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THE LIFESTYLE MANUAL FOR THE MODERN MOM DECEMBER 2014 路 THESAVVYMOMS.COM

FAMILY

TRADITION TWO ARKANSAS FAMILIES SHOW US HOW THEY CELEBRATE THE SEASON

COLLEGE GUIDE

NAVIGATING HIGHER-ED OPPORTUNITIES IN ARKANSAS


ASMSA is your opportunity to be

You are smart, and learning excites you. You find philosophical discussions more interesting than reality TV arguments. You want to create the newest app, not just download it. As a high school junior, you can join a community of peers from across Arkansas who are dreamers, thinkers and doers at

the state’s premier public high school. Engage in courses designed to challenge bright minds. Travel to international destinations and explore other cultures. Grow as a student while earning more than a year of college credit. Be a researcher. Be an artist. Be a scholar. ASMSA will help you become extraordinary.

Arkansas School for Mathematics, Sciences and the Arts

Digital Learning • Residential Experience • Enrichment Programs

Discover who you can become at asmsa.org. #ASMSA 2

DECEMBER 2014 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM


The key to separation anxiety: be loving, be brief, be strong.

Separation anxiety is a normal behavior and an indication of a child’s attachment to his parents. There are some things parent’s can do to ease the stress of saying goodbye. Be loving – give him your full attention and tell him you love him and when you will return for him. Be brief – put her in the hands of your care giver, give her kisses and hugs and leave quickly. She will likely recover within minutes. Be strong – when you walk away, do not return to your child for one last hug. Talk to your child care provider in advance about engaging your child in other interests to make your exit less stressful for everyone. Visit our website to download

12 ways to help

your child say goodbye www.ARBetterBeginnings.com • 1-800-445-3316

Division of Child Care and Early Childhood Education

THESAVVYMOMS.COM | DECEMBER 2014

3


I AM THE AEA

athy Hill is a kid at heart. And mind. And career. Kathy Hill has taught Kindergarten for more than 30 years, and she has never thought once of changing her path. “We have so much fun,” Hill said. “They may begin the year a little timid, but after a few weeks, my students say, ‘What are we doing next?’ and ‘Why do we have to leave so soon? This was a short day!’ It always reaffirms to me that what they are learning in class is sticking with them as they move on to other grades.” Hill teaches in the Cabot Public School system, at what is known as the International School, an English-as-secondlanguage program. Hill teaches students from all over the world – China, Russia, Japan and Mexico, to name a few. “I’ve had students who don’t speak a word of English when they start my class,” she said. “In fact, I had one little girl who had only been in this country for two days before she started school. By the end of the year, she was reading chapter books. It is amazing to watch how quickly kids learn English.” In addition to teaching full time, Hill tutors students two days a week and leads the Extended Learning Opportunity program, which works with small groups of students to help with math and reading. “The great thing about ELO is it helps students who need a little extra instruction get the help they need, and their parents don’t have to pay for a tutor,” Hill said. “We call our program Math and Literacy Learning, or MALL for short. Because the kids have been in school all day and they’re tired, we try to make it as much fun for them as possible so they want to learn. We have MALL bucks they can earn through good behavior, improved grades and other criteria, and when they have saved up $10 in those bucks, they can go shopping for supplies in our school store. Around Christmas and at the end of the school year, we have parties where we cook hotdogs, decorate cookies, watch a movie. Because we teach MALL from 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m., the kids don’t get to go home and play. This is our way of keeping them motivated and making

Brian Chilson

K

Meet Kathy Hill, Cabot School District

them feel special.” For 32 years, Hill has been a member of the Arkansas Education Association. She said she initially joined at the encouragement of her fellow teachers, but has remained a loyal supporter because of AEA’s commitment to its members. “Education has changed so much since I started teaching,” Hill said. “The AEA wants to make sure that it’s going in the right direction.” Hill notes the solid partnership the AEA has with its members as one of the association’s greatest strengths. “They are knowledgeable about the issues teachers face, and they can answer our questions when we have them,” Hill said. “I know that if I need something, they will back me up.”

1500 W. 4th St. Little Rock 501.375.4611 aeaonline.org 4

DECEMBER 2014 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM


College

&

The Little Rock School District is committed to preparing all students for college and career success. The ACT exam plays an important role in predicting success in college and career. EXPLORE and PLAN provide predicted score ranges for the ACT, while the ACT subject-area tests provide predicted grade ranges for certain college courses. Test results also reveal a wealth of information helpful in setting and reaching career goals.

EXPLORE (grade 8) Scores: 1-25 PLAN (grade 10) Scores: 1-32 ACT (grades 10-12) Scores: 1-36 The above multiple-choice exams test knowledge and skills in four areas: English, math, reading and science. The directions/ format and pool of questions are consistent but the tests become more difficult at each level. Student Score Reports: • Provide strategies for improving academic skills and test scores • Assess academic needs and career interests • Describe careers that match student interests • Contain information helpful in planning high school coursework, setting career goals, and developing an educational plan to achieve goals

Career

Readiness Pathway

College Admission in Arkansas

Only students with an ACT composite score of 21 and a minimum 2.5 cumulative GPA can expect to receive unconditional admission to any public college or university in the state of Arkansas.

Did you know?

• NCAA standards are changing for student-athletes entering college in 2015-16 and beyond. To be eligible to play Division I sports students will be required to have a higher ACT score and a higher core course grade point average. Visit www.eligibilitycenter.org for more information. • Every point above a composite score of 21 can translate into thousands of dollars in scholarship awards. • Low ACT scores can make college more expensive. Students who do not meet college readiness standards are required to take remedial classes. Remedial classes cost the same as college-level classes but do not count toward the college degree. • ACT fee waivers are available for students in grades 11-12. High school guidance counselors can verify eligibility.

• There are a number of free ACT preparation programs available to LRSD students. Some programs reward good attendance and course completion with prizes. High School guidance counselors can provide more information. 2015 ACT Test Dates NEW! Photo ID Upload Requirement Test Date Feb. 7, 2015 Registration Deadline Jan. 9 Late Fee Registration Jan. 10-16 Test Date April 18, 2015 Registration Deadline March 14 Late Fee Registration March 14-27 Test Date June 13, 2015 Registration Deadline May 8 Late Fee Registration May 9-22

Little Rock School District

The NEW Little Rock School District Where WE Put Children First

PERFORMANCE WORKPLAN ENCE FOR TOMO lrsd.org

CREATING EXCELL

RROW

THESAVVYMOMS.COM | DECEMBER 2014

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DECEMBER ON THE COVER: ALLISON AND ADAM GLADDEN, WITH THEIR 2-YEAR-OLD SON, BOB. PHOTOGRAPHY BY KAREN SEGRAVE.

35 FAMILY

TRADITION TWO ARKANSAS FAMILIES SHOW US HOW THEY CELEBRATE THE SEASON

48 COLLEGE GUIDE

DEPARTMENTS 6

DECEMBER 2014 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM

14 nest LET IT GO

16 Thrive GET COZY! GIFT GUIDE

28 Nosh

HOLIDAY SWEETS

42 CULTIVATE

HOLIDAY HAPPENINGS SYMPHONY APPRECIATION

KAREN SEGRAVE

EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO NAVIGATE THE HIGHER-ED LANDSCAPE IN ARKANSAS


FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED SINCE 1959! There are many brands of beef, but only one Angus brand exceeds expectations. The Certified Angus Beef brand is a cut above USDA Prime, Choice and Select. Ten quality standards set the brand apart. It's abundantly flavorful, incredibly tender, naturally juicy. 1701 MAIN STREET 501-376-3473

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2203 NORTH REYNOLDS RD, BRYANT 501-847-9777 THESAVVYMOMS.COM | DECEMBER 2014

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LETTER FROM THE

EDITOR It’s time to stop resisting, because the holidays are officially here! Welcome to the December issue of SAVVY! My name is Mel Jones, and I’m your new editor. I’ve only been here for a few weeks, but I can already tell I’m going to like being part of this family! And speaking of family, this issue features two who have some great traditions they honor every Christmas. From the Gladdens’ grand gathering and “gift exchange” to the McMillens’ activity filled holiday, both families are carrying on some traditions from generations past while creating their own as well. But more than anything, you can really see the love and joy that fills both broods. • One of my favorite traditions is a common one—driving around looking at Christmas lights. I remember as a kid we would drive around looking at houses that were all lit up (for • better or worse!), and in college I would inevitably drag my friends around to do the same. So it should come as no surprise that my husband and I try to get out and find the illuminated homes in and around our neighborhood, although I admit the excursion is usually driven by the desire to find the wildest and wackiest display (you know the ones!), as opposed to the prettiest and most elegantly decorated home on the block! No matter what we find, we always have a great time just driving around looking at the holiday houses, and swearing that we’ll actually decorate outside next year. I hope you enjoy this issue of SAVVY as much as I’ve enjoyed working on it. I’d love to know what you like or don’t like, so drop me a line at the address below. • Until then, happy holidays, from the SAVVY family to yours!

Since 1985, our goal has been to provide the best psychiatric and behavioral health care while

supporting the whole family. New beginnings are possible at Rivendell where our mission is “changing lives through compassionate healing.”

Directions to Rivendell:

100 Rivendell Drive | Bento

From Little Rock, take I-30 We

BRIAN CHILSON

A Place ALL OFFor New Beginnings. THE LIGHTS

Take exit 121 (Alcoa Road

Turn right onto Alcoa Road Highway 5. Rivendell Drive

From Hot Springs, take Hwy toward Little Rock

Take exit 121 (Alcoa Road

• Turn left onto Alcoa Road ( MEL JONES, EDITOR MELANIE@ARKTIMES.COM

S E L E C T S

The best part about working on the gift guide is shopping…for myself! I’m a #dogmom, so I had to buy this St. Francis of Assisi pendant from Bella Vita Jewelry. See more on page 20.

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DECEMBER 2014 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM

Expertly decorated Christmas cookies. Need I say more? Kelli Marks demonstrated a few techniques then sent us home with a box of goodies. That’s my kind of photo shoot! Check out the results on page 32. See what else is new in higher-ed in our College Guide.

1-800-2

I love this story about taking a gap year. It was unheard of when I was in school—instead we took advantage of summer French programs in Quebec and studying literature in the UK.


Changing seasons, changing lives… Giving you peace of mind every step of the way.

RIVENDELL’S ADULT SERVICES UNIT (ASU) has a lot to offer! The ASU team will work with you on setting goals for yourself and aid you in the healing process. Our tailored therapeutic activities will help you make important lifestyle changes. Find the treatment that’s right for you.

DBT – DIALECTICAL BEHAVIORAL THERAPY Designed to help deal with life’s stressors in the moment, as well as learn new skills to help you cope. Held three times a week.

enton, AR 72019

COURAGE TO HEAL A group that focuses on healing from physical, emotional, and sexual abuse. It offers hope and validation as survivors actively participate in reclaiming power in their lives. Held twice a week.

0 West toward Hot Springs/Texarkana

RELATIONSHIPS This group will assist you with exploring relationships in your life. How have they helped you? How have they hurt you? Held twice a week.

oad)

oad, at the stoplight turn right onto rive is the first street on the left.

DOMESTIC PEACE A supportive group that explores issues of family and domestic abuse. Types of abuse include emotional, verbal, physical, sexual and financial. Educational information is presented on the cycle of domestic violence, signs of domestic abuse, issues of power and control, and ways to deal with abuse. Held once a week. LIFE SKILLS Daily session covering various topics for discussion that address real-life issues you face once treatment is completed. Held daily. HEALTH & WELLNESS Groups designed to help you develop healthy lifestyles by looking at nutrition, exercise, dress, sleep patterns, and more. Held four times a week.

wy 70 East to I-30 East

FOCUS GROUP Designed to assist you with setting a daily goal/focus for the day. Held daily. DISCHARGE PLANNING Provides both individual and group assistance in identifying resources for your aftercare. Held three times a week.

oad)

AA “Alcoholics Anonymous® is a fellowship of men and women who share their experience, strength and hope with each other that they may solve their common problem and help others recover…” This community led group is strictly voluntary. Held 1-2 times a week.

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100 Rivendell Drive • Benton, AR www.rivendellofarkansas.com

1-800-264-5640

THESAVVYMOMS.COM | DECEMBER 2014

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AN EDUCATION WITH EXPECTATIONS PUBLISHER REBEKAH HARDIN | rebekahhardin@arktimes.com EDITOR MEL JONES | melanie@arktimes.com EDITORIAL ART DIRECTOR PATRICK JONES ADVERTISING DIRECTOR ELIZABETH HAMAN | elizabeth@arktimes.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES ROSE GLADNER | rose@arktimes.com BONNY GREGORY | bonny@arktimes.com WENDY HICKINGBOTHAM | wendy@arktimes.com LESA THOMAS | lesathomas@arktimes.com ADVERTISING COORDINATORS ROLAND GLADDEN | roland@arktimes.com ERIN HOLLAND | erin@arktimes.com

A SCHOOL AND A THERAPY CLINIC At the Academy at Riverdale, teaching methods and curriculum are designed to recognize the individual needs of our students from Kindergarten – Age 21. We are committed to on-going collaboration between parents, teachers, and therapists. Our only goal is to provide the instruction and encouragement students need to work toward realizing their full potential.

Reading & Writing • Math & Science • Literature Social Studies • Character Education • Social Skills

IF YOUR CHILD HAS BEEN DIAGNOSED WITH A DEVELOPMENTAL DISORDER: Autism Asperger Syndrome Pervasive Developmental Disorder Down Syndrome Apraxia Other Language Disorders Sensory Integration issues

Contact us today for more information or to schedule an evaluation for your child.

(501) 663-6965 · 1600 Riverfront Drive Little Rock, Arkansas 72202 We work with a variety of private insurance providers as well as ARKids 1st, Medicaid, TEFRA and TRICARE.

www.academyatriverdale.com

10 DECEMBER 2014 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM

DIGITAL MEDIA PRODUCER BRYAN MOATS SOCIAL MEDIA DIRECTOR LAUREN BUCHER | laurenbucher@arktimes.com GRAPHIC DESIGNERS BRYAN MOATS | MIKE SPAIN | KEVIN WALTERMIRE PHOTOGRAPHER BRIAN CHILSON PRODUCTION MANAGER WELDON WILSON IT DIRECTOR ROBERT CURFMAN CONTROLLER WELDON WILSON ACCOUNTS PAYABLE KELLY LYLES BILLING/COLLECTIONS LINDA PHILLIPS CIRCULATION DIRECTOR SUSIE SHELTON

PENDING

ALL MATERIALS ARE HANDLED WITH DUE CARE; HOWEVER, THE PUBLISHER ASSUMES NO RESPONSIBILITY FOR CARE AND SAFE RETURN OF UNSOLICITED MATERIALS. ALL LETTERS AND PICTURES SENT TO SAVVY™ WILL BE TREATED AS INTENDED FOR PUBLICATION AND ARE SUBJECT TO SAVVY'S™ UNRESTRICTED RIGHT TO EDIT OR TO COMMENT EDITORIALLY. 201 E. MARKHAM ST. SUITE 200, LITTLE ROCK, AR 72201 501-375-2985. ALL CONTENTS ©2014 SAVVY™


THESAVVYMOMS.COM | DECEMBER 2014

11


contributors DECEMBER 2014

KD REEP

is a writer and public relations practitioner in Little Rock. She owns Flywrite Communications, Inc., a public relations agency, and is the PR director for Mass Enthusiasm, a full-service marketing communications firm in Little Rock.

MATTHEW COOPER

is executive chef at Cache Restaurant in Little Rock and owner of Dandelion Herbs, Spices, Teas. He is an Arkansas native and grew up in a family of food technologists and educators. He graduated from the Western Culinary Institute in Portland, Oregon (Le Cordon Bleu Schools Northwest). His cooking style revolves around rustic and traditional cuisine, focusing on local and sustainable ingredients. He and his wife, Priscilla, have a 9-year-old daughter, Lillian, who hopes to be a pastry chef when she grows up.

DWAIN HEBDA

is a writer and editor living in Little Rock. He and his wife Darlene are the parents of four grown children. The empty-nesters spend their time traveling, working out and spoiling their two dogs.

CHARLIE SIMPSON

12 DECEMBER 2014 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM

KELLI MARKS

opened Sweet Love in January of 2012 with the idea that treats can both feed a sweet tooth as well as the soul. Her first foray into elaborate decorated cakes came with her grandparents’ 50th anniversary, where she embarked upon the world of cake, fondant and royal icing, creating an edible masterpiece to feed over 200 guests. More than 10 years later, Kelli continues to astound with culinary creations that are as delicious as they are beautiful.

is a licensed marriage and family therapist for the Arkansas Relationship Counseling Center.


GRANTING EVERY HOLIDAY WISH THIS SEASON. Whether you need the perfect venue for a holiday party, catering for your seasonal event, or simply want a cozy place to connect with friends over great food and cocktails this season, Savoy is your complete holiday resource. Call us to plan your party today.

1620 Market Street | Little Rock, AR 72211 501 221 1620 | 1620SAVOY.COM THESAVVYMOMS.COM | DECEMBER 2014

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nest | Thrive | NOSH | CULTIVATE

NEST PARENTING | FAMILY

LET IT GO!

Is it time to land the helicopter and let kids make their own mistakes? See how your parenting style affects their decision making today and as they grow up BY CHARLIE SIMPSON, LPC, LMFT

Do you find yourself straddling the line between helping and hovering? Are you often trying to “save” your child or keep him or her from making a mistake? When your child has a task to complete how many times have you found yourself dictating instructions rather than encouraging the children to figure it out on their own? Let me begin by saying that it’s ok to allow kids to fail. Hearing this may bring discomfort to some parents and cause them to disregard the remainder of this article. But I urge you to remember that kids will soon become adults, and they will require self confidence in order to make the best decisions without help from their parents. Your job is to prepare them to do that, not to keep them from making mistakes. To know when to let a child make mistakes requires parents to understand their parenting style. Following are the four styles that I have seen in my practice.

