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THE MANY FACES OF ARKANSAS NURSING

Special Advertising Supplement of the Arkansas Times


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and comforting heart. That is why we are Arkansans’ choice for their health care needs. We have a variety of nursing opportunities, from a Level III NICU to a 90-bed Critical Care area. Baptist Health offers top quality benefits for employees. We look for nurses who think critically and are compassionate and service-oriented. We want to offer a “World Class” environment for everyone. Please apply online at baptist-health.com.

nursing informatics and much more! To learn more about a rewarding career serving as a Champion for Children, visit www.archildrens.org or call us at (501) 364-1398

MEET THE SCHOOL & HOSPITAL RECRUITERS

Left to Right: Rachel VanVeckhoven, Recruitment Specialist and Ava Coleman, Assistant Director of Student Enrollment

Tachia Awbrey, MS., (left) BSN Education Counselor and Amanda Abramovitz, MA, (right) RN to BSN, MSN, BSN to DNP and Post Master’s DNP Education Counselor

Gigi Flory, Nursing Recruiter Gigi Flory

Nursing Recruiter UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS Jefferson Regional Medical Center, Pine Bluff JEFFERSON REGIONAL SCHOOL FOR MEDICAL Jefferson RegionalMedical Medical Center serves Jefferson Regional Center serves a Terri McKown SCIENCES a 10-county area, so our nurses must be Brenda Trigg, DNP, GNP, RN, CNE 10-county area, so our nurses must be prepared Arkansas Tech University (ATU) Department of UCA SCHOOL OF NURSING prepared for a busy and diverse patient Director of Nursing UAMS is the only health science center in

offers many options to acquire nursing for a busy and diverse patient base. From base. From neurology to cardiology, from neuOuachita Baptistlargest. University,It The UniversityNursing of Central Arkansas, School Arkansas and one of the region’s licensure. We work with you and for you to surgery to orthopaedics, JRMC has aorthopaemedical rology to cardiology, from surgery to Arkadelphia of Nursing is committed to educating students includes five colleges (Nursing, Medicine, achieve the career choice you desire. From Listaff that 25 different specialties, Our innovative dual degree RN-to-BSN prodics, JRMC hasrepresents a medical staff that represents at the undergraduate and graduate levels asAssociate censed Practical Nursing (LPN) or an Pharmacy, Health Professions and Public so our program offersso many different nursing gram pairs the strengths of Ouachita Baptist 25 different specialties, our program offers Degree in Nursing (ADN) at our sister camleaders in the delivery of quality health care Health) and a graduateUniversity school with along with a of Baptist Health opportunities for our staff to experience. We the strengths many different nursing opportunities pus in Ozark, to a pre-licensure Bachelor of the advancement of the nursing profession. pride ourselves on patient-centered carefor andour a College Little Rock.centers, Ouachita isand a nationalhospital, statewide network of regional Science in Nursing (BSN) Registered Nursing staff to family experience. Weamong prideour ourselves onand paatmosphere employees, ly-ranked liberal arts college founded in 1886 We offer both online and on-campus programs affiliations with Arkansas Children’s Hospital (RN) degree in Russellville. Want more? We we go thecare extra and mile toahelp our nurses be the tient-centered family atmosphere a mission Healthcare of fostering a love God and to ofaccommodate needs of for ourworking diverse and Central Arkansas with Veterans offerthe bridge programs men and best they can be. JRMC provides competitive a love of learning. And Baptist Health College among our employees, and we go the extra populations: the on-campus BSN, online women to achieve a higher level of educaSystem, and seven UAMS institutes whereleader in health additional compenLittle Rock is a recognized mile to pay helpand ourbenefits, nursesincluding be the best they can be. tion: LPN to BSN at our Russellville campus, completion program RN to BSN, the online clinical, academic and research resources are sation for nurses with advanced degrees, and care education since 1920 and an integral pay and for benefits, or our ADNas to BSN ComePost tour ourJRMC Sim- provides a six-monthcompetitive nurse residency program nurses MSN wellonline. as the part oforBaptist Health, the healthNurse care Educator, focused on specific diseases conditions. Thelargest Labs—we have SimMom, SimNewB, including additional nurses just out of school. compensation Your success is ourfor success, system in Arkansas. Learn howMaster’s you can earn Doctor ulation of Nursing Practice (DNP) and UAMS College of Nursing provides bachelor’s, SimBaby, SimMan, multiple Nurse Anne’s,with and advanced and it all benefits our and patients, who are thenurse degrees, a six-month two degrees (AAS & BSN) in 4BSN obu. (Family Practitioner). Doctor master’s (MNSc), Doctor of Nursing Practice yearstoat DNP much Nurse more! ATU’s nursing faculty are experts reason we are for all innurses the health edu/nursing or call (870) 245-5110. residency program justcare out profesof school. (DNP) students mustand come in their field adding breadth depth to both (DNP), and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) of Nursing Practice sion. If you’re interested in a nursing career at Your success is our success, and it all benefits your classroom and clinical education. Come to campus for a few planned events. Whether JRMC, contact me at florygi@jrmc.org. programs to more than 800 students. There join usfor at ATU...where “Everycollege Student Counts.” our patients, who are the reason we are all in 9/24/18 5:07 PM the traditional are online programs to help existing RNs earn students are looking the health care profession. If you’re interested their BSN or MNSc. The college is engaged experience or to advance their current degree, in a nursing career at JRMC, contact me at floUCA School of Nursing is an affordable and in activities and interprofessional partnerships 9/24/18 5:07 PM rygi@jrmc.org. 9/24/18 5:07 PM high quality option. For more information, across all UAMS colleges that promote scholarly excellence, research and service to please visit www.uca.edu/nursing. 9/24/18 5:07 PM the university nursing profession and society. Recruiting for UAMS College of Nursing is more than informing the prospective student about our programs. It is about introducing them to a career field that allows them to be lifelong learners and caregivers. We do more than just educate nursing students, we prepare them to care for the total patient and their families. For more information on our programs, contact us at 501-686-5224, by email at conadmissions@ uams.edu or visit our website at www.nursing.uams.edu. CHI ST. VINCENT CHI St. Vincent Infirmary is Arkansas’s first hospital to achieve Magnet status for ON THE COVER: professional nursing practice. As a health TOP ROW, Left to Right: Tabitha Kamau, CHI ST. VINCENT system with facilities located throughout the Debbie Fields, Pinnacle Pointe Hospital state, our focus is the health and well-being of Tonya Freeman, Senior Jessica Cedillo, Steffan Lewis, UAMS CON, Nurse Arkansans. We have served Arkansas since Recruiter Recruiter Anesthesia, Second year student 1888 with a history of many firsts and numerous awards for patient care. When you join CHI St. SECOND ROW, Left to Right: Vincent you will enjoy the career you deserve, Jennifer Phan, CHI St. Vincent the quality of life you’ve been looking for, the Dr. Josuanne Nduku, UA Little Rock School joy of serving in our ministry, a comprehensive of Nursing benefits package for you and your family, Alexa Cash, CHI St. Vincent continued education opportunities, and much BOTTOM ROW, Left to Right: more! Sign-on bonuses and NEW higher pay Jonathan Stevenson, UAMS CON, Nurse for all RNs + increased pay for clinical ladder! Anesthesia, First year student To join our team of health care heroes, see more Dr. Colton McCance, DNP, UAMS CON Brandy Shell, Senior Samantha McClard, info at chistvincent.com/nurses. Clinical Instructor Recruiter Recruiter Rani Simpson, Graduate from National Park College, Travel RN Nurse

2 OCTOBER 2021

ARKANSAS TIMES

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Arkansans’ choice for their health care needs. We have a variety of nursing opportunities, from a Level III NICU to a 90-bed Critical Care area. Baptist Health offers top quality benefits for employees. We look for nurses who think critically and are compassionate and service-oriented. We want to offer a “World Class” environment for everyone. Please apply online at baptist-health.com.

Janice Ivers, MSN, RN, CNE Dean of Nursing & Health Sciences

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Brenda Trigg, DNP, GNP, RN, CNE NATIONAL Director of Nursing PARK COLLEGE NationalBaptist Park University, College is in the business of Ouachita changing lives, one student at a time! Choosing Arkadelphia nursing as a career change the trajectory Our innovative dualcan degree RN-to-BSN pro- of an individual’s life as well as their family’s lives. gram pairs the strengths of Ouachita Baptist We offer awith Practical Nursing and a University the strengths of program Baptist Health Registered Nursing program with a traditional College Little Rock. Ouachita is a nationaltrack, as well as arts LPNcollege to RN founded options. in National ly-ranked liberal 1886 Park College nursing programs have offered an with a mission of fostering a love of God and Associate of Science in Baptist Nursing degree since a love of learning. And Health College 1976 and is aa Practical Nursing Certificate Little Rock recognized leader in healthsince 1958. Whethersince you just graduated from high care education 1920 and an integral school or are changing careers, National Park part of Baptist Health, the largest health care College help you meethow your goals. Applisystem incan Arkansas. Learn you can earn cation period(AAS for & traditional two degrees BSN) in 4entry yearsbegins at obu.in January and or runs the first Monday in edu/nursing callthrough (870) 245-5110. March for fall admission. Please go to www. np.edu for more detailed admissions information. We would love to meet with you and get you on the path to meeting your education and career goals. For more information on our programs please contact the Division of Nursing at (501) 760-4290 or email at jivers@np.edu. At National Park College, student success is our focus!

Janice Ivers, MSN, RN, CNE Dean of Nursing & Health Sciences National Park College National Park College is in the business of changing lives, one student at a tim Choosing nursing as a career can change the trajectory of an individual’s life well as their family’s lives. We offer a Practical Nursing program and a Regist Nursing program with a traditional track, as well as LPN to RN options. Natio Park College nursing programs have offered an Associate of Science in Nursin degree since 1976 and a Practical Nursing Certificate since 1958. Whether y just graduated from high school or are changing careers, National Park Colleg can help you meet your goals. Application period for traditional entry begins i January and runs through the first Monday in March for fall admission. Please to our website www.np.edu for more detailed admissions information. We wo Gigi Left toFlory Right: Lindsay Blitz, MSN, RN,education TNCC love to meet with you and get you on the path to meeting your and Recruiterand Susan Erickson, MNSc, -Nursing Nurse Recruiter career goals. For more information on our programs please contact the Divisio Jefferson Regional Pine Bluff RN, BC-NA, CHCR Medical - Senior Center, Nurse Recruiting Terri McKown,atDNP, APRN, FNP-BC Jefferson Regional MedicalAt Center serves Park Colle Nursing (501) 760-4290 or email at jivers@np.edu. National Manager Terri McKown Professor Nursing, Assistant Head a 10-county area, soUAMS our nurses must be studentof success is (ATU) our focus! Arkansas Tech University Department of prepared for a busy and diverse patient Nursing offers many options to acquire nursing ARKANSAS licensure. We workTECH with youUNIVERSITY and for you to Arkansas Tech University Department achieve the career choice you(ATU) desire. From Liof Nursing offers many options to acquire nurscensed Practical Nursing (LPN) or an Associate ing licensure. We work with and for you to Degree in Nursing (ADN) at you our sister camachieve the career choice you desire. From pus in Ozark, to a pre-licensure Bachelor of Licensed Nursing or an Nursing Associate SciencePractical in Nursing (BSN)(LPN) Registered Degree in Nursing (ADN) atWant our sister campus (RN) degree in Russellville. more? We in Ozark, to a pre-licensure Science offer bridge programs forBachelor working of men and in Nursing (BSN) Registered women to achieve a higherNursing level of(RN) degree educain Russellville. Want We offercampus, bridge protion: LPN to BSN at more? our Russellville grams for working nurses to achieve higher or our ADN to BSN online. Come tour aour Simlevel of Labs—we education:have LPNSimMom, to BSN at our Russellulation SimNewB, ville campus, or our ADN to Nurse BSN online. SimBaby, SimMan, multiple Anne’s,Come and tour Simulation Labs—we have muchour more! ATU’s nursing faculty are SimMom, experts SimNewB, SimMan, in their fieldSimBaby, adding breadth andmultiple depth toNurse both Anne’s, and much ATU’s nursingCome faculty your classroom andmore! clinical education. are in their fields adding breadth and join experts us at ATU...where “Every Student Counts.” depth to both your classroom and clinical education. Come join us at ATU...where “Every Student Counts”.

Whether just graduated, pursuing a second base. or From neurology cardiology, fromnurscareer looking for a to new work family, surgery to orthopaedics, JRMC has a medical es have a servant’s heart, providing care and staff that represents different specialties, compassion to those25 who need healing. That’s so our program offers many different nursingfor why nurses are the heart of UAMS, caring opportunities for our staff to experience. We patients and their families each and every day pride ourselves on patient-centered care and a to provide the very best health care with our familyofatmosphere among ourTeam employees, team providers. By joining UAMS, and you we go mileexperience to help our of nurses be thein will getthe theextra unique working beststate’s they can JRMC provides the onlybe.academic medicalcompetitive center that pay and benefits, including additional compenalso supports a culture of nursing excellence sation forcareer nursesadvancement, with advancedprofessional degrees, and through dea six-month and nurserecognition residency program for nurses velopment, – the best place justpractice out of school. Your success is ourimmediate success, to nursing. You and your and it all benefits our patients, who are the disfamily can also enjoy a generous tuition reasonofwe all inthroughout the health care profescount up are to 50% the UA System. sion. If you’re interested in salary a nursing at In addition to competitive andcareer benefits, JRMC, contact me at florygi@jrmc.org. including 11 paid holidays with separate sick and vacation accruals, UAMS provides up to a 10% percent match to retirement savings – five times what many employers offer. To join the more than 11,000 people who have made a career for life, log onto: nurses.uams.edu or join our Facebook/Instagram pages by searching UAMSNurses!

UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS LITTLE ROCK SCHOOL OF NURSING

2021 NURSES GUIDE PUBLISHER

ALAN LEVERITT

NURSES GUIDE EDITOR DWAIN HEBDA

DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING PHYLLIS A. BRITTON

Belinda Nix, Academic Counselor

For over 50 years, the UA Little Rock Department of Nursing has inspired and guided individuals toward the dynamic profession of nursing. Our faculty and staff are dedicated to improving the health care of all Arkansans by educating professional, thoughtful and compassionate nurses. We offer an Associate of Applied Science (AAS), BSN, LNP/ Paramedic to RN and online BSN completion program. Our advice for students is to take ownership and get as much information as possible about the nursing profession and degree options. Don’t be afraid to ask questions. Do this early and often! Visit: www.ualr.edu/nursing or email bknix@ualr.edu for additional information.

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

BROOKE WALLACE, LEE MAJOR, TERRELL JACOB, KAITLYN LOONEY

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OCTOBER 2021 3


E SCHOOLMEET & HOSPITAL RECRUITERS THE SCHOOL & HOSPITAL RECRUITERS BAXTER REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER

In 2021, Baxter Regional Medical Center, located in beautiful Mountain Home, became the first Magnet® hospital in northern Arkansas and southern Missouri and was named by Modern Healthcare and Arkansas Business as one of the Best Places to Work. Baxter Regional is a place our nurses and staff call home; we are family! Our CNO believes in servant leadership, and shared governance ensures that our nurses have a voice in their practice. Join the Baxter Regional Family to see for yourself! You’ll fall in love with the Ozarks, our lakes and rivers, and most of all, our hospital and culture. Visit www. workwhereyouvacation.com or contact Kim Beavers, Recruiter, at kbeavers@baxterregional.org or (870) 5081070 for more information.

Kim Beavers, Recruiter Jennifer Yarberry, Chief Nursing Officer Belinda Nix Jennifer Yarberry PINNACLE POINTE BEHAVIORAL Academic Counselor Chief Nursing Officer SYSTEMSystem, UA Little Rock PinnacleHEALTHCARE Pointe Behavioral Healthcare Pinnacle Little Rock Pointe Behavioral Healthcare Sys- For over 50 years, the UA Little Rock Departare Pinnacle Pointe Behavioral Healthcare System a ment of Nursing has inspired and guided tem is committed to consistently delivering e high is committed to consistently delivering a system system of quality behavioral health care with individuals toward the dynamic profession of ces. of qualitytobehavioral health care with in integintegrity children and adolescents concert nursing. Our faculty and staff are dedicated to merrity totheir children and adolescents concert and improving the health care of all Arkansans by with parents, caregivers, in guardians care educating professional, thoughtful and comwith their parents, caregivers, and community professionals. The guardians team at Pinnacle s. In offer Word, an Associate of community professionals. The team atand PinnaPointe Hospital is both passionate highly passionate nurses. WeAlishia Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System ees BSN, Gaston, LNP/Paramedic cle Pointe Hospital both passionate experienced. Our isdedication to theand highest Applied Science (AAS), Amanda Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System heir completion highly experienced. Our dedication thepresti- to RN and online BSNAnna standard of quality helped us attaintothe Williams,program. University of Arkansas at Little Rock been is to take ownership highestGovernor’s standard ofQuality qualityAchievement helped us attain the Our advice for students gious Award. Chad Moore, Veterans Healthcare System of the Ozarks Work as possible about prestigious Achievement This awardGovernor’s recognizesQuality Pinnacle Pointe Hospi- and get as much information Colby Ross, Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System Work and degree options. Award. This award recognizes Pinnacle tal’s commitment and practice of qualityPointe princi- the nursing professionColton McCance, University We are Don’t be afraid to ask questions. Do this early of Arkansas for Medical Sciences- College of Nursing Hospital’s commitment and practice quality ples through a thorough process of of excellence. Cortney Threat, Central ers who Visit and often! Visit: www.ualr.edu/nursing or Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System principles throughtoaapply: thorough process of our website pinnaclepointehospiRiddle,informaMagnolia Regional Medical Center re. We tal.com/career-opportunities/ email bknix@ualr.edu Courtney for additional excellence. Visit our website to apply: pinnaCristena Cook , Arkansas Air Ambulance n can tion. clepointehospital.com/career-opportunities/ Crystal Rose, University of Arkansas at Little Rock with Deborah Hutts, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences portuAshley Davis, MNSc, RN, PhD(c) e also Fairah Solomon, University of Arkansas at Little Rock Executive Director ailable FarrenInc. Moore, University of Arkansas at Little Rock Arkansas Center for Nursing, Care, Howard, The Arkansas Center forFiona Nursing wasUnited startedHealthcare nd James Braxton Yeager, Mission Family Practice by a grant from the Robert Wood Johnson oin Janine Randles, Foundation in 2011 in response to theCentral recom-Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System it our Jennifer Shuler, Department of Human Services mendations that were published in the Arkansas Institute of ou Medicine’s “Future of Nursing” report. TheUniversity ACN Joanna Rostad-Hall, of Arkansas at Little Rock llani@ was established to promote a culture of health JoLeigh Davidson, Conwayfor Regional Health System 8. the citizens of Arkansas Kaitlin by advancing nursing Stringfellow, Hospice Home Care education, practice, and workforce Dustin Evans Recruiter, , RecruiterConway - North Little Rock, *use same photoleadership Katelin Whiddon, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Ken Duncan, development. CAN offers several different lead-Children’s Hospital Conway, regionalRecruiter, facilities Manager Kristan Cooper, Arkansas Joni Stephenson, training in MSN working toward third their Joni Stephenson, ManagerLittle Rock Hospitals ership Michelle S. programs Odom, RN, fromTech left) University April Robinson, Recruiter, Kristin Jaye(pictured, Henderson, Arkansas mission to empower and equip the current and April Robinson, Recruiter, Little Rock Hospitals Director of Recruitment and Retention Whitney Brewer, Recruiter, Krystal Goodwin, Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System- North Little Rock future nursing Children’s workforce,Hospital, includingLittle the 40 Nurse Whitney Brewer, Recruiter Arkansas Rock North Little Rock Hospital Lakeisha Falls, University of Arkansas at Little Rock Leaders Under 40 award program and the BSN Children are at the center of everything we do.Regional Arkansas Children’s Kelli Hopkins, Recruiter, Regional Lauren Elliottmember, North Arkansas Medical Centeris the only hospital Young Leaders program. Individual system in the state solely dedicated to caring for children, which allows our organizaBAPTIST HEALTH MEDICAL Hospitals (not pictured) Utley,membership Arkansas Children’s Hospital shiption of ACN is free.shape YouLoren can to uniquely thefind landscape of pediatric care in Arkansas. As Champions for CENTER Baptist Health Medical Center Mallory Brown, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences information, as well as information regarding Children, Arkansas Children’s Hospital has joined the elite 6 percent of hospitals in the Our belief at Baptist Health is that we aare Our belief at Baptist Health is that we are Mark Foster, Arkansas State University ACN programs and workforce reports, on their world that have Magnet Status. Arkansas Children’s offers a wide range of opportua healing ministry. provide quality patient healing ministry. WeWe provide quality patient Olivia Cox, Baptist Health Center – Little Rock administration, website, www.arcenterfornursing.org. nities for nurses, from direct patient care toMedical staff education, research, care services servicestotoall allArkansans Arkansanswith witha a caring care caring System Patrick Blaylock, Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare nursing informatics and much more! To learn more about a rewarding career serving and comforting comforting heart. heart. That That isiswhy whywe weare are Arand Philip Prousnitzer, Baptist Health Medical Center Little Rock 364-1398 as a Champion for Children, visit www.archildrens.org or call us at (501) kansans’ choice Arkansans’ choicefor fortheir their health health care care needs. Sara Damron, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences We have haveaavariety varietyofof nursing opportunities, We nursing opportunities, Sarah Goodhart, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences from aaLevel LevelIII III NICU a 90-bed Critical from NICU to ato90-bed Critical Care Sarah Holland, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Care area. top quality area. BaptistBaptist HealthHealth offersoffers top quality bene-beSherrie Searcy, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences ne-fits employees. for nurses fits for for employees. WeWe looklook for nurses whowho Taylor Chapman, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences think critically criticallyand andareare compassionate think compassionate andand Teresa Dukes Scott, Baptist Health College Little Rock service-oriented. We We want wanttotooffer offera a“World “World service-oriented. Class” environment environmentfor foreveryone. everyone.Please Pleaseapply apTierra Donson, Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System Class” ply online at baptisthealthcareers.com. Veronica Taubert, Baptist Health Medical Center - Fort Smith online at baptist-health.com.

2021 40 Nurse Leaders Under 40

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MEET THE SCHOOL & HOSPITAL RECRUITERS

4 OCTOBER 2021

ARKANSAS TIMES

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Brenda Trigg, DNP, GNP, RN, CNE Director of Nursing

OUACHITA BAPTIST UNIVERSITY keeping with Ouachita’s BrendaInTrigg, DNP, GNP, RN,commitment CNE to answering nationwide calls for innovation in nursDirector of Nursing ing education, the university offers two degree Ouachita tracksBaptist and hasUniversity, received prerequisite approval Arkadelphia from the Arkansas State Board of Nursing to establish a third: 4-year, residential BSN proproOur innovative duala degree RN-to-BSN gram. Through our distinctive RN-to-BSN dual gram pairs the strengths of Ouachita Baptist enrollment completion program in partnership University with the strengths Baptist Health with Baptist Health College of in Little Rock, you College Ouachita is aBSN) nationalcanLittle earn Rock. two degrees (AAS and in four yearsliberal with thearts option of adding a BA inininterly-ranked college founded 1886 missions, Spanish or biology with only with anational mission of fostering a love of God and one additional year of study. Our 100% online a lovedegree of learning. And Baptist Health College track offers licensed Registered Nurses with no a program Little Rock is arestrictions recognized leaderforinearning healtha BSN in 9-12since months. Pending approvcare education 1920 and initial an integral al from the Arkansas State Board of Nursing, part ofOuachita Baptistwill Health, the largest health care launch the 4-year residential BSN systemprogram in Arkansas. Learn you and canopen earn in the Fall 2022how semester new state-of-the-art, high-fidelity two degrees (AAS & BSN) in 4 simulation years at and obu. teaching or center. how one of Ouachita’s edu/nursing call Learn (870) 245-5110. nursing degree tracks can meet your educational goals at obu.edu/nursing or by calling (870) 245-5110.

Terri McKown Arkansas Tech University (ATU) Department of Nursing offers many options to acquire nursing licensure. We work with you and for you to achieve the career choice you desire. From Licensed Practical Nursing (LPN) or an Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN) at our sister campus in Ozark, to a pre-licensure Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) Registered Nursing (RN) degree in Russellville. Want more? We offer bridge programs for working men and women to achieve a higher level of education: LPN to BSN at our Russellville campus, or our ADN to BSN online. Come tour our Simulation Labs—we have SimMom, SimNewB, SimBaby, SimMan, multiple Nurse Anne’s, and much more! ATU’s nursing faculty are experts in their field adding breadth and depth to both your classroom and clinical education. Come join us at ATU...where “Every Student Counts.”

Gigi Flory Nursing Recruiter Jefferson Regional Medical Ce Jefferson Regional Medical Ce a 10-county area, so our nurs prepared for a busy and dive base. From neurology to card surgery to orthopaedics, JRMC staff that represents 25 differe so our program offers many d opportunities for our staff to e pride ourselves on patient-cen family atmosphere among our we go the extra mile to help o best they can be. JRMC prov pay and benefits, including ad sation for nurses with advance a six-month nurse residency p just out of school. Your succes and it all benefits our patients reason we are all in the health sion. If you’re interested in a n JRMC, contact me at florygi@

Peggy Henderson, Director of Nursing

METHODIST FAMILY HEALTH

Methodist Family Health is a statewide continuum of care for Arkansas children and their families who are abandoned, abused, neglected, and struggling with psychiatric, behavioral, emotional, and spiritual issues. We have immediate openings for nurses who love children and want to see them thrive. We offer full-time, part-time, and contract positions; signon, retention, and Christmas bonuses; tuition assistance; public service loan forgiveness; a complete suite of insurance; 401(k) with match; telemedicine for outpatient programs, generous personal time off (PTO); a $300 bonus for proof of COVID-19 vaccination, and much more. Visit MethodistFamily.org and click on Careers for more information and to apply. Special Advertising Section

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OCTOBER 2021 5


Alan Bandala, nursing student at UCA, prepares for an exam.

