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COMMENT

Trump, Christianity and decency Considering how many appeals Arkansas’s Republican leaders have made to the religion of Christianity over the years, how can they justify continued support of the least Christian person in the presidential race? Rich Hutson Cabot After watching the Michelle Obama speech from Oct. 13, I felt good inside and comforted that the first lady stood up for me. She has a sense of decency that Donald Trump and his followers — Mike Pence, Mike Huckabee, Tom Cotton, Governor Hutchinson, Attorney General Leslie Rutledge and half of the Arkansas legislature — will never understand, because they lack it in themselves. She didn’t let Trump get away with his horrible remarks about women. I would vote for her if she ran for president. She has more class, courage, humanity, intelligence and integrity in her little finger than the whole Arkansas government has. Governor Hutchinson and other state government officials were either silent or made lame excuses for Donald Trump’s sexual predator remarks

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about women. Some politicians protested the crude remarks for media attention, but these same politicians vote against women when it comes to equal pay, equal health care and violence against women. Look at their voting records. The Arkansas legislature is known for making disrespectful remarks about women when they are passing discriminatory, unequal women’s health care laws, so I am not impressed with the few who said they were offended by Donald’s sexual assault remarks because of their female family members. I guess they aren’t outraged on my behalf, since I am not part of their family. In my opinion, if you are still a Trump supporter after the sexual assault remarks he made, then you are no more a Christian, or conservative, or patriot, or decent human being than Donald Trump is. When you wave that family values, conservative flag at me, I will just call you what you are: a liar. Women in Arkansas deserve better state government representation than what we have. It is wrong for our state government to act like it is normal to use women as sexual punching bags, and this attitude is part of the reason that so many women are raped in the United States of America. Sexual preda-

tor Donald Trump and excuse-making Mike Pence do not deserve to represent America. Strangely, it was two Arkansas women, Leslie Rutledge and Sarah Huckabee Sanders, who made fools of themselves on national media shows when they failed miserably in their defense of Donald Trump’s sexual bragging and ended up sputtering and talking in circles. There is no defense. Why would they want to defend him? Money? Were they promised a job in the White House? Are they mentally unstable and need help? If you weren’t offended by Trump’s sexual assault remarks, what does that say about you? Young girls and boys heard a man running for president make excuses for himself for bragging about sexually assaulting women’s bodies. It is not OK for his supporters to excuse the disrespectful, vulgar way he talks about women, in the past and in the present. People like Trump create a culture where people accept rape as normal, instead of being outraged by it. The first lady said, “Strong men — men who are truly role models — don’t need to put down women to make themselves feel powerful.” Shineon Libby Little Rock

From the web In response to the Sept. 29 Arkansas Reporter, “Democrats’ last stand in NE Arkansas”: I was tickled to death to get this much valuable information about a Senate race outside my own district, until I started reading Brandt Smith’s positions. There’s just something wholeheartedly discouraging about the demise of the political talent and common sense in this state, and the voters are to blame. Don’t get me wrong, I share Nate Looney’s admiration and recollection for common sense and sometimes even fairly conservative Democrats. Bumpers, Pryor and Clinton were names that garnered national respect. Why do we never hear anything about Arkansas politicians on the national stage any more, unless it is the embarrassing craziness of Leslie Rutledge or Mike Huckabee twanging it up for Trump, or Tom Cotton trying to start WWIII? Here are a few reasons: 1) Looney cites a study about the value of pre-K funding from one of the foremost institutions of higher learning in the country, and somehow Smith associates the findings with the urban problems of the city where Arkansas State University is located? What is maddening is that so many voters probably see his (lack of) reasoning. 2) In one of the poorest and most disadvantaged states demographically in the entire nation, Smith is citing the availability of air conditioners and cell phones as some measure of economic comfort and security for pre-K children? What? And as for the value of full-time parenting of the young, that may be fine for many, but does he not realize that the best thing to do for immense numbers of children is to get them into a safe learning environment at as young an age as possible? I guess it would be too much to hope he had read Plato’s “Republic.” 3) And enough with this need to establish Christianity as the official state religion. Honestly, is the threat of Sharia law really a common problem in Jonesboro? This is just another example of local Republicans listening to conservative radio or watching Fox News to get guidance for solutions to problems that don’t exist. 4) And yes, by all means, let’s fund efforts to stop immigration or the flow of people into our state. That shouldn’t cost much since it is doubtful anybody would want to come to Arkansas with policymakers like Smith setting the standards. Godspeed, Mr. Looney. redeemed626


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BRIAN CHILSON

EYE ON ARKANSAS

DOWN GOES THE BROADWAY BRIDGE: Or at least most of it. A blast on Oct. 15 failed to down the span on the right. A pneumatic ram brought it down later that day.

WEEK THAT WAS

Quote of the Week “I’m troubled by the statements that have been made by Donald Trump in terms of women in past decades. I am not following the current discussions that closely … . I think we do have two candidates that are both flawed and the American public just has to evaluate it. My evaluation is on the big picture items: on where our economy goes, where we are in fighting ISIS, in terms of the Supreme Court.” — Governor Hutchinson at a press conference last week, responding to questions about the infamous 2005 video of the Republican presidential nominee boasting about his sexual assault of women.

Two ballot questions moot The Arkansas Supreme Court has ruled two proposed constitutional amendments ineligible for consideration on Election Day. The ballot titles of Issue 4, which would have capped damages awarded in medical malpractice lawsuits, and Issue 5, which would have allowed three new casinos in the state, both failed to adequately inform voters about certain critical points, the court said. (Both questions will remain on ballots — which have already been 6

OCTOBER 20, 2016

ARKANSAS TIMES

printed — but votes will not be counted.) However, the justices rejected a challenge brought against Issue 6, an amendment that would legalize medical marijuana; it’s now in the hands of voters. As of the time of this writing, the court had yet to decide on a challenge to Issue 7, an initiated act that would also legalize medical marijuana.

Justice comes for Boeckmann Former District Judge Joseph Boeckmann of Wynne was indicted Oct. 5 on 21 federal counts of wire fraud, bribery, travel act violations and witness tampering stemming from the judge’s use of his position to obtain “personal services, sexual contact and the opportunity to view and to photograph in compromising positions persons who appeared before him,” according to the indictment. Boeckmann resigned in May amid a state judicial conduct investigation into his practice of allegedly lessening or dismissing sentences in exchange for sexual favors from young male defendants in Cross County who were charged with misdemeanors or traffic violations. He is in custody at the Pulaski County Jail.

LR schools bracing for closures

Little Rock School District Superintendent Mike Poore appeared before the state Board of Education to present his plan to cut $15.3 million from the district’s budget next academic year, the largest chunk of which will come from closing as many as four school campuses. The schools will be identified by a committee of parents and district staff in the coming months, Poore said. He also floated the possibility of holding an election in 2017 to ask voters for an extension of the current millage rate.

The foster care surge Between January 2015 and today, the number of kids in Arkansas’s foster care system swelled from under 4,000 to almost 5,100 — an unprecedented figure. Why? The Arkansas Times last week obtained an internal report from the state’s Division of Children and Family Services that attempted to answer that question. DCFS commissioned the previously unreleased report from an independent consulting firm, Hornby Zeller Associates, but the agency said it disagreed with HZA’s key findings and is now working on its own report. Chief among HZA’s conclusions: The state is sometimes too quick to take children into custody, due in part to

systemic problems at DCFS (including sky-high employee turnover) and in part to overly aggressive action by some juvenile judges.

A tough old bridge The old Broadway Bridge is finally gone, but not without a fight. First, explosives failed to bring down its steel arches as planned on Tuesday morning, so tugboats pulled down the crippled structure with cables that afternoon. On Saturday, controlled blasts around the bridge’s three remaining concrete arches left one standing; crews had to turn to a pneumatic ram to knock it into the river. Not bad for a “structurally unsound” 93-year-old bridge.

A tough old senator Former U.S. Sen. David Pryor was hospitalized at Fayetteville’s Washington Regional Medical Center after suffering a stroke last week. His family says Pryor, 82, is recovering well. That’s thanks in part to the presence of two doctors at Washington Regional who happen to be experts in advanced stroke care and performing minimally invasive neurosurgery, Drs. Mayshan and Mahan Ghiassi (they’re brothers).


OPINION

Trumped in Arkansas

A

fter two solid debates and the release of a video and corroborating testimony that further confirmed the misogyny of Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton is favored to win the presidential election Nov. 8. I’d laugh. But the busy Russian hackers may yet turn up a nugget for Wikileaks that reverses the polling trend. And there’s also this: Trump will carry Arkansas easily. What if Arkansas is more representative of voters nationally than polling indicates? It’s sad that a state that claims leaders like J.W. Fulbright, Winthrop Rockefeller, Dale Bumpers, David Pryor, Bill Clinton, Jim Guy Tucker and Mike Beebe is about to vote for Donald Trump. Sadder still is that it won’t be a surprise. The black president opened the exit door to the residual traditional Democratic vote in Arkansas. It’s not soon to

return. I was challenged on this the other day by a former Democratic office holder. He MAX thinks there’s a forBRANTLEY maxbrantley@arktimes.com mula for a Democratic resurgence. It needs about five big themes that would be popular with a broad crosssection of voters. The lottery, for example, had broad support as a ticket to more college education. Pre-K is hard to quarrel with, though some on the extreme right don’t like it. Climate change is reality and voters are increasingly receptive to alternatives to fossil fuel — wind and solar, for example. An increase in the minimum wage enjoyed broad bipartisan support. Quick, think of a few more.

Issue 3: blank check

W

ho could object to a constitutional amendment “concerning job creation, job expansion and economic development,” which is the condensed title for Issue 3 for Arkansas voters on Nov. 8? Invoking “jobs” is how you sell anything nowadays, whether it’s casino gambling, legalized marijuana, tax cuts, deficit spending, gas fracking, coal burning or a border wall. But what if the title of Issue 3 read “an amendment to allow government to raise unlimited taxes and spend them to help businessmen and industrialists turn a profit and to reward those who help them”? Might taxpayers take a jaundiced view of the proposition? The second is actually a fair description of the amendment, which the Republican state legislature, with some Democratic help, put on the ballot. But there will be no money spent to tell voting taxpayers what the amendment would do to their pocketbooks and how it would control the way their tax dollars are spent. The amendment is flying as a noncontroversial proposition rather than the

treasury raid that it is. Corporate welfare is the new definition of conservatism. There was little courage ERNEST in the legislature DUMAS to risk being called job killers by voting against the referral of Issue 3. Twenty-seven legislators voted “no” and another eight ducked the roll call. Issue 3 has four components, only one of which is relatively benign. It would allow cities and counties to issue bonds for anything that could be called “economic development,” not just a factory. They could borrow money in the taxpayers’ name for a call center or corporate offices. The other provisions erase the old limits in the Constitution on levying taxes and incurring government debt to support industries and other commercial enterprises and on spending taxpayers’ funds for almost any business purpose. Technically, the legislature could spend all the revenues of the state to assist busi-

Now the hard part. Find a cadre of bright politicians capable of talking about issues such as these, but also willing to exhibit a little backbone. A guy named Bill Clinton, for example, endorsed gun control and stood up for a woman’s right to have an abortion. He succeeded despite those positions, which were seen as contradictory to conventional Arkansas thinking. (In fact, Clinton knew that polls showed the majority of voters, even in Arkansas, favor gun safety and preservation of legal abortion. But it takes bravery to stand up to loud, well-organized and passionate opposition.) The resurgence theory has a certain intellectual appeal. But emotion triumphs over IQ. See Trump’s reflexive support in Arkansas. Hard as I could, I tried to evaluate the town hall debate fairly. Trump avoided answers to direct questions when he wasn’t going off in incoherent tangents. He glowered. He sniffed. He lurked over Clinton. He uttered falsehoods. He demonstrated little understanding of — or curiosity about — world affairs. Clinton, on the other hand, spoke knowledgeably on all subjects. She made

game stabs at explaining her weak spots on trade and email. She handled a challenge on the leak of a private speech in which she said a politician sometimes can’t always say in public what she might say in private — not if she hopes to achieve political aims. She was unflustered by Trump’s remark that he’d emulate a banana republic strongman and have her arrested if he became president. Yet there remains a deep kinship to Trump and a loathing of Clinton in Arkansas. It doesn’t bode well for a Democratic rebirth. The debate weekend was marked, coincidentally, by worldwide attention to Yellville’s perverse practice of cheering a local pharmacist (and dedicated Church of Christ member) who drops live domesticated turkeys out of his airplane from 500 feet as a lure to attendance at the Turkey Trot festival. Two of 10 turkeys plummeted to gruesome deaths this year. It’s a “tradition,” the locals bray. They complain bitterly about criticism. Somehow, I don’t think many of the faces in that bloodthirsty Turkey Trot crowd are destined to be Democratic voters — this year or for years to come.

nesses, leaving nothing for highways, col- “economic development projects” with leges, prisons, health care, fish and wild- tax funds, including furnishing land, life programs and the rest of government. improvements, buildings, infrastructure, No one would expect the legislature job training and environmental mitigato ever do such a thing, but Issue 3 would tion for almost any kind of commercial at least allow it to throw fiscal caution venture. Anything. to the winds. But all that is minor stuff. The amendIn the interest of full disclosure, I ment would clear the way for cities and have to reveal that the amendment’s first counties to levy any kind of taxes to supobjective is to reverse a court order in a port new industries and businesses, not lawsuit that I instigated in 2013 as a direc- just the 5 mills of property taxes that are tor of the Arkansas Public Law Center. now allowed, and remove all the restricArticle 12 of the state Constitution pro- tions on financing superprojects that hibits cities and counties from appropri- were imposed in constitutional amendating money to private corporations and ments in 2004 and 2010, which allowed associations, a provision the drafters put the state to go deeply into debt to finance in the charter in 1874 to stop cities from infrastructure and other aids for large turning over their meager incomes to the manufacturing projects, like the Missisrailroads. In the 1990s, the state Chamber sippi County steel mill. of Commerce told local chambers they Currently, the legislature cannot should ask their local governments to borrow more for a new industry than 5 give them operating grants every year percent of the state’s general revenues because the chambers helped economic from the previous year, which would be development. Dozens of cities, including $268 million. If voters ratify Issue 3, the Little Rock and North Little Rock, began lawmakers could ring up a state debt of doing it. Pulaski Circuit Judge Mackie $268 billion. If you want to be silly but still technical, $268 trillion, which is 14 Pierce ruled last year in Lynch v. Stodola that Article 12 had to be interpreted lit- times the current national debt. All of it, erally. Appropriating tax money to the remember, would be to enhance business chambers was illegal. profits, not national defense, health care Issue 3, using the ruse of “amend- and education, the principal purposes of ing” the provision, actually would repeal the national debt. If you have serene confidence in the that constitutional law and allow cities and counties not only to fund cham- sanity and probity of all future legislabers of commerce but to finance whole tures, Issue 3 may still be for you. arktimes.com

