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The Food Issue 2017 | arkansasfoodandfarm.com

DISH IT OUT

RECIPES FOR FRESH FIXIN’S LUNCH, SUPPER & DESSERTS

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We’re cooking up soy dishes across the state. Stop in and order the featured dish with each of our partners to learn how the Arkansas soybean industry contributes to the food we eat.

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For full tour details, check TheMiracleBean.com


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The Food Issue 2017 WHAT’S INSIDE

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CACHE FINDS A NICHE

Chef Payne Harding gives down-home cooking the uptown treatment.

Gourmet Crepes with Arkansas Ingredients Join us for Brunch! Tuesday-Friday: 7am-2pm Saturday-Sunday: 8am-2pm 501-205-9904

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ASK MADGE: ROY’S PEAR HONEY

Introducing a column on classic canning for the modern kitchen.

17

FARM TO TABLE RECIPES

Chefs and farmers from across the state share their favorite eats.

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TWO GENERATIONS OF MUSIC

APRIL 29 • A.J. Croce Performing songs of his father, Jim Croce

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Arkansas Products? Find them here! A Special Publication of Arkansas Times ALAN LEVERITT Publisher alan@arktimes.com

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REBEKAH LAWRENCE Associate Publisher rebekah@arktimes.com EDITORIAL MANDY KEENER Creative Director mandy@arktimes.com MICHAEL ROBERTS Editor michael@arktimes.com ADVERTISING PHYLLIS A. BRITTON Sales Director phyllis@arktimes.com ELIZABETH HAMAN Sales Director elizabeth@arktimes.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES ASHLEY GILL | ashley@arktimes.com BLAKE HANNAHS | blake@arktimes.com BROOKE WALLACE | brooke@arktimes.com LEE MAJOR | lee@arktimes.com LESA THOMAS | lesa@arktimes.com RHONDA CRONE | rhonda@arktimes.com STEPHEN PAULSON | stephen@arktimes.com PRODUCTION WELDON WILSON Production Manager/Controller ROLAND R. GLADDEN Advertising Traffic Manager JIM HUNNICUTT Advertising Coordinator GRAPHIC DESIGNERS BRYAN MOATS KEVIN WALTERMIRE MIKE SPAIN SOCIAL MEDIA LAUREN BUCHER lauren@arktimes.com OFFICE STAFF ROBERT CURFMAN IT Director LINDA PHILLIPS Billing/Collections KELLY JONES Office Manager/Accounts Payable ANITRA HICKMAN Circulation Director 201 E. MARKHAM ST., SUITE 200 LITTLE ROCK, AR 72201 501-375-2985 All Contents © 2016 Arkansas Food & Farm

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PRAISE BE TO PLANTING

Farmer and publisher Alan Leveritt gathers his Butterhead lettuce harvest for Trio’s Restaurant in Little Rock. The succulent lettuces grow in raised high tunnels.

Alan Leveritt Publisher, Arkansas Food & Farm Arkansas Times Publishing 8

ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM | THE FOOD ISSUE 2017

PH OTOGR A PH Y BY LI L A LE V ER I T T

O

n a cool, sunny Sunday morning in mid-March, my daughter and I stood in our plastic covered hoop house inhaling the clean scent of moist earth. For weeks, hundreds of jewel-like red and green Butterhead lettuces had filled the rows, to be harvested 60 or 70 at a time for Capi at Trios Restaurant. Now the rows were empty, the plastic mulch replaced and we were devoting our morning to planting a hundred heirloom and hybrid tomatoes about a month before we could plant them outside. The dark red, almost black Carbons, the big Goldies and the French green and red bi-color Ananas Noir are my holy trinity of heirloom tomatoes. I’ve trialed at least 100 large heirloom varieties over the years, and these three are the ones that work for me. In addition, we were trying Damsel, a new hybrid that purportedly has great disease resistance and outstanding flavor comparable to an heirloom Brandywine. I’m convinced the greatest and most talented liars do not go into politics or the law as is commonly thought, but instead write copy for the seed catalogs. And while my three heirlooms are as close to perfect as tomatoes come, they have little in the way of disease resistance in the humid, fungus-ridden environment of a hoop house— I need the insurance that comes with a hybrid. So we will see how Damsel does, though my skepticism runs deep. If everything works, which in farming it seldom does, we will have beautiful tomatoes in late May or early June which is very early for heirlooms. Outside we have about 35 120-foot raised bed rows recently amended with leaves, horse manure and compost. Sometime in early April we will till the beds and then drag a bed shaper over the soil that in one pass, creates a raised bed, lays irrigation line, lays a biodegradable plastic like mulch and throws the soil over the edges to keep the plastic from blowing away. Then on the first clear weekend we’ll draft our friends, children and children’s friends to plant about 900 tomato plants including German Giant, Russian, Bumblebee, Sungold, Kosovo, Cherokee Chocolate and the trinity. In short order that planting will be followed by as assortment of sunflowers, zinnias, celosia, watermelons, spaghetti squash, green beans, cantaloupe and basil. June will bring an abundance of elephant garlics, raspberries and then huge Indian variety black berries. I plan and plant all of this in the freshness of a cool spring and then repent throughout the heat and humidity of June, July and August. I have never wished for one more row to hoe or another hundred tomato plants to tie. In July the labor will be brutal. Yet the work is so fundamentally satisfying that it gives me a certain joy and peace. This last Sunday morning was as lovely as any I have spent in a year.


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HAPPY NEW YEAR

o here we are at the start of another year for Arkansas Food & Farm, and we are once again proud to bring you some of the tastiest farm to table recipes we’ve discovered all across the Natural State. From braised shortribs to a tasty take on the classic bread salad (see cover), we’ve got all sorts of goodies to last you throughout the year. We do this issue a little differently than our others. For one, there just aren’t a lot of things growing right now (as of this writing), and so we take this opportunity to get everyone excited about what’s about to spring forth from the earth. I’d also like to introduce a new feature that launches in this issue: “Ask Madge,” our new column on canning and preserving. For farmers that work hard to get the food out of the ground, it’s great for consumers to be able to stretch those ingredients out as long as possible. As always, it was a joy to put together this issue with our Food & Farm team, particularly the food-styling skills of creative director Mandy Keener and photographic excellence of Lily Darragh. It’s always great to work with people who have such a great vision—and our team here is one of the best. I hope you enjoy the issue, and let me know how everything tasted!

Michael Roberts Editor, Arkansas Food & Farm Arkansas Times Publishing @ARFoodFarm

SHOP LOCAL AT CENTRAL ARKANSAS’ PRODUCER ONLY FARMERS’ MARKETS! 10

Dogtown Farmers’ Market

410 Main Street, North Little Rock (in the historic Argenta Arts District next to the library)

Open on Saturdays April 22 - Sept 30. Specific opening hours listed below. April through June, 8am -12pm July through September, 7am-12pm

Westover Hills Farmers’ Market 6400 Kavanaugh Blvd, Little Rock Open May through October Tuesdays from 4 pm - 7 pm

Hillcrest Farmers’ Market Bernice Garden Farmers’ Market Located in the Bernice Garden at 1401 S. Main Street, Little Rock Open from April 16 - November 12 Sundays from 10am - 2pm

ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM | THE FOOD ISSUE 2017

YEAR-ROUND

Located on the sidewalk in front of Pulaski Heights Baptist Church, 2200 Kavanaugh, Little Rock Open year-round on Saturdays May-September, 7am-12pm October-April, 8am - 12pm

PH OTOGR A PH Y BY BR I A N CH I L SO N

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Little Rock's original farm to table, fine dining restaurant.

Farm to Table

Founded in 1991

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With a blend of innovative cuisine, unique settings and our signature southern charm, Arkansas is a food lover’s paradise. see what’s on the menu in The Natural State at arkansas.com/taste.

THE FOOD ISSUE 2017 | ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM

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CACHE FINDS A NICHE Chef Payne Harding gives down-home the uptown treatment

Chef Payne Harding has developed an extensive menu of farm to table delights at Cache Restaurant in Little Rock's River Market District.

by Dwain Hebda

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ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM | THE FOOD ISSUE 2017

PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIAN CHILSON

A

t any given time, Payne Harding has about 10 things going simultaneously. There’s the day-to-day of Cache, the restaurant he and his father co-own and that he opened in 2014. Situated in the heart of the River Market, the restaurant was a bold entrant to central Arkansas’ dining scene and quickly took its place on the roster of the state’s best. Then there’s Harding Garden, the farming side of his culinary enterprise, where he’s growing a variety of vegetables, herbs, heirloom tomatoes, berries and greens. Payne is renovating a farmhouse on the property with the intention of someday hosting farm to table meals and events there. It’s the kind of life he’s dreamed about since he was barely a teenager, when he first got interested in food, wine and cooking. “When I was younger I was always really creative; I enjoyed drawing and always liked working with my hands,” he said. “I cooked for my grandmother a little bit and my mom cooked for the family a lot and I always helped. “A few nights a week, we would eat out and my parents enjoyed going to nice places. I remember Ashley’s when Chef Lee (Richardson) was there. I was in about the seventh or eighth grade. I remember Chef Lee’s food really had an impact on me.” Just turning 30, Harding has spent half of his life in the restaurant business. The journey from busboy to restauranteur took him to New York where he attended culinary school and served internships and externships that exposed him to various cooking styles and philosophies. But it wasn’t until he came back home that his own personal philosophy began to take shape. “It’s weird how things evolve,” he said. “Early on I was so much more interested in the look of the plate. I was interested in all these chefs in New York and I always thought that food needed to look really nice. I was obsessed with it.” “When I came back to the South, I started embracing Southern cuisine quite a bit more. I started taking a look at what the chefs were doing in the South and developed an idea for the refined Southern cuisine we’ve got going at Cache.” Fueling that vision was access to quality local ingredients. Even as he’s developed his own farm,

Harding is a regular haunt at local farmer’s markets and has also developed relationships with a number of local farms. “The River Market farmers market is someplace where a lot of chefs go and gives farmers the chance to show what they have. I definitely go there every year,” he said. “There’s also the farmers market in Hillcrest (Little Rock) that I have been to for squash and tomatoes and berries and greens. That’s awesome because of the small market farmers that are there, just mom-and-pop people. “Some of the local markets are a relatively unknown thing. Everyone knows about the River Market one, but not everyone knows Hillcrest or the Bernice Garden. I had to have someone take me there and show me the first time. Getting to see those is fun as a foodie and as a chef to see the fresh organic produce. Meeting the farmers is nice too.” Harding said like all larger establishments, it’s difficult for Cache to be 100 percent farm to table given the volume of ingredients the restaurant requires on a daily basis and the general seasonality of such things. “We need lots of stuff, we’re serving lunch, dinner and a brunch on Sunday,” he said. “I like to supplement what we do and I do like small tastings where I’ll get as local as possible. “I actually do my best with produce in season. I’m always looking for what farmers have, right down to squash blossoms, anything like that. During the summer things are pretty vibrant, but winter things,


“[LITTLE ROCK] IS AWESOME BECAUSE OF THE SMALL MARKET FARMERS..." —PAYNE HARDING root vegetables and such like that, it can be challenging.” Still, he strives for relationships with local growers and companies whenever feasible, such as War Eagle Mill in Rogers which supplies grits and RoZark Hills Coffee Roasterie in Rose Bud. He’s also very high on Arkansas Natural Produce, based in Hot Spring County “Arkansas Natural is awesome,” he said. “I love their baby arugula. Their field greens are great and vibrant and their micro basil is awesome.” Harding’s culinary journey may have taken the man out of the Natural State for a time, but it never quite got the Arkansas out of him. Sourcing local whenever possible is just one outgrowth of local culinary culture, he said. “When I started, the food was just too frous-frous,” he said. “All young cooks go through that, they want food to look real pretty. After all these years I realize it’s more important what the food tastes like than what the food looks like. Now, I appreciate more of a rustic approach, appreciating the flavor of the food rather than obsessing over how it looks. “I mean, presentation’s important but Arkansas people value what tastes good more. They want flavor and they don’t want small portions; they don’t want to pay $55 for a portion that looks nice but you have to go eat a pizza afterwards. As a chef I hate the thought of that.”

A Family Store INSPIRING a Local economy.