UCA/ SETH FOLEY, UCA PHOTOGRAPHER

THREE REASONS TO BECOME A NURSE

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ursing is one of the most time-honored and important jobs in American society. In times ordinary and extraordinary, at the point of birth to the moment of death, nurses have without fail answered the call to serve patients. Nursing is also one of the toughest and most demanding profession there is physically, academically, mentally and emotionally. It’s always been that way; nursing takes everything you have to give and demands that you come back the next day for more. There have been few times in American history where the nurse is more important — or more needed — than today. Demand is everywhere and opportunities have never been greater, but then, so have the stakes. Here are three reasons why the world needs nurses — needs YOU — now more than ever: 1. The pandemic. Nurses have been the first line of defense against COVID and continue to stand toe-totoe with the greatest medical foe humanity has seen in generations. But time in the trenches is taking its toll and many nurses are worn down enough to consider leaving the profession, a particularly dire statistic considering how deep the shortage was before the world had even heard of COVID. Yet, above the fatigue and mental duress, nurses’ pride shines through as they fight the greatest battle of their professional lives. “I’ve been so impressed by the way our nursing staff has performed,” said Ron Peterson, CEO of Baxter Regional Medical Center in Mountain Home. “It’s been a roller coaster over the past 18 months with ups and downs and so many days we switched directions on a dime. I think of the word ‘resilience’ when I think about our team; at first nobody understood the impact the pandemic would have and it’s amazing to look back and see how we learned to adapt

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ARKANSAS TIMES

and move forward. “I think, and I hope, that this experience will inspire more individuals to get into health care. I go to orientation every other week and I welcome people to our hospital family and hear their stories for going into nursing, and they all come down to helping people. I think the pandemic will continue to bring the cream to the top and get more people interested in health careers.” 2. There’s room for everyone There was a time when nurses looked as identical as the starched uniforms they wore, but that’s no longer the case. Nursing has evolved to welcome everyone to the profession; right here in Arkansas you can find male and female nurses of all ages, backgrounds, national origins, sexual orientations, family backgrounds, religions and native languages. It’s a stunning display of diversity and the profession has been the better for it. “Society itself is diverse,” said Hauwa Anda, a native Nigerian who works on the Stem Cell Transplant Unit at the UAMS Medical Center. “America is a country of immigrants and there are many different people from different backgrounds. That is the beauty of this country. And in health care, when you see that kind of diversity in the workforce, it is good. It helps you identify with the needs of the different populations that we serve.” Anda said diversity not only benefits patients, but the work environment itself as teams learn from many different perspectives at work. “You can’t say that there are no differences, because even in your family, people have different perspectives,” she said. “As a team, we learn from our different backgrounds and we provide better care and are more sensitive about people as a result. We also have a culture of mutual respect and admiration for one another because of the supportive climate that Special Advertising Section

UAMS has provided. I think that’s what makes it really a great career and a really great place to work.” 3. You’re Needed Now, More Than Ever We get it; headlines today are scary. Tales from the hospital ward are enough to make anyone think twice about entering the health care field. There’s no way to sugar-coat the demands of the job, but there’s also no way to overstate the personal and professional satisfaction that being a healer and a comfort to the sick gives you. Nursing will demand your best and pull out of you a courage and heroism that you may not know is there. And that, says Marcie Trice with CHI St. Vincent, is a journey worth taking. “I never thought that I would be able to do something like nursing because growing up, blood grossed me out, needles grossed me out,” she said. “But after taking care of my grandmother, I gave myself a pat on the back and I was like, ‘You know what, Marcie? You can do this.’” Trice’s path was a long one, especially after she failed her first semester of nursing school. The grit that made her try again, this time succeeding, is something she’s drawn on often in her career. “I think of it like ‘Finding Nemo,’” she said. “When I feel myself drowning, and we can drown a lot here at the hospital, I just think about Dory. Just keep swimming, just keep swimming. I find myself saying that every week, just keep swimming, because things can get hectic here in the nursing world. “If this is something that you are certain you want to do, if you care about others around you, nursing is for you. Especially right now during the pandemic, you have to be very compassionate, you have to make sure your heart is truly there. And if your heart is truly there, I say go for it.”


HERO SPOTLIGHT

TOSHA APPLEGATE

Nurse Practitioner Baxter Regional Medical Center

The Mountain Home native has become a COVID specialist over the past 18 months. In the early days of the pandemic, she volunteered to assist in New York City, and today she works in the infusion department at BRMC, treating COVID patients with a life-saving procedure. What made you want to go to New York last year? I was feeling a calling and an urge to do something more than what I was doing. One night, I was on Facebook and it was late. I just happened to see a post someone shared in one of the nurse practitioner groups about these opportunities in New York. The next day, I talked to my husband and it all went from there. It all happened really fast. What was the experience like? None of us really knew what to expect. We walked in and the chief nurse came in and said, “OK, we’re going to have a crash-course orientation.” It was quick and dirty and we

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were off. Things were definitely shocking. They had five ICU units opened at that time, where they would normally have just one. People are dying left and right. They had trailer trucks outside that were makeshift morgues. I remember some of the night shifters were getting off and one guy walked by and said, “Good luck. It’s hell in there.” How did it change you as a nurse? When I came back to Arkansas, everybody already knew the treatments in theory. But because I’d seen it first-person how to do this and how not to do that, I could come in and say, “Well here, this is what we were doing there.” I saw every part of what was going on and so I could offer my expertise. As far as personally, I knew I’d lived through a war-zone situation. That definitely made me more confident that I could step out into any situation and I could go do anything that I put my mind to.

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HOW TO BE THE MVP

The Nurse’s Guide to Crushing It at School and Work.

MOVING FROM JOB TO CAREER In an emotionally charged industry such as nursing, it can be hard to keep one’s eye on the big picture. Despite best efforts, outcomes are sometimes not positive ones. Diagnoses are sometimes bad, patients sometimes die, families always grieve. Nurses are often the only health care workers who are in the mid8 OCTOBER 2021

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Collaboration is a big part of UCA nursing students’ education.

UCA/ SETH FOLEY, UCA PHOTOGRAPHER

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t’s not easy being the best at something, especially something with as many moving parts as nursing. From the classroom to the clinic and the first job through your dream job, nurses have to exercise many muscles to be successful. Arkansas Times Nurses Guide asked nursing professionals for their best advice for nurses at every stage of their education and career, on how to be a Most Valuable Player in the field. Whether you are just starting your journey or have been in the game for some time, this is the information you need to make the most of an exciting and rewarding career. , THE STUDENT Nursing school is one of the most rigorous and challenging academic fields there is, demanding your best in the classroom and other learning environments. Standing out takes dedication, time management and the perseverance to see things through. And nurses can begin to develop these good habits before they ever set foot inside a college classroom. In fact, as Pamela Ashcraft, professor at the University of Central Arkansas notes, high school is the ideal time to lay the groundwork for later success. “Being organized, taking care of yourself and learning how to study are all important to your future success in college and nursing school,” she said. “It is also important to start exploring the requirements for nursing school. Meet with an academic adviser to make sure that you take the right courses. Talk to friends or family members who are health care professionals. Ask them about their experiences and for tips on how to be successful. Hearing from others about their own personal experiences can oftentimes provide immeasurable pearls of wisdom.” Ashcraft said at every level of higher education it’s useful to develop a relationship with a mentor to help head off missteps and keep the process moving in the right direction. “Think about your career goals and seek out a professor who has worked in the same area you are interested in or who has expertise in that area,” she said. “Schedule a meeting and ask if they would be interested in mentoring you. You might be surprised at how many faculty members are actually happy to mentor students. Mentoring is beneficial to both the mentor and the mentee, so go ahead and ask.”

SUCCESS STRATEGY FOR STUDENTS

TAKE RESPONSIBILITY. Learning is the responsibility of the learner. Faculty can guide learners in the right direction, but they cannot force anyone to put in the work necessary for success. Come to class prepared for the content at hand. MANAGE YOUR TIME. Learn how to manage study time with work, family and other personal agenda items. Allocate daily study time and start studying in advance versus holding cram sessions the night before exams. EVOLVE AS A STUDENT. Forget memorization study habits and embrace learning how to apply content. Get to know your classmates early on as collaboration presents different perspectives and knowledge bases that can facilitate deeper understanding of the subject matter. EYES ON THE PRIZE. Nursing school is challenging, so keep dreams and goals at the forefront of your thoughts. It is easy to lose motivation or make poor decisions in the moment that can permanently alter your life’s path. EMULATE SUCCESS. Having a strong support system will help a student overcome many obstacles. Find a mentor in the health care field — be it family, friends or professors — as this can provide realistic expectations and understanding of the process. —Ashley York, Nursing faculty, National Park College dle of such experiences from beginning to end. As important as it is to focus on what’s in front of you, it is equally important to take opportunities to look to the future. Not having a goal is something like dog paddling: Sure, the water feels nice at first, but eventually you want to move to another shore. Moving forward with new assignments, different skills or advanced schooling is what separates a mere job from a rewarding career. “There are times in nursing where we may have our life goals in mind, but we pursue those goals without careful planning,” said Angela Anderson, clinical instructor with UAMS College of Nursing. “I was this nurse, and I had to learn that while having goals is great, having a plan is what makes those goals a reality.” Anderson suggested a multistep approach for Special Advertising Section

moving from dreaming to doing when it comes to one’s career. “Determine what is required to obtain your goal,” she said. “This is your career and you should do what brings you pleasure versus always thinking about the money. Money is great, but doing a job that you love to do is more rewarding and easier to go to every day.” “Once you’ve identified where you want to go, seek out certification courses, attend continuing education and obtain as much on-thejob training as you can. These things will help you become proficient in your area of interest. Anderson also said nurses should understand that things that look interesting from the outside may not be a good fit in the day-to-day. In a profession as varied as health care, there’s always room and time to change one’s career path.


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THE NURSING FACTS OF LIFE

Nurses have to remember our everyday, routine workday is, for most patients, the worst time of their lives. Learn to give patients grace and understanding even when they are difficult to handle. There will be times the patient is dying and does not have a family support system. In these times, it is so important for the nurse to be with the patient as they pass. Death can be sad, but no one deserves to die alone. Being a nurse does not make you superhuman. Nurses will make mistakes because we are human. Nurses are natural caregivers and we tend to take care of everyone else and forget ourselves. Taking time for self-care, no matter what that looks like, is important to prevent burnout. Invest in caring for yourself so that you can continue to care for others. Nursing is the best and the worst. The hours are long, the work is hard and sometimes it feels like no one appreciates you. But we are also privileged to share in life’s happiest moments with our patients, loving on them, crying with them, fighting with time. That makes being a nurse one of the most rewarding professions. —Britt Beasley, clinical instructor, UAMS College of Nursing

Brandon Haley

“It is all right to change your focus or area of interest once you start practicing,” she said. “This is your career, not just a job; embrace each learning opportunity and try not to get in a rush to complete everything at one time. Plan things out and take new opportunities one day at a time.”

DO’S AND DON’TS FOR JOB INTERVIEWS

DON’T be unprepared. You never want to go on an interview unprepared with no knowledge about the institution or position you are applying for. That energy can be easily spotted out by employers and jeopardize your opportunity to land the job. DO conduct research. Websites are a great means of learning about an institution and its programs. Understand the opportunities that are open to you going in so that you can make the most of them later. DON’T second-guess yourself. Interviewing can be intimidating, but you must show confidence in your abilities and what you bring to the table. Listen to the questions and take a few moments before providing your response. Enter and exit the interview with a positive attitude and your head held high. DO ask questions. Having questions is normal and expected. Potential points to ask hiring committees include new graduate RN training/orientation schedules, job responsibilities and expectations, nurse-patient ratios and day-to-day operations on your unit. DON’T forget to dress for success. With COVID-19, many interviews shifted from in-person to over the phone or on Zoom. Nevertheless, make sure to dress for the part in business-casual attire. Leave the scrubs in your closet. DO follow up after the interview. Thank the nurse manager or hiring committee for taking the time to interview you. This shows gratitude for the interview and also maintains an open line of communication between you and the employer for the future. —Brandon Haley, RN Hospital Medicine, UAMS Medical Center

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THE NEW NURSE Once you’ve cleared the baseline formal education, the next hurdle is landing and excelling at your first job. Given the demand for nurses, this isn’t as daunting a task as in previous eras, because everyone is hiring! However, like any job, it is important to make the right first impression and get off to a solid start. Success in your first job, as with most things in nursing, turns on your ability to work as part of a team. It is natural to feel some intimidation and even some hesitancy when you are new on the ward, and no one expects you to be perfect. But what will be expected by your supervisors and your teammates alike is that you show a willingness to learn and pull your weight, treating others with respect and always upholding the dignity and reputation of the nursing profession. “Any new graduate should go into their new role with confidence and an attitude to soak up as much information as possible,” said Brandon Haley, a nurse with UAMS Medical Center. “Your co-workers can be a wonderful resource of knowledge as you establish your independent nursing practice. As a new graduate you should focus on creating a healthy environment for teamwork and collaboration. “Events can take place fast in nursing and no one person can do it all by themselves, which makes it even more vital to have a strong team behind you and also to be able to function as a strong team member when you are needed.” One of the worst things a new graduate nurse can do is enter the profession or a new work space thinking they know it all.” Shannon Nachtigal, vice president and chief nursing officer of Baxter Regional Medical Center, said soft skills have increased in importance over the years. “The attitude used to be — and this was across the nation — if you were highly skilled, that equated to being a good nurse,” she said. “As time has transitioned over the last 25 years, Special Advertising Section

that alone is not the definition of a good nurse. A good nurse is someone who is highly skilled, but is more than that, to me. “A good nurse also has empathy and compassion and makes you feel like you have been taken care of by an angel, really.” Nachtigal said the hospital reinforces this belief by its internal culture that stresses compassion and servant leadership in all things. “The fact is, if you’re not nice, then you’re not meeting the definition of a good nurse,” she said. “Being caring, empathetic and helpful, not just to your patients but to your nursing assistants, physicians, the lab tech or the food service person bringing the tray, that’s what sets someone apart. Good nurses are no longer defined by medical skills alone.”

FIVE ELEMENTS OF A GOOD TEAMMATE

COMMUNICATION. The saying “silence is golden” doesn’t apply when something is wrong or a patient’s life or health is being compromised. If there is a strong urge to speak up because something seems wrong, speak up. FLEXIBILITY. An attribute that is beyond price. Don’t be so set in your own ideas you don’t allow others to pour into you and your nursing career. Each nurse has a positive attribute to be learned, so take advantage of the opportunity to draw from them. POSITIVITY. Avoid getting on the negativity wagon; all jobs come with negative aspects, but remain positive, see the glass half full and make the best out of difficult situations. Understanding there are going to be stressful times, it helps to practice stress-reducing activities daily. LIFELONG LEARNER. Never be afraid of asking questions, never be afraid to demonstrate a willingness to learn, never fail to admit you are not perfect and mistakes will happen. Own them, learn from them and move on to provide better care. EMPATHIC. Being able to understand and share the feelings of another, particularly when the person is having a difficult time, is a vital skill for any nurse. Rather than judge, be empathic; it will help you see the person and not necessarily the situation they’ve created, leading to better patient outcomes. —Veneine Cuningkin, clinical assistant professor, UAMS College of Nursing


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NURSING NEWS

What’s Happening in Arkansas Nursing. UA Little Rock students train on the most advanced medical manikins available.

Baxter Regional Medical Center was also selected by Modern Healthcare magazine as a 2021 Best Place to Work in Healthcare.