14 DECEMBER 2014 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM

AUTHORITARIAN These parents utilize their authority and a “do as I say” mentality when parenting. It’s difficult to give up control, leading to power struggles between parents and children. Children typically are not allowed to make personal mistakes since the parents will make choices for them. This results in the child not learning how to take responsibility very well as an adult. The best time to utilize this technique is when your child is in immediate danger and there is no time to process or analyze the situation. Be an authoritarian when a decision must be made that protects the child and creates a foundation for respecting boundaries.

PERMISSIVE People who parent with this style encourage their children to accomplish whatever they set their minds to and support their children in these endeavors. Sounds very encouraging, right? But there is a down side. Permissive parents often have challenges with setting boundaries and following through


with restrictions. Children may feel unloved due to poor restrictions and may not mature as well. Children will have opportunities to make mistakes but will not receive the nurturing they need in order to learn from their mistakes in a positive way. Once these children enter adulthood they may struggle with personal goals and become discouraged when failure occurs. If they fail, they may seek attention from others for inspiration.

AUTHORITATIVE This parenting style is a combination of authoritarian and permissive. Parents with this style typically find a balance with parenting depending on the situation. Children are able to venture out and experiment, yet have restrictions when necessary. These children tend to be the happiest, most confident and are more self assured. Parents will allow their children to make mistakes and provide reassurance to help build their character. Parents are not afraid to watch their children fail since they can build their children back up. Children with authoritative parents learn responsibility well in adulthood through making mistakes and having nurturing parents. UNINVOLVED These parents are normally

CHILDREN WITH AUTHORITATIVE PARENTS LEARN RESPONSIBILITY WELL IN ADULTHOOD THROUGH MAKING MISTAKES AND HAVING NURTURING PARENTS.

not involved with their children’s decisions. They may not be very responsive to children’s needs or they may be absent for a period of time, perhaps during a military deployment or when battling a se-

rious illness. In some instances the children are raised by grandparents, older siblings or themselves. These children may struggle with selfconfidence as adults. They are forced to learn through trial and error how to navigate through adulthood. Many mistakes are made and it’s often up to them to understand the mistake and not repeat it. That’s not to say that parents can’t still play a role in their child’s development. They can provide reassurance that they will return and try to stay connected. This is a time when other caring adults, such as scout leaders, teachers, church members and others can fill the gap and provide support. Now that we understand the parenting styles it’s important to determine which one identifies you. The important component with teaching responsibility and allowing children to learn from mistakes is finding balance with each style. There are times when you might display each parenting style, even uninvolved, and develop well-rounded children who learn responsibility at early ages. In general, don’t be fearful of allowing children to learn the hard way. Be careful and strategic on when to utilize certain parenting styles and your child will be ok.

Charlie Simpson is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist for the Arkansas Relationship Counseling Center. http://arkansasrelationshipcounseling.com.

2 PM, Saturday, Dec. 6 Children’s Department Make decorations for our tree and take some home for your tree, too!

A T

R

Y

LAMAN LIBRARY

W I L L I A M F. L A M A N P U B L I C L I B R A R Y S Y S T E M 2801 ORANGE STREET • NORTH LITTLE ROCK 5 0 1 - 7 5 8 -1 7 2 0 • W W W. L A M A N L I B R A R Y. O R G THESAVVYMOMS.COM | DECEMBER 2014

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THRIVE Fashion | lifestyle | health

GET COZY!

The chill outside means it’s time to snuggle up in festive PJs and loungewear BY MEL JONES • PHOTOGRAPHY BY SARA BLANCETT CO N TIN UED O N PAGE 18

16 DECEMBER 2014 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM


they’re here..... The perfect present is a discovery away!

Find fun and unique gifts for any age or give the gift of a museum membership

Save the Date! Science with Santa

Step inside Santa’s science lab to explore his favorite toys and participate in some wacky and wintery science experiments! Visitors will also get their pictures taken with Santa! Saturday, December 6; 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

THESAVVYMOMS.COM | DECEMBER 2014 17 500 President Clinton Ave Little Rock, AR 72201 www.museumofdiscovery.org 501.396.7050


nest | Thrive | NOSH | CULTIVATE Continued from page 16

Mom Jenny Brown Bradford’s laidback look by Urban MuuMuu is perfect for lounging. The supersoft knee-length tunic, from Haus Werk in Little Rock, boasts inset pockets, and is also available in a fulllength style. Son Bo, 8, and daughter Ellyson, 10, are ready for Christmas morning in Sara’s Prints pajamas from Whippersnappers in Little Rock. Bo’s green-and-white striped long john PJs have a Santa appliqué front and center, while Ellyson is stylish in a modern chevron print in traditional holiday hues. PREVIOUS PAGE: Ellyson gets caught jumping around before bed. Classic red polka dot gown by Sara’s Prints from Whippersnappers.

18 DECEMBER 2014 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM


nest | Thrive | NOSH | CULTIVATE Jenny, Ellyson and Bo keep cozy by the fireplace. Bo and Ellyson wear matching PJs by Tom & Jerry from The Toggery in Little Rock. Jenny’s flannel PJ Salvage set features Santa’s favorite couple—milk and cookies—and is available at Bella Boutique in Little Rock.

www.icm-inc.org • 501-228-0063

from your friends at icm

Like us on facebook Come visit our new home at 1525 Merrill Drive, Little Rock, AR 72211! THESAVVYMOMS.COM | DECEMBER 2014

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nest | Thrive | NOSH | CULTIVATE

Holiday 2014

GIFT GUIDE ARKANSASMADE GIFTS FOR EVERY MOM ON YOUR LIST

PHOTOS BY BRIAN CHILSON

Handcrafted by Little Rock artisan Julie Holt, these colorful clay Christmas trees are available in a variety of sizes and one-of-a-kind styles, and are sure to impart a touch of whimsy to your holiday dĂŠcor. Box Turtle.

20 DECEMBER 2014 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM


Santa at the Center December 6, 13, 20 • 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. William J. Clinton Presidential Center

FREE

1200 President Clinton Ave Little Rock, AR 72201 • 501-374-4242 www.clintonpresidentialcenter.org

We love this vintage St. Francis of Assisi pendant, and so will your favorite animal lover. Bella Vita Jewelry.

This Christmas, Give The Gift Of Music Little Rock Jams Gift Certificates

One Month Of Lessons For $99

Lessons For:

info@littlerockjams.com www.littlerockjams.com 501-312-1800

Guitar, Piano Bass, Voice & Drums

Candace McCray of CC Creations makes painted signs from wood that has been hand-distressed, and this Arkansas sign is just right for moms who want to show some Natural State pride. Full Moon.

Merry Christmas & Happy New Year! A pediatric therapy program specializing in the evaluation and treatment of sensory processing and feeding disorders. Specialized, comprehensive treatment in the A pediatric therapy program specializing A pediatric therapy program specializing in the One-on-one consultation and training evaluation andparent treatment of sensory processing evaluation and treatment of sensory processing Intensive home programming and feeding disorders. and feeding disorders. Specialized, comprehensive treatment One-on-one parent Call usconsultation todaytreatment at and training Specialized, Intensivecomprehensive home programming

(501) 315-4414 One-on-one parent consultation and training Intensive home programming for more Call us today atinformation! (501) 315-4414 for more information!

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(501) 315-4414 300S. Rodney Parham Ste. 12 • Little Rock for more information!

www.kidsourcetherapy.com 17706 I-30 Frontage Rd Ste. 4 • Benton 300 S. Rodney Parham Ste. 12 • Little Rock

www.kidsourcetherapy.com

THESAVVYMOMS.COM | DECEMBER 2014

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nest | Thrive | NOSH | CULTIVATE

Holiday 2014

GIFT GUIDE

From ArkieStyle in North Little Rock, this multicolor glitter and resin ring encased in a vintage brass setting will add instant sparkle to any outfit. Box Turtle.

From Myrrh Handmade Jewelry by Michelle Rhodes of Little Rock, this small layering necklace and one-of-akind dangle earrings with red beads are simply stylish. Ember.

Hand-poured in Helena, these ‘Gentleman’ and ‘December’ candles from the WAX Candle Company are packaged in cup-size Mason jars with galvanized lids. Domestic Domestic.

22 DECEMBER 2014 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM


nest | Thrive | NOSH | CULTIVATE

The delicate scrollwork of these vintage earrings from Bella Vita add instant elegance to any ensemble.

Keep knives sharp with a soft bench stone from Dan’s Whetstone Company. Handcrafted in Percy, the stones are available in a variety of grades and sizes, and include a wooden box for storage and display. Domestic Domestic.

Inspired by the Mexican Discada, Blue Moon Disk’s cooking disks are handcrafted from old, discarded farm plow blades, and have horseshoes for handles. Made in Little Rock since 2009. A variety of seasonings are also available. Eggshells Kitchen Co.

THESAVVYMOMS.COM | DECEMBER 2014

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nest | Thrive | NOSH | CULTIVATE

Holiday 2014

GIFT GUIDE

In addition to being beautifully crafted, Shawn’s Pottery by Shawn Johnson in Jonesboro is also dishwasher-, oven- and microwave-safe. The Full Moon.

From September cover mom Korto Momolu, this vibrant purple sweater is smartly cropped and boasts a classic cowl neck. Box Turtle.

24 DECEMBER 2014 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM

Honor her hometown, the tropical island where she said “I do” or her favorite place to get away with these unique coordinates necklaces by Joella Peck. Box Turtle.


How does a cHild tell you wHat’s wrong before sHe learns How to speak?

At 18 months, children are expected to use five to 10 words, and 300 words by age 3. So a delay at 18 months that goes undetected will have adverse effects on later development. That’s why ACCESS provides Early Intervention Early Childhood Therapy. With neurodevelopmental therapy techniques, coordination and phonation, and training in vision and learning orientation, your child can continue to reach those crucial milestones. Your child may be eligible for state and/or federal funding for medical expenses. Let us help you find which option is best for you. 501-217-8600

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Developmental Preschool & Outpatient Therapy Services

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www.Helpinghandcc.com • 501-791-3331 4901 North Shore Dr • North Little Rock Helping Hand Learning Center Is A 501 (C)(3) Non-Profit

THESAVVYMOMS.COM | DECEMBER 2014

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Holiday nest | Thrive | NOSH | CULTIVATE

2014

GIFT GUIDE

Whether she’s a dog lover or a #dogmom, these stone coasters, made by Forgetmeknots in Little Rock, are emblazoned with sweet sentiments that are sure to please. The Dog Bowl.

This charcoal gray scarf from Sybil C. Knits in Little Rock is festooned with poms with colorful strands woven throughout its fringe-y style. Haus Werk.

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE ARTISANS

Wax Candle Company waxcandlecompany.com Blue Moon Disk Co. bluemoondisk.com Myrrh Handmade Jewelry https://www.etsy.com/shop/MyrrhHandmadeJewelry Korto Momolu kortomomolu.com Julie Holt http://julieholtstudio.blogspot.com/ Joella Peck joellapeckoriginals.com ArkieStyle arkiestyle.com CC Creations facebook.com/buycccreations Bella Vita Jewelry http://bellavitajewelry.blogspot.com/ Special thanks to The Social Type for the gift wrap used as a background throughout the gift guide.

@HistoricArk

26 DECEMBER 2014 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM


sick as a dog? Come see us at Velocity Care, your neighborhood walk-in urgent care clinic for non-life-threatening injuries and illnesses. With our board-certified, emergency medicine physicians, you couldn’t ask for better care. So walk in, see a doctor now and start feeling better right away.

ER doctors without the ER wait EXPRESS CHECK-IN at www.VelocityCare.com

11600 Chenal Pkwy. (Next to the Purple Cow)

501-221-1160

Zoo membership is a gift that gives and gives. When you give a membership to the Little Rock Zoo, you do two good deeds with one gift. You give family and friends hours and hours of fun. AND you help fund the Zoo’s crucial mission of wildlife conservation and education.

Give one gift that helps both humans and animals! Get all the great details at www.littlerockzoo.com/membership or at Guest Services at the Zoo’s main entrance. Or call (501) 661-7218 with questions.

www.littlerockzoo.com #1 Zoo Drive | Little Rock, Arkansas | 501.666.2406 Like us on Facebook!

THESAVVYMOMS.COM | DECEMBER 2014

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NOSH COOKING | DINING | NUTRITION

HOLIDAY SWEETS

From decadent desserts to fun and easy food gifts, we’ve got you covered with the best seasonal eats and treats PHOTOGRAPHY BY SARA BLANCETT

BANANA CAKE ROLL WITH CARAMEL FROSTING AND CANDIED ALMOND TOPPING RECIPE BY MATTHEW COOPER

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nest | Thrive | NOSH | CULTIVATE

BANANA CAKE ROLL 3 eggs 1 cup sugar 2/3 cup mashed ripe banana 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 3/4 cup all purpose flour 1/2 teaspoon baking powder 1/2 teaspoon baking soda 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg 1/4 teaspoon salt Powdered sugar 1 recipe caramel buttercream 1/2 recipe candied almonds (optional) Chocolate drizzle (optional) White chocolate drizzle (optional) 1. Preheat oven to 350°F 2. Grease and line a 15”x10” pan with parchment 3. Beat together eggs and sugar until smooth 4. Add banana and vanilla 5. Sift together flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt and spices 6. Add flour mixture a little at a time 7. Spread evenly into baking pan 8. Bake 15 to 17 minutes or until cake springs back. 9. White cake bakes, line a piece of parchment or a towel with sifted powdered sugar. 10. After cake is done, carefully loosen and turn the cake onto the paper and roll the cake and towel up together. Let cool.

CARAMEL BUTTERCREAM

Rhea

Drug Store A Traditional Pharmacy with eclectic Gifts. Since 1922 2801 Kavanaugh Little Rock • 501.663.4131

2 cups butter, room temperature 1 pound confection sugar 1/2 cup of your favorite caramel sauce 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 pinch salt 1. Beat butter until light and fluffy, 3 to 5 minutes. 2. Reduce speed and add sugar, followed by caramel, vanilla and salt. 3. Scrape down sides as needed.

CANDIED ALMOND SLICES 1 egg white 2 cup sliced almonds 1-11/2 cups sugar 1. Whisk egg white until bubbly. 2. Add almonds and toss. 3. Sprinkle sugar on top and toss until well combined. 4.Line a baking sheet with parchment or a silicone sheet. Spread almonds out evenly. 5. Bake at 350°F for 5 to 7 minutes, or until golden. 6. Cool and store in a sealed container until ready to use.

ASSEMBLY 1. After cake has cooled, carefully unroll cake. 2. Spread half the caramel buttercream frosting onto cake and roll it up. 3. Cover and secure the cake roll in the towel, and chill 15 to 30 minutes. 4.Remove the towel and frost the outside of the cake with the remaining frosting. 5. Carefully sprinkle and top the cake with candied almonds. 6. If you desire, drizzle the top with dark and white chocolate. 7. Chill and enjoy.

Carols, Cookies and Family Fun! Sunday, December 7, 1 – 4:30 p.m. Free Admission

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nest | Thrive | NOSH | CULTIVATE C O N T I NU ED FROM PAGE 2 9

CINNAMON-SUGAR ALMONDS RECIPE BY MEL JONES

1/3 cup unsalted butter 2 eggs whites 1 pinch salt 1 cup sugar 4 teaspoons cinnamon 4 cups almonds 1. Preheat oven to 325째F. 2. Melt butter in baking pan for 5 to 7 minutes. 3. Beat eggs whites with salt until soft peaks form.

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4. Add in sugar and beat until stiff peaks form. 5.Fold in cinnamon and almonds, and stir until completely coated. 6. Pour over butter in baking pan, and stir to coat. 7. Cook at 325째F for 45 minutes, stirring every 10 to 15 minutes. 8. Let cool and break apart large pieces onto a parchmentlined baking sheet. 9. Store in airtight container until ready to serve. Package in bags, tins or jars for quick and easy gifts for friends and family.


SOCIALLY

Regardless of age, LIFE is meant to be

ENJOYED.

F I N D

U S

O N

Children’s Mental Health Services • Psychological Evaluations & Psychiatric Services • Mental Health Paraprofessional Intervention • School-based Services • Family Therapy • Play Therapy To ensure your child’s well being, visit us online at familiesinc.net, where you can learn more about our children’s services.

YOU’RE INVITED TO

Breakfast In Bethlehem It’s Beginning To Look A Lot Like Christmas! Pulaski Heights United Methodist Church

1200 James Street Jacksonville, AR 72076 Toll-free: 877.595.8869 501.982.5000

4823 Woodlawn · Hillcrest

Start A New Career As A Home Caregiver Classes For 2015 Now Forming The field of home care is exploding with opportunities for adults who want to earn an income while making a difference in the lives of others. Schmieding Home Caregiver Training is a proven program.

Family Christmas Eve Service

AN LIVE IMA L S!

(501) 664-3600

December 24, 4pm

For a complete schedule of our Advent Calendar go to phumc.com.

Both services will be held in the Great Hall off Lee St. - Entrance 10.

Lifeway Pulaskiwho County You don’istseeking smoke,coalition but you’members re aroundinpeople do. to join in our efforts to educate the community about the dangers of smoking. Interested in volunteering?

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Help Arkansas Fight every year from exposure to secondhand smoke. Against Smoking…

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• No experience necessary • Small class sizes • Close to home Learn more today at www.arcaregiving.org. Call 501-526-6500 to register.