OCTOBER 20, 2016

7


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o now the big crybaby says he’s losing because his opponent is crooked and the referees are blind. It’s straight out of the WWE “Wrestlemania” playbook. As I’ve said before, it’s not for nothing that Donald J. Trump was inducted into the WWE Hall of Fame. It’s all there: the boasting, the strutting, the racial taunts and the simulated mayhem naive observers sometimes mistake for real. But it’s all make-believe, and deep down nearly all WWE fans know it. I expect most Trump supporters do, too. Having failed miserably in his televised debates with Hillary Clinton — if he hadn’t been so outclassed, it’d be tempting to say he choked — Trump now claims that the entire U.S. political system is corrupt. “The election is being rigged by corrupt people pushing completely false allegations and outright lies in an effort to elect her president,” the GOP candidate whined. “We can’t let them get away with this, folks. ... Remember this, it’s a rigged election. … It’s a rigged election. … It’s a rigged election.” No, Donald, you’re just a big loser. Possibly one of the biggest losers in the history of American politics. “A thirdrate con man who wilted under pressure and was finally incinerated in a fireball of his own stupidity” is how Rolling Stone’s Matt Taibbi puts it. The big question is how Trump’s impassioned supporters will respond to his dung-throwing. “Election officials brace for fallout from Trump’s claims of a ‘rigged’ vote,” the Washington Post warns. The Boston Globe cautions, “Warnings of conspiracy stoke anger among Trump faithful.” Globe reporters definitely found a few real humdingers among the crowd at a Trump rally in Cincinnati. There was Joe, a 39-year-old first-time voter who fears Sharia law but apparently dozed through 8th grade civics. “This is my prediction,” Joe said. “Trump is going to win the popular vote by a landslide, and the Electoral College will elect Hillary, because of all the corruption.” Then there was Steve, a 61-year-old carpenter planning to heed Trump’s call to monitor suspect precincts. “I’ll look for … well, it’s called racial profiling. Mexicans. Syrians. People who can’t speak American,” he said. “I’m going to go right up behind them. … I want to see if they are accountable. I’m not going to do anything illegal. I’m going to

make them a little bit nervous.” Also Dan, a 50-year-old contractor who anticipates the worst: GENE “If [Hillary LYONS Clinton’s] in office, I hope we can start a coup. She should be in prison or shot. … We’re going to have a revolution and take them out of office if that’s what it takes. There’s going to be a lot of bloodshed. But that’s what it’s going to take. I would do whatever I can for my country.” As I say, this is your basic pro-wrestling crowd. They’re mostly there for the spectacle — blowing off steam. So my predictions are as follows: Joe won’t vote this time, either. Why bother if it’s fixed? Steve’s enthusiasm for racial profiling will fade after election officials inform him that harassing voters is a federal crime. As for Dan, I’m guessing that the 50-year-old revolutionary’s zeal for a “Second Amendment solution” will vanish after the Secret Service knocks on his door. He’d probably been drinking. Multiply those three by millions. Look, we’ve been hearing semi-hysterical rhetoric from Cow State white folks for many years. If it’s not the Tea Party, it’s the End Times delusions of the “Left Behind” novels. Only last year, a substantial proportion of Texans persuaded themselves that U.S. Army maneuvers code named “Jade Helm” constituted the opening wedge of an Obama-sponsored invasion. Empty Walmart stores would serve as barracks for foreign soldiers; hundreds of miles of secret tunnels were being dug to help ISIS fighters infiltrate. Christian patriots would be imprisoned in FEMA re-education camps. Texas Gov. Greg Abbot promised vigilance. Sen. Ted Cruz made sympathetic noises. And then? Nothing happened. In Arkansas, where I live, Trump will probably win by 20 points. Obama Derangement Syndrome has turned the state deep red. So what happens after Hillary Clinton’s declared the winner come Nov. 9? Well, the Arkansas-LSU game is in Fayetteville three days later. Don’t bother us, we’re busy. Sometimes I think the only thing in American life as predictable as Cow State paranoia is Blue State intellectuals taking it far too seriously.


Microclimates

L

ast week, the crew at FiveThirtyEight.com produced one of those maps that sucked away a chunk of my day. In it, the potential impact of Hillary Clinton’s exceptionally high support with voters of color and whites with a college degree and Donald Trump’s extraordinary appeal with whites without a college education are deciphered in a map that includes every county across the United States. The counties that have the potential to shift in the Democratic direction in relation to the 2012 election are shaded blue, and those where Trump will likely perform better than Mitt Romney are red. The picture of that polarization is a map bleeding red in the northeast quadrant of the country — running from Maine to Minnesota — and a decidedly bluer South and Southwest. The map gets even more interesting when one hones in on the likely shifts within states. While the movement from 2012 will not be as significant in Arkansas as in other states, variance created by the Trump candidacy does show itself across every county here as well. Unlike the past several election cycles in Arkansas, 2016 is a story of political microclimates. In the lead-up to the past four Arkansas election cycles, the forecast has been a fairly simple one: strong winds blowing in the GOP direction. When President Obama was elected in 2008, the then-weak Arkansas GOP produced few candidates to take advantage of disaffection with Obama, which was particularly strong among white voters in rural portions of the state. In 2010, the strong winds blowing in the Republican direction showed themselves early in the year and were even more intense by Election Day, with Republicans winning in many state legislative races and in three statewide races despite being disadvantaged in fundraising and electoral experience. Two years later, in 2012, Mitt Romney won resoundingly and brought enough state legislators along with him to give Republicans a clear majority in the state Senate and a smaller one in the state House. In 2014, the final statewide Democrat, U.S. Sen. Mark Pryor, was flushed out of office, the GOP took control of every other statewide office, and the historic majority party was shellacked in legislative battles. These dynamics throughout the Obama years mark the starkest electoral change in any American state in modern history.

Undoubtedly, as shown in the FiveThirtyEight map, Trumpism has strong adherents in some of JAY those Arkansas BARTH counties that have been newly receptive to Republicanism in the Obama era — the “rural swing” counties and Ozark counties that lack economic vibrancy. But, the backlash to Trump is also intense, particularly among better-educated whites and persons of color. While the state has a lower college graduation rate than all but a handful of others, there are Arkansas counties where Clinton has significant growth potential over Obama. In addition to Pulaski County (Arkansas’s largest), these include the fastest growing counties in the state — burgeoning Northwest Arkansas and the suburban counties around Little Rock. Clinton will outperform Obama in Arkansas, driven by large changes in a handful of counties. There will be implications for the competitive state legislative races underway, which are driven by turnout patterns at the top of the ticket. Unquestionably, GOP candidates in certain districts with pro-Trump demographics will be advantaged. Indeed, having Trump at the top of the ticket may pull Republicans across Arkansas to victory. More of the contested races this cycle, however, are in areas where the backlash to Trump is likely to be most intense. While the stage may be set for a few Democratic pickups in the legislature, there are two caveats. First, it remains unclear how much ticket-splitting we will see. There was an almost perfect correlation from the top of the ticket to the bottom in Arkansas in the 2014 election cycle, but the Trump candidacy may be seen as so exceptional by voters that we see a rebirth of ticket-splitting this cycle. Second, Donald Trump’s relative underperformance may occur in parts of the state where GOP candidates have a big margin with which to work. No matter how poorly Trump does in Benton County, for instance, there is no real likelihood that the heavily Republican county will go for Clinton at the end of the day. Thus, overperformance does not equate to victory for Democrats, particularly in the parts of the state where Republicans have built such clear advantages in recent years.

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OCTOBER 20, 2016

ARKANSAS TIMES

icture Bret Bielema pole-vaulting for a minute. Then, once the laughter subsides, hear me out with this absurd analogy. Four times in four seasons, the Hog head coach has tried like hell to clear the “Bama bar” without immediately evident success. There’s not too many ways to pierce the walled football enclave that Nick Saban has constructed. The Crimson Tide are reaching an unthinkable apex in an era of alleged parity, rotating new QBs in every single year, sending studs off to the NFL early, testing young players at skill positions, and generally getting all the same dominant results regardless of how dramatically the target on their backs continues to expand. Bielema dusts himself off quite nicely, though, and takes the hard lesson to heart. The last two years, Bama’s narrower wins catalyzed late-season porcine success. The Tide’s 14-13 escape in 2014 proved the Hogs had progressed rapidly from doormat status, and the remainder of that year bore that out, with consecutive shutouts of LSU and Ole Miss and a Texas Bowl beating of the Longhorns. After leading for nearly three full quarters in Tuscaloosa last October, the Razorbacks unraveled a bit late to end up on the wrong side of a 27-14 margin; Arkansas’s measly 2-4, 1-2 record at that point belied the authority with which it played down the stretch, winning five of the last six regular-season games and then steamrolling Kansas State in the Liberty Bowl. So here we are in 2016, and postapocalyptic fears after the Tide waxed the Hogs 49-30 were rampant. The defense was disorganized; the offensive line, a sieve constructed of large immobilized humans. But Bielema made damn sure that his team wasn’t going to lose twice to Alabama, as the adage goes. Seven days after the loss on the very same field, Arkansas looked quite a bit steadier in all facets of a 34-30 takedown of 12th-rated Ole Miss. Austin Allen took one nasty sack on the opening possession, then stayed generally upright and secure in the pocket for another banner night at the helm of Dan Enos’ precision offense. Were it not for an errant snap that led to a 22-yard third-quarter loss, and Allen killing off the remaining clock in the last possession by running around for negative yardage, Arkansas (5-2, 1-2) would have again nudged toward the 500-yard total offense mark.

The obvious flaws exposed by Alabama received abundant attention. With linebacker BEAU Dre Greenlaw WILCOX gone for the year, the Hogs leaned on young Dwayne Eugene, Jr. to hold serve, and he commendably did so. A defensive line that was neutered a week ago was refreshed, as Deatrich Wise Jr. and Jeremiah Ledbetter made impact plays against the run and the pass. But mostly, the secondary shored up its work: after Chad Kelly lit the Hogs up on two drives in the first half to the tune of a 13-21-0, 190-yard effort, the DBs locked down passing lanes and challenged the Rebels’ sizable wideouts physically. Kelly ended up misfiring on 13 of his 18 second-half throws, chucking one pick to Henre Toliver and having another one taken off the board by a suspect penalty. A week of toiling in practice was evident. Santos Ramirez made the hit heard ’round the Ozarks when Kelly desperately lunged for the first down marker on a 4th-and-16 scramble with less than two minutes to go, but even before that ringing blow, he and fellow safety Josh Liddell were extremely active against an offense that is nigh impossible to permanently clamp. Ole Miss (3-3, 1-2) was hell on wheels when first downs were productive and the speed of the game ramped up, but as Enos has consistently done the past 13 games — again, postAlabama — he has deployed a variety of inventive plays and entrusted them to skill people more than capable of executing them. The go-ahead touchdown was the archetype: after Rawleigh Williams barreled down inside the 10 to get the last 22 of his career-high 180 yards, Enos had Jared Cornelius familiarly in motion for what portended a jet sweep on secondand-goal from the 6. Instead, Cornelius slowed his presnap jog to a light trot, took the handoff, and picked his way off tackle with all the instinct and vision of a true tailback. It wasn’t as breathless as the Brandon Allen two-point lunge to victory a year ago, but it was just as effective. And in the end analysis of 2016, it may be the play that causes everyone to muse again about how the Hogs are mastering the lessons that Alabama teaches them.


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hat with the big, clear-thedecks Road Trip issue last week — which we’re sure you stuffed immediately in your motorcar’s glove box, turtle hull or catchall, for when you get a hankerin’ to gallivant — The Observer has had two glorious weeks to Observe since the last time we conversed. We’ve taken full advantage of it, too, even if the weather has been vacillating wildly between “actual October” and “fairly mild for August.” A few more days of this, and the jack-o-lanterns will rot on the doorstep long before they can be lit for the first candy beggars. Yours Truly hates a hot Halloween, the goodies threatening to melt in the bottom of the bag and little ghosties sweating through two sheets by the time they hit the tail end of Ridgeway. That’s Arkansas for you. So much to say, so much to cover. No dilly-dallying. Five pounds of puckey in a 2-pound bag is the rule, so we will move on quickly. Did you see that the Federales finally took down the former judge from up in Wynne, who — investigators said — had allegedly been having his way with some of the young men who came before him as defendants, allegedly forcing them to bend over while he snapped voyeuristic pics of their rumps, allegedly having some of them do more, all while allegedly having a human heart, a moral soul and a conscience? He is innocent until proven guilty on all that, of course, but we suspect maybe less so on those last three. The G-men, we hear, frog marched him right on into the jailhouse where he’d sent so many, his stately black robe traded in for an orange jumpsuit. Let’s hope the next to wear that robe takes the oath a little more seriously. Then again, they can’t do any worse. Speaking of — though time is short — The Observer must take a moment for a shout-out to the true hero of that sordid tale: Emily White of the Judicial Discipline and Disability Commis-

sion, the lawyer and dogged investigator who first broke that rotten fruit open so that justice might pour forth as mighty waters. Without her, everything stays. Google “Boeckmann” and “Emily White” if you don’t believe it, then tell her thanks the next time you see her down at the coffee shop. Quickly, quickly! Did you see all the scary clown furors? What the hell? Reminds The Observer of the Satanic Panics of the old days, only the clowns wear less makeup than the Goth kids they were putting on trial in kangaroo courts back then. Did you see the bridge that said no? The Observer was on the Main Street Bridge with the other reporter riffraff when they tried to make the old Broadway span kiss the river it had defied since Calvin Coolidge was president: an explosion that thudded in the bones from 500 yards away, a spray of plywood crapola into the river, and then the bridge that was supposed to be lounging among the catfish by then just … didn’t, with a near audible “uh-oh” rising from the hardhats lining the barges along the north shore of the river. Once we learned it didn’t really have a Plan B in case “Massive Controlled Explosion” failed, The Observer tried to cable the Arkansas Highway and Transportation Department with word that we would be willing to bravely accept 15 percent of the $93 million bridge contract to venture out onto the now precarious span and reset the charges, but our offer of help went rudely unheeded. Five hours later, two boats with a big ol’ cable finally managed to yank down the bridge, a scenario that Jerry Bruckheimer is NEVER going to be interested in making a thrilling, ripped-fromthe-headlines movie about. As Dorito Mussolini’s presidential campaign has shown us, the American public is clamoring for a straight-talking, semi-anonymous, obscenely wealthy hero fighting against the odds! But once again, Arkansas misses its chance at stardom. Can’t say we didn’t try.