Baptist Health College Baptist Health College Little Rock has three program options for individuals wishing to pursue a career in nursing. Our Practical Nursing program is a two-semester program with prerequisites. Upon success of the program, students will graduate with a diploma and be eligible to sit for the NCLEX-PN. Our Traditional Nursing program is a three-semester associates degree program that requires nine prerequisite courses. Upon successful completion of this program, students will graduate with an associate of applied science in nursing and be eligible to sit for the NCLEX-RN. Our accelerated program is a two-semester program with nine prerequisites for current LPNs and certified paramedics with an unencumbered license wishing to transition into a career as a registered nurse. Upon successful completion of this program, students graduate with an associate of applied science in nursing and are eligible to sit for the NCLEX-RN. For more information on the nursing and allied health programs that BHCLR offers, please visit our website at www.bhclr.edu. etitive pay as the basis for the 4.2-star rating from 92 percent of more than 700 nurses surveyed. Baxter Regional Medical Center Baxter Regional Behavioral Health is a proud sponsor of the annual Project Semicolon Suicide Prevention and Awareness Art Contest in partnership with the Viola High School Art Department. Students compete for prizes via their artistic creations around the theme of suicide awareness. Nurse.org, the web’s leading career site for nurses, has recognized Baxter Regional Medical Center as one of the top hospital workplaces for nurses in Arkansas. Reviewers cited supportive co-workers, flexible scheduling and competitive pay as the basis for the 4.2-star rating from 92 percent of more than 700 nurses surveyed. 12 OCTOBER 2021

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CHI St. Vincent CHI St. Vincent Infirmary ranks first in cardiology, heart surgery and orthopedics among Arkansas hospitals according to the latest Best Regional Hospital rankings released by U.S. News & World Report. The 2020–2021 Best Hospitals rankings were based on independent analysis of multiple data categories, including patient outcomes, volume of high-risk patients, patient experience, nurse staffing and advanced clinical technologies. CHI St. Vincent Hot Springs has received national Magnet designation by the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) for its continued commitment to nursing excellence and compassionate patient care. CHI St. Vincent Hot Springs becomes the fourth hospital in Arkansas to receive Magnet designation and one of only 530 hospitals nationwide to receive that recognition. Methodist Family Health Methodist Behavioral Hospital in Maumelle, the only nonprofit behavioral hospital for children in Arkansas, is celebrating its 20th anniversary of the hospital. The Methodist Family Health Foundation Scholarship Fund provides a scholarship for anyone who has spent at least one night in its residential treatment facilities, including psychiatric residential treatment centers, qualified residential treatment programs or Arkansas Centers for Addictions Research, Education and Services. Eligible individuals pursuing a nursing degree may apply at methodistfamily. org/docs/ScholarshipApplication.pdf. Ouachita Baptist University The Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN) recently affirmed accreditation for Ouachita Baptist University’s Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program. The peer-review process involves program assessment planning and evaluation by the Department of Nursing and staff team with oversight by ACEN peer experts to assess mastery of six ACEN accreditation categories: administration, student resources, nursing faculty excellence, curriculum, program resources and program outcomes. The Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program (BSN), introduced in Fall 2019, is an innovative, RN-to-BSN dual enrollment completion Special Advertising Section

program in partnership with Baptist Health College Little Rock. The Department of Nursing has since added a fully online RN-to-BSN degree program option for students who already have a valid registered nurse license, and who seek to earn a BSN degree. Ouachita Baptist University nursing students Cassie Lackey and Jacob Moreno were awarded scholarships by the Foundation of the National Student Nurses’ Association (FNSNA) for their involvement in Ouachita’s NSNA student chapter and upon recommendation from their professors in the Department of Nursing. Lackey is a junior nursing major from Wylie, Texas, while Moreno is a junior nursing major from Little Rock. University of Arkansas Little Rock The UA Little Rock School of Nursing is now home to a state-of-the-art augmented reality simulation training experience. The school procured CAE LucinaAR with Microsoft HoloLens 2, the world’s first augmented reality childbirth simulator. A breakthrough in health care simulation, LucinaAR offers an unprecedented shared training experience for nursing students in which they can see the anatomy inside the physical LucinaAR manikin or a completely stand-alone holographic manikin. The school’s new technology was made possible in part by the support of the Walker Foundation. UA Little Rock Nursing also recently added “Todd” to its simulation inventory, purchasing the latest Laerdal SimBaby manikin. The purchase was made possible thanks to $70,000 in CARES funding. UAMS Medical Center Nurses in the COVID-19 Triage Team at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences were honored by the national DAISY Foundation and the California-based HealthImpact nonprofit organization for devising a screening process for patients who are homeless or rely on public transportation. The UAMS team, along with five individual nurses from across the country, were chosen as the inaugural recipients of the HealthImpact DAISY Nurse Leader Award in Policy. The American Nurses Association extended the 2020 Year of the Nurse and Nurse Midwife into 2021 to build upon the increased visibility of nurses’ contributions affecting the health and well-being of our communities during the pandemic. UAMS dedicated an entire month to


honor its nurses and staff Lance Lindow, registered nurse in the UAMS Medical Center emergency department is the current president of the Arkansas State Board of Nursing’s Board of Directors. Lindow joined the ASBN Board in 2019 as vice president and took over the president’s duties in 2020. His focus in this role is on educating and combating violence again nurses and health care workers, incidents of which have increased during the pandemic, in addition to mentoring and inspiring future nurses. UAMS College of Nursing The UAMS College of Nursing is starting a new accelerated, bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) program at the UAMS Northwest Campus in Fayetteville. This program, which will admit 24 students annually, enables students who already hold a bachelors degree in another subject to secure a nursing degree with eligibility for licensure as a registered nurse in just 15 months. The College of Nursing awards over $300,000 in scholarships annually, predominantly through endowments. Other sources of funding include the Hearst Foundation for Ph.D. and doctor of nursing practice (DNP) students and the Jonas Foundation to help support doctoral students who are addressing some of the nation’s most pressing health care needs in underrepresented and underserved populations. UAMS, with its five colleges (Nursing, Medicine, Public Health, Health Professions and Pharmacy) and Graduate School, have been named by Forbes Magazine one of the 10 best workplaces in the United States in terms of diversity.

BAPTIST HEALTH COLLEGE ROLLS OUT NEW PROGRAM

Baptist Health College Little Rock’s new PCT program will have its first class in January 2022 upon Accrediting Bureau of Heath Education Schools and Arkansas Department of Higher Education approval. Upon completion, the program will offer graduates the opportunity to sit for testing in national certificates for patient care technician, electrocardiogram technician and phlebotomy technician. The need in this field is great. As of July 2021, within the five major hospitals in the Little Rock area alone there were 93 PCT job listings. In a recent survey conducted by BHCLR, 87.5 percent of the responses said they would like to see this program come to the area and a like number stated the triple certificate would strongly benefit the health care team. Having a self-motivated, well-trained PCT on your unit is absolutely priceless. PCTs lift a lot of burden off of nursing staff and are often the first person to catch a change in patient status due to the ability to spend more face-to-face time with the patients. Having a more strenuous training program will mold a more confident PCT. This confidence will help in job satisfaction and should increase their time in the field.

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SPECIALTIES IN DEMAND Oh, the Places You’ll Go.

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f your only image of a nurse is someone at the bedside, listen up: The nursing profession is one of the most diverse and multifaceted careers you can have. In addition to patient-facing positions in hospitals and clinics, nurses can be found in the research lab, in corporate America, in the classroom. They report for duty in schools, retirement homes, prisons and military bases. They serve police investigators and testify in court; they keep job sites safe and workers healthy. Nurses specialize in a wide range of physical medicine as well as behavioral and psych roles. Nurses have the opportunity to continue their education through the highest levels of academia, where some become entrepreneurs, building a solid and profitable business on their base of knowledge. The sky’s the limit for the ambitious and motivated. Read on for just a few of the areas that highlight this ever-changing and dynamic profession. Note: Salary figures are representative of the specialty nationwide; your actual pay scale will vary depending on job experience, education and region of the country.

National Park College students enjoy state-ofthe-art lab facilities.

NURSING INFORMATICS Meljoelyn Gardner began her journey to nursing informatics by joining the U.S. Air Force at age 17. After six years of military training and service, Gardner enrolled in Cebu Doctors’ University, Cebu City, Philippines, earning a bachelors degree in 2012. Gardner began her career at UAMS Medical Center with six years as an operating room nurse before changing to nurse informatics in 2019. What experience was most impactful for you as a nurse? I studied nursing in the Philippines, which is a developing country with a high level of poverty. Health care, education and other basic services are grossly insufficient. The humbling education and experience I gained by providing care to the poorest of the poor helped me harness the skills to be able to adapt and improvise care depending on the available facilities and environment. What made you choose nursing informatics? Nursing informatics professionals are unique and are hybrid heroes of health care. We improve workflows for health care staff and are guided by best practices to effectively manage information structures, processes and technology. I enjoy being an advocate for impactful innovation and my work keeps patients safe and at the center. Summary of Duties: Nursing informatics leverage information technology and nursing education to optimize various computer systems, back-office and patient-facing processes, such as improved management of health records, streamlined workflow and improved patient care. Average Salary or Salary Range: $70,000$117,120 Job Outlook: 9 percent growth through 2028 Source: waldenu.edu

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NURSING ADMINISTRATION As an instructor and nursing administration specialty coordinator at UAMS College of Nursing in Little Rock, Neal Reeves prepares the next generation of nursing administrators for the challenges of a dynamic workplace. It’s a role he takes seriously and one that has come into sharper focus during the COVID pandemic. How do your graduates fit into the health care ecosystem? The Nursing Administration program in the College of Nursing at UAMS prepares future nursing executives, administrators and leaders to fill middle- to top-level leadership roles in their health care systems. Our graduates are trained with the skills to be effective in communication, conflict management, personnel development, team building, systems thinking and other specialties to meet the challenges faced by these organizations. How has this role changed over time? Our health care system is often seen as a complex social system. This leads many to think that it is chaotic and unpredictable. The COVID-19 pandemic showed us many areas where we may not have been as prepared as we thought we were and, in many cases, added more complexity to how we conduct and manage our health care, outreach and supply chains. As nursing leaders, we must develop a complexity leadership approach, which is a continual process routed in collaboration, systems thinking and innovation. Summary of Duties: Tasks vary by specialty; may include overseeing nursing staff, managing finances, creating budgets, ensuring workplace meets regulatory requirements and/or implementing necessary nursing procedures in a health care facility. Average Salary or Salary Range: $58,500$122,000 Job Outlook: 20 percent growth through 2026 Source: nursepractitionerschools.com


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The Arkansas Center for Nursing is excited to

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these six UA Little Rock 40 Nurse Leaders Under 40

Anna Williams Crystal Rose Fairah Solomon

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Nurses work as a life-saving team at Baxter Regional in Mountain Home.

NURSE ANESTHETIST Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNA) are key members of the medical team in some of the most critical medical situations in health care. Chase Watson is a second-year student at UAMS College of Nursing, studying to take his place in this most vital role. What does the education process include in this medical specialty? There is a plethora of information that we are expected to learn and understand, in such a short time span. My day-to-day is at least 3.5 hours of independent studying when attending lectures/lab full time or more if attending online. My independent study involves creating and memorizing flashcards, reading textbooks and PowerPoint presentations. On top of that, I have life to juggle to ensure my family does not feel neglected. What advice do you have for someone entering this field? From a student’s perspective, time management is the heaviest burden. Going back to school can feel overwhelming in the beginning, but once you start to understand and apply the new information you are learning, studying no longer becomes a dreaded task, but an enjoyable exercise. I often start on a simple topic, then I start to read or listen to lectures and a whole new perspective is opened up to me. I have learned so much about what it means to practice anesthesia and how the operating room functions. Summary of Duties: CRNAs usually work in hospital operating rooms, emergency rooms, intensive care units, cardiac care units or outpatient surgical clinics. They work with surgical teams to assess patient response to anesthesia, identify possible risks, including allergies, and administering precise dosages. Average Salary or Salary Range: $167,000 (Arkansas average) Job Outlook: 26 percent growth through 2028 Source: nursepractitionerschools.com, nurse.org 16 OCTOBER 2021

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NURSE EDUCATOR One area that has been in particularly short supply of employees in recent years are nurse educators. These individuals are indispensable in the creation of new nurses at colleges, universities and nursing schools and the shortage of educators limits the number of new nurses these institutions can serve at one time. Therefore, growing this field of teaching professionals, such as Colton McCance, clinical instructor at UAMS College of Nursing, is critical to meeting demand in the future. Why did you choose to go into nursing education? I chose nursing education because I remember how challenging and rewarding nursing school can be. The support I received, the knowledge of the faculty and, most of all, how they all had a passion for nursing made me want to help others discover the vast opportunities that nursing offers. In addition to subject matter, what do you communicate to your students? Just that the opportunities in nursing are endless. That is one of the greatest parts of being a nurse. You can be an integral part of bringing life into this world or holding someone’s hand as they take their last breath. You can improve the health of the patients you are assigned that day or address the needs of an entire population. As an educator, you get to lead others to experience that. Summary of Duties: Nurse educators provide education and training for nurses at all levels, from students in their first year of nursing school to experienced nurses seeking professional development. Educators combine clinical expertise and experience to serve as guides and mentors to aspiring nurses. In addition to traditional classrooms, educators also work in health care settings from hospitals to public health centers. Average Salary or Salary Range: $41,130$133,460 Job Outlook: 9 percent growth through 2029 Source: nursejournal.org, allnursingschools.com Special Advertising Section

BEST OF THE REST Registered Nurses — Bedrock of the profession in the acute care setting. RNs provide care to patients in hospitals, outpatient settings, home care, schools and industry with the biggest need right now in acute care hospitals. Salary range: $60,000-$65,000 Registered Respiratory Therapists — Assist in the diagnosis, treatment and management of patients with pulmonary disorders. The vital role of these medical professionals has become much more visible in the era of COVID-19. Salary range: $58,000-$65,000 Radiologic Technologists — Perform medical exams using X-rays to create images of specific parts of the body, images that are interpreted by a doctor for diagnosis and monitoring of disease. RT’s typically work in hospitals and outpatient clinics. Salary range: $45,000$50,000 EMS workers — Emergency medical personnel consisting of two job titles. EMTs ($26,000$30,000) care for patients at the scene of an incident and while taking patients by ambulance to a hospital. Paramedics ($33,000$39,000) respond to 911 calls for emergency medical assistance, such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) or bandaging a wound, then assess a patient’s condition and determine a course of treatment or life support, including during transport. Medical Laboratory Technicians — Assist physicians in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases by performing tests on tissue, blood, and other body fluids in a laboratory setting. Salary range: $21,000-$34,000. —Janice Ivers, dean of nursing and health science, National Park College


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HIGH TOUCH MEETS HIGH TECH Nursing Field Demands Technology Skills.