Sponsored by phyouth & PHKidz!

Saturday, December 6 · 8:00-10:00am Free breakfast, crafts & a journey through the Christmas Story!

REFER YOUR LOVED ONE TO THE QUIT LINE TODAY! CALL. IT’S FREE. 1-800-QUIT-NOW 1-800-784-8669

Steve Del Rio Schmieding home caregiver Training Program Supported by a grant from the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation.

Faith Lutheran Church 7525 West Markham Little Rock

501-920-2531

THESAVVYMOMS.COM | DECEMBER 2014

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Kelli Marks, owner of Sweet Love bakery in Little Rock, shares tips that will have you decorating cookies like a pro From Santa and snowmen to snowflakes, trees and stars, decorated cookies are a must-have at Christmas. Kelli Marks, owner of Sweet Love bakery in Little Rock, shows us how to dress up sugar cookies for the holidays.

PHOTOS BY BRIAN CHILSON

DELICIOUS DECORATING

EVERYTHING FOR YOUR PERFECT HOLIDAY CELEBRATION! SERVEWARE, TABLEWARE, DECORATIONS, & MORE STARTING AT JUST

32 DECEMBER 2014 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM

1

$ .49


nest | Thrive | NOSH | CULTIVATE

1

2

3

4

5

6

1. Begin with completely cooled cookies that have a nice golden edge. Underbaked cookies fall apart and won’t hold icing and decorations. You also don’t want cookies that are too crunchy. 2. Have a general idea of what you want your cookies to look like before you get started, and make sure your icing and decorations ready to go. Marks recommends investing in pastry bags, plus three or four different sized tips. She finds a lot of her decorating supplies locally at Vanness in Little Rock. 3. Use a light touch when outlining. Hover just above the surface and outline your cookie, touching down on the corners as you go. Marks uses a basic royal icing recipe that she modified a bit to ensure the icing glides easily.

11218 N. RODNEY PARHAM RD. / LITTLE ROCK

501.223.4929

4. Working within the outline, completely fill in the cookie with icing. If you aren’t comfortable using a pastry bag, Marks suggests dunking your cookies in a plate of icing instead. It’s an easy way to decorate solid, one-color cookies like our tree, and a good way to get the kids involved, too. 5. Begin adding decorations as soon as you finish filling in your cookie. Marks says decorations stick best on just-applied icing, and it’s easier than trying to put them on with icing later. Kids will love using sprinkles, colored sugars, nonpareils and other fun toppings to decorate the cookies. 6. Resist temptation and let cookies sit for 24 hours before you stack them on a plate or tray, so as not to damage your hard work.

4822 N. HILLS BLVD. / NORTH LITTLE ROCK

501.978.3154

THESAVVYMOMS.COM | DECEMBER 2014

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Allison and Adam Gladden, with their 2-year-old son, Bob, only look unassuming—their family Christmas gathering is known as the “Holiday Battledome.”

Emphasizing

“CHANGE” in Gift Exchange It didn’t begin as an all-out brawl, but in the spirit of the holidays, it became the Gladdens’ most favorite family tradition BY KD REEP PHOTOS BY KAREN SEGRAVE

THESAVVYMOMS.COM | DECEMBER 2014

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Allison adds the finishing touch to her traditional holiday mantel dĂŠcor. FACING PAGE: Allison and Bob take time out for a Christmas story.

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“Holiday Battledome” is how Allison and Adam Gladden and their 2-year-old son, Bob, refer to it. “On Adam’s side of the family, we do a big group gathering, which is held before Christmas,” Allison explains. “It started in Osceola at his grandparents then eventually moved to his aunt’s home in Wilson. Last year, it was held at a younger cousin’s house near Searcy.” The Gladden Gathering involves a potluck, which always includes tiny egg salad sandwiches among the broad range of nibbles. About 30 people attend the celebration, 10 of whom are children. “There is lots of running in and out of the house and near-misses with the Christmas tree,” Allison says. The first item of business is to eat. Afterward, the Gladdens get down to serious gift business. “The gathering first started in the late 1950s by Adam’s grandparents, Olen and Bertha,” Allison says. “At the end of each gathering, everyone drew the name of the person for whom they would buy a gift the following year. At some point after Adam’s grandma passed away in the late 1990s, it turned into a Santa exchange.” This exchange begins when the Gladden kids get toys, which are “generally broken, missing or being used as weapons within 20 minutes,” Allison says. Once the kids are distracted with their gifts, the Gladden adults draw numbers for the gift exchange. “There’s usually one number missing, or two people have the same number. Our particular branch of the family—the Jerry Gladden Family—may be responsible for it turning into Holiday Battledome,” Allison says. Adam attributes this switch to himself, his parents Jerry and Linda, and his brother Michael. According to Adam, after one year of polite swapping, they engineered a system by which they would pass gifts back and forth to each other to ensure they got what they wanted. After that year, everyone else at the gathering caught on, and the exchange became an all-out competition. “It’s all in good fun, but that won’t stop someone from literally prying a gift out of your hands or hiding it behind the chair in hopes that you’ll forget about stealing it,” Allison says. “One year, there was nearly a physical altercation over a pink Snuggie. But when the dust settles, and the last gift card has been stolen, the boys end up outside playing football like when they were kids.” Allison’s side of the family has their own traditions, too. Her favorite tradition is helping her mom decorate the tree, but she notes just how particular her mother, Pam, can be about where the decorations are placed. “Out of 10 ornaments I put on the tree, maybe one stays where I put it,” Allison says. “She’s so particular, in fact, she had to get a second tree. The first one goes in the living room, and it is always gorgeous. The second one goes in the den, and that’s where all the other ornaments go, like the ones I made as a child. I suspect, though, that if Bob makes her an ornament, it will be front and center on the tree in the living room.” The Gladdens have used their families’ unique take on the holidays to form their own. After Bob arrived on the scene, Allison and Adam get him an ornament that relates to the Halloween costume he wore that year. The one thing that ties all their traditions together, though, is what Allison and Adam cherish most — laughter. “I think what makes the holidays special for me is the soundtrack of our gatherings,” Allison says. “From the moment we are all together, we are laughing and telling stories. I have loved getting to know more about Adam’s family in that way, and for Adam, I think it has become even more special since we had Bob. It doesn’t feel like that long ago to him that he was a kid, playing with his cousins, and it’s nice to think that someday Bob will be standing in a kitchen somewhere with his family, maybe having that same feeling. This year will be a little bittersweet for the Gladdens, because it will be the first Christmas they will have without Adam’s mom, Linda. “She loved that gift exchange,” Allison says. “But, we’ll remember her in the ornaments, food, stories, jokes and gifts we’ll share. And by ‘share,’ I mean ‘steal.’”

— ALLISON GLADDEN

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Chris, Aiden, Mia, Zoe and Tina McMillen—as well as one of the family’s miniature schnauzers—enjoy the holiday season and all of its opportunities for making new memories together.

If the conventional wisdom is true that family is made up of those you love and not by blood, Chris and Tina McMillen’s family is a shining example THESAVVYMOMS.COM | DECEMBER 2014

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Mia’s heritage has brought a new perspective to the family’s celebrations.

40 DECEMBER 2014 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM


TOP ROW, LEFT TO RIGHT: Zoe’s stocking boasts a zebra print and hot-pink accents. Mom Tina, Mia and Zoe show off their Christmas PJs. Chris and Aiden take turns choosing ornaments for the family’s eclectic tree. BOTTOM ROW, LEFT TO RIGHT: The Advent calendar is filled with fun activities the family can do together. Mia ponders an ornament selection. This camper ornament is Chris’ favorite because it belonged to his grandmother. A single father with a 5-year-old son named Aiden, Chris McMillen was working full time and attending college classes when he met Tina in 2001. Four years later, they welcomed their blue-eyed, blonde daughter Zoe, but something told them their family unit wasn’t quite complete. “God impressed upon my heart to adopt,” Tina says. “And while I looked at agencies here and several other countries, I always came back to South Korea.” On December 5, 2008, the McMillens gathered at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport to welcome a 9-month-old daughter from South Korea. “Mia’s gotcha day still makes the hair stand up on my arms,” Chris says. “We were all so excited. Zoe kept saying, ‘Where’s my sister? I don’t think my sister’s ever going to get here.’ But when Mia walked out of the gate with her escort, it really was like she was being born into our family.” While the McMillens already had some holiday traditions in place—an advent calendar that both Tina and Chris carried with them from their childhoods— Mia’s heritage brought a new perspective to the family’s celebrations. “Tina created Christmas stockings for each of us, and they reflect our personalities in some way,” Chris says. “Aidan’s is all rock ’n’ roll, Zoe’s is zebra print and all about dance, mine is argyle. Mia’s is based on her hanbok.” A hanbok is the traditional South Korean dress often characterized by vibrant colors and simple lines without pockets. It’s worn as a semi-formal or formal dress during traditional South Korean festivals and celebrations, like a baby’s first birthday, known as dol. “Mia’s Christmas stocking is a way for all of us to acknowledge her Korean heritage while honoring our Christian traditions,” Tina says. “Chris and I try to make everything we do at Christmas about the family. We recognize each of our indi-

vidual tastes because it’s important for us all to know that we are unique, but we do it in such a way that we reinforce we also make up one family.” This includes new pajamas they all get to open on Christmas Eve, and a daily activity they get to do together. “The girls get to trade days during Advent because, otherwise, they would fight over who gets to open that day’s gift,” Chris says. “Instead of candy or a tiny present, the days of the calendar are filled with something we can all do, like go get ice cream in our PJs or watch a Christmas movie together, or make something like brownies or ornaments.” After Christmas, the McMillens have another tradition based on the Lunar New Year. Korean New Year is a three-day family holiday that generally falls on the day of the second new moon after winter solstice. Many South Koreans celebrate the holiday by returning to their hometowns to visit parents and other relatives. The McMillens have incorporated these aspects into their own family tradition by writing wishes and attaching them to lanterns, which they release over the lake. “In South Korea, they call this lighting of a moon house,” Chris says. “It symbolizes warding off bad or evil spirits for the New Year, and hoping for the wishes we make to come true. It’s really pretty watching those lanterns float over the lake and thinking about all the things that happened that year and what we hope happens in the next.” Tina and Chris both hope they can take Aidan, 19; Zoe, 11; and Mia, 6; to South Korea one day to celebrate the Lunar New Year in the most authentic way possible. “It’s definitely on our bucket list,” Chris says. “Until then, we’ll keep wearing our new PJs each Christmas Eve, fighting over who gets to open the Advent calendar that particular day and enjoying our custom-made Christmas stockings.” THESAVVYMOMS.COM | DECEMBER 2014

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ARKANSAS TRAIL OF HOLIDAY LIGHTS No matter where you are in Arkansas, there’s a beautiful holiday light display to behold. From illuminated town squares to towering decorated trees and even drive-thru light displays, you’ll find it on the Arkansas Trail of Holiday Lights. Visit http://www.arkansas.com/places-to-go/trail-of-lights/ to see what’s near you!

THE VELVETEEN RABBIT

NOV. 28-DEC. 21, FRIDAYS 7 P.M. | SATURDAYS 2 P.M. & 4 P.M. SUNDAYS 2 P.M., THE CHILDREN’S THEATRE

COURTESY ARKANSAS ARTS CENTER

“What is real?” the Velveteen Rabbit asks his strange new friend. “Real is something that happens to you when a child loves you for a long, long, time—not just to play with—but really loves you,” the old Skin Horse replies. From this moment on, the timid toy bunny longs for only one thing in the world—to become real. Visit arkarts.com for more information.

HOLIDAYS IN THE PARK

NOV. 29, 2014-JAN. 3, 2015, LITTLE ROCK From a nightly light display complete with animation and music to the annual Little Rock Big Jingle Jubilee Holiday Parade on Saturday December 6, the Riverfront Park and downtown Little Rock area will be bustling with holiday activity all season long. In west Little Rock, visit The Promenade at Chenal and see the spectacular 24-foot animated tree and light display. The animated tree performs hourly from 5 p.m.-11 p.m. through January 1. For a compete list of events visit holidaysinlittlerock.com.

ELF

DEC. 3, 2014-JAN. 4, 2015, ARKANSAS REPERTORY THEATRE, LITTLE ROCK

Holiday

HAPPENINGS OUR PICKS FOR COOL TO-DOS AROUND CENTRAL ARKANSAS for a complete calendar of events, visit our website at thesavvymoms.com.

Adapted by Thomas Meehan and Bob Martin from the popular 2003 film starring Will Ferrell, with a score by Tony®-nominated songwriting team of Matthew Sklar and Chad Beguelin, Elf turns one of Hollywood’s most beloved holiday hits into a hilarious and heartwarming musical that towers above the rest. For more information, visit therep.com.

THE ARKANSAS CRAFT GUILD’S 36TH ANNUAL CHRISTMAS SHOWCASE DEC. 5-7, HOURS VARY. GOVERNORS’ HALL II AT THE STATEHOUSE CONVENTION CENTER, LITTLE ROCK

This holiday shopping extravaganza features quality art and fine crafts, both traditional and contemporary, by members of the Arkansas Craft Guild and their guests. Over 100 artists offer a unique array of fine handcrafted work including pottery, woodworking, fiber art, glass, photography, jewelry, gourmet foods and much more. Free admission Saturday morning from 8 a.m.-10 a.m. for The Early Bird Shoppers Special. Visit arkansascraftguild.org for more information.

CHILDREN’S CRAFTS: GOING WILD FOR A NATURAL HOLIDAY

DEC. 6, 3 P.M.-5 P.M., MILLSAP BRIDE’S HALL AT GARVAN WOODLAND GARDENS, HOT SPRINGS

Bring the kids for loads of fun making striking ornaments of natural materials with resident artist Suzie Burch. Each ornament will be on display in the Gardens until New Year’s Eve! Visit garvangardens.org or call 800-366-4664 for more information. C ON T I N U E D ON PAGE 4 4

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THESAVVYMOMS.COM | DECEMBER 2014

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COURTESY HISTORIC ARKANSAS MUSEUM

The Historic Arkansas Museum will be serving it’s famous ginger cake at the Christmas Frolic on December 7. CONT I N U E D FR O M PA GE 4 2

47TH ANNUAL CHRISTMAS FROLIC & OPEN HOUSE

DEC. 7, 1 P.M.-4 P.M., HISTORIC ARKANSAS MUSEUM, LITTLE ROCK This free event celebrates Christmas as it was in the 1800s with living history, carols, reenactments, live music, dancing and more. Don’t miss the famous hot cider and ginger cake, as well as Arkansas-made holiday shopping in the Museum Store. For more information, visit historicarkansas.org.

HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE

DEC. 7, 1 P.M.-4:30 P.M., OLD STATE HOUSE MUSEUM, LITTLE ROCK The traditions of joyous family holiday celebrations past can be relived at Holiday Open House. Visitors will find the Old State House colorfully decorated for the season. Fun, hands-on activities will be available to children, and delightful carols will be performed by local music groups. Admission is free. Visit oldstatehouse.org for more information.

sic, strolling carolers and a special live Christmas concert at Villa Marre at 3:30 p.m. Two trolley buses will run continually, stopping at each home for tourists to hop on or off. A Christmas Market and room full of complimentary holiday refreshments round out the package. Visit http://qqumc.org/citq/ for more information.

CHRISTMAS YULE LOG CULINARY CLASS

DEC. 9, 5 P.M., PULASKI TECHNICAL COLLEGE, NORTH LITTLE ROCK Want to make a delicious centerpiece cake for your holiday parties? Roll up the perfect chocolate yule log and decorate with edible marzipan ornaments including holly leaves, bows, mushrooms and a sweet little reindeer! All supplies are included and students will take home a decorated 12-inch yule log. $75. Visit pulaskitech.edu for more information.

CHRISTMAS IN THE QUARTER 2014

LIVE AT LAMAN: A NIGHT OF HOLIDAY CHEER WITH KEMISTRI, FEATURING NICKY PARRISH AND RODNEY BLOCK

Step back a couple of centuries without leaving Little Rock by touring the holiday-decorated homes and church, and enjoy appetizers, beverages and live mu-

This month’s can’t-miss Live at Laman concert will feature a special holiday concert with award-winning artists Nicky Parrish and Rodney Block.

DEC. 7, 2 P.M.-4 P.M., QUAPAW QUARTER UNITED METHODIST CHURCH, LITTLE ROCK

44 DECEMBER 2014 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM

DEC. 11, 7 P.M., WILLIAM F. LAMAN PUBLIC LIBRARY, NORTH LITTLE ROCK


MAKING THE ACT AS EASY AS ABC. ONLINE AND LIVE!

COURTESY CAPITAL HOTEL

ACT PREP CLASSES DECEMBER 5, 6 & 7 JANUARY 31, FEBRUARY 1 & 2

CHRISTMAS AT THE CAPITAL HOTEL The Capital Hotel has lots of opportunities to see Santa throughout the month of December.

DEC. 7, 14 & 21, 12 P.M.-2:30 P.M.: SUNDAYS WITH SANTA DEC. 13. 1:30 P.M.-3:30 P.M.: TEDDY BEAR TEA DEC. 19, 5:30-7:30 P.M.: ARKANSAS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA VIOLINS BEGIN AT 5:30 P.M. DEC. 20, 11:30 A.M.-1:30 P.M.: GINGERBREAD WORKSHOP BEGINS AT 10:30 A.M. DEC. 22, 6 P.M.-8 P.M.: STORIES WITH SANTA

• Easy way to prep • Class is scheduled close to test date so info will be fresh • Affordable • We focus on what the ACT is and how to prep for it • We break down all four subjects and show you specific strategies for each subject • It’s online so you prep from the convenience of your home • It’s live so you can ask questions at any time.