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OCTOBER 20, 2016

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Arkansas Reporter

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Youth movement Irvin Camacho, 24, hopes to be the first Latino elected to the Arkansas legislature. BY DAVID KOON

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our community. I’ve protested outside [U.S. Rep.] Steve Womack’s office. I’ve been trying to get hold of [former U.S. Sen.] Mark Pryor and talk to him. I’ve had contact with a lot of the politicians in Arkansas for a few years now, trying to get what we feel are the things our community needs.” Camacho was born in California, but moved to Springdale with his parents in 2002 when he was 11. “There’s a lot of gang activity where I was from, especially in my neighborhood,” Camacho said. “There were quite a few gangs there, so my dad didn’t want me to get involved with gangs. At the same time, he wanted me to have a better chance at pursuing my education, and job opportunities were a bigger

out of the shadows, Camacho says he sees the struggles they endure because they can’t fully contribute to society. He says he entered the race because he believes cities in Northwest Arkansas could do more to help people of all classes and races, including undocumented immigrants. “I believe that in order for us to help out more people, sometimes we have to step up from where we are and help out on a bigger scale,” Camacho said. “I saw the bigger picture. I know where we can progress in our city and make it a more welcoming place in all. … That’s one of my biggest motivators for being involved in this campaign: I really want the best for Springdale.” District 86 Rep. Greg Leding (D-Fay-

SERGIO ELIZALDE

he influx of Latinos into Arkantion reform and suicide prevention. He sas has reshaped the cultural and also serves as the coordinator for the business landscape in ways that Arkansas Natural DREAMers, an orgawere unimaginable 25 years ago. Now nization that supports giving in-state a young Latino political activist runcollege tuition to undocumented chilning for the Arkansas statehouse out dren raised in Arkansas, and the Develof Northwest Arkansas hopes to be at opment, Relief and Education for Alien the vanguard of an effort to reshape the Minors (DREAM) Act, which would political landscape as well. open a path to citizenship for undocuIrvin Camacho, 24, of Springdale is running in House District 89 against Republican Jeff Williams. Incumbent Micah Neal, a Republican, did not seek reelection. Though Springdale has historically gone Republican, Camacho has worked to build grassroots support among the district’s minority populations, including African Americans and the Marshallese, and helped hundreds get registered to vote. If elected, Camacho would be the sole Latino representative in the legislature. With District 89 around 46 percent Latino — though a much smaller percentage of Latinos are both eligible and registered to vote — Camacho looks like the shape of things to come in Northwest Arkansas, and maybe other areas of the state with large Latino populations, even if he doesn’t pull out a win in November. According CAMACHO: “Sometimes we have to step up ... and help out on a bigger scale,” the state House candidate says. to a survey released by the Pew Research Center in January, 205,000 Latinos live in Arkansas, but only around 60,000 of them thing over here in Arkansas than they etteville) is one of the Democrats who mented immigrants brought to the U.S. were in California for people that don’t before they were 16. are eligible to vote. As the native-born first approached Camacho about runspeak English.” children of Latino immigrants come of “I’m more of a social justice advocate,” ning for the District 89 seat. Leding said age, however, it could signal an electoral Camacho said. “That’s what I’ve been Camacho said many of his friends the changing demographics and the shift in places like Springdale. doing since I graduated high school. are undocumented. Though the Obama “Walmart universe” around Bentonville That’s Camacho’s hope, anyway. I’ve been fighting for the DREAM Act administration’s 2012 Deferred Action — with the retail giant and its suppliers He’s been active politically in Northand for immigration reform. … I’ve for Childhood Arrivals program, which relocating multicultural employees from west Arkansas since he was a teenager, been in the face of a lot of the politihalted the deportation of undocumented all over the country to the area — are leading marches and peaceful demoncians here in Arkansas, trying to bring immigrants brought to the country as contributing to a shift in the politics of Northwest Arkansas. strations for causes such as immigramore awareness to the issues that affect minors, allowed some of them to come 12

OCTOBER 20, 2016

ARKANSAS TIMES


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IRVIN CAMACHO

“One thing I point out to people, and it still amazes them, is that only Pulaski County is richer with Democrats than Benton County,” Leding said. “That shouldn’t be a surprise because Benton County is the second most populous county. But so pervasive is the myth that there are no Democrats there that that’s what everybody believes. It’s just not true.” Leding said that Camacho has been a pleasant surprise, especially for someone so young, and has worked hard in the campaign. “When I learned about the work he did organizing those peace marches, one he did last year in response to some gang violence in Springdale, and one this year in response to youth suicides, it was impressive,” Leding said. While Leding believes a win for Camacho in the still right-leaning district is something of a longshot, he thinks the young politician will go far as the racial and electoral makeup of Springdale continues to change. “He knows the odds, but I think he’s been a fantastic candidate, and I think he’s run one of the best campaigns,” Leding said. “Given how few people tend to vote in that House district, I think he’s got an outside shot.” Camacho says that he has tried to run a positive campaign, but he believes he is the better candidate to represent the area. The campaign, he said, has been about “small victories” along the way. “We know where our city can go if it doesn’t have the proper representation,” he said. “That’s what I’m trying to provide. There are so many communities that have been ignored for so many years now: Latinos, the Marshallese community, African Americans. It’s time we had someone who really takes the time to listen to these people. That’s what we’re trying to provide: representation for all.”

THE

BIG PICTURE

Inconsequential News Quiz: Midway Coronary Edition Play in the Hall of Industry using a free pen from the Arkansas Rice Board!

1) Governor Hutchinson is out of state this week. Where’d he go? A) D.C.-area motel, where he joined Republican Party Chairman Reince Priebus for a sobbing, weeklong bender. B) On a pussy-grabbin’ bus tour with Donald Trump. C) China, where he’ll spend six days promoting Arkansas products and the state as a location for industry. D) Zurich for one last jewel heist, so he can retire from life as a second-story man. 2) The Arkansas State Fair started Friday. Which of the following is a real foodstuff that will be offered on the midway this year? A) Maple bacon corn dogs. B) Chocolate-covered angioplasty. C) Lardsicles. D) Deep-fried Oxycodone on a stick. 3) A person who might be considered famous in some circles came to Arkansas last week to address a subcommittee discussing the construction of two monuments on the state Capitol grounds. Who was it? A) Our Lord Jesus Christ, who told Sen. Jason Rapert (R-Conway) to “knock off the bullshit” before dropping the mic and ascending back to heaven. B) Donald Trump’s basic human decency, which divorced him in 1986. C) Lucien Greaves, co-founder of the Massachusetts-based Satanic Temple. D) Vermont resident Steve “Sticky” Merkin, who is on a nationwide apology tour for starting the trend in which people begin their answer to any question with: “So … “ 4) Last week, Conner Eldridge, a Democrat running for U.S. Senate, finally got something he had been dreaming of for months. What was it? A) A puppy of his very own! B) His picture on the cover of Conservative Hairstyles magazine. C) X-Ray Specs he ordered from the back of a comic book when he was 12. D) A debate with his Republican opponent, Sen. John Boozman, who has repeatedly skipped other scheduled opportunities to spar with Eldridge and Libertarian candidate Frank Gilbert on the issues. 5) North Little Rock District Judge Jim Hamilton, who is serving as a substitute judge in the hot-check cases of four people who brought a federal civil rights lawsuit against Sherwood describing the city’s hot-check court an unconstitutional “debtors prison” that has kept some defendants trapped in debt for decades, refused attorneys’ calls to recuse from those cases last week. Why, according to attorneys for the plaintiffs, should Hamilton have stepped down? A) Caught on video helping Sherwood officials pick up and shake hot-check defendants by their ankles until the last bit of change rattled out of their pockets. B) Admitted he found the recent “Ghostbusters” reboot “somewhat funny in places.” C) One of the attorneys said Hamilton had previously told him he hoped the federal suit against Sherwood would fail. D) Has the phrase “Pay Up, Sucker” and a dollar sign tattooed on the palm of his right hand.

Answers: C, A, C, D, C

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LITTLE ROCK & NORTH LITTLE ROCK

HAVE ANOTHER It’s time for Toast of the Town.

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he Toast of the Town gives Arkansas Times readers a way to raise a newsprint glass (and a virtual one, too) to the state’s bars, booze and breweries. This year, survey participants said “Cheers!” to new champs: Readers crowned South on Main best Central Arkansas bar and South on Main longtime cocktail master David Burnette best Central Arkansas bartender. They also gave cozy and historic Maxine’s Tap Room in Fayetteville top honors in the around-the-state division. As usual, our Toast of the Town issue comes just as we’re gearing up for our annual Craft Beer Festival (Friday, Oct. 28). Read all about the festival and the breweries and beers that’ll be available for sampling. Because Arkansas can’t get enough of craft beer, Lindsey Millar surveys the licensed breweries in the state to help guide you along our winding state ale trail. Meanwhile, David Koon checks in with Arkansas spirits makers Core and Rock Town to see what’s new in the craft-distilling scene. Read on, preferably with a cold one in hand.

Bar South on Main Finalists: Capital Bar and Grill, Four Quarter Bar, The Hillcrest Fountain, The White Water Tavern

Bartender David Burnette (South on Main) Finalists: Kevin Creasy (White Water Tavern), Derrick Hall (109 & Co.), Veo Tyson (SO RestaurantBar)

Best bar for live music Revolution Finalists: Four Quarter, South on Main, Stickyz Rock ’n’ Roll Chicken Shack, White Water Tavern

New bar Four Quarter Finalists: Flyway Brewing, Rebel Kettle Brewing Co., JJ’s Grill, The Water Buffalo

Wine bar Crush Wine Bar Finalists: By the Glass, Cache Restaurant, Zin Urban Wine and Beer Bar

Sports bar Twin Peaks Finalists: Gusano’s, Fox and Hound, The Tavern Sports Grill, West End Smokehouse and Tavern

CONTINUED ON PAGE 20 14

OCTOBER 20, 2016

ARKANSAS TIMES


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n 2010, there were four craft breweries in the state. Today, there are — well, it depends on how and when you count. According to the state Alcohol Beverage Control Board, there are 31 with a license to brew, though one of those, 501 Brewing Co. in Saline County, doesn’t have a retail location and likely won’t until 2017, and another, the national chain BJ’s Brewhouse, doesn’t brew its house beer in Arkansas. That count will only expand. We’re amid a craft beer explosion, where new breweries pop up every other month and all existing ones that have aspirations to grow are doing so. In other words, there’s never been a better time to hit the road and sample some suds — and that’s likely to remain the case for the near future. We’ve arranged our guide in order of rough proximity. Unless otherwise noted, taprooms don’t serve food. We’ve described output by barrels in several instances below. One barrel is equal to about two kegs of beer, or roughly 330 12-ounce pours.

ON THE TRAIL OF ALE Arkansas has dozens of breweries to visit, with more on tap. BY LINDSEY MILLAR

utors have approached Lost Forty about adding its popular Love Honey Bock to their portfolios. That’s kind of hard to say no to, Beachboard says. Still, there remains much more growth potential in

501-319-7275.

REBEL KETTLE Little Rock Rebel Kettle has just about every-

LOST FORTY BREWING Little Rock The rapid success of Lost Forty has been somewhat of a surprise even for Yellow Rocket Concepts, the Little Rock restaurant group behind Lost Forty and some of Central Arkansas’s most beloved restaurants — Big Orange, Heights Taco & Tamale, Local Lime and ZAZA. In not even two years, it’s more than tripled its output. In 2015, Lost Forty became the largest brewery in the state, and, on target to produce around 9,000 barrels this year, it will hold that distinction — and by a significant margin. “First and foremost we want to be an Arkansas brewery,” co-owner John Beachboard says. But in recent weeks, out-of-state distrib-

Arkansas, he said. Look for Lost Forty to expand its year-round offerings and grow its seasonal program. Also possibly on the horizon: a facility to expand its barrel-aging program and do sour beers. The brewery’s cavernous taproom, with communal, beer-hall-style seating and two massive flat-screen TVs, stays packed. Beachboard and Co. recently purchased a custom-built smoker made from a salvaged 1,000-gallon propane tank that lives behind Lost Forty, and it’s been running weekly specials on pork butt, ribs and brisket. Look for barbecue to become a bigger presence on the already popular menu. 501 Byrd St.,

thing you could want in a brewpub: a wide variety of beers to try on 16 taps (in just six month of operation, brewer John Lee has put out 88 different beers); a menu of excellent, Cajun-tinged pub grub, along with complimentary popcorn; a large deck and fenced-in outdoor area with picnic tables and cornhole boards; and big ambitions. Aside from a few half-barrel kegs, Rebel Kettle has been unable to distribute because demand in its brewpub has been so high. So it’s doubling capacity and already discussing opening another production facility, where it could continue to brew more beer, add a canning or bottling

line and move into a more extensive barrel-aging and sour program. Also maybe coming soon for the East Village brewpub: an outdoor stage for live music. Looking for an introduction to Rebel Kettle? Try the Working Class Hero, a blonde ale. It’s the brewery’s best seller by far, Lee says. 822 E. Sixth St., 501-374-2791.

DAMGOODE BREWS Little Rock Damgoode’s mini pizza empire — with three locations in Little Rock and one in Fayetteville — got into the beer business in 2015, when it moved into the former home of Boscos Restaurant & Brewing Co. in the River Market district. Longtime Boscos brewer Joshua Quattlebaum continues to run the show. He and his crew maintain three staples — Red Ribbon Golden Ale, Arkansas Amber and Damgoode Pale Ale — along with a rotation of specials, like Darth Porter and its toned-down coffee porter cousin, Jabba the Porter, and their take on traditional German lager, Arktoberfest. The River Market district location, which has outdoor seating that’s especially coveted during an event at the First Security Amphitheater and a large horseshoe-shaped bar inside, is the only place to consistently get all the brews Damgoode churns out, though you’ll find some offering at every location. 500 President Clinton Ave., 501-664-2239.

BLUE CANOE BREWING CO. Little Rock When Blue Canoe opened in December 2014 in the River Market district, its taproom and brewery space were among the smallest in the state. Brewers Laura Berryhill and Patrick Cowan, who coarktimes.com

OCTOBER 20, 2016

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own Blue Canoe with Cowan’s wife, Ida Cowan, had to take over the taproom on Monday and Tuesday just to get brewing done. But now on the eve of its second anniversary, Blue Canoe will soon be open daily. The owners have been able to add square footage to the brewery and the space next door, where they opened the restaurant Taco Beer Burrito. TBB serves wine and liquor, which you can’t take next door to the taproom, but you can dine on the TBB food at Blue Canoe. Of its year-round brews — 4X4 Pale Ale, Whittler Milk Stout, Wolf Trail Irish Red, Razorback Rye PA and Bear Trail Belgian Blonde — Patrick Cowan says the 4X4 Pale (7.5 alcohol by volume) is probably the best seller. Business is good, Cowan says. He just left his job as a lawyer to go full time at the brewery, he’s tripled his fermenting capacity since opening, and Blue Canoe is now being distributed by Glazers in Little Rock and in Northwest Arkansas. 425 E. Third St., 501-492-9378.

ing, which has been in business in Little Rock for more than 35 years. Gray worked as a trucker for years, but when that business started to slow, he decided to take over the Cedar Street space and make a longtime hobby a business. The opening of Refined Ale in 2010 made Gray the first African American to own a brewery in the state. Another quality that likely makes him unique among the state’s brewers? He doesn’t drink. After self-distributing for years, he recently got a license to be open daily and sell his bottled beer and malt liquor from the brewery. So far, sales have been swift, he said. His Arkansas Premium Craft Irish Stout is his biggest seller, Gray said. 2221 S. Cedar St., 501-280-0556.