All Natural Meats Farm To Table Café Arkansas Made & Arkansas Grown Products

17202 Highway 5 | Benton | 501-794-2393

@oldecrowgeneralstore oldecrowgeneralstore.com THE FOOD ISSUE 2017 | ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY RICHARD LEDBETTER

Pear-grower Bill Farmer shows off a batch of Bartlett Pears to author Richard Ledbetter. The unique fruit trees still dot the Arkansas landscape, a relic of pioneer days.

ASK MADGE: ROY’S PEAR HONEY Classic Canning for Modern Kitchens by Jennifer Sullivan and Richard Ledbetter

B

efore Dr. Willis Carrier discovered the refrigeration cycle in 1902, our ancestors had to preserve their foods without the benefit of artificially cold air. Any adult of age with some kind of rural roots probably recalls their aunt or grandmother canning vegetables from the garden and fruit from the orchard. If so, the memory of steam roiling from a stovetop pot and the aroma of vegetables or fruit parboiling in preparation is likely an immediate and pleasant recollection of a happy, wholesome childhood. So okay, you’ve grown it in your garden or orchard or been to the farmer’s market and made your selection of fresh produce, now what? Without an electric refrigerator, how else does one take the flavor and freshness of local homegrown goodness and save it for consumption throughout the year? On the farm where I operate along with my wife and grower Bill Farmer, there remain a pair of old Bartlett Pear trees that have been on the property since it was first being homesteaded. Tradition holds how in return for 14

ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM | THE FOOD ISSUE 2017

receiving government grants of free land, settlers were required to reside on the property for at least six years and plant six variety of trees as part of their contract. Once back firmly on the ground, the process of what to do with the abundance began. We employed a couple different methods to preserve our harvest: pear honey and dehydrated pears. Regardless of which method you pick to keep your fruit, a core remover is an essential tool to slice and prepare the final wedges. A large cooking pot will also be needed for preserves or honey, preferably of the five-gallon variety. According to nationally recognized canning guru Roy Johnson, whose recipe we are sharing, “The Bartlett Pear is the one most cherished for making pear honey. This method of preparation is quite simple. Sugar is the main ingredient used with the fruit. The second item added to the mix is sliced pineapple. The best option is the whole pineapple sliced and cubed. Sugar is measured by weight rather than volume and should traditionally be equal to the weight of the


From top to bottom: Bartlett Pears should be cored and peeled prior to processing. A dehydrator makes for excellent preserved fruit. Cooking the pears down with pineapple for canning is another way to preserve the harvest, with jars of honey-sweet pears available yearround.

pears.” My own recipe preference is to cut the sugar to half the weight of the fruit. “The pineapple ratio should be roughly one pineapple for every five-gallon bucket of whole pears. The secret to good honey is to produce the end product without any water added. Peeling and slicing the pears and sprinkling half the sugar over the pear wedges the night before cooking will readily achieve this. It’s surprising how much liquid will be in the pot after setting in sugar all night.” “The next step is bring the mixture to a slow boil. Add the pineapple and remaining sugar slowly as more liquid is needed.” This form of canning requires no pectin added to the mixture. Sugar, pears and pineapple are the only three ingredients. “About three hours of cooking will generally jell the mixture to the desired viscosity.” The final thickness should be relative to that of bee honey… thus the name. “It will be a rare instance if you don’t like what you’ve created.” When the honey is finished cooking, sterilize canning jars by boiling them in hot water for ten minutes. Remove the jars and allow them to completely air dry. Quickly fill the jars to within half an inch of the top. Wipe the jar lips clean and top by tightly screwing on lids. Process jars by boiling in water for ten minutes to complete the airtight seal. Let the jars cool and label the ingredients with date and name. Once you get in the habit of canning, you’ll be surprised how much product you can stock on your pantry shelves. The labels will come in handy when you occasionally need to be reminded just what and when certain items were put up. The dehydration method is simpler still. Using a readily purchased dehydrator just cut the pears into half-inch thick wedges and place them at evenly spaced intervals on drying trays. One may also utilize an oven on very low heat and a cookie sheet to accomplish like result. This method will take approximately twenty-four hours to reduce pears slices to liquid free, properly preserved fruit wedges. It’s important to regularly check the dehydration process to insure the fruit isn’t overdried beyond practical use. Store them in plastic containers or jars until such time as you’re ready to rehydrate them for cooking by letting the dry wedges soak in water. Good luck and good canning! Richard Ledbetter and his wife Jennifer Sullivan work with grower Bill Farmer to study, preserve and share age-old techniques. Look for their Ask Madge column in future issues. THE FOOD ISSUE 2017 | ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM

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NORTHWEST ARKANSAS FARMERS MARKETS SPRINGDALE Farmers’ Market

Locally Grown Fruits, Vegetables, Herbs, Honey, Eggs, Frozen Meats and More

DOWNTOWN FAYETTVILLE SQUARE Saturdays April - November, 7AM-2PM Thursdays & Tuesdays April - October, 7AM-1PM

fayettevillefarmersmarket.org For information about Holiday Markets, Winter Markets & Special events, please check our website, Facebook page or call 479-236-2910.

May-October Tuesday, Thursday & Saturday 7am-1pm

On the Jones Center Memorial Walk s

sweeten your sundays in

Bella Vista

Treat your family to the Bella Vista Farmers’ Market where you can celebrate our community with local food, goods, and entertainment.

Sundays, April 23 - October 29 10:00am to 3:00pm

The parking lot of Mercy Bella Vista 1 Mercy Way Bella Vista, AR 72714

Farmers Market Saturdays The Bentonville Square April 22nd-Oct 28th | 7:30am- 1:00pm downtownbentonville.org Visitbentonville.com

TASTE OF NORTHWEST ARKANSAS

BOCCA Italian eatery & pizzeria Offering fresh ingredients and house-made pastas, sauces, breads, mozzarella, and wood-fired pizzas.

2036 N College Ave. Fayetteville; 479-301-2688;  Boccanwa.com

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ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM | THE FOOD ISSUE 2017

AN ITALIAN RESTAURANT LIKE NOTHING FAYETTEVILLE HAS EVER SEEN.

REAL FOOD, AMAZING INGREDIENTS, BEAUTIFUL ATMOSPHERE.

17 E Center St. | Fayetteville | 479-966-4649 |vetro1925.com


BO U NTY

of th e

SEASON S

No matter the time of year, there’s something out there being grown by an Arkansas farmer that’s simply perfect for your table. Take a look at our year-round journey through farm to table goodness. PHOTOGRAPHY BY LILY DARRAGH | STYLING BY MANDY KEENER

GOAT GO UDA RISOTTO wi th

SPINACH WHITE RIVER CREAMERY, ELKINS SERVES 4-6

INGREDIEN TS: 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 small onion, minced 1 clove garlic, minced 6 cups chicken stock ¾ cups spinach, chopped 1½ cups Arborio rice 6 ounces shredded goat Gouda 1 tablespoon unsalted butter salt and pepper to taste

DIRECTION S: Heat olive oil in a skillet.

Add onion and cook until translucent. Add garlic and cook for 2-3 minutes longer. Stir in rice and add stock one cup at a time, stirring until absorbed. Add spinach and stir. Risotto is done when texture becomes creamy and tender. Stir in Gouda, butter, salt and pepper to taste.

THE FOOD ISSUE 2017 | ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM

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SPICED FRU I T COMPOTE LOBLOLLY CREAMERY, LITTLE ROCK | MAKES 2-3 QUARTS

INGREDIEN TS:

4 cups mixed seasonal fruit such as blackberries, persimmons, pears and/or apples 1 ounce maple syrup 2 teaspoons ginger, minced 1 teaspoon cinnamon ½ teaspoon nutmeg ½ cup brown sugar ½ cup white sugar

DIRECTION S:

Combine all ingredients in a large saucepan, stirring thoroughly until fruit is evenly coated with the sugar and spices. Bring mixture to a simmer and cook for 20 minutes, stirring occasionally. As the fruit and sugar begin to break down, the sauce will thicken. 18

ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM | THE FOOD ISSUE 2017

FIND U-PICK FARMS IN OUR LISTINGS!


FARM ERS MARKET VEG ETABLE & BREAD SALAD SCOTT MCGEHEE, YELLOW ROCKET CONCEPTS | SERVES 6-8

INGREDIEN TS:

1 medium shallot 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar 4 tablespoons balsamic vinegar 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil (for croutons) 7 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil (for dressing) 2 teaspoons salt 1 loaf sourdough bread 2-3 Arkansas heirloom tomatoes ½ medium cucumber, peeled and cut into bite-sized pieces 1 bell pepper, chopped 15 large basil leaves salt and pepper

DIRECTION S:

SALAD DRESSING: Slice shallots as thinly as possible, then cover with the red wine vinegar. Allow to marinate for 15 minutes. Whisk with 2 teaspoons salt and olive oil to complete the dressing. CROUTONS: Preheat oven to 350˚F. Tear or cut bread into bite size pieces and drizzle 2 tablespoons olive oil over the bread. Toss until oil is well-

disturbed, spread in a single layer on a sheet tray and toast until golden brown. SALAD: Carefully slice tomatoes into bite size segments. Be gentle so that they don’t lose the juice and seeds. Slice or tear the basil leaves. Gently toss the tomatoes, croutons, peppers, cucumber, dressing, basilISSUE and salt pepper to taste. THE FOOD 2017 and | ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM 19


PEACH SHORTCAKE JAMISON ORCHARD, NASHVILLE | SERVES 18-20

INGREDIEN TS: SHORTCAKES: 1 cup flour ¾ cup butter 2 tablespoons ice water 1/8 teaspoon salt PEACHES: 1 pound fresh peaches, sliced 1 cup sugar

DIRECTION S: Preheat oven to 300˚F.

Slice fresh peaches and cover with white sugar. Allow to chill at least an hour before serving. Gently combine all ingredients in a mixing bowl to create shortcake dough. Divide the dough into 18-20 equal size balls, then flatten each ball into disk. Bake on a greased cookie sheet for 20 minutes until golden brown. Serve with peaches and whipped cream.

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ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM | THE FOOD ISSUE 2017


RED WINE BRAISED SHORT RIBS WHOLLY COW FARMS, JUDSONIA | SERVES 4-6

INGREDIEN TS: 2-4 tablespoons butter 2 medium onions, chopped 3-4 cloves garlic, minced 2 pounds short ribs 1 quart bone broth 1-2 cups dry red wine salt, fresh ground pepper, some thyme or rosemary and bay leaves to taste

FALL-OFFTHE-BONE TENDER!

DIRECTION S :

In a large skillet, cook onions in butter until they begin to brown. Add garlic, cooking for 2-3 minutes longer. Add meat and liquid to the pan and bring to a slow simmer. Add 1-2 bay leaves. Simmer over low heat for 3 hours. Remove meat from braising liquid and finish by broiling or grilling over an open flame. Retain braising liquid and reduce by half to create a savory sauce.

THE FOOD ISSUE 2017 | ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM

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SU M M ER SALSA H&R FARMS, MAYFLOWER | MAKES 6 PINTS

INGREDIEN TS:

20 very ripe tomatoes 4 onions, peeled and quartered 2 green bell peppers, cored and deseeded 10 jalapeĂąo peppers, halved 10 cloves garlic, peeled and halved salt to taste

DIRECTION S:

Peel and core tomatoes. Put tomatoes and all remaining vegetables in a food processor and pulse until all chopped but still chunky. Pour mixture into a saucepan and bring to a simmer, adjusting salt to taste. Cook over medium heat until thickened to desired consistency, typically 45 minutes to an hour.

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ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM | THE FOOD ISSUE 2017


BLACKBERRY COBBLER FALLING STAR FARMS, MAYNARD | SERVES 6

INGREDIEN TS: 1¼ cups sugar, divided use 1 cup self-rising flour 1 cup milk ½ cup butter, melted 2 cups blackberries

DIRECTION S: Preheat oven to 350˚F.

In a large mixing bowl, whisk together sugar, flour and milk until blended. Whisk in melted butter. Pour batter into a generously greased 8x12 baking dish. Sprinkle blackberries over batter, then add the remaining ¼ cup sugar, distributing it evenly over batter. Bake for one hour, or until golden brown and bubbly.

ADD OTH ER BERRY TYPES DU RING SEASON!