SPACE IS LIMITED SO SIGN UP NOW! CALL 888-8MY-MATH TODAY! YOU GET EIGHT TOTAL HOURS OF PREPARATION SPREAD OUT OVER THREE DAYS FOR $399

THE NUTCRACKER

DEC. 12, 7:30 P.M.; DEC. 13, 2 P.M. & 7:30 P.M.; DEC. 14, 2 P.M. MAUMELLE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER Nothing brings the magic of the holiday season to life better than the world’s favorite ballet, The Nutcracker! Join Ballet Arkansas as they ring in the holidays with Tchaikovsky’s magical score performed by Arkansas Symphony Orchestra. With enchanting costumes and original choreography, the tradition of The Nutcracker will create unforgettable memories for children of every generation.

ARKANSAS’ LARGEST PUBLIC MENORAH LIGHTING

DEC. 16, 5:30 P.M., CENTENNIAL BANK AT BOWMAN & CHENAL, LITTLE ROCK Join the Jewish Federation of Arkansas on the first evening of Chanukkah for the lighting ceremony of Arkansas’ Largest Public Menorah. Enjoy music, hot latkes, gelt and more.

www.awesomescores.com THESAVVYMOMS.COM | DECEMBER 2014

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nest | Thrive | NOSH | CULTIVATE

CULTIVATE

PHOTOS COURTESY ARKANSAS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

ARTS | EDUCATION | PHILANTHROPY

SNEAKING A SYMPHONY INTO CHILDREN’S ACTIVITIES Parents make music part of special events and everyday life for their kids

Since the beginning of parenthood, almost every son and daughter has uttered three words that resonate with dread: “Mom, I’m bored!” Common solutions are: 1) find a new use for old toys, which shortly results in more boredom; 2) ignore until the phrase reaches critical mass and/or meltdown; 3) seek out truly unique activities. Choice 3 is the least easy but most rewarding of these. Nancy Gardner knows this from experience. Making new activities into memorable occasions is something she and her children have been doing for some time. Nancy’s children share a love of music that’s classical in nature, and it started with a book. “My daughter read Lloyd Moss’ picture book Zin! Zin! Zin! A Violin and got really interested in orchestral music,” Nancy recalls. Not long after that initial

46 DECEMBER 2014 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM

encounter the Gardners started attending performances at Robinson Center Music Hall featuring the Arkansas Symphony Orchestra. “We make it a special event—everybody wears nice clothes with the children choosing their outfits, we all have dinner out together as a family before the concert starts, and the kids even choose the restaurant. It’s always a good time and really breaks up the routines we sometimes fall in to.” “Even if you aren’t interested in music, it’s good to take your children to a symphony performance, says Nancy. “It might get them interested.” Brandon Dorris employs other methods of making music elemental in his children’s days. “I take them to ASO concerts, but I also bring the music to them as part of their everyday living.” Brandon finds cartoons or movies with classical performances as musical themes or elements, lets his kids


nest | Thrive | NOSH | CULTIVATE

The PediaTric clinic, P.a. of norTh liTTle rock

Over 50 Years of

Caring watch without commenting on the music and when those pieces are played in a live setting “the kids are so surprised and excited. It’s rewarding and energizing at the same time.” He notes that their sense of discovery renews his enthusiasm for masterworks and pops compositions and serves to bring the family closer together. Another method of infusing a classical repertoire into his children is stealth. “I play music from upcoming ASO masterworks concerts during morning routines. It’s in the background, but it’s there.” Brandon says he also plays the music in the car on the way to school and on the way back home. “Without letting them know I’m doing this deliberately, I’m mainly trying to expose them to the music” so that it comes to their minds naturally. One of the symphony’s most comprehensive outreach programs to young people statewide makes it easy for school-age children to attend ASO concerts. During regular season masterworks and pops shows, ASO corporate partner Entergy supports the Entergy Kids’ Ticket series. Every student, from kindergarten to 12th grade may attend ASO masterworks or pops matinee concerts free of charge with a paying adult. Estimates put the total number of children eligible for this service at 400,000, with many able to experience live orchestra performance for the first time in their lives. There have been many methods used over the years to bring classical music into children’s lives. Mainstream works like Benjamin Britten’s Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra in which the instruments of the orchestra are introduced piecemeal, Carl Stalling’s integration of the classics into vintage Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck and Road Runner cartoons, and Baby Boom generation parents playing classics while carrying their babies to term. While numerous studies have linked early classical music exposure to enhanced learning, cognitive and neural skills, the kids view the music as…music.

Accepting New Patients Birth Through Adolescence Most Insurance Accepted Lourie Battles, MD • Robert Choate, MD • Kim Clinton, MD Anthony Elias, MD • Kim Hurlbut, MD Stephen Fiedorek, MD • Eric Fraser, MD • Gary Fowler, APN Bishawn Morris, MD • JoAnne Wilson, APN Tina Jones, MD • Nicole Turner, APN 3401 Springhill Drive, Ste. 245 North Little Rock • 501.758.1530 CLINIC HOURS: MONDAY-FRIDAY 8 AM-6 PM WALK-IN SICK CLINIC: SATURDAY 8 AM 203 B Plaza Boulevard Cabot • 501.843.0068 CLINIC HOURS: MONDAY-FRIDAY 8 AM-5 PM

Feeling broken is no way to live. Behavioral issues in young people become increasingly difficult if not treated by age 14. We offer extensive in-patient and

ARKANSAS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA SWINGS FOR THE HOLIDAYS The Arkansas Symphony Orchestra presents a true family event—“Swingin’ Holiday Extravaganza”—at Pulaski Academy’s Conner Performing Arts Center December 19 and 20 at 7:30 p.m., and December 21 at 3 p.m. (a great show time for extra young audience members). Featuring the vocal stylings of tenor Destan Owen and soprano Mandy Gonzalez, this ASO annual show will showcase familiar seasonal selections like Jingle Bells and Santa Claus is Coming to Town and themes from favorite holiday movies like The Polar Express and How the Grinch Stole Christmas. Tickets to this special concert are $19-$58, available at arkansassymphony.org or 501-666-1761.

out-patient programs for all ages. Help someone reclaim their life. Contact The BridgeWay for a no-cost assessment.

21 BridgeWay Road • North Little Rock, AR 72113 501.771.1500 • 800-BRIDGEWAY TheBridgeway.com Accepting most insurance plans, including Medicare and Private Option. THESAVVYMOMS.COM | DECEMBER 2014

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PHOTOS COURTESY ARKANSAS TIMES

2014 college guide

Dr. Robin E. Bowen was unanimously elected by the Arkansas Tech Board of Trustees as the 12th president of the university during an event on the south lawn of the Ross Pendergraft Library and Technology Center on April 22, 2014.

Navigating Higher-Ed Opportunities Across the State CENTRAL ARKANSAS

ARKANSAS TECH UNIVERSITY Enrollment at Arkansas Tech University has grown by 168 percent since 1997. Today, Arkansas Tech is one of just five universities in the state with 11,000 or more students, and among those “big five” institutions, Arkansas Tech has the most affordable tuition and fees structure. Arkansas Tech has a demonstrated track record of academic innovation, adding more than 60 degree programs over the past two decades and a growing distance learning presence through its digital campus, eTech. With pre-professional degree programs in fields such as pre-medical, pre-dental, pre-law, pre-pharmacy, pre-physical therapy and pre-veterinary medicine, Arkansas Tech provides many of our state’s brightest students with an ideal environment to build the foundation for a successful career.  Providing pre-professional programs such as these are part of a commitment to STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) education that became part of the culture at Arkansas Tech long before the issue was a national talking point. That head start in the STEM fields has made Arkansas Tech a recognized and accredited leader in such fields as business, emergency management, electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, nursing and many other disciplines that are critical to our state’s economic prosperity during the 21st century.  Fraternities and sororities, intramural sports, NCAA intercollegiate athletics

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and outdoor recreation are just some of the opportunities available to students seeking the personal enrichment that comes from participation in campus life. BAPTIST HEALTH SCHOOLS LITTLE ROCK To meet growing demand, Baptist Health Schools Little Rock (BHSLR) has expanded its surgical technology program. The 12-month program prepares students for a career working as part of a surgical team under the direct supervision of a surgeon or a registered nurse. The surgical technologist anticipates the needs of the surgeon, utilizes surgical equipment, and provides for the needs of the patient and surgical team. BHSLR now offers a larger class size, new instructors and job availability in all Baptist Health surgery areas. Baptist Health Schools Little Rock’s Sleep Technology program was developed in 2008 due to changing needs in sleep health care. The year-long program prepares students to work with sleep abnormalities, in sleep clinics, hospital settings and off-site clinics. COLLEGE OF THE OUACHITAS In health-related professions, there is still a high demand for registered nurses in the hospital acute care setting. Several facilities are magnet status or seeking magnet status, which requires the majority of their nurses to have a bachelor’s of nursing degree or higher, depending on the position they are hired for. This move toward magnet status has changed the licensed practical nurse C ON T I N U E D ON PAGE 5 0


I knew I wanted to explore one of the state’s best engineering programs, but I didn’t know I would be interning at NASA.

Dacen Waters, recent graduate with a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering, at Mount Nebo State Park — minutes from Tech Campus

At Arkansas Tech, your college experience goes far beyond the classroom. While you can choose from more than 100 areas of study, in some of the most modern educational facilities in the state, you can also enjoy the great outdoors around the campus. Tech is committed to providing the highest quality education and the best overall experience. It’s easy to see why more than 12,000 students choose Tech. With Greek Life, campus recreation and plenty of student activities available both on campus and in the surrounding area, you’re sure to find your place at Tech. Take a tour of campus and discover what you don’t know about Tech. Get started at discover.atu.edu. THESAVVYMOMS.COM | DECEMBER 2014

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UALR research intern Amanda Winters at the Panama Canal. (LPN) role in the acute care setting. Many hospitals are not using LPNs, so LPNs are seen more often in physician offices and nursing homes. Another trend in health care is the focus on evidence-based practices, and this is reinforced throughout the College of the Ouachitas’ (COTO) programs. Research has shown evidence-based nursing practice increases the safety and quality of care to patients, and hands-on clinical experience is a valuable tool to reinforce evidence-based nursing practices. Not only do the students care for real patients in various clinical settings, but simulation is used at COTO as a means to reinforce these practices. The use of electronic health records (EHR) has grown in the industry during the last few years, and because this is such an important tool to learn, COTO purchased its own EHR system that simulates documentation in the real world. COTO students are required to document clinical work in the EHR, and as they progress through the program, they transition their learning from the COTO EHR to the facility’s EHR, giving them valuable experience when they begin their practice. To assist with meeting the demand for those interested in practical nursing and associate’s degrees in nursing, COTO accepts students in January and May for both programs of study. The number of hours required to obtain the technical certificate for practical nursing was reduced to 40 hours, as recommended by the Arkansas Department of Higher Education.

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NATIONAL PARK COMMUNITY COLLEGE Careers in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) are expected to grow 17 percent by 2018, far faster than the 10 percent growth projected for overall employment. Through a variety of partnerships with high schools, universities, business partners and other two-year colleges, National Park Community College (NPCC) has identified a variety of unique opportunities that provide multiple paths for students into STEM career fields. The National Park Technology Center for area high school juniors and seniors recently added a pre-engineering program. This program is offered in association with Project Lead the Way. The curriculum is designed to be thought-provoking, develop critical thinking and leadership skills, and to prepare students to compete in a global economy. The two-year program consists of four classes: Introduction to Engineering Design, Principles of Engineering, Engineering Design and Development, and an elective focused engineering capstone course. NPCC will begin offering a Technical Certificate in Industrial Technology in spring 2015 to include coursework to meet the needs of manufacturing and industrial organizations. NPCC partnered with seven other Arkansas community colleges to develop a core curriculum that includes coursework in subject areas such as hydraulics, pneumatics, blueprints, electricity, industrial motor control and programmable logic controllers. These courses could be completed to obtain a career in industrial technology or transferred to a degree in industrial technology. NPCC and the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville have partnered in making an Associate of Science with Emphasis in Engineering degree available. The new NPCC associate degree is part of the STEM preparation program designed to increase access to STEM classes for students at two-year colleges in Arkansas. Collaboration between NPCC and the University of Arkansas provides science, engineering and math classes online with lab classes at NPCC. Classes are taught by University of Arkansas professors at the NPCC tuition rate. New classes to be offered for the engineering track are Calculus I, II and III; Differential Equations; Introduction to Engineering; and University Physics I and II. Classes offered this fall at NPCC are Calculus I, University Physics I and Introduction to Engineering. PULASKI TECHNICAL COLLEGE The college’s new 60,000 square-foot Culinary Arts and Hospitality Management Institute celebrated its first birthday this past August. The program has garnered significant accolades and recognition from area employers and aspiring chefs and hospitality professionals. This facility allows the programs to educate students in a state-of-the-art learning environment.  Pulaski Tech’s accreditation has demonstrated that the college is competitive on the national stage among other culinary and hospitality degree programs. With a facility rivaling the best in the nation, Pulaski Tech’s hospitality and culinary programs is a magnet for aspiring chefs and other professionals both in the state and outside Arkansas’s borders. The college offers more than 76 degree and certificate programs in allied health and human services, aviation, business, culinary arts, information technology, manufacturing, and industrial and automotive technology, as well as continuing education and community services. The college awards Associate of Arts and Associate of Science degrees to graduates of the university-transfer program, as well as Associate of Applied Science degrees, technical certificates and certificates of proficiency. UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS AT LITTLE ROCK Students in the criminal justice doctoral program at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock (UALR) can enjoy plenty of job offers once they complete their degree. A doctorate in criminal justice prepares students to research positions at law enforcement and state agencies such as the Arkansas Department of Corrections. Graduates are also qualified to teach at the college level. The program, which can be pursued full-time or part-time, gives students a solid knowledge base regarding crime theory and data analysis. 


As the Baby Boomer generation ages, federal labor statistics project an increased need for nursing and other health care. This fall, nursing students at the UALR will learn from excellent faculty in a state-of-the-art facility that holds a simulation lab for students to practice life-and-death situations. Licensed practical nurses and paramedics may take advantage of UALR’s LPN/Paramedic to RN program, while other students may find the online RN to BSN program beneficial to their careers. UALR also offers a four-year ladder program that enables first-time entering freshmen who meet nursing entry requirements guaranteed placement in nursing courses by sophomore year. Freshmen living-learning communities for nursing are also available. Finally, students considering in-demand careers should consider these two words: Big Data. Whether through digital pictures, cell phones or social media posts, data is hurling at us at an accelerating pace. All that data and technology will continue to produce a need for people who are highly skilled in engineering and information technology and other related areas. UALR has one of the most vibrant and highly regarded computer science programs in the state, housed in the state-ofthe-art Donaghey College of Engineering and Information Technology (EIT). The EIT program prepares students for careers as computer scientists in business and industry, with the ability to deliver software and hardware design and development. UALR offers undergraduate and graduate degrees in computer science as well as the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree in Integrated Computing. UALR graduates hold excellent jobs in national and international companies and have pursued advanced degrees at prestigious institutions. UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL ARKANSAS The University of Central Arkansas (UCA) continues to be a leader in the area of health sciences and provides a full range of health sciences degrees and programs, including nursing, physical therapy, occupational therapy, psychology, nutrition, kinesiology, and communication sciences and disorders. UCA also has strong programs in the area of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). Degree options include biology, biochemistry, chemistry, computer science, environmental science, mathematics and physics. UCA science and mathematics students can enroll in UCA STEMTeach, a program that allows students to earn a degree and become licensed as a K-12 teacher in their chosen STEM discipline. Students majoring in the College of Business Innovation and Entrepreneurship program generate new ideas and business plans to start their own businesses upon graduation. UCA faculty members are preparing to incorporate more service learning into the curriculum, which provides additional opportunities for students to connect with the community and nonprofit organizations.  UCA works to meet the academic needs of its students and the requirements of Arkansas employers. As the state continues to face a shortage of qualified personnel in health-related fields, UCA continues to produce highly skilled graduates in the fields of nursing, physical therapy, occupational therapy, and communication sciences and disorders. In support of Arkansas’ growing knowledge-based economy, UCA is building its already strong programs in the sciences and mathematics. UCA has also begun a comprehensive study on adding degree programs in health information technology, health services administration and optometry. 

!

Choose World Class. Choose North Little Rock School District.

NORTHWEST ARKANSAS

JOHN BROWN UNIVERSITY In response to a growing need for nurses, John Brown University has added a nursing program. The first class of pre-nursing students began this fall and will complete two years of prerequisites before applying to the nursing program for fall 2016. A $6 million lead gift for the construction of a 20,000 square foot state-of-the-art nursing program facility was received last spring, and construction is slated to begin in 2015 and be complete by fall of 2016. C ONTIN UED O N PAGE 52 THESAVVYMOMS.COM | DECEMBER 2014

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internships, cutting edge technology and exciting career opportunities. Other new programs at UAFS include a Bachelor of Business Administration in International Business, a Bachelor of Business Administration in Finance, a Bachelor of General Studies, and a Certificate of Proficiency in Professional Sales.