BUFFALO BREWING CO. Little Rock

STONE’S THROW BREWING Little Rock Stone’s Throw Brewing’s Ninth Street taproom is a neighborhood pub in the best kind of way. It’s often sleepy — a quiet place to get an afternoon pint — but it gets hopping with some regularity. There’s a biergarten with six large picnic tables that the brewery added in 2015 for when the weather’s nice and an annex for 16 additional seats that opened earlier that year for when it’s not. A food truck is always parked outside and you’re welcome to eat from it or any other outside food inside the taproom. Stone’s Throw keeps its Amadeus Vienna Lager (its best seller), Common Sense California Common and Shamus Oatmeal Stout on tap year-round along with a rotating cider selection and three seasonals that change every three months. Every Tuesday is Hops for Hope, where $1 of every pint sold goes to a local charity of the month. Brewer and co-owner Ian Beard says he and his partners don’t have ambitions of growing Stone’s Throw too much beyond the 600 barrels they’re currently producing. Distribution is only in Pulaski County and will likely stay that way. But keep on the look out for expanded offerings, including more barrel-aged beers (in partnership with Rock Town Distillery). 4402 E. Ninth St., 501-244-915.

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ARKANSAS TIMES

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Now in its 26th year, Little Rock’s first brewpub is also the state’s oldest continually operating brewery. Owner Henry Lee has resisted the urge to change up a winning formula. The menu remains little more than pizza and calzones — among the best in town by our estimation — while the venue room in the back continues to be open to all-ages and the signature brews are always in rotation on tap. We wouldn’t have it any other way. Lee did make one welcome update several years back: an expanded, multilevel outdoor seating area. Now is an especially good time to revisit Vino’s if it’s been a while. After some time at Damgoode and working as a gypsy brewer on his own Moody Brews, Josiah Moody is back at Vino’s, brewing all the beloved regular styles — Firehouse Pale Ale, Lazyboy Stout, Rainbow Wheat — along with special Moody Brews. 923 W. Seventh St., 501375-8466.

REFINED ALE BREWERY Little Rock Windell Gray does it all. He handles all the brewing at Refined Ale, hand-bottles his five varieties and runs Refined Ale Catering out of his mother’s adjacent restaurant, Wayne’s Cater-

The Water Buffalo sells supplies to hobby brewers and winemakers, home gardeners, picklers and people who want to make their own cheese and soda. Now, owner Nolen Buffalo (yep, that’s really his name) has opened Buffalo Brewing, a microbrewery in the back of the store with a small taproom attached. After only a month in business, demand has been so high that Buffalo has already added fermentation tanks to double his capacity. He’s rotating in four beers: a pineapple wheat (the most popular so far), a red ale, a chocolate stout and a pale ale. Brewing three days a week, if he’s really “humping it,” he says he might do 300 barrels per year. In addition, he’s stocking a wide range of local brews on 16 taps and opening up the brewery and some taps to accomplished home-brewers. Buffalo is excited about the prospects for the store, which already offers free how-to classes. “Now, when people come in and say they want to learn to brew beer, we can walk over to the taproom and taste some beers and get some benchmarks for, say, what a stout is supposed to taste like or what a saison is supposed to smell like.” 106 S. Rodney Parham Road, 501725-5296.

DIAMOND BEAR BREWING CO. North Little Rock The state’s first production brewery — founded in 2000 — is still growing. After moving from Little Rock to North Little Rock and opening the Arkansas Ale House brewpub in 2014, Diamond Bear increased production by 30 percent in 2015 to 4,000 barrels and was

on pace to grow similarly after the first six months of this year when equipment problems slowed it down. After repairs, the brewery has been in catch-up mode, owner Russ Melton said. That’s forced it to forgo experimenting with more exotic beers so it can keep up demand for its standard brews: Pale Ale, Southern Blonde, Presidential IPA, Two Term Imperial IPA, Paradise Porter and Dogtown Brown. But stay tuned for more from its Hibernation series of barrelaged beer and expanded distribution for its delicious, nonalcoholic Big Rock Root Beer, Melton says. The Ale House’s food menu — the Reuben and wings, especially — have a dedicated following. And take note: When the weather is nice, the brewery brings out cornhole and other lawn games for patrons to play in its large north lawn and the outdoor patio fills up. 600 N. Broadway St., 501-708-2739.

FLYWAY BREWING CO. North Little Rock Matt Foster has a grand vision for Flyway Brewing — and Arkansas beer culture. Just off the trolley line in Argenta, his comfortable, modernly appointed brewery sits in a 5,000-square-foot building that in past lives was a Safeway grocery store, a tire shop and a pool hall. In keeping with the brewery’s name, which comes from the Mississippi Flyway, the migration route that takes birds over Arkansas to and from Canada and the Gulf of Mexico, all of his year-round beers have migration-themed names: Bluewing Blueberry Wheat, Early Bird IPA, Free Range Brown Ale, Migrate Pale Ale and Shadowhands Stout. The food menu, in a similar vein, features dishes made largely with game and fish you find in Arkansas, including quail, venison and wild boar sliders. Foster hopes to one day replicate the only-inArkansas theme with some of his beer. In 2013, he began to work with farmers and a state agronomist on the Arkansas Native Beer Project, an effort to brew beer made with ingredients grown and processed in Arkansas. It’s still ongoing; barley hasn’t been grown much in Arkansas and getting a sufficient number of farmers to do test plots of it has been a challenge. Getting people to drink Flyway beer, however, has not been a challenge. In less than a year in operation, the brewery has already added new fermentation tanks to expand capacity and is eyeing another expansion next year to be able to do more packaging. Until then, look out for hand-bottled 22-ounce bottles of Flyway in your


favorite liquor store. 314 Maple St., 501-812-3192.

ent who became intrigued with the prospect of starting a brewery after Martin offered him one of his special homebrews. The brewery brews and sells draft beer out of Bubba Brew’s Sports Pub and Grill, a separate business owned by Ned Bass’ son, Jason, who’s currently building a second location on Lake Hamilton in Hot Springs. The restaurant serves pub grub, has a full bar, hosts karaoke and live bands and has cornhole boards and pool tables. So far, Bubba Brew’s has produced about 300 to 400 barrels yearly since opening; Martin would like to increase that to 1,500 and possibly add a small canning line, though he’ll stay focused on increasing his current distribution in Hot Springs, Arkadelphia, Little Rock and other Central Arkansas locations. By a large margin, Martin says, 10 Point Bock, an amber bock lager, is his best seller. 8091 Airport Road, Bonnerdale, 870-356-4001.

SUPERIOR BATHHOUSE BREWERY Hot Springs From 1916 until 1983, Superior Bathhouse drew people from around the country to luxuriate in its “healing” spring waters. Now, Rose Schweikhart uses those thermal waters to brew beer to help people blow off steam. Her Superior Bathhouse Brewery, the first brewery to open in a national park and perhaps the only brewery in the world to use hot spring-fed water, has become one of the leading attractions in downtown Hot Springs. With massive windows across the front and a large front porch, it’s an ideal spot to people-watch the tourists parading down Bathhouse Row. Open with tasty food and beer from other beer makers since 2013, Schweikhart couldn’t begin brewing her own beer until 2015 because of the lengthy federal permitting process. Already, the brewery is in expansion mode, planning to begin distributing statewide by the end of the year, working toward opening banquet space upstairs and expanding its biergarten. Thus far, the Beez Kneez, a Kolsch infused with honey from Benton and basil from a farm in Malvern, has been the biggest seller. 329 Central Ave., 501-624-2337.

BUBBA BREW’S BREWING CO. Bonnerdale (Garland

NORTHEAST AND NORTHWEST ARKANSAS GRAVITY BREWWORKS Big Flat (Baxter County) County) Jonathan Martin is a practicing attorney in Hot Springs who somehow finds time to brew every batch of beer at Bubba Brews, the microbrewery he owns in Bonnerdale, an unincorporated community 20 minutes southwest of Hot Springs. After home-brewing for 15 years, Martin opened Bubba Brews in 2014 with partner Ned Bass, a cli-

Longtime Vino’s regulars will remember Bill Riffle, who brewed at the pizza-pub for almost a decade in the aughts. When he followed that stint by opening Gravity BrewWorks 11 miles west of Blanchard Springs in Baxter County in 2013, those who didn’t know Riffle might have been left scratching their heads. But Riffle and his wife, Tony Guinn, didn’t relocate to the middle of

nowhere; they opened a brewery on 23 acres on the closest spot in a wet county to home. Riffle had been commuting from his home near Mountain View to Vino’s all along. “We mainly concentrate on the best ingredients we can get,” Riffle says. “We’re not really into gadgets.” They prime all kegs with local honey. All their beers are unfiltered and naturally carbonated in kegs. Each week, they brew new styles, which they sell exclusively in the taproom. There’s a 16-seat taproom and a large biergarten with a hop trellis outside. Riffle says he’s never been able to maintain supply to satisfy demand, but he’s in the process of expanding his one-barrel brewing system. 11512 State Hwy. 14 E., 870448-2077.

BRICK OVEN BREWERY & PIZZA CO. Harrison and Paragould A mini-chain with locations in Missouri, Mississippi and Texas, as well as Cabot, Conway, Harrison, Paragould, Russellville and Searcy, Brick Oven started brewing beer three years ago to supply all of its locations that are allowed to sell beer. So far the regular styles include an amber, brown ale and oatmeal stout. Locations in Harrison, Paragould and Abilene, Texas, also brew, and word from the Paragould outlet is demand has been difficult to maintain and each brewery is upgrading its system. 814 U.S. Hwy. 62/65 N., Suite 9001-D, Harrison, 870-741-0012; 2410 Linwood Drive, Paragould, 870236-4200.

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BREWING CO. Paris (Logan County) Back when she was running a marine microbial biology lab at the University of California at Santa Cruz, Liz Preston said she and her husband, Mike, started hobby brewing. That was before craft beer was cool. With a passion for cooking and healthy eating, the Prestons long wanted to own an organic farm and brew beer with homegrown ingredients. When Mike, a chemist, got a job at Arkansas Nuclear One in Russellville, they decided to make their dream a reality and bought a 10-acre hilltop farm 12 miles east of Paris, between Subiaco and Midway, and installed a one-barrel brewing system. Liz Preston said she didn’t know what to expect when they opened — there was no craft beer for sale anywhere nearby — but demand has been so high that the Prestons are planning to expand into a 15-barrel system in their 100-year-old barn. Prestonrose beer is only available to go in growlers (though the Prestons offer tasting flights like wineries at the farm), but when the expansion is complete late next year, Liz Preston hopes to be able to sell food she’s grown along with pints in an onfarm pub and biergarten. 201 St. Louis Valley Road, 479-847-5174.

COLUMBUS HOUSE BREWERY Fayetteville A three-barrel brewhouse owned by three University of Arkansas alumni, Columbus House bills itself as a lowkey neighborhood spot where students and other folks can stop in for a pint. Located just off the Scull Creek Trail near campus, the brewery has a cozy taproom, including a red maple bar top built by one of the owners and an outdoor patio. You’ll always find Yellow Card Golden Ale, Nutty Runner Brown Ale, Weekend Warrior IPA and Spottie Ottie Oatmeal Stout on tap. 479-9353752, 701 W. North St.

WEST MOUNTAIN BREWING CO. AND TINY TIM’S PIZZA Fayetteville In the ’90s, Tiny Tim’s Pizza owner John Schmuecker took steps to brew beer for his restaurant, but after equipment and personnel troubles, he shelved his plans and for 13 years nothing happened with West Mountain Brewing despite a “coming soon” sign that failed to deliver for years. Then Andy Coates got the brewery up and running in 2011 and made it a destination before leaving to found Ozark Brewing. Since then, 18

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the popular hangout on the south side of the Fayetteville square has gone through several brewers, but it remains a “ ‘Cheers’-type bar, filled with an amazing crew of locals” who come in every day, said Casey Letellier, the new brewer. Letellier came from 28 Springs in Siloam Springs and, before that, Bathtub Row Brewing in New Mexico. The brewery’s IPA is a customer favorite, Letellier said. 21 W. Mountain St., 479521-5551.

THE HOG HAUS BREWING CO. Fayetteville Fayetteville’s oldest brewpub is getting a facelift. All new plumbing, heat and air, doors and windows, bar tops and more. In the meantime, owner Juli Sill recently debuted a new food menu and is searching for a brewer to anchor her Dickson Street brewpub. 430 W. Dickson St., 479521-2739.

FOSSIL COVE BREWING CO. Fayetteville Fossil Cove owner/brewer Ben Mills started making wine during his undergraduate years at Arkansas Tech University. It wasn’t very good, so he turned to home-brewing beer and later enrolled in brewmaster school at University of California-Davis. He named the brewery after a favorite fossil-laden cove of Beaver Lake and uses a T-rex fossil wearing a top hat for a logo. You’ll always find Paleo American Ale, La Brea Brown, Birch Ave. Blonde, Oatty (Oat-

meal) Stout, IPA No. 3 and T-Rex Tripel on tap. In liquor stores in Northwest Arkansas and, increasingly, Central Arkansas, you won’t miss Fossil Cove’s colorful, cartooncovered cans of Paleo American Ale and La Brea Brown. The Container Kitchen, a separate business owned by Mills and Little Bread co-owner Mitchell Owen and housed in a shipping container adjacent to the brewery, offers sliders and tacos. 1946 Birch Ave., 479445-6050.

In 1900, Benton and Washington counties produced more apples than any other county in the country. While the boom didn’t last, the Ozarks remain prime apple country. That enables the brewers at Black Apple Crossing, the state’s first and only cidery in modern times, to use only local and regional ingredients in its hard apple ciders. Owners Leo Orpin, John Handley and Trey Holt spent years as hobby brewers with the aim of opening a brewery. “Our friends told us our beer wasn’t good, but our cider was great,” Orpin said. Because of its reliance on seasonal ingredients, Black Apple’s lineup is always changing, but it’ll always have dry, semi-sweet and hoppy varieties on tap. The brewery is using 700 square feet in the 8,000-square-foot former George’s chicken hatchery for its taproom. Orpin said it might expand that space and maybe carve out room for a restaurant. Only sold since July, Black Apple is available at about 20 locations in Northwest Arkansas, but look for major growth and a package of some sort down the road, Orpin said. 321 E. Emma Ave., 479-751-0337.

