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THE LIFESTYLE MANUAL FOR THE MODERN MOM

OCTOBER 2014 · THESAVVYMOMS.COM

GENERATIONS OF

HARVEST TWO LOCAL WOMEN ARE CARRYING ON ARKANSAS’S RICH FARMING TRADITION WHILE RAISING THEIR FAMILIES IN THE PROCESS

Electoral Education What kids should know about politics FIVE-Minute Makeup Minimal effort tips for moms on the go Go Gluten-Free Recipes and Halloween treats Gypsy Gardening How to make a fall planter scene


Photography by Nacy Nolan

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THESAVVYMOMS.COM | OCTOBER 2014

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HOW DOES A CHILD TELL YOU WHAT’S WRONG BEFORE SHE LEARNS HOW TO SPEAK?

ADD/ADHD APRAXIA AUTISM DEVELOPMENTAL DELAYS DOWN SYNDROME DYSLEXIA FEEDING DISORDERS HEARING IMPAIRMENTS INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES LANGUAGE DELAYS LEARNING DISABILITIES READING DISORDERS SENSORY INTEGRATION DISORDER WRITTEN EXPRESSION DISORDERS

At 18 months, children are expected to use five to 10 words, and 300 words by age 3. So a delay at 18 months that goes undetected will have adverse effects on later development. That’s why ACCESS provides Early Intervention/Early Childhood Therapy. With neurodevelopmental therapy techniques, coordination and phonation, and training in vision and learning orientation, your child can continue to reach those crucial milestones. Your child may be eligible for state and/or federal funding for medical expenses. Let us help you find which option is best for you. 501-217-8600

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OCTOBER 2014 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM

SPEECH, PHYSICAL & OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY

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OCTOBER

ON THE COVER: KATIE SHORT WITH DAUGHTERS MAGNOLIA AND HONEY. PHOTOGRAPHY BY RETT PEEK.

30 GENERATIONS OF

HARVEST

KATIE SHORT AND DOROTHY HALL ARE DEDICATED TO LIVING OFF THE LAND, RAISING LIVESTOCK AND INSTILLING A SENSE OF TRADITION IN THEIR FAMILIES.

DEPARTMENTS 6

OCTOBER 2014 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM

14 nest

ELECTORAL EDUCATION MONEY MATTERS

18 Thrive

COZY CARDIGANS FIVE-MINUTE MAKEUP

22 Nosh

GOING GLUTEN-FREE POSH SQUASH

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LETTER FROM THE

EDITOR

NANCY NOLAN

GOURDS, GRASSLANDS AND GLUTEN-FREE GOODIES

Fall is by far my favorite time of year, and I think we have captured the essence of the season in our October issue. The subjects of harvest and nature run through its pages. The title of our cover story, “Generations of Harvest,” says it all. The story profiles two local farmers, who also happen to be moms, and discusses their love for living off the land and passing along these ideals to their children and grandchildren. I greatly enjoyed meeting these women and visiting their farms, something this city girl doesn’t do very often. Writer KD Reep did an excellent job telling their stories, and photographer Rett Peek beautifully captured their spirits. Fall and Halloween, of course, are also main topics of the issue. We have tips for buying and cooking fall squash from the folks at Whole Foods and a fall gardening project from the experts at The Good Earth Garden Center. And, Dempsey Bakery provided us with the most adorable (and gluten-free) shortbread cookies and cupcakes just in time for Halloween. In this month’s Nosh department, Lisa Lakey writes about her daughter’s celiac disease diagnosis and the family’s transition to a gluten-free diet. Local chef James Harris has some gluten-free recipes to help other families in the same situation. We’re also introducing a new take on the “best of” poll of our readers. The 2014 LoLo Awards (Love Local) is our way of supporting local businesses. Check out this year’s winners and runners-up. We hope everyone enjoys the fall season and has a very happy Halloween! Be sure to find us on Facebook at facebook.com/savvymagar.

ERICA SWEENEY, EDITOR ERICASWEENEY@ARKTIMES.COM

S E L E C T S

I love this oversized, cozy cardigan from Tulips. It seems like the perfect piece to wrap up in on a crisp fall day, and gray is one of my favorite neutrals because it goes with almost anything.

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OCTOBER 2014 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM

Seeing pumpkins around always makes me happy it’s fall. And, I especially love all the varieties you can get nowadays. I spotted these orange and green ones at The Good Earth Garden Center. I love how spooky they look.

Butternut squash is my all-time favorite fall vegetable. It’s delicious cooked so many ways. If you haven’t tried butternut squash mac and cheese, you need to do so.


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THESAVVYMOMS.COM | OCTOBER 2014

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PUBLISHER REBEKAH HARDIN | rebekahhardin@arktimes.com

A School & A Therapy Clinic

EDITOR ERICA SWEENEY | ericasweeney@arktimes.com

A place where children with developmental disabilities and learning differences can grow and develop in an environment tailored to meet their unique needs.

EDITORIAL ART DIRECTOR PATRICK JONES ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES ROSE GLADNER | rose@arktimes.com

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WENDY HICKINGBOTHAM | wendy@arktimes.com LESA THOMAS | lesathomas@arktimes.com ADVERTISING COORDINATOR ROLAND GLADDEN | roland@arktimes.com

w n ed

DIGITAL MEDIA PRODUCER BRYAN MOATS GRAPHIC DESIGNERS KEVIN WALTERMIRE | BRYAN MOATS | PATRICK JONES | MIKE SPAIN

Therapy Services chool and AOutpatient Therapy Clinic Occupational · Physical · Speech zes (maximum of 8 children per class) ional, Physical & Speech Therapy If your child has been diagnosed with a developmental tpatient therapy is available.disorder:

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PHOTOGRAPHER BRIAN CHILSON PRODUCTION MANAGER WELDON WILSON IT DIRECTOR ROBERT CURFMAN CONTROLLER WELDON WILSON ACCOUNTS PAYABLE KELLY LYLES BILLING/COLLECTIONS LINDA PHILLIPS CIRCULATION DIRECTOR SUSIE SHELTON

PENDING

ALL MATERIALS ARE HANDLED WITH DUE CARE; HOWEVER, THE PUBLISHER ASSUMES NO RESPONSIBILITY FOR CARE AND SAFE RETURN OF UNSOLICITED MATERIALS. ALL LETTERS AND PICTURES SENT TO SAVVY™ WILL BE TREATED AS INTENDED FOR PUBLICATION AND ARE SUBJECT TO SAVVY'S™ UNRESTRICTED RIGHT TO EDIT OR TO COMMENT EDITORIALLY. 201 E. MARKHAM ST. SUITE 200, LITTLE ROCK, AR 72201 501-375-2985. ALL CONTENTS ©2014 SAVVY™


THESAVVYMOMS.COM | OCTOBER 2014

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contributors OCTOBER 2014

KD REEP

Thank you Central Arkansas for voting Dr. Bryan Hiller “BEST LOCAL ORTHODONTIST”

is a writer and public relations practitioner in Little Rock. She owns Flywrite Communications, Inc., a public relations agency, and is the PR director for Mass Enthusiasm, a fullservice marketing communications firm in Little Rock.

TESSA WILMANSHIGGINS

is a makeup artist, esthetician and owner of Beauty Geek Lash and Skincare Lounge in the Heights. Her love for beauty products began at the tender age of 6, when she held her first bottle of sparkly pink Hello Kitty nail polish. The rest, as they say, is history. For makeup and skincare tips, visit beabeautygeek.com.

PROVIDING CUSTOM TREATMENT THROUGH West Rock Braces Proudly Supports Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Arkansas!

DIGITAL ORTHODONTICS • Invisalign and Invisalign Teen • Metal or Esthetic (clear) Braces • 3D Digital Scanning Technology • Laser Treatment • Temporary Anchorage Devices (TADs) • No Referral Necessary • Flexible Payment Plan

west rock

CALLIE FRANCE STERLING

is a 23-year-old graduate of the University of Central Arkansas. She has a degree in Journalism with an emphasis in print as well as broadcast. She loves photography, scrapbooking, writing and going on adventures with her husband and their two dogs.

STEVE WEIMAN

is store manager at The Good Earth Garden Center. His love of horticulture began in childhood, and he has a degree in ornamental horticulture from Delaware Valley College. He is on the board of directors of Arkansas Green Industry. He has two children and two grandchildren.

LISA LAKEY

WestRockBraces.com 501.712.5080 16003 Chenal Parkway (Next to Chuy’s) 12 OCTOBER 2014 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM

is a freelance writer, wife and (somewhat) savvy mom of two living in Benton.

EMILY BROWN’S

love of fashion and design are the driving forces behind her unique, contemporary store, Tulips in the Heights. She lives in Little Rock with her husband, Mark, and their two children, Peyton and Millie.

SARA FULTONKOERBLING

is Whole Foods Market Little Rock’s Healthy Eating Specialist. She is a certified personal chef and attended the School of Culinary Arts and Hotel Management at Santa Barbara City College in California. She loves cooking, sharing food and hosting dinner parties because she sees food as a way to foster a sense of community. She eats locally and seasonally as much as possible.

JAMES HARRIS

is the executive sous chef at Pleasant Valley Country Club in Little Rock. He was trained in the culinary arts at Johnson & Wales University and has qualified as a GREAT Guide as part of The National Foundation for Celiac Awareness’ Gluten-free Resource Education and Awareness Training program.

DWAIN HEBDA

is a writer and editor living in Little Rock. He and his wife, Darlene, are the parents of four grown children. The emptynesters enjoy traveling, working out and spoiling their two dogs.

STEPHEN NORTHINGTON

is a Certified Divorce Financial Analyst based in Little Rock. He can be reached at 501993-0167 or Stephen. Northington@lpl.com. To learn more about the CDFATM Certification, visit institutedfa.com.


THESAVVYMOMS.COM | OCTOBER 2014

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nest | NOSH | Thrive | CULTIVATE

NEST PARENTING | FAMILY

ELECTORAL EDUCATION

Discussing politics with children can help them learn about the world around them, develop critical thinking skills and appreciate diversity B Y D WA I N H E B D A

It was a post-9/11 parenting moment Paul Spencer still retells with a slight catch in his voice. He and his eldest son, then a preschooler, were driving near Little Rock when the tyke looked out the window at the downtown skyline. “Daddy,” the youngster asked, pointing at the cluster of office towers, “is someone going to fly an airplane into that building?” “That melted my heart, actually broke my heart more than anything else,” Spencer recalled. “They know more than you think they know, for one thing, and they’re capable of understanding more than you think they’re capable of understanding.” While there can be no debate that in the gallery of modern America 9/11 stands alone, the ongoing political issues of our day may be more pervasive than even that seminal event. Mature themes and nasty tone make many of these issues inappropriate, even disturbing for young children. Scotty Smittle, clinical director with Chenal Family Therapy’s Conway office, said parents shouldn’t assume that even very young kids aren’t hearing and understanding certain elements of political rhetoric. “As early as kindergarten or even into preschool, the idea of a president comes

14 OCTOBER 2014 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM

to mind,” he said. “Kids are aware of fairy tales, they’re aware of kings and so, for my kids anyway, they asked ‘Who’s the president? Is he our king?’” Given the early age at which kids are exposed to politics, Smittle said it is important for parents to remember some of the most powerful messages aren’t coming over the airwaves, but across the dinner table. “The idea of the blank slate parent is a myth,” he said. “You cannot not influence your children; you’re going to influence whether you want to or not.” A lot of things make diversity of political thought particularly complicated in the family dynamic. For one, political views often grow out of a family’s religious beliefs, making some issues moral imperatives. Such core beliefs, are unavoidable and actually important early moorings for a youngster’s identity, Smittle said. “The best route to take is not to try to create an open field for them to explore whatever they want. It’s really impossible to do that,” he said. “I think you stay honest to what you believe as a family and you introduce that to them, and that gives them a starting point in their development.”