NORTHWEST ARKANSAS NORTHEAST ARKANSAS COMMUNITY COLLEGE ARKANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY Electronic health records are here, and there’s a steady demand for skilled With the growing complexity in health care, there’s a high demand for nurses workers who can use and understand this technology, which is why NorthWest with graduate degrees. At Arkansas State University (ASU), the Doctor of NursArkansas Community College has developed a new program, Health Information ing Practice (DNP) program is an online program that includes an on-campus Management (HIM), and will offer an Associate immersion experience prior to the start of each semesof Applied Sciences degree in Health Information ter. The DNP program is offered as a post-master’s nursManagement. Accreditation by the Commission on ing degree, and applicants are required to have a current ARKANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY HAS Accreditation for Health Informatics and Information advanced practice nursing license (nurse practitioner, PARTNERED WITH THE Management Education is currently pending. clinical nurse specialist, nurse anesthetist). The practiceNEW YORK INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY (NYIT) TO With the adoption of electronic health records, the focused doctoral program prepares nursing leaders for BRING AN OSTEOPATHIC scope and challenges facing health information promthe highest level of clinical nursing practice beyond the MEDICAL SCHOOL TO ARKANSAS, AND THE ises to be overwhelming resulting in a greater need for initial and master’s preparation in the discipline.  ARKANSAS HIGHER health information management professionals. The The DNP curricula builds on traditional master’s proEDUCATION COORDINATING BOARD RECENTLY GRANTED traditional method of processing and evaluating health grams with education in evidenced-based practice and NYIT CERTIFICATION FOR care data will continue to evolve and transform. Conteaches advanced clinical, organizational, economic, and THE SCHOOL ON A-STATE’S CAMPUS. tinued education will be required to develop additional leadership skills to design and implement programs of skills to increase efficiency. care delivery which significantly impact health care outStudents in the HIM program will take classes on comes and have the potential to transform health care medical coding and health care statistics, as well as completing an internship. delivery. Graduates with this terminal practice degree will be prepared for roles in direct care or indirect, systems-focused care. UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS Doctors of osteopathic medicine (DO) – fully trained physicians who comThe University of Arkansas offers more than 200 degree programs, the most in plete four years of medical school and are licensed by state medical boards to the state, to ensure that students have the opportunity to prepare for the career of prescribe medication, perform surgery and practice in all recognized medical their choosing. Currently, graduates in high demand from employers are ready for specialties – are also seeing high demand. DOs are one of the fastest growing careers in nursing and home health care; computer technology, including software segments of health care professionals in the United States, according to the development, analysis and web development; retail sales management; financial American Osteopathic Association (AOA), and the number of active osteopathic analysts with accounting and statistics backgrounds; biomedical engineering; biophysicians is expected to grow from 70,000 this year to more than 100,000 by physics; athletic training; and environmental engineering. 2020. According to the State Medical Board, Arkansas has 450 active D.O. liLaunching new businesses that create new jobs for Arkansas continues to be cense holders, including 265 who currently practice in Arkansas. a major trend at the University of Arkansas. In the last six years, entrepreneurial Arkansas State University has partnered with the New York Institute of teams from the university have won 20 national business plan competitions, two Technology (NYIT) to bring an osteopathic medical school to Arkansas, and the times more than the next closest competitor, earning more than $2.3 million in Arkansas Higher Education Coordinating Board recently granted NYIT certificacash prizes. During the same period, the teams have founded 12 high-growth tion for the school on A-State’s campus. businesses, raising $25 million in private investments, grants and tax incentives. The major academic trends at the University of Arkansas include continued LYON COLLEGE development of interdisciplinary courses and programs; growth in the univerKnown for its strong liberal arts curriculum and its pre-professional programs sity’s online offerings, both in undergraduate and graduate programs; and an in- in the health sciences, it’s not surprising that many Lyon students pursue degrees crease in the number and size of grants being offered to professors for research in those areas. The most popular majors of graduating seniors in 2014 were biolthey are doing in applied and theoretical research. ogy and psychology, with 23 percent and 14 percent respectively of the graduatThe University of Arkansas Institute for Nanoscience and Engineering is at ing class earning degrees in these fields. Business administration followed at 13 the forefront of research in nanoscience and nanotechnology, and is one of the percent and English at 10 percent. The college’s pre-med graduates enjoy an acuniversity’s six research strengths. Other inter-disciplinary research strengths ceptance rate into medical school well above the national average. Lyon graduates include: health; energy and the environment; supply chain logistics and trans- who apply for law school also have an acceptance rate of more than 90 percent. portation; food safety; and American art, architecture and the humanities.  MID-SOUTH COMMUNITY COLLEGE Mid-South Community College’s (MSCC) new Associate of Applied Science UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS - FORT SMITH For students with above-average math skills and an interest in mechanics, Degree in Digital Media program is seeing increasing interest among students. the University of Arkansas - Fort Smith (UAFS) is now offering a Certificate of Program-specific courses include Film & Video Production, Audio Production, Proficiency in Robotics Technology that will introduce the student to robotics, Screenwriting, Cinematography, Producing and Directing, Advanced Digital allow them to develop hands-on skills in installing, commissioning and main- Graphics, Digital Radio, Intro to Web Page Design, Digital Graphics for the Web, taining a robot system, and design and implement robot programming projects, and Web Design & Methodology. MSCC also offers a 12-hour Certificate of Proficiency in Film and Video Proand is believed to be the first of its kind in the state. The courses may be applied duction that includes Introduction to Film, Film and Video Production, Audio towards the Associate of Applied Science degree. Production, and Screenwriting. The audio production course includes an introEarning a Certificate of Proficiency in Robotics Technology allows students to find duction to theory and practice and provides both hands-on experience with careers in industrial automation/robotics, health care and engineering. The program at UAFS offers small class sizes, highly trained/certified instructors, opportunity for C ON T I N U E D ON PAGE 5 4

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b h s l r. e d u

There’s There’s never never beenbeen a better a better time time toto gocollege to college to go or or an easier an easier wayway to apply for for to apply financial aid aid financial

a commitment beyond academics

The Arkansas The Arkansas Department Department of Higher of Higher Education Education reviews reviews and approves and approves

The Arkansas Department of Higher Education is responsible academic academic programs programs for theforstate’s the state’s 11 public 11 public universities universities and 22 and public 22 public for two-year distributing over $130 million annually fromforstate and two-year colleges. colleges. In addition, In addition, the agency the agency is responsible is responsible distributing for distributing lottery funds in the form of financial aid. approximately approximately $150 $150 million million annually an nually from state from state revenues revenues and lottery and lottery fundsfunds ForFor complete information about our programs, visit to to complete For complete information information aboutabout our programs, our programs, visit www.adhe.edu visit www.adhe.edu scholarships.adhe.edu/ review program rules and review review program program rules rules and regulations. and to regulations. The eligibility The eligibility requirements requirements and and regulations. Thetheeligibility requirements and rules governing rules rules governing governing programs the programs administered administered by ADHE by ADHE are subject are subject to to legislative and administered regulatory and regulatory amendments. amendments. Please Please e-mail e-mail the Financial the to Financial Aid Aid thelegislative programs by ADHE are subject legislative and regulatory amendments.

nursing histotechnology medical technology nuclear medicine technology occupational therapy assistant radiography sleep technology surgical technology

Apply online at bhslr.edu For additional information please call 501-202-6200 or 1-800-345-3046. Baptist Health Schools Little Rock does not discriminate on the basis of age, color, creed, physical challenges, gender, marital status, race, national origin, or religion. Gainful employment and consumer information can be found at bhslr.edu/outcomes BHSLR-Schools of Allied Health are licensed by the Arkansas State Board of Private Career Education. BHSLR-Schools of Nursing are licensed by the Arkansas State Board of Nursing.

•Application periodperiod opens January academic yearyear  t Application is from Januaryfor 1 toupcoming June 1 for upcoming academic t Must complete FAFSA as well as YOUniversal scholarship application •Must complete YOUniversal scholarship application t Download free YOUniversal app for any smart phone •Download free YOUniversal app for any smart phone

11900 Colonel Glenn Road, Little Rock, AR 72210

THIS IS A-STATE!

ARKANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY

AState.edu

Scan to see video THESAVVYMOMS.COM | DECEMBER 2014

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Construction of Ouachita Baptist University’s Cliff Harris Stadium was recently completed, and the stadium was dedicated at the Tigers’ first home football game. The new stadium seats more than 3,000 fans. equipment and techniques as well as discussions of the principles and ethics underlying the writing, recording, and editing of creative audio presentations. With the rapid rise of digital media, many people have already been exposed to some of its practical applications.

SOUTH ARKANSAS

HENDERSON STATE UNIVERSITY Henderson State University has added four new academic programs—Bachelor of Arts in Innovative Media Arts, Master of Science in Education (M.S.E.) in School Counseling, Master of Science in Education (M.S.E.) in Special Education, and Master of Liberal Arts in English (M.L.A) Teaching English in the Two-Year College. Bachelor of Arts in Innovative Media Arts­—The disciplines of graphic design and mass media have seen rapid change in what students must know in order to become viable candidates in the workforce. Shifting technology has integrated information, entertainment, and tools for creating media on computers, cell phones, tablets and new devices. Henderson’s program in Innovative Media offers an interdisciplinary approach to working in the new media landscape. Students in the B.A. program will take classes in mass media, digital art, video, and computer science and marketing, along with hands-on experience creating products for actual clients in an Innovative Media Lab. The program minor will provide media grounding to majors in marketing, computer science, educational technology, and in other fields where media merges with everyday experience. Master of Science in Education (M.S.E.) in School Counseling—Potential school counselors are now able to receive the school counseling degree and related license as their first educator license. Previously, candidates for this degree were required to have an existing teaching license and teaching experience. This program adjustment was prompted by changes in Arkansas Department of Education rules governing educator licensure and allows those without an education degree or teaching license to pursue school counseling as a career. State-approved exams are required for admission and graduation. Master of Science in Education (M.S.E.) in Special Education—Candidates pursuing the special education master’s degree will now complete one degree program

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and receive one area of license covering all (K-12) grade levels. Changes in Arkansas educator licensure rules combined the two previous options in early childhood special education (P-4) and special education instructional specialist (4-12). Candidates in this program are required to have an existing teaching license prior to admission. State-approved exams are required for program completion. Master of Liberal Arts in English (M.L.A) Teaching English in the Two-Year College— Taught by English, foreign languages and philosophy faculty at Henderson and faculty from a local community college, this course focuses on cultures, missions and practices of teaching in community colleges, especially in south Arkansas. The teaching team will introduce participants to central issues of teaching and learning in the community-college sector of higher education. The course will explore the unique characteristics of community-college students as well as the mission and history of the colleges. Finally, the course will focus on practical issues: career transitions, syllabus design, writing courses and pedagogy, and the development of one’s own teaching ethic as a potential faculty member. OUACHITA BAPTIST UNIVERSITY Ouachita Baptist University (OBU) will soon offer a high-intensity degree program for students interested in science careers. Beginning in fall 2015, students will have the opportunity to enter the Biomedical Scholars program, a three-year degree program from which students will graduate with a Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Sciences and a minor in Chemistry. This program is designed to be an intensive academic experience for motivated, ambitious and well-prepared students. The program provides a rigorous academic curriculum enhanced with experiential learning through study abroad opportunities, experimental research, community service and clinical shadowing rotations. The program will be highly competitive—only 10 students will be accepted into the program per year. For students interested in pursuing careers in the business side of the sports industry, Ouachita Baptist University has just launched a new sport management emphasis. The 12-hour emphasis is a collaborative effort between the university’s Hickingbotham School of Business and the Department of Kinesiology and Leisure Studies. Participating students will graduate with a major in business administration with the option of adding a second major in kinesiology and leisure studies or another field. The sport management emphasis will include five course options, including Big Data/Data Mining; Sport Law; Program Design & Management; Organization and Administration of Health, Physical Education & Recreation; and Sport Management Internship.  PHILLIPS COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS One of four Arkansas two-year colleges to participate in Achieving the Dream, Phillips Community College of the University of Arkansas (PCCUA) has been selected as an Achieving the Dream Leader College. Leader colleges are selected based on their committed leadership, use of evidence to improve programs and services, broad engagement, and systemic institutional improvement.  PCCUA was also invited by the Higher Learning Commission (HLC) to participate in the Higher Learning Commission’s Open Pathway Construction Project, a new model for accreditation. PCCUA is one of only three Arkansas colleges and universities and one of only about 20 within thousands of HLC-accredited colleges and universities invited to pioneer this process because of accreditation standing with HLC. PCCUA is part of a regional initiative that has been selected as a Bellwether Legacy Award finalist for 2014. The Arkansas Delta Training and Education Consortium (ADTEC), consisting of five member colleges, is among 10 finalists competing for this prestigious award, sponsored by the Association of Community College Trustees. ADTEC provides access to a wide range of uniquely designed bachelor, graduate and specialized programs in an effort to provide a skilled and educated workforce for the region. The partnership is unique in that all member colleges have collaboC ON T I N U E D ON PAGE 5 6


Christ Over All since 1919

JBU.EDU

a great college education just got more affordable As families today look for ways to keep college costs as affordable as possible, Ouachita Baptist University is actually doing something about it. Our innovative loan affordability pledge is the first of its kind among

any university in Arkansas. It is being coupled with the new finish in 4 guarantee designed to offer additional financial peace of mind to students and families. Ouachita’s Loan Affordability Pledge is

available to all incoming freshmen in fall 2015.

It will help repay both student and parent loans if graduates’ salaries do not meet specified income levels. The benefit is provided at no cost to our students or their families. Come discover the Ouachita difference, including our Loan Affordability Pledge and Finish in 4 Guarantee. To learn more, visit www.obu.edu/afford.

THESAVVYMOMS.COM | DECEMBER 2014

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rated to share curriculum and support strategies. ADTEC was born in 2005 when the member colleges joined forces to provide a focused regional response to workforce development for eastern Arkansas. With funding from the U.S. Department of Labor, the colleges began laying the groundwork for innovative, industry-driven training opportunities. SOUTHEAST ARKANSAS COMMUNITY COLLEGE To meet its mission of providing quality education and workforce development for its six-county service area, Southeast Arkansas College has experienced major construction and enhancement of its campus, particularly the main entrance. The college is becoming major force in the area through its outstanding job training, enhancement of work skills and the economic development efforts. SOUTHERN ARKANSAS UNIVERSITY Southern Arkansas University (SAU) is now offering a slate of new and unique degree options, some of which are the only programs of their kind in the area and state. These programs include the only engineering degree program in all of south Arkansas, slated to start this fall. SAU also boasts the only marine biology program in the state, which will also start in the fall. The marine biology program is in collaboration with Gulf Coast Research Laboratory and Dauphin Island. For tech-minded students, SAU’s computer game

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and animation design program is the only complete program of its kind in the state, and is attracting a growing number of students. On the business side, new business programs at SAU include entrepreneurship and a master’s in business administration degree with an emphasis in supply chain management. The website OnlineU.org has named SAU’s online MBA program the most affordable accredited program in the country. SAU has an online program designed for registered nurses to complete a Bachelor of Science degree in nursing. With the high demand for nurses, especially those with bachelor’s or advanced degrees, this program offers students currently working full-time the opportunity to advance their careers without losing income. 

SOUTHERN ARKANSAS UNIVERSITY TECH Building projects are on the rise again, which means there is a need for skilled construction and fabrication workers. The Welding Technology Program at Southern Arkansas University (SAU) Tech provides students basic entry-level job skills and theory related to the welding profession. Welding is a skill used by many trades: sheet-metal workers, ironworkers, diesel mechanics, boilermakers, carpenters, marine construction, steam fitters, glaziers, repair and maintenance TO MEET ITS MISSION personnel in applications ranging from the sculpture OF PROVIDING QUALITY home hobbyist to heavy fabrication of bridges, ships EDUCATION AND WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT and many other projects. A skilled welder may qualify FOR ITS SIX-COUNTY as a technician, supervisor, inspector, or as an owner of SERVICE AREA, SOUTHEAST ARKANSAS COLLEGE HAS a welding business. EXPERIENCED MAJOR SAU Tech’s Welding Technology program provides CONSTRUCTION AND ENHANCEMENT OF ITS training in SMAW (shielded metal arc welding), GTAW CAMPUS, PARTICULARLY (gas tungsten arc welding), PAC (plasma-arc cutting), THE MAIN ENTRANCE. GMAW (gas metal arc welding), FCAW (flux-cored arc welding), OAW (oxyacetylene welding), OAC (oxyacety-


lene cutting), basic fabrication, and shop safety. The SAU Tech Career Academy Welding Technology program, facilities, and instructors are National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER) certified. NCCER is a nonprofit education foundation created to develop industrydriven standardized craft training programs with portable credentials and help address the critical workforce shortage facing the construction industry.  Students completing the sequence of concurrent credit courses earn the Certificate of Proficiency in Welding Technology from SAU Tech. Concurrent credit also applies to the Associate of Applied Science Degree in Technology: Industrial Maintenance Emphasis at SAU Tech. In addition to welding, SAU Tech now offers two emphasis tracks under its Associate of Applied Sciences in General Technology degree: industrial maintenance or engineering technology. Both programs can transfer into the SAU industrial technologies or engineering programs or prepare students to enter the workforce. These degree tracks prepare technicians to work at various levels in a manufacturing setting to provide the support and management needed to keep machines running smoothly. SOUTHEAST ARKANSAS COLLEGE Through development of Program Advisory Committees for every technical program and all nursing and allied health programs, the college is beginning to position itself to promote and provide a more skilled workforce. The Pine Bluff area has also indicated a need for two career paths, industrial maintenance technician and industrial operators. UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS AT PINE BLUFF Imagine being able to walk through the central nervous system, forensics scene or the activity of a data stream – all of that will soon be possible thanks to the innovative minds at the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff (UAPB). Dr. Sederick C. Rice, assistant professor of biology, has been awarded a $176,000 instrumentation grant from the Arkansas IDeA

IMAGINE BEING ABLE TO WALK THROUGH THE CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, FORENSICS SCENE OR THE ACTIVITY OF A DATA STREAM – ALL OF THAT WILL SOON BE POSSIBLE THANKS TO THE INNOVATIVE MINDS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS AT PINE BLUFF (UAPB).