APPLE BLOSSOM BREWING CO. Fayetteville

CORE BREWING AND DISTILLING CO. Springdale

Named for the state flower and founded in 2013 by the owners of the popular Smoke & Barrel Tavern, Apple Blossom is perhaps the largest brewpub in the state and one of a small handful in Northwest Arkansas. It’s got a full, kid-friendly menu with a 250seat bar and dining room. Collaborations with other breweries throughout the state — Bike Rack, Moody Brews, West Mountain — have been a regular feature on tap. But whenever you go, you’ll find Fayetteweisse, Armstrong APA, Unwind Wheat, Nitro Hazy Morning Coffee Stout and Soulless Ginger Ale (a rye ale brewed with fresh ginger). 1550 Zion Road No. 1, 479-287-4344.

The state’s second-largest brewery is everywhere. On pace to brew around 6,000 barrels this year, a 33 percent increase over last year, the Springdale brewery distributes its cans emblazoned with a wiener dog logo throughout Arkansas as well as in Missouri, Oklahoma, Tennessee and Georgia. Meanwhile, its English-style public houses, often with beer and nothing else on the menu, have been popping up like Starbucks cafes. There are two in Springdale and one each in Bentonville, Fayetteville, Fort Smith, North Little Rock and inside the Northwest Arkansas Regional Airport, with more likely on tap. The public houses are the place to try the full range of Core brews as well as those that the brewery is taste-testing for wider release. Next year, Core will open a distillery in Fort Smith and produce bourbon, rum and brandies, according to owner Jesse Core. “Our motto is we let our customers drive our growth,” Core says. “When there’s an opportunity, we figure it out.”

BLACK APPLE CROSSING Springdale

Derrick McEnroe got a job as an analyst for MillerCoors’ Bentonville office after college around the same time he

NEW PROVINCE BREWING CO. Rogers


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got a homebrew kit from his mom. “Four or five years later, here we are,” McEnroe said recently. In March, he opened New Province Brewing Co. in an 8,000-square-foot warehouse in Rogers. Already, he’s purchased Fossil Cove’s old canning machine to make a leap in production brewing. McEnroe’s yearround brews include Civilian Pale Ale, Philosopher IPA, Citadel Belgian Tripel, White Queen Belgian Wit and Yeoman Porter. New Province’s tap room seats 60 and there’s a pool table. A food truck is usually out back. 1310 W. Hudson St., 479-246-0479.

fine, but on the way back we had a crash,” he said. A few modifications and Rehbock expects to be up and running in no time. Meanwhile, he’s been producing between 1,000 and 2,000 barrels per year, which he says is only a fraction of his capacity. He expects to ramp up production in the not-too-distant future and expand what he’s bottling and canning. 18244 Habberton Road, 479-419-9969.

BENTONVILLE BREWING CO. Bentonville

OZARK BEER CO. Rogers Ozark Beer’s philosophy is all about “slow growth,” marketing director Marty Shutter says. “We hire slow. We develop recipes slow.” But demand has made it difficult to grow slowly. The brewery doubled its production in its first three years in business. It hit its fiveyear projects in year two. “I don’t think we know what it takes to meet demand yet,” Shutter said. In an effort to find out — and to help spark downtown revitalization in Rogers — it’s soon to move from its warehouse offthe-beaten path to the old Rogers Milling Co. building on the square. Brewer and co-owner Andy Coates first apprenticed and later worked for Goose Island and then spent a couple of years at West Mountain Brewing Co. before going out on his own. His annual special Bourbon Barrel Aged Double Cream Stout has developed such a following that people camped out in the brewery’s parking lot the night before the last release. You can find cans of Ozark’s American Pale Ale, Belgian Golden Ale and Cream Stout in Northwest and Central Arkansas. India Pale Ale and Onyx Coffee Stout are also available year-round. 1700 S. First St. (moving to 109 N. Arkansas), 479-636-2337.

FOSTER’S PINT & PLATE Rogers A massive gastropub with seating for 160 and an outdoor patio and fire pit, Foster’s also boasts 82 beers on draft, an impressive wine list and a full bar. Owners Chris and Katie Moore know something about the business; they also own 20

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Spiriteaux Wines & Liquors next door. Five of Foster’s taps are reserved for beer brewed in house, including an IPA, red ale and an Arkansas blonde, and despite the competition, the in-house brews represent a sizable portion of sales. 479-621-0093, 2001 S. Bellview Road.

SADDLEBOCK BREWING Springdale Call it destination brewing. Saddlebock sits on 30 acres on the edge of Springdale where the White River flows into Beaver Lake. There are three outdoor decks that overlook woods and pasture, where Black Angus cattle roam. The cattle represent an effort to move the brewpub, the White River Cafe, more closely to farm-to-table, says owner Steve Rehbock, who opened Saddlebock in 2012. Rehbock has been experimenting with delivering food from the cafe kitchen, located across the street, to the taproom by commercial drone. “The deliveries have gone

Pickup bar Ciao Baci Finalists: 109 & Co., Bar Louie, Cache Restaurant, The Hillcrest Fountain

Gay bar Sway Finalists: 610 Center, Discovery, Triniti Nightclub

Dive bar

Bentonville Brewing Co.’s best seller — five times better than anything else — is its Homewrecker IPA, so named because it really did cause some marital strife between some regulars, according to head brewer and co-owner Beau Boykin. So be warned. Like many of its peers, the 1-year-old brewery is planning to build a separate production facility where it will begin canning; Boykin hopes it will be open next summer. In the meantime, it just bought a bottler, so look for more of its brew in Northwest Arkansas liquor stores soon. 1000 S.E. Fifth St., 479-464-0150.

Midtown Billiards

BIKE RACK BREWING CO. Bentonville

The Hillcrest Fountain

Bentonville’s first brewery draws its name from the bicycle culture that’s gripped Bentonville, especially with the opening of the Razorback Regional Greenway, which passes right in front of the brewery’s front door. Owned by six people, most of whom work in Walmart and Sam’s Club corporate offices, Bike Rack grew out of a homebrew club, and now, two years after opening the doors of its small taproom, the owners are transforming a former Tyson plant into a new 7,000-square-foot brewery at 801 S.E. Eighth St., sharing part of the former plant with the Northwest Arkansas Community College’s Culinary Arts program, some of whose students will learn to brew in Bike Rack. In the new location, the brewery will be able to produce in a day what now takes it a month. It’ll start canning and distributing more widely as soon as it moves into the new space. Its five staple beers are Angus Chute American Stout, F.A.S.T. Session IPA, Rusty Tricycle Amber Ale, Faster Double IPA and Urban Trail Golden Ale. 410 S.W. A St., Suite 6, 479-268-6648.

Finalists: Four Quarter, The Hillcrest Fountain, Town Pump, The White Water Tavern

Hotel bar Capital Bar and Grill Finalists: Marriott Lobby Bar, One Eleven at the Capital, Table 28

Neighborhood bar Finalists: Four Quarter, The Pantry Crest, Stone’s Throw Brewing, South on Main

Bar for pool, darts, shuffleboard or other games West End Smokehouse and Tavern Finalists: The Hillcrest Fountain, Skinny J’s, Town Pump, Zack’s Place

Bar for food Capital Bar and Grill Finalists: Four Quarter, Reno’s Argenta Cafe, The Pantry Crest, South on Main CONTINUED ON PAGE 22


WE’LL SEE YOU AT THE

ARKANSAS TIMES

CRAFT BEER FESTIVAL!

TOAST TOWN OF THE

FINALIST

BEST BREWPUB BEST LOCALLY BREWED PALE ALE

DIAMOND BEAR BREWING CO.

TOAST TOWN OF THE

WINNER

BEST NEIGHBORHOOD BAR BEST HAPPY HOUR

TOAST TOWN OF THE

FINALIST

BEST BAR BEST PICK-UP BAR BEST DIVE BAR BEST BAR FOR POOL, DARTS, SHUFFLEBOARD OR OTHER GAMES BEST PATIO OR DECK FOR DRINKING COLDEST BEER

arktimes.com

OCTOBER 20, 2016

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LITTLE ROCK & NORTH LITTLE ROCK

CONT.

Happy hour

Local brewery

The Hillcrest Fountain

Lost Forty

Finalists: Big Orange Midtown, South on Main, Stickyz Rock ’n’ Roll Chicken Shack, Skinny J’s

Finalists: Flyway, Rebel Kettle, Stone’s Throw Brewing, Vino’s

Drinking brunch U.S. Pizza (Hillcrest)

Finalists: Abita, Founders Brewing Co., Mother’s Brewing Co., Summit Brewing Co.

Patio or deck for drinking

Locally brewed pale ale

U.S. Pizza (Hillcrest)

Lost Forty Pale Ale

Finalists: Cajun’s Wharf, Ciao Baci, The Hillcrest Fountain, The Fold

Finalists: Blue Canoe 4 x 4 Pale Ale, Diamond Bear Pale Ale, Flyway Migrate Pale Ale, Vino’s Pale Ale

Twin Peaks Finalists: The Hillcrest Fountain, Pizza Cafe, The Tavern Sports Grill, U.S. Pizza

Cocktail list

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Lost Forty

Bloody Mary South on Main Finalists: Midtown, Dugan’s Pub, Red Door, Revolution

Martini

ARKANSAS TIMES

Finalists: 107 Liquor, Legacy Wine & Spirits, O’Looney’s Wine and Liquor, Sullivant’s Liquor

Finalists: 109 & Co., Capital Bar and Grill, Ciao Baci, Raduno Brick Oven & Barroom

Finalists: Cantina Laredo, Heights Taco and Tamale, Local Lime, Santo Coyote

OCTOBER 20, 2016

Colonial Wines and Spirits

Brewpub

The Fold

22

Liquor store

South on Main

Margarita

GLUTEN FREE AND VEGAN OPTIONS AVAILABLE HERE!

Boulevard Brewing Co.

Finalists: The Fold, Loca Luna, Lost Forty Brewing, South on Main

Coldest beer

A Taste of Brazilian Cuisine

National brew

Capital Bar and Grill Finalists: 109 & Co., Ciao Baci, The Pantry, South on Main

Finalists: Diamond Bear Ale House, Flyway, Rebel Kettle, Vino’s

Beer selection (bar or restaurant) Flying Saucer Draught Emporium Finalists: Big Orange, The Pantry, Raduno Brick Oven & Barroom, Samantha’s Tap Room & Wood Grill

Beer selection (retail) Colonial Wines and Spirits Finalists: 107 Liquor, Legacy Wine & Spirits, Metro Liquor, Sullivant’s Liquor


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Time for a tipple

BRIAN CHILSON

Make plans to attend the Arkansas Times Craft Beer Festival

I

f you don’t make it any farther in this article, remember this: The Arkansas Times Craft Beer Festival takes place from 6-9 p.m. Friday, Oct. 28, at the Argenta Plaza at 6th and Main streets in North Little Rock, and it is a hot ticket. The festival routinely sells out, so if you think sampling beers from around the country (and world) while noshing on food from local restaurants and listening to live music sounds like a good time, hasten to centralarkansastickets.com and buy your ticket in advance. As usual, dozens of breweries will be pouring more than 250 different beers. There will be food from Skinny J’s Argenta, Zaffino’s by Nori, Whole Hog Cafe in North Little Rock, Arkansas Ale House, Taziki’s, Damgoode Pies, Cafe Bossa Nova, Old Chicago North Little Rock and Edwards Food Giant. Opal Agafia & The Sweet Nothings, a self-described “soul/roots/folk” band from Northwest Arkansas, will provide the soundtrack. Plus, Sam Adams will have a pop-a-shot, cornhole and something called a mustache teeter-totter set up in its corner. As usual, proceeds benefit the Argenta Arts Foundation. Read on to learn more about the breweries and beers coming to the festival.

Arkansas Breweries (See page 15 for more on Arkansas breweries.)

BUBBA BREWS You won’t miss this brewery at the beer fest; it will be serving its 10-Point Bock, All-American Pale Ale, Dirty Blonde, English Godfather ESB, Great White, Oatmeal Stout, Scooter Trash IPA and Southern Rok 24

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ARKANSAS TIMES

Oktoberfestbier out of its tap truck. BLUE CANOE The River Market district brewery will be pouring 4X4 Pale, Wolf Trail Pale and The Whittler, a milk stout. BUFFALO BREWING CO. The state’s newest brewery is also one of the state’s smallest. Situated in the back of The Water Buffalo, a supply store for gardeners and cheese-,

wine- and beer-makers, it will have on hand 3 Doses, Easy Red Rider, Pineapple Wheat and a nonalcoholic root beer. Also, look out for a Water Buffalo tent with info on home brewing and the store’s free classes. CORE BREWING CO. The Springdale-based behemoth continues to open public houses throughout the state at a rapid clip. Next year, look for it to open a distillery in Fort Smith. At the festival, try Core’s Arkansas Red, Behemoth Pilsner, ESB, Hilltop IPA, Kyya Imperial Chocolate Stout, Leg Hound Lager, Pumpkin Pie Lager, Raspberry Lager and Toasted Coconut Ale.

serving tasty food from its North Little Rock Arkansas Ale House as well as most of its beer lineup: Dogtown Brown, Oatmeal Stout, Pale Ale, Pig Trail Porter, Presidential IPA, Rocktoberfest, Southern Blonde and Strawberry Blonde. FLY WAY BREWING The Nor t h Little Rock brwery will have on hand its year-round Bluewing Blueberry Wheat, Free Range Brown and Migrate Pale Ale as well as special and seasonal brews Coffee Cake Stout, Magdalene Tripel and Pumpkin Ale.

DAMGOODE BREWS The River Market district brewpub will pour its A rkansas Amber, Arktoberfest, Damgoode Pale Ale and O Quattlebaum, an IPA named for longtime brewer Joshua Quattlebaum.

LOST FORTY BREWING The state’s largest brewery will debut its new limited release Snake Party IPA, a double dry-hopped double IPA, and pour its latest seasonal, Forest Queen Stout, along with year-round brews Love Honey Bock and Rock Hound IPA.

DIAMOND BEER BREWING CO. The state’s oldest production brewery will be

OZARK BEER CO. The Rogers-based brewery will have on hand its widely distributed


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ARKANSAS BREWERIES

A R K A N S A S T I M E S C R A F T B E E R F E S T I VA L Here’s your scorecard for the Oct. 28 event.