EVAN LEWIS/ UAMS

Medical tech is front and center at UAMS College of Nursing.

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ursing is one of the most demanding and rewarding professions there is. To be the best at it, nurses have to demonstrate a number of attributes, from excellence in the classroom, to communication and empathy skills, to physical strength and endurance. And to that list of talents, you can also add technical aptitude, as technology is everywhere in today’s health care environment. “Technology is ever-evolving and expanding,” said Pamela de Gravelles, clinical assistant professor and IPC/simulation coordinator for UAMS College of Nursing. “All nurses must be well-versed with certain equipment, such as Vital Sign machines, heart monitors and IV machines, and from there, the more advanced the unit, the more advanced the equipment. “For example, ICU nurses need to be familiar with more complex patient monitors and IV pumps running a variety of medications simultaneously. Operating room nurses may need to know everything from cautery machines to the robotics equipment being used. eICU nurses must direct patient care remotely from eICU computer stations.” As a result of all this, nurses have to be able to grasp tech tools, and quickly, in order to do their jobs in a safer and more efficient way. This even applies to the humble patient chart. “The biggest change I have seen in the last 15-plus years at the bedside is the fact that 95 percent of the patient’s record is now electronic,” said Jacob Baker, instructor and simulation center manager for the University of Central Arkansas. “The nurse must be able to navigate the electronic health record to find labs, progress 18 OCTOBER 2021

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reports, interdisciplinary reports, demographic information, etc. “When nurses pass the NCLEX, they understand and know how to perform the skills to take care of a patient, and that is the same skill set in Searcy, Arkansas, or Chicago, Illinois. The electronic health record, however, can be extremely different and specific to an area of nursing. The new nurse must be comfortable and adaptive to new software programs.” Stacy Petty, APRN coordinator and director of HealthNow for UAMS Medical Center, said technology is rapidly expanding across every department of a typical hospital. “While nurses still have to have the same strong core knowledge base, I have seen rapid expansion and technology expertise since I started my career,” she said. “That may look like more advanced ventilators, specialty beds to prevent skin breakdown, cooling helmets for neonatal patients, or very specialized post-operative equipment which allow nurses to monitor tissue that has just been reimplanted to a new area of the body. “There has also been a whole new field of nursing related to telemedicine and remote patient monitoring devices that requires you to interact with patients in a slightly different way than when you are face-to-face. These technologies sometimes challenge you to think with a different perspective than what many people think of as ‘nursing.’ “Today’s nurse must be quick on their feet, competent at troubleshooting and assessing, and the calm in a storm when things are not going as expected, all the while utilizing technolSpecial Advertising Section

ogy to connect warmly and compassionately.” The COVID pandemic has introduced its own new categories of technology, from PPE to clinical tools and testing to new ways to communicate with patients. “In the wake of the COVID pandemic, an important feature of the nursing landscape is telehealth, also known as remote care,” said Dr. Patricia Cowan, dean and professor at the UAMS College of Nursing. “Students in the College of Nursing are now routinely trained on the use of telehealth devices and the associated care protocols, which will enable health care professionals to connect with rural and underserved communities in a faster, more efficient way than ever before. “This new technology, combined with our commitment to rural clinics and preventative care, will give UAMS a greater capacity to serve the state of Arkansas.” Technology has also taken a quantum leap forward in the classroom, Cowan said. “Simulation has become integral to nursing education and practice, supplementing learning outside of the classroom and clinical settings,” she said. “UAMS is building a new 5,100-square-foot simulation center for the Northwest campus. Students will begin simulation experiences in their first semester and actively participate in simulation throughout their nursing education. “Use of standardized patients, patient simulator manikins and other high-fidelity simulation offers interactive, challenging experiences in a safe, nonthreatening environment that support development of teamwork and decision-making skills.”


RISE OF THE MACHINES

Technology hasn’t replaced human nurses, but the technologically savvy nurse will find himself or herself in high demand across a number of rewarding careers, according to Stacy Petty of UAMS Medical Center. These include: Nursing Informatics and Education: These professionals design, maintain and train others on hospital IT systems specific to patient information and integrated data that keeps all departments connected to a patient’s medical history at a glance. Nursing Forensics: Forensics RN’s or APRN’s deal with the aftermath of violence, be it mass disasters, domestic abuse, sexual assault or death investigations. These nurses determine if someone has been victimized or how they died and may assist outside agencies in gathering evidence. Flight Nurse: Highly skilled nurses who accompany critically ill patients, from preemies to elders, being transported on med flights. These nurses must be extremely well-versed in technology, as well as work in environments with limited resources. They are true jack-of-all-trades professionals. Nursing Researcher: A clinical research nurse helps develop and implement scientific studies to investigate and provide new-evidence-based information for medications, process improvement, medical procedures and safe/quality nursing care. They may also oversee a research staff and run clinical trials, the results of which may be published in medical journals and other periodicals.

I am a St. Vincent Nurse. Alexa provides care for orthopedic and spine surgery patients. “Nursing is the most rewarding profession. We have the privilege of stepping into the lives of strangers to make a difference. I love getting to know my patients, forming a relationship to gain their trust. Nurses share victories big and small with patients, and that is the best feeling!”

Join Alexa and become part of our work family. Sign-on bonuses and NEW higher pay for all RNs + increased pay for clinical ladder! chistvincent.com/nurses

UCA UNVEILS INTEGRATED HEALTH SCIENCES BUILDING

The University of Central Arkansas’s new Integrated Health Sciences Building was completed in May 2021. The 80,000-squarefoot facility is home to the School of Nursing, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, the Nabholz Center for Healthcare Simulation and an Interprofessional Teaching Center. The building provides space for cutting edge instruction, producing health professionals well-equipped to meet the challenges of the future. Among the four-story building’s features are one entire floor designated for health care simulation; flexible classroom space; faculty offices and multiple flex spaces for group study. The first floor is home to an Interprofessional Teaching Center which features multiple clinics, an audiology lab, therapy gym, a kitchen for cooking classes and spaces for counseling and psychology students to meet with clients. In addition to serving the needs of the university today, the new center also provides additional capacity for the future. UCA currently has 150 nursing students, and the Health Sciences Building provides the space to expand that number significantly, preparing new generations of students to take their place providing quality health care throughout Arkansas.

Alexa, BSN, RN Orthopedics and Spine Surgery

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A PLACE FOR ALL

Diversity Growing, Needed in Nursing Profession. Dr. Josuanne Nduku oversees nursing students at UA Little Rock.

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f you haven’t noticed, the face of nursing is changing. For generations, the profession has been dominated by women, but no more. The number of men in the profession is growing, as is diversity of race, ethnicity, age, gender identity, religious backgrounds, languages and just about any other category you can think of, which puts nursing at the forefront of growing opportunity and equality in the workplace. “Our human nature gravitates us toward others like us,” said Janice Ivers, dean of Nursing and Health Sciences at National Park College in Hot Springs. “Since we live in a melting pot of cultures, we need nurses to come from that same melting pot of people. We promote diversity and encourage exploration and collaboration in the classroom, highlighting the importance of awareness of this diversity, in order to break down stereotypes and barriers.” Part of the reason why the nursing profession has worked so hard to diversify is pure market demand. Nursing has been a short-handed profession for years as many have stepped into retirement without enough students coming up to take their place. As health care has grown as an industry, this has made the situation even worse. As if that weren’t challenging enough, COVID is squeezing existing nurses even tighter, and the stress and fatigue of the pandemic is causing many to drop out of the profession altogether. An August 2021 survey by Vivian, a health care worker marketplace, reported what hospitals and chief nursing officers across the nation already knew: 43 percent of nurse respondents (and nearly half of ICU nurses) were considering quitting. This shows a growing problem, as surveys earlier in the pandemic placed the num20 OCTOBER 2021

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ber at around 20-30 percent. But beyond the sheer need for numbers, Ivers said diversity in the workforce is equally important, as it directly affects the quality of care being delivered. “Having a diverse population of nurses improves the possibility of reaching and teaching a patient more easily,” she said. “In the profession, diversity includes gender, veteran status, race, disability, age, religion, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, sexual orientation, education, nationality and physical characteristics. Every day, nurses everywhere encounter people from every race, religion, ethnicity, cultural background, gender and sexual orientation to care for, so it is important that as we teach the next generation of nurses, we help them understand these differences and embrace them. “If the nurse looks and speaks the same language as a patient does, for example, this helps to reduce fear, increase trust and hopefully improve the performance and compliance of that patient and ultimately the outcome. Having diversity within the nursing workforce generates a variety of perspectives from all different people, which facilitates improvement. It truly takes all shapes, sizes and colors to care for the sick and infirm.” Yolanda Shaw, second-year student in the registered nurse anesthetist program at UAMS College of Nursing, sees the positive impact her school has had on the diversity of the student body. “UAMS promotes diversity in every way,” she said. “I am currently in graduate school for nurse anesthesia. We are the inaugural cohort, and it is comprised of 18 students. Of those 18 Special Advertising Section

students, seven students are minorities, seven students are women and our program director is a Hispanic woman. As far as the workplace, UAMS is very diverse, employing people from all cultures and abilities.” That said, Shaw notes the industry still has a ways to go before it fully realizes acceptance of diversity in all areas of nursing. “Males are still under-represented due to the stigma of nursing being a female profession,” she said. “Allowing the community to see more males in nursing practice, especially pediatric nursing and intensive care units, has aided in bringing more men into the profession. “That’s important because having diverse perspectives in the health care industry leads to better outcomes for patients. It also fosters understanding and effective communication, which improves the patient-provider relationship.” Dr. Josuanne Nduku, assistant professor with the University of Arkansas at Little Rock School of Nursing and a native of Camaroon, said diversity also comes into play in the classroom. “I am reminded of a melting pot and shared experiences when I think about diversity,” she said. “I am fortunate to work at the University of Arkansas School of Nursing with a diverse group of faculty and staff with different cultural backgrounds, ethnicity, nationality, gender, race, age, nursing specialty, clinical background, educational background and interests. “We also serve a diverse student population between all programs. Our differences are what make us unique because we can learn from each other, and students can relate to us and see different facets of our profession.”


HERO SPOTLIGHT

ANSWER YOUR CALLING. Learn how to meet the needs in your community from nurse educators who are not only committed to academic excellence but also to your spiritual growth. T H R E E T R AC K S :

TABITHA KAMAU

Emergency Department, CHI St. Vincent Infirmary How did you get interested in nursing? After completing high school, I wanted to study medicine but didn’t know what I wanted to do. My aunt was a nurse educator and she wanted me to go into nursing. She told me positive things about nursing, and I have never regretted following her advice. Why the emergency room? I worked the emergency department at a hospital in Kenya and I liked the challenge and using my critical thinking. We never know what will come into the ER; in Kenya, I saw a lot of trauma cases. I learned how to treat patients not only physically, but also emotionally, psychologically and spiritually. Having come from another country, what do you bring to your team? We work in a world that is comprised of different cultures, races, ethnicities, religions/beliefs and genders. Patients express their health needs better when their cultures and beliefs are observed. Observing these cultural differences, the health care team can provide patient-centered care where patients have trust in the care that is delivered. This improves patient outcomes and satisfaction. How does maintaining diversity benefit the organization? A diverse workforce has better work relations, effective communication and good interprofessional collaboration. An organization that embraces diversity has a conducive working environment and high retention rate. My facility is an equal opportunity employer and diversity is on the forefront. As patients and co-workers walk through the door, they feel valued and welcomed, regardless of background.

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CARING FOR THE CAREGIVER Survival Skills 101: Mind Your Own Health

A Baxter Regional nurse provides the caring touch.

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ursing is one of the few jobs where you can say you were the difference between life or death. Ask any longtime nurse and he or she will tell you, that’s one of the most intense and awe-inspiring parts of the career. But at the same time, it’s an enormous responsibility that carries with it stress and anxiety that can lead to burnout over time. Throw in the unrelenting pressure of COVID surges and the occasional natural disaster that overwhelms short-staffed emergency rooms and bursting-atthe-seams hospitals, and you have one of the toughest jobs on the planet. New nurses should know exactly what they are getting into and not kid themselves about the need for self-preservation and care, say nursing experts. “There are normal daily stressors associated with being a health care worker providing care to patients of all ages,” said Barbara McDonald, lead ARPN, COVID Triage and Immunization with UAMS Medical Center. “These stressors can include monitoring changes in health care status, observing patients who have suffered trauma, dealing with patients who are combative or verbally abusive, and having to tell patients and their family members that they have a terminal illness. “These stressors are usually transient with periods of respite in between. When the pandemic occurred, however, the stress increased tremendously for various reasons. We were not 100 percent sure how the disease was transmitted or exactly how it could affect those who acquired it. There was the fear of taking this new disease home to loved ones. There were facilities and locations that did not have the recommended PPE for health care workers providing care for the patients with COVID.” As exhausted as today’s nurses are, the problem of burnout was a major issue in the industry before anyone had ever heard of COVID. Emory School of Medicine found one-third of the nurses who left their job in 2017 cited burnout 22 OCTOBER 2021

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as the reason, pointing to understaffed working conditions and long hours as contributing factors. But the situation was also made worse by nurses’ tendency to put off their own health in service to others. An American Nurses Association survey found in December 2020 that 75 percent of nurses reported feeling exhausted in the past two weeks, yet almost 70 percent in another ANA survey simultaneously said they regularly put their patients’ health and safety ahead of their own. “Nurses are always the caregiver!” said Janice Ivers, dean of Nursing and Health Sciences for National Park College. “Nurses really feel that level of responsibility of being a nurse 24/7, of accepting the fact that you live in a fish bowl. That what you do as a nurse, on- and off-duty, matters as someone is watching you. What you post on social media matters, what you do when driving matters, what you do at a party matters. And that definitely take a toll over time.” For many nurses, the unrelenting pressure and self-sacrifice of the past 18 months is finally catching up with them. Depending on which recent study you consult, between 20-40 percent of front-line U.S. health care workers (and half of ICU workers) say they are considering leaving the profession. Ivers said in Arkansas, even nursing students are not immune to this, which prompted the nursing school to take action. “Some nursing students decided to postpone their education, verbalizing the inability to learn in a virtual environment. Others postponed as they had to go find a job to support their families,” she said. “The college continued to offer a drive-by food pantry and awarded federal CARES funds to help with the struggling financial situations of many of our students. “For those students affected by COVID-19, we offered an opportunity to take a COVID-WITHDRAWAL and return to the withdrawn class the next time it was offered, at no charge. That Special Advertising Section

demonstrated a lot of compassion by the college administration.” Such gestures by hospitals and colleges have not gone unnoticed by nurses and nursing students. “I am grateful UAMS appreciates the work of our nurses and the challenges they face,” said Trenda Ray, chief nursing officer for UAMS Medical Center. “Our leadership team recognizes and appreciates the hardships and challenges nurses face and is working to provide, resources to help our team cope and manage. “We received a UAMS wellness grant for nursing mini-retreats, and the first of the monthly retreats was held in October 2020. Feedback has been very positive. The retreat starts with stretching and simple yoga moves, and even the most cynical participant reluctantly admitted afterwards that she actually enjoyed it. UAMS Wellness Director Natalie Cannady has also created a wide variety of wellness resources available for our nurses to use.” Experts admit the problem of nurse burnout will not go away overnight. However, because of the events of the past 18 months, health care organizations are much more sensitive to the issue of nurse burnout at the physical and mental level. “COVID-19 challenged us to provide patient-centered care in extreme situations, such as when dying patients were not allowed to see loved ones due to social distancing restrictions,” said Elizabeth Riley, clinical assistant professor with UAMS College of Nursing. “Nurses were on these front lines and faced extreme situations. This experience has taught us that mentorship of new nurses and nursing students is vital. Collaboration has always been important, but we must continue to do more mentorship and maintain self-care programs for all nurses. “It was certainly not the Year of the Nurse that we ever expected, but health care organizations are now seeing the value of recruitment strategies that place a value on nurse retention as well as bringing in new graduates.”


HERO SPOTLIGHT

ALEXA CASH

Every day, Alexa Cash delivers the most informed, cutting-edge care to her patients. But, she says, the secret to this work is having the heart to care for others. What are some of the day-to-day things you do in your work? Working on an orthopedic surgical floor we do a lot of post-op admissions and discharges. Post-op care consists of continuous patient assessment, treatment and education for things like dressing changes and pain management. Our team works closely with physical therapy, teaching the patients proper precautions for getting out of bed and walking. Another huge part of this job is to motivate the patient and family to follow discharge instructions to help optimize the recovery. What’s it like to work in your department? We work like a machine. We’re very team-based, very fast-paced. You’ve got to be efficient, practice really good

time-management skills and be ready to roll with the punches. Most of these patients are coming in for scheduled elective surgery to fix something they’ve been dealing with for a long time. These difficulties have limited daily activities for the patient and can be very hard on families. So, when they get this surgery it’s an exciting time to know that they’re going to have a better future. What’s the key to succeeding in nursing? You absolutely have to have the heart for it. If you are not a people person or lack compassion to help somebody every day, this is not the job for you. Going through any surgery is painful and challenging. People can be difficult and easily upset when they don’t feel well. As a nurse you have to be understanding to what they’re going through and provide the best care possible. It is extremely rewarding to see the smiles and hear thank you as they leave our unit to return home.

Orthopedics and Spine Surgery CHI St. Vincent

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Additional compensation for BSN, MSN & other national certifications

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Interested in earning an Associates of Applied Science degree in Nursing?

Call the Jefferson School of Nursing at 870-541-7858

Potential bonuses of $4k-$8k. Contact Nursing Recruiter Gigi Flory at 870-541-7774 or florygi@jrmc.org. Special Advertising Section

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TWO ARKANSAS HOSPITALS RECEIVE GLOBAL NURSING DISTINCTION

BAPTIST HEALTH CELEBRATES CENTENNIAL

Baxter Regional Medical Center, an ANCC Magnet hospital.

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wo Arkansas hospitals have attained ANCC Magnet Recognition®, one of the highest distinctions on the planet for nursing. Baxter Regional Medical Center in Mountain Home and CHI St. Vincent Hot Springs joined the exclusive roster of hospitals, numbering only about 500 worldwide. “As our healing ministry works to build healthier communities here in Arkansas, we have long realized that our nurses are the key to that ongoing success and consistent improvement in patient outcomes,” said CHI St. Vincent Market CEO Chad Aduddell in a press release. “This recognition by the American Nurses Credentialing Center provides independent verification of the inspirational work taking place at CHI St. Vincent Hot Springs and the ongoing dedication to its nurses and to the patients and families they serve.” “I’m so proud of the nurses, nursing leaders and all involved in making this journey to Magnet excellence possible,” said Shannon Nachtigal, vice president and chief nursing officer of Baxter Regional in a statement. “Although Magnet status is a nursing designation, it’s also recognition of the outstanding efforts of our entire health system.” Magnet recognition is the gold standard for nursing excellence and is a factor when the public judges health care organizations. U.S. News & World Report’s annual showcase of “America’s Best Hospitals” includes Magnet recognition in its ranking criteria for quality of inpatient 24 OCTOBER 2021

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care. The Magnet Model provides a framework for nursing practice, research and measurement of outcomes. Through this framework, ANCC evaluates applicants across a number of components and dimensions to gauge an organization’s nursing excellence. “The nurses at CHI St. Vincent Hot Springs are some of the most committed and professional health care professionals in our state,” said Bryan Williams, chief nursing executive at CHI St. Vincent via a statement. “As we move forward, we remain committed to supporting our nurses through education, development and collaborative practice as we work to continually attract the very best nurses to CHI St. Vincent hospitals so they can deliver the highest quality care to our patients.” Less than 9 percent of all U.S. hospitals have received this designation. Baxter Regional, which was recognized in June and CHI St. Vincent Hot Springs, which was awarded in October 2020, are two of only five hospitals in Arkansas to achieve the status. “Magnet recognition provides our community with the ultimate benchmark to measure the quality of patient care,” said Ron Peterson, president and CEO of Baxter Regional in a press release. “Achieving Magnet recognition reinforces the culture of excellence that is a cornerstone of how we serve our community. It’s also tangible evidence of our nurses’ commitment to providing excellent care to every patient, every time.” Special Advertising Section

In late 1920, the Arkansas Baptist State Convention purchased the former Little Rock Sanitarium property in downtown Little Rock to build a new hospital serving the state of Arkansas and began temporary operations in the sanitarium building. On Feb. 16, 1921, the Pulaski County Circuit Court incorporated the Baptist State Hospital, giving the hospital official standing as a legal entity. Although the original hospital opened its doors with less than 100 beds, the building served 1,315 patients during its first year of operation. From the humble beginnings of Baptist State Hospital through the 100 years it has taken to become the Baptist Health system we know today, the purpose has remained the same — to create a healthier community through Christian compassion and innovative services. Today, Baptist Health is Arkansas’s most comprehensive health care organization, with more than 250 points of access including 11 hospitals, urgent care centers, a senior living community and more than 100 primary and specialty care clinics in Arkansas and eastern Oklahoma. The system additionally offers a college with studies in nursing and allied health, a graduate residency program and access to virtual care through a mobile app. Baptist Health, as the largest not-for-profit health care organization based in Arkansas, provides care to patients through the support and expertise of about 11,000 employees, groundbreaking treatments, renowned physicians and community outreach programs.


HERO SPOTLIGHT

JESSIE DANIEL

Advanced Practice Registered Nurse UAMS Cardiovascular Service Line

As a nurse, Jessie Daniel always knew there would be life and death situations she would have to face. But it wasn’t until she was directly responsible for saving a life that she felt the full measure of her awesome job responsibility. A little over two years ago, you saved a life. What happened? A patient entered my trauma bay from another hospital. I was the primary nurse responsible and I noticed this really sick patient, who they were concerned might actually be brain dead, had a tear rolling down their face. I saw that, it didn’t feel right and I mentioned it to the physician. Long story short, we realized that this patient had a medication, a paralytic, that was lingering for much longer than it should have been. We gave a reversal agent and the patient woke up. What emotions did you feel after that? A little bit of everything. It was really great to work together as a team and pick up on this thing that was very impactful for the patient. At

the same time, you have this fear that, “Oh my gosh, how many times has something like this happened and people just didn’t notice it?” How has the experience impacted your confidence and willingness to speak up? The longer you do this, you learn to trust your gut a little bit when you have that voice saying something’s off. You have to listen to that and reach out to people around you and say, “This doesn’t feel right; maybe I don’t know what it is, but something’s off. Let’s dig into this a little further.” What advice do you have for the nursing student or someone in their first job after graduation? Nothing ever fully prepares you to enter into this field. You have to be a really dedicated, motivated, self-driven kind of learner, because you never know everything there is to know. Realizing there is always room to grow, I think, is one of the most important things that people who go into this profession know and understand.

Choose the Best. Choose UAMS. Whether you’re looking for the right place to further your education or the right place to start your nursing career, UAMS is the best choice for you.

Arkansas’ most comprehensive nursing college with new program options: ■ Accelerated BSN (located on Northwest Arkansas campus) ■ MNSc in Case Management ■ DNP Nurse Anesthesia Visit nursing.UAMS.edu for Student Recruitment

Already a nurse and looking for the best place to work? Nurses are the heart of UAMS. ■ Statewide opportunities for growth in many areas ■ Market competitive salaries at the only academic medical center in the state ■ Tuition discounts at U of A System colleges for you and your family Visit nurses.UAMS.edu for Nurse Recruitment

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WHAT I’VE LEARNED For new nurse graduates getting through the first year, you must have an excellent mentor, not specifically your preceptor, but someone who will take you under his or her wing and help you navigate a complicated system. Also, my best advice after a stressful and difficult day is to try to leave it at the door when you clock out. I know this is not always possible as it takes time to process and reflect on those difficult shifts. Laura Hall, assistant professor University of Central Arkansas

Nursing is a gift. Everyone doesn’t have the gift to provide care or show empathy towards someone they don’t know. Whether you want to get into nursing, are new to nursing or are a seasoned nurse, you must come into the profession with a purpose. As long as your purpose continues to exist, the difficulties and stress of nursing will all be worth it. Marcie Trice CHI St. Vincent

In nursing school, paying attention in class and being present for lectures is vital; you will build strong relationships by taking initiative and interacting in class. DON’T be late to clinical days. Treat clinicals as if you were already a hired nurse working on the floor. Come early, come equipped and be ready to work. Caitlin Youngman, student UAMS College of Nursing

Take time to take care of yourself; you can’t take care of others well if you don’t take care of yourself first. If you are in a high-stress area, intermittent vacations help. Take a mindfulness and compassion course or class to help be more aware of your circumstances and bring more compassion if you are feeling burned out. Brenda Ramsey, RN Dermatology Oncology UAMS Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute

As an experienced online educator, I found that students needed me more than in previous semesters. They needed more support, more flexibility and sometimes they just needed someone to listen. Working in a pandemic full time with mandatory overtime is something they never expected. Kimberly Porter, faculty UA Little Rock

Time management is the biggest struggle I had with nursing school. I figured out that if I set an extra hour aside, more than what I originally thought was needed, it helped me out a lot. In high school, I was also the person who just remembered everything in my head for school. In nursing school, that’s not possible; you have to have a planner. As soon as I get my schedules. I put them in my planner for the entire semester. Ryan Glenn, student UAMS College of Nursing

Most nurses experience the loss of a patient at some point in their career. As nurse faculty specializing in obstetrical nursing, I am asked frequently about coping with fetal or infant loss. Often students want to know how I hold it together or not cry while in the moment. My answer is always the same: I don’t. I am human. I feel. Ashley York, nurse educator National Park College The simplest act you perform can mean the world to a patient. The patient and their family may never thank you, but you will know that you made things a little easier or better for them. The relationships we build with our patients and families may slip our minds from time to time, but I guarantee they will never forget your kindness and care. This is why I come to work every day. Cathy Buzbee, RN Case Manager UAMS Medical Center Find the one nurse you know that you can trust — the one you can lean on for knowledge, guidance and one you know will stand with you in the face of adversity. They do exist. There are nurses who want to help the young and build them into successful, seasoned nurses. Sarah Overbey, associate degree nursing faculty National Park College I loved nursing from start. After 30 years I still think that it’s rewarding being able to help someone in need. That said, I am not perfect and I still make mistakes, and you will, too. Just try to learn from them. Shirley Jones, RN Labor and Delivery UAMS Medical Center Mental health plays a huge part in our profession. To properly channel our exuberant energy, we must first pour love and positivity into ourselves. Flexibility, creativity, compassion, kindness, excellent communication and assertiveness are displayed daily by our awesome nursing faculty. Shelia Brooks, faculty UA Little Rock

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You are often meeting patients at their worst moments, whether they are acutely ill, dealing with a new diagnosis, facing a devastating loss or in their own emergent situation. It is important to remember that you can always have compassion for another person’s situation. Handle each situation with grace and the same compassion you would want shown to your family and yourself. Chasey Dibble, simulation and lab coordinator National Park College You need to have a passion for nursing. Be prepared to give it your all. It’s hard but worth it. Gina Clements, student UA Little Rock Being a nurse is hard. It’s 24/7/365. You are a nurse at the ball field, at family gatherings, at church, on mission trips; everywhere you go you are “the nurse.” And while it is a job of difficulty and stress, it is also one of great joy. I don’t stop being a nurse when I leave the job. It is who I have become after all these years. Sandra Bennett, RN case manager UAMS Childhood Post-Infectious Autoimmune Encephalopathy Clinic When interviewing for that first job, the best advice I can give is be yourself! There’s no need to come into your interview sounding like a robot and answering questions because they sound good. Remember why you’re doing this in the first place. Authenticity is better than having the “right” answers. Aundria Webber, student UAMS College of Nursing

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The AHA Quality Team works with hospital quality improvement teams, raising the bar on patient safety and quality statewide. From left: Cindy Harris, administrative assistant; Cindy Crump, quality specialist; Nikki Wallace, quality specialist; and Pamela Brown, vice president of Quality and Patient Safety.

MEET THE AHA QUALITY TEAM!

The Arkansas Hospital Association’s Quality Team works with hospitals every week, helping health care workers throughout the state put the latest, best practices into service. “We work with hospital quality leaders on specific improvement areas, such as early sepsis identification, avoidance of ventilator-acquired pneumonia, C. difficile containment, etc., and on the year’s overall improvement goals,” explained Pamela Brown, vice president of quality and patient safety. “These deal with reducing inpatient harm by a certain percentage or lowering the number of readmissions within 30 days of discharge. No matter how many improvements we make, we will always have new conditions and concerns to address.” When working with AHA member hospitals, Brown says she enjoys seeing Arkansas hospital clinicians, professionals and quality team members learning from and sharing experiences with one another. They also gain access to national best practices and make important networking contacts through AHA initiatives. “When I look back at how far health care quality improvement has come, I feel a great sense of connection,” she said. “Quality improvement work and the fellowship of a team’s commitment to positive outcomes … gives people a sense of personal worth.” Looking forward, Brown said she’d like to see more alignment of leadership, processes, core measures and delivery of care. The more those in positions of hospital governance and administration are involved in the work of quality and patient safety, she said, the more successful they will be. “With experience, we improve safety and quality,” she says. “But ‘quality’ is really a part of the whole patient experience. It’s not only a question of ‘How can we improve this procedure,’ but also, ‘How can we improve the care experience for each patient, family and caregiver?’ and ‘How can we sustain improvements we have worked so hard to achieve?’ “I’d like to see a reduction in the burden of more required measures. At the hospital level, we are moving toward more automated processes for data management, which will help in identifying opportunities for improved care delivery. I’d also like to see a more vigorous focus on support of hospital quality and the professionals who deliver care every day. A nationwide effort to show how to apply and align our quality work — and ways to embed strategies that are cross-cutting — would be very effective. A version of this article first appeared in the Spring 2020 edition of Arkansas Hospitals magazine, a print and digital publication of the Arkansas Hospital Association.

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OCTOBER 2021 27


Arkansas College/University

Yrs/Public Private

Calendar

Degree Offered

Length Of Program

Living Arrangements

Aid Deadline

Arkansas State University - Jonesboro • 870-9723074 (nursing) • 870-972-3024 (admissions)

4 yr public

Semester

Traditional A.A.S.N. LPN-to-AASN LPN - AASN (Online) RN-to-BSN (Online Program - must have an RN license) 2nd Degree Accelerated, B.S.N. Traditional B.S.N.

varies

on campus housing for Jonesboro; off campus for online RN-BSN

July 1st; Online students pay apply year around

Arkansas Tech University, Russellville • 479968-0383

4 yr public

Semester

BSN, LPN to BSN, RN to BSN, MSN, RN to MSN

BSN-4yrs, RN to BSN-1yr, MSN-2yrs

on campus housing

varies

Harding University, Searcy • 1-800-477-4407, 501-279-4682

4 yr private

Semester

BSN, MSN FNP, Post Graduate

BSN 4 yrs; MSN FN - 2yrs, PG - 2yrs

on campus housing

February 1st

Henderson State University, Arkadelphia • 870-230-5015

4 yr public

Semester

BSN (traditional); RN to BSN online; RN to BSN online enrollment both fall and spring; LPN to BSN on campus; MSN online,Online HSU Nursing Education Certificate

4 yrs for the Traditional BSN and LPN to BSN on Campus; RN-BSN Online in 1 year (3 semesters)Online MSN has two different tracks: Family Nurse Practitioner and Nursing Administration, both take 2 years to complete. Online HSU Nursing Education Certificate take 1 summer or 2 summer options.

on/off campus

June

Ouachita Baptist Univeristy, Arkadelphia • 870-245-5000

4 yr private, faithbased

Semester

Dual Enrolled RN to BSN Completion (Ouachita Baptist University and Baptist Health College Little Rock), RN-BSN Online

Dual Enrolled RN-BSN 4 yrs, BSN Online Full or Part-time: 9-12 months

Dual Enrolled RN to BSN: On campus housing at Ouachita first 4 semesters; commuter campus while attending BHCLR; off campus for final semester online, RN to BSN Online, off campus

Priority Dec. 1

Southern Arkansas University, Magnolia • 870-235-4040

4 yr public

Semester

BSN, Online RN-BSN Completion

4 yrs BSN, 1-4 yrs online RNBSN Completion program

on campus housing

July 1st

University of Arkansas, Fayetteville • 479-5753904

4 yr public

Semester

BSN, RN-BSN (online program), MSN (online program), DNP (online program)LPN-BSN (online program)

4 years for BSN, 3-5 semesters RN to BSN, 2 years part-time MSN, 3 years full-time / 4 years part-time post-BSN-DNP, 2 years part-time post-MSNDNP

on campus housing for BSN students

March 15th

Univeristy of Arkansas, Little Rock, School of Nursing, Little Rock • 501-569-8081

4 yr public

Semester

AAS, BSN, RN-BSN Completion

AAS program 18 to 24 months, RN-BSN online 12 or 18 month track

on/off campus housing

April 1st, Contact Financial Aid Office 501-916-3035

University of Central Arkansas, Conway • 501-450-3119

4 yr public

Semester

BSN, RN TO BSN, MSN (Nurse Educatior with Clinical Specialty), Post-Master’s DNP and BSN to DNP (Family Nurse Practitioner)

BSN 4 yrs, RN to BSN 12 mos 100% online, MSN 5 semesters, 100% online, PMC varies, DNP 2yrs, BSN to DNP (FNP) 4 yrs part-time

on campus housing available

July 1st

University of Arkansas - Fort Smith • 479-7887841, 1-888-512-LION

4 yr public

Semester

BSN

4 yrs for BSN/Varies for RN-BSN

on campus housing

Priority Oct. 1st

University of Arkansas at Monticello • 870460-1069

4 yr public

Semester

AASN (LPN-RN), BSN, RN-BSN, LPN-BSN

2 to 4 yrs

on campus housing

contact financial aid (870) 460-1050

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, College of Nursing, Little Rock • 501-686-5224

4 yr public

Semester

RN to BSN, BSN, MSNc (APRN and Admin), BSN to DNP (APRN), DNP (Leadership), and PhD. Post Masters options available.

BSN generic: 2 full calendar years/ RN to BSN: 1 yr full time/ MNSc, DNP & PhD: students have up to 6 yrs to complete degree requirements.

on campus housing

varies, visit nursing.uams.edu. Click on Financial Assistance under Future Students

Arkansas Northeastern College, Blytheville • 870-780-1228

2 yr public

Semester

AAS Nursing

2 year

commuter campus

Priority April 15

Arkansas State University - Jonesboro • 870-9723074 (nursing) • 870-972-3024 (admissions)

4 yr public

Semester

D.N.P., M.S.N., B.S.N., AASN (LPN to AASN and Online LPN to AASN offered at A-State Jonesboro;Traditional and LPN to AASN offered at ASU MidSouth, and ASU-Mountain Home)

varies

on campus housing for Jonesboro

July 1st

Arkansas State University - Mountain Home • 870-508-6266

2 yr public

Semester

AAS in RN- LPN/Paramedic to RN

30 hrs pre-req courses, plus 1 yr LPN/Paramedic, Plus 1 yr RN

commuter campus

Nov. 1

Arkansas Tech University - Ozark Campus, Ozark • 479-667-2117

public

Semester

AAS in Allied Health-Practical Nursing and AAS in Registered Nursing

3 semesters-PN; 2 semesters - RN

commuter campus

Priority April 15

College of the Ouachitas, Malvern • 800-3370266 ext 1200

2 yr public

Semester

Technical Certificate in Practical Nursing (PN), Associate of Applied Science in Nursing (LPN/Paramedic to RN), Certified Nursing Assistant, Medication Administration Program

12 months

commuter campus

open

East Arkansas Community College, Forrest City • 870-633-4480

2 yr public

Semester

AASN

2 yrs

commuter campus

April 15th

Mississippi County Community College, Blytheville • 870-762-1020

2 yr public

Semester

AAS in Nursing

2 yrs

commuter campus

Priority April 15 - Rolling

National Park College, Hot Springs • 501-7604290

2 yr public

Semester

Associate of Science in Nursing (RN) traditional & LPN to RN, Technical Certificate in Practical Nursing (PN)

2 yrs RN, 1 yr PN

commuter campus

open

North Arkansas College, Harrison • 870-7433000

2 yr public

Semester

AAS in Nursing-traditional. LPN, RN Bridge

RN-2 yr; RN Bridge-1yr; PN-1yr

commuter campus

Pell Grant June 30

Northwest Arkansas Community College, Bentonville • 479-636-9222, 800-995-6922

2 yr public

Semester

AAS, RN

68 credit hours

commuter campus

June 1st and November 1st

Ozarka College, Melbourne • 870-368-2024 (Admissions) 870-368-2077 (Nursing)

2 yr public

Semester

Associate of Applied Science in Registered Nursing

12 mos

commuter campus; limited housing units available on campus

none

Phillips Community College of the University of Arkansas, Helena-West Helena, Stuttgart • HWH 870-338-6474 x1254; Stuttgart 1-870-6734201 x1809

2 yr public

Semester

AAS

63 credit hrs, 5 semesters

commuter campus

Federal and state deadlines observed.

Southeast Arkansas College, Pine Bluff • 870543-5917

2 yr public

Semester

AAS: RN, Generic RN & LPN/Paramedic to RN. Technical Certificate: PN

PN-1 yr, Generic RN-5 Semesters

commuter campus

open

University of Arkansas, Little Rock, Department of Nursing, Little Rock • 501-569-8081

4 yr public

Semester

AAS/LPN to RN/BSN

4 semesters

on/off campus housing

April 1st

BACCALAUREATE

ASSOCIATE DEGREE

28 OCTOBER 2021

ARKANSAS TIMES

Special Advertising Section


Scholarship Deadline

Required Exams

Application Deadline

Comments/Home Page Address

February 15th

ACT, SAT, COMPASS, or ASSET; HESI A2 Nursing Admission Exam or HESI LPN to ADN Mobility Exam

varies

Nursing programs are accredited by the Accrediting Commission for Education in Nursing, Inc. www.astate.edu

varies

BSN-ACT or COMPASS, TEAS, RN to BSNNone, MSN-GRE or MAT

BSN: Mar 1, Oct 1; RN to BSN: Mar 1, Aug 1, Oct 1; MSN: Ongoing

RN to BSN and MSN online, ACEN accredited, www.atu.edu/nursing

Rolling

ACT or SAT

Rolling

Quality nursing education with a focus on Christian service and professionalism. www.harding.edu

varies

ACT, SAT, or COMPASS

August ( August 1) and January ( apply by January 1)

The school with a heart. Small classes. CCNE Accredited. www.hsu.edu

Priority Dec 1

ACT or TEAS (BHCLR)

Dual Enrolled RN to BSN: Priority Dec 1 (OBU); November 30 (OBU & BHCLR), RN to BSN Online, Ongoing,

Dual Enrolled RN to BSN: Earn two degress in four years in this innovative, affordable program (AAS from BHCLR, BSN from OBU).RN to BSN Online: Small classes, Can be completed in 9-12 months, Entry into program 5 times per year.

Priority March 15, Final August

ACT, TEAS at least 60%

BSN Spring: Jan. 15-Mar. 1 for Fall Admission, Sep. 10 - Oct. 31 for Spring Admission; RN-BSN Completion Program Aug. (prior to classes beginning for Fall Admission, Jan. (prior to classes beginning for Spring Admission)

www.saumag.edu/nursing

November 15th

SAT, ACT, and BSN-DNP

Varies

We offer generalist and advanced nursing degree programs to prepare nurses to meet the health needs of the public in an ever-changing health care environment. The DNP offers two options: family nurse practitioner and acute-geriatric nurse practitioner. nurs.uark.edu

February 1st

ACT/SAT for students with less than 12 credits.

AAS application Jan 5-February 28 classes start during the summer semester, RN-BSN online program rolling admissions

BSN completion for current RNs or recent graduates of an accredited nursing program. UA-Little Rock students can earn an AAS and ladder into the online BSN and graduate within 4 years. www.ualr.edu/nursing.

February 15 - University Scholarships | March 9 Foundation Scholarships

No entrance exam required for nursing major.

varies by program, see website for dates

Student-centered, NCLEX-RN 1st time pass rates are consistently above state and national average. All programs are CCNE Accredited. www.uca.edu/nursing

June 1st

ACT/Accuplacer

Oct 1st for Spring/ March 1st for Fall

RN-BSN is an Online Completion Program. Http://health.uafs.edu/programs/rnto-bsn; health.uafs.edu

March 1st

Entrance

March 1st

Achieve your nursing goals with us. http://www.uamont.edu/pages/school-of-nursing/degree-programs/

varies, visit nursing.uams. edu. click on Financial Assistance under Future Students.