Network of Biomedical Research Excellence (Arkansas INBRE) to fund the Generating Enhanced Teaching through Science Education and Technology (GET-SET) project. Rice is the principal investigator, and Dr. Antonie Rice, associate dean of the School of Arts and Sciences, is the co-principal investigator for the project. GET-SET is an instrumentation grant project designed to acquire and utilize immersive learning and research technology in the form of a lowcost, turnkey 3D visualization system. The main components of the GETSET project are designed to develop a 3D visualization center at UAPB to improve STEM faculty professional development along with the application and use of 3D visualization in STEM classroom and research settings on the undergraduate and graduate levels. The funds from GET-SET will be used to develop a 3D visualization center in Rust Technology Hall on UAPB’s campus. UAPB is known internationally for its aquaculture/fisheries program; however, the institution has also graduated a large number of students in criminal justice, business administration, biology, human sciences and industrial technology. The merchandising, textile and design program from the human sciences department made a memorable impression on the community this summer when they offered institutes for teachers and students.

THESAVVYMOMS.COM | DECEMBER 2014

57


GUIDE TO COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES

FOUR YEAR SCHOOL

CITY

PHONE

YEARS

ENROLLMENT PER SEM FEMALE 1,119 36%

PER MALE 64%

SEM TERM HRS / SEM

TUITION SEM

HOUSING SEM

4-year

PUBLIC / PRIVATE 4-year Private

Arkansas Baptist College

Little Rock

501-370-4000

Semester

12-17 hours

$3,900

870-972-2100/800-382-3030 (in-state only)

4-year

4-year Public

13,552

60%

40%

Semester

12 hours$2,304 (in-state) full time undergraduate

$3,975 (double occupancy: 19 Meals/week) $3,875 (room and board)

Arkansas State University

Jonesboro

Arkansas Tech University

Russellville

479-968-0343/ 1-800-582-6953

4-year

4-year Public

11,369

56%

44%

Semester

15

$3,624.00

Central Baptist College

Conway

501-329-6872/1-800-205-6872

4-year

4-year Private

827

44%

56%

Semester

15

$6,150.00

Crowley’s Ridge College

Paragould

870-236-6901

4-year

4-year Private

200

51%

49%

Semester

12 or more

$4,950.00

Harding University

Searcy

800-477-4407

4-year

4-year Private

6,500

53%

47%

Semester

15

$8,280.00

Henderson State University

Arkadelphia

870-230-5028/1-800-228-7333

4-year

4-year Public

3,580

57%

43%

Semester

12-15 hours

$2,388.00

Hendrix College

Conway

800-277-9017/ 501-450-1362

4-year

4-year Private

1,432

56%

45%

Semester

4 courses/ semester

$2,931 (including room & board) $19,995 (including $5,456 (including fees) meals)

John Brown University

Siloam Springs

877-528-4636/ 479-524-7157

4-year

4-year Private

2,589

58%

42%

Semester

12-18 hours

$11,276.00

$4,752.00

Lyon College

Batesville

1-800-423-2542/ 870-698-4242

4-year

4-year Private

600

55%

45%

Semester

12

$12,035.00

$3,895.00

Ouachita Baptist University

Arkadelphia

1-800-DIAL-OBU/ 870-245-5110

4-year

4-year Private

1,543

53%

47%

Semester

up to 18

Philander Smith College Little Rock Southern Arkansas University Magnolia

501-370-5221 870-235-4040

4-year 4-year

4-year Private 4-year Public

700 3,330

66% 60%

34% 40%

Semester Semester

12-16 hours 15

$11,660 (including fees) $5,902.00 $3,150.00

$3,450 (room and board) $4,425.00 $2,751.00

University of Arkansas at Little Rock

Little Rock

1-800-482-8892

4-year

4-year Public

12,377

60%

40%

Semester

12

$7908.90 (15 hours)

$5,636 (including room & board)

University of Arkansas at Monticello

Monticello

870-460-1026/800-844-1826

4-year

4-year Public

3,945

60%

40%

Semester

12-15 hours

$141/credit hour

$1,510-$2,200

University of Arkansas Pine Bluff

Pine Bluff

870-575-8000

4-year

4-year Public

2,615

54%

46%

Semester

15

$2,220.00

$3,733 (20 meals)

University of Arkansas

Fayetteville

479-575-5346/1-800-377-8632

4-year

4-year Public

25,341

50%

50%

Semester

15

$4,727.00

University of Central Arkansas University of Arkansas at Fort Smith

Conway

501-450-5000

4-year

4-year Public

11,534

61%

39%

Semester

15

$4,105 (including fees) $3,994.40

Fort Smith

1-479-788-7120/ 1-888-512LION

4-year

4-year Public

7,154

56%

44%

Semester

15

$2,445-$3,322 Semester + meal plan

University of the Ozarks

Clarksville

479-979-1227/ 1-800-264-8636

4-year

4-year Private

600

51%

49%

Semester

12-17

$139/credit hr (in-state) - $380/ credit hr(out of state) $11,875.00

Williams Baptist College

Walnut Ridge CITY

1-800-722-4434/ 870-759-4120

4-year

4-year Private

650

55%

45%

Semester

12-17

$6,700.00

$3,300.00

PHONE

YEARS

HOUSING SEM

870-762-1020

2-year

PER MALE 30%

TUITION SEM

Blytheville

ENROLLMENT PER SEM FEMALE 1,500 70%

SEM TERM HRS / SEM

Arkansas Northeastern College Arkansas State University

PUBLIC / PRIVATE 2-year Public

Semester

15

$62/hr

N/A

Beebe

501-882-3600

2-year

2-year Public

4,500

57%

43%

Semester

12

$93/hr

Residence Halls

Arkansas State University at Newport Arkansas State University at Mountain Home

Newport

1-800-976-1676

2-year

2-year Public

2,100

60%

40%

Semester

12

$86/hr

N/A

Mountain Home

870-508-6100

2-year

2-year Public

1,413

64%

36%

Semester

12

$87/hr

N/A

TWO YEAR SCHOOL

58 DECEMBER 2014 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM

starting at $2,733 (includes meals) $3,750.00 $3,450 (includes meal plan) $3,258.00

$2,889.00

$3,550.00

INFORMATION CURRENT AS OF AUGUST 2014. **IN COUNTY. ***OUT OF COUNTY. †IN-DISTRICT. ††OUT OF DISTRICT. †††OUT OF STATE.


)

TOTAL SEM COST

AID DEADLINE Open

PER ON AID 87%

SCHOLARSHIP DEADLINE None

REQUIRED EXAMS ACT/SAT/COMPASS

APP DEADLINE FEE RELIGIOUS AFFILIATION None Baptist

$6,970.00

June 30th

76%

Feb. 1st

ACT/ASSET/SAT

None

AP/CLEP

In-state tuition available to out-of-state students residing in counties in contiguous states. There is a higher per-credit-hour tuition for ASU courses in the Colleges of Business, Engineering, Nursing & Health Professions and Sciences & Mathematics. Differential Tuition for non-resident, first-time and returning students prior to 2011. www.astate.edu

$6,357 (not including books) $10,650.00

Open

78%

Feb. 28th

ACT/SAT

1st day of classes/ $15-Undergraduate; $30-Graduate/ Masters Specialist; $40 International Students; $50 Doctoral Open/ No Fee

None

AP/CLEP

www.atu.edu

June 30th

90%

Dec. 10th First Priority

ACT or SAT

1st Day of Classes

AP/CLEP

$9,000 for boarding Open students $11,778.00 August 1st

80%

Aug. 24th

ACT/ASSET

Aug. 24th

Baptist Missionary Association of America Church of Christ

Our strength is fostering an excellent education program with a Christian perspective. www.cbc.edu www.crc.edu

96%

August 1st

ACT/SAT

Open/ $50

Church of Christ

AP/CLEP/IB

with fees approx $6,019.00 $25,101.00

April 15th Priority March 1 Priority

89%

Feb. 1st Priority

ACT/SAT

None

None

AP/CLEP

100%

ACT or SAT

Early Action I - Nov. 1, Early Action II Feb. 1

United Methodist

AP/CLEP/IB

All students engage in “Your Hendrix Odyssey” – a unique array of active, reallife learning experiences that enrich every degree program. www.hendrix.edu

$16,028.00

March 1 Priority

91%

Nov. 15 Early Action for certain scholarships, however scholarships are awarded through all application deadlines March 1st Priority

ACT/SAT

Rolling/ $25

Interdenominational

AP/CLEP/IB

$16,045.00

Rolling but priority consideration by Feb. 1st

99%

Rolling but priority consideration by March 1st

ACT/SAT

Rolling/ $25

Presbyterian

AP and International Baccalaureate

$15,110.00

June 1st

97%

Jan. 15th Priority

ACT/SAT

March 1st July 1st

98% 84%

Rolling Deadline March 1st

ACT/SAT ACT or SAT

Arkansas Baptist State Convention United Methodist None

AP/CLEP

$10,459.00 $5,901.00

Open/ No Application Fee Open/$25 Open/No Fee

John Brown University is a private Christian university, ranked No. 2 overall and No. 1 Best Value among Southern regional colleges by U.S. News and World Report. JBU enrolls more than 2,500 students from 42 states and 44 countries in its traditional undergraduate, graduate, degree completion and concurrent education programs. JBU is a member of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities and a founding member of the Evangelical Council for Financial Accountability. www.jbu.edu Lyon College is an undergraduate liberal arts college affiliated with the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). Founded in 1872, it is the most established independent college in Arkansas. Lyon provides a residential learning community distinguished by its unique student-driven honor system, innovative house system, and endowed Nichols International Studies program. Lyon has made the top tier of liberal arts colleges in U.S. News & World Report, Washington Monthly, The Princeton Review, and Forbes.com. Fourteen Lyon professors have earned the distinction as Arkansas Professor of the Year. www.lyon.edu Discover the Ouachita Difference. www.obu.edu

$14,944.90 (est 15 hrs tuition/fees, rm/brd, books/ supplies) $8,251 including campus room and board

March 1 Priority

70%

Dec. 1st Priority, Feb. 1st Final

ACT or SAT

None

AP/CLEP/PEP/ Regents College Exams

Rolling

83%

March 1st Priority

ACT/ASSET/SAT/ COMPASS (for placement)

None

AP/CLEP

UAM consists of the main university campus in Monticello as well as the UAM Colleges of Technology in Crossett and McGehee. www.uamont.edu

$6,711.00

April 15th Priority

90%

March 1st/ April 1st

ACT/SAT

Freshman admission and credential deadline is one week before classes begin. Rolling/No Fee - Except for international applicants Open

None

CLEP

$8,832.00

March 15th

68%

Aug. 1

None

AP/CLEP/IB

$6,833.40

Open

77%

Feb. 1st (Freshman) April ACT/SAT 1st (transfers) Feb. 17th ACT/SAT

UAPB is a comprehensive 1890 Land Grant, HBCU institution and the second oldest public university in Arkansas with a diverse student population, competitive degree offerings and stellar faculty that provides liberal and professional education. www.uapb.edu www.uark.edu

None

None

AP/CLEP/IB

Varies

June 15th

96%

Varies

ACT/COMPASS/SAT

Open/ No Fee

None

UCA is a comprehensive university offering students excellence in education. www.uca.edu AP/CLEP/Challenge UAFS is a comprehensive workforce focused university teaching real world professional employment preparation via certificate programs, associate degrees, and baccalaureate education. www.uafs.edu

$15,425 (not including books or fees) $10,480.00

Feb. 15 Priority

98%

April 1st Priority

ACT/SAT/IB

May 1st Priority

Presbyterian

AP/CLEP

Ozarks Outdoors is one of the premier university-affiliated outdoor education and recreation programs in the state. www.ozarks.edu

May 1st

97%

None

ACT/SAT

Open/No Fee

Southern Baptist

AP/CLEP

www.williamsbaptistcollege.com

TOTAL SEM COST

AID DEADLINE Open

PER ON AID 67%

SCHOLARSHIP DEADLINE April 1st Priority

REQUIRED EXAMS ACT/COMPASS/SAT

APP DEADLINE FEE RELIGIOUS AFFILIATION Open None

CREDIT EXAM ACCEPTED AP/CLEP

COMMENT AND WEBSITE

Priority dates 57% June 1/Nov 1/ Mar 31 Open 72%

June 1st

ACT/ASSET/COMPASS

Open/ No Fee

None

CLEP

Bachelor and graduate degrees are available through Arkansas State UniversityJonesboro on the Beebe campus. Call 501-882-8809. www.asub.edu

April 1st

Open/ No Fee

None

AP/CLEP

Priority 81% Consideration Deadline June 1st

June 1st

ACT/ASSET/ COMPASS/SAT ACT/ASSET/ COMPASS/SAT

Open/ No Fee

None

AP/CLEP

A great place to start! Campus locations: 7648 Victory Drive in Newport; 5504 Krueger Drive in Jonesboro; and 33500 Hwy 63 East in Marked Tree. www.asun.edu Bachelor and graduate degrees are available in some areas through ASU-Jonesboro’s Degree Center at ASUMH. Nestled in the heart of Ozark Mountains. www.asumh.edu

$7,875 (Tuition + room and board)

$930 plus fees $1,305 tuition/fees $1,760 (plus books and fees) $1,044 plus books and fees

CREDIT EXAM ACCEPTED CLEP

CLEP/AP

CLEP AP/CLEP

COMMENT AND WEBSITE Arkansas Baptist College . . . It’s a GOOD thing! www.arkansasbaptist.edu

One of America’s leading character-building colleges with a distinguished academic program. www.harding.edu Connecting academic aspirations to career opportunities. getreddie.hsu.edu

Think Justice. www.philander.edu Affordable, student-centered education and the Complete College Experience. www.saumag.edu Apply and register on-line today! www.ualr.edu.

www.anc.edu

TO COMPILE THIS, FORMS WERE SENT TO EVERY QUALIFIED COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY WITH INSTRUCTIONS TO RETURN BY A SPECIFIED DEADLINE. THOSE SCHOOLS NOT MEETING THE DEADLINE WERE REPEATED FROM LAST YEAR. EVERY ATTEMPT IS MADE TO GATHER AND VERIFY THE INFORMATION.

THESAVVYMOMS.COM | DECEMBER 2014

59


TWO YEAR SCHOOL TWO YEAR SCHOOL

CITY CITY

PHONEPHONE

YEARSYEARSPUBLIC / PER PER PER PER SEM TERM HRS / HRS SEM/ SEMTUITION SEM SEM HOUSING SEM SEM PUBLIC / ENROLLMENT ENROLLMENT SEM TERM TUITION HOUSING PRIVATE FEMALE PRIVATE SEM SEM FEMALE MALEMALE 2-year2-year2-year2-year Public Public 350 350 45% 45% 55% 55% Semester Semester18 18 $83/hr$83/hr doubledouble room $2,310, room $2,310, single single room $2,710 room $2,710 BeebeBeebe campuscampus

501-207-6200 Arkansas Arkansas State University State University SearcySearcy (a (a 501-207-6200 technical technical campuscampus of of ASU-Beebe) ASU-Beebe) BaptistBaptist HealthHealth SchoolsSchools Little Rock Little Rock501-202-6200/800-345-3046 501-202-6200/800-345-3046 2-year2-year2-year2-year PrivatePrivate900 900 Little Rock Little Rock

T

V

85% 85%

15% 15% Semester SemesterVaries Varies by by Varies Varies By Program By Program No Campus No Campus Housing Housing Program Program

V

2-year2-year2-year2-year Public Public 2,300 2,300

64% 64%

36% 36% Semester Semester12

12

V

Cossatot Cossatot Community Community CollegeCollege De Queen De Queen 870-584-4471/ 870-584-4471/ 1-800-844-4471 1-800-844-4471 2-year2-year2-year2-year Public Public 1,500 1,500 of the of University the University of Arkansas of Arkansas

70% 70%

30% 30% Semester Semester12

12

Fall 2014 Fall$102/hr 2014 $102/hrN/A N/A with fees, with$83/hr fees, $83/hr withoutwithout fees fees $57/hr$57/hr ** ** N/A N/A

East Arkansas East Arkansas Community CommunityForrestForrest City City870-633-4480 870-633-4480 877-797-EACC 877-797-EACC 2-year2-year2-year2-year Public Public 1,302 1,302 28% 28% CollegeCollege (Fall 2012) (Fall 2012)

72% 72% Semester Semester12

12

N

ITT Technical ITT Technical Institute Institute

N/A N/A

12

$72 per$72 credit per hour credit hour N/A N/A (in-county) (in-county) $81 per$81 per credit hour credit(out hourof(out of county)county) $493/hr $493/hr N/A N/A

GUIDE TO COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES GUIDE TO COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES

Black River CollegeCollege Pocahontas BlackTechnical River Technical Pocahontas870-248-4000 870-248-4000

Little Rock Little Rock501-565-5550 501-565-5550

2-year2-year2-year,2-year, Continual Continual N/A N/A 4-year4-year PrivatePrivate Mid-South Mid-South Community Community West West 870-733-6722/ 870-733-6722/ 866-733-6722 866-733-6722 2-year2-year2-year2-year Public Public 1,776 1,776 62% 62% CollegeCollege Memphis Memphis (Fall 2013) (Fall 2013)

National National Park Community Park Community Hot Springs Hot Springs 501-760-4222 501-760-4222 CollegeCollege