AN HO N EST A P P R O A C H At the Spencer household, this blueprint has been elevated beyond most. A government and politics teacher at Catholic High School for Boys, devout Catholic and longtime political activist, he co-founded Regnat Populus, a grassroots political organization campaigning for reforms in campaign financing. Not surprisingly, the three Spencer kids have had front-row seats to a variety of events advancing political and social justice issues. “The kids have gone with us on marches, they’ve held signs with us, it’s something they grew up with,” he said. “We didn’t set out to be activists; I believe I have a moral obligation to do the things that I do and we’re a family that believes that we stick together.” As a result, “they understand that ordinary people sometimes have to do things that aren’t always the most exciting things, aren’t always the most popular things, and sometimes it will hurt a little. Sometimes people will say things about their dad in the newspaper that aren’t nice things. That’s just part of it.” Spencer’s formula for helping children understand political happenings, even the uglier ones, is a straightforward one. Be age appropriate, but be honest. “I don’t believe any time is a bad time to start teaching children about the world around them,” he said. “Obviously, I don’t want to talk about journalists being beheaded when we’re having family time, but there are a lot of things that we can talk about. And we don’t shy away from that.” While the breadth of his children’s experience is unique, Spencer said he’s seen evidence in his students that other parents are also making political issues more central in their children’s upbringing. “They tend to be better read, they seem to be more in tune with their surroundings. I think they understand the urgency of having to live in a very small world now,” he said. “You can’t force anything down these boys’ throats. They’re too smart for that. If I try to force my opinions on them, they’re not so gullible as to say, ‘Well Mr. Spencer says this, this must be the gospel truth.’” THINKIN G CR ITICA L LY Achieving this kind of intellectual maturity is a process that begins early. Noel Brewster, head of Early Childhood School and Lower School at Pulaski Academy, said the school strives to hone critical thinking across all subject matter, including the seeds of political thought. “We want to train our children from an early age to be able to analyze information, look at data and make good decisions in any particular content area whether its civics or some type of scientific data, approached from the standpoint of developmental appropriateness,” she said. Students as young as fourth grade discuss government and take fields trips to the State Capitol building, but Brewster said a foundational element that transcends the curriculum is the manner in which students engage in discourse. An early appreciation for diversity and dissenting opinion yields tremendous intellectual and social dividends down the road. “They do have opinions and yes, they are primarily reflective of their parents’ opinions. That’s just natural at this age,” she said. “At Pulaski Academy, it’s just not mission friendly for our kids to not accept other peoples’ opinions and respectfully hear them. We want our kids to be able to express themselves, share an opinion and then that opinion be agreed or disagreed with and it be OK when we walk away, because we all have that right.” The combination of critical thinking skills and tolerance of others’ opinions prepares a child to stand on his or her own two feet when it comes to forming opinions, Brewster said. Parents, of course, are a critical element in this process, whether in discussing an issue or helping to diffuse the inflammatory, even frightening, rhetoric of political ads. “We encourage our parents to communicate with their children honestly; that’s what we do at school,” she said. “I would treat [political ads] like I would any other question a child may have about something that’s bothered them. Let’s talk about it and let’s talk about why that person is saying that and is it in fact the case for everyone. Kids are very capable of determining information like that.”

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Thank You Savvy Readers we think you’re the best!

5817 Kavanaugh Blvd Little Rock, AR 72207 501.614.7343 tulipsarkansas.com THESAVVYMOMS.COM | OCTOBER 2014

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nest | NOSH | Thrive | CULTIVATE

MONEY MATTERS Moving forward financially after a divorce or loss of a spouse BY STEPHEN NORTHINGTON

It wasn’t supposed to end this way. When you married, you both promised it would last forever. But it didn’t. Whether by divorce or death, many women in Arkansas are often faced with the task of moving forward with their lives financially on their own. “Can my family make it financially, without my husband?” “Do I have enough money in my account to pay my bills this month?” As a Certified Financial Planner and Certified Divorce Financial Analyst, I hear these questions frequently. They are the reality for many women who have lost a spouse by death or divorce. If you feel adrift and insecure financially, that’s normal. Your goal if this happens is to educate yourself on financial issues in a way that builds confidence so you won’t be fearful about your financial future. Today is a start on the journey we call “Financial Comfort.” CASCADING EMOTIONS Sometimes, when confronting financial issues around divorce or the loss of a spouse too early, it can feel emotionally overwhelming. Individuals in this situation may feel frightened, paralyzed, emotionally drained, numb, abandoned, disoriented, angry and fragile. These emotions take time to go away. At a time when you feel least able to cope with life and lack mental and physical energy, decisions must be made that can permanently affect your finances, your family, your livelihood and so much more. MOVING FORWARD AFTER DIVORCE After child custody, the No. 1 concern for women going through a divorce is “will my kids and I be financially OK to move forward?” It’s sometimes shocking how many divorce settlements are signed with no planning in place to help answer that very important question. “Hope” and “I think” are not viable planning techniques. Here is the problem. You only get one chance to get your divorce settlement right. If you make a mistake, it is very challenging to get it corrected in family law. In addition, that mistake can also cause undue financial stress up to and including personal bankruptcy. A Certified Divorce Financial Analyst can work with individuals and their attorneys to take any proposed settlement and project it into the future. A settlement that looks fair and equitable today based on a 50-50 split of marital assets may not be fair and equitable in five, 10 or 15 years. Let’s look at a case study of a couple we will call June and Dan. This example shows how taxation can really take a bite out of a divorce settlement. VACATION HOME $50,000 (VALUE: $200,000; MORTGAGE: $150,000) CDS $50,000 401(K) $100,000 ASSETS JUNE DAN VACATION HOME $50,000 CDS $50,000 401(K) $50,000 $50,000 TOTAL $100,000 $100,000 Since he wanted to keep the CDs, Dan suggested that June get the vacation home and sell it. Everyone, including the attorneys, thought this sounded like a fair and simple solution, so that’s what they did. Let’s take a look what happened when June really sold the home.

16 OCTOBER 2014 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM

ASSETS VACATION HOME SALE: PROCEEDS FROM SALE LESS: MORTGAGE PAY OFF LESS: COMMISSIONS PRE-TAX NET PROCEEDS LESS: CAPITAL GAINS TAXES NET PROCEEDS

JUNE DAN $200,000 (150,000) (12,000) $38,000 (7,600) $30,400

CDS 50,000 401(K) 50,000 50,000 TOTAL $80,400 $100,000 Were the marital assets split equally? Yes, the split was equal, $100,000 for both June and Dan. After paying $12,000 in commissions and $7,600 in taxes, on the vacation home June is left with only $80,400; Dan, on the other hand, still has $100,000. Is this settlement fair and equitable? No. Can June go back and get this settlement changed? No. I don’t think June planned to fail in this case. It was a failure to plan. Here are two learning points to remember so this doesn’t happen to you: • All assets are not equal. Because of taxes, cost and growth rates, what you put in your 50 percent really does matter. • Fair and equitable does not always mean equal: 50-50 may become 60-40 or 55-45 to make the settlement equitable to both parties. Securities and Advisory Services offered through LPL Financial, a Registered Investment Advisor Member FINRA/SIPC. Content in this article is for general information only and not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual. The example used in this article is hypothetical and not representative of any specific scenario.

FINANCIAL FEARLESSNESS

If you have just lost a spouse or you are at any point in the divorce process, here is a list of best practices and mistakes to avoid in achieving financial fearlessness: • If you’ve lost a spouse, don’t rush. During the first year, do not make any financial decisions that cannot be reversed. • If you are divorcing and have marital assets of $500,000 or more, never sign a divorce settlement without projecting that proposed settlement into the future. Consider using the professional services of a Certified Divorce Financial Analyst. Remember, fair and equitable does not always mean equal. • If you’ve lost a spouse, learn to say no. It is not unusual for family members or would-be suitors to take advantage of you while you are vulnerable. • In a divorce, the biggest financial mistake we see clients make is keeping the marital home. This emotional decision can cause financial distress; also, you bear the cost to maintain and sell the home entirely on your own. • Lastly, be gentle with yourself. Your journey will be difficult, but you deserve to succeed.


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For more information contact the HELPLINE: 800.643.8258 or visit us at http://humanservices.arkansas.gov/ddds/Pages/FirstConnectionsProgram.aspx

THESAVVYMOMS.COM | OCTOBER 2014

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THRIVE Fashion | lifestyle | health

COZY CARDY B Y E M I LY B R O W N PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIAN CHILSON

Oversized cardigans can rev up anything you’re wearing this fall. The coolest new member of your closet can be paired with jeans or leggings. Add super-hot heels to make your whole look sizzle. Now, where are we going, Mom?

3 WAYS TO WEAR THIS FALL TREND 1. Carpool Pickup. Pair this cozy cardy with boyfriend jeans, your favorite tee and booties. 2. Girls Night Out. This cardigan looks great with gray skinnies, leather peplum top, heels and a long pendant. 3. Date Night. Drape over a black fitted dress, tights and heels.

18 OCTOBER 2014 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM

Free People gray striped open-front cardigan, $128; available at Tulips in Little Rock.


Regardless of age, LIFE is meant to be

GET YOUR CHEER ON!

We offer tumbling and cheer classes for all ages and ability levels. Contact us today to learn more about our programs. We also offer school team discounts! New Classes Boys Only! Super Hero Training: 4-8 Years Old Xtreme Tricking & Tumbling: 8 Years And Older

cheercityunited.com (501) 407-8050 • 7 Clearwater Drive, Suite B • Little Rock

Have A Howling Ghoul Time! 19th Annual

pick up a game card for prize drawings! Flat Screen TV or $100 gift card

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Children’s Mental Health Services • Psychological Evaluations & Psychiatric Services • Mental Health Paraprofessional Intervention • School-based Services • Family Therapy • Play Therapy To ensure your child’s well being, visit us online at familiesinc.net, where you can learn more about our children’s services. 1200 James Street Jacksonville, AR 72076 Toll-free: 877.595.8869 501.982.5000

Enjoy a safe and fun Halloween Thurs., Oct. 30 from 6 PM to 8:30 PM • Trick-or-treating • Fun and games • Safe and accessible for children and families LOCATIONS: • Arkansas Arts Center • Historic Arkansas Museum • Little Rock Visitor Center at Curran Hall • MacArthur Museum of Arkansas Military History • Mosaic Templars Cultural Center • Museum of Discovery • Old State House Museum • Ron Robinson Theater • Witt Stephens Jr. Nature Center SPONSORED BY:

FOR MORE INFORMATION, VISIT LITTLEROCK.COM THESAVVYMOMS.COM | OCTOBER 2014

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nest | NOSH | Thrive | CULTIVATE

FIVE-MINUTE MAKEUP This quick makeup routine will help even the busiest mom look flawless no matter how little time she has in the mornings BY TESSA WILMANS-HIGGINS PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIAN CHILSON Little Rock mom Jonie Burks after the five-minute makeup routine.

Before

Everyone needs to get out the door in a rush every now and then. Or everyday… no judgment here, I totally get it. I’ve got to have my beauty sleep. Need tips to get you polished and pretty in no time? Check out this five-minute makeover I did on my adorable, hard-working client and mom of three teenagers, Jonie Burks, and learn my fav tricks!

