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THE LIFESTYLE MANUAL FOR THE MODERN MOM

MARCH 2016 路 THESAVVYMOMS.COM

summER EVERYTHING YOUR CAMPER NEEDS to KNOW

SIP THE RAINBOW COLORFUL & HEALTHY

SMOOTHIE RECIPES

ORGANIZE IT!

DESKTOP to CLOSET

ALL GEARED UP FOR CAMP!


Focused

WE BELIEVE THAT EVERY CHILD IS

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MARCH

MODERN MOM 16 AGING: THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE PUDGY SLURP ON THESE S! SMOOTHIE

18 PILLOW TALK 20 POLISHED PLANNING 22 DEEP, CLOSET-CLEANSING BREATHS

SAVVY FAMILY 24 SIP THE RAINBOW 31 SUMMER CAMP 101 34 HEAD'S UP

IN EVERY ISSUE 6 EDITOR’S NOTE 12 NEWS & NOTES 38 BAG CHECK

ON THE COVER: SPENCER PITTMAN IS READY FOR CAMP SEASON. PHOTOGRAPHY BY LILY DARRAGH.

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MARCH 2016 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM


11501 Financial Centre Parkway Little Rock, Arkansas 72211 501. 223.3322 • 800.880.3322 www.PinnaclePointeHospital.com


The days are steadily getting longer, and 70-degree teasers are already lulling us into daydreams of wearing our best floppy beach hat on summer vacation; feeling a warm breeze while we sip a frozen mojito, and catching up with friends on our favorite local patio; and listening to the kids running, yelling and creating perfect chaos OUTSIDE of the home. Yes, it’s time to turn off the heat in the house, open the windows and take a deep breath…this issue is all about getting outside, and airing out your life to get ready for spring. Find all the products you need to get yourself organized, hand-selected by Shindig Paperie owner, Trisha Logan. While you’re at it, you may want to re-think your overstuffed closet. Get tips on how to clear out the clutter and breathe some life and simplicity back into your wardrobe with Ashley Peeples, owner of Beige in Little Rock. Spring is also a great time to revaluate your grocery list and lighten things up. We are all coming out of hibernation, shaking off our winter layers, and nervously looking toward the impending onslaught of swimsuit season. In her column, the hilarious Jen Holman confronts a skimpy, crocheted two-piece in the ladies’ swim department. Good Eats focuses on a rainbow of colorful smoothie recipes to get healthy fruits and veggies into your kid’s diet. Surely you noticed how much fun cover boy Spencer Pittman was having at our summer camp photo shoot. Now is the time to start thinking about sending your brood off to gain independence, make new friends and replenish their ghost story arsenals at summer camp. We’ve highlighted a few around the state, and compiled some tips on what to pack, how to cope with saying goodbye and how to create a top-notch care package for your happy camper. Oh, and if you’re wondering who this spring weather-loving person who’s been gushing about the March issue is…I’m Amy, the new editor at Savvy. Feel free to drop me a line with feedback or ideas. I’m excited to join the Savvy team!

Here are a few of my favorite things from the March issue—

Story stones are a great craft to get the imagination working. I hired my artistic husband to help me create these. Page 32

This pretty pastel journal is perfect to keep organized! Page 20 6

MARCH 2016 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM

The delicious Lucky Leprechaun smoothie is packed with greens, tropical fruits and a zing of ginger. Page 27

Amy Gordy Editor, Savvy @SavvyAR

PHOTOGRAPHY: LILY DARRAGH

HEY SAVVY READERS, IT'S FINALLY MARCH!


High quality child care looks like

LITERACY.

When you look for child care, look for lots of books. Look for teachers that talk to and read to infants. Look for teachers that tell stories children love. This is quality child care. Literacy is a process that begins in infancy. The process involves all of your child’s care givers.

Your child care provider is an important partner in your child’s future. Choose quality child care that helps lead your child to reading and writing. Visit our website to find quality child care that works for you.

www.ARBetterBeginnings.com • 1-800-445-3316 Division of Child Care and Early Childhood Education


NOW ENROLLING STUDENTS IN PK4 THROUGH 8TH GRADE. • Located Downtown in Beautiful Historic District • Oldest elementary school in the city of Little Rock • Diverse School environment • A legacy of rich Catholic education, academic excellence and service for over 130 years 501.374.9166 | 805 Sherman St., Little Rock, AR 72202 www.saintedwards.net

PUBLISHER REBEKAH HARDIN | rebekah@arktimes.com EDITOR AMY GORDY | amy@arktimes.com CREATIVE DIRECTOR MANDY KEENER | mandy@arktimes.com ADVERTISING DIRECTOR ELIZABETH HAMAN | elizabeth@arktimes.com

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NEW BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT BLAKE HANNAHS | blake@arktimes.com SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE LESA THOMAS | lesa@arktimes.com

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ADVERTISING COORDINATOR JIM HUNNICUTT | jimhunnicutt@arktimes.com DIGITAL MEDIA PRODUCER BRYAN MOATS SOCIAL MEDIA DIRECTOR LAUREN BUCHER | lauren@arktimes.com GRAPHIC DESIGNERS BRYAN MOATS | MIKE SPAIN | KEVIN WALTERMIRE PHOTOGRAPHER BRIAN CHILSON PRODUCTION MANAGER | CONTROLLER WELDON WILSON IT DIRECTOR ROBERT CURFMAN ACCOUNTS PAYABLE KELLY LYLES

Visit our website for information on services, upcoming events, and access to our resources! Kidsourcetherapy.com Services We Provide: •Early Intervention Services •Therapy Evaluations •Speech/Language Therapy •Occupational Therapy •Physical Therapy

Supportive Programs: •Sensory Integration •Feeding & Swallowing •Hippotherapy •Aquatics •Special Olympics

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MARCH 2016 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM

BILLING/COLLECTIONS LINDA PHILLIPS CIRCULATION DIRECTOR ANITRA HICKMAN

ALL MATERIALS ARE HANDLED WITH DUE CARE; HOWEVER, THE PUBLISHER ASSUMES NO RESPONSIBILITY FOR CARE AND SAFE RETURN OF UNSOLICITED MATERIALS. ALL LETTERS AND PICTURES SENT TO SAVVY™ WILL BE TREATED AS INTENDED FOR PUBLICATION AND ARE SUBJECT TO SAVVY'S™ UNRESTRICTED RIGHT TO EDIT OR TO COMMENT EDITORIALLY. 201 E. MARKHAM ST. SUITE 200, LITTLE ROCK, AR 72201 501-375-2985. ALL CONTENTS ©2016 SAVVY™


FACT: Vaccines save lives. Learn more at archildrens.org/vaccines

Artistry in the Rock March 14-16 A celebration and showcase of LRSD student talent in the performing & visual arts. FREE and Open to the Public! Talent Schedule Metroplex Event Center Monday, March 14 9:30 Western Hills Band 9:45 Chicot Primary Choir 10:00 Geyer Springs GT Academy 10:20 Pulaski Heights M.S. Girls’ Chorus 10:40 Forest Heights STEM Acad. Band 11:05 Rockefeller World Music Ensemble 11:30 Mallory Baker, Solo Piano 12:00 Parkview Arts/Science Magnet Madrigals, Girls’ Chorus and Orchestra Tuesday, March 15 9:30 Booker Arts Magnet Orchestra 10:00 McDermott Choir 10:20 Roberts 4th Flag Line 10:30 Dunbar Magnet Concert Band and Concert Choir 11:00 Roberts 5th Flag Line 11:10 Watson Intermediate Orff Ensemble 11:30 Mann Arts/Science Magnet Concert Band and Concert Choir

Wednesday, March 16 9:30 Meadowcliff Choir & Drum Ensemble 10:00 Brady Choir 10:30 Pulaski Heights Elem. Choir 11:00 Central Madrigals & Concert Choir 11:45 Mabelvale Middle Choir 12:00 Terry Recorder Ensemble 12:30 Central Jazz Band II Wednesday, March 16 Evening Performances and Silent Auction Fundraiser 6:30 pm Barry Zhang, Solo Piano 6:45 pm Mann Magnet Jazz Band 7:15 pm Artistry Awards 7:45 pm McClellan Jazz Band 8:00 pm Central Jazz Band Student Art Gallery March 14-16 9 am - 2 pm

Little Rock School District PERFORMANCE WORKPLAN CE FOR TOMORRO lrsd.org

LLEN CREATING EXCE

W

For more information, THESAVVYMOMS.COM | MARCH 2016

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contributors MARCH 2016

KERRY GUICE is a food blogger and photographer living in Little Rock with her husband, two kids and their dog. When she’s not sharing her latest meal on Instagram, Kerry is planning her family’s next Arkansas adventure or crafting with her creative tots.