2-year2-year2-year2-year Public Public 3,244 Fall 3,244 Fall 62% 62% 2013 2013

Quarters Quarters12

38% 38% Semester Semester1-21 hours 1-21 hours $90/hr$90/hr (in county), (in county), N/A N/A $110/hr $110/hr (out of(out of county/in county/in state),state), $300/hr $300/hr (out of(out of state) state) 38% 38% Semester Semester12

12

North North Arkansas Arkansas CollegeCollege Harrison Harrison 870-743-3000 870-743-3000 or toll or freetollatfree at 2-year2-year2-year2-year Public Public 1,998 1,998 1-800-679-6622 1-800-679-6622

60% 60%

40% 40% Semester Semester12

12

North West NorthArkansas West Arkansas Community Community CollegeCollege

Bentonville Bentonville479-636-9222/ 479-636-9222/ 1-800-995-6922 1-800-995-6922 2-year2-year2-year2-year Public Public 8,000 8,000

58% 58%

42% 42% Semester Semester15

15

CollegeCollege of the of Ouachitas the Ouachitas Malvern Malvern 1-800-337-0266/ 1-800-337-0266/ 501-337-5000 501-337-5000 2-year2-year2-year2-year Public Public 1,400 1,400

60% 60%

40% 40% Semester Semester12

12

OzarkaOzarka CollegeCollege

$89/hr$89/hr $1,602$1,602 max max N/A N/A in-district; in-district; $99/hr$99/hr $1,782$1,782 max out max of out of districtdistrict $948 (in $948 county) (in county)N/A N/A $1,236$1,236 (out of(out of county)county) $1125$1125 in district in districtN/A N/A ($75 per ($75 credit per credit hr)/$1,837 hr)/$1,837 out of out of districtdistrict ($122 ($122 per per credit hr) credit hr) $1,020$1,020 N/A N/A

$

V

A va a p in p h V

N

$ $ (t

Melbourne Melbourne870-368-7371 870-368-7371

2-year2-year2-year2-year Public Public 1,390 1,390

70% 70%

30% 30% Semester hours hours$84/hr$84/hr Semester12-15 12-15

N/A N/A

$ a V

PhillipsPhillips Community Community CollegeCollegeHelenaHelena 870-338-6474 870-338-6474

2-year2-year2-year2-year Public Public 2,028 2,028

67% 67%

33% 33% Semester Semester15

N/A N/A

$

PulaskiPulaski Technical Technical CollegeCollege North North Little Little501-812-2200 501-812-2200 Rock Rock

2-year2-year2-year2-year Public Public 9,969 9,969 64% 64% (Spring(Spring 2014) 2014)

36% 36% Semester SemesterVaries Varies

$95/credit $95/credit hr hr N/A N/A

Remington Remington CollegeCollege

2-year2-year2-year2-year PrivatePrivate370 370

80% 80%

2-year2-year2-year2-year Public Public 1,000 1,000

71% 71%

20% 20% ContactContact 12 hours 12 hours full - fullContact - Contact CampusCampusN/A N/A CampusCampus time student time student 29% 29% Semester Semester15 15 $1,035$1,035 N/A N/A

T tu fe st h se C

2-year2-year2-year2-year PrivatePrivaten/a n/a

75% 75%

25% 25% Semester Semester16-Dec16-Dec

$1,800$1,800

70% 70%

30% 30% Semester Semester15

$1,215/$1,410/$2,535 $1,215/$1,410/$2,535 N/A N/A

80% 80% 54% 54%

30% 30% Semester Semester12-18 12-18 hours hours$84/hr$84/hr N/A N/A 46% 46% Semester $108/hr in statein state$1,100/semester Semester15 15 $108/hr $1,100/semester $156/hr out of out of double double [On-Campus]; $156/hr [On-Campus]; state state $1,300/semester double double $1,300/semester [Off-Campus]; [Off-Campus]; $1,850/semester single single $1,850/semester

V V

2-year2-year2-year2-year Public Public 1,574 1,574

70% 70%

30% 30% Semester Semester12

12

V

2-year2-year2-year2-year Public Public 1,500 1,500

69% 69%

31% 31% Semester Semester12

12

2-year2-year2-year2-year Public Public 2,376 2,376

60% 60%

40% 40% Semester Semester12

12

Little Rock Little Rock501-312-0007 501-312-0007

Rich Mountain Rich Mountain Community CommunityMena Mena CollegeCollege ShorterShorter CollegeCollege

479-394-7622 479-394-7622

North North Little Little501-374-6305 501-374-6305 Rock Rock

South South Arkansas Arkansas Community Community El Dorado El Dorado 870-864-7142 870-864-7142 2-year2-year2-year2-year Public Public 1,774 1,774 CollegeCollege Southeast Southeast Arkansas Arkansas CollegeCollegePine Bluff Pine Bluff 870-850-8605/888-SEARKTC 870-850-8605/888-SEARKTC 2-year2-year2-year2-year Public Public 1,700 1,700 Southern Arkansas University Camden 2-year2-year2-year2-year Public Public 2,487 2,487 Southern Arkansas University Camden 870-574-4500 870-574-4500 Tech Tech

University of Arkansas University of Arkansas Batesville Batesville 870-612-2000 870-612-2000 Community CollegeCollege at at Community Batesville Batesville University University of Arkansas of Arkansas Hope Hope 870-777-5722 870-777-5722 Community Community CollegeCollege at Hopeat Hope University University of Arkansas of Arkansas Morrilton Morrilton 1-800-264-1094 1-800-264-1094 Community Community CollegeCollege at at Morrilton Morrilton

60 DECEMBER 2014 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM

15

15

$67.25$67.25

N/A-non-residential N/A-non-residential

$63/hr$63/hr in district in districtN/A N/A $75/hr$75/hr out of out of districtdistrict $64/credit $64/credit hour hour N/A N/A $78/hr** $78/hr** $85/hr$85/hrN/A N/A in-statein-state

INFORMATION INFORMATION CURRENTCURRENT AS OF AUGUST AS OF AUGUST 2014. **IN 2014. COUNTY. **IN COUNTY. ***OUT OF ***OUT COUNTY. OF COUNTY. †IN-DISTRICT. †IN-DISTRICT. ††OUT OF††OUT DISTRICT. OF DISTRICT. †††OUT OF †††OUT STATE.OF STATE.

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REQUIRED REQUIRED EXAMSEXAMS COMPASS COMPASS

APP DEADLINE FEE FEE RELIGIOUS APP DEADLINE RELIGIOUS AFFILIATION AFFILIATION Open/Open/ No FeeNo Fee None None

CREDIT EXAMEXAM COMMENT AND WEBSITE CREDIT COMMENT AND WEBSITE ACCEPTED ACCEPTED N/A N/A 15 Technical 15 Technical Certificate Certificate programsprograms are offered are offered on the Searcy on thecampus. Searcy campus. www.asub.edu www.asub.edu

Varies Varies By Program By ProgramMay 1 May / Oct11/ Oct70% 1 70% May 1stMay 1st

ACT/SAT ACT/SAT

Varies Varies By Program By Program / Baptist / Baptist No FeeNo Fee

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Varies Varies

Open Open

ACT/COMPASS ACT/COMPASS

Open/Open/ No FeeNo Fee

None None

Advance Advance Placement Placement

$729-$850 $729-$850

Fall-May Fall-May 1, 1,70% 70% April 1st April 1st Spring-Nov. Spring-Nov. 1, 1, Sum.-April Sum.-April 15 15

ACT/ASSET/ ACT/ASSET/ COMPASS/SAT COMPASS/SAT

Open/Open/ No FeeNo Fee

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N/A N/A

July 1 July 1

75% 75% April 15th April 15th

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Varies Varies

N/A N/A

N/A N/A

ACT/SAT/WONDERLIC ACT/SAT/WONDERLIC Open Open

None None

N/A N/A

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70% 70% April 15th April 15th

Open Open

Approx.Approx. $2,600 $2,600 but but Open. Open. varies depending varies depending on on academic/technical academic/technical programprogram (does not (does not includeinclude transportation, transportation, personalpersonal expenses, expenses, housing). housing). Varies Varies Open Open

64% 64% Open Open

ACT/COMPASS/SAT ACT/COMPASS/SATOpen/Open/ No FeeNo Fee

None None

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N/A N/A

60% 60% June 15th June 15th

ACT/COMPASS ACT/COMPASS

None None

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Varies Varies

Approx.Approx. Early June, Early(Fall June,2015) (Fall 2015)ACT/ASSET/ ACT/ASSET/ 80% 80% COMPASS/SAT COMPASS/SAT

Open Open

CCCUA has CCCUA 4 on-line has 4 on-line associate’ associate’ s degrees s degrees and more andthan more70than internet 70 internet coursescourses available. available. The college The college also offers alsomany offerstechnical many technical programs, programs, a brandanew brandagriculture new agriculture degree,degree, occupational occupational therapytherapy assisting assisting program, program, Aviation, Aviation, PhysicalPhysical Health,Health, Wellness, Wellness, and and LeisureLeisure degreesdegrees and rodeo andteam. rodeo team. www.cccua.edu www.cccua.edu EACC isEACC an open-door is an open-door institution institution of higher of higher education education servingserving the Arkansas the Arkansas delta delta since 1974. since www.eacc.edu 1974. www.eacc.edu ITT Technical ITT Technical InstituteInstitute offers associate offers associate and bachelor and bachelor degreedegree programs programs in Electronics, in Electronics, CriminalCriminal Justice,Justice, Networking, Networking, Design Design and Project and Project Management. Management. www.ITT-Tech.edu www.ITT-Tech.edu Mid-South Mid-South Community Community CollegeCollege is committed is committed to economic to economic development development in the in the Arkansas Arkansas Delta through Delta through the provision the provision of highofquality, high quality, affordable, affordable, and convenient and convenient learninglearning opportunities opportunities and services. and services. www.midsouthcc.edu www.midsouthcc.edu

Learning Learning is our Focus! is our Student Focus! Student SuccessSuccess is our Goal! is ourExcellent Goal! Excellent academic academic two-year two-year community community collegecollege in beautiful in beautiful Hot Springs. Hot Springs. www.npcc.edu www.npcc.edu

$1,550$1,550 in-dist,in-dist, May 1stMay 1st Approx.Approx. Feb. 25Feb. 25 $2,260$2,260 out-dist out-dist 54% 54% (tuition/fees/books) (tuition/fees/books)

ACT/COMPASS/SAT ACT/COMPASS/SATOpen/Open/ $10 $10

None None

Northark Northark offers transfer offers transfer and technical and technical degreedegree programs, programs, one-year one-year technical technical certificates, certificates, certificates certificates of proficiency, of proficiency, customized customized businessbusiness and industry and industry training,training, adult basic adulteducation basic education (GED) classes (GED) classes and non-credit and non-credit community community education education courses.courses. In addition, In addition, Northark Northark offers two offers associate two associate degreesdegrees 100% online. 100% online. www.northark.edu www.northark.edu AP/CLEP/DANTE AP/CLEP/DANTEwww.nwacc.edu www.nwacc.edu

$1,020$1,020 plus books plus booksOpen Open 86% 86% May 1st/ MayDec 1st/1stDec 1st and fees and fees Varies Varies PriorityPriority 80% 80% MarchMarch 1st 1st deadline of of deadline June 1June 1 $1,296.25 $1,296.25 Call 870-338Call 870-33870% 70% Call 870-338-6474 Call 870-338-6474 6474 6474 The average The average cost ofcost Fall-May of Fall-May 15, 15,76% 76% Open Open tuitiontuition and basic and basic Spring-Oct. Spring-Oct. fees forfees a full-time for a full-time15, Sum15, Sumstudentstudent takingtaking 12 12Mar. 15Mar. 15 hours ishours $1,616 is $1,616 per per semester. semester. ContactContact CampusCampus ContactContact ContactContact ContactContact CampusCampus CampusCampus CampusCampus $1,035$1,035 plus fees plus& fees &MarchMarch 1st 1st 70% 70% April 1st April 1st books books

ACT/ASSET/ ACT/ASSET/ Open/Open/ No FeeNo Fee COMPASS/SAT COMPASS/SAT ACT/ASSET/COMPASS Open/Open/ No FeeNo Fee ACT/ASSET/COMPASS

None None

AP/CLEP AP/CLEP

None None

AP/CLEP AP/CLEP

As a TopAsTen a Top Community Ten Community CollegeCollege in the Nation, in the Nation, CollegeCollege of the Ouachitas of the Ouachitas wants towants to help youhelp build youabuild futurea you future thought you thought possiblepossible only in only yourindreams. your dreams. www.coto.edu www.coto.edu Providing life-changing experiences throughthrough education. www.ozarka.edu Providing life-changing experiences education. www.ozarka.edu

ACT/ASSET/COMPASS ACT/ASSET/COMPASS Open/Open/ No FeeNo Fee

None None

AP/CLEP AP/CLEP

www.pccua.edu www.pccua.edu

ACT/COMPASS ACT/COMPASS

None None

AP/CLEP AP/CLEP

For more For information more information and a schedule and a schedule of classes, of classes, visit ourvisitwebsite our website at www. at www. pulaskitech.edu. pulaskitech.edu.

ContactContact CampusCampus 1st day1stof day classes of classes None None

none none

www.remngtoncollege.edu www.remngtoncollege.edu

ACT/SAT/COMPASS ACT/SAT/COMPASSOpen/Open/ No FeeNo Fee

None None

AP/CLEP AP/CLEP

$2,500$2,500 including includingOpen Open books books

ACT/SAT/COMPASS ACT/SAT/COMPASSOpen Open

AfricanAfrican American American CLEP CLEP Episcopal Episcopal ChurchChurch

ACT/ASSET/ ACT/ASSET/ COMPASS/SAT COMPASS/SAT ACT/COMPASS ACT/COMPASS ACT/ASSET/ ACT/ASSET/ COMPASS/SAT COMPASS/SAT

Open/Open/ No FeeNo Fee

None None

AP/CLEP AP/CLEP

A comprehensive A comprehensive collegecollege providing providing a varityaofvarity programs, of programs, services,services, and learning and learning opportunities. opportunities. Transfer,Transfer, technical technical degreesdegrees and courses: and courses: professional professional workforce, workforce, personalpersonal development development and adult andbasic adulteducation. basic education. EnglishEnglish as a second as a second language; language; studentstudent supportsupport and outreach and outreach programs; programs; financialfinancial aid assistance. aid assistance. www.rmcc.edu www.rmcc.edu Serves traditional Serves traditional and non-traditional and non-traditional studentsstudents offeringoffering the Associates the Associates of Arts Degree of Arts Degree in General in General StudiesStudies with concentrations with concentrations in General in General Studies,Studies, TeacherTeacher Education, Education, and and Christian Christian Leadership. Leadership. www.shortercollege.org www.shortercollege.org Where Where studentsstudents come first. comewww.southark.edu first. www.southark.edu

Open Open Open/Open/ No FeeNo Fee

None None None None

AP/CLEP AP/CLEP CLEP CLEP

Open/Open/ No FeeNo Fee

None None

AP/CLEP AP/CLEP

Changing Changing lives…one lives…one studentstudent at a time! at awww.seark.edu time! www.seark.edu Southern ArkansasArkansas University Tech is aTech two-year comprehensive collegecollege emphasizing Southern University is a two-year comprehensive emphasizing technical programs and is commited to providing qualityquality educational programs technical programs and is commited to providing educational programs delivered throughthrough variousvarious technologies and methodologies to meettothe needs delivered technologies and methodologies meet theofneeds of its service areas. Itareas. accomplishes this through technical career programs, transfertransfer its service It accomplishes this through technical career programs, curricula, continuing education, workforce education, transitional education, and and curricula, continuing education, workforce education, transitional education, administrative, student,student, and community services.services. www.sautech.edu administrative, and community www.sautech.edu StudentStudent Centered. Community Focused.Focused. www.uaccb.edu Centered. Community www.uaccb.edu

ACT/COMPASS/ASSET ACT/COMPASS/ASSET Open/Open/ No FeeNo Fee

None None

AP/CLEP AP/CLEP

www.uacch.edu www.uacch.edu

ACT/ASSET/COMPASS ACT/ASSET/COMPASS Open/Open/ No FeeNo Fee

None None

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UACCMUACCM - A Journey - A Journey with Meaning. with Meaning. www.uaccm.edu www.uaccm.edu

95% 95% Open Open

Varies Varies

July 1stJuly 1st 60% 60% MarchMarch 1st Priority 1st Priority

Varies Varies Varies Varies

May 1 May priority 1 priority 46% 46% April 30th April 30th Varies Varies 60% 60% 1-Mar 1-Mar

Varies Varies

Open Open

Varies Varies

April 1st April 1st 47% 47% April 1st April 1st

le

Open Open

BaptistBaptist Health Health SchoolsSchools Little Rock Littleprovides Rock provides nine programs nine programs of studyoffor study students for students interested interested in entering in entering the healthcare the healthcare field. For field. more Forinformation more information please please contactcontact us at bhslr.edu. us at bhslr.edu. Black River CollegeCollege - Bridging Resources, Technology, and Challenges… BlackTechnical River Technical - Bridging Resources, Technology, and Challenges… One Graduate at a time. One Graduate at awww.blackrivertech.org time. www.blackrivertech.org

Open/Open/ No FeeNo Fee

e Varies Varies ContactContact Financial Aid Aid ACT/ASSET/ Financial ACT/ASSET/ COMPASS/SAT COMPASS/SAT

1,365 plus 1,365books plus booksJune 30June 30 68% 68% Nov. 1st/ Nov.April 1st/1st April 1st prioritypriority

TO COMPILE TO COMPILE THIS, FORMS THIS,WERE FORMS SENT WERE TO SENT EVERYTOQUALIFIED EVERY QUALIFIED COLLEGECOLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY AND UNIVERSITY WITH INSTRUCTIONS WITH INSTRUCTIONS TO RETURN TO RETURN BY A SPECIFIED BY A SPECIFIED DEADLINE. DEADLINE. THOSE SCHOOLS THOSE SCHOOLS NOT MEETING NOT MEETING THE DEADLINE THE DEADLINE WERE REPEATED WERE REPEATED FROM LAST FROM YEAR. LASTEVERY YEAR.ATTEMPT EVERY ATTEMPT IS MADEISTOMADE GATHER TO GATHER AND VERIFY ANDTHE VERIFY INFORMATION. THE INFORMATION.