THE FOOD ISSUE 2017 | ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM

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CLAM CHOWDER KATIE CONNALLY CONFECTIONS, LITTLE ROCK | SERVES 8

INGREDIEN TS:

3 8-ounce bottles of clam juice 1 pound of North Pulaski Farms potatoes (peeled and diced, about ½ inch per piece) 2 tablespoons Wayne Plantation Sunflower Oil 2 cups diced Lighthouse Farms onions 1 cup diced celery 4 Weal and Woe Farm garlic cloves 6 cans of chopped clams (save liquid) 1¼ cups of half and half ¼ cup flour salt and pepper to taste

DIRECTION S:

Bring the clam juice and potatoes to a boil in a pot, then reduce heat to medium and simmer until potatoes are tender, about 8 minutes (you want them to keep their shape). Pour into the crockpot. Put 2 tablespoons of the sunflower oil in a skillet and sauté the celery, garlic and onion until soft and fragrant. Add to crockpot when done. Mix flour with the saved canned clam liquid and add to the pan with the sautéed vegetables and stir until smooth. Then put the sautéed veggies and the half and half in a crockpot on low. Season with salt and pepper to taste and let simmer for at least one hour. Ladle into bowls and sprinkle the parsley on top before serving.

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LOCAL POTATOES MAKE ALL TH E DIFFERENCE!


HONEY WHOLE WH EAT SANDWICH BREAD HERITAGE FARM, BENTONVILLE | MAKES 2 LOAVES

INGREDIEN TS:

2½ teaspoons active dry yeast 13 ounces warm water, divided use ⅓ cup honey 3 tablespoons butter, melted 2¼ cups white wheat unbleached all-purpose flour 2 cups whole wheat flour ¼ cup flax seed meal 1½ teaspoons salt 2 tablespoons buttermilk powder 2 tablespoons flax seeds 2 tablespoons chia seeds

DIRECTION S: Preheat oven to 400˚F.

In a small bowl, mix together the yeast, 3 ounces of warm water and honey. Set aside and allow to sit for 5 minutes. Using a large mixing bowl, mix both types of flour with the flax seed meal, salt, buttermilk powder, flax seeds and chia seeds. Place the yeast mixture into the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment. With the mixer running on its lowest speed, slowly add the remaining 10 ounces of warm water.

WE LOVE IT TOASTED WITH A BITO-HONEY!

Once the additional water is incorporated, begin to slowly add the flour mixture, then add the melted butter. Mix for approximately 15 seconds. Switch the mixer’s paddle attachment for the dough hook. Run mixer with dough hook for 4 minutes in order to knead bread. Allow kneaded mixture to rest for 10 minutes. Transfer dough to a large bowl and cover with a clean tea towel. Allow dough to rise for 1 hour. After an hour, punch down risen dough in the middle and edges. Divide into two equal portions. Knead dough until it takes on a smooth texture.

To shape loaves, punch each dough portion into a flat oval shape. Fold in each of the short sides and then fold over each of the long sides like you’re wrapping a package. Give it a good pinch to seal the seam and flip it over. Give each formed loaf a good smack against the counter in order to seal the bottom and remove internal air gaps. Place each loaf into a greased loaf pan. Cover and allow to rise for an additional 45 minutes. Bake loaves for 3 minutes at 400˚F, then reduce oven temperature to 375˚F. Bake for 25 minutes. Remove loaves from oven and allow to cool.

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PIRI PIRI BARBECU E CHICKEN ELEVEN, BENTONVILLE | SERVES 6-8

INGREDIEN TS: 2 small red bell peppers 8 dried chiles 1 red beet, peeled and boiled 8 cloves garlic 1½ tablespoon oregano 1½ tablespoon paprika 2 teaspoons kosher salt 2 teaspoons annatto powder 1½ teaspoons chipotle powder juice of one lemon ½ cup vegetable oil 6 tablespoons red wine vinegar ¼ cup cilantro, chopped

THIS SAUCE IS UN-BEETABLE!

DIRECTION S:

Place all of the ingredients except for the chicken and cilantro into a blender. Blend on high until silky smooth. Add cilantro when finished. In a glass bowl, coat chicken with this mixture generously, reserving a small amount. Cover tightly and allow to marinate overnight. Remove chicken and grill over medium-high heat, brushing with marinade every 10-15 minutes. Heat up previously reserved marinade (do not use marinade that came into contact with raw chicken) and serve as sauce. 26

ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM | THE FOOD ISSUE 2017


CABBAG E ROLL CASSEROLE MCCOOL FARMS, ROVER | SERVES 6

INGREDIEN TS: 1 pound breakfast sausage 1 pound hamburger 3 tablespoons ground cloves 2 eggs 1 cup cooked rice 1 medium onion 2 tablespoons sea salt 2 tablespoons black pepper 1 head cabbage

GREAT THE NEXT DAY, TOO!

DIRECTION S: Preheat oven to 350ËšF.

Thoroughly mix all ingredients except cabbage in a large bowl. Separate the cabbage into individual leaves, boiling each leaf individually until transluscent. In a glass dish, create a layer of cabbage leaves and top with meat mixture, then cover with more cabbage. Bake until internal temperature of the meat mixture reaches 165 degrees.

THE FOOD ISSUE 2017 | ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM

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FRESH SAUTEED VEG ETABLES LAUGHING STOCK FARM, SHERIDAN | SERVES 4

INGREDIEN TS:

2 cups sliced fresh veggies such as carrots, squash, zucchini and eggplant 1 clove garlic, chopped 2 tablespoons olive oil Chopped fresh dill to taste salt and pepper to taste

DIRECTION S:

Heat oil in pan on medium heat and sauté garlic and fresh vegetables. Add dill, salt and pepper to taste. Reduce heat and simmer until vegetables are tender.

FRESH DILL ADDS A U NIQU E F LAVOR & CAN BE GR OWN AT HOM E.

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ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM | THE FOOD ISSUE 2017


B UTTERN UT SQU ASH SO UP wi th SAG E & CINNAMON CREAM SOUTH ON MAIN, LITTLE ROCK | SERVES 6-8

INGREDIEN TS : CINNAMON CREAM: 1 cup heavy cream 1 tablespoon cinnamon

SOUP: 2 medium butternut squash salt pepper ¼ cup honey 2 teaspoons cinnamon 1 teaspoon nutmeg ⅛ cup light brown sugar 2 cups whole milk cinnamon cream fried sage, chopped FRIED SAGE: ½ cup peanut oil 1 sprig sage

DIRECTION S:

Whisk cinnamon into cream. Continue whisking until cream has stiff peaks. Set aside. Heat oil in a small sauté pan. Just before the oil smokes add the sage. Fry for 1 minute, and then flip the sprig over and fry for another 30 seconds. Remove from oil and set aside on a paper towel to drain. Preheat oven to 325°F. Split both squash from north to south pole. Season the cut side of the squash with salt and pepper, and then place the pieces face down on a baking sheet lined with foil. Cook in the oven for 40 minutes.

Scoop out the squash and place it in a food processor. Blend on low adding honey, cinnamon, nutmeg and brown sugar. Switch machine to high and add ½ cup of milk. Blend until smooth. Transfer the purée to a large-size pot on the stove. Over medium heat, whisk in the rest of the milk and bring to a simmer. Allow to cook for 30 minutes. Place in a bowl and serve.

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SQU ASH RE LISH

ST. JOSEPH FARM, NORTH LITTLE ROCK | MAKES 6-8 PIINTS

INGREDIENTS:

8 pounds yellow or zucchini squash 2 large onions 1 large green bell pepper 1 large red bell pepper 3 ½ cups sugar 3 cups vinegar 2 tablespoons celery seed 2 tablespoons turmeric

DIRECTION S: Slice squash and finely chop the peppers and onions. Put in large pot and add 1 cup water. Bring to boil.

Combine with vegetables and bring to a boil for 10 minutes.

In another pot, mix vinegar, celery seed, turmeric and sugar. Bring to a boil to dissolve the sugar.

Pack in hot jars, seal and let stand at least 5 days.

According to the definition adopted by Congress in 2008, anything labeled LOCALLY or REGIONALLY PRODUCED must be within 400 miles of its origin, or located within the state it was produced.

For more food and farm facts, visit arfb.com

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ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM | THE FOOD ISSUE 2017


This is what Arkansas farm to table looks like! Experience Trio's

WWW.TRIOSRESTAURANT.COM Monday through Saturday 11am - 2:30pm, 5:30 – Close Sunday Brunch ~ 10am - 2pm 8201 Cantrell Road • Little Rock Pavilion in the Park • 221.3330

THE FOOD ISSUE 2017 | ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM

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D fo og r q ea ui r t ck hi re s p fe ag re e nc e!

FIND YOUR SOURCES

For our Food Issue, we have limited our normal listings to grocers, CSAs, u-pick farms, farmers markets and restaurants. For our full listings, visit arkansasfoodandfarm.com, and if you’d like to see your farm listed in upcoming issues, submit the details at ArkansasGrown.org. It’s free and easy.

FARMERS MARKETS, CSAs, U-PICK FARMS, FARM TO TABLE RESTURANTS & GROCERS Page 33

CENTRAL ARKANSAS

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NORTHWEST ARKANSAS

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NORTHEAST ARKANSAS

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SOUTHWEST ARKANSAS

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SOUTHEAST ARKANSAS

Page 44 FARM TO TABLE RESTAURANTS & ARKANSAS GROCERS

Holiday Island Bella Vista • Eureka Maynard • Corning • Piggott • Gravette • Gepp • • Viola Springs • Omaha • Bentonville • • Salem Greenway • Avoca Mountain Home Berryville • • Decatur Knobel • • Rogers • Hardy • Centerton Rector • Cherokee Village • • •• Pocahontas • • YellvilleCotter • • Gassville Green Forest • Harrison • Elm • • Lafe • • Everton • Bruno Springs• • Springdale Evening Shade • Huntsville Western Grove • • Siloam SpringsFayetteville • • Harrison • • Poughkeepsie • Walnut Ridge • Kingston • Jasper Harriet Melbourne • • Sage Farmington • • • Blytheville • Greenland Mount Pleasant • • Elkins • •Cave City•Smithville • Brookland • Parthenon Prairie • Fork Leslie Grove • West • • Mountain View • Deer • Jonesboro Swifton• • Evansville • Winslow Pettigrew• • Fallsville • Cash Batesville • Witt Spring • Dennard • Northwest Arkansas • Desha • Trumann • Shirley Cedarville Northeast Arkansas Newport • • • Clinton Rudy • Heber Springs • Mulberry Clarksville • Tyronza Alma • • • Lamar • Bee Branch • Ozark Cherry Valley Jerusalem • Bradford Cleveland • • • • Altus Bald Knob • • Fort Smith Dover • Center Ridge Judsonia • • Augusta London • • • Lavaca • Hattieville • Guy • Romance Charleston• • • McCrory Marion • Paris Russellville • • • Searcy • Springfield • Wynne • • Morrilton Dardanelle • Atkins Booneville • • • McRae • El Paso Beebe • Colt Proctor • • Conway • Vilonia • • Huntington Perry • • Belleville Perryville Houston Ward Cabot • • • Forrest City • Cotton Plant • Palestine Rover • • •Bigelow Des•Arc • • Mayflower Jacksonville • Roland • Fargo • Waldron DeVall’s • Sherwood • Lonoke Bluff • •North Central Arkansas Little Rock • Parks • Little Rock • • Scott Southeast Arkansas Jessieville • Mabelvale Hot Springs Village•• Mena Benton • • • Woodson • Mount Ida • • Hot Springs • Bauxite • Hensley Helena Royal • Stuttgart • Malvern • Bismarck •Prattsville •• Poyen • Altheimer • De Witt Sheridan Grannis • Hall • Donaldson • • White • Pine Bluff • Dierks • Arkadelphia • Grady • De Queen Rison • • Nashville • Dumas Prescott • • Foreman McGehee • Monticello • • Ashdown • Hope Southwest Arkansas Warren • • Camden • Hampton • Dermott • Texarkana Louann • Lake Village • • Fouke Magnolia • • Hamburg Crossett El Dorado Eudora • • • • Bradley Junction City • Gentry

Lowell Cave Springs

Solgohachia

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ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM | THE FOOD ISSUE 2017


• Fork Prairie Grove • West • Deer • Evansville • Winslow Pettigrew• • Fallsville

• Jonesboro • Leslie • Mountain View • Swifton• • Cash Batesville • Witt Spring • Dennard •Desha Northwest Arkansas • • Trumann Shirley • CENTRAL ARK ANSAS Cedarville Northeast Arkansas • • Newport • Clinton Rudy • Heber Springs • Mulberry • Tyronza Alma • • • Clarksville Bee Branch to individuals or restaurants. Call ahead • • Ozark Lamar Cherry Valley Jerusalem Bradford Cleveland • • • • Center Ridge Altus Wholesale Farm. Bald Knob • for availability. U-Pick, • • Fort Smith Dover • Augusta Judsonia • Farmers London • • • Lavaca Back Acres • Hattieville • Guy Charleston• • • • McCroryMarket atWynne Marion • • Paris Russellville • • • • Springfield • Romance • Searcy 3725 College Ave., 501-940-2729 • Dardanelle Atkins • • Booneville • MorriltonConway Vilonia • McRae Farmers market selling • El Paso Beebe • ColtfromArkansas Proctor produce purchased farmers. • • • • 8 • Huntington Perry • • Belleville Perryville Houston Forrest City Cotton Plant Cabot • • Ward • a.m.-3 p.m. Tues.-Sat. Farmers Market. • • • Mayflower Rover • • Bigelow Des Arc • • • Palestine • • Jacksonville DeVall’s Fargo • Waldron • Roland Sherwood Lonoke GUY Bluff • • Central Arkansas Little Rock • Parks • •North Scott Little Rock • • Southeast Arkansas Arkansas Farm to Table at Pops Jessieville CENTRAL • Mabelvale Hot Springs Village•• Market Mena Benton • Woodson • • ARKANSAS • Mount Ida 603 Hwy. 25 N., 870-283-9065 • • Hot Springs • Bauxite • Hensley Helena Stuttgart • arkansasfarmtotable.com Farmers Markets, CSAs • Royal Malvern seasonal fruits and vegetables, & U-Pick Farms • Bismarck •Prattsville •• Poyen • Altheimer Offers Sheridan • De Witt baked goods, cheeses and other • Grannis • Donaldson White Hall • • Pine Bluff prepared foods. CSA, Farmers Market. • Dierks • Arkadelphia • Grady De Queen • • Cadron Crest Orchard   Rison • 86 Mode Rd., 501-679-3243  • Nashville battlesorchard.com  • Dumas Offers u-pick strawberries, peaches, Prescott type onions, Irish potatoes, sweet • • Foreman McGeheewatermelons, cantaloupe potatoes, watermelons (including Monticello apples, • • Ashdown • Hope Southwest Arkansasseedless), cantaloupe,Warren and • tomatoes throughout the season. blueberries, • Call in advance for availability, May• Camden peaches, • Hamptonplums, blackberries, • Dermott Sept. U-Pick. nectarines, peppers, pumpkins, turnip • Texarkana Louann • local honey and homemade Lake Village • greens, • Fouke HOT SPRINGS jams. Farmers Market. Magnolia • • Hamburg Eudora • Downtown Farmers Market • Crossett Historic • El Dorado Just Picked Vegetables  • Bradley 121 Orange St., 501-545-0534 4007 W. Cleland Rd., 501-988-1003  Junction City • hotspringsfarmersmarket.com U-pick seasonal produce Solgohachia

including broccoli, bok choy, collard greens, kale and sugar snap peas. U-Pick.

BRYANT Arkansas Fresh Bakery 1506 N. Prickett Rd., 501-847-6638 arkansasfreshbakery.com A wholesale bakery that provides bread to central Arkansas restaurants and sells on Saturdays at the Argenta Farmers Market and Hillcrest Farmers Market. Operates a café and deli in Bryant. Farmers Market. CABOT The Cabot Patch 500 Mt. Carmel Rd., 501-605-1313 cabotpatch.3m.com Pick yourself or find pre-picked strawberries, peaches, okra, plums, purple hull peas, tomatoes, cantaloupe and watermelons. 8 a.m.-6 p.m. 7 days, April-Aug. On-Farm Sales, U-Pick. Caney Creek Berry Farm   2568 Little Creek Dr., 501-548-0475  U-pick berry farm. Call for availability. U-Pick. Holland Bottom Farms Produce Stand 1255 Hwy. 321, 501-843-7152 hollandbottomfarm.com Pre-picked strawberries, squash, cucumbers, zucchini, tomatoes, okra, purple hull peas, sweet corn, Vidalia-

Mountain High Produce 1000 E. Justice Rd., 501-983-8881  U-pick strawberries during season. Call for availability. U-Pick. North Pulaski Farms  13018 Ellen Cove, 501-240-4233  Certified organic vegetable farm located in the northernmost part of Pulaski County. CSA, Wholesale Farm. CONWAY Arkansas Portable Pumpkin Patch 1356 Wiley’s Cove, 501-703-8147 arkansasportablepumpkinpatch.com Offers pumpkins, Christmas trees and local honey. Call for appointment. On-Farm Sales, U-Pick. Caney Creek Berry Farm 2568 Little Creek Dr., 501-548-0475 U-pick berry farm. Call for availability. U-Pick. Conway Locally Grown 925 Mitchell St., 501-339-1039 conway.locallygrown.net Year-round online farmers market where customers order the items they want. Farmers Market. David Wilson 2568 Little Creek Dr., 501-548-0475 Small u-pick and pre-picked berry sales

Offers fresh produce, locally prepared foods, crafts, demonstrations and entertainment. 7 a.m.-noon Sat., 4 p.m.7 p.m. Tues., May-Oct.; 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Sat. Nov.-Apr. Farmers Market. Spa City Co-Op 103 Georgian St., 501-760-3131 spacity.locallygrown.net Online farmers market featuring natural foods and products produced or grown within 100 miles of Hot Springs. Two market periods per month. Farmers Market. HOT SPRINGS VILLAGE

Green Market of Hot Springs Village 1105 DeSoto Blvd., 501-992-5556 facebook.com/GreenMarketHSV Offers locally grown vegetables, fruits, Arkansas meats, eggs, homemade baked good and handcrafted items. 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Thurs. Farmers Market. LITTLE ROCK Arkansas Local Food Network 509 Scott St., 501-291-2769  littlerock.locallygrown.net  Year-round online farmers market. Products include grass-fed meats, organic and naturally grown fruits and vegetables, gourmet cheeses, artisan breads, mushrooms, honey, nuts, garden supplies, jams, jellies, pickled products, and locally produced bath & beauty products. Farmers Market.

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CENTRAL ARK ANSAS

Arkansas Sustainability Network   509 Scott St., 501-291-2769  littlerock.locallygrown.net  An online farmers market operated by the Arkansas Sustainability Network. Farmers Market.  Arkansas Urban Gardening Educational Resource  1800 S. Chester St., 501-529-8520.   Sells produce and fresh flowers.  Farmers Market. Bernice Garden Farmers Market   1401 S. Main St., 501-617-2511  thebernicegarden.org  A Sunday market that only includes Arkansas growers and producers. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Sun. May-Oct. Farmers Market.  BHealthy Farmers Market  9601 Baptist Health Dr.  Farmers market hosted by Baptist Health featuring fresh produce and health information. 7 a.m.-1 p.m. Tues. Farmers Market. Hillcrest Farmers Market 2200 Kavanaugh Blvd., 501-661-1129 Little Rock-area year-round market offering locally grown produce. Also offers jams, jellies, pastries, cut flowers and food trucks. Farmers Market. Little Rock Farmers Market  400 President Clinton Ave., 501-3752552  rivermarket.info  Open-air farmers market beneath the River Market Pavilions in Little Rock. Wide selection of produce, prepared food and crafts from around the state. Farmers Market. Market at Green Tree 9305 Rodney Parham Rd., 501-225-6303 visitgreentree.com Showcases fresh, locally grown produce and grocery items during the Arkansas growing season. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Sat. Farmers Market. The Green Corner Store 1423 Main St., 501-374-1111 thegreencornerstore.com General store and gift shop focusing on Arkansas made and produced products. Houses a soda fountain serving locally made ice cream and beverages produced by Loblolly Creamery. Artisan Foods.

LONOKE Barnhill Orchards 277 Sandhill Rd., 501-676-2305 barnhillorchards.com Offers strawberries, blackberries, peaches, squash, cucumbers, sweet corn, cantaloupe, watermelons, okra, pumpkins, pecans and sweet potatoes. Farm store available on site. On-Farm Sales, Wholesale Farm, Farmers Market. LONSDALE The Farm at Barefoot Bend 6608 Narrows Rd., 501-251-7436 All-natural livestock operation providing pastured poultry, grass-fed beef, forested pork and pastured turkey. Also operates the Olde Crow General Store two miles from the farm. Olde Crow is located at 17202 Hwy. 5 in Benton. Homegrown by Heroes, OnFarm Sales, Farmers Market. MAYFLOWER Clark’s Pecan Grove 59 Jones Ln., 501-454-2667  cowsandpecans.com    A 30-acre orchard growing papershell, Stuart, desirable and native pecan trees. Features 140 trees that are 30 to 40 years old. Open to the public in the latter part of October for picking. Customers can come pick pecans and are allowed to keep half of what they pick for free, but have the option to purchase more. On-Farm Sales, U-Pick.

ROLAND Wye Mountain Flowers and Berries 20309 Hwy. 113, 501-330-1906  wyemountain.net  U-pick blackberries, blueberries and raspberries. Also offers flowers in season. U-Pick. SCOTT Scott Heritage Farm  15301 Alexander Rd., 501-831-7881  scottheritagefarm.org  A 30-acre family farm and participant in the Arkansas Grown Farm to Table program. CSA. SHERWOOD Sherwood Farmers Market  2303 E. Lee, 501-835-4699  keepsherwoodbeautiful.net  Arkansas-grown products from all around central Arkansas. Farmers Market.

NORTH LITTLE ROCK Argenta Farmers Market   6th and Main St., 501-831-7881  argentaartsdistrict.org/argenta-farmersmarket  Verified Arkansas farmers and artisans selling products grown or made only in Arkansas. Farmers Market. Dogtown Farmers Market 420 Main St. dogtownfarmersmarket.com New market opening in North Little Rock in 2016. Plans to offer local produce and other goods as well as special events throughout the season. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Sat., Apr.-Oct. Farmers Market.

Westover Hills Farmers Market  6400 Kavanaugh Blvd., 501-420-4132  westoverhills.org  Selection of central Arkansas vendors selling fruits, vegetables and prepared products. 4 p.m.-7 p.m. Tues.  Farmers Market.

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North Little Rock Community Garden 2400 Lakeview Rd., 925-303-6344  facebook.com/NLRCommunityFarm  Half-acre intensive school farm that raises vegetables and eggs for market in North Little Rock. Sells produce and eggs through a mobile farmers market, weekly farm stand and at local farmers markets. Also functions as an educational tool for the school district and is open to the public for tours, work days and to host events for the community. Farmers Market.

ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM | THE FOOD ISSUE 2017

DO THIS! APRIL 4

GET SAUCY LEARN THE BASICS OF SAUCE PREPARATION WITH THE EXPERTS AT THE WINTHROP ROCKEFELLER INSTITUTE. 1 Rockefeller Dr., Morrilton 501-727-6243 rockefellerinstitute.org


EXPERIENCE SPRING

IN LITTLE ROCK’S RIVER MARKET

SATURDAYS BEGIN MAY 6 7AM – 3PM THROUGH SEPT. 30 • Garden Gourmet Cooking Demonstrations 2nd Saturdays, May - Sept. • FREE PARKING for the Farmers’ Market – ask for passes from vendors.

WEDNESDAY NIGHTS IN JUNE AND JULY

WEDNESDAY NIGHTS IN APRIL AND SEPTEMBER – MUSIC BEGINS AT 6 PM

FREE movies at dusk at First Security Amphitheater – pets and coolers welcome. Don’t forget the bug spray!

• FREE jazz at Riverfront Park’s History Pavilion • Beer, wine, soft drinks and water available for purchase – no coolers allowed. • Lawn chairs and blankets welcome

See RiverMarket.info or LittleRock.com for schedules and more information.

Located at

BENTONVILLE

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NORTHWEST ARK ANSAS

Holiday Island Bella Vista • Eureka Gravette • Gepp • • Springs • Omaha • Bentonville • Berryville Avoca Mountain H • • Decatur • • • Centerton• • Rogers Ch Yellville Gassville • • • Green Forest • Harrison • Elm • • • Cotter Everton • Bruno Springs• • Springdale • Western Grove • • Siloam SpringsFayetteville • Huntsville • Har Kingston • Jasper Harriet Melbour Farmington • • • • Mount Pl • Greenland Parthenon Elkins • • • Prairie West Fork Grove • • Leslie •M • Deer • Evansville • Winslow Pettigrew• • Fallsville • Witt Spring • Dennard Northwest Arkansas • Shirley Cedarville Clinton • • Rudy • • Alma • • MulberryOzark • Clarksville Bee Branch • • Altus Lamar Jerusalem Cleveland • • • Center Ridge • • Fort Smith Dover • Lavaca London • • • Hattieville • Guy • Charleston• • Paris Russellville • • • • Springfield • R • Booneville Dardanelle • Atkins • MorriltonConway Vilon •E Huntington • • • Belleville Perry • • Houston Perryville • • MayflowerCabot • Rover • • • Bigelow Roland • Ja • Waldron • Sherwo Central Arkansas • Parks • •North ScLit Little Rock • • Jessieville • Mabelvale Hot Springs Village•• BERRYVILLE ELM SPRINGS• Benton • Mena Woods • Mount Ida Bauxite • Hensle Hot Springs • • • Berryville Farmers Market MelonJ Gardens • Royal 601 Dr. Spurlin Cr., 870-654-5589 126 Water Ave., 479-601-3099 • Malvernservices, Poyen Bismarck facebook.com/pages/BerryvilleOffers a variety of gardening • Prattsville •• • Sheridan • Grannis Farmers-market• from simple tilling and soil preparation Donaldson • Locally grown seasonal produce, flowers, to full garden installation and • Dierks eggs and baked goods. From•Apr. 27-Oct. maintenance throughout the growing Arkadelphia • De Queen 31. 7:30 a.m.-noon•Sat. Farmers Market. season. Also offers an on-site and u-pick market. U-Pick. • Rison CLARKSVILLE • Nashville Lowell Cave Springs

Gentry

NORTHWEST ARKANSAS Farmers Markets, CSAs & U-Pick Farms

ALMA Alma Farmers Market  533 Fayetteville Ave., 479-632-4127  Alma-area produce and prepared foods. Farmers Market. BENTONVILLE Bentonville Farmers Market 105 N. Main St. (Bentonville Square) 479-254-0254 downtownbentonville.org/events/ farmers-market A producer-only market that sells local foods, produce, meats, along with arts and crafts. With special programming such as chef demonstrations and live music, too. 7:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Sat. Farmers Market. Ramo d’Olivo 217 S. Main St., 479-715-6053 ramodolivo.biz Shop offering olive oils and vinegars. Artisan Foods. Sarah Jane’s Farm 13024 W. Hwy. 12, 479-899-7833 sarahjanesfarm.com Offers non-GMO pastured poultry and eggs. CSA, On-Farm Sales.

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Solgohachia

EUREKA SPRINGS Cox Berry Farm Prescott Foreman 1081 Hwy. 818, 479-754-3707 Ashley’s Blueberries Hope Offers strawberries, raspberries, 245 CR 329, 501-253-8344 Ashdown Warren blueberries, blackberries, tomatoes, Sells organic high-bush blueberries. Southwest Arkansas Camden Hampton peaches, apples, pumpkins and nursery U-Pick. Texarkana plants. 7:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Mon.-Sat. U-Pick. Eureka Springs Farmers Market Louann Fouke CLINTON 2075 E. Van Buren St., 507-413-2573 Magnolia facebook.com/ESFarmersMarket Grass Roots Farmers Cooperative Produce, eggs, beef, pork, honey, flowers, El Dorado 314 Highway 65B, 479-310-0037 fruit trees, vegetables, ornamental Bradley grassrootscoop.com plants and baked goods. Free coffee. 7 City Junction Farmer-owned and farmer-operated a.m.-noon, 6 p.m.-9 p.m. Tues.-Thurs. co-op. All members are raising livestock (April-Nov.), 9 a.m.-noon Thurs. (Nov.in Arkansas and are committed to April). Farmers Market. the highest standards of agricultural sustainability. CSA. Foundation Farm 10 Woolridge, 479-253-7461 The Dirty Farmers Community Market foundationfarm.com 364 Main St., 501-253-4716 Farm and school offering fresh local Farmers market features locally grown produce and free classes on how to farm. produce and the Greater Good Cafe, CSA. where you “eat what you need and pay what you can.” 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Tues.-Sat. White Street Saturday Market Farmers Market. 26 White St., 479-981-3128 facebook.com/SaturdayFarmersMarket Neighborhood farmers market offering mostly organic, all locally produced fruits, vegetables, beans, bread and more. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Sat. Farmers Market.

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FAYETTEVILLE Cobblestone Project P.O. Box 1242 Farm project established to help impoverished and food insecure people. CSA. Fayetteville Farmers Market 101 W. Mountain St. (Fayetteville Square), 479-236-2910 612 S. College Ave. (Jefferson Center) fayettevillefarmersmarket.org Arkansas’ largest farmers market, featuring certified local produce, meats, and prepared foods. Two locations: Fayetteville Square, 7 a.m.-1 p.m. Tues., Thurs.; 7 a.m.-2 p.m. Sat.; Jefferson Center, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Sun. Fayetteville. Farmers Market. Green Fork Farmers Market 205 W. Dickson St., 479-225-5075 greenforkfarmersmarket.locallygrown.net Year-round farmers market sells vegetables, herbs, fruit, honey, eggs, mushrooms, chicken, duck, lamb, pork, beef, salsa, lacto-fermented kraut, baked goods, plants, herbal soaps, bath and beauty products. Indoor market, open rain or shine. Pre-order system available online to reserve products for pickup at the market. 4 p.m.-7 p.m. Wed. Farmers Market. Mason Creek Farm 15620 Black Oak Quarry Rd., 479-422-6000 Subscription farm offering delivery services of pastured poultry, eggs, organic herbs and heirloom vegetables. CSA, Wholesale Farm. Northwest Arkansas Local Harvest P.O. Box 2968, 479-251-1882 Community supported agriculture operator in northwest Arkansas. Offers four 8-week seasons. CSA. Reagan Berry Farm 241 E. 13th St., 479-601-2268 Family farm offering u-pick strawberries. U-Pick. Sta-N-Step Farm 3104 Wildcat Creek Blvd., 479-361-2789 sta-n-step.blogspot.com Pick your own blackberries, blueberries and raspberries. 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tues., Sat. U-Pick. Summer Kitchen Farm 3702 Wilson Hollow Rd., 479-263-9965 Partners with CSA and local markets to provide raw milk, eggs, pork, chicken and vegetables. Customers can buy directly from farm. CSA, Wholesale Farm.

Wren Thicket Market 1041 S. School Ave. wrenthicketmarket.com Year-round, online pre-order farmers market with pick-up at Firefighters Association Building; also some produce available to those who didn’t order. SNAP/EBT, SFMNP coupons accepted. 9 a.m.-noon Sat. Farmers Market. FORT SMITH Downtown Fort Smith Farmers Market 201 Garrison Ave., 479-784-1001 GoDowntownFS.com/farmersmarket.aspx Farmers market with verified growers and artisans. Fresh produce, crafts and prepared foods available, along with regular live music. 7 a.m.-noon Sat. Farmers Market. GARFIELD McGarrah Farms 16329 N. Old Wire Rd., 479-451-8164 facebook.com/mcgarrahfarm U-pick strawberries, blackberries, raspberries and pumpkins. U-Pick, OnFarm Sales. GENTRY Gentry Farmers Market 500 E. Main St., 479-871-1052 facebook.com/TheChickenCoop.GentryAR Located under the pavilion at the Chicken Coop. Offers fresh food, quality arts and good music. Will accept EBT/ debit cards. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Thurs.-Sat. Farmers Market. GRAVETTE Gravette Farmers Market 110 Park Dr., 479-787-5368 cityofgravette-ar.gov/ gravettefarmersmarket.html Market features fresh and locally grown produce, live folk music on market days. WIC and Senior Nutrition vouchers accepted. Farmers Market. GREEN FOREST Green Forest Farmers Market Green Forest Public Square, 870-480-6071 Local farmers market trying to make fresh produce available to the public within the most economical means possible. 7 a.m.-noon Wed. March-Oct. Farmers Market. HOLIDAY ISLAND Holiday Island Farmers Market 2 Holiday Island Dr. Heirloom vegetables, herbs, eggs and crafts. 8 a.m.-noon Fri. Farmers Market.

HUNTSVILLE Dripping Springs Garden 1558 CR 548, 870-545-3658 drippingspringsgarden.com One of Arkansas’ oldest organic farms, offering seasonal produce, cut flowers and educational outreach. CSA, Wholesale Farm. Wildfire Farm 4059 CR 516, 870-545-3120 locallygrown.net Online farmers market serving Carroll County as well as shares in a Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) program. CSA, Wholesale Farm. JASPER Newton County Farmers Market 504 W. Court St., 870-446-2240 Produce and crafts from Newton County. WIC participant. 7 a.m.-noon Wed., 4 p.m.-6 p.m. Fri. May-November. Farmers Market. LAMAR Johnson County Farmers Market 400 Cabin Creek Rd., 479-885-6575 Market offering produce from Lamararea growers. Noon-4:30 p.m. Tues., Thurs., Sat. Farmers Market. Peach Pickin’ Paradise 1901 McGuire Rd., 479-754-2006 Mark Morgan’s farm grows peaches and nectarines. 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Mon.-Sat. June-Aug. U-Pick. LESLIE Ozark Mountain Market Corner of Oak and Main St., 870-504-1034 A bimonthly produce and crafts market. Second and fourth Sat. April-Oct. Farmers Market. LONDON Renee’s Berry Garden 1265 Will Baker Rd., 479-293-3229 sites.google.com/site/ reneesberrygarden Pre-picked and u-pick blueberries. Call ahead for picking conditions. U-Pick. MORRILTON Conway County Farmers Market 117 S. Moose St., 501-354-2393 Locally grown, in-season fruits and vegetables. 9 a.m.-2 p.m., Sat. Farmers Market. MULBERRY Bluebird Song Farm 5260 Chastain Rd., 479-997-1996 Conventionally grown muscadine

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NORTHWEST ARK ANSAS

grapes and blueberries. U-pick fruit and blueberry bushes for sale. U-Pick, Wholesale Farm. OMAHA Roberson Orchards Farm Market Hwy. 14 E., 877-504-9050 facebook.com/robersonorchards Peaches, vegetables in summer, apples in fall. Store carries a selection of dried fruits, nuts, honey, sorghum, jams, jellies, relishes and candies. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. daily Aug.-Feb. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. daily JuneSept. Farmers Market. OZARK Franklin County Farmers Market 300 W. Commercial St., 479-667-2525 ozarkareacoc.org Local produce and crafts from area growers.7 a.m.-10 a.m. Sat. Farmers Market. PARIS

RUSSELLVILLE Pope County Farmers Market 2200 W. Main St., 479-747-5429 Arkansas produce sold directly by the grower. Farmers Market. Russellville Community Market 501 S. Phoenix Ave., 913-636-8193 russellville.locallygrown.net Online market sells products farmed within 150 miles of Russellville yearround. Farmers Market. Tri Peaks Community Market West C St., 479-264-3682 facebook.com/tripeakscommunitymarket Downtown market featuring local farmers, crafters, artists, musicians and food vendors. 8 a.m. to noon Sat. Farmers Market. SILOAM SPRINGS

Paris Farmers Market 25 W. Walnut, 707-502-5544 facebook.com/parisarkansasfarmersmkt Farmers Market on the courthouse square in Paris. Vendors are all required to be strictly Arkansas growers, producers, craftsmen and artisans. Farmers Market.

Siloam Springs Farmers Market Corner of University and Mt. Olive, 479-524-4556 siloamsprings.locallygrown.net Producer-only market offering fresh produce, garden and landscaping plants, fresh-cut flowers, seasonal vegetables, local raw honey, baked goods and crafts. 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Tues. and Sat. Apr. 20-Oct. 26 Farmers Market.

ROGERS

SPRINGDALE

The Blueberry Barn 650 Lippert Dr., 479-636-9640 U-pick blueberries. Call for picking conditions. U-Pick. The Blueberry Patch 1201 Longview Dr., 479-631-2483. Offers pre-picked and u-pick blueberries. Buckets and bags furnished. 7:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Mon.-Sat. U-Pick. Downtown Rogers Farmers Market 101 E. Cherry St., 479-936-5487 mainstreetrogers.com Farmers market in downtown Rogers operated out of a newly renovated, city owned indoor/outdoor location. 7 a.m.noon Sat., April 30-Oct. 29; 4 p.m.-8 p.m. Thurs., May 19-Aug 18. Farmers Market. Neal Family Farm 1246 W. Laurel Ave., 479-659-1750 facebook.com/Nealfamilyfarm U-pick blueberries in season. U-Pick. Rogers Farmers Market Corner of First and Walnut, 479-246-8383 rogersfarmersmarket.org Farm fresh produce and local crafts. 7 a.m.-1 p.m. Wed., Sat. April 27-Nov. Farmers Market.

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Mill Street Market Mill St., 479-966-3255 millstmarket.com Located between Johnson Avenue and Huntsville Avenue in Springdale, The Mill Street Market offers Arkansas made and Arkansas grown products. 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Sat., 5 p.m.-8 p.m. Tues. Farmers Market. Songbird Gardens 301 Michael St., 479-966-3255 songbird-gardens.com Urban farm selling CSA-style garden boxes. CSA. Springdale Farmers Market Corner of Hwy. 265 and E. Emma, 479-466-1285 springdalefarmersmarket.org Fresh fruits and vegetables, herbs, honey, nuts, farm fresh eggs, frozen meat, flowers, plants, jams, jellies, baked goods, homemade soaps, wood furniture and crafts available. Accepts SNAP/ EBT and WIC. 7 a.m.-1 p.m. May-Oct. Farmers Market. VAN BUREN Van Buren Farmers Market 1409 Main St., 479-218-2316 An up and coming market providing

ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM | THE FOOD ISSUE 2017

a wide range of locally sourced fresh produce and handcrafted jellies, jams, candies and soaps. 7 a.m.-noon Wed. Farmers Market. WALDRON Scott County Farmers Market 100 W. First St. (Scott County Courthouse), 479-207-1040 Tomatoes, potatoes, melons, peppers, fruits, berries and other produce. First Sat. of every month. Farmers Market. WEST FORK Roots in Bloom 14148 Sugar Mountain Rd., 479-502-2491 rootsinbloom.weebly.com Wellness farm working to establish sustainability by using upcycled materials when possible and naturally grown standards. Offers produce, herbs, CSA packages, plant starts and plant start kits. Also makes all-natural wellness and personal care products. CSA, On-Farm Sales. West Fork Farmers Market Corner of Hwy. 170 and Campbell Lp., 479-225-1611 Market offers USDA meats, organic vegetables and artwork. The growers are expanding to year-round production and working to implement a “Farm to School” program with the West Fork Schools. 7:30 a.m.-noon Sat., 3 p.m.dusk Wed. Farmers Market. WINSLOW Winslow Farmers Market Winslow Blvd. winslowar.com/index_files/Page993.htm Features the on-site Winslow Garden that benefits Winslow Community Meals Inc. Garden is run by volunteers and the local 4-H Club. 9 a.m.-noon Sat. beginning in April. Farmers Market. YELLVILLE Yellville Farmers Market 105 N. Berry St., 501-650-2356 facebook.com/YellvilleFarmersMarket Growers-only open air market in conjunction with “Music on the Square.” Offers locally grown vegetables, fruits, eggs, bedding and garden plants, baked goods, jams and jellies, worm castings and Ozark crafts. 5:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m. Sat. Second week in April through second week in Sept. Farmers Market.


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NORTHEAST ARK ANSAS Holiday Island Bella Vista • Eureka Maynard • Corning • Piggott • Gravette • Gepp • • Viola Springs • Omaha • Bentonville Salem • • Greenway • Avoca Mountain Home Berryville • • Decatur Knobel • • • Centerton• • Rogers • Rector • Cherokee Village • • Hardy Pocahontas • Gassville • YellvilleCotter • • Green Forest • Harrison • Elm • • • • Lafe Everton • Bruno Springs• • Springdale Evening Shade • Huntsville Western Grove • • Siloam SpringsFayetteville • • Harrison • • Poughkeepsie • Walnut Ridge Kingston Jasper • Harriet Melbourne • • Sage Farmington • • •Smithville • • Blytheville • Greenland Mount Pleasant • • Parthenon Elkins • •Cave City Brookland • • Prairie • West Fork Leslie Grove • Mountain View • • • Deer • Jonesboro Swifton• • Evansville • Winslow Pettigrew• • Fallsville • Cash Batesville • Witt Spring • Dennard • Northwest Arkansas • Desha • Trumann • Shirley Cedarville Northeast Arkansas Newport Clinton • • • Rudy • Heber Springs • Mulberry Clarksville • Tyronza Alma • • • Lamar • Bee Branch • Ozark NORTHEAST Cherry Valley Jerusalem • Bradford Cleveland • • Bald Knob • • Altus London • Dover • • Center Ridge • Fort Smith Judsonia • • Augusta Guy • Lavaca Hattieville • • • McCrory Charleston Romance • ARKANSAS • Marion • • • Paris Russellville • • • • Springfield • • Searcy • Wynne Dardanelle Atkins • Booneville • McRae FarmersHuntington Markets, CSAs & U-Pick•Farms • MorriltonConway Vilonia • El Paso Beebe • Colt Proctor • • • • • Belleville Perry • • Houston MayflowerCabot • • Ward • Forrest City • Cotton Plant • Palestine Perryville • • Rover • • Des•Arc • • Bigelow Jacksonville • Fargo • Waldron DeVall’s • Roland Sherwood Lonoke Bluff • • • Central Arkansas Parks Little Rock • • North Scott Little Rock • • Southeast Arkansas Jessieville Mabelvale • Hot Springs Village•• Benton • Mena Woodson SHADE •EVENING • Mount Ida Harrison Farmers Market Hot Springs • • Bauxite •• Hensley • Helena Stuttgart Royal • 1425 N. Main St., 870-365-7925 • PineyMalvern Fork Berry Farm produce grown by farmers • Poyen Bismarck 163 Blueberry Ln., 870-368-5001 • Altheimer Features • De Witt Prattsville •• Sheridan from Boone, Newton, Carroll, Marion • • Grannis Highbush blueberries available during • Hall • Donaldson • White and Searcy counties. 7 a.m.-noon Tues., Pine Bluff season. Call ahead for availability. • • Dierks Sat.; 4 p.m.-7 p.m. Thurs. • Arkadelphia U-Pick. • Grady Farmers Market. • De Queen • Rison GASSVILLE • Nashville JONESBORO • Dumas Farmers Market • Prescott Gassville ASU Regional Farmers Market • Foreman 204 S. School St., 870-435-6439 McGehee Hope Monticello corner of Stadium Ave. and Aggie Ashdown • • • New market opened Warren in 2014, •N.E. • Southwest Arkansas Rd., 870-892-2087 Camden Hampton offering produce from the Gassville • • •asuregionalfarmersmarket.org Dermott area. Looking for vendors; call for BATESVILLE • Texarkana Offers local produce from Jonesboroinformation. Located next to the Louann Lake Village • • • Fouke area growers. 7 a.m.-11 a.m. Sat. Gassville Branch Library. 7 a.m.-1 p.m. Williams Berry Farm Magnolia Hamburg Farmers Market. • Sat. Farmers Market. • 350 Harmontown Rd., 870-793-2074 • Crossett Eudora • Grape crush July-Aug. Call ahead to • El Dorado MAYNARD HARRISON • Bradley make a reservation. On-Farm Sales, Junction City • U-Pick. Gentry

Lowell Cave Springs

Solgohachia

CHEROKEE VILLAGE Spring River Farmers Market Cherokee Village Town Center, 870-8477286 facebook.com/pages/Spring-RiverFarmers-Market Selling fresh produce and locally made crafts. 8 a.m.-11:30 p.m. Sat. Farmers Market. CHERRY VALLEY Riley’s Orchard 3964 Hwy. 364, 870-588-4335 Offering peaches and grapes. Grapes are u-pick. Peaches sold at Jonesboro Farmers Market. Call ahead for availability and picking conditions. U-Pick, Wholesale Farm.

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Central Ozarks Farmers and Artisans Market Court Park Sq. Farmers market offering produce, crafts and flowers. 7 a.m.-noon Tues., Sat. June-Oct. Farmers Market. Cline Berry Farm 224 S. Spruce St., 870-741-7121 clineberryfarm.com Offers several varieties of blueberries during season. U-Pick.

Fentons Farm Market 6715 Hwy. 7 S., 870-741-6871 facebook.com/fentonsfarmmarket Offers handcrafted jams and jellies, with plans to expand into a new certified kitchen in 2016. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Mon.Fri., April-Oct. Call for expanded holiday hours in Nov.-Dec. Artisan Foods, On-Farm Sales, Farmers Market.

ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM | THE FOOD ISSUE 2017

Falling Star Farms 4068 Hwy. 166 N., 870-202-9595 facebook.com/FallingStarFarms Produces a line of jellies, preserves and fruit butters. Also sells farm fresh eggs and seasonal fruits and vegetables. 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Tues.-Sat. Artisan Foods, Farmers Market. MCCRORY

Corner Market Corner of Hwy. 64 and Hwy. 775, 501281-0893 Local farm offering seasonal produce including cucumbers, green beans, green onions, okra, peas, peppers, potatoes, radishes, squash and tomatoes. On-Farm Sales, Farmers Market.


MOUNTAIN HOME Mountain Home Farmers Market 3296 Hwy. 201 S., 870-492-2303 Fresh local produce from area producers. 6 a.m.-noon Wed. and Sat. May-Sept. Farmers Market. Ozark Locally Grown U.S. Hwy. 62 W., 870-421-2203 ozark.locallygrown.net/welcome Online farmers market covering northern Arkansas and southern Missouri. Farmers Market. NEWPORT Downtown Newport Farmers Market Newport Lake, 870-664-0542 Farmers market selling local produce and crafts from the Newport area. Wed., Sat. June-Oct. Farmers Market. PARAGOULD Paragould Farmers Market 300 W. Court St., 870-236-7684 Locally grown produce, eggs and meats, along with handmade crafts and baked goods. 8 a.m.-noon Sat., May-Aug. Farmers Market. PROCTOR Vera’s Heritage Farm 105 Hinkley Rd., 571-228-4202 High quality, naturally grown vegetables and fruits for consumers at affordable prices and easy accessibility. U-Pick. WYNNE Cross County Farmers Market 705 E. Union Ave., 870-238-5745 Fresh fruit, vegetables and handmade crafts. 7 a.m.-10 a.m. Tues., Thurs., Sat. Farmers Market. Killough Farms 661 Highway 64B, 870-238-7038 Pick your own blueberries on-site. Daylight hours during season. U-Pick.

DO THIS! APRIL 29

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• Booneville

SOUTHWEST SOUTHWEST ARK ARKANSAS ANSAS

SOUTHWEST ARKANSAS

Farmers Markets, CSAs & U-Pick Farms

Point Cedar Grocery 107 Hwy. 347, 501-865-6238 Small community grocer located west of Bismarck. Also raises hormone- and antibiotic-free Angus beef. Farmers Market. HOPE

ASHDOWN Happy Frog Farm 1101 Little River 35, 870-898-3679 facebook.com/happy-frog-farm Start-up farm raising Barred Rock chickens and produce. Sells eggs, jams, preserves, sauces, pre-mixed spice blends and crafts. Artisan Foods, On-Farm Sales, Farmers Market. Joe Crews 217 Little River 142, 870-542-7220 Seasonal produce that you pick yourself. Call for availability. U-Pick.

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Hope Farmers Market Third and Elm St., 870-703-8788 Home to some of the world’s largest watermelons. Features farm-fresh produce straight from the back of the trucks. 7 a.m.-11 a.m. Tues., Sat. May-Sept. Farmers Market.