TOEFL for int’l students, ATI TEAS V for BSN applicants.

RN to BSN: Jan. 1, Mar. 1, Jun. 1, Sept. 1, Nov. 1/ BSN generic: Mar. 1/ MNSc: Sept. 1 & Feb. 1/BSN to DNP: Feb 1/ PhD: Mar.1, Jun. 15, Nov. 15

conadmissions@uams.edu • www.nursing.uams.edu

Priority April 15

ACT, SAT, COMPASS, or ACCUPLACER and PAX-RN

RN- March 31

ANC offers the RN, LPN, and LPN to RN programs of study. www.anc.edu

February 15th

ACT or SAT or COMPASS or ASSET; HESI A2 Nursing Admission Exam or HESI LPN to ADN Mobility Exam

varies

The mission of the School of Nursing is to educate, enhance and enrich students for evolving professoinal nursing practice. Nursing programs are accredited by the Accrediting Commission for Education in Nursing, Inc. www.astate.edu

varies

ACT, ACCUPLACER plus HESI LPN-ADN or HESI EMS-ADN

Oct. 15, March 15 (ASUMH starts a second cohort in Summer 2020)

Application packet and program requirements online. www.asumh.edu

varies

PN: TEAS, RN: HESI

March 15th, October 1st-PN; March 15-RN

Clinical experience in hospitals of varying size, physicians’ offices and geriatric facilities. www.atu.edu/ozark

Fall-May1, Spring-Dec 1

COMPASS/ACCUPLACER for the PN Program & Kaplan for RN Program

2nd Friday in Sept. for Jan. admitance; 2nd Friday in Feb. for May admittance to RN program

www.coto.edu for additional information.

varies

ACT, ACCUPLACER / Nursing Pre-entrance exams

varies

Allied health program offering RN-Nursing degree (basic students, LPN completion). www.eacc.edu

Priority April 15

PAX-RN

March 31st

www.mccc.cc.ar.us

open

ACT, SAT or College Entry Exam & TEAS

First Monday in March

Options for LPN and new High School seniors. www.np.edu

June 15th

ACT, ACCUPLACER

varies with program

Northark’s students receive excellent healthcare education leading to rewarding careers in nursing. www.northark.edu/academics/areas-of-study/health-and-medical/index

April 1st

HESI A2

Track I: May 1st, Track II: Dec. 1st, LPN to RN: Nov. 1st

The college of the NWA community, member of Northwest Arkansas Nursing Education Consortium. www.nwacc.edu/academics/nursing. The NWACC Nursing program is ARSBN approved and ACEN accredited

April 1st

NACE test

Aug. 31/Spring entry (application window: Jan 1- Aug 31)

Providing life-changing experiences through education. www.ozarka.edu

none

Nelson Denny Reading Test 10th grade level and 55 on the ATI Critical Thinking Exam

June 1st

ACEN accredited. www.pccua.edu

none

ACT, COMPASS, PAX for PN,KAPLAN Admission Exam

Second Friday in March

Changing lives…one student at a time! www.seark.edu

February 1st

ACT/SAT/Compass for students with less than 12 credits.

Priority Application Deadline Feb 28/ Applications accepted until class full.

LPN/Paramedic to RN (1 year). Traditional AAS (2 years). Accelerated AAS (18 months). See above for BSN information. www.ualr.edu/nursing

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OCTOBER 2021 29


University of Arkansas Community College at Batesville • 870-612-2000, 800-508-7878

2 yr public

Semester

AAS-Generic RN, AAS-LPN-to-RN Online or Traditional, TC-Practical Nursing

AAS-Generic RN 16mos, ASS-LPN-to-RN 12 mos, TC-Practical Nursing 11mos

commuter campus

varies

University of Arkansas at Hope-Texarkana • 870-777-5722

2 yr public

Semester

Associate/RN; LPN (Hope); LPN (Texarkana)

12 months (excludes prerequisites)

commuter campus

July 15th

Baptist Health College Little Rock • 501-2026200, 800-345-3046

private, faith-based

Semester

diploma/PN, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing/RN

RN traditonal track 3 semesters + general education courses PN 1yr. RN Accelerated 1yr (LPNs or Paramedics).

commuter campus

March 1st priority

Jefferson Reg. Med. Center School of Nursing, Pine Bluff • 870-541-7858

private

Semester

Associate of Applied Science in Nursing

79 weeks

off campus only

none

Arkansas Northeastern College, Blytheville • 870-780-1228

public

Semester

Technical Certificate of Practical Nursing

13 months

commuter campus

Priority April 15th

Arkansas State University - Beebe • 501-2076255

public

Semester

Certificate LPN

11 mos

commuter campus

varies

Arkansas State University - Mountain Home • 870-508-6266

public

Semester

Technical certificate in PN

11 mos

commuter campus

varies

Arkansas State University - Newport • 870680-8710

public

Semester

Technical Certificate in Practical Nursing

11 mos

commuter campus

contact financial aid

Arkansas Tech University - Ozark Campus, Ozark • 479-667-2117

public

Semester

AAS in Allied Health-Practical Nursing

3 semesters

commuter campus

Priority April 15

ASU Technical Center, Jonesboro • 870-932-2176

public

Semester

LPN

11 mos

commuter campus

none

Baptist Health College Little Rock • 501-2026200, 800-345-3046

private

Semester

diploma/PN, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing/RN

2 semester PN

commuter campus

Priority March 1st

Black River Technical College, Pocahontas • 870248-4000 ext. 4150

2 yr public

Semester

AAS/RN, Certificate/PN, Certificate of Proficiency/Nursing Assistant

AAS/RN 3 semesters, Certificate/PN 3semesters, Certificate of Proficiency/Nursing Assistant 5 weeks.

commuter campus

contact financial aid office

College of the Ouachitas, Malvern • 800-3370266 ext 1200

2 yr public

Semester

Technical Certificate in Practical Nursing

12 months

commuter campus

Spring-November;Summer-April

University of Arkansas - Cossatot, DeQueen and Nashville • 870-584-4471, 800-844-4471

2 yr public

Fall, Spring, and Summer semesters

LPN Technical Certificate, RN Associate of Applied Science

LPN DeQueen Day Program 11 mos, LPN Nashville Evening Program 18 mos, RN (transition from LPN) Nashville Evening Program 11 mos.

commuter campus

varies

Crowley’s Ridge Technical Institute • Forrest City • 870-633-5411

public

Semester

LPN

LPN: 40 wks

commuter campus

Please call 870.633.5411 for more information

National Park College, Hot Springs • 501-7604160

Public

Semester

Certificate in Practical Nursing

11 mos FT

commuter campus

none

Northwest Technical Institute, Springdale • 479-751-8824

public

Semester

diploma/PN

3 sem. & 1 Summer session (includes Pre-Reqs)

commuter campus

July 1/Fall, December 1/Spring

Ozarka College, Melbourne • 870-368-2024 (Admissions) 870-368-2077 (Nursing)

2 yr public

Semester

Technical Certificate in LPN, LPN-RN track offered

11 mos. track or 18 mos. track

commuter campus with limited housing units available on campus

none

Phillips Community College of the University of Arkansas, Helena-West Helena, DeWitt • HWH 870-338-6474 x1254; DeWitt 1-870-946-3506 x 1511

2 yr public

Semester

Technical Certificate

42 credit hrs; 3 semesters

commuter campus

Federal and state deadlines observed.

University of Arkansas Pulaski Technical College, North Little Rock • 501-812-2200

2 yr public

Begins in early August and ends in mid-June of each school year

Technical Certificate in Practical Nursing/PN

11-month traditional track/22month non-traditional track

commuter campus

April 15 for upcoming fall semester

University of Arkansas Rich Mountain, Mena • 479-394-7622

2 yr public

Semester

Associate of Applied Science in Registered Nursing, Technical Certificate in Practical Nursing, CP in Nursing Assistant

11-12 mos

commuter or on-campus housing available in 2020

varies, contact financial aid office

SAU Tech, Camden • 870-574-4500

2 yr public

Semester

Technical Certificate

11 mos

commuter campus and on-campus

N/A

South Arkansas Community College, El Dorado • 870-864-7142, 870-864-7137

2 yr public

Semester

ADN,LPN

11 mos

commuter campus

June 1, November 1, April 1

University of Arkansas at Monticello College of Technology, McGeHee • 870-222-5360

2 yr public

Semester

Technical Certificate in Practical Nursing

January to December

commuter campus

varies

University of Arkansas Comm. College at Morrilton • 501-977-2000

2 yr public

Semester

Practical Nursing (PN) Technical Certificate; Registered Nursing (RN) Associate of Applied Science degree

PN is 12 months; RN is 12 months after prerequisites are met

commuter campus

prior to semester

University of Arkansas at Hope-Texarkana • 870-777-5722

2 yr public

Semester

certificate/PN

10.5 or 12 months (excludes prerequisites)

commuter campus

July 15th

PRACTICAL NURSING

*** for Basic nursing education; Varies with previous coursework or nursing license; MSN program = 2 yrs

30 OCTOBER 2021

ARKANSAS TIMES

Special Advertising Section


March 1- High school Academic; July 15- Others; Nursing Scholarship- Dec. 1

ASSET, ACT, SAT or ACCUPLACER, and KAPLAN Nurse Entrance Test

TC-PN and AAS-Generic RN May 1; AAS-LPN-to-RN July 15

Prerequisite courses and KAPLAN entrance testing must be completed prior to entry into a nursing program. www.uaccb.edu

April 15 and November 15

ACT or ACCUPLACER or LPN license

August 31st

www.arnec.org, www.uacch.edu

varies

ACT or SAT; TEAS

RN traditional track/PN program: July 1st & December 1st , RN Accelerated: December 1st

www.bhclr.edu

none

ACT

Oct. 15 for Jan. class; Apr. 15 for June class. $35 application fee.

www.jrmc.org/schoolofnursing

Priority April 15th

ACT, SAT, COMPASS, or ACCUPLACER and PAX-PN

PN-March 31st

Variety of clinical experiences. www.anc.edu

June 15th

ACCUPLACER and WONDERLIC

April 15 and November 15

Application packet and program requirements are online. www.asub.edu

varies

ACT, ACCUPLACER plus HESI A2

Oct. 15, March 15

Application packet and program requirements online. www.asumh.edu

varies

Accuplacer, ATI TEAS

August class (Newport/Jonesboro)-June 1, January class (Marked Tree)- Oct 15

Application packet and program requirements online. www.asun.edu

varies

TEAS

March 15th, October 1st

Clinical experience in hospitals of varying size, physicians’ offices and geriatric facilities. www.atu.edu/ozark

none

ASSET, NET

June 1 & November 1

Combines classroom instruction with clinical experience. Graduates eligible to take NCLEX.

varies

ACT or SAT; TEAS

Dec 1st & June 1st

www.bhclr.edu

April 15th

ACT or Accuplacer for BRTC Admission and NA Applicants; TEAS for PN Applicants, NACE for RN Applicants.

NA - Contact Nursing department, PN April 1 for following fall acceptance and October 31 for following spring acceptance, August 31 annually for following Spring RN acceptance.

BRTC: A college of vision. BRTC has a 95% plus boards pass rate. www.blackrivertech.org

Spring-November;Summer-May

HESI Entrance Exam

2nd Friday in Oct. for Jan. admittance; 2nd Friday in March for May admittance to PN program

www.coto.edu

April 1st

ACCUPLACER or ACT; TEAS for LPN; NACE for RN

LPN Day Program-De Queen: March 1st, LPN and RN Evening Program-Nashville: August 31st

Prerequisites required prior to admission. www.cccua.edu/MedEd

varies

ACCUPLACER

CRTI is currently in the process of merging with East Arkansas Community College. Call for more information.

www.crti.ar.tec.us

none

College Entry Exam, TEAS

First Monday in March

Do you want to make a difference? Then nursing is for you! www.np.edu

June 1/Fall, December 1/ Spring

NET, COMPASS

November 1st

Bilingual scholarships available- www.nwansged.org

April 1st

PAX Test

April 1/Fall entry, November 1/Spring entry

Providing life-changing experiences through education. www.ozarka.edu

none

Nelson-Denny Reading Test 9th grade level and 47 on ATI Critical Thinking Exam

June 1st for fall admission and Oct. 1st for spring admission

www.pccua.edu

varies

ACT or ACCUPLACER and Kaplan Admission Test

April 15th

Call the Allied Health Advisor to discuss eligibility requirements. www.uaptc. edu/programs_of_study/nursing/practical_nursing.asp. Allied Health Advisor: 501-812-2745. Allied Health Administrative Specialist: 501-812-2834. INTERNET HOME PAGE ADDRESS - www.uaptc.edu

Nov. 15 - Priority; Apr. 1 - Pending funds available; Foundation Scholarship Deadlines: Fall - Apr. 1 & Jul. 30; Spring - Dec. 1

RN: NACE; LPN: PSB and ACT or Accuplacer

LPN-March, RN-August

www.uarichmountain.edu

March 1st

ASSET. TEAS. Practical Nursing

March 31st

Two Applications required: admissions and nursing. www.sautech.edu

Priority April 1st

ACT, ASSET, or COMPASS

open

SouthArk: Where students come first. www.southark.edu

March 1st

ACT, Accuplacer, ASSET, COMPASS, or SAT - TABE and TEAS

Early October

Approved by Arkansas State Board of Nursing, Accredited by the Higher Learning commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools

April 1st

TEAS, NACE

PN deadlines are Oct. 1 & Mar. 1; RN dealine is Aug. 31

Enrollment in PN program on Morrilton campus limited to 24 in spring semester and summer. Enrollment in RN program limited to 48 for classes beginning each January. www.uaccm.edu

April 15 and November 15

ACT or ACCUPLACER

May 1st and November 1st

www.uacch.edu

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OCTOBER 2021 31


32 OCTOBER 2021

ARKANSAS TIMES

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