THESAVVYMOMS.COM | DECEMBER 2014

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PHOTOS BY BRIAN CHILSON

2014 college guide

School officials say eStem’s downtown location is a useful resource in students’ development.

Ready or Not College prep starting a lot earlier say educators, admissions personnel B Y D WA I N H E B D A

An ever-more competitive college admissions picture, coupled with shrinking scholarship money, has many parents more concerned than ever about their child getting into the right college or university. As a result, the days of waiting until junior or senior year to start looking seriously at college options are over. “Colleges have become more selective,” says Carter Lambert, president of Central Arkansas Christian Schools of Little Rock. “Consequently, students and parents have become more proactive about taking steps to distinguish themselves from other applicants by building an academic resumé that gives them an edge in the admissions process. That can lead to thinking that doing more and doing it earlier than everyone else is the key to success.” Like many of Little Rock’s private schools, CAC is in demand down to its primary grades thanks to academic reputation and college acceptance rates. But while offering a roster of accelerated courses, the school’s bigger focus is on students’ ability to think critically. Lambert says attention to this and other fundamentals equip students as well or better than simply plowing through advanced subject matter. “Some schools offer pre-algebra as early as sixth grade. On a typical mathematics track, that would mean they would be taking Algebra II in ninth grade,” he says. “There isn’t anything wrong with that if students are developmentally ready for more abstract thinking at that age. However, parents often feel their children are getting behind if they don’t take the ‘accelerated’ track when there is really no benefit. “We are more concerned about teaching our students how to think and live than trying to be all things to all people. We have found if we do a good job in these core areas, our students will be successful. With that in mind, we try to

62 DECEMBER 2014 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM

establish objectives at each grade level that guides our curriculum and leads to our graduates being prepared for college.” Several public schools are hot on private schools’ trail in this regard, perhaps none more so than eStem Public Charter School, a K-12 system located in downtown Little Rock. The school’s very tagline touts, “College Ready”, a mindset chief executive officer John Bacon hones daily. “Everything we do, we believe should be getting kids college ready,” he says flatly. “We’re constantly trying to figure out what types of instructional models we need to implement, all the way down to kindergarten.” Like CAC, eStem’s system focuses as much on study skills and fundamental educational building blocks as on the content itself. Bacon says the school’s philosophy is to engage students early and make them accountable for their learning. Once students take that ownership, they better embrace even advanced subject matter. “We start all the way down in kindergarten and work our way up through the elementary and middle school,” Bacon says. “It’s important that we teach the content, because kids need that knowledge to be successful, but what we really aim to do is to get them to think and problem solve and find ways to take the content that they’ve learned and use it to get something done.” Bacon says eStem utilizes numerous things outside the classroom to help spur students’ development—even the school’s downtown location is a useful resource. “We aren’t tucked away in some closed-off neighborhood where kids never venture outside that bubble,” he says. “I think the neat thing about where we’re located is that this is a business setting, this is a political setting, this is the adult professional world. Here you have the future world they’re going to be working in.”


Not every student attends a school with a similarly progressive curriculum, which is what leads many to outside education companies to augment learning. Bryan Redditt, owner of Huntington Learning Center in Little Rock, says the desire to stand out from one’s peers, particularly on a college application, has pushed his company into an entirely new market of high achievers. “I’ve got kids here who desire to be in the top of their class and so they’re already working on the next year’s material,” he says. “They’re very motivated individuals.” The Huntington catalog underscores this new focus with advanced classes including thermodynamics, nuclear chemistry, physics, calculus and trigonometry, to name a few. Students get one-on-one attention in such classes, the descriptions of which carefully underscore the college relevance of such subject matter. “I think parents realize you can’t just flip a switch in high school and score high on the ACT. You have to make sure that you have all of the foundational skills to do well,” Redditt says. “You’d be amazed at how many kids we get that are coming for study skills. They may not be doing poorly in a class, but they want to hone their study skills.” At the same time students are piling up impressive academic markers, they are also taking a decidedly accelerated approach their college of choice. Middle schoolers engaged in serious college shopping aren’t the norm, but are numerous enough not to be an oddity anymore, says Fred Baker, associate vice president for enrollment and director of admissions at Hendrix College in Conway. “It’s not prolific in the middle school years yet but there’s more than there used to be, as well as more freshman and definitely sophomores,” he says. “A decade ago, these were groups of students you just didn’t hear from.” Baker says this earlier legwork isn’t necessarily bad. In past years, high school students typically tried to jam their entire college search process into their senior year. Starting this process in 9th or 10th grade affords families a lot of benefits. “I don’t think everything about this increasingly advanced look-ahead that

students and their parents are undertaking is negative,” he says. “There’s some good to be gained by getting a longer lead-in, putting in a lot more thought and being more intentional about finding schools. “In the not-so-distant past, seniors were trying to cram so much into that last year in terms of do I want big or small, should I do in-state or out-of-state. Whereas now, with some of this lead-in, they can more appropriately start to gauge their comfort level with size of an institution, distance from home and those sorts of elements.”

“I THINK PARENTS REALIZE YOU CAN’T JUST FLIP A SWITCH IN HIGH SCHOOL AND SCORE HIGH ON THE ACT. YOU HAVE TO MAKE SURE THAT YOU HAVE ALL OF THE FOUNDATIONAL SKILLS TO DO WELL.” — BRYAN REDDITT

Motivated students are getting a jump start on next year’s materials thanks to more advanced classes and programs. THESAVVYMOMS.COM | DECEMBER 2014

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2014 college guide

Little Rock teen Hannah Hooper spent a year studying in Costa Rica.

Mind the Gap Taking a year between high school and college not as hot a trend locally as in other places B Y D WA I N H E B D A

After years of summertime trips to various international locations with her parents and older sister, it came to no one’s surprise when Little Rock teen Hannah Hooper applied to spend a year in Central America halfway through her high school career. So determined was she that when the program she applied for fell through, she went anyway, after doing the legwork of finding a school and making connections with a Costa Rican family looking for American hosts for their like-minded teen. “Hannah was just always curious about other cultures,” says her mother, Suzanne Wilmoth. “Given her strong interest, we decided to help her configure her own thing and make it happen.” Wilmoth, a science teacher, and Hannah’s dad Phil Hooper, a guidance counselor, appreciated the educational value of such a trip, all parental concerns aside. Even the possibility that the credits from her Costa Rican school would not transfer—and they didn’t, so Hannah is re-taking her junior year here— didn’t lessen the impact of the experience. “It’s been phenomenal. Something this experience has given her is a very realistic, but strong sense of confidence and can-do,” Wilmoth says. “I have zero doubt that the experience that Hannah had was worth whatever sacrifice it might have been at times.”

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DECEMBER 2014 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM

Hannah’s experience is relatively unique in these parts, but elsewhere in the country she would simply be another kid taking a gap year, a growing trend whereby high school students, typically new graduates, take a year off to pursue alternative educational opportunities, travel or perform community service. TIME magazine reported in May that the practice has the support of many college educators who point to students’ higher level of maturity and focus after taking a gap year. Some schools are footing the bill for students to do so, Harvard, Princeton and the University of North Carolina among them. Boston’s Tufts University even coordinates gap year activities for students looking to go that route. All of which sounds nice but means almost nothing to Kim Williams, a guidance counselor at Central High School in Little Rock. He says most parents view their child’s wish to take a year off as serious trouble, a harbinger of the student ultimately never completing their education, an opinion he does nothing to dissuade. “I discourage it and I know most of the counselors in my office at Central discourage gap years,” he says. “It has to be an extraordinary circumstance for that to occur. We don’t recommend it as a department. “Secondary education is a must and with any type of a gap year, you’re taking C ON T I N U E D ON PAGE 6 6


Australia Chile England France Greece Italy Zambia

Spanning the globe At Harding University we don’t just talk about global experiences, we provide them. At seven international campuses spanning five continents, Harding students spend a semester studying outside the realm of a traditional classroom encountering different cultures, historic sites, foreign languages and amazing architecture. Nearly 50 percent of students in each graduating class have attended one or more of the international programs, which provide a Christian worldview.

Faith, Learning and Living Harding.edu | 800-477-4407 Searcy, Arkansas THESAVVYMOMS.COM | DECEMBER 2014

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2014 college guide CONT I N U E D FR O M PA GE 6 4

a year off from learning, you’re taking a year off from all of the preparation that it took to get you to high school graduation. And to have a year away from a formal education is just something that we don’t recommend.” Williams says there are a variety of reasons students consider a gap year, with economics both a primary motivation and an effective deterrent. For some students, needing to work full time and save money for school is a harsh reality, but that same tight financial picture can rule out the possibility of using funds for anything other than formal education. “Economics can play a big part, in fact socio-economics is probably more of a reason because students who come from affluent families have the wherewithal and the economic means to not have to worry, necessarily, what it would take to do a gap year,” he says, adding students who don’t have those kinds of resources can’t afford to add another year of expense. Williams also says while he doesn’t see very many students interested in a gap year per se, he does see a rise in students exploring early graduation, often with a gap activity in mind. “It used to be one student every four or five years and today we have three or four per year inquire about it and one or two that actually go through with it,” he says. Contrary to popular thought, most students who take a gap year aren’t doing so just to bum around and “find themselves,” although some certainly do. Some do it for the aforementioned financial reasons while others look at community service programs such as AmeriCorps, which accept students as young as 17 years of age. “Students today don’t have the fear of consequences that we grew up with. They just don’t,” says Sister Joan Pfauser, RSM, who has spent 30 years in the guidance

“ECONOMICS CAN PLAY A BIG PART, IN FACT SOCIO-ECONOMICS IS PROBABLY MORE OF A REASON BECAUSE STUDENTS WHO COME FROM AFFLUENT FAMILIES HAVE THE WHEREWITHAL AND THE ECONOMIC MEANS TO NOT HAVE TO WORRY, NECESSARILY, WHAT IT WOULD TAKE TO DO A GAP YEAR.”

— KIM WILLIAMS

department at Mount St. Mary Academy in Little Rock. “So, of course I can skip a year and I’ll be OK. Of course I can not go to college and I’ll still get in the next year. They don’t fear adventure and they don’t fear risk like they used to.” Others enter one of many programs offered by a growing list of companies catering to the demographic. According to the New York Times, the flagship USA Gap Year Fairs put on seven informational events in 2006, featuring 10 companies and hosting several hundred individuals. By 2013, the number had grown to more than 35 fairs showcasing 50 gap year organizations to 4,000 students. Such programs aren’t cheap—$10,000 for three months programming isn’t uncommon; throw in an international focus and it gets even more expensive. However, structured programs tend to assuage parents who are often caught between concern for their child’s short-term well-being and long-term success and their desire to let their kids experience things outside the classroom. It is, according to Sister Joan, the latest evolution of generation gap. “Students are much more accepting of this diversity of thought. I don’t think their parents are, but they are.” Sister Joan says. “The parents want them to get (college) started, get it over with and get a job. They’re worried about their security. The kids are less worried about that and they don’t look down on other kids that might make the choice to not go to college. Even those kids that get a job to save for a year, there’s really no stigma to that.”

We take your child’s education With quality public schools like Chenal Elementary, the education you want for your child is close at hand. Choose PCSSD schools with: • Test scores higher than other local districts • Millions in college scholarships awarded • Teachers with advanced degrees • Talented and gifted programs • State-winning sports teams

pcssd.org

501.234.2000 66 DECEMBER 2014 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM


WHEN KIDS ARE SICK LEAVE THE DRIVING TO US TAKING KIDS TO THE DOCTOR IS STRESSFUL ENOUGH. LET US DELIVER YOUR PRESCRIPTIONS, AND SOME MUCH NEEDED RELIEF RIGHT TO YOUR DOOR

WE’RE JUST A PHONE CALL AWAY!

Little Rock Chenal 821-2300 N. Rodney Parham 223-2224 Otter Creek 455-1900

North Little Rock JFK 246-3035 Lakewood 353-1984

Conway Hogan Lane 328-3282

Find us on Facebook Badge

CMYK / .ai

Visit us online for a complete list of locations

www.cornerstonepharmacy.com YOU ASPIRE Dreams drive each of us. Whether you want to be a pilot or a teacher, a doctor or an artist, your ambitions can become reality at Henderson State University. WE EMPOWER At Henderson we empower you with the tools to excel. We have more than 70 majors and a variety of academic support resources. YOU ACHIEVE A student-centered focus makes Henderson more than a university. We’re a community that prepares you for a successful career and life. Visit us to learn how Henderson can transform your aspirations into lifelong achievements.

Arkadelphia, AR • 800-228-7333 • hsu.edu THESAVVYMOMS.COM | DECEMBER 2014

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Why is MyACH your new BFF? Find your way to and around Arkansas Children’s Hospital and clinics using QR codes and step-by-step directions. º

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Access to ACH CareHub for busy families on the go!

Get MyACH FREE from the App StoreSM! archildrens.org | Healing is in our nature.®

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Like elves on a mission, we love exploring Little Rock during the holidays! Searching for that special, one-of-a-kind gift in the city’s unique neighborhood shops, grabbing a delicious meal as we carefully check off our lists, and watching the beautiful lights of the bridges and the Holidays in the Park light show before heading for the warmth and comfort of home. Little Rock has a new Southern style that’s uniquely its own, and we get to experience it each day, right here in Little Rock.

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HOLIDAY EVENTS NOV. 29, 2014 – JAN. 3, 2015 Holidays in the Park Enjoy a winter wonderland of lights set to holiday music at First Security Amphitheater

SATURDAY, DEC. 6 Big Jingle Jubilee Holiday Parade/ Lighting of the State Capitol SUNDAY, DEC. 21: Women’s SEC/Big 12 Challenge Texas vs. Texas A&M Arkansas vs. Oklahoma

For a complete listing of holiday activities and events, go to HolidaysinLittleRock.com

68 DECEMBER 2014 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM


Sharon Bale HONORING

JANUARY 17, 2015

MARRIOTT HOTEL GRAND BALLROOM LITTLE ROCK, AR

W OM EN & CHILDREN F IR ST

Woman of the Year Gala Invites you to the

TICKET PRICE $250 (donations are welcome)

Cocktails • Dinner • Music by “The Rockets” (BRANDI WISEMAN (501) 960-6778 OR BWISEMAN@WCFARKANSAS.ORG)

WOMEN & CHILDREN FIRST: The CenTer AgAinsT FAmily ViolenCe Women & Children First: The Center Against Family Violence empowers those who have been subjected to domestic violence and their children, to live independently and free from violence by providing crisis intervention, safe shelter, social/legal advocacy, transitional housing, prevention education, and support services.

IN 2013 WOMEN & CHILDREN FIRST PROVIDED THESE SERVICES: · Emergency Shelter accommodations were provided to over 731 individuals, representing more than 8,508 shelter days. · The Advocacy Program provided crisis intervention, case management, emotional support, 2,132 support group hours and more than 2,862 individual support hours. · The Court Advocacy Program provides accompaniment in court for emotional support. More than 1,500 women were assisted with legal and support issues.

· Transitional Housing provided more than 687 case management hours and supportive services to families seeking permanent housing free of violence after leaving the shelter. · The Children’s Program served over 200 children in the shelter, in addition to educational and group support activities. · Community Outreach and Education presentations were given 79 times in the community as well as 9 radio/TV interviews. · The Domestic Violence Hotline answered 12,128 crisis calls.

THESAVVYMOMS.COM | DECEMBER 2014

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MOMSPEAK

FREDRICKA B. SHARKEY, MA PHOTOGRAPHY BY SARA BLANCETT

AGE: 42 OCCUPATION: DIRECTOR OF MEDIA RELATIONS, UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL ARKANSAS CHILDREN: NEAL SHARKEY IV, 14; SARAH SHARKEY, 13; FREDERICK SHARKEY, 12 MY FAVORITE THING ABOUT WORKING AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL ARKANSAS IS…the people. I work with a great team

of creative thinkers who are dedicated to the mission of the university as well as higher education. MY FAVORITE HOLIDAY TRADITION I HOPE TO PASS ON TO MY CHILDREN IS…the spirit of giving. Our holiday traditions

include volunteering at homeless shelters and food banks so that we always remember how truly blessed we are. My children used to hate it. Now, they look forward to it. IT’S THE HOLIDAY PARTY SEASON, AND MY GO-TO OUTFIT/ ACCESSORY/SHOE IS…my red, faux-fur boa. Pulling off a boa

of any kind is difficult, but the holidays give me the perfect reason to wear that one. ONE WAY I LIKE TO GIVE BACK TO MY COMMUNITY IS…talk-

ing to people about saving money by using coupons. I spend at least an extra 30 minutes on my trips to the grocery store because I take time to explain how coupons work or telling a mom how to maximize her savings. MY FAVORITE PICK-ME-UP ON A STRESSFUL DAY IS…taking

a walk on the UCA campus. The campus is always beautiful, regardless of the season. Walking in the fresh air among all the bright, young students always picks me up. IT’S FRIDAY NIGHT AND I’M HOME ALONE, SO I…kick back,

eat, read, and watch reruns on Netflix and Hulu.

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Savvy - December 2014