20 OCTOBER 2014 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM


1. FOUN DATIO N I think most women wear too much foundation. There’s no need to cover every teensy pore and freckle. Bonus, it’s quicker if you use less. Jonie has beautiful skin, and I let it show through a light dusting of Julie Hewett’s mineral powder in shade 1. 2. CON CEA L This one is very important, gals. I dabbed Julie Hewett’s concealer in shade 2 under Jonie’s eyes to even out skin tone. Pro tip: If you need a two-minute makeup, skip the foundation and apply concealer under your eyes and around your nose a little. Set with my must-have powder, Laura Mercier’s Secret Brightening Powder, for ultimate staying power. 3. LA SH ES Jonie has lash extensions, which go a long way in helping her in the gettingready department. Her lashes are so lovely, in fact, that I skipped eye shadow altogether … easy peasy. 4. TIG H TL IN IN G This is one of my favorite tricks. Think of it as invisible eyeliner. I take Benefit Cosmetics’ They’re Real Pushup Liner, and press and swipe it into the roots of the lashes from underneath instead of on top. It really brightens the eyes and makes your lashes (extensions or not!) look super full and thick. 5. BRO WS This is a no-brainer. Like your hair frames your face, brows frame your eyes, and I think it looks like you spent way more time on your makeup than you actually did when you fill in your brows. We used Brett Brow Duo-Shade Powder in Pale Blonde. 6. BRO N ZER Sweep a brownish-toned bronzer (easy on the shimmer, please!) under the cheekbone, at the jawline and on the forehead in a 3 or E shape. This adds a little warmth and dimension. We used Julie Hewett’s sun bronzer. You could call it a day after this, or…. 7. LIP A N D CH EEK I’m all for multitaskers in the makeup department, especially when you’re in a hurry. To finish Jonie’s easy and pretty look, I dabbed Julie Hewett’s Rosie Cheekie on both her cheeks and lips for a polished, professional and pinky glow, perfect for all year-round. Many of the products discussed are available at Beauty Geek in Little Rock’s Heights neighborhood.

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www.roseberry-farms.com • (501) 722.8545 • 12223 Hwy 9 • Benton THESAVVYMOMS.COM | OCTOBER 2014

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NOSH COOKING | DINING | NUTRITION

Penne with Cherry Tomatoes and Grilled Chicken, prepared by James Harris (recipe on page 24).

22 OCTOBER 2014 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM


nest | NOSH | Thrive | CULTIVATE

GOING GLUTEN FREE

Local writer Lisa Lakey shares the story of her daughter’s celiac disease diagnosis and offers tips for parents in helping learn what kids with gluten intolerances can eat. Local chef James Harris shares his favorite kid-friendly, gluten-free recipes. STORY BY LISA LAKEY RECIPES BY JAMES HARRIS PHOTOGRAPHY BY SARA BLANCETT

She just wanted a doughnut. It seemed like a simple enough request. Why not just one? But just one of those fried confections smothered in sweet wonderfulness was filled with more than just calories and a week’s worth of sugar. That innocent doughnut contained my daughter’s own personal kryptonite: gluten. Statistics show that one in 133 people have celiac disease, yet my husband and I had never heard of it. We were as clueless about this mystery disease as we were what was causing the stomach pains and anxiety in our young daughter for roughly a year. So when someone suggested we look into it, we did. And it changed our lives and our eating habits forever. Celiac disease is a digestive autoimmune disease triggered by the consumption of gluten (a protein found in wheat, barley and rye). Basically, when a person with celiac disease consumes food containing gluten, it triggers an immune system response that ultimately destroys the villi in the small intestine. These little finger-like guys are responsible for our bodies absorbing the nutrients in food. Yep, we need ’em. When they get destroyed, malabsorption (along with hundreds of other gluten-related symptoms) can occur. According to the Celiac Disease Foundation, some of the most common symptoms in children include abdominal pain, fatigue, delayed growth, tooth enamel defects and even depression. The treatment? A 100 percent gluten-free diet. That’s right. Pizza delivery on Monday night? Forget about it. Drive-thru chicken nuggets after a late game? Think again. Fruit and veggies are naturally gluten free, as is unprocessed meat. But gluten is lurking in more than just bread and crackers. It hides in many processed lunchmeats and even some drink mixes. GLUTEN-FREE GAME PLAN Some parents are choosing to go gluten free for reasons other than celiac disease or gluten intolerance. Many parents will testify the diet has shown improvement in symptoms of children with autism or other disorders. Whatever the reason, the loss of convenience foods is a small price to pay for the health of our children. But truth be told, some of us can’t help but mourn the loss of our Oreos. For my daughter, it was her favorite doughnut shop. We’re still coming to terms with that one. But seriously. For those of us new to the lifestyle, the gluten-free world can be a bit scary and overwhelming, leaving a lot of parents stuck and wondering, “Where do we go from here?” Enter James Harris, the new executive sous chef at the Pleasant Valley Country Club and gluten-free extraordinaire. Oh, and he may be the coolest thing gluten-free Arkansans have seen since Dempsey Bakery opened in 2011. Harris, a former chef for the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness and a father of three, understands the struggles of going gluten free. While with the NFCA, Harris taught classes and workshops on gluten-free cooking and worked with restaurants on how to safely cook for gluten-free customers.

“You have to rethink how you’re cooking,” Harris says. “The first shopping experience, that’s the hardest thing. That first time you go shopping you actually have to start looking at labels. Say a normal person is spending maybe 25 minutes shopping. For someone with celiac disease, it’s going to take an hour and a half to two hours.” His best advice for newbies? Have a game plan. “Research first,” he says, “then make out a list. Go onto the NFCA website. It gives a checklist and shopping list of what to look for.” When it comes to the home, many parents opt for a gluten-free household. It’s just easier. No gluten, no risk. But when you have a home with mixed preferences and personalities, it can be a challenge. For those who have split households, Harris offers his No. 1 rule of gluten-free cooking. “Keep your kitchen clean,” he says. “It all comes down to cross contamination. Two different cutting boards, two different toasters. Every time you fry chicken in a fryer, you have to bring out a new pot and grease to cook the gluten-free chicken. Heat does not kill the gluten particle.” Harris also points out that it’s hard (maybe impossible) to keep a truly “clean” kitchen when working with wheat flours. While the flour on surfaces can be wiped away, particles can stay in the air for 24 hours. GET KIDS INVOLVED As hard as all of this can be for parents to absorb, it’s twice as hard on the kids. Those who are diagnosed at an age where they have been consuming glutenfilled goodies most of their lives are likely to be resistant to change. “Get them in the kitchen,” Harris suggests. “Let them help you prepare their meals. When they get more involved they’re taking responsibility for what they eat. Then they think, ‘I want this cookie, but this cookie will make me sick. What are my other options?’” Another unexpected downside of a gluten-free diet is the social implications. Eating at a restaurant or attending a birthday party takes a heads-up and a little extra planning to ensure the child is safe, happy and healthy. “When at a restaurant, talk to the manager first,” Harris says. “Ask to see the kitchen manager or chef to explain what’s going on. If they look at you wideeyed, I would go someplace else. If a child is having a party at a pizza place, call ahead and ask, ‘Is it OK if I bring a pizza for my daughter?’” Communicate with your kids early on so they learn what they can have, what they can’t and how to handle any food situations that occur when you aren’t there. Because it’s going to happen sooner or later, and if you prepare them, the gluten-free world may not be such a scary and overwhelming place after all. “Be patient with kids,” Harris says. “Make them feel special. Watch out for what they want to eat and get them involved in decisions.” C ON T I N U E D ON PAGE 2 4 THESAVVYMOMS.COM | OCTOBER 2014

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nest | NOSH | Thrive | CULTIVATE CONT INU E D FR O M PA GE 2 3

SMOOTH TRANSITION

Paula Dempsey, owner of Dempsey Bakery in Little Rock, knows a thing or two about gluten and how to avoid it. As the creator of the only 100 percent gluten-free (and wheat-, soy- and nut-free) eatery in town, Dempsey has made it her calling to show some gluten-free love in Little Rock. Here, Dempsey shares her tips on making the gluten-free transition a bit smoother for your kids: • Make your home a gluten-free safe haven. “If the household willingly eats that way, then the child will not feel alone in the home,” Dempsey says. “When other family members go away from the home, they can do as they want.” • Volunteer for school treats. “That way you know your child is getting safe food,” she says. “If you are providing the snacks, then everyone will get the same.” • Communicate with teachers. “She should be able to warn you of upcoming events so you can make sure your child has the proper snacks and treats,” she says. “My grandchildren have stand-by treats stashed with the teacher for those unannounced occasions.” • Be patient. “It will come easier as time goes by,” Dempsey says.

PENNE WITH CHERRY TOMATOES AND GRILLED CHICKEN Serves 4 1 pound cherry tomatoes cut in half 1/2 small red onion, thinly sliced 1/4 cup white wine vinegar 4 tablespoons olive oil 1 tablespoon fresh basil, chopped 1/4 cup fresh parsley, chopped 1/4 teaspoon pepper 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 cup of parmesan cheese 1 pound gluten-free penne, cooked according to package instructions and drained 4 8-oz. skinless chicken breasts 1/4 cup olive oil Salt and pepper to taste 1. Season chicken breast with salt and pepper. Chicken may be sauteed or grilled. To sautee, heat pan over mediumhigh heat, add olive oil to the pan and carefully add chicken in pan. Let the chicken cook, and after 4 to 5 minutes, turn the chicken over and cook till done. 2. When cooking gluten-free pasta, double the amount of water. Add salt to the pasta water and let the water come to a rolling boil before adding the pasta. Cook according to package instructions and drain (do not rinse the pasta). 3. In a large bowl, combine cherry tomatoes, onion, vinegar, oil, basil, parsley, pepper and salt. Add cooked pasta, toss to combine and add cheese and place on plates. Cut the chicken into strips and serve with the pasta. CONT INU E D O N PA G E 2 6

24 OCTOBER 2014 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM

GLUTEN-FREE PASTA DOUGH

You can also make your own gluten-free pasta at home. This recipe makes 1 pound of fresh pasta, and a pasta machine and stand mixer are needed.  /2 cup potato starch (2.125 ounces), plus 1 additional for rolling out dough 2/3 cup corn flour (2.5 ounces) 1/2 cup quinoa flour (2.5 ounces) 2 teaspoons xanthan gum 1 teaspoon guar gum 1 1/2 teaspoons fine salt 2 large eggs 4 large egg yolks 1 to 3 tablespoons warm water, or as needed 1. Sift the dry ingredients into the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment; add the eggs, yolks and 1 tablespoon of warm water, and beat on medium speed until the mixture holds together or forms a ball, about 2 to 3 minutes. If the dough is too dry, add more warm water, 1 teaspoon at a time, until the dough holds together. If the dough is too sticky, mix in just enough additional potato starch to form the dough. 2. Remove the dough from the bowl, and cut into fourths. Wrap three of the pieces in plastic wrap, then set aside until needed. Using a potato starch-dusted rolling pin, shape the remaining piece into a rectangle approximately the same width as the pasta machine rollers. Adjust the pasta machine rollers to their widest setting. 3. Lightly dust the dough rectangle with potato starch on both sides to keep it from sticking. Roll the rectangle of pasta through the rollers. Tighten the rollers of the pasta machine one notch, and feed the dough through the rollers again. Continue to feed the dough through the rollers, tightening the rollers one notch each time, until the pasta is paper thin (around number 6). 4. If the pasta starts to tear, do not roll any further. Cover the pasta sheet with plastic wrap, and set aside while rolling out the remaining three pieces of dough. 5. Place the desired cutting attachment on the pasta machine. Feed one end of a pasta sheet through the blades while holding the other end straight up from the machine. Catch the strips from underneath the machine before the sheet goes completely through the cutting attachment. Place the cut strips on a potato starch-dusted baking sheet or a clean kitchen towel, or hang them on a pasta rack. Let dry for 5 to 10 minutes before cooking.


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nest | NOSH | Thrive | CULTIVATE CONT INU E D FR O M PA GE 2 4 Gluten-free Chocolate Cupcake with Chocolate Mousse Icing, prepared by James Harris.

ARKANSAS IS IN THE TOP 5 IN ABUSE

OF PRESCRIPTION PAIN MEDICATION BY TEENAGERS. Recreational use of prescription drugs is killing our children. Every 11

minutes an overdose occurs. Arkansas is in the top five in abuse of prescription pain medication by teenagers. We must act to remove unused and unneeded drugs from our medicine cabinets to prevent abuse. The Pulaski County Sheriff’s Office has installed a prescription drug drop box at the administration building located at 2900 S. Woodrow, Little Rock, AR. Drop your unused or expired medications in this convenient, anonymous box 24 hours a day/seven days a week. The drugs are then incinerated in accordance with federal and state environmental guidelines. For more information go to www.artakeback.org.

26 OCTOBER 2014 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM


nest | NOSH | Thrive | CULTIVATE

GLUTEN-FREE CHOCOLATE CUPCAKES

CHOCOLATE MOUSSE ICING Makes enough icing for 10 cupcakes 1 cup raw cashews 1/4 cup coconut milk 1/4 cup cocoa powder 1/3 cup dates, pitted and chopped 1 tablespoon pure maple syrup  Place all ingredients in a food processor or blender, and blend together until very smooth. If it is too thick, add coconut milk to thin it slightly.

Makes 10 cupcakes 1 1/2 cups Bob’s Red Mill Gluten-Free Flour 3/4 cups unsweetened cocoa powder 1 teaspoon gluten-free baking powder 3/4 teaspoon gluten-free baking soda 3/4 teaspoon salt 1 avocado 1 cup pure maple syrup 1/3 cup coconut oil 1 cup almond milk 1/3 cup coconut milk 2 teaspoon gluten-free vanilla extract

WRAP IT!

1. Preheat oven to 350°F. Place cupcake liners in muffin pan. 2. Whisk together flour, coco powder, baking powder, baking soda and salt in a bowl. Puree avocado in a food processor until smooth. Add maple syrup, almond milk, oil and vanilla and blend until creamy. 3. Whisk avocado mixture into the flour mixture, combine until smooth. 4. Spoon batter into muffin pan and bake for 25 minutes or until toot pick inserted into center comes out dry with crumbs. Allow to cool before icing.

Turn your family’s favorite sandwich into a gluten-free wrap. Rudi’s brand gluten-free tortillas are a great option, and can be stuffed with a variety of fillings. This is a perfect for lunchboxes. These tortillas can be purchased at local supermarkets.

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nest | NOSH | Thrive | CULTIVATE

GLUTEN-FREE HALLOWEEN PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIAN CHILSON

Candy and other sweet treats are a major part of Halloween festivities. For kids on a gluten-free diet, there are several options for delicious and adorable Halloween goodies so that they always feel a part of any celebration. In Central Arkansas, Dempsey Bakery’s iced shortbread cookies are gluten free, as well as soy and nut free. They can be made dairy and egg free upon request. And, the bakery’s cupcakes are gluten, soy, dairy and nut free. Two weeks before Halloween, a variety of seasonal treats will be available at Dempsey’s bakery case. These festive items may also be custom ordered at 501-375-2257 or visit dempseybakery.com for more details. Candy corn, the most quintessential Halloween treat, is also gluten free. The Celiac Disease Foundation has a complete list of gluten-free candy at celiac.org. We’ll link directly to the list on our Facebook page (facebook.com/savvymagar).

28 OCTOBER 2014 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM


I AM THE AEA s a Health Sciences, Technology and Education instructor, Tarji Anderson-Russell introduces students to the medical profession, while also serving as coordinator of the school’s Career and Technical Education (CTE) and Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) programs. In addition, she leads the school’s dance team, where’s she’s affectionately known as “Mama Russ.” Anderson-Russell says she enjoys working with high school students because of their maturity level and ability to take learning into their own hands. The students, she says, are also “more settled and more structured.” Inspiring learning in her students is one of her favorite aspects of teaching, and she particularly appreciates learning about her former students’ successes. She says she feels a sense of pride and accomplishment when she sees a student who has struggled in the past finally succeed. “My favorite thing is when I see those ‘ah-ha’ moments and see the light bulb come on,” she says. “That’s great.” Anderson-Russell, 41, was named Dumas School District Teacher of the Year for 2014-15, and previously received the honor in the 2010-11 school year. She joined Dumas New Tech High School in 2006, after teaching seventh grade life science at Dumas Junior High School for four years. She began her teaching career at Lonoke Middle School, where she taught earth science, in 1999. Before becoming a teacher, she was a respiratory therapist, and still works twice a month as a respiratory therapist at McGehee-Desha County Hospital. She has bachelor’s degrees in respiratory therapy and health education, and a master’s degree in secondary school leadership from the University of Central Arkansas. In 2002, Anderson-Russell joined the Arkansas Education Association. At first, she says she mostly appreciated the organization’s benefits and discounts, but the most important aspect of being a member is the sense of “collectiveness.” “We’re one voice,” she says. “When we’re all together,

Brian Chilson

A

Meet Tarji Anderson-Russell, Dumas New Tech High School

we’re louder.” Anderson-Russell is the mother of two sons: 25-year-old Damian Anderson, who is a member of the National Guard military police and currently serving in Afghanistan; and 12-yearold Damarian Russell, a seventh grader at Dumas Junior High. Outside the classroom, Anderson-Russell loves watching football (the Washington Redskins and Arkansas Razorbacks are her favorite teams), going to church and collecting elephants, the mascot of the Delta Sigma Theta sorority to which she belongs. She says people often describe her as fun loving, organized and even a neat freak. She also admits that she sometimes takes on too much and wears just as many hats in her personal life as she does at school.

1500 W. 4th St. Little Rock 501.375.4611 aeaonline.org

THESAVVYMOMS.COM | OCTOBER 2014

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nest | NOSH | Thrive | CULTIVATE

POSH SQUASH

Fall’s bounty brings a variety of squashes to the table. Learn some tips and tricks for preparing the season’s most delicious vegetable. BY SARA FULTON-KOERBLING PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIAN CHILSON

Fall and winter squash come in a variety of shapes, sizes and colors. Many are familiar to grocery shoppers, but others may seem a little exotic. While these beautiful squash may be used to decorate your front porch or as a centerpiece, they can also be eaten. So, don’t let them go to waste. Try a new variety of squash this season. Here is an introduction to a few of the varieties, along with tips to help you select the best squash and prepare them in a delicious way that the whole family will love. One of the simplest ways to cook each of these squashes is to simply cut in half, scoop out the seeds, season and roast in the oven until the flesh is soft. And, don’t forget to season and roast the seeds for a great snack.

HOW TO CHOOSE A SQUASH When choosing squash, look for a stem that is dry, tan and possibly frayed, especially if you’re planning to store it for a long time. If the stem is still green or is leaking sap, it was not completely cured and will not last long in storage. But, you can certainly use it immediately. Another thing to look for is color. A bright, shiny squash looks pretty, but won’t store as long as a dull, matte one.

RED KURI This is a red-orange Japanese winter squash that is rich in beta carotene. They are 5 to 10 pounds each and teardrop-shaped. The golden flesh is smooth, dry, sweet and rich, and stores well. Red kuri have a chestnut-like flavor and are mildly sweet. Because of their dense texture, they hold their shape when steamed, and are smooth and velvety when pureed. This is a very versatile squash that can be used in Thai curries, soups, pilafs, gratins or baked goods.

ACORN The small fruits have sweet but mild, yellow-orange flesh. The skin is very tough, and shouldn’t be eaten, but holds its shape well when cooked. They are often used for stuffing. Cut the squash in half and scoop out the seeds. Bake until soft. Scoop out some of the baked squash and combine with other fillings, sweet or savory.

BUTTERNUT Their vivid orange flesh is sweet and slightly nutty with a smooth texture that falls apart as it cooks. Although the rind is edible, butternut squash is usually peeled before use. This is a versatile squash that can be used in soups, purees, pies or any recipes where smooth texture and sweetness is a main feature. The flesh is sweet and perfect for desserts, roasting, stuffing and baking.

KABOCHA The flesh of kabocha is smooth, dense and intensely yellow, while the outer shell is dark, rich green. It is rich in beta carotene, as well as potassium and iron. Kabocha is similar in sweetness and texture to a sweet potato. They are best used in curries, soups, stir-fries or salads. These varieties of squash are available at Whole Foods in Little Rock. Visit wholefoodsmarket.com for a variety of recipes using these types of squash.

30 OCTOBER 2014 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM


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PERFECT SPOT FOR YOUR NEXT GIRLS NIGHT OUT ASK ABOUT SAVOY’S SPECIAL GIRLS NIGHT PERKS AND PRIVILEGES

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GENERATIONS O HARVEST Dorothy Hall and Katie Short are two of the many women in farming across the state. They work hard to raise crops and livestock while raising families and carrying out many other duties. Each represents Arkansas’s farming tradition in her own way. BY KD REEP PHOTOGRAPHY BY RETT PEEK

32 OCTOBER 2014 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM


Dorothy Hall with grandchildren Gwinn and Rece at their family’s farm in Roland.

THESAVVYMOMS.COM | OCTOBER 2014

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Katie Short with daughters Magnolia and Honey at their farm in Perry County.


Arkansas has a rich farming tradition that is often carried through generations of families. In Central Arkansas, two women are holding true to this timeless tradition as they work the land and raise livestock while they raise families and serve their communities. Recently, comedian, mother and feminist Amy Poehler and her best friend, producer Meredith Walker, launched an online community for young girls and the young at heart to help women and girls cultivate their authentic selves. For farmers Dorothy Hall and Katie Short, they’ve followed this advice from the cradle. Short followed her dreams from California to establish a new farming tradition for her family. Hall and her children and grandchildren are carrying out their family’s farming tradition with hay and cattle farms.