Polk County Farmers Market 524 Sherwood, 479-394-6018 Local crops, fruits, honey, homemade breads, goat milk cheeses, local crafts, jams and relishes. 7 a.m. until sold out (about 10 a.m.) Tues., Thurs., Sat. MayOct. Farmers Market. NASHVILLE Blue Bayou Orchard 601 W. Hempstead St., 870-845-2333 Peaches available, either pick yourself or buy by the pound. Call ahead for availability. U-Pick. Howard County Farmers Market 110 S. Washington St., 870-557-2352 Produce grown within 50 miles of Nashville for sale by growers. Farmers Market.

ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM | THE FOOD ISSUE 2017

• Magnolia

BISMARCK

MENA

Warren

• Camden • Hampton

Louann

Clark County Farmers Market U.S. Hwy. 67/10th St., 870-246-1050 facebook.com/clarkcountyfarmersmarket Produce-only market featuring Clark County growers. 7 a.m.-noon Tues., Sat. Farmers Market.

Atkins

• Prescott • Foreman • Ashdown • Hope Southwest Arkansas • Texarkana • Fouke

ARKADELPHIA

• MorriltonConway Vilonia • El P • • • Belleville Perry • • Houston MayflowerCabot • Perryville • • Rover • • • Bigelow Roland • Jack • Waldron • Sherwoo Central Arkansas Litt • Parks • •North Scot Little Rock • • Jessieville • Mabelvale Hot Springs Village•• Benton • Mena • Bauxite • Woodson • Mount Ida Hot Springs • • Hensley • Royal • Malvern Poyen Bismarck • • Prattsville •• Sheridan Grannis • • Donaldson • • WP • Dierks • Arkadelphia • De Queen • • Rison • Nashville Dardanelle

Huntington

Bradley

• El Dorado • Junction City

Jamison Orchard 195 Orchard Rd., 870-845-4827 Third-generation peach farm, also grows plums and blackberries. Sold u-pick at the orchard, at farmers markets and wholesale to vendors and restaurants. U-Pick. Nashville Farmers Market 110 S. Washington St., 870-557-2352 A local-growers-only market in an openair pavilion built by local volunteers with certified kitchen, small demonstration organic garden, gardening workshops and cooking demonstrations throughout most of season. Farmers Market. ROYAL Sunshine Store 3719 Sunshine Rd., 501-767-4614 Offering local vegetables, homemade salsa and other products on Saturdays. Farmers Market. TEXARKANA Farmers Market of Texarkana 3004 Linden Ave., 870-772-4558 Farm with seasonal produce including corn, fruits, honey and other vegetables. Farmers Market. Gateway Farmers Market 3019 E. 9th St. 870-774-9171 Locally grown produce (within 75 miles) sold by the grower. Farmers Market.


• • Paris

Dover • Center Ridge Judsonia • • Augusta • • • Hattieville • Guy • Romance • • McCrory Marion • • Searcy • • • • Springfield • Wynne Dardanelle Atkins Morrilton McRae • El Paso • Booneville Colt • • • • Proctor • SOUTHEAST ARK ANSAS • Huntington • Conway • Vilonia • Beebe Perry • • Belleville Perryville Houston Forrest City Cotton Plant Cabot • • Ward • • • • Mayflower Rover • • Bigelow • Des Arc • • Palestine • • Jacksonville DeVall’s Fargo • Waldron • Roland Sherwood Lonoke Bluff • • • Central Arkansas Parks Little Rock • • North Scott Little Rock • • Southeast Arkansas Jessieville Mabelvale • • Hot Springs Village • Mena Benton • • • Woodson • Mount Ida • • Hot Springs • Bauxite • Hensley Helena • Stuttgart • Royal Malvern • Bismarck •Prattsville •• Poyen • Altheimer • De Witt • Sheridan • White Hall • Grannis Donaldson • • Pine Bluff • Dierks • Arkadelphia • Grady • De Queen Rison • SOUTHEAST • Nashville • Dumas Prescott • ARKANSAS • Foreman McGehee Ashdown • Hope • Monticello • • Warren • Farmers Markets, CSAs Southwest Arkansas • Camden • Hampton • Dermott & U-Pick Farms • Texarkana Louann Lake Village • • • Fouke • Magnolia • Hamburg • Crossett Eudora • • El Dorado • Bradley • Junction City

Lavaca Charleston

CROSSETT Ashley County Farmers Market U.S. Hwy. 82 Area produce from Ashley County growers. Informal market; no set times. Farmers Market. GRADY Hardin Farms 1 Disaster Ridge Rd., 870-866-3753 Sells squash, melons, peppers, peas, beans, blackberries, corn, tomatoes, potatoes, pecans and wheat. Also raises goats. Wholesale Farm, Farmers Market. HAMBURG Triple M Farms of Ashley County 2383 Hwy. 189 N., 870-853-9285 Sells wholesale and retail u-pick tomatoes, peppers, watermelon, pumpkins and cantaloupe. U-Pick. LAKE VILLAGE Mel’s Farmers Market W. Main St., 870-265-5325 Farmers market offering fresh produce, nuts and eggs. Farmers Market.

London

Russellville

Solgohachia

PINE BLUFF

STUTTGART

Pine Bluff Farmers Market Saracen Landing, Martha Mitchell Expy. Produce and crafts from Jefferson County. WIC participant. 6 a.m-1 p.m. Tues., Thurs., Sat. Farmers Market.

Arkansas County Farmers Market S. Main St., 870-946-3231 Offers Arkansas County produce, eggs and more. WIC accepted. 7 a.m.-11 a.m. Tues., Thurs., Sat. Farmers Market.

POYEN

WARREN

Ken Landreth 706 W. 6th St., 501-844-6510 Seasonal produce available for wholesale or u-pick. U-Pick. PRATTSVILLE A&B Berry Farm 2929 Hwy. 190 S., 870-699-4792 Pick your own blueberries during season. U-Pick. RISON

Jim Parker 23210 U.S. 63 N., 870-357-2748 Sells u-pick tomatoes, blackberries and cantaloupe. U-Pick. WASHINGTON Old Washington Farmers Market 106 W. Carrol St., 870-703-4154 oldwashingtonfarmersmarket.com Farmers market in historic Washington offering seasonal produce and artisan prepared foods. Farmers Market.

Joe Willis 10920 Hwy. 63, 870-357-2302 Offers tomatoes, peaches, squash, okra, cucumbers, cantaloupe and watermelon. Farmers Market. SHERIDAN Grant County Farmers Market 101 W. Center St., 870-942-2231 Seasonal, open-air market offering produce from local farmers. Farmers Market.

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the heart of Little Rock’s River Market, Cache has carved itself a niche in the downtown dining scene. 11 a.m.-close Mon.-Fri., 5 p.m.-close Sat. Last seating at 9:45 p.m. each evening. Café Heifer 1 World Ave., 501-907-8800 facebook.com/CafeatHeifer This wonderful café is one of downtown Little Rock’s best kept secrets. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Mon.-Fri.

CENTRAL ARKANSAS BRYANT Arkansas Fresh Bakery Café 304 N. Reynolds Rd., Ste. 5, 501-213-0084 arkansasfresh.com The Arkansas Fresh name has long been a baked goods mainstay on menus across central Arkansas. In 2015, the bakery launched its namesake cafe. 7 a.m.-3 p.m. Mon.-Fri., 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Sat. LITTLE ROCK At The Corner 201 E. Markham St., 501-400-8458 thecornerlr.com Fresh beef ground daily on site, hand-cut fries and salads featuring local greens are just the start here. 7 a.m.-2 p.m. Tues.-Fri., 8:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Sat. Big Orange 17809 Chenal Pkwy., 501-821-1515. 207 N. University Ave., 501-379-8715  bigorangeburger.com Juicy burgers loaded with toppings from farms and artisans like Cedar Rock Acres and Kent Walker Artisan Cheese are sure to hit the spot—and don’t skip dessert! 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Sun.-Thurs., 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Fri.-Sat. Boulevard Bread Company & Bistro 1417 Main St., 501-375-5100   1920 N. Grant St., 501-663-5951   9601 Baptist Health Dr., 501-217-4025 boulevardbread.com An expansion of the restaurant’s flagship location in Little Rock’s Heights neighborhood has seen this local chain achieve new heights in fine dining, from seared duck breast dishes to some of the finest charcuterie in town. Brave New Restaurant 2300 Cottondale Ln., 501-663-2677  bravenewrestaurant.com Before “Farm to Table” was a common phrase, there was Peter Brave and Brave New Restaurant. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Mon.-Fri., 5 p.m.-9 p.m. Mon.-Thurs., 5 p.m.-10 p.m. Fri.-Sat. Cache Restaurant 425 President Clinton Ave., 501-850-0265  cachelittlerock.com With a fancy two-story restaurant in

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Capers 14502 Cantrell Rd., 501-868-7600 capersrestaurant.com Since opening in 1997, Capers has become a hot spot in Little Rock for great seafood, great wine and a stellar take-home market which provides gourmet meals to go. 11 a.m.-2 p.m., 5 p.m.-9:30 p.m. Mon.-Thurs.; 11 a.m.-2 p.m., 5 p.m.-10:30 p.m. Fri.-Sat. Capital Bar and Grill 111 Markham St., 501-370-7013 capitalbarandgrill.com The chefs at CBG are known for sandwiches. 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Mon.-Thurs., 11 a.m.-midnight Fri.-Sat., 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Sun. Cheers in the Heights 2010 N. Van Buren, 501-663-5937  cheersith.com Local tomatoes from the likes of Laughing Stock Farm in Sheridan are just one of the hidden treasures you’ll find on the menu at Cheers. 11 a.m.-9:30 p.m. Mon.-Sat. Ciao Baci 605 N. Beechwood St, 501-603-0238  ciaobaci.org Featuring local food like chicken from Crystal Lakes Farm in Decatur and its own creations like Baci bacon and pork belly confit, this is a tapas menu like no other in the city. 4 p.m.-2 a.m. Mon.-Fri., 4 p.m.-1 a.m. Sat. Clean Eatery 10720 N. Rodney Parham Rd., 501-505-5088 cleaneaterylr.com With a menu featuring seasonal produce and a selection of healthy dishes there’s no doubt Clean Eatery is doing its best to promote healthy lifestyles. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon., Thurs.; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Fri. Copper Grill 300 E. Third St., 501-375-3333  coppergrilllr.com Like its sister restaurant Capers, Little Rock’s Copper Grill knows how to work magic. 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Mon.-Sat. The Fold 3501 Old Cantrell Rd., 501-916-9706  thefoldlr.com This botanas bar in Little Rock’s Riverdale neighborhood takes local so seriously that it’s growing herbs and peppers on site. 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Sun.-Thurs., 11 a.m.midnight Fri.-Sat.

ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM | THE FOOD ISSUE 2017

Loca Luna 3519 Old Cantrell Rd., 501-663-4666 localuna.com Stop in for the fresh-baked honey wheat and Bavarian yeast rolls—then stick around for main courses that range from pizza to tamales to steak. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Mon.-Fri.; 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Sat.-Sun.; 5:30-9 p.m. Sun.-Thurs.; 5:30 p.m.-10 p.m. Fri.-Sat. Mylo Coffee Co. 2715 Kavanaugh Blvd., 501-747-1880  mylocoffee.com Owner Stephanos Mylonas is adamant that everything he serves at his Hillcrest coffee and pastry shop be either grown or made in Arkansas, and the coffee roasted on site is particularly nice. 7 a.m-9 p.m. Tues.-Thurs., 7 a.m.-10 p.m. Fri.-Sat., 9 a.m.-5 p.m. The Root 1500 S. Main St., 501-414-0423  therootcafe.com The list of local farmers on The Root’s website is longer than the restaurant’s menu. 7 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Tues.-Fri., 8 a.m.3:30 p.m. Sat., 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Sun. Samantha’s Tap Room & Wood Grill 322 Main St., 501-379-8019 samstap.com Coursey’s bacon makes dishes like the bacon-wrapped asparagus hard to beat, while the sandwiches, salads and various wood-cooked entrees are local dining at its very best. 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Mon.-Fri., 10 a.m.-10 p.m. Sat. SO Restaurant-Bar 3610 Kavanaugh Blvd., 501-663-1464  sorestaurantbar.com SO has made a push to support local farms and farmers markets, advertising its use of local produce and partnering with businesses like Hocutt’s Garden Center in Little Rock. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Sun., 4 p.m.-10 p.m. Sun.-Wed., 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Thurs.-Sat. South on Main 1304 Main St., 501-244-9660 southonmain.com From fried chicken “blue plate” specials at lunch to hoppin’ john and smoked duck, there’s always something delicious and local on the seasonal menu—thanks to partnerships with local farms like Barnhill Orchards and Farm Girl Meats. 11 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Mon.-Sat., 5 p.m.-10 p.m. Tues.-Sat. Southern Gourmasian 219 W. Capitol Ave., 501-313-5645 thesoutherngourmasian.com What began in a bright yellow food truck has become one of Little Rock’s hottest Asian-fusion brick-and-mortar restaurants, now growing some of their own produce. 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Mon.-Fri., 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Sat.


Trio’s 8201 Cantrell Rd., Ste. 100 501-221-3330  triosrestaurant.com For Capi Peck of Trio’s, farm to table cooking is just “cooking.” Trio’s famous strawberry shortcake is only available when the restaurant can source Arkansas berries, while local kale and other seasonal ingredients make an appearance on the menu every year. 11 a.m.-2:30 p.m., 5:30-close Mon.-Sat., 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Sun. NORTH LITTLE ROCK Arkansas Ale House 600 N. Broadway St., 501-708-2739 diamondbear.com Little Rock’s Diamond Bear Brewing is Arkansas’ oldest production brewery still in operation, and great house-made food and items from local artisans. 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Sun., Tues.-Thurs.; 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Fri.-Sat. Mugs Café 515 Main St., 501-379-9101  mugscafe.org Farm fresh eggs and great coffee drinks are a mainstay of the Mugs breakfast experience, and the huge burgers make lunch a treat, too. 7 a.m.-6 p.m. Mon.-Sat. Ristorante Capeo 425 Main St. 501-376-3463  capeo.us  Capeo has ruled the Italian dining scene in North Little Rock for years, and the recent addition of wood-fired pizzas for lunch has kept things as fresh as the ingredients used in the kitchen. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Mon.Fri., 5 p.m.-10 p.m. Mon.-Sat. 

NORTHWEST ARKANSAS BENTONVILLE Eleven 600 Museum Way, 479-418-5700 crystalbridges.org/eleven Although located in the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, this is not your typical museum restaurant. 11 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Sun., Mon., Wed.-Sat.; 5 p.m.-9 p.m. Wed.-Fri. The Hive 200 N.E. A St., 479-286-6575  thehivebentonville.com Multiple James Beard Award nominations for chef Matt McClure have made this Bentonville restaurant a regional name in great dining. The Hive is leading the “Ozark High South” cuisine trend sweeping northwest Arkansas, focusing on simple, bold flavors and local ingredients. Breakfast 6:30 a.m.-10 a.m. Mon.-Fri., 7 a.m.-11:30 Sat.-Sun.; lunch 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Mon.-Fri.; dinner 5 p.m.-9:30 p.m. Sun.-Thurs., 5 p.m.-10:30 p.m. Fri.-Sat.; Sunday brunch 11:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Bar hours: 5 p.m.-11 p.m. Sun.-Thurs., 5 p.m.-11:30 p.m. Fri.-Sat.

Oven & Tap 215 S. Main St., Ste. 3, 479-268-5884 ovenandtap.com Wood-fired lasagna topped with local greens? Salads festooned with Neal Family Farm blueberries? Luke Wetzel’s Oven & Tap does all that and more. Check out the seasonal offerings—they’re good any time of year. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Sun., Sat.; 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Tues.-Fri.; 4 p.m. 10 p.m. Tues.-Sat. Pressroom 100 NW 2nd St., Ste. 100, 479-657-2905 eatatpressroom.com Relationships with local farms like Rios Family Farm in Little Flock and Hanna Farms in Luxora are part of what makes this restaurant such a fantastic option in Bentonville. 7 a.m.-10 p.m. Mon.-Thurs., 7 a.m.-11 p.m. Fri.-Sat. Table Mesa 108 E. Central Ave., 479-715-6706 tablemesabistro.com Local, cage-free chicken is a selling point for this modern Latin restaurant, but it’s the skill with which the food is prepared that keeps the crowds coming back for more. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Sun., 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m.-9:30 p.m. Sat. Tusk & Trotter 110 S.E. A St.  tuskandtrotter.com This brasserie has made a mission of sourcing local ingredients and meats for its stellar lineup of charcuterie and other protein-heavy dishes. Don’t miss the Crispy Pig Ear Nachos. 11 a.m.-9:30 p.m. Mon.-Thurs., 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Fri.-Sat., 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Sun. EUREKA SPRINGS Fresh 179 N. Main St., 479-253-9300 freshanddeliciousofeurekasprings.com This farm to table restaurant and market serves homemade breads and pastries, cured meats, gourmet cheeses, homemade pasta and more. 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Mon., 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Thurs.-Sat., 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Sun. FAYETTEVILLE Arsaga’s 200 W. Center St., 479-301-2795 548 W. Dickson St., 479-443-9900 401 W. Mountain St., 479-521-1993 1045 W. Maple St., 479-527-0015 3215 N. Northills Blvd., 479-463-1105 As it has expanded over the years, Arsaga’s has become synonymous with sustainably sourced, locally roasted coffee. And when it comes to fresh, local ingredients, there’s a reason why the locals head to Arsaga’s for breakfast or an afternoon pick-me-up.

Farmer’s Table Café 1079 S. School Ave., 479-966-4125 thefarmerstablecafe.com There’s nothing at Farmer’s Table that isn’t local—just check out the list of farmers proudly displayed in the dining room. Now serving dinner! 6 a.m.-4 p.m. Tues.-Sun.; 5 p.m.-9 p.m. Fri.-Sat. Four Corners Kitchen 1214 Garland Ave., 479-301-2801 4cornerskitchen.com This restaurant opened in 2015 with a desire to mold its menu around the seasonal crops of northwest Arkansas. 11 a.m.-2 p.m., 5:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m. Tues.-Sat. Greenhouse Grill 481 S. School Ave., 479-444-8909  greenhousegrille.com Greenhouse Grill has a passion for local ingredients, sourcing from area growers whenever possible. 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Tues.Thurs., 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Fri.-Sat., 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Sun. Mockingbird Kitchen 1466 N. College Ave., 479-435-6333 mockingbirdkitchen.com Mockingbird Kitchen strives to bring together the best local ingredients from local farmers throughout the Ozarks. 11 a.m.-2 p.m., 5 p.m.-9 p.m. Tues.-Sat. Ozark Natural Foods Café 1554 N. College Ave., 479-521-7558  onf.coop Fayetteville’s original natural foods store’s café offers locally roasted coffee, vegan dishes, breakfast pastries, craft beers and hand-mixed cocktails. And after you eat, take some great local food home with you! Hot bar 11 a.m.-2 p.m. daily. JASPER Boardwalk Café 215 E. Court St., 870-446-5900  arkansashouse.net/menu-wide.html This classic eatery specializes in organic food made from locally grown and raised ingredients. Grab pancakes for breakfast or a burger at lunch—you’re in for a treat either way! 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Mon., Tues., Thurs., 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Fri.-Sat, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sun. ROGERS The Green Bean 5208 Village Pkwy., Ste. 11, 479-464-8355 or 479-381-2055  itsagreenbeanworld.com  This organic café offers locally sourced luncheon fare, and they maintain a presence at the Rogers Farmers Market on weekends. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Mon.-Fri.

THE FOOD ISSUE 2017 | ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM

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SILOAM SPRINGS 28 Springs 100 E. University, 479-524-2828 28springs.com The seasonal, local offerings from 28 Springs have put Siloam Springs on the culinary map. Go Southern with the 28 Springs Chicken Fried Steak or vegetarian with the Falafel Burger—either way, you’re in for a treat. 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Mon.-Sat., bar open until last call.

HARRISON

Edwards Food Giant 870-295-2484 edwardsfoodgiant.com  Grocery store with locations in Little Rock, Bryant, Forrest City, Harrisburg and Marianna. Producers, contact Jeff Nosbisch at 501-850-6338 for produce or Bob Childers at 870-2951000 for meat.  

Prairie Market’s Tall Grass Deli 418 S. Main St., 870-743-3267 This health food restaurant is located inside a farmers market-style grocer. Check out their new location in Harrison! 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat.

Fresh Market 336-272-1338 thefreshmarket.com  Specialty grocer with locations in Little Rock and Rogers. Producers, contact 336-272-1338 for more information. 

SOUTHWEST ARKANSAS

Good Earth Natural Food 3955 Central Ave., Hot Springs  855-293-2784  goodearthvitamin.com  Offers fresh organic local produce, packaged organic foods, earth-friendly home and personal care products, and a huge variety of supplements.  

NORTHEAST ARKANSAS

HOT SPRINGS Café 1217 1217 Malvern Ave., 501-318-1094 cafe1217.net Fresh and local has been the hallmark of Café 1217’s menu since the beginning. Go gluten-free with Dempsey Bakery bread on your sandwich, or enjoy one of the salads like Cobb or Greek made with local greens. 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Mon.-Fri., 11 a.m.4 p.m. Sat.

GROCERS

Allen’s Food Market 60 Sugar Creek Ctr., Bella Vista 479-876-6190 facebook.com/allensfoods  Grocery store that specializes in organic, locally and regionally produced items. Brookshire’s Food & Pharmacy  903-534-3000 brookshires.com  Full-service grocery in variety of locations in southern Arkansas.

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Greg & Jim’s Grocery & Grill 46 Old Military Rd., Colt  870-633-0541  Grocer that also serves breakfast and lunch six days a week and dinner two days. Full line of groceries and produce.   Harps Foods  harpsfoods.com  Regional, employee-owned grocery store with dozens of locations in Arkansas.     Hogg’s Meat Market  4520 Camp Robinson Rd., North Little Rock  501-758-7700  hogsmeatmarket.com  Butcher Shop and catering business in operation since 1961. Processes wild game.   Kroger  kroger.com  National grocery store with some 50 locations in Arkansas. Producers should contact produce managers at individual stores.  Meat Works Butchery  816 De Queen St., Mena  479-394-2900  Grass-fed and finished beef, lamb, goat, pastured pork and chicken as well as eggs, breads, vegetables, fruits, specialty oils, sauces, honey and spices. Also delivers. 

ARKANSASFOODANDFARM.COM | THE FOOD ISSUE 2017

Natural Grocers naturalgrocers.com Fresh produce, meat and dairy along with natural supplements and grocery items. Locations in Little Rock and Fayetteville. Natural Things 5407 Hwy. 5 N., Bryant  501-213-0034  Natural foods store that sells mostly grocery items.   Olde Crow General Store 17202 Hwy. 5, Benton 501-794-2393 facebook.com/oldecrowgeneralstore Family store providing Arkansas grown and made products, all-natural meats, convenience items and farming supplies. Olde Fashioned Foods  8434 Phoenix Ave., Fort Smith  479-649-8200  Offers local and organic foods, herbs, alternative medicine and health products.   Ozark Natural Foods  1554 N. College Ave., Fayetteville  479-521-7558  ozarknaturalfoods.com  Natural foods co-op owned by a community of more than 10,000 investors. Producers, contact produce manager Pauline Thiessen at 479-5217588 or Pauline@onf.coop.   Stratton’s Market  405 E. Third St., Little Rock  501-244-0542  duganspublr.com  Small grocery and liquor store attached to Dugan’s Pub in Little Rock.  Surfas Culinary District  510 Ouachita Ave., Hot Springs.   501-624-2665  culinarydistrict.com  Offers kitchen supplies, gourmet ingredients and a large selection of local meats and prepared products.  Walmart  Bentonville (corporate office)  800-925-6278  The international discount chain has sold Arkansas produce in its store for 20 years. Local and organic produce available statewide.  Whole Foods  wholefoodsmarket.com  National chain with locations in Little Rock and Fayetteville. See website for information about placing products.


CHANGE IS HOME-GROWN Heifer USA is working with small-scale farmers and local partners in Arkansas to revolutionize the way people produce, sell and eat their food. Our farmers are using sustainably produced, local food to ignite change in our own back yard. Visit www.heifer.org/usa to support our shared vision of a sustainable future. Or call 501.907.8877.

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