LILY DARRAGH is a photographer in Little Rock. She studied photography at Parsons the New School of Design in New York. Currently working out of a photography studio in downtown Little Rock, Lily loves to shoot people and places unique to Arkansas.

The Clinton Presidential Center’s newest temporary exhibit includes photographs, film, and memorabilia from dozens of American Olympic athletes, and significant material related to American Presidents, just in time for the Rio 2016 Olympic Games.

March 12 – September 11, 2016

www.clintonfoundation.org/AmericanChampions 1200 President Clinton Avenue • Little Rock, AR 72201 Photo: Clinton Presidential Library

10 MARCH 2016 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM

ASHLEY PEEPLES & CARRIE HURLEY worked together to purge and simplify Carrie's wardrobe in a total closet cleanse. Ashley is a local fashionista, mother of two, and owner of clothing boutique Beige in Little Rock. Carrie owns The Rendezvous, an antique venue in Round Top, Texas, operates a local creative services company, and is the mother to a very active 18-month-old.

TRISHA LOGAN is a design obsessed shop owner living in Fayetteville, Ark., with her husband and two boys. Trisha owns Shindig Paperie—a stationery boutique— with locations in Fayetteville and Bentonville. She studied apparel and textiles at the University of Arkansas and earned her Master of Arts degree from Colorado State University. Trisha loves spending time at her shop, and adventuring around Northwest Arkansas with her family in her spare time.


Every Step of the Way T H E L AT E S T I N T E C H N O L O G Y. T H E B E S T I N C A R E . Amputee Shawn Fallin has always driven himself to do things that others might consider impossible. Of course, now that he has a very active four year young son, oldShawn son, Shawn realizesrealizes that that keeping up with him might just be the toughest challenge he has faced. Fortunately, he can count on the professionals at Snell Laboratory to be by his side every step of the way.

Statewide Toll-Free:

1-800-342-5541

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Accredited Facility

Offices located in Little Rock, Russellville, Fort Smith, Mountain Home, Fayetteville, Hot Springs, North Little Rock, Pine Bluff and Conway.

We take your child’s education With quality public schools like College Station Elementary, the education you want for your child is close at hand. Choose PCSSD schools with: • Test scores higher than other local districts • Millions in college scholarships awarded • Teachers with advanced degrees • Talented and gifted programs • State-winning sports teams

pcssd.org

501.234.2000 THESAVVYMOMS.COM | MARCH 2016

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NEWS & NOTES

THE LATEST FOR PARENTS & KIDS STYLE

WRITE HOME

These handmade cards are perfect to send with your kids to sleep away camp. Illustrated by Keiko Brodeur, they are printed on 100 percent recycled card stock and blank inside so your camper can scrawl a letter to send back home. Don't forget to pre-address and stamp the envelopes! Available at etsy.com/shop/smalladventure. SOCIAL

DEAL ALERT!

HAVE A CRAFTY EASTER

Fall down the rabbit hole of Easter crafts on Savvy’s “Easter” Pinterest board. We’ve curated an exciting collection of pastries, centerpieces, egg-dying tips and tricks, and craft ideas for kids of all ages. Follow us at pinterest.com/savvymagar.

Mid-America Science Museum in Hot Springs is offering discounted family memberships in celebration of its one-year reopening anniversary. All month long, guests are invited to explore this fun center for science and renew or sign up for a family membership for only $75. Everyone who takes advantage of this deal also gets a $10 museum store gift card and two free guest passes. Also, beginning this month, members of the Museum of Discovery in Little Rock can gain access to the Mid-America Science Museum for only $5. Just show your membership card at the front desk. Visit midamericamuseum.org for more information.

PHOTOGRAPHY: COURTESY SMALL ADVENTURE, MID-AMERICA SCIENCE MUSEUM AND HABITAT FOR HUMANITY OF CENTRAL ARKANSAS

CULTURE

DID YOU KNOW?

OF PARENTS REPORT "STEALING" FROM THEIR KIDS' EASTER CANDY STASH. *NATIONAL CONFECTIONERS ASSOCIATION

12 MARCH 2016 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM


THRIFTY

ROCK THE BLOCK & GET INVOLVED!

FREE FUN FOR SPRING BREAK

The best things in life are free, and central Arkansas has tons to fill your time away from school

BOX SLEDDING

Weekends on the grounds of the Clinton Presidential Center are filled with laughter as kids run up the rolling hills just to fly down them with glee, hanging on to a piece of cardboard. Hit the slopes for hours of fun at no cost. Just pick up a box from your recycling bin before you head out.

DISCOVER NATURE

Get to know some of the state’s native fish and wildlife at the Witt Stephens Jr. Central Arkansas Nature Center in the River Market district. Plan your visit to catch a fish or alligator feeding. Admission is always free. Visit centralarkansasnaturecenter.com for more information.

JURASSIC PARK AT RON ROBINSON THEATER

This older kid-friendly Steven Spielberg thriller explores a secret island theme park filled with live dinosaurs created from prehistoric DNA. Starring Laura Dern and Sam Neill; rated PG-13. March 24, 7 p.m. Free admission. Visit cals.org for more information.

ROCK THE BLOCK WITH HABITAT

Spring break is a good opportunity to encourage kids to get involved in the community. Habitat for Humanity of Central Arkansas’s Rock the Block event will focus on 15 homes in the Baring Cross neighborhood of North Little Rock that need some TLC. Be ready to paint, landscape, pick up trash, weatherize and repair at 8 a.m. on March 19. Food, drinks and a bounce house for kids will be provided at this block party with a purpose. Visit habitatcentralar.org for more information.

A SCHOOL AND AN OUTPATIENT PEDIATRIC THERAPY CLINIC’ A place where children with developmental disabilities and learning differences can grow and develop in an environment tailored to meet their unique needs.

OUTPATIENT THERAPY SERVICES

OCCUPATIONAL • PHYSICAL • SPEECH

IF YOUR CHILD HAS BEEN DIAGNOSED WITH A Autism DEVELOPMENTAL DISORDER: • Asperger Syndrome

Pervasive Developmental Disorder Down Syndrome • Apraxia • Other Language Disorders Sensory Integration issues

Contact us today for more information or to schedule an evaluation for your child.

(501) 663-6965 • AcademyAtRiverdale.com 1600 Riverfront Drive, Little Rock, AR 72202 We work with a variety of private insurance providers as well as ARKids 1st, Medicaid, TEFRA and TRICARE.

THESAVVYMOMS.COM | MARCH 2016

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MARCH 2016

The Emmy Award-winning program may be decades old, but adults will score cool points with their kids as they sing along to their favorite hits at School House Rock Live! including “Just a Bill,” “Conjunction Junction,” “Three is a Magic Number,” and “Interplanet Janet.” This fresh adaptation will have kids wide-eyed and learning while they have fun. Best enjoyed by all ages. Presented by the Arkansas Arts Center Children’s Theater; Fridays at 7 p.m., and Saturdays and Sundays at 2 p.m. Special spring break performances March 22-25, 2 p.m. Tickets are $12.50; $10 for AAC members. Visit arkarts.com for more information.

Get those little feet pounding the pavement at the Little Rockers Kids Marathon. This fun event gives children ages 7-12 the opportunity to complete the 25.2-mile marathon over the course of several months. They can use Little Rockers Kids Marathon Training Program either on their own or through their schools. On March 5, all participants are invited to complete their final mile at the official Little Rock Marathon finish line. Be there to cheer them on! Visit littlerockmarathon.com for more information.

PHOTOGRAPHY: COURTESY ARKANSAS ARTS CENTER, LITTLE ROCK MARATHON, IRISH CULTURAL SOCIETY OF ARKANSAS AND CLINTON PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY

DO THIS!

LITTLE ROCK

NORTH LITTLE ROCK

501.223.4929

501.978.3154

11218 N. RODNEY PARHAM RD.

14 MARCH 2016 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM 1116-026M_StPats_SavvyMag.indd 1

4822 N. HILLS BLVD.


Give in to the excitement of the Summer Games at the Clinton Presidential Center. The latest exhibit, American Champions: The Quest for Olympic Glory, opens March 12, and is set against the backdrop of the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. This exhibit follows the story of American athletes in the modern Olympic Games, and will include photographs, film and memorabilia related to those athletes and American presidents. Visit clintonfoundation.org for more information. Get decked out in green for the Rock to North Little Rock St. Patrick’s Day Parade. The Irish Cultural Society of Arkansas puts on this annual event that begins at 3rd and Rock streets in Little Rock and winds through the River Market with a big finish at 5th and Main streets in Argenta. Look for kid favorites including parade floats, the Irish wolfhounds, bagpipes, clowns, dancing, beads and more. Visit irisharkansas.org/parade for more information.

St. Patrick’s Day Accessories Starting at

99

¢

THESAVVYMOMS.COM | MARCH 2016

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1/27/16 10:22 AM


MAMA SAID...

I

AGING: THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE PUDGY

t was a dumb thing to do. I see that now. But in my defense, it was turquoise and chevron—two qualities I find nearly impossible to resist. The pressure was simply too great and I caved in a moment of weakness. Over the past several weeks, each time I entered my favorite retail chain, the first things I saw were women’s swimsuits. You know the ones. The trendy, tiny suits are displayed front and center the moment you walk through the sliding doors. They’re stationed near the aisle for all to see, while the tummy-control mom suits are hidden in the back, against the wall. I was just minding my own business, making a quick run for shampoo and dog food, when, WHAM!, a flounce crocheted two-piece caught my eye. It made me think of carefree days on the beach or at the lake. The days when I didn’t have to leave the fun to make lunch for little people and put them down for naps. “That’s adorable,” I thought. “I could totally pull that off.” And then, those six words dreaded by women since the dawn of lycra escaped my lips. “I need to try that on.” I practically skipped to the dressing room. I was shopping alone, my bigs at elementary school and the two littles at pre-K for a couple of hours. I’ll be 39 this year. Did I mention that? I should have. I slipped on the adorable swimsuit, noting that clothes manufacturers are making women’s sizes smaller and smaller every year. Medium is the new small, apparently. I fastened the clasp at the back of my neck and lifted my head, glancing into the mirror for the first time. My horrified howl probably sent the poor dressing room attendant on alert for a Code Red. “That’s not my butt,” I told the mirror. “That’s my mother’s butt. Where’s my butt?” I looked behind me—like I’d find my 25-year-old butt. Like the store’s dressing room had been installed with a funhouse mirror. Nope. That was it, all right. Worse: It was accessorized with a brand-new set of love handles. I stripped the scrap of a suit off in record time and went home with my tail between my (thick) legs. It had happened. I’d lost my girlish figure. Certainly, things had changed after the birth of my children, and that was to be expected. I had found a way to love my post-baby bod because it was all a part of motherhood. But this—my body’s changes as a result of aging? Try as I might, I couldn’t find any affection for that.

What was I to do? I eat healthfully and am fairly active. We’re already constantly on the run with several growing kiddos and their extracurriculars. And I patently refuse to starve myself to meet the ridiculous standard women are held to in magazines and on television. You’ll find no thigh gap or bikini bridge on this mom’s body. But I did want to be healthy, and I wanted to take my kiddos to the pool this summer and actually remove my cover-up. I developed a two-pronged approach, joining the gym and resolving to (try to) lovingly embrace aging. For most healthy adults, the Department of Health and Human Services recommends at least 150 minutes a week of moderate or 75 minutes of vigorous aerobic activity. It also recommends strength training at least twice a week to counteract the muscle loss associated with aging. Did you know people who aren’t physically active can lose from 3 to 5 percent of muscle mass per decade after age 30? I didn’t, either, but at least I’ve isolated what happened to my butt. The second prong to my plan was less tangible. It was a mental workout. How do you learn to love a body that requires more work and will probably still never look as good as it once did? For me, the key was embracing “health” rather than “perfection,” and letting beauty radiate from a happy and content heart. A wise woman once told me to “look deeper” when I complained of the imminence of aging. I took her advice, and have never been happier. I isolated and exercised the muscles that built character and kindness. I toned the areas that made me feel more fulfilled and accomplished as a woman, as a human being, as a mother. Will my plan work? Can I balance health and happiness? I think so. I may never have abs of steel, but they’ll get plenty of exercise from laughter.

THE FIRST PRONG OF MY TWO-PRONGED PLAN—JOIN THE GYM.

Jen Holman is often irreverent and frequently imperfect. But she’s happy, by God, and that’s what matters. She lives in Little Rock with her husband, three children and a nephew, striking that delicate balance between inspiration and frustration. Jen has published two novels under the pseudonym Jen Crane, the second of which was selected by iTunes/iBooks as “Our Pick” in fantasy sci-fi.

16 MARCH 2016 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM


WHEN YOU WANT TO TEACH THEM TO MANAGE MONEY BEFORE THEY START MAKING IT.

WE’RE HERE.

At First Security, we believe it’s never too early to learn smart financial skills. That’s why we make it fun with our Penny Pockets Kids Club account. It only takes $5 to open. There’s no service fee or minimum balance to earn interest, just lots of kid-friendly features to teach the importance of saving money. Ready to move past the piggy bank? First Security is here for you – and your kids.

O N L Y IN A R K A N S A S Bank Better. fsbank.com | onlyinark.com

Member FDIC

Spring into health at the Arkansas Children’s Hospital 34th Annual Children’s Health Fair!

• • • •

Play fitness games Learn fun nutrition facts Make a finger cast Take home lots of souvenirs from the day

SATURDAY, MARCH 12, 2016 PARK PLAZA MALL 10 AM - 4 PM

THESAVVYMOMS.COM | MARCH 2016

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Consistent bedtimes and wake times can lead to more restful sleep.

PILLOW TALK

A change in hormone levels could be disrupting your sleep. Here’s how to take control and turn sleepless nights into a restful, restorative experience. BY MEL JONES

N

early 40 million Americans suffer from sleep disorders, and in the National Sleep Foundation’s 2007 Sleep in America poll, approximately two-thirds of all women reported experiencing a sleep problem at least a few nights a week. Because of biological conditions unique to us—periods, pregnancy, menopause —sleep can be frequently disrupted and serious problems, like insomnia, can develop. Levels of hormones like estrogen and progesterone change monthly, as well as over the course of our lifetimes, and combined with other lifestyle habits and environmental factors, sleep can become more of a dream than reality. Often, sleepless nights begin due to menstruation, pregnancy or menopause, and those poor sleep habits become seemingly impossible to break. We all know that a lack of sleep means daytime tiredness, problems concentrating and an increased risk of car accidents, but an extended period of poor sleep can lead to being sick more, weight gain, depression, increased stress levels and anxiety, to name a few. Of course, with these issues come more potential for insomnia and other sleep problems. How to break the cycle? Making a variety of lifestyle and behavioral changes can mean vast improvements in both quality and quantity of sleep. The NSF offers a variety of helpful tips specifically for women, included below. However, if your sleep doesn’t improve or, in fact, worsens, you may have an underlying and treatable health issue that could be ruining your sleep. Talk to your doctor—she may prescribe medication to help you sleep and to address the root cause of your insomnia.

SLEEP: A HOW-TO GUIDE

Tips to Improve Your Sleep

MAINTAIN A COOL BEDROOM ENVIRONMENT A cool bedroom is conducive to better sleep. Room temperatures between 60 and 67 degrees Fahrenheit are optimal. Given increases in core body temperature during menstruation, it can be even more important to maintain a cool bedroom environment during that time.

TRY A WARM BATH OR SHOWER BEFORE BED We begin to feel sleepy when our body temperature drops. You can enhance this effect by taking a warm bath or shower before bed. The contrast between the warm bath or shower and your cool bedroom environment will help with sleep onset.

VISIT THESAVVYMOMS.COM FOR PRODUCTS AND GADGETS TO ENHANCE YOUR SLEEP

18 MARCH 2016 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM


AVOID STIMULATING SUBSTANCES CLOSE TO BEDTIME Caffeine, alcohol and nicotine can make it difficult to fall or stay asleep. Depending on how your body absorbs caffeine, it can be helpful to avoid caffeine in the late afternoon/evening.

LIMIT NOISE IN THE BEDROOM Noise can disrupt sleep and lead to less refreshing sleep. Limit bedroom noises as much as possible. An alternative to eliminating sounds is to mask them using a “white noise” device such as a sound machine. LIGHT EXPOSURE AFFECTS SLEEP Exposure to bright light during the daytime helps to regulate our sleep/wake cycle. Nighttime light exposure, however, even a dim light can be disruptive to sleep. Limit outdoor light through the use of blackout curtains, and avoid the use of electronic devices in the bedroom. ENGAGE IN RELAXATION OR OTHER COPING EXERCISES Many women report increased anxious and depressive symptoms before and during menstruation. Engaging in activities to alleviate these symptoms will help with sleep. Relaxation, deep breathing or other ways of coping with stress such as keeping a “worry log” can help to decrease feelings of anxiety and depression that may disrupt sleep.

we

all about healthy nutrition

As the fuel that energizes our children’s daily activities and learning, it’s safe to say that having a healthy, nutritious diet is important in every family. “A well-balanced diet plays a vital role in the growth and development of children,” said Chuck Smith, M.D., a family medicine specialist at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS).

each night allows the body to anticipate and prepare for bedtime. As a result, you will feel sleepier at bedtime and fall asleep quicker. Similarly, engaging in a bedtime routine will help your body (and mind) to relax and transition into sleep. Avoid stimulating activities close to bedtime and engage in calming, relaxing rituals.

There are plenty of quick, healthy options for every meal. Here are a few tips to get your child’s diet on the right track: Energy to Start the Day. Some type of protein and carbohydrate is important for your child in the morning. This can be in the form of yogurt, milk or string cheese with a whole grain or fruit. Some popular choices to try to avoid are pastries, donuts and other foods loaded with sugar. Spice Up Lunch. Like adults, kids enjoy appealing foods. For lunch, incorporate different colors to boost your child’s appetite at the lunch table. Get Everyone Involved in Meal Prep. No matter the meal, getting kids involved in the preparation process at the store and at home can help them be more open to try new foods.

CHOOSE A COMFORTABLE SLEEPING POSITION Just before and during menstruation, women can

This month is National Nutrition Month, so check out UAMShealth.com/nutrition for more information.

AVOID HEAVY MEALS BEFORE BED Indigestion, nausea and diarrhea can be present during menstruation and can result in disrupted sleep. Eating a light snack and avoiding heavy meals before bedtime can help to avoid some of these digestion difficulties. MAINTAIN CONSISTENT BEDTIMES/WAKE TIMES AND ROUTINES Going to bed at a similar time

experience cramping, nausea and muscle aches. Selecting a sleeping position to minimize pressure on tender areas, such as sleeping on your side and back, can help to minimize the impact of these symptoms on your sleep. Visit sleepfoundation.org for more tips and information. For an appointment, call 501-686-8000 UAMShealth.com/centerforprimarycare

THESAVVYMOMS.COM | MARCH 2016 UAMS March advertorial Savvy.indd 1

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1/26/16 8:01 AM


POLISHED PLANNING

PASTELS ARE PERFECT FOR SPRING!

Trisha Logan, trendsetter and owner of Shindig Paperie, a stationery boutique in Northwest Arkansas, curated a collection of top-notch organization products. These pencils, cards, datebooks and more are sure to get your life on task and your office space on point.

Russell + Hazel journal contains 248 sheets of ruled paper with coptic stitchbinding, so it opens flat when journaling at the end of the day.

PICK YOUR FAVORITE COLORS & FONT!

Personalized letterpress stationery with geometric lined hot pink envelopes by Haute Papier. This stationery ensemble is perfect for spring and highly customizable. The Kaweco Sport fountain pen is pocket-sized!

Gold paper scissors by Studio Carta will add a gilded touch to your desktop. They are crafted in Italy—mimicking a classic 1950s design—and engineered specifically for cutting paper.

Geometric laser-cut thank you notes by Avie Designs feature a watercolor accent on each note. Packaged in a box of 10 notecards, with charcoal envelopes.

Gold foil pencils from Haute Papier will put some shine on your correspondence. Available in six patterns.

Keep a calendar on your terms with the year-less planner by Ferme á Papier. It contains 130 pages of open-ended planning plus additional graph and blank pages for notes.

These items can be found at Shindig Paperie in Fayetteville and Bentonville, shindigpaperie.com.

20 MARCH 2016 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM

Black hardback notebook by Shinola filled with192 high quality, acid-free pages. It is smyth-sewn, so it opens flat.

A PLANNER FOR THE RIGHT-BRAINED!


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GRAB THE KIDS & COME OUT TO PLAY!

SPRINGFEST IS A FREE FAMILY FESTIVAL PACKED WITH FOOD, FUN AND SUN ON THE BANKS OF THE ARKANSAS RIVER. You’ll find everything from acrobats and art projects to food trucks and flying dogs. Plus, your favorite band, Trout Fishing in America!

BROUGHT TO YOU BY THESAVVYMOMS.COM | MARCH 2016

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Adolescent girls tend to have lasting ramifications from dating violence, which can lead to risky behavior later in life.

DEEP, CLOSETCLEANSING BREATHS One clothes horse’s journey toward a more zen-filled stable BY CARRIE HURLEY

T

“Your closet is like the Forbidden Forest in Harry Potter, dark, dangerous and dense.” ­—Anonymous friend

22 MARCH 2016 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM

Thank my lucky stars Caroline offered to come over BEFORE the process with Savvy officially commenced. This is my friend whose safe place is The Container Store, so you can imagine the bewildered look on her face upon entering. To say it was brutal would be an understatement. Sweet Caroline got a glimpse of just how sentimental, unorganized and ADD I really am. But hey, good friends love you anyway, and great friends pour you a glass of bubbly, put their hair in a ponytail, and help you weed through your black abyss of a closet because she doesn’t want anyone to “see you this way.” I am ever grateful for this pre-gaming, because if Ashley Peeples had seen my closet before this particular purge, cardiac arrest would have been sure to follow. However, even after my preemptive strike, Ashley’s definition of “cleanse” and mine were completely different. What I thought was a cleanse was more of a “just cut out Cokes,” or “no carbs after 2 p.m.” type of eradication. She was thinking more along the lines of a hot-water-and-lemon-only kind of closet detox. “What do you mean I need to pick one black top when I have 17 perfectly acceptable ones?!” Deep breaths. Deep, CLEANSING breaths. Somewhat reluctantly, I threw lots of “maybe I’ll wear this someday” away and made piles to give away to friends, or donate to The Dorcas House. Kiddingly, I asked, “Am I a hoarder?” and Ashley paused and said, “Maybe.” In my defense, I’m not the kind of hoarder to have 173 packets of Fire Sauce from Taco Bell, or save every greeting card I’ve ever received in life, but it turns out I am a bit of an emotional accumulator when it comes to the ol’ walk-in. So, with a brave face (and a killer leather jacket), Ashley went to town. Correction: She helped my "crazy town" of a closet downsize to more of a sweet little cul-de-sac occupied by signature staples and a select few trendy pieces. We separated items into a Thred Up (see sidebar) pile, a seasonal selection-to-be-stored-elsewhere stack, and an I’m-noteven-sure-Goodwill-will-take-this pile. Ashley was nothing but gracious and kind. And truly, the more I tossed the easier it became. So much so that by the end, I was asking Ashley to just decide for me. Her boutique in downtown Little Rock is known for its sophisticated selection of classic, impeccably constructed pieces, so I’m pretty sure the woman knows what she’s talking about. When we finished, I had a color-coded, curated group of tees, sweaters, jackets, pants, denim and dresses. The Sultan of Streamline (as I lovingly refer to her) provided a list of must-haves with specific instructions NOT to buy something just to buy it. To be sure, as of now there are holes. Fine, gaping holes if I’m being honest. Ergo the cue for the next step in my closet crusade…creating the capsule wardrobe! Stay tuned. And Ashley, pretty please, don’t break up with me. I’m gonna need ya.

PHOTOGRAPHY: LILY DARRAGH

Ashley and Carrie in her newly organized closet.

ruth be told, my closet tends to look as if wild animals have been climbing the shelves in search of food and water. And heck, being a mom to an 18-month-old, it often feels like there actually is a creature whose sole mission is to seek and destroy anything remotely tidy or organized. So when Savvy asked if I was up for a wee bit of a closet cleanse followed by the creation of a capsule wardrobe overseen by Ashley Peeples, owner of Beige, I was all like, “Yes please! Where do I sign?!” Besides, it would be nice to associate the word cleanse with something other than drinking my weight in green juice, or LOTS of time in the ladies room. This should be easy enough. Let’s do this. Game on. Then I called my friend Caroline. And well, a harsh new reality set in. As one of my besties, she felt the freedom to tell me there was NO WAY she would let anyone, ANYONE, see the state of my wardrobe’s union. To quote another, less tactful friend, “Your closet is like the Forbidden Forest in Harry Potter, dark, dangerous and dense. No two visits are the same.” So, I was instructed to clean up before the maid comes, so to speak.


KEY QUESTIONS FOR A SUCCESSFUL CLOSET CLEANSE DO YOU LOVE IT? This, to me, was the most crucial question Ashley asked. Granted there were a few times I said yes, but most of the time, my affinity fell somewhere in between “eh” and “sort of.” It made it so much easier to say “buh bye” when I realized that I wasn’t even “in like” with some of the items, let alone in love with them. According to Ashley, all pieces should be marriage material on the love scale. Before the cleanse, I’d say most of my ensembles would rate more as dinner, a movie and “let’s just be friends.” DO YOU FEEL GOOD IN IT? Let’s be honest. Those brandnew shoes in the box are not going to suddenly be comfortable to wear. And no, most of us are not the same size we were in junior high. And while I know those maternity pants are like wearing butter, Mama, you can’t be seen in public sportin’ those puppies. So, if you don’t feel like your best self in something, say "sayonara." DOES YOUR CLOSET MAKE YOU HAPPY? Mine does. Now. Because I have significantly fewer items hanging in my closet, I sacked the plastic Walmart hangers and splurged on wooden ones (they’re really less expensive than you think). I also filled my shelves with art and things I adore looking at, so now walking into my closet feels calming. Like my husband says, “There is freedom in simplicity,” and to be able to see everything in a single scan and KNOW that it all works together gives me some hippie-like peaceful vibes. FED UP? THRED UP! Ashley knew just how to entice me to toss some of my nicer things (some still with tags attached). She told me about Thred Up. It’s a website that will send you a large bag in which to mail (at no charge) your designer duds to them. They will sell them for you online or, if it is an unsellable item, they will donate them. So I packed up two bags worth and sent them to Thred Up to recoup some of my moolah, and save up for a piece worth investing in. I’ve got my eyes on Ashley’s leather jacket…

A SMALL PORTION OF THE CLOTHES CARRIE IS READY TO TOSS.

REGISTER NOW DOWNTOWN DASH 10K/5K 8:30 a.m. JUNIOR DASH 1K 8 a.m. www.jllr.org/downtowndash

CHECK BACK NEXT MONTH WHEN CARRIE AND ASHLEY REVEAL THE CURATED CAPSULE OUTFITS TO COMPLETE CARRIE'S WARDROBE.

Online registration is available through midnight 4/21/2016. Mail-in registrations must be postmarked by 4/15/2016. THESAVVYMOMS.COM | MARCH 2016

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hese smoothies are better than a pot of gold at the end of a rainbow, only because they're made of the rainbow! March is National Nutrition Month, so making these smoothies with your kids is a great way to show them that being healthy can be fun. My kids love to help in the kitchen, and juicing and blending is a great way for them to participate since all it takes is the push of a button for them to feel like they've helped out big time. Don't forget to keep the blender unplugged until the lid is in place—trust me on that one.

24 MARCH 2016 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM


WITH LOADS OF FRESH, HEALTHY FRUITS AND VEGGIES, THESE COLORFUL TREATS ARE GREAT FOR AN AFTER-SCHOOL SNACK, BREAKFAST OR HEALTHY DESSERT STORY & PHOTOGRAPHY BY KERRIE GUICE

WE LOVE THIS BACKDROP RAINBOW PAINTED BY VIOLET GUICE!

THESAVVYMOMS.COM | MARCH 2016

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*THROW A SMOOTHIE PARTY WITH YOUR KIDS AND EXPERIMENT WITH DIFFERENT FRUIT, VEGETABLE AND COLOR COMBINATIONS.

26 MARCH 2016 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM


Lawson Witcher with the Lucky Leprechaun smoothie.

If your kids get queasy at the idea of veggies in their smoothies, mix the ingredients ahead of time without the yogurt and banana and freeze them into ice cubes. When it's time to make the smoothie, just ask them what “color” they want, then add the cubes, yogurt and banana and blend them up. When they're slurping down the last little bit of yum at the bottom of their cup, you can share with them what they've just enjoyed. They'll learn that eating healthy isn't so bad after all! Some say not to be sneaky about veggies with your kids, but I'd say they must not have kids. We do the best we can as parents, and we can use all the sneaky help we can get! I prefer to use a combination of blending and juicing for smoothies. Blend as much as you can, and only juice the few things that would create an inferior texture in your smoothies like carrots and beets. When you blend your fruits and veggies, you retain the fiber that slows your digestion and makes you feel full and satisfied longer than juicing. Let your kids have fun and create smoothie flavors with different combinations until they find their favorite mix! For the best tasting (and prettiest) smoothies, pair fruits and veggies with similar colors.

Lucky Leprechaun Smoothie Serves 2-4 ½ cup packed fresh baby spinach ½ cup packed fresh baby kale 1 mango, peeled and cored 1 kiwi fruit, peeled and cut 1 cup frozen pineapple chunks ½ cup orange juice ½ teaspoon grated ginger Juice from 1 lime ½ cup Greek yogurt (plain or vanilla) Blend all ingredients in a blender until smooth. THESAVVYMOMS.COM | MARCH 2016

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Matilda Thessing with the Breezy Bunny smoothie.

THE POWER OF HEALTHY EATING March has been named National Nutrition Month by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, and this year’s appetizing theme is “Savor the Flavor of Eating Right.” The goal is to encourage people to fully appreciate all the enrichment food and physical activity can add to their lives. It’s not just what we eat that affects our health, but also when, where, why and how. Nutritious food choices are a necessity, and a foundation of mindful eating patterns must be laid in order to reach the perfect Zen of a balanced food-healthy lifestyle.

FIGHT DISEASE

Look for simplicity in healthy eating to control your weight. A diet that is high in lean protein, low in sugar and incorporates plenty of colorful fruits, vegetables and fiber is the perfect place to start. Whole grains and healthy carbs can be a part of your nutritious lifestyle, as well as the “healthy” or unsaturated fats. Maintaining a healthy weight and eating a healthy diet are key to avoiding type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Lowering your sodium intake alone helps with hypertension, which is directly related to high blood pressure.

GET ENERGIZED

Keep your energy up by eating predominantly nutrient-dense foods. Vegetables and fruits are easily included in this category, while refined breads and fried, fatty foods should be avoided. High sugar and starchy carbohydrates make everybody feel lethargic and put strain on your body as it tries to metabolize them.

FUEL YOUR BRAIN

Blueberries and salmon are two of the best foods to fuel your brain. Wild salmon is rich in omega-3 fatty acids, which are essential for brain function, while blueberries help protect the brain from oxidative stress. Exercise is also a great way to alleviate depression through the release of endorphins. Improve your memory by getting the heart rate up and increasing blood flow to the brain.

LIVE LONGER

Breezy Bunny Smoothie Serves 2-4 1 cup carrot juice 1 ½ cups orange juice frozen into ice cubes 1 mango, peeled and cored 1 tablespoon honey 1 banana ½ cup Greek yogurt (plain or vanilla) Blend all ingredients in a blender until smooth.

Studies show that vitamin E—which can be found in nuts, seeds, spinach, turnip greens, hazelnut oil and sunflower oil—can help significantly extend your lifespan.

EAT HEALTHY AS A FAMILY

Encouraging healthy eating in kids will lay the foundation for good nutrition choices down the road. The simple introduction of a meal and snack schedule can jumpstart their metabolism. When dealing with food choices for kids, remember to keep it fun and tasty. If your child protests to vegetables, then create a low-sugar/low-fat dip to accompany them. Most importantly, be a role model! If you have crazy eating habits or are always on a diet, your children will grow up thinking that is normal. Instead, send good, nutritious food messages through routine and example while also remembering to inspire activity and exercise! Laying this groundwork for yourself and your kids generates only positive results!

CHOOSE THIS, NOT THAT

Honey or agave nectar instead of sugar Popcorn (plain) instead of chips Guacamole instead of cheese dip Whole grain pasta with tomato sauce instead of fettuccine Alfredo Pureed cauliflower instead of mashed potatoes Skim milk mozzarella cheese instead of cheddar cheese Oatmeal instead of cereal

28 MARCH 2016 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM


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Beet Berry Smoothie

Serves 2-4 1 cup frozen blackberries 1 cup frozen blueberries ¼ cup beet juice ½ cup orange juice 1 banana ½ cup Greek yogurt (plain or vanilla)

Blend all ingredients in a blender until smooth.

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Serves 2-4 2 cups frozen strawberries ¼ cup beet juice ¼ cup orange juice ¼ cup lite coconut milk Juice from 1 lime 1 banana ½ cup Greek yogurt (plain or vanilla) Blend all ingredients in a blender until smooth. THESAVVYMOMS.COM | MARCH 2016

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30 MARCH 2016 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM


LET YOUR MINIATURE MONET EXPLORE THE ARTS!

FUTURE QUARTERBACKS CAN LEARN THE ROPES!

GET OUTSIDE AND DISCOVER NATURE!

SUMMER CAMP 101 Camps are a great way to get your kids outside and exploring this summer. There are tons of camps that cater to the athletes, artists, scientists and brainiacs in your brood. Here’s Savvy’s guide to Arkansas summer camps, as well as tips for first time campers and parents, care package ideas, packing list, resources and more. Happy camping! BY AMY GORDY PHOTOGRAPHY LILY DARRAGH THESAVVYMOMS.COM | MARCH 2016

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ARTS

ARKANSAS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA SUMMER STRINGS CAMP

Junior musical prodigies will delight in this five-day intensive program for violin, viola, cello and double bass players. Private lessons are also available. Ages: Elementary, junior high and high school levels. Students must have at least one year of string study on their particular instrument. Location: Pulaski Heights United Methodist Church. Dates and times: June 27-July 1; 1:30-5 p.m. Cost: $125 before June 3; $150 afterward. Sign up: Visit arkansassymphony.org.

BALLET ARKANSAS SUMMER INTENSIVE

Students will learn the fundamentals of dance from professionals in the field. Audition on March 12 and acceptance required. Ages: 12+ or at least one year en pointe. Dates and times: July 18-22, July 25-29 Cost: $350 per student (1 week); or $625 per student (2 weeks). Location: UALR Center for the Performing Arts. Sign up: Call 501-2235150, or visit balletarkansas.org/summer-intensive.

Learning tricks can be a fun way to pass free time and entertain new friends.

Every kid loves a squirt gun! Pick up a pack of small squirt guns from a party supply store, and send enough for the whole cabin to get in on the action. It’s a fun way to cool off on hot afternoons!

Send a plain white t-shirt and some markers for new friends to doodle and leave their mark.

CUTWELL FOR KIDS ART CAMP

Children explore their creative sides at this weekly day camp in Hot Springs. The camp culminates with an art show displaying the campers’ works. Ages: 4-12. Dates and times: Mondays, May 9-July 25 (off July 4); 10 a.m.-noon. Cost: $240. Sign up: Call 214-497-3715 or email c4kartclasses@ gmail.com. Visit cutwell4kids.org for more information.

JUNIOR ARTS ACADEMY

Kids will discover the worlds of theater and fine art in this two-week summer day camp. The session closes with “Play & Display,” where parents are invited to see the young thespians perform original short plays on the Children’s Theatre Main Stage, and view their artwork on display in the Arkansas Arts Center. Ages: 6-9. Dates and times: June 6-17; Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Cost: $444 for members; $555 for non-members. Sign up: Register at arkansasartscenter.org by May 23.

SUMMER MUSICAL THEATER INTENSIVE

The Arkansas Repertory Theatre offers a great program for aspiring young performers in Arkansas. Intensive sessions last 2 weeks and are taught by a staff of professional directors, choreographers, musicians and designers. Each session involves intensive daily rehearsals culminating in a performance of a selected musical or musical revue on the Arkansas Repertory Theatre Main Stage. Ages: 10-23. Dates and times: Check therep.org for date announcements. Cost: $600 per session. Sign up: Students must audition for spots in this program. Check therep.org for audition announcements.

Card games provide hours of fun, as well as some healthy competition within the cabin. Look for games with easy instructions like Uno, Old Maid or Memory.

CAMPY CRAFT

Story stones are a great way to spark some imagination around the campfire, or around the dinner table at home. All you need is a handful of smooth, flat rocks, acrylic paint and brushes. Decorate stones with simple images that could easily be incorporated into storytime, and place them in a cotton bag. There are many ways to use story stones, so feel free to create your own game, or follow these instructions …

1. Have each child take turns choosing one stone that interests them, and let them tell an entire story based on that stone. 2. Let each child reach in the bag and choose a stone. Starting with the youngest child, go clockwise in a circle as each child adds onto the tale by incorporating his or her stone. 3.Choose five stones, and create a story using all five stones.

CAMPFIRE STORIES ROCK!

DID YOU KNOW? *AMERICAN CAMP ASSOCIATION

32 MARCH 2016 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM


LET'S GET PACKIN' Packing doesn’t have to be stressful if you plan ahead. Just remember not to send anything that you or your child can’t live without if it’s damaged or lost, and put a label on everything! Permanent marker works great for most things, and personalized iron-on labels are best for clothes. Include the packing list in your child’s trunk or suitcase to help them keep up with their things. Here are a few summer camp essentials to get you started!

ACCESSORIES

Hat Glasses/contacts Cleaning solution Sunglasses Goggles Small backpack or tote Waterproof watch

CLOTHING

Jeans Raincoat Shorts Sweatshirt or light jacket Swimsuit and coverup Swim shirt with UV protection T-shirts Pajamas Socks (pack extra!) Underwear (pack extra!)

FOOTWEAR

Cleats (if needed) Shoes (closed-toe) Sandals for the shower

LINENS

Bedding if required Pillow Beach towels Hand towel (dries faster than a beach towel, and is convenient for daily use)

DOCUMENT THE TRIP WITH A WATERPROOF DISPOSABLE CAMERA!

PERSONAL

Prescription medications (alert the camp director) Comb or brush Deodorant Feminine products Bug repellent Lip balm Shampoo and conditioner Liquid body wash Sunblock Toothbrush/toothpaste Razor and shaving cream Reusable water bottle Wet wipes

ENTERTAINMENT

Disposable camera Flashlight (make sure it has new batteries) Pre-addressed and stamped envelopes Journal Pens Drawing pad Family photo Stuffed animal Card games Favorite book

EDUCATIONAL

ARKANSAS GOVERNOR’S SCHOOL

This state-funded six-week program helps high school seniors explore cutting-edge theories in the arts and sciences. Students are challenged to develop creative and intellectual skills that will ready them for their lives beyond high school. Students must fill out an application form, and receive a nomination from their school to attend this program. Ages: High school seniors. Dates and times: June 12-July 23. Cost: Free. Sign up: This program is highly competitive and spots are limited. The application deadline for 2016 has passed; however rising high school juniors should consider now for 2017. Look for application information in the fall at hendrix.edu/ags.

ARKANSAS TEEN COLLEGE

This summer program at Pulaski Technical College will enrich middle school and high school minds with an intensive program taught by college instructors. Classes offered include dance, acting, digital photography, video game design, digital media, art, creative writing and Raspberry Pi. Ages: 11-18. Dates and times: June 11-22; 8 a.m.-noon, or noon-5 p.m. Cost: $50 non-refundable deposit; $200 per week half-day sessions. Sign up: Email cnesmith@pulaskitech.edu. Visit pulaskitech.edu for more information.

FRENCH IN A WEEK!

Learn to speak French in a week at this full-immersion program at Arkansas School for Mathematics, Sciences & Arts. This method, using raps, chants, songs, movement and games, encourages students to learn at a highly accelerated pace. Ages: Rising grades 7-10. Dates and times: June 13–17, 9 a.m.–noon. Cost: $200. Sign up: Visit asmsa.org or call 501-622-5143.

PIONEER CAMP

Discover what life was like in the 1800s at the Historic Arkansas Museum’s day camp. This year’s theme is “Expedition Arkansas,” and interactive activities will help campers learn about early explorers in Arkansas and the plants, animals and rocks they discovered. Campers will learn about botanists, geologists, chemists, ornithologists, illustrators, and writers who traveled to early Arkansas. Ages: Rising grades 3-6. Dates and times: June 13-17 (rising grades 3-4); June 20-24 (rising grades 5-6); 8 a.m.-noon. Cost: $85 for non-members; $65 for museum members. Sign up: Contact Joleen Linson at 501-324-9351, or email joleen@ arkansasheritage.org.

SUMMER LAUREATE UNIVERSITY FOR YOUTH (SLUFY)

SLUFY is an educational program through the University of Arkansas at Little Rock that offers a wide variety of enriching courses in math, science, the arts, social studies, language arts and more. This program is geared for high-ability students, and allows them the opportunity to meet other talented students and form friendships that last long beyond the summer program. Ages: Grades K-8. Dates and times: Monday-Friday, July 11-22; 12:30-5:30 p.m. Cost: $300. Sign up: Applications are available online at ualr.edu, or call 501-569-8757.

ZOOFARI SUMMER CAMP

Learn about the importance of the wetlands that used to cover our state and all the critters that call Arkansas home. This day camp at the Little Rock Zoo is the perfect place for animal-crazy kids. This year’s theme, “Foggy Bog: Wetland Conservation,” is sure to please. Classes are three days long. Ages: 5-7 and 8-10. Dates and times: June 13-15, June 20-22, June 27-29, July 11-13, July 18-20; 9 a.m.-noon. Cost and sign up: Visit littlerockzoo.com. THESAVVYMOMS.COM | MARCH 2016

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NATURE & OUTDOORS

SCIENCE

ARKANSAS 4-H OVERNIGHT CAMPS

4-H STEM CAMP

Campers learn great teambuilding skills at a variety of Arkansas 4-H overnight camps located at the C.A. Vines Arkansas 4-H Center, 10 miles west of Little Rock. Cloverbud Camp is a four-day family overnight camp with a summer Olympics theme for children (ages 5-8) who are accompanied by a guardian. Junior Camp (ages 9-12) offers an independent three-day overnight experience with a fun, competitive summer Olympics theme. Adventure and Challenge Camp (ages 13-19) offers the three-day ExCEL Leadership program, which includes a ropes course, swimming, campfire and other camp activities. Dates and times: July 8-20. Cost: $170. Sign up: Visit arkansas.4honline.com.

CAMP ALDERSGATE

Enjoy a unique overnight experience at Arkansas’s only nonprofit uniquely dedicated to serving kids with special needs and medical conditions. The camp offers traditional summer camp activities such as campfires, singing, canoeing, fishing, arts and crafts, swimming and nature hikes. Ages: Varies by camp session; call for details. Dates and times: June 12-Aug. 5. Cost: Varies by camp session; call for details. Sign up: Call 501-225-1444, or visit campaldersgate.net.

CAMP OZARK

This intensely fun residential camp features one-, twoand three-week sessions. Campers can choose from 150 activities, including crafts, sports, water slides, a water trampoline, fishing and more on the 400-acre grounds in Mt. Ida. Ages: 7-17. Dates and times: May 29-Aug. 6. Cost: $1,795-$4,790 ($225 deposit required with registration). Sign up: Visit campozark.com, or call 870-867-4131 for more information.

CAMP TANAKO

This faith-based overnight camp, nestled on 27 acres just outside Hot Springs, near Lake Catherine State Park, offers a multitude of programs to accommodate new and experienced campers. If it’s your child’s first time camping, consider the Family Camp or Mini Camp to ease them into the experience. Tanako offers a variety of activities, including kayaking, swimming, archery, fishing, arts and crafts, scavenger hunts, sports, worship, hiking and more. Ages: Rising 1-12 grades. Dates and times: June 6-Oct. 8. Cost: $100-$438. Sign up: Visit tanako.org.

FERNCLIFF SUMMER OVERNIGHT CAMP

This popular faith-based camp located just 10 miles west of Little Rock offers more than 30 camp experiences. Ferncliff provides overnight camping programs in an atmosphere of caring and acceptance. Activities include hiking, swimming, canoeing, kayaking, fishing, games, sand volleyball, mountain biking, crafts, worship, campfires and more. Grades: Rising grades 1-12. Dates and times: MondayFriday, June 5-Aug. 5. Cost: $250-$575. Sign up: To register, visit ferncliff.org, or call 501-821-3063.

34 MARCH 2016 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM

Perfect for the technologically inclined student, this overnight camp focuses on the amazing world of robotics. Campers will learn to program robots starting with basic programming skills and work their way up. Completed robots will eventually race and compete. This program is designed to give the techie kid a camp that they will enjoy, and also serve as an introduction for those who like robots but don’t know how to program yet. Ages: 9-14. Dates and times: July 5-7. Cost: $170. Sign up: Visit arkansas.4honline.com, registration deadline is June 15.

AMUSEMENT PARK ENGINEER EXTRAORDINAIRE

This popular day camp at the Museum of Discovery allows children to design and build an amusement park and arcade that are out of this world. Ages: 6-8 and 9-13. Dates and times: June 13-17, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Cost: $275 for members, $300 for non-members. Sign up: Call 501-537-3073, or visit museumofdiscovery.org.

SCIENCE SAMPLER WEEK AT MUSEUM OF DISCOVERY

Can’t decide on just one topic? Then try a science sampler! Each day campers will explore something different. The 2016 topics include: Chef Science, Tinkering Tuesday, Exploring Dinosaurs, The Delight of Flight, and Yarr! Tharr be Pirates! Ages: 6-8 and 9-13. Dates and times: July 25-29, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Cost: $275 for members, $300 for non-members. Sign up: Call 501-537-3073, or visit museumofdiscovery.org.

TECH-RECREATION

This fun technology-based camp will encourage kids to use technology in ways that keep them physically and mentally active! Campers will explore the great outdoors while interacting with awesome apps that teach them about trees, flowers and their natural surroundings. They will also get to stretch their tech muscles even more through learning about robotics with fun and adorable Cubelets robot blocks. Ages: 8-13. Dates and times: July 20-24, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Cost: $175 for members, $200 for non-members. Sign up: Call 501-7673461, or visit midamericamuseum.org.

THRILLS AND SPILLS!

Students go for a wild ride as they study the science of amusement parks at Arkansas School for Mathematics, Sciences & Arts. The adventure begins with classroom exploration of the physics, chemistry and biology behind amusement park rides. They will strive to answer the question, “Why do you feel like you do when riding a rollercoaster?” Then theories will be put to the test as students experience the feelings that were studied on an outing at Magic Springs amusement park. Ages: Rising grades 8-10. Dates and times: June 13-17, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Cost: $400 includes supplies, snacks, lunch and entrance to Magic Springs. Sign up: Visit asmsa.org, or call 501-622-5143.


SPORTS & FITNESS ARKANSAS FOOTBALL CAMPS

These four football camps held in Fayetteville cater to a variety of skill levels, from rising first graders to high school seniors. Each camp allows students to work directly with coaching staff and lower division coaches to improve overall football skills. The Youth Half-Day Camp (grades 1-4) allows young campers to run drills and get autographs from current players. The Football Specialist Camp (grades 9-12) hones in on skills for kickers, punters and long snappers. The Junior High Day Camp (grades 5-8) is a non-padded, skills, technique and fundamentals camp with seven-onseven games by age group. The High School Overnight Camp (grades 9-12) includes seven-on-seven games and weight and instruction training. Shoulder pads and helmet are required. Ages: Rising grades 1-12. Dates and times: June 8-19, times vary. Cost: $55-$330. Sign up: Visit razorbacksfootballcamps.com.

ARKANSAS UNITED SOCCER CAMPS

Your little soccer stars have many options to hone their skills at Arkansas United Soccer Camps. A variety of three-day camp sessions are available for a range of skill levels. These camps are great for those who are just beginning the sport, trying to perfect their goalie skills, or hoping to be selected to attend the National and International West Ham United Academy Camps. Ages: 4-18. Dates and times: May 16-July 30. Cost: Call for pricing. Sign up: Visit arkansasunited.com, or call 501-603-9880.

FIRST TEE OF CENTRAL ARKANSAS SUMMER GOLF CAMP

Get young golfers working on their backswing and developing character at one of the First Tee of Central Arkansas summer golf camps. The First Tee’s mission is to impact the lives of young people by teaching life skills through the great game of golf, and provide affordable access to the game while developing character through golf’s positive values. Young golfers will spend the day at the 9-hole Championship course and 15-acre driving range as they work with pros to develop skills. Ages: 7-17. Dates and times: June 14-17, June 28-July 1, July 12-15, July 26-29, Aug. 9-12, 8:30 a.m.-noon (all camps) Cost: $85 for members, $125 for non-members. Sign up: Visit thefirstteecentralarkansas.org.

GYMNASTICS DAY CAMP

Once school is out, get your kid tumbling through the day at River City Gymnastics. This camp is a fun, activity-filled program with your child’s health and fitness in mind. There is plenty of time to play, tumble, develop gymnastics skills and do arts and crafts at the week-long sessions. Ages: 5-12. Dates and times: June 6-Aug. 12, 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Cost: $145 per week. Sign up: Visit river-city-gymnastics.com.

NIKE BASKETBALL CAMP

This elite, five-day basketball program at Episcopal Collegiate School helps athletes to develop fundamental skills and improve shooting, offensive moves, defense, rebounding, team play and more. Sessions for boys and girls available. Ages: 9-15. Dates and times: June 13-24, Monday-Thursday, 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Friday, 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Cost: $265. Sign up: Visit ussportscamps.com.

ALL YOUR QUESTIONS ARE ANSWERED!

ADVICE FROM A SUMMER CAMP EXPERT

In our quest to learn everything there is to know about summer camps, we came across The Summer Camp Handbook. It is a 270-page paperback that covers important topics like what certificates counselors and instructors should hold; provides checklists for packing; gives tips for visiting day; dos and don’ts on sending care packages; tips on how to handle food allergies; and much more. Author Dr. Chris Thurber answered a few of our burning campfire questions… At what age do you recommend first sending a child to camp? The decision is more about maturity than chronological age. Many children are ready for day camp at 5; overnight camp of a week or more by 8. After settling a first-time camper in, what is the best exit strategy for a parent? As recommended in The Summer Camp Handbook, families should discuss a goodbye plan in the weeks before opening day drop-off. As a general rule, short and sweet is far easier for children than long and conflictual. What are a few things a parent can do to prepare a first time camper for the possibility of homesickness? Discuss the normalcy of missing home; have the child spend practice time away from home (without parents), such as a sleep-over at a friend’s house; never make a pick-up deal. Can you give parents some tips on how to get through missing their child while she/he is away? Enjoy the well-deserved break from full-time parenthood! Oh, and write a few handwritten letters. Care Package 101: If a child is doing a mini-camp (only 2 or 3 nights) is a care package typically expected? What are some of the best care package goodies? Forget care packages, especially at short camps. Sending your child to camp IS showing how much you care. Boys and girls don’t need presents to enjoy camp. What are some important questions you should remember to ask the camp counselor on pick up day? What were my child’s strengths and weaknesses? What were the highlights and challenges of the session? Oh, and remember to tip. Even a few dollars helps buy that pizza on the next night off.

Find The Sumer Camp Handbook at everythingsummercamp.com. THESAVVYMOMS.COM | MARCH 2016

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SAFETY AND AWARENESS ARE KEY TO PREVENT CONCUSSIONS.

HEAD'S UP

The recent spotlight on National Football League concussions puts the focus on child sports safety BY DWAIN HEBDA

J

ustin Hawkins has a lot on his mind when it comes to concussions. As director of coaching for Arkansas United Soccer Club in Little Rock, Hawkins is responsible for implementing coaches’ education that includes how to respond appropriately when a player is injured. Increasingly, that means looking for signs of traumatic head injury. “This has definitely been a very hot topic in soccer over the last year and a half, ” Hawkins said. “We have certain mandates on the ways we can train in practice all the way to the referees association and how they handle things like this in games.” Arkansas United’s safety measures—which include educational components and concussion protocols that parents, coaches and referees are made to learn and abide by—are a sign of the times in youth sports. Thanks to alarming headlines from the pro ranks, specifically football, sports-related concussions have gained more attention on the soccer pitch, basketball court and other fields of play. “A lot of our kids play multiple sports, so if we’re keeping one sport safe we need to keep all sports safe,” Hawkins said. While no sport is completely free of potential injury, concussions included, Hawkins said youth soccer is growing in part due to the perception of a lower threat of head injuries, particularly by parents nervous about football. And while that may be accurate anecdotally, national figures paint a murkier picture. In late 2009, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell was hauled before Congress to answer to former players’ health issues, and by year’s end, the league had admitted concussions may lead to other problems later in life. Over the next three seasons, the nation’s largest youth football organization, Pop Warner, reported a nearly 10 percent drop

36 MARCH 2016 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM

in participation, according to a 2013 investigative piece by ESPN. As additional stories about high school teams struggling to fill rosters began to pop up all over the nation, some speculated the unthinkable was happening in football-mad America. However, The Washington Post reported last year that rumors of the death of tackle football may have been greatly exaggerated. It cited the annual survey by the Sports & Fitness Industry Association which found organized tackle football participation stayed relatively constant, down a mere 4 percent between 2009 and 2013. What’s more, the survey reported youth sports participation in general was down, further suggesting that while football was catching most of the flack, other supposedly non-contact sports were having issues of their own. Such ongoing debate has driven positive changes in youth sports, notes Dr. James Nesmith, medical director of the Arkansas Children’s Hospital Concussion Clinic. “There are certainly studies that have shown an increase in emergency room visits for kids with concussions,” Nesmith said. “That increase has been parallel with the increase in public knowledge; more people are recognizing it and more people are taking kids in to get checked out. “It’s also due to legislation. All states now have youth concussion laws that say pretty much the same thing in that they mandate that someone who is suspected of having a concussion must be evaluated by a health care provider before they return to play.” On the other hand, Nesmith said people who view youth sports as the sole culprit when it comes to kids and concussions aren’t seeing the whole picture. “Concussions don’t just happen in sports; they can occur in any recreational activity,” he said. “Certainly any activity that carries with it a significant risk of fall or hitting something, you’re going to have that possibility." Dr. Brent Masel of Galveston, Texas, national medical director of the Brain Injury Association of America, said parents need to take a balanced, common-sense approach when evaluating risk. “(Concussions happen with) stuff that you and I did when we were children: Falling off the swing, playing with your friends,” he said. “The overwhelming majority of concussions in children are playing-around kinds of sports, not organized sports. But, I wouldn’t let my kids play football. You can’t put your kid in a bubble, but you don’t go out of your way looking for it. Certainly, there are other organized sports where you get the camaraderie and the teamwork and the goal-driven stuff just as easily as opposed to banging your head.” Masel added that much of what the medical community knows about concussions during childhood is still evolving and that the thinking surrounding treatment has taken a dramatic about-face in the last couple of years. “We’re just starting to figure this out; we used to think you put the kid in a dark room and no exposure to anything and give them absolute rest. It turns out that was really a bad idea because the kids go nuts,” he said. “Certainly if they’ve had a concussion it’s not a good idea to just get up and go back to school that day and certainly not to go back and play football. Take a day or two off, not necessarily in a dark room and with no exposure to anything, just hang around the house.”


Also contrary to previous thought, parents should strive to get kids back to school as soon as possible, as most can be cleared to return to class even before they are cleared to return to the field. Then, Masel said, students should be reintegrated until they begin to demonstrate symptoms, then back off and repeat. It’s a strategy that requires a deft touch. “It’s a completely individualized kind of thing and it takes a very involved, educated parent, it takes understanding teachers and understanding coaches.”

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YOUTH CONCUSSIONS: WHAT TO LOOK FOR With the majority of concussions, the person does not lose consciousness and youth may lack the verbal or cognitive skills to tell you what’s happening. Any time a child or youth suffers a fall or collision that includes hitting their head on another person, game equipment or the ground, pay particular attention to the following: IF THE ATHLETES FEELS: • Headache or “pressure” in head • Nausea or vomiting • Balance problems or dizziness • Double or blurry vision • Sensitivity to light • Sensitivity to noise • Feeling sluggish, hazy, foggy or groggy • Concentration or memory problems • Confusion • Just not “feeling right” or is “feeling down”

SWIMMING • CANOEING • ARCHERY ROCK CLIMBING • HIKING • ARTS & CRAFTS

Campers ages 7-15 • June 13-August 5 Outdoor Adventures • Creativity Camp • Teen Camp Makers Camp • Natural State of Science Sports of all Sorts • Science in Action • CSI/Mystery Wilderness Skills • Greatest Hits

www.uaex.edu/daycamp For more info contact Mike Simmons: (501)821.6884 or daycamp@uaex.edu or go to Arkansas4HCenter.org

The Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service is an equal opportunity/equal access/affirmative action institution. If you require a reasonable accommodation to participate or need materials in another format, please contact the Arkansas 4-H Center as soon as possible. Dial 711 for Arkansas Relay.

IF YOU OBSERVE THE ATHLETE: • Appears dazed or stunned • Is confused about assignment or position • Forgets an instruction • Is unsure of game, score or opponent • Moves clumsily • Answers questions slowly • Loses consciousness (even briefly) • Shows mood, behavior or personality changes • Can’t recall events prior to hit or fall • Can’t recall events after hit or fall CONCUSSION DANGER SIGNS: An athlete should receive immediate medical attention if after a bump, blow or jolt to the head or body if she or he exhibits any of the following danger signs: • One pupil larger than the other • Is drowsy or cannot be awakened • A headache that gets worse • Weakness, numbness or decreased coordination • Repeated vomiting or nausea • Slurred speech • Convulsions or seizures • Cannot recognize people or places • Becomes increasingly confused, restless or agitated • Has unusual behavior • Loses consciousness; even a brief loss of consciousness should be taken seriously Source: US Youth Soccer “Heads Up” Program & Centers for Disease Control THESAVVYMOMS.COM | MARCH 2016

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"I ALWAYS CARRY PAPER AND COLORFUL PENS AND PENCILS TO JOURNAL, DRAW AND WRITE NOTES TO MY FRIENDS."

YOU HAVE TO HAVE A FLASHLIGHT AT CAMP! ESPECIALLY AFTER STAYING UP LATE AND TELLING GHOST STORIES.

I TRADE SHOPKINS WITH MY FRIENDS

I GOTTA KNOW WHAT TIME ARCHERY STARTS!

I PLAN TO SEND LETTERS BACK HOME TO TELL MY FAMILY ABOUT ALL THE GREAT THINGS AT CAMP.

"I LIKE TO USE COLORFUL THREAD TO MAKE FRIENDSHIP BRACELETS."

LILLA GORDY, SECOND GRADER, ONE-TIME OVERNIGHT CAMPER.

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MARCH 2016 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM

38 MARCH 2016 | THESAVVYMOMS.COM

PHOTOGRAPHY: LILY DARRAGH/STYLING: MANDY KEENER

MY

FA V

SH AD ES !

Bag Check with LILLA GORDY


Call TODAY. We can help. Confidential Assessments Callavailable TODAY. We can help. 24/7 at no charge Confidential Assessments available 24/7 at no charge

The Joint Commission Top Performer on Key Quality Measures 2013

The Joint Commission Top Performer on Key Quality Measures 2013

1-800-264-5640 www.rivendellofarkansas.com 1-800-264-5640

www.rivendellofarkansas.com Most insurances accepted including Medicare,

Tricare, BCBS, UBH, Ambetter and Private Option.

Most insurances accepted including Medicare,


Meet Buddy from “Dinosaur Train” Monday, March 21, and Curious George and The Man with the Yellow Hat Tuesday, March 22 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.

500 President Clinton Ave

Little Rock, AR 72201

www.museumofdiscovery.org

501.396.7050

Savvy March 2016