FAMILY OF FARMERS If one were to look up “force of nature” in the dictionary, it is quite possible Hall’s photo is beside the definition. Hall, a retired mother and grandmother from Sheridan, is reliving her childhood and her childhood dream. Today, she and her family own and work two farms — a hay farm in Calmer and a cattle farm in Roland — while she manages seven rental homes and upgrades residential properties for sale. “When I was graduating high school, there were three things women could do for careers — be a secretary, teacher or nurse,” Hall, 66, said. “If it was a different time, I would have been an architect — I love construction and building. And I literally grew up on the farm. I learned to drive in the hayfields before I was barely able to clutch the truck.” The oldest of five children, Hall was who her father relied on to keep the farm running while he worked in construction. One year, Hall, her three sisters and brother picked, loaded and delivered to Rison and sold three acres of cucumbers to a pickle company. “I was 12 or 13,” Hall said. “I grew up with a lot of responsibility. When I was 9 years old and my sister was 8, we managed 2,500 laying hens. Before we went to school, we’d feed them and check for eggs. When we came home from school, we’d check them again, gather the eggs, then wash and pack them.” Hall went on to earn a degree in home economics from the University of Central Arkansas and a master’s degree in home economics with an emphasis in housing from the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville. She worked for more than 30 years for the University of Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service, becoming the first female associate director for the organization. It was about the time she retired that her father became ill, and she took on caregiving duties for him and other members of her family. “My son, Jeffrey, who has a degree in agriculture, approached me about taking on my dad’s land as a hay farm,” Hall said. “He wanted to keep it in our family so we started it with not one piece of equipment that held together for the first season. My father was one of the first to sprig his hay meadows with Tifton 44 hay, and we are still cutting it today.” Hall and her family, which includes her husband, Randy; daughter, Gretchen;

and son, Jeffrey, and his family — wife, Kelly, 9-year-old daughter, Gwinn, and 6-year-old son, Rece — work together at the hay farm at Calmer, which raises hybrid Bermuda hay. They square bale this hay and sell it to horse owners. The mixed-grass hay they raise is baled and fed to the cattle in their crossbred herd at Roland. Each person has his or her own job, and one of Hall’s is running the square baler or raking if they are baling round bales. “That particular piece of equipment has a cab on it and comes with air conditioning,” Hall said, noting that tractors used for raking and picking up the hay are open-station, which means without a cab. “It’s a team effort. We have to be really diligent about keeping an eye on each other to make sure we don’t get too hot, and it is always hot in a hayfield.” When Hall isn’t on the tractor in the field, she is managing rental homes, overseeing and upgrading a residential property in Little Rock, and coordinating a political action committee, Arkansas Women Vote, which aims to change the dialogue of campaigns and refocus them on the issues that will make a difference for women in the state and across the country. It’s farming, however, where she finds strength and enjoyment. Her grandchildren, Gwinn and Rece, are carrying on the family tradition as they take active roles in all aspects of the farm. Both children show livestock at county fairs and plan to show at the Arkansas State Fair later this month. “I love the changing of the seasons,” Hall said. “I like how nature puts all things in perspective. It is a wonderful lifestyle, and it teaches children responsibility and helps them understand the cycle of life. I believe Gwinn and Rece are benefiting from the farming experience. At the end of every day, you see what you have accomplished. “One time when I was in college, I had an instructor tell me she thought I ought to consider something other than pursuing a degree. I told her, ‘I didn’t expect this to be easy, and I’m here to stay.’ It’s how I’ve approached my entire life DOROTHY HALL, DISCUSSING — be persistent, work hard and get HER FAMILY’S FARMING TRADITION the job done.”

“...I LITERALLY GREW UP ON THE FARM. I LEARNED TO DRIVE IN THE HAYFIELDS BEFORE I WAS BARELY ABLE TO CLUTCH THE TRUCK.”

CALIFORNIA GIRL TURNED FARM GIRL “I knew from the earliest time I wanted to be a farmer,” Katie Short said. “Even when I was a little, little girl, I knew I wanted to grow things.” Sitting in Short’s sunny kitchen as her daughters, 6-year-old Honey and 4-year-old Magnolia, munch on a breakfast of cinnamon toast and freshsqueezed milk, one can see just how rich it is to remain true to a personal calling. Short, her husband, Travis, and their daughters work Farm Girl Meats, a farm in Perry County that raises Animal Welfare Approved pork, chicken and beef. According to Short, Farm Girl Meats works on the premise that the best tasting, most nutritious foods are farmed with a light hand. “Our animals are bred and raised in the most natural of settings, on wholesome diets, and in tune with their given instincts,” Short, 30, said. “There is a distinct difference in the flavor and nutrition of a hog raised in its most natural setting, surrounded by its piglets, in community with other hogs, and one that is raised in a corporate environment.” C ON T I N U E D ON PAGE 3 9 THESAVVYMOMS.COM | OCTOBER 2014

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Nine-year-old Gwinn Hall takes an active role on her family’s farm. She is also showing livestock at the Arkansas State Fair this month.

THESAVVYMOMS.COM | OCTOBER 2014

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Dorothy Hall says life on the farm teaches her grandchildren responsibility and helps them understand the life cycle. “I like how nature puts all things in perspective,� she says.

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“THERE IS SOMETHING INTRINSIC IN TREATING A LIVING BEING — CHILD, ANIMAL, PLANT OR OTHERWISE — IN THE BEST POSSIBLE WAY.”

KATIE SHORT, DISCUSSING FARMING AND PARENTING

According to the Arkansas Agriculture Department, there are almost 20,000 women in Arkansas who pursue agriculture as a career. Short, a native of Berkeley, California, focuses on organic, sustainable agriculture on her farm, which, according to Arkansas Farm Bureau, provides an excellent market for producers to receive a premium for their production, which will cost more to produce. “For me, I wanted to make the connection between my food, culture and self to the land,” Short said. “I left college when I was 19 because I knew I needed to have my hands in the dirt. My mom learned about Heifer International on a trip through Arkansas and told me that if I was serious about farming, I should consider the program Heifer has at the ranch in Perryville. I worked there for two years, and it showed me what was possible.” After those two years, Short began her own operation with a small flock of sheep. She went back to college, attending Arkansas Tech University and earning a degree in animal science and agricultural business. She and her husband, who also was a volunteer at Heifer Ranch, leased some land from the nonprofit, which they still maintain. After purchasing 30 acres in Perry County, Short added pigs, goats and dairy cows, eventually expanding further into meat chickens and ducks. Today, Farm Girl Meats focuses on pork, chicken, eggs and milk for sale through Community Supported Agriculture (CSA); online farmers markets in Conway and Little Rock; grocery stores and restaurants including Hillcrest Artisan Meats, Butcher & Public, South on Main, The Root Cafe and Boulevard Bread Co.; its own store, which is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at 1388 Highway 60 East in Houston on Wednesdays; and online at farmgirlfood.com. Short’s day begins at sunrise (or before, depending on the time of year), and typical farm work — like feeding pigs, milking cows, checking on chickens — extends to packing orders, coordinating deliveries, recordkeeping and keeping her blog and website up-to-date. That’s in addition to house-

work and other chores. The Shorts also home-school their children. Honey joined 4-H for the first time this year and showed her pony, Sweet Pea, at the Perry County Fair last month, where she won grand champion in her class. Both of Short’s daughters help out with feeding animals and learning all they can about life on the farm. “Now, my focus is to raise my children like I raise the animals,” Short said. “There is something intrinsic in treating a living being — child, animal, plant or otherwise — in the best possible way. It affects the entire being, and it shows in the outcome. I only have this one chance to raise these girls right, and I will take much care in doing it well.”

ABOUT

t

FARMS FARM GIRL MEATS 16 SHORT FARM LANE, HOUSTON (PERRY COUNTY) 501-215-0419 FARMGIRLFOOD.COM Animal Welfare Approved beef, chicken, eggs, pork and poultry are available. The farm’s Arkansas Grown profile states, “We believe the best tasting, most nutritious foods are farmed with a light hand. Our animals are bred and raised in the most natural of settings, on wholesome diets, and in tune with their given instincts.”

HALL FAMILY FARM 18025 JUNEBUG LANE, ROLAND (PULASKI COUNTY) 501-920-7422 This third-generation cattle and hay farm produces corn and grasses and recently began producing vegetables again after a 30-year hiatus. The fresh homegrown vegetables are served at restaurants in Central Arkansas. The hay farm is located in Calmer in Cleveland County.

ARKANSAS GROWN

Studies show that consumers want to buy locally grown foods when given the choice. Arkansas Grown is a dynamic local-branding program that allows the Arkansas Agriculture Department to serve consumers by helping them more easily identify the locally grown foods they are increasingly demanding while helping producers expand their markets. Simply put, the primary goal of the Arkansas Grown program is to get more Arkansas-grown food on the plates of consumers whether at home or in a restaurant. The department has partnered with Arkansas celebrity and fellow farmer P. Allen Smith to bring more awareness to the Arkansas Grown program through his various media avenues. Arkansas Grown has expanded its options to provide more promotional and educational benefits, including the Arkansas Food and Farm publication and a mobile app. Both Katie Short and Dorothy Hall are members of Arkansas Grown. For more information, visit arkansasgrown.org and arkansasfoodandfarm.com. THESAVVYMOMS.COM | OCTOBER 2014

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CULTIVATE ARTS | EDUCATION | PHILANTHROPY

Gypsy gardens are a fun way to express creativity in the garden.

GYPSY GARDEN

Let your kids get their hands in the dirt and create this unique fall scene. And, once the season is over, change out the accessories for a new look. BY STEVE WEIMAN PHOTOGRAPHY BY SARA BLANCETT C ON T I N U E D ON PAGE 4 2

40 OCTOBER 2014 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM


Feeling broken is no way to live.

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 11TH 9AM • MILLS PARK

Behavioral issues in young people become increasingly difficult if not treated by age 14. We offer extensive in-patient and out-patient programs for all ages. Help someone reclaim their life. Contact The BridgeWay for a no-cost assessment.

1110 Shobe Rd (Ball Fields) Bryant, AR 21 BridgeWay Road • North Little Rock, AR 72113 501.771.1500 • 800-BRidgeWAy TheBridgeway.com Accepting most insurance plans, including Medicare and Private Option.

BEST LOCAL PEDIATRIC THERAPY CENTER

To register visit www.kidsourcetherapy.com and click the events tab, then click on Kidsource 5K

THESAVVYMOMS.COM | OCTOBER 2014

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nest | NOSH | Thrive | CULTIVATE CONT INU E D FR O M PA GE 4 0

WALKING THROUGH THE

GYPSY GARDEN Looking for something unique for your fall decor? Gypsy gardens are perfect for both indoor spaces or covered outdoor spaces, and a bonus — they are very fun to make. What makes a gypsy garden? It’s all in the accessories which are quirky, colorful and unique. The accessories can easily be changed into holiday ones, so this is a centerpiece that can last a long time. These little gardens are guaranteed to enchant your guests, both young and old, and give you and your family many smiles. Jessie Armbruter, 7, of Paron demonstrates how to create a gypsy garden.

WHAT YOU NEED Container Gravel Quality potting soil Moss Stones Plants (succulents and small terrarium plants work well) Accessories Mini-pumpkins

ASSEMBLE THE GYPSY GARDEN There are a few ways to approach the construction of a gypsy garden: Either lay out the space before beginning or just dive in and play. Either way, it’s a fun

1

42 OCTOBER 2014 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM

process. Think about how natural spaces look and add stones to give the garden contour and depth. Pea gravel creates a nice path, and layered thin rocks give the appearance of a nature rock outcropping. Moss adds texture and provides a soft ground covering for lawn accessories like gazebos. Add in a giant pumpkin (a.k.a. a mini pumpkin) as an accent. 1. Start by choosing a container; the profile of these gardens is low, and to keep the completed look balanced, a low planter bowl works well. But part of a gypsy garden’s charm is that it can be made in anything: a cool old container, partially broken pot or vintage container like an old case. Whatever the container, make sure it has drainage holes before planting. Add some stones in the bottom of the container, making sure that the drainage holes aren’t blocked. Add soil. 2. Choose plants that have similar water and light needs and provide good texture contrast. Little succulents and tiny terrarium plants work well in gypsy gardens. Dig a small hole in the soil and place the plant inside. Press the soil around the plant firmly so it stays in place. 3. Add accessories. Gypsy gardens are both whimsical and nostalgic, with a little bit of fairy magic mixed in. Collect natural accessories like bark, branches, stones and pea gravel, and then add miniature garden accessories like flowers, mini lawn chairs, pumpkins or gazing balls. Tiny gypsy garden swag makes these gardens really stand out. Once the gypsy garden has been completed, place it in a bright area with indirect sun. Water by misting the garden surface a couple of times a week.

2

3


It’s your turn to smile. Delta Dental has ways of doing that.

Choose Delta Dental as part of your employee-benefit plan at work, or on your own at DeltaDentalAR.com, and get affordable coverage that fits your family’s budget. Plus, you’ll have access to the state’s largest network of dentists and the majority of dentists nationwide. Enroll with Delta Dental, the dental insurance experts, and let us put a smile on your face.

DeltaDentalAR.com • 800-814-3451 THESAVVYMOMS.COM | OCTOBER 2014

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nest | NOSH | Thrive | CULTIVATE

Visitors can explore the darkness at the Museum of Discovery’s newest exhibit.

DEEP DARK WORLD The Museum of Discovery’s newest exhibit explores the undiscovered darkness BY CALLIE FRANCE STERLING

Darkness can be spooky, thrilling and chilling. The Museum of Discovery’s In the Dark Exhibit will ignite your imagination this season. “Sometimes scary, but always intriguing, darkness beckons exploration and represents the unknown,” said Museum of Discovery Chief Marketing Officer Kendall Thornton. “Since prehistoric times, humans have sought to find utility in darkness and have invented ways to acclimate to dark conditions. Visiting In the Dark, guests experience and explore these mysteries via electronic, mechanical and computer interactives, immersive dioramas and lifelike models.” In the Dark allows young minds to discover darkness in depth. The exhibit provides insight on five areas of darkness: the Darkness of Night, Darkness Within the Soil, Darkness Deep Within Caves, Darkness of the Deep Sea and Darkness and Humans. The exhibit opened late last month and runs until Jan. 4. “Like everything in the Museum of Discovery, this exhibit will be extremely hands-on,” Thornton said. “In the Dark features five immersive zones, enabling visitors to see and experience some of these dark and largely unseen worlds, including the ways people have reacted to darkness throughout history. Each diorama uses mechanical displays, life-size animal models and informational panels to surround visitors with the sights, sounds, smells and sensations of several dark ecosystems.” The Darkness of Night sector of the exhibition gives visitors insight on two different environments after nightfall: a forest in the Great Smoky Mountains and the Sonoran Desert. “Visitors walk through the mountainous forest and witness how bobcats, barred owls, spotted skunks, flying squirrels and salamanders forage for meals,” Thornton said. “They also see how bats feed on night-blooming cacti in the Sonoran Desert.” Darkness Within the Soil demonstrates to visitors the plants and animals that live beneath the soil of earth’s surface. “Here, the relationships among the world’s complex underground ecosystems as well as plants, animals and humans living above ground are emphasized,” Thornton said. “Visitors will get a look at what dwells below the soil in a typical back yard with a life-size diorama featuring a cross section of earth that reveals moles, cicadas, bumblebees, worms, millipedes, slugs and other animals that call the soil home.”

44 OCTOBER 2014 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM

Darkness Deep Within Caves provides an inside look at open cave systems as well as closed caves. This section provides insight on how each cave type is formed and organisms that live within caves. “The dioramas include a walk-through recreation of a limestone solution cave and a closed ecosystem found in Romania’s Movile Cave,” Thornton said. “Interactive elements explore animal adaptations and cavern environments, such as the cave cricket’s fine hair-like structures, called mechanoreceptors, which collect information about its dark environment.” Darkness Deep Within Caves includes an interactive “cave maze” called “Be a Bat,” where participants will have to rely on sound to find their way out of a computer-simulated cave. This will give visitors an inside look at how bats navigate through caves. Darkness of the Deep Sea highlights and compares two deep-sea environments. “The two environments that are highlighted are a deep sea vent field and a section of the open deep sea,” Thornton said. “This section compares their two divers ecosystems, the organisms that live in each and the unique survival habits of each creature.” Darkness and Humans reflects on past human experiences with dark environments as well as modern experiences that humans have had as a result of dark ecosystems. “Humans have found ways to adapt to the total lack of light, including incredible adaptations for the blind, and also how to bring light into the dark world,” Thornton said. “Stories and folklore reveal cultural interpretations of night and darkness, while modern technology such as sonar, radar and image enhancers reveal how humans mimic the adaptations of animals like dolphins, bats and owls.” In the Dark will open eyes of visitors and help participants explore the life that is waiting to be discovered in the darkness. “This exhibit allows people to see what they normally cannot see because of darkness,” Thornton said. “Visitors will discover animals and environments they did not know existed. A personal reason I am excited is there will be a cave exhibit and it doesn’t get much cooler than that!” The cost of the exhibit is included in regular daily Museum of Discovery admission. Tickets are $10 for adults and $8 for children 12 or younger. Admission for members’ children under 1 are free. For more information about the exhibit, visit museumofdiscovery.org.


Caring For An Older Family Member In Your Home? The Schmieding Home Caregiver Training Program educates individuals to care for older adults in the home. Whether your goal is to help care for an older family member or friend, we want to help.

Over 50 Years of

Caring

accepting New Patients Birth Through adolescence Most insurance accepted

Learn more today at www.arcaregiving.org. Call 501-526-6500 to register. Free family caregiver workshops are available at the UAMS campus: Caregiving Skills • Sept 8-9 Caregiving Skills • Nov 5-6 Dementia Care • Nov 17-18 Caregiving Skills • Dec 8-9 Dementia Care • Dec 15-16

The Pediatric Clinic, P.A. of North Little Rock

Lourie Battles, MD • Robert Choate, MD • Kim Clinton, MD anthony Elias, MD • Matthew Hadley, aPRN, PhD • Kim Hurlbut, MD Stephen Fiedorek, MD • Eric Fraser, MD • Gary Fowler, aPRN Bishawn Morris, MD • Joanne Wilson, aPRN Tina Jones, MD • Nicole Turner, aPRN

Schmieding home caregiver Training Program Supported by a grant from the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation.

3401 Springhill Drive, Ste. 245 North Little Rock · 501.758.1530 CliniC Hours: Monday-Friday 8 aM-6 pM Walk-in siCk CliniC: saturday 8 aM 203 B Plaza Boulevard Cabot · 501.843.0068 CLiNiC HouRS: MoNDay-FRiDay 8 aM-5 PM

We take your child’s education With quality public schools like College Station Elementary, the education you want for your child is close at hand. Choose PCSSD schools with: • Test scores higher than other local districts • Millions in college scholarships awarded • Teachers with advanced degrees • Talented and gifted programs • State-winning sports teams

pcssd.org

501.234.2000 THESAVVYMOMS.COM | OCTOBER 2014

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Thank You

We Make Gluten, Wheat, Soy and Nut-Free Birthday Cakes.

Little Rock!

BEST LOCAL PHOTOGRAPHER

Egg, Dairy and Sugar-Free available.

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M US IC S LESSODN RUMS

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FUN! F 75 YEARS O For 75 years, Arkansas has loved the State Fair and school field trips is one of the reasons why.

Kiddie Days – October 13 & 17 Ages 6 and under can ride Kiddie Rides free from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Free gate admission for adults bringing kiddies. (Parking included.) FFA/FCCLA, Scout Day and 4-H Day – October 18 $3 gate admission for FFA/FCCLA students, Scouts and 4-H members, sponsors and bus drivers.

Discount Group Rates Available ArkansasStateFair.com

For tickets call (501) 372-8341 or visit www.ArkansasStateFair.com 46 OCTOBER 2014 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM


THESAVVYMOMS.COM | OCTOBER 2014

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FUN

BEST LOCAL MUSEUM Winner: Museum of Discovery Runners-up: Arkansas Arts Center, Historic Arkansas Museum BEST LOCAL KIDS’ PARTY LOCATION Winner: The Wonder Place Runners-up: The Little Gym, Impact Martial Arts BEST LOCAL FIELD TRIP Winner: Little Rock Zoo Runners-up: Museum of Discovery, Heifer International BEST LOCAL FESTIVAL Winner: Riverfest Runners-up: Harvestfest, Toad Suck Daze BEST LOCAL LIBRARY Winner: William F. Laman Public Library Runners-up: Central Arkansas Library System – Main Library, Hillary Rodham Clinton Children’s Library (CALS) BEST LOCAL PARK Winner: Pinnacle Mountain State Park Runners-up: Riverfront Park, Two Rivers Park BEST LOCAL SUMMER DAY CAMP Winner: The Little Gym Runners-up: Impact Martial Arts, Little Rock Zoo BEST LOCAL SUMMER OVERNIGHT CAMP Winner: Brookhill Ranch Runners-up: Arkansas 4-H Center, Camp Mitchell BEST ARKANSAS DAY TRIP Winner: Hot Springs Runners-up: Buffalo River, Petite Jean State Park

SAVV Y

LOLO AWARDS 2014

This year, we gave our annual “best of” reader poll a new name and a new look. The 2014 Savvy LoLo (Love Local) Awards gave readers the chance to vote for their favorite local spots and show some love for our local retailers, restaurateurs and other business owners. Check out this year’s winners and runners-up.

48 OCTOBER 2014 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM

BEST OUTDOOR EXCURSION IN ARKANSAS Winner: Petit Jean State Park Runners-up: Pinnacle Mountain State Park, Buffalo River

SHOPPING

BEST LOCAL OUTDOOR SHOPPING CENTER Winner: Promenade at Chenal Runners-up: Midtowne Little Rock, Pleasant Ridge Town Center BEST LOCAL MALL Winner: Park Plaza Mall Runners-up: McCain Mall, Promenade at Chenal BEST LOCALLY OWNED STORE FOR KIDS Winner: The Toggery Runners-up: Cheeky Marshmallow (Box Turtle), Caroline’s Consignment BEST LOCALLY OWNED WOMEN’S BOUTIQUE Winner: Tulips Runners-up: Box Turtle, Fringe Clothing C ON T I N U E D ON PAGE 5 0


Halloween Safety Rule: Treats should not be eaten until an adult can check them for choking hazards or tampering.

Halloween is a great holiday for kids, but can be scary for parents of young children. To help keep your child safe while trick or treating, talk to him before going out for the festivities. Set some basic rules such as not to wander away and to stay in visual and verbal contact with you when you are out at night. Remind her to never go with a stranger or go into a stranger’s house. Explain to him that it’s better to be safe than polite. If he is scared, he should yell to you for help. Ask her what she’s learned about safety in child care and discuss how she can use that knowledge when trick or treating. Visit our website to download

10 family rules for safety

www.ARBetterBeginnings.com • 1-800-445-3316

Division of Child Care and Early Childhood Education

THESAVVYMOMS.COM | OCTOBER 2014

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LIFESTYLE

BEST LOCALLY OWNED SHOP FOR MEN Winner: The Independent Runners-up: Greenhaw’s Men’s Wear, Bauman’s Men’s Fine Clothing

BEST FARMERS MARKET Winner: Hillcrest Farmers Market Runners-up: River Market, Argenta Farmers Market

BEST LOCALLY OWNED GIFT SHOP Winner: Box Turtle Runners-up: The Crown Shop, Bella Boutique

BEST LOCAL DATE-NIGHT SPOT Winner: Local Lime Runners-up: Vesuvio Bistro, Cache Restaurant & Lounge

BEST LOCALLY OWNED CONSIGNMENT/ RESALE SHOP Winner: Caroline’s Consignment Runners-up: Name Brand Second Hand, Underground Exchange (Benton) BEST LOCALLY OWNED BOOKSTORE Winner: Wordsworth Books BEST LOCALLY OWNED FURNITURE STORE Winner: Hank’s Fine Furniture Runners-up: MertinsDykeHome, Galaxy Furniture BEST LOCALLY OWNED PARTY SUPPLIES Winner: Party City Runners-up: The Crown Shop, Vanness

BEST LOCAL PLACE FOR GIRLS’ NIGHT OUT Winner: Local Lime Runners-up: Painting with a Twist, Cache Restaurant & Lounge BEST LOCAL HAIR SALON Winner: Fringe Benefits Salon Runners-up: Swank Hair Studio, Caracalla Spa BEST LOCAL SPA Winner: Rejuvenation Clinic Day Spa Runners-up: Caracalla Spa, Quy’s Salon & Spa (Maumelle) BEST LOCAL SPOT FOR A PEDICURE Winner: Fashion Nail Runners-up: Caracalla Spa, Ethereal Nail Spa

BEST LOCALLY OWNED GARDEN CENTER Winner: The Good Earth Garden Center Runners-up: Cantrell Gardens, Botanica Gardens

BEST LOCAL GYM Winner: Little Rock Athletic Club Runners-up: Chenal Health & Fitness, ZenStudio Fitness Boutique

BEST LOCALLY OWNED JEWELRY STORE Winner: Sissy’s Log Cabin Runners-up: Roberson’s Fine Jewelry, Cecil’s Fine Jewelry

BEST LOCAL PHOTOGRAPHER Winner: Jennifer McHam Photography Runners-up: Jonathan Funk Photography, Christopher Nolan Photography

BEST LOCALLY OWNED CAR WASH Winner: Best Car Wash Runners-up: Splash Car Wash, Boomerang Carwash

BEST LOCAL CAR DEALERSHIP Winner: Bale Chevrolet Runners-up: Parker Cadillac, Steve Landers Toyota Scion

BEST LOCALLY OWNED SHOE STORE Winner: Warren’s Shoes Runners-up: Shoe Connection, The Toggery

BEST LOCAL BANK Winner: Simmons Bank Runners-up: Arvest Bank, Bank of the Ozarks

BEST LOCALLY OWNED SPORTING GOODS STORE Winner: Gene Lockwood’s Runners-up: Ozark Outdoor Supply, Go Running BEST LOCALLY OWNED PET STORE Winner: Bow Wow & Meow (Maumelle) Runners-up: Doggy Daddy, Bill’s Pets BEST LOCALLY OWNED FLORIST Winner: Tipton & Hurst Runners-up: About Vase, Frances Flower Shop

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BEST LOCAL NONPROFIT Winner: Access Runners-up: Thea Foundation, Out of the Woods Animal Rescue BEST LOCAL HAPPY HOUR Winner: Bar Louie Runners-up: Cache Restaurant & Lounge, Copper Grill BEST LOCAL MOVIE THEATER Winner: Chenal 9 Imax Runners-up: Colonel Glenn 18, Riverdale 10

BEST LOCAL CONCERT VENUE Winner: Verizon Arena Runners-up: First Security Amphitheater, Stickyz Rock ’n’ Roll Chicken Shack BEST LOCAL DRY CLEANERS Winner: Schickel’s Cleaners Runners-up: Oak Forest Cleaners, Shinn’s Cleaners BEST LOCAL PET GROOMER Winner: Doggie Do’s Runner-up: Happy Days Groom and Board BEST LOCAL PET BOARDER Winner: Chenal Pet Palace Runners-up: Fairview Kennels, Canine Country Club

EDUCATION

BEST PRIVATE PRESCHOOL Winner: Access Runners-up: Pulaski Academy, Miss Selma’s Schools BEST PRIVATE ELEMENTARY/MIDDLE SCHOOL Winner: Pulaski Academy Runners-up: Access, Little Rock Christian Academy BEST PRIVATE HIGH SCHOOL Winner: Pulaski Academy Runners-up: Access, Catholic High School for Boys BEST PUBLIC PRESCHOOL Winner: Woodruff Early Childhood Center (LRSD) Runner-up: Fair Park Early Childhood Center (LRSD) BEST PUBLIC ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Winner: Don R. Roberts Elementary School (LRSD) Runners-up: Thomas Jefferson Elementary School (LRSD), Fulbright Elementary School (LRSD) BEST PUBLIC MIDDLE SCHOOL Winner: Pulaski Heights Middle School (LRSD) Runners-up: eStem Middle Charter School, Bethel Middle School (Bryant) BEST PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL Winner: Little Rock Central High (LRSD) Runners-up: North Little Rock High School, Bryant High School BEST DAYCARE CENTER Winner: Access Runners-up: Miss Carrie’s Day School, Child Development Center C ON T I N U E D ON PAGE 5 2


THANKS FOR THE VOTES! THE BEST DENTISTRY AT THE MOST AFFORDABLE PRICE Dr. Steven Ray does a full spectrum of dental services from basic cleanings to advanced cosmetic restorations.

DR. STEVEN RAY BEST LOCAL DENTIST

(501) 312-1127 11811 • Hinson Road, Suite 200 • Little Rock

www.docspray.com

HELPING HAND

Developmental Preschool & Outpatient Therapy Services

NOW ENROLLING FOR FALL

DEVELOPMENTAL PRESCHOOL SERVICES Occupational Therapy • Physical Therapy Speech-Language Therapy Day Habilitation: 6 weeks - 5 years old OUTPATIENT SERVICES: Birth to 21 years old ZOIE’S STORY.

INFO & JOB POSTINGS

“My daughter Zoie started attending Helping Hand Children’s Center when she was 14 months old. She wasn’t crawling, walking, or talking, and she refused to eat anything but pureed baby food. She was also very shy and timid around other people and did not like going new places. After just a few months of receiving therapies from Helping Hand, she was trying new foods, repeating sounds and some simple words, pulling herself up, and taking small steps. Zoie is now almost 3 years old and her progress has been incredible! She’s walking and running everywhere, and went from eating only pureed food to eating pretty much every kind of food she can get her hands on. She loves to play and interact with her peers, and one of her favorite things to do is sing songs with her class. Helping Hand’s therapists, teachers, and staff are amazing! Even though she still has a long way to go, I know Zoie would not be where she is today without them. Zoie and I love Helping Hand, and I can tell every single person there genuinely cares about every child in their center.Thank you so much, Helping Hand!” – Shawna Bowden

www.Helpinghandcc.com • 501-791-3331 4901 North Shore Dr • North Little Rock Helping Hand Learning Center Is A 501 (C)(3) Non-Profit

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BEST TUTORING CENTER Winner: Access Runners-up: Huntington Learning Center, Sylvan Learning Center BEST SPECIAL-NEEDS SCHOOL Winner: Access Runner-up: Easter Seals Arkansas, Pathfinder BEST VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL Winner: Pulaski Heights United Methodist Runners-up: Immanuel Baptist Church, New Life Church

FOOD

BEST LOCALLY OWNED FAMILY RESTAURANT Winner: Big Orange Runners-up: Mexico Chiquito, The Root Cafe BEST LOCALLY OWNED SPOT FOR FRENCH FRIES Winner: Big Orange Runners-up: David’s Burgers, Mooyah Burgers BEST LOCALLY OWNED SPOT FOR BURGERS Winner: Big Orange Runners-up: David’s Burgers, Gadwall’s Grill BEST LOCALLY OWNED SPOT FOR PIZZA Winner: Pizza Cafe Runners-up: Damgoode Pies, U.S. Pizza BEST LOCALLY OWNED SPOT FOR CHEESE DIP Winner: Mexico Chiquito Runners-up: Local Lime, Dizzy’s Gypsy Bistro BEST LOCALLY OWNED SPOT FOR SUSHI Winner: Sushi Cafe Runners-up: Mt. Fuji Japanese Restaurant, Ocean’s at Arthur’s BEST LOCALLY OWNED SPOT FOR SMOOTHIES Winner: Tropical Smoothie Cafe Runner-up: Red Mango BEST LOCALLY OWNED SPOT FOR ICE CREAM Winner: Loblolly Creamery Runner-up: Shake’s Frozen Custard BEST LOCALLY OWNED SPOT FOR FROZEN YOGURT Winner: Red Mango Runner-up: Orange Leaf Frozen Yogurt

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BEST LOCALLY OWNED SPOT FOR MILKSHAKES Winner: Purple Cow Runners-up: Big Orange, Loblolly Creamery BEST LOCALLY OWNED SPOT FOR CUPCAKES Winner: Cupcakes on Kavanaugh Runners-up: Brown Sugar Bakeshop, Dempsey Bakery BEST LOCALLY OWNED SPOT FOR BIRTHDAY CAKES Winner: Blue Cake Co. Runners-up: Dempsey Bakery, Mickey’s Cakes & Sweets BEST LOCALLY OWNED SPOT FOR COOKIES Winner: Community Bakery Runners-up: Sweet Love, Brown Sugar Bakeshop BEST LOCALLY OWNED PET-FRIENDLY RESTAURANT Winner: Trio’s Restaurant Runner-up: U.S. Pizza BEST LOCALLY OWNED SPOT FOR BREAKFAST Winner: The Root Cafe Runners-up: Leo’s Greek Castle, Delicious Temptations BEST LOCALLY OWNED SPOT FOR WEEKEND BRUNCH Winner: The Root Cafe Runners-up: Alley Oops, Red Door BEST LOCALLY OWNED SPOT FOR WORK-DAY LUNCH Winner: Cache Restaurant & Lounge Runner-up: Capital Bar & Grill, Larry’s Pizza BEST LOCALLY OWNED SPOT FOR A COFFEE BREAK Winner: Mylo Coffee Co. Runners-up: Boulevard Bread Co., Community Bakery BEST LOCALLY OWNED SPOT FOR FINE DINING Winner: Cache Restaurant & Lounge Runners-up: 1620 Savoy, Arthur’s Prime Steakhouse BEST LOCALLY OWNED SPECIALTY FOOD SHOP Winner: Terry’s Finer Foods Runners-up: Boulevard Bread Co., Hillcrest Artisan Meats

HEALTH

BEST LOCAL PEDIATRIC CLINIC Winner: All for Kids Pediatric Clinic Runners-up: Arkansas Pediatric Clinic, Little Rock Pediatric Clinic BEST LOCAL OBSTETRICIAN Winner: Jenny Gregory Runners-up: Ashley Deed, Stephen Marks BEST LOCAL DENTIST Winner: Steven Ray Runner-up: Kitchens Pediatric Dentistry, Dickinson Dental BEST LOCAL ORTHODONTIST Winner: Bryan Hiller Runners-up: David Wardlaw, Phelan Orthodontics BEST LOCAL HOSPITAL Winner: Baptist Health Runners-up: Arkansas Children’s Hospital, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences BEST LOCAL PEDIATRIC THERAPY CENTER Winner: Access Runners-up: Kidsource Therapy, Pediatrics Plus BEST LOCAL BEHAVIORAL/ MENTAL HEALTH CENTER Winner: Rivendell Behavioral Health Services Runner-up: The BridgeWay BEST LOCAL EYE DOCTOR Winner: Edward Penick Runner-up: James Eyecare BEST LOCAL DERMATOLOGIST Winner: Jay Flaming Runner-up: Ray Parker BEST LOCAL COSMETIC SURGEON Winner: Suzanne Yee Runner-up: Edward Love BEST LOCAL VET CLINIC Winner: Bellevue Animal Clinic Runners-up: Pinnacle Valley Animal Hospital, Rodney Parham Animal Clinic

SAVV Y

LOLO AWARDS www.thesavvymoms.com


Trick orTreat, Spooky or Sweet? THANK YOU FOR VOTING US THE BEST! BEST LOCALLY OWNED SPOT FOR BIRTHDAY CAKES

Rhea

Drug Store A Traditional Pharmacy with eclectic Gifts. Since 1922

2801 Kavanaugh Little Rock • 501.663.4131 monogrammable

Stop by our NEW location at 6800 Cantrell Rd (Across From Stein Mart) for Petit Fours, Cookies, Macarons and Cupcakes! Monday-Friday 10am-6pm, Sat 10am-3pm ASK ABOUT OUR SPECIALTY DESSERT CAKES.