BLUE CANOE

❏ 4X4 Pale Ale______________________________ ❏ Wolf Trail Ale_____________________________ ❏ The Whittler______________________________

R I C k YA N C e y T H E 5 T H WAV E

❏ 10-Point Bock_ ___________________________ ❏ All-American Pale Ale______________________ ❏ Dirty Blonde______________________________ ❏ English Godfather ESB_____________________ ❏ Great White______________________________ ❏ Oatmeal Stout____________________________ ❏ Scooter Trash IPA_________________________ ❏ Southern Rok Oktoberfestbier______________

BUFFALO BREWING CO. (1)

❏ 3 Doses__________________________________ ❏ Easy Red Rider_ __________________________ ❏ Pineapple Wheat__________________________ ❏ Root Beer (nonalcoholic)_ _________________

CORE BREWING CO. (2)

❏ Arkansas Red____________________________ ❏ Behemoth Pilsner_________________________ ❏ ESB_____________________________________ ❏ Hilltop IPA_ ______________________________ ❏ Kyya Imperial Chocolate Stout______________ ❏ Leg Hound Lager__________________________ ❏ Pumpkin Pie Lager________________________ ❏ Raspberry Lager__________________________ ❏ Toasted Coconut Ale_ _____________________

DAMGOODE BREWS (2)

❏ Arkansas Amber__________________________ ❏ Arktoberfest______________________________ ❏ Damgoode Pale Ale________________________ ❏ O Quattlebaum___________________________

DIAMOND BEAR BREWING CO. (1)

❏ Dogtown Brown___________________________ ❏ Oatmeal Stout____________________________ ❏ Pale Ale__________________________________ ❏ Pig Trail Porter_ __________________________ ❏ Presidential IPA___________________________ ❏ Rocktoberfest____________________________ ❏ Southern Blonde__________________________ ❏ Strawberry Blonde________________________

FLYWAY BREWING (1)

THE SAINT LOUIS BREWERY (4)

❏ Schlafly Grapefuit IPA_____________________ ❏ Schlafly Kolsch___________________________ ❏ Schlafly Noble Lager_ _____________________ ❏ Schlafly Pale Ale__________________________ ❏ Schlafly Pumpkin Ale______________________

SHINER (8)

BUBBA BREWS

❏ Andygator Dopplebock____________________ ❏ Big Easy Session IPA______________________ ❏ Bourbon Street Coffee Stout_ ______________ ❏ Bourbon Street Honey Pale Ale_____________ ❏ Oktoberfest_ _____________________________ ❏ Peach Harvest Lager______________________ ❏ Purple Haze______________________________

BOULEVARD BREWING CO. (8)

❏ Boulevard Wheat_ ________________________ ❏ Nutcracker Ale____________________________ ❏ Rye-on-Rye X Sazerac_____________________ ❏ Saison Brett______________________________ ❏ Snow and Tell_ ___________________________ ❏ Tank 7 Saison____________________________

CEDAR CREEK BREWERY (7)

❏ Dankosaurus IPA_ ________________________ ❏ Lawn Ranger Cream Ale_ __________________ ❏ Patio Pounder Pale Ale_ ___________________

CHARLEVILLE BREWING (5)

❏ Late Night Karate Kicks____________________ ❏ Oktoberfest_ _____________________________ ❏ TBD_____________________________________

COOP ALE WORKS (5)

❏ Cherry DNR______________________________ ❏ DNR Belgian Strong Ale____________________ ❏ Elevator Wheat___________________________ ❏ F5 IPA___________________________________ ❏ Spare Rib Pale Ale_ _______________________

GHOST RIVER BREWING CO. (7)

❏ 1887 IPA_________________________________ ❏ Golden Ale_ ______________________________ ❏ Midnight Magic___________________________ ❏ Riverbank Red____________________________

GOLDCREST BREWING CO. (6)

❏ Goldcrest 51______________________________

❏ Ruby Redbird_____________________________ ❏ Shiner Bock______________________________ ❏ Shiner Cheer_____________________________ ❏ Wicked Ram IPA__________________________

SOUTHERN STAR BREWING CO. (3)

FOUNDERS BREWING CO. (4)

❏ Bombshell Blonde_________________________ ❏ Buried Hatchet_ __________________________ ❏ Conspiracy Theory IPA_ ___________________

TALLGRASS BREWING CO. (4)

❏ 8-Bit Pale Ale_____________________________ ❏ Buffalo Sweat_ ___________________________ ❏ Flying Hawaiian___________________________ ❏ Songbird Saison__________________________ ❏ Top Rope IPA_____________________________ ❏ Zombie Monkie___________________________

TIN ROOF BREWING CO. (7)

❏ Blonde Ale_ ______________________________ ❏ Game Day IPA____________________________ ❏ Juke Joint IPA____________________________ ❏ Perfect Tin Amber_________________________ ❏ Turnrow Coriander Ale_____________________ ❏ Voodoo Bengal Pale Ale____________________

WISEACRE BREWING COMPANY (2)

❏ Adjective Animal DIPA_____________________ ❏ Ananda IPA_ _____________________________ ❏ Oktoberfest_ _____________________________ ❏ Speciality________________________________ ❏ Tiny Bomb American Pilsner________________

❏ Flour De Wheat___________________________ ❏ Lazy Saison______________________________ ❏ Me and The Dev Ale_______________________ ❏ Southern Pecan_ _________________________

MARSHALL BREWING CO. (5)

BLUE MOON BREWING CO. (8)

❏ Atlas_ ___________________________________ ❏ Black Dolphin____________________________ ❏ Old Pavilion_ _____________________________ ❏ Sundown_ _______________________________

MOTHER’S BREWING CO. (2)

❏ Brandy Barrel MILF_ ______________________ REBEL KETTLE BREWING CO. (2) ❏ Harvest Season Saison____________________ ❏ Loopty Loop______________________________ ❏ REDRUMPUM Imperial Pumpkin Amber Ale__ ❏ Three Blind Mice__________________________ ___________________________________________ ❏ Winter Grind_ ____________________________ ❏ Show ’Em Your O’Fest Oktoberfest Märzen___ ___________________________________________ ❏ Working Glass Hero Blonde Ale_____________

STONE’S THROW BREWING (1)

❏ Amer Belge Belgian IPA____________________ ❏ Barton British Standard____________________ ❏ Big Dam Horn Imperial Oktoberfest__________ ❏ Special Cider Release______________________

VINO’S & MOODY BREWS (1)

❏ Moody Brews Earl Grey ESB________________ ❏ Moody Brews Watermelon Ginger IPA_ ______ ❏ Vino’s Dry Hopped Gardenhouse____________ ❏ Vino’s Dunkelweizen_ _____________________

REGIONAL BREWERIES ABITA BREWING CO. (8)

OCTOBER 20, 2016

ARKANSAS TIMES

NEW BELGIUM BREWING CO.

❏ Citradelic IPA_____________________________ ❏ Fat Tire__________________________________ ❏ Lips of Faith Tart Lychee Sour______________ ❏ Pumpkick________________________________ ❏ Ranger IPA_______________________________

PINEY RIVER BREWING CO. (6)

❏ Black Walnut Wheat_______________________ ❏ Masked Bandit IPA________________________ ❏ Old Tom Porter_ __________________________ ❏ Sweet Potato Ale__________________________

PUBLIC HOUSE BREWING CO. (7)

❏ Courtship Cranberry Ale_ __________________ ❏ Elusive IPA_______________________________ ❏ Hide and Seek Hefeweizen_________________ ❏ Revelation Stout__________________________ ❏ Rod’s Cream Ale_ _________________________

THE DUDES’ BREWING CO. (7)

EINSTÖK BREWERY (8)

❏ BA Fire Ant_______________________________ ❏ Devil’s Harvest APA_______________________ ❏ Jack the Sipper___________________________ ❏ Suzy B___________________________________

LOST FORTY BREWING

❏ Forest Queen Milk Stout___________________ ❏ Love Honey Bock_ ________________________ ❏ Rockhound IPA___________________________ ❏ Snake Party IPA_ _________________________ ❏ OZARK BEER CO. (1)_ _____________________ ❏ American Pale Ale_________________________ ❏ BDCS 2016 (limited)_______________________ ❏ Belgian Golden_ __________________________ ❏ Cream Stout______________________________ ❏ October Saison___________________________

❏ Kona Longboard Lager_ ___________________ ❏ Kona Big Wave Golden Ale_________________ ❏ Widmer Hefewizen________________________ ❏ Omission Pale Ale_________________________

SOUTHERN PROHIBITION BREWING (3)

❏ Anchor Steam____________________________ ❏ Brotherhood Steam_ ______________________ ❏ California Lager___________________________ ❏ Christmas Ale_ ___________________________ ❏ Flying Cloud Stout_ _______________________ ❏ Porter_ __________________________________

LAZY MAGNOLIA BREWERY (4)

CRAFT BREW ALLIANCE (4)

❏ Apple Wheat_ ____________________________ ❏ Belgian White_ ___________________________ ❏ Pretzel Wheat_ ___________________________

GREAT RAFT BREWING (2)

❏ Commotion_______________________________ ❏ Creature of Habit_ ________________________ ❏ Reasonably Corrupt_______________________ ❏ Southern Drawl___________________________

❏ Chocolate Sombrero_______________________ ❏ Evil Crawfish_ ____________________________ ❏ Mango___________________________________ ❏ Undead Party Crasher_____________________

❏ Blood Orange Amber_ _____________________ ❏ Grandma’s Pecan Brown___________________ ❏ Peach Berliner Weiss______________________ ❏ Pumpkin Golden Ale_______________________ ❏ Schnitzen Giggles_________________________

SHOCK TOP BREWING CO. (4)

❏ Bluewing Blueberry Wheat_________________ ❏ Coffee Cake Stout_________________________ ❏ Free Range Brown_ _______________________ ❏ Magdalene Tripel_ ________________________ ❏ Migrate Pale Ale_ _________________________ ❏ Pumpkin Ale______________________________

❏ Amber Ale________________________________ 26

“I T ’S A N A L IEN A POCA LY PSE! QU ICK, GR A B T H E BEER!”

NATIONAL & INTERNATIONAL BREWERIES ANCHOR BREWING CO. (8)

❏ Belgian White_ ___________________________ ❏ Cappuccino Oatmeal Stout_________________ ❏ Cocoa Brown_____________________________ ❏ Cinnamon Horchata Ale____________________ ❏ White IPA________________________________

❏ Artic Berry_ ______________________________ ❏ Artic Pale Ale_____________________________ ❏ Toasted Porter____________________________ ❏ White Ale_ _______________________________ ❏ All Day IPA_______________________________ ❏ Breakfast Stout___________________________ ❏ Centennial IPA____________________________ ❏ Dirty Bastard_____________________________ ❏ KBS_____________________________________ ❏ PC Pils___________________________________ ❏ Porter_ __________________________________

GOOSE ISLAND BEER CO. (4)

❏ 312 Urban Wheat__________________________ ❏ 4 Star Pils________________________________ ❏ Bourbon County Stout 2014________________ ❏ Gillian_ __________________________________ ❏ Halia_ ___________________________________ ❏ IPA______________________________________ ❏ Lolita____________________________________ ❏ Pepe Nero________________________________

GREEN FLASH BREWING CO. (6)

❏ Alpine Hoppy Birthday_____________________ ❏ Cosmic Ristretto Porter____________________ ❏ Passion Fruit Kicker_______________________ ❏ StyRian Golding Single Hop_ _______________

JOSEPH JAMES BREWING CO. (6)

❏ American Flyer_ __________________________ ❏ Busker Brown_ ___________________________ ❏ Citra Rye_________________________________ ❏ I’m Out___________________________________

LAGUNITAS BREWING CO. (5)

❏ 12th of Never_____________________________ ❏ Brown Shugga____________________________ ❏ IPA______________________________________ ❏ Sucks_ __________________________________

OSKAR BLUES BREWERY (5)

❏ Beerito_ _________________________________ ❏ Dale’s Pale Ale____________________________ ❏ Old Chub_________________________________ ❏ Priscilla__________________________________ ❏ Ten FIDY_________________________________

ROGUE ALES (7)

❏ 4 Hop IPA________________________________ ❏ 7 Hop IPA________________________________ BREWERY OMMEGANG (8) ❏ Dead Guy________________________________ ❏ Game of Thrones Take the Black____________ ❏ Hazelnut Brown Nectar____________________ ❏ Game of Thrones Three-Eyed Raven Saison__ ❏ Shakespeare Oatmeal Stout________________ ___________________________________________ ❏ Lovely, Dark and Deep Winter Ale___________ SAMUEL ADAMS ___________________________________________ ❏ Boston Lager_____________________________ ❏ Witte Wheat Ale_ _________________________ ❏ Cascade IPA______________________________ ❏ Nitro Coffee Stout_________________________ CARSON’S BREWERY (6) ❏ Rebel IPA________________________________ ❏ Brown Cow_______________________________ ❏ Rebel Grapefruit IPA_______________________ ❏ Demonik_________________________________ ❏ Rebel Rider IPA___________________________ ❏ E-Ville___________________________________ ❏ Winter Lager_____________________________ ❏ Harlot_ __________________________________ ❏ White Christmas Ale_______________________ ❏ Purgatory________________________________ ❏ RIPA_ ___________________________________ SIERRA NEVADA BREWING CO. (8) ❏ Celebration_______________________________ CASCADE BREWING (5) ❏ Hop Hunter IPA___________________________ ❏ Apricot_ _________________________________ ❏ Nooner Pils_______________________________ ❏ Blueberry Ale_____________________________ ❏ Oktoberfest_ _____________________________ ❏ Kriek____________________________________ ❏ Otra Vez_________________________________ ❏ Strawberry_______________________________ ❏ Torpedo IPA______________________________

CLOWN SHOES (5)

❏ Barista__________________________________

SIXPOINT BREWERY (3)


STONE BREWING CO. (3)

SUMMIT BREWING CO. (6)

❏ Oktoberfest_ _____________________________ ❏ Saga IPA_________________________________ ❏ Unchained No. 23 West London Ale_________

TOMMYKNOCKER BREWERY (3)

❏ Golden Monkey___________________________ ❏ Hop Devil_ _______________________________ ❏ Prima Pils________________________________ ❏ Storm King_______________________________ ❏ Winter Cheers____________________________

WASATCH AND SQUATTERS (7)

❏ Squatters Full Suspension Pale Ale__________ ❏ Squatters Hop Rising Double IPA_ __________ ❏ Squatters Off Duty IPA_____________________ ❏ Wasatch Apricot Hefeweizen_______________ ❏ Wasatch Devastator Double Bock___________ ❏ Wasatch Evolution Amber__________________ ❏ Wasatch Ghostrider White IPA______________ ❏ Wasatch Polygamy Porter__________________

is limited M usic

OPA L AGA FI A & THE SW EET NOTHINGS

S P O N S O R N OT E

The Argenta Downtown Council,  founded  in  2007  by local business and property owners, is committed to providing an environment for economic development to occur and to support the local businesses in the Argenta Arts District. The organization is recognized as a leader, advocate and resource in assuring that downtown is a safe, clean, green and vital place. The Public Safety Ambassador Program assists in creating a secure, well-managed and welcoming environment to everyone who visits  Argenta. The Clean Team Ambassador program helps provide a clean, well-managed and welcoming environment to property owners, residents, guests and visitors of Argenta. The Green Team Ambassador program is responsible for improving the landscaping and annual color in the  downtown  area. Over 100 ADVANCE flower pots, 40 hanging baskets and 44 colorful beds are seasonally planted along Argenta’s unique streetscape. In the last five years there has been over $200 million in new or announced private and public investment, events have increased 200 percent, resAT THE DOOR taurant taxes increased 36 percent and hotel taxes increased 58 percent.

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❏ Grapefruit Shandy_ _______________________ ❏ Jack O Pumpkin Shandy___________________

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❏ Butthead Bock____________________________ ❏ Green Chile Lager_________________________ ❏ Imperial Nut Brown________________________ ❏ Jack Whacker Wheat______________________ ❏ Legend Anniversary Ale____________________

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❏ Arrogant Bastard Ale______________________ ❏ Coffee Milk Stout_ ________________________ ❏ Go To IPA________________________________ ❏ IPA______________________________________ ❏ Who You Callin’ Wussie____________________

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❏ 5 Beans__________________________________ ❏ Bengali__________________________________ ❏ The Crisp_ _______________________________ ❏ Resin____________________________________ ❏ Sweet Action_____________________________

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American Pale Ale, Belgian Golden and Cream Stout as well as its October Saison. True beer nerds will likely be hovering around Ozark’s table, waiting for a limited pour of its Bourbon Barrel Aged Double Cream Stout (BDCS), one of the most celebrated Arkansas beers. R E B E L K E TTLE BREWING CO. The rapidly growing East Village brewery will show off its range at the beer festival, pouring its popular Working Glass Hero Blonde Ale along with a trio of specials — Harvest Season Saison, REDRUMPUM Imperial Pumpkin Amber Ale and Show ’Em Your O’Fest Oktoberfest Märzen. S TONE’S THROW BREWING The Ninth Street nanobrewery will have on hand its Amer Belge Belgian IPA, Barton British Standard, Big Dam Horn Imperial Oktoberfest and Special Cider Release.

Wine list (bar or restaurant)

Best bar for live music

The Pantry

George’s Majestic Lounge (Fayetteville)

Finalists: By the Glass, Ciao Baci, Crush Wine Bar, One Eleven at the Capital

Wine selection (retail) Colonial Wines and Spirits Finalists: 107 Liquor, Grapevine Wines & Spirits, Springhill Wine and Spirits, Sullivant’s Liquor

AROUND ARKANSAS

Bar

Maxine’s Tap Room (Fayetteville) Finalists: George’s Majestic Lounge (Fayetteville), Grub’s Bar and Grille (Fayetteville), Maxine’s Live (Hot Springs) 28

OCTOBER 20, 2016

ARKANSAS TIMES

Finalists: Maxine’s Live (Hot Springs), Neumeier’s Rib Room (Fort Smith), Smoke & Barrel (Fayetteville)

Brewery Core Brewing (Rogers) Finalists: Black Apple Crossing (Springdale), Fossil Cove Brewing Co. (Fayetteville), Ozark Brewing Co. (Rogers), Superior Bathhouse Brewery (Hot Springs)

VINO’S & MOODY BREWS After a stint at Damgoode Brews and working on his own Moody Brews as a gypsy brewer, Josiah Moody is back at Vino’s while also working on his own creations. He’ll have both at the festival: Moody Brews Earl Grey ESB, Moody Brews Watermelon Ginger IPA, Vino’s Dry Hopped Gardenhouse and Vino’s Dunkelweizen.

Regional Breweries ABITA BREWING Louisiana’s largest craft brewery was started in 1986 in the small town of Abita Springs, which sits about 30 miles north of New Orleans. Driven in part by the concentrated collective thirst radiating across Lake Pontchartrain, Abita has grown to produce over 151,000 barrels of beer annually, including its signature Amber. It will have a full menu of brews on offer this year: Amber, Purple Haze, Big Easy Session IPA, Oktoberfest, Andygator Dopplebock, Bourbon St. Coffee Stout, Bourbon

St. Honey Pale Ale and Peach Harvest Lager. BOULE VARD BREWING CO. For fans of wheat beer, Boulevard Brewing Co.’s Unfiltered Wheat Beer — usually just called “Boulevard Wheat” — is a reliably delicious tap mainstay, a brew to order when you’re not feeling adventurous and none of the tap handles look familiar. The brew that earned the beer a Gold Medal from the Great American Beer Festival likely owes a lot of its complexity to the Kansas City brewery’s bottle conditioning process, in which sugar and yeast are added to the brew just before it’s bottled, creating a second fermentation inside the bottle. The company also brings its Tank 7 Farmhouse Ale, a floral-scented saison that’s heavy on the grapefruit; the Snow and Tell, an oak-aged Scotch ale added to the brewery’s lineup last winter; the Nutcracker Ale, a reddish winter brew with hints of caramel and toffee; the special-release Rye On Rye On Rye (or, Rye on Rye X), a beer version of the New Orleans Sazerac cocktail aged in a Templeton Rye whiskey barrel; and the Saison Brett, a take on the Tank 7, bottle-conditioned with a wild yeast called Brettanomyces. CEDAR CREEK BREWERY Situated on Cedar Creek Lake 60 miles southeast of Dallas, 4-year-old Cedar Creek Brewery is another fairly recent addition to the booming Texas craft beer scene. Founded by beer lover Jim Elliott and his wife, Cindy, the brewery grew out of Jim’s frustration with not being able to find good craft brews on tap when he moved to the area in 2008. Elliott eventually hired brewmaster Damon Lewis and together, they cobbled up a brewery from former dairy equipment. Since then, the little brewery has expanded considerably and continues to churn out fan-favorite suds. At the festival, look for the Dank-oSaurus IPA, Patio Pounder Pale Lager and Lawn Ranger Cream Ale. CH A RLE V ILLE V I N E YA R D & MICROBREWERY A w iner y t h at ex pa nde d into brewing, Charleville is situated in Sainte Geneive, Mo., in the hills just south of St. Louis, where in addition


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to the winery and brewhouse, there’s a refurbished 1860s log cabin that serves as a bed and breakfast. Look for the brewery to pour Late Night Karate Kicks, Oktoberfest and more.

the same at the Craft Beer Festival. The new 51, the only beer produced by Goldcrest, is based on the original recipe and is now lightly hopped with Fuggle and Tradition hops.

ing” Sundown Wheat, Atlas India Pale Ale and the Old Pavilion pilsner. The fourth is the Black Dolphin Russian Imperial Stout, a beer with which to celebrate cooler weather.

COOP ALE WORKS T h i s 7- y e a r - o l d Sooner brewer y based in Oklahoma City, bottles, cans and kegs its beers and is sending five to Central Arkansas for the festival: Its highoctane DNR (the label featuring bare feet and a toe-tag), a Belgian dark ale with notes of cinnamon, dried fruit and yeast; muddled pink Very Cherry DNR; its hop-forward F5 India Pale Ale; Spare Rib pale ale (a “gas station beer”); and spicy Elevator Wheat, a blend of Maris Otter barley, white wheat and rye. COOP expanded in 2014 and made its Craft Beer Festival debut that year, its first time to venture out of state.

G R E AT R A F T BRE W ING The Great Raft was a ma ssive log ja m on the Red River, at one point clogging the river from Shreveport 65 miles downstream to Campti back in the 19th century. Great Raft Brewing, on the other hand, has been flowing freely on the Red since 2012, when Andrew and Lindsey Nations launched their brewery in their hometown of Shreveport. Since then, the brewery has landed a Gold in the pale ale category of the 2015 U.S. Beer Championships. Great Raft paddled all the way upstream to Little Rock in September for Great Raft Arkansas Launch Week, serving up several varieties of suds at The Faded Rose, Maddie’s Place, Flying Saucer, Reno’s and at liquor stores. It returns for the Craft Beer Festival laden with Commotion Pale Ale, Reasonably Corrupt dark lager, Southern Drawl “Euro” lager and Creature of Habit American Brown ale.

M O T H E R ’ S B R E W I N G C O. The brewers at Mot her ’s, headquartered just up the road in Springfield, Mo., say they are doing their best to make their mothers proud with beers they say show their love for community. Mother-love in Central Arkansas will come in the form of four brews: Loopty Loop, a New World lager; Brandy Barrel MILF; Winter Grind, a coffee stout; and Three Blind Mice, a brown ale. Mother’s, opened in 2011 in a former Hostess bread bakery and won a 2016 Feast award for best microbrewery in mid-Missouri. You may have sampled some of Mother’s best at last year’s festival or at Oktoberfest at Eureka Springs or the Osceola Gala last weekend. If you were born at least 21 years ago, Mother you should know: It’s the beer with the heart label.

GHOST RIVER BREWING According to the brewers at Ghost River, “The Memphis Sand Aquifer is purified naturally through 850 feet of fine sand and natural quartz. That’s why every brewery in Memphis uses it.” The brewery donates $1 for every barrel it brews to the Wolf River Conservancy in the spirit of preserving that aquifer, and it’ll bring the results of that purification to the festival by way of four brews: the flagship Golden Ale; the Riverbank Red, a Great American Beer Festival winner originally brewed for the Memphis Redbirds baseball team; the 1887, an IPA made with Columbus hops; and Midnight Magic, a Germanstyle black ale that’s light-bodied, but still tastes like a dark beer. GOLDCREST B R E W I N G C O. Last year, Goldcrest Brewing Co. revived the domestic lager Goldcrest 51 , a .k . a . “ The Original Memphis Beer,” produced from 1906 by the Tennessee Brewing Co. until 1954, when the brewery closed. (The brewery was older, having opened in 1885.) Memphians used to say, “I’ll have a 51”; now we can say

L A Z Y MAGN O L I A M ississippi’s first package brewery since prohibition, Lazy Magnolia has become one of the South’s most widely distributed beers. Founded in 2003 in Kiln, Miss. (the hometown of Brett Favre), the brewery will be pouring three beers from its Welcome to the Porch Series, or as it calls them, “easy-drinking brews for all occasions”: Flour De Wheat, an American wheat ale; Lazy Saison, a pale Belgian-style wheat ale; and Southern Pecan, its popular nut brown ale. Also on tap: the brewery’s fall seasonal, an American strong ale called Me and The Dev Ale. MARSHALL BREWING Brewmaster Eric Marshall untapped the first of his “full-strength ales and lagers” in Tulsa in 2008 and says his goal is to be the “premiere brewery in Oklahoma.” The brewery is sending over four beers, three of them from its year-round lineup: its “easy-drink-

PINEY RIVER BREWING CO. More Ozarks-brewed beer for the Craft Beer Festival: Piney River Brewing Co. returns with seasonals Sweet Potato Ale and Masked Bandit black rye IPA and year-round releases Black Walnut Wheat Ale, the 2012 Grapes, Grains and Growls Festival winner; and Old Tom Porter, the 2013 Great American Beer Festival Gold Medal winner. Piney River Brewing was once a nanobrewery on Joleen and Brian Durham’s farm in Bucyrus, Mo.; it’s still on the farm, but now has a canning line and is distributed in Missouri and Arkansas. PUBLIC HOUSE BREWING CO. A brewery that grew from coowner Josh Stacy’s adventures helping his homebrewer father make his own kitchen suds, the Rolla, Mo., Public House Brewing Co.and Brewpub opened in 2010 to rave reviews, and now has three locations in Rolla and St. James. Especially known for its seasonal brews, including a strawberry wheat ale and Courtship Cranberry Ale, Public House is fast becoming

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one of the big names of craft brewing in the Show Me State, which knows a thing or two about beer. Look for five of its favorites at the festival, including its Courtship Cranberry Ale, Rod’s Cream Ale, Revelation Stout, Hide and Seek Hefeweizen and Elusive IPA. SHINER BEER The Shiner Brewery was founded by Kosmos Spoetzl, a Bavarian beer enthusiast who settled in Shiner, Texas, where he began brewing from within a tin shed in 1909, spreading the gospel of the Spoetzl Brewery’s output by leaving bottles of his beer on the fenceposts surrounding the fields in which local farmers worked. “Every drop” of the beer is still brewed there, Shiner says, and it’ll be bringing drops (collected conveniently in kegs) of its low-ABV summer grapefruit-ginger lager Ruby Redbird; the signature Shiner Bock that inspired the ram on the beer’s label; Shiner Cheer, a dunkelweisen brewed with peach and pecan; and the Wicked Ram IPA, the brewery’s first India Pale Ale. SOUTHERN STAR BREWING Located about 40 miles north of Houston in the town of Conroe, Texas, Southern Star began brewing in 2008. It’s known locally for sponsoring a homebrew “Pro-Am,” in which the winner has a chance to brew his or her recipe using Southern Star’s equipment. This year, it’ll

be pouring Bombshell Blonde, Buried Hatchet and Conspiracy Theory IPA. TALLGR ASS BREWING CO. Founded in 2007 in Ma nhat ta n, Ka n., Tallgrass now distributes throughout the Midwest and South, exclusively in 16-ounce cans with colorful labels. For the festival, look for 8-Bit Pale Ale; Buffalo Sweat, an oatmeal cream stout brewed with vanilla beans; Flying Hawaiian, a double IPA brewed with pineapple; the Belgian-style Songbird Saison; Top Rope IPA; and Zombie Monkie, a robust porter made with roasted dark chocolate and specialty malts. TIN ROOF BREWING A standout from the burgeoning Louisiana craft brew scene, Baton Rouge’s Tin Roof Brewing Co. is yet another example of beer lovers creating their own supply when living in an area where the local beer offerings didn’t pass personal muster. Friends and business partners Charles Caldwell and William McGehee, both hardcore craft beer fans, had long dreamed of opening their own artisan brewery for years before making Tin Roof a reality in November 2010. Among other popular brews, they’ve since canned up the official beer of LSU, but please don’t hold that against them, Hog fans. They won’t be pouring their LSU-approved Bayou Bengal Lager at the festival, but they will


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be offering up their Juke Joint IPA, Game Day IPA, Perfect Tin Amber Ale, Turnrow Coriander Ale, Voodoo Bengal Pale Ale and Blonde Ale.

National Breweries A NCHOR BRE WING CO. This hallowed San Francisco institution claims to be “America’s first and oldest craft brewery,” and with roots dating back to at least 1896, it makes a convincing case. Anchor has survived Prohibition, the mid-century era of mass-produced lagers, and, long before any of that, the destruction of its original brewery in the great earthquake of 1906. It still produces its famous Anchor Steam in a copper brewhouse in San Francisco, along with variants like Brotherhood Steam, California Lager, Flying Cloud Stout and Anchor Porter — all of which will be available for sampling. BLUE MOON BREWING CO. Initially named “The Sandlot” because of its being situated in a Denver, Colo., baseball stadium, the Belgian White beer that earned Blue Moon its reputation — with a signature orange wheel garnish in place of the traditional lemon — spread like wildfire when brewer and founder Keith Villa

toured bars with cases of the brew and bags of oranges. Blue Moon’s Belgian White made its way first to Northwest Arkansas and then across the state, eventually becoming a taproom staple. The MillerCoors brewery also brings its White IPA, a hoppier twist on the classic Belgian Wit made with a hops variety called Huell Melon; a Cappuccino Oatmeal Stout, a limited-release beer that makes up part of the brewery’s winter sampler pack; a Cocoa Brown that pairs chocolate with a hint of orange; and the brewery’s Cinnamon Horchata Ale, a take on the classic Valencian agua de horchata, a milky cinnamon beverage brewed with long-grain rice. BREWERY OMMEGANG Situated on a hilltop in Cooperstown, N.Y., Brewery Ommegang looks more like a farmhouse wedding destination than a brewery, and there’s a reason for that: The brewhouse is situated on a former hops farm. Like Blue Moon, Ommegang’s signature brew is a Belgian wheat called Witte that’s brewed with orange peel and coriander. It’ll have that on hand, as well as the brewery’s Lovely, Dark and Deep Winter Ale, brewed with midnight wheat, chocolate and flaked oats, as well as two brews based on HBO’s “Game of Thrones,” which the brewery says are “made to be deep, dark and complex like those who have sworn the oath to defend Westeros against threats from the north.”

WORK OUT WITH AN EXPERT Kathleen Rea specializes in helping men and women realize their physical potential, especially when injuries or just the aches and pains of middle age and more discourage a good work out. With a PH.D. in Biomedical Engineering, Kathleen understands how your body works and how to apply the right exercise and weight training to keep you fit and injury free. Workout in the privacy of a small, well equipped gym conveniently located in Argenta with one of the state’s best private trainers. For more information call Kathleen at 501-324-1414.

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CARSON’S BREWERY Jason Carson’s 3-year-old microbrewery is new to the Craft Beer Festival. Carson’s produces six core beers, seasonals and barrel-aged products in Evansville, Ind., and is sending five of those plus a retired label, Purgatory, which means you’ll be drinking the last of it. Carson’s marketing has a dark side, as you’ll see by the names: Meet the RIPA, Carson’s Red India Pale Ale; Demonik Double IPA, with a “sarcophagi bitter finish”; the nutty and dark Brown Cow brown ale; the Harlot Honey Blonde light ale; and Eville American Wheat ale. Don’t fear the RIPA: It brought home the bronze medal in the Double Red Ale category at this year’s Great American Beer Festival. CASCADE BREWING A Portland, Ore., brewery founded in 1998, Cascade Brewing only makes sour beer, which is intentionally brewed to be sour or acidic in taste. Cascade will have on hand its Apricot Sour Ale, a blend of blonde ales aged in wine barrels with apricots; Blueberry Northwest Style Sour Ale, a blend of blonde and wheat ales aged in wine barrels with blueberries; Kriek Northwest Sour Ale, a blend of sour red ales aged in wine barrels with Bing and sour pie cherries; and Strawberry Northwest Sour Ale, a blend of blonde and wheat ales aged in wine barrels with strawberries and vanilla beans. CLOWN SHOES BEER The mission of this Ipswich, Mass.based brewery is “to produce beer without pretension while being free and a little crazy.” Judge for yourself by trying The Barista, a “breakfast” brown ale; Chocolate Sombrero, a Mexican-style Chocolate Stout; Evil Crawfish Imperial Red Ale; Mango, an American Kolsch; and Undead Party Crash, an American Imperial Stout.

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CR AF T BRE W ALLIANCE The fifth largest craft brewer y in the country was born in 2008 out of the merger of two popular Pacific Northwest breweries founded in the 1980s — Redhook Brewery and

Widmer Brothers Brewing. Over the years, Craft Brew Alliance has added Kona Brewing Co., Hawaii’s oldest and largest craft brewery, and glutenfree Omission Beer. At the fest, look for Kona’s Longboard Lager and Big Wave Golden Ale along with Widmer Hefewizen and Omission Pale Ale. THE DUDES B R E W I N G C O. Torrance, Calif.based The Dudes Brewing Co. might not be the brewery traveling the farthest distance to participate in the festival, but it’s probably in the running. Founded in 2013 by surfer and craft brewer Jeff Parker and his business partner Toby Humes, the company has long been big on putting its offerings in beachfriendly cans, and often brings the flavors of Southern California to its brews. All the beers from its popular “Juicebox” series will be available for sampling at the festival, including its Blood Orange Amber, Grandma’s Pecan Brown, Peach Berliner Weiss, Pumpkin Golden Ale and Schnitzen Giggles. EINSTOK BREWING CO. Einstok’s we b s it e pr om inently features a set of geographic coordinates: N65° W18°, a spot about 60 miles south of the Arctic Circle. That would be the fishing port of Akureyri on the northern coast of Iceland, which is where Einstok crafts its ales. Newcomers to the festival this year, the Nordic brewmasters will serve their White Ale, Toasted Porter, Arctic Pale Ale and Arctic Berry, which is flavored with hand-picked bilberries. FOUNDERS BREWING CO. A winner of six World Beer Cup medals, four European Beer Star medals and three Great American Beer festivals, this Grand Rapids, Mich.-based brewery will be pouring its All Day IPA, Breakfast Stout, Centennial IPA, Dirty Bastard, Kentucky Breakfast Stout, PC Pils and Porter. GOOSE ISL AND Owned by AnheuserBusch InBev since 2011, Goose Island


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has kept up the quality and willingness to experiment that’s made it such a well-respected name in craft beer. It’ll bring an impressive lineup to the fest, including standards 312 Urban Wheat and Goose IPA; vintage ales Lolita, Halia and Gillian; Belgianstyle farmhouse ale Pepe Nero; and the 2014 edition of the highly coveted Bourbon County Stout. GREEN FLASH BRE W ING CO. You’d have to visit the West Coast to sample Green Flash brews in their natural environment, but luckily, the San Diego brewery is bringing its inventive and always lovely-hued brews inland, including the Cosmic Ristretto, a highABV dense black porter brewed with espresso; the Passion Fruit Kicker, a tart wheat ale brewed with tea and passion fruit juice; and the Styrian Golding Single Hop, founded on a base of English malt. Green Flash Brewing Co. joined forces with a fellow San Diego brewery, Alpine Beer Co., with a handshake between owners that doubled the capacity of Alpine’s production, a badly needed strategic move after Alpine’s Great American Beer Festival medals stretched its popularity beyond its facility’s capacity. Green Flash now brews several Alpine beers, one of which it will have in tow at the festival: Alpine’s Hoppy Birthday, a session IPA. JOSEPH JAMES BREWING CO. This Henderson, Nev., brewery,

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founded in 2008, will be pouring its American Flyer Craft Lager, Busker Brown Ale, Citra Rye American Pale Ale and I’m Out Imperial Stout. LAGUNITAS BREWING CO. A new and welcome entry into Arkansas last year, this Petaluma, Calif.- and Chicago-based brewery has been in expansion mode since it sold a 50 percent stake to Heineken International last year. It will bring its hop-forward 12th of Never Ale, American Strong Ale Brown Shugga, IPA and Lagunitas Sucks Ale to the fest. NEW BELGIUM BREWING CO. Founded in a Fort Collins, Colo., basement in 1991 with two soon-tobe-famous recipes — Abbey, a dark Belgian Dubbel, and the now-ubiquitous Fat Tire Amber Ale — New Belgium this August celebrated both its 25th anniversary and the grand opening of its second production facility, in Asheville, N.C. Along with Fat Tire, New Belgium will be serving Citradelic IPA, Ranger IPA, Pumpkick and Tart Lychee, a sour ale in the brewery’s boundary-pushing “Lips of Faith” series. OSKAR BLUES B R E W E R Y O sk a r, which operates three


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breweries — in Longmont, Colo.; Brevard, N.C.; and Austin, Texas — calls its products the “original craft brew in a can.” Cans, Oskar says, keep beer fresher, are portable and are recyclable. This basement-to-149,000-barrels-of-beer outfit was founded by Dale Katechis in Longmont, which is open for tours in case you want to scope out the process that goes into making Dale’s Pale Ale (named “Best Pale Ale” by the New York Times in 2005 and first brewed in Katechis’ bathtub when he was a student at Auburn University in Alabama); Beerito Mexican lager; Old Chub Scotch ale; Priscilla (a take on Belgian Classic Wit); and Ten Fidy, a “boundary stretching” Imperial stout. ROGUE Founded in 1988, Rogue Ales was at the vanguard of the craft beer movement that has since spread around the world, making the Oregon-based brewery one of the foundation stones of the phenomenon. A repeat medalist for its beers at the Great American Beer Festival, Rogue is known for complex flavors and willingness to field quirky brews — like Voodoo Doughnut Pretzel, Raspberry and Chocolate Ale — as well as its commitment to never using preservatives and sourcing local ingredients, which have become a hallmark of craft brewing. It will be pouring some of its most popular brews for the festival, including Dead Guy IPA, 4 Hop IPA, 7 Hop IPA, Hazlenut Brown Nectar and Shakespeare Oatmeal Stout.

Pulaski Technical College Coulinary Arts and Hospitality Management Institute SAMUEL ADAMS (BOSTON BEER CO.) Event Chairs: Honoring: Though the first batch Mike & Ginger Beebe Jennifer McCarty of ”Boston Lager -Remove the was image of the book -Rearrange images of Yeti and Beer cap trap to fill space -C concocted in the home we had a star or bubble that says “Beer Cap Reserve Trap” -Is possible YouritTickets Todayto change the background c of founder Jim Koch in 1984, its lin501-301-7773 the beer more? It’s getting lost in the white. eage goes back to the 1870s, when cap trap is on so that it will pop Koch’s great-great-grandfather, Louis Koch, used the recipe at his St. Louis, Mo., brewery. Over a century later, Jim’s gamble to rekindle the family business paid off big: The Bostonbased company today produces over 4 million barrels per year, making it the nation’s second-largest craft brewery. In addition to its trademark lager, Sam Adams will be pouring Winter Lager, White Christmas Ale, Nitor BEER CAP TRAP Coffee Stout and four different IPAs: Rebel, Rebel Rider, Rebel Grapefruit and Cascade.

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SHOCK TOP Another brewer y u nder t he Anheuser-Busch InBev umbrella, Shock Top specializes in drinkable, wheat-style beers. At the fest, try the Apple Wheat, Belgian White and Pretzel Wheat. S I E R R A NEVADA Now t h e n a t i o n ’s third-la rgest cra f t brewer y (behind only the makers of Yuengling and Sam Adams), this pillar of the beer scene helped define the citric, hopheavy style that’s come to be called the American IPA. Sierra Nevada still brews

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in Chico, the California town where it got its start in 1979, but in 2012 it opened a second facility in Mills River, N.C. It will be pouring its trademark Pale Ale, along with Nooner Pils, Otra Vez, Hop Hunter IPA, Torpedo IPA and Oktoberfest. SIXPOINT BREWERY Founded in Brooklyn’s Red Hook neighborhood in 2004, Sixpoint makes the audacious claim that its history really began “at the dawn of civilization,” seeing as the

six-pointed “Brewer’s star” that ornaments its slender cans has quasi-mystical roots that trace back to before the Middle Ages. Say what you will about Brooklyn and cultural appropriation, but Sixpoint makes some fantastic beers: This year, it’ll be pouring Resin, The Crisp, Sweet Action and Bengali (all available yearround), as well as its specialty 5 Beans, brewed with coffee, cocoa, vanilla and black cardamom. STONE BREWING Now celebrating its 20th year in business, Stone Brewing

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is the 10th largest craft brewer in the United States, and has breweries in Berlin as well as Richmond, Va. The company started as a microbrewery in San Diego and now operates Stone Brewing World Bistro and Gardens restaurants there and in Escondido, Calif. The brewery, which uses an image of a gargoyle on its label, has seven year-round releases, including two coming to the festival: Stone IPA and Stone Go To IPA, the latter brewed with “an irrational amount of hops” for an aromatic and bitter drink. Stone is also sending its limited release Stone Coffee Milk Stout, a bittersweet brew; and, from Stone’s Arrogant Brewing division, Arrogant Bastard, a bourbon-barrel-aged beer, and the pilsner Who You Callin Wussie. BeerAdvocate Magazine has called Stone Brewery the “All-Time Top Brewery on Planet Earth.” SUMMIT BREWING CO. Founded in 1986 in Saint Paul, Minn., in an old auto parts warehouse, Summit has been in Arkansas for two years now and gained a strong following. In 2009, it started the Unchained Series, where Summit brewers were given the freedom to brew anything they wanted. One of those, Unchained No. 23 West London Ale, will be available at the fest, along with the brewery’s Oktoberfest and excellent Saga IPA. TRAVELER BEER CO. Can a brewery subsist on shandies alone? Traveler’s success proves it’s possible. Since first opening in 2012, this Burlington, Vt., based company

has grown to distribute its light blends of American wheat ale and other ingredients to all 50 states. It will bring to the festival its Grapefruit Shandy (which is available year-round) and the seasonal Jack-O Traveler Pumpkin Shandy. TOMMYKNOCKER BREWERY No, not like the Stephen King book. In miner folklore, tommyknockers are subterranean sprites of mischievous inclination and dubious goodwill — a fitting image for any beer and especially one brewed in Idaho Springs, Colo., a mountain town forged by the Pike’s Peak Gold Rush of the 1850s. The recipient of a cumulative 17 medals from the Great American Beer Festival, Tommyknocker Brewery returns to the festival this year with Green Chile Lager, Legend Anniversary Ale, Butthead Bock, Imperial Nut Brown and Jack Whacker Wheat. WASATCH BREWERY/ SQUATTERS CRAFT BEERS Now in its 30th year, Salt Lake Citybased Wasatch Brewery is another old-timer of the craft brewing scene, and was often forced in its early days to battle for the right to exist in conservative, buttoned-down Mormonland. When the company opened in 1986, it was the first brewery in Utah and later spearheaded the legal effort to bring brewