recite it), visual-spatial organization (where objects are in space), and processing speed (perform easy or over-learned tasks) are hallmarks of ADHD and cannot be identified with a conversation alone. Using cognitive tests, the clinician can discover where someone ranks in these categories, which helps them accurately diagnose and target areas for treatment. Measures of Executive Functioning, Complex Attention, and Cognitive Processing are invaluable in parceling ADHD from other disorders. For instance, if a child is struggling in school it can be difficult to know whether symptoms result from an academic delay, they are overwhelmed by anxiety, or are limited in their ability to focus. Individuals with ADHD are at a higher risk for other problems, too. Depression, anxiety, substance abuse, and oppositional/defiance are some of the comorbid problems they may face. A detailed interview combined with an empirically validated objective measure can help identify these problems. Extended time with the individual will allow an experienced clinician the opportunity to contrast how one person responds to a task against other performances. Subtle differences can be telling; do instructions need repeated, how persistent

36 JULY 2017 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM

is the person, do they respond to redirection, and how do their reported symptoms present? A thorough assessment should include an objective screener of personality, a measure of intellectual functioning, a measure of academic achievement, a thorough review of the medical history that includes a hearing exam, and an intensive intake interview that covers multiple behavior domains and psychosocial history. Block off half a day and bring a snack. The considerations above explain why there is some disagreement about the prevalence of ADHD. Estimates suggest that between 2 and 17 percent of children in the US struggle with abnormal levels of distraction, impulsivity, hyperactivity or a combination. That’s a wide range so it’s important to be thorough. A diagnosis brings with it a targeted therapeutic and psychopharmacological intervention, a degree of stigma, adjustments in the living environment, and modification at work or school if needed. If the diagnosis is mistaken, then not only are resources misplaced, but the individual potentially undergoes additional stress and confusion on how to cope with their symptoms. Finally, a competent evaluation should include a discussion about attempts to manage symptoms and various behavioral and psychopharmacological interventions. Close collaboration between a prescribing physician and psychologist is imperative and can ensure that questions about medication and behavioral modification strategies are answered.

Dr. Brian Anderson is a Clinical Psychologist and Behavior Analyst specializing in behavior modification and communication strategies for the workplace and home. He can be contacted at Integrated Psych Solutions, 1100 N. University Ste. 139, Little Rock, AR 72207 or 501-416-1019. integratedpsychsolutions.


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37


I’M ADDICTED TO NAIL NIPPERS. I WILL OBSESS AND PICK IF I CAN’T CLIP IT OFF.

I READ A LOT, SO THERE’S ALWAYS A BOOK READY TO GO ON MY KINDLE.

HENRY LOVES HIS WUBBANUB. HE SLEEPS WITH FIVE OF THEM!

I ALWAYS CARRY EMERGENCY EARRINGS FOR WHEN I WANT TO FEEL MORE PUT TOGETHER.

THIS IS MY FAVORITE STILA LIP GLOSS, AND IT DOESN’T LEAK IN MY PURSE!

I NEED A NOTEPAD TO KEEP UP WITH JEWELRY IDEAS AND MY TO-DO LIST. IF I DON’T WRITE IT DOWN I’LL FORGET IT!

I LIKE TO CARRY A SMALL PURSE THAT WILL FIT INSIDE MY DIAPER BAG. I TRIED CARRYING BOTH AT FIRST AND IT WAS A BIG NOPE!

CHRISTY BOURNS WARD

CHRISTY BOURNS WARD IS MOM TO CURLY HEADED, 10-MONTH-OLD HENRY. A FIRST-TIME MOM, SHE’S BEEN LEARNING TO BALANCE LIFE RUNNING A HANDMADE JEWELRY DESIGN BUSINESS, ROBINSON LANE, AND RUNNING A HOUSEHOLD (THAT INCLUDES RUNNING AFTER HENRY). SHE AND HER HUSBAND, DEREK, LOVE TRAVELING AND EXPLORING AND CAN’T WAIT TO INTRODUCE HENRY TO THIS BIG, BIG WORLD. IN THE MEANTIME, THEY SPEND THEIR TIME EXPLORING THEIR NEIGHBORHOOD, LOCAL PARKS AND VARIOUS SWING SETS ACROSS THE CITY. YOU CAN OFTEN FIND CHRISTY AND HER FAMILY DEVOURING CHEESE DIP ON ONE OF THE MANY RESTAURANT PATIOS IN LITTLE ROCK.

38 JULY 2017 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM

PHOTOGRAPHY: LILY DARRAGH/STYLING: MANDY KEENER

bag check


Yes, recovery may take 12 steps… But The BridgeWay has always been the first. As the first psychiatric hospital in the state of Arkansas, The BridgeWay has helped thousands of Arkansans recover from addictions. From legal to illegal substances, we have treated them all.

Under the care of a certified addictionologist, The BridgeWay was the first to offer multiple individualized treatment options: n Abstinence-based treatment n Medication-assisted outpatient treatment with Suboxone n Individualized goal-based recovery Whether you need inpatient care or outpatient treatment, The BridgeWay has always been the first place to call. We provide evidence-based services that treat addictions for adults, ages 18 and older, within a structured setting: n Pet-assisted therapy n Medical detoxification n Art therapy n Intensive Outpatient Treatment n Yoga n Support by AA and Al-Anon n Nutritional guidance n Computer access n Visitation

Let The BridgeWay be your first call. 1-800-245-0011 Our assessment and referral staff is available twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week. Assessments are provided at no charge and are always confidential. The BridgeWay is an in-network provider for Medicaid, up to 21 years of age, and all other insurance companies in Arkansas including Medicare and Tricare.

www.TheBridgeWay.com |

PUBLIC EDUCATION: PROVIDING OPPORTUNITIES

Pulaski County Special School District

Visit your school’s website and get ready for a great school year! The 2017-2018 school year starts Monday, August 14, but it’s not too early to prepare. Visit your school’s website for school supply lists, uniform information and all of your back-to-school-needs! pcssd.org

501.234.2000 THESAVVYMOMS.COM | JULY 2017

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D &CHILD ADOLESCENT SERVICES ADOLESCENT SERVICES ADULT&TREATMENT OPTIONS T SERVICES

MOBILE ASSESSMENT MOBILE ASSESSMENT

ACUTE CARE KIDS ACUTE CARE FORFOR KIDS

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We now for Suicide Risk & Behavioral  Onsite at School, Clinic, Onsite at School, Clinic, CourtCourt  Group & Individual Therapy  Group & Individual Therapy for Group & Individual Therapy  Group & Individual Therapy ome allHealth ages, 4Problems and above, seeking treatment emotional  MondayFriday MondayFriday  Substance Abuse Counseling  Substance Abuse Counseling  24/7 Emergency Admission  Psychiatric Evaluation Admissions  Psychiatric Evaluation  24/7 Emergency behavioral issues.  8:00am-5:00pm 8:00am-5:00pm  Mental Health Screening  Drug & Physical Pr  Drug Screen/History & Physical Screen/History Short Term Stabilization  Special Education Certified  Special Education Certified  Short Term Stabilization Program Inpatient Psychiatric Hospitalization Inpatient Behavioral Health Inpatient Behavioral Health Services  No charge No charge  Statewide Screenings  Psychiatric Evaluation  Psychiatric those suffering from depression, anxiety, anger,  Medication  Medication  Evaluation 7 Day Average Length of Sta trauma, 7Management DayManagement Average Length of Stay Services for Children Ages 4 to 11  Confidential Confidential for Children Ages 4 to 11 for ages 12 to 18  Special Education Certified Therapy  Onsite at School, Clinic, Court  Special Education , addiction, and impulsivity, Rivendell provides place of& Individual  Lunch & Refreshments Included  Lunch &a Refreshments Included  GroupCertified & Individual avioral Group Therapy 30 Minute to 1 Hour Interview 30 to 1 Hour Interview  Medication Management  Medication MondayFriday ngMinute and hope. Whether detox in a hospital is needed  Recreational Therapy  setting Recreational Therapy  Management Substance Abuse Counseling Psychiatric Evaluation  24/7 Emergency Admissions less Parental Consent Required Parental Consent Required  24/7 Emergency  Recreational Therapy  Recreational Therapy restrictive 8:00am-5:00pm  History & Physical outpatient option isAdmissions look desired, History &we Physical  Drug Screen/History & Phy Special Education Certified ng  Assessment Recommendations Assessment Recommendations  Short Term Stabilization Program  Short Term Stabilization Program  Family & Visitation  Family Therapy & Visitation Family Therapy & Management Visitation  Family Therapy & Visitation No charge ard toInpatient continuing down theHospitalization path toward a well lived life  Therapy Psychiatric Evaluation  Medication Inpatient Psychiatric Hospitalization Psychiatric  Aftercare Planning  Aftercare Planning  Referral(s) Provided Referral(s) Provided  7 Day Average Length of Stay  Aftercare Planning  Aftercare Planning  7 Day Average Length of Stay you, your loved ones, your clients.  Confidential  Special Education Certified for ages to  Lunch & Refreshments Included ages 1212 toand 1818 c, Courtfor  Group & Individual Therapy  Medication Management Group & Individual Therapy  Recreational Therapy 30 Minute to 1 Hour Interview  Substance Abuse Counseling  Recreational Therapy  Psychiatric  Parental Consent Required Evaluation  History & Physical 24/7 Emergency Admissions & Drug Screen/History & Physical  Special Education Certified ACUTE CARE FOR KIDS CARE FOR TEENS ASSESSMENT MOBILE  Family Therapy & Visitation  Family ACUTE Therapy Visitation  Assessment Short Term Recommendations Stabilization Program Inpatient Psychiatric Hospitalization Inpatient Behavioral Health Services Face to Face & Phone Screenings  Psychiatric Evaluation  Medication Management  Aftercare Planning  Referral(s) Provided  Aftercare Planning Rivendell’s hospital offers a safe Rivendell’s acuteacute carecare hospital offers a safe forStay Children Ages 4 to 11 for ages 12 to 18 7 Day for Suicide Risk Average & Behavioral Length of  Special Education Certified  Lunch & Refreshments Included setting for children and adolescents struggling setting for children and adolescents struggling Health Problems  Group & Individual Therapy  24/7 Emergency Admissions  24/7 Emergency Admissions nterview onemore or more offollowing the following issues:  Medication Management withwith one or of the issues:  Mental Health Screening  Recreational Therapy  Short Term Stabilization Program  Short Term Stabilization Program  Substance Abuse Counseling  7 Day Average Length of Stay  7 Day Average Length of Stay uired  Statewide  Recreational Therapy  History &Group Physical at School, Clinic, Court  Group & Individual Therapy Anger & Individual Therapy Anger Aggression Aggression Onsite Drug Screen/History & Physical  Monday- Friday  Substance AbuseCounseling  Psychiatric Evaluation ndations Family Therapy & Visitation  Family Therapy & Visitation  8:00am-5:00pm Depression Suicidal Thoughts  Drug Screen/History & Physical Depression Thoughts Psychiatric Evaluation  Special Education Certified Rivendell’s acuteSuicidal care hospital offers a  Aftercare Planning  No charge  Aftercare Medication Planning  Psychiatric Evaluation Management Special Education Certified setting for children and adolescents Trauma Homicidal Threatsstr Homicidal Threats  Confidential  Special Education Certified Trauma  Lunch & Refreshments Included  30 Minute to 1 Hour Interview  Medication Management  Recreational Therapy with one or more of the following issue Medication Management Mood Disorder Anxiety Mood Disorder Anxiety  Parental Consent Required  Recreational Therapy  History & Physical  Assessment Recommendations  Family Therapy & Visitation  Recreational Therapy  Family Therapy & Visitation ADHD/ADD Impulsive Behavior ADHD/ADD Impulsive Behavior Anger Aggression  Aftercare Planning  Referral(s) Provided  Aftercare Planning  Family Therapy & Visitation Grief/Trauma Sexual Abuse(IOP) Grief/Trauma Sexual Abuse Depression Suicidal Tho Partial Hospitalization Program tox & Acute Psychiatric Care Behavioral Intensive Outpatient Program Inpatient Psychiatric Hospitalization Rivendell’s acute care hospital offers a safe Inpatient Health Services  Aftercare Planning Welcome to Rivendell where our mission remains: Changing lives through compassionate healing! eenings

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CHANGE1-800-264-5640 A LIFE. 1-800-264-5640 CALL TODAY.

Savvy July 2017