868-7771 www.thebluecakecompany.com

THESAVVYMOMS.COM | OCTOBER 2014

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(better known as the flu) With the new school year right around the corner, it's nice to know that your local Velocity Care clinic treats cold and flu symptoms and provides flu shots, as well as tests for influenza and strep throat. Owned and operated by board-certified, emergency medicine physicians, Velocity Care provides premier medical care with little or no wait.

ER doctors without the ER wait EXPRESS CHECK-IN at www.VelocityCare.com

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Happy Halloween from your friends at ICM

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54 OCTOBER 2014 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM

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THESAVVYMOMS.COM | OCTOBER 2014

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ARKANSAS STATE FAIR

OCT. 10-19, ARKANSAS STATE FAIRGROUNDS, LITTLE ROCK Celebrating its 75th anniversary, the Arkansas State Fair offers an array of concerts, food, livestock competitions, arts and crafts, bull riding, rides and games for the whole family. This year, the fair also includes a parade through downtown Little Rock and closing-night fireworks. Visit arkansasstatefair.com for a full schedule and ticket information.

ST. JOSEPH FARM FEST

OCT. 18-19; SATURDAY 9 A.M.-8 P.M., SUNDAY NOON-5 P.M. 6800 CAMP ROBINSON ROAD, NORTH LITTLE ROCK This first-ever event at St. Joseph Farm features a Sorghum-Sudan Maze for kids, a five-acre pumpkin patch, farm-to-table dinners, live music, Arkansas Craftsman’s Fair, livestock barn, speakers, workshops and more. Adults $10, kids $5, and free for ages 3 and under. Call 501-681-9073 or visit stjosephfarm.com for details.

BOO AT THE ZOO

OCT. 18-19, OCT. 24-NOV. 1; 6-9 P.M. LITTLE ROCK ZOO The zoo’s annual Halloween festival features trick-or-treating, colorful lights and lots more. There’s even an adult night on Friday, Oct. 17. Activities include Criminal Critters Animal Mystery, carousel rides, Frankenstein’s dance party, nightly costume contests, haunted houses, obstacle courses and more. $10 per person, $20 all-inclusive armband, $5 discount for zoo members. Visit littlerockzoo.com for the full details and to purchase tickets.

WORLD CHEESE DIP CHAMPIONSHIP

octoBER

HAPPENINGS OUR PICKS FOR COOL TO-DOS AROUND CENTRAL ARKANSAS for a complete calendar of events, visit our website at thesavvymoms.com.

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OCT. 25, 11 A.M.-3 P.M. BERNICE GARDENS, 1401 S. MAIN ST., LITTLE ROCK

Amateurs and professionals from around the country will compete for the title of World Cheese Dip Champion. Attendees get to sample a variety of dips and vote for their favorites. Tickets are $8 in advance, $10 at the gate, kids 10 and under get in free. Proceeds benefit Harmony Health Clinic. Visit cheesedip.net for details.

BIG BOO!-SEUM BASH

OCT. 30, 6-8:30 P.M. DOWNTOWN LITTLE ROCK MUSEUMS AND ATTRACTIONS Downtown museums and attractions have partnered with the Little Rock Convention and Visitors Bureau to offer a variety of activities, including trick-or-treating, game cards, prize drawings and more. Partners include Witt Stephens Jr. Central Arkansas Nature Center, Arkansas Inland Maritime Museum, Mosaic Templars Cultural Center, Little Rock Central High School National Historic Site, Curran Hall, Arkansas State Capitol, Arkansas Arts Center, Historic Arkansas Museum, MacArthur Museum of Arkansas Military History, Arkansas National Guard Museum, Museum of Discovery, Old State House Museum and Ron Robinson Theater. Visit littlerock.com for the full details and a list of stops.


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How Safe Is Your Child?

ARKANSAS DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

Children with high levels of lead in their bodies can suffer- learning disabilities, hearing loss, speech delays, violent behaviors and, in rare cases seizures and even death. These are some of the effects lead paint poisoning has on young children. If your home was built before 1978, lead paint on your walls, doors, windows and sills may be dangerous. To learn more about the simple steps you can take to safeguard your family, contact the Arkansas Department of Health Lead-Based Paint Program at (501) 671-1549. THESAVVYMOMS.COM | OCTOBER 2014

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Thea Paves The Way PHOTOS BY CALLIE FRANCE STERLING

1. Dixie Watson and Kate Hassen 2. Eboni Smith, Jamee McAdoo, Aquisha Morgan, Erin Jacks, Maddie Robertson and Isabella Robertson 3. Natalie Childress 4. Summer Morgan, Sophie Buckley, Kennedy Banks and Kyron Jones

5. YinXue (Eric) Lu, Alex Cutler and Kate Suchan 6. Keturah Aldi and Cheng Vang 7. Chris Walker 8. Naomi Green, Cassandra Christ, Madeline Robinson, Josh Mateo, Samantha Emery, Aalia Hall, Pearl Arrieta and Rachel Stuckey 9. Kiera Taylor, Brittany Wright, Elizabeth Ornberg, Kinna Mieseh, Grethel Silva, Cydney Ballard, Zanna Camp and Joey Otter

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Rollin​’ on the River Benefits Easter Seals Arkansas PHOTOS BY NELSON CHENAULT

6. Mount St. Mary Academy students 7. The Dynamic Voices singing group, led by Easter Seals residents Andre Whitfield and DanQuisha Collins, performs a song they wrote, called “Feel Good.” 8. North Little Rock High School cheerleaders perform in support of their fellow cheerleader Hannah Johnson.

1. Logan, Victoria, Will and Scott Butler, with Morgan Purkiss 2. Josh, Zack, Tammy, Rebekah, Jake and Brad Gridley 3. Team Shawn at the finish line 4. Race participants 5. Runners in action

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Dempsey Bakery Hosts Kids’ Support Group PHOTOS BY LISA LAKEY

Dempsey Bakery hosted their Support Group for kids with food allergies on Sept. 2. Kids with various food allergies enjoyed a reading of Horace and Morris Say Cheese (Which Makes Dolores Sneeze!) and discussed their own feelings about living with food allergies. They made trail mix and decorated goodie

bags. Each child received a complimentary Allie-O (think Oreo, but better) at the end of the meeting. 1. From left: Joe Curran, Eren Ibis, Barak Erickson, Paula Dempsey, Elena Erickson, Ella Lakey, Makayla Rowe 2. Barak Erickson 3. Eren Ibis

4. Joe Curran 5. Elena Erickson 6. Paula Dempsey 7. Ella Lakey 8. Makayla Rowe

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Museum of Discovery Hosts Tinkerfest PHOTOS BY CALLIE FRANCE STERLING

1. Calvin Layton 2. Sarah Wilcoxson and Ella Ward 3. (Front row, L to R) Peter Hoffman, Kristin Gangluff, Kaylah Curry, Crystal Lucero, Janice Burns and Jenna Sanders (Back row, L to R) Cory Kinler, Wesley White, Dariesky Linares, Evan Sanders, Tino Barraza, Enmanuel Madera, Mason Thomas and Casey Forbess

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4. Maddox Still, Brittany Still and Scarlett Still 5. Elvie Pearson and Taylor Elswick 6. Cheryl Milliorn and Ken Milliorn 7. Ben Wedel, Matthew King and Jackson Lawry 8. Pepper Feazell, Winter Feazell and Vesper Feazell 9. Kenneth McKay and Jack Shue

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#whyileft One in four women experience severe physical violence within their lifetime. Domestic violence affects 15.5 million children each year. In light of the Ray Rice/NFL situation, we want you to hear from some of the strongest women we know in their own words. #whyileft “I left a great home. My fiancé’s sister did not like me. She beat me and put me in the hospital. I did not want anyone else hurt so I had to leave.” #whyileft “Why I left domestic situation • The safety and stability of my kids- didn’t want them observing negative situation. • To avoid a tragic situation where someone could have gotten hurt.” #whyileft “I left the situation I was in because I didn’t want to put my children through the heartache and pain of seeing me getting abused again” #whyileft “I was choked and slammed on the bed. That was the first time he was violent with me. But the verbal and mental was what hurt the most.” #whyileft “No one should live under someone else’s thumb. If he couldn’t be happy neither could me or the kids.” #whyileft “I did not want my daughter to think that the way her mommy was treated was acceptable and I didn’t want my daughter to grow up and live in the fear that I lived in.” #whyileft “I had a friend in Jr. high that liked me. I was always nice to him. I hadn’t seen him in 20 years. I saw him at another friend’s house. I tried to leave, so he beat me and raped me so I wasn’t safe. That’s my situation.” #whyileft “My situation was unhealthy for my family. Sometimes the grass is not greener on the other side.” If you or someone you know needs help, please contact us today.

For more information contact: Angela McGraw, Executive Director amcgraw@wcfarkansas.org 501-376-3219 • Toll Free 1-800-332-4443 • P.O. Box 1954 • Little Rock, AR 72203

www.wcfarkansas.org THESAVVYMOMS.COM | OCTOBER 2014

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MOMSPEAK LAUREN LANDERS

PHOTOGRAPHY BY SARA BLANCETT

AGE: 34 HOMETOWN: LITTLE ROCK OCCUPATION: RESEARCH REGULATORY AND DEVELOPMENT COORDINATOR (CARDIOLOGY DEPARTMENT AT THE CENTRAL ARKANSAS VETERANS HEALTHCARE SYSTEM) CHILDREN: DAUGHTER ADDISON, 4 I ENJOY WORKING WITH THE LITTLE ROCK ZOO BECAUSE …

Born and raised in Little Rock, the zoo has been an important part of my life and now my daughter’s. It is also a vital part of the community being one of the largest tourist attractions for the state. Serving on the Arkansas Zoological Foundation board is a privilege, and my hopes are that we can continue to make the needed improvements for better exhibits and an overall better experience for all. There are several fundraisers throughout the year, and one of my favorites is Wild Wines in the spring, where I also serve as a committee member and look forward to chairing in 2016. The penguins are one of my favorite animals at the zoo. They have been a great addition, and I look forward to raising money so the zoo can add more new and exciting exhibits and improve the existing ones. MY FAVORITE FALL ACTIVITY IS … Watching football! I love the Razorbacks (Landers is a UA alumnus), but college football in general is what I look forward to the most in the fall. MY FAVORITE HALLOWEEN TRADITION IS … A neighbor and friend bought an ambulance last year, and we took all the kids around the neighborhood for trick-or-treating. It was fun for the adults and kids (we all dressed up), and I hope to continue the new tradition! MY FAVORITE PICK-ME-UP ON A STRESSFUL DAY IS … Getting

to hang out with family and friends, whether it’s on a patio with friends or dinner and a movie with the family. My daughter enjoys the classics: “Swiss Family Robinson,” “The Sound of Music,” “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial” and more! IT’S FRIDAY NIGHT AND I’M HOME ALONE, SO I …

Always enjoy relaxing with a good book!

62 OCTOBER 2014 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM


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SAVVY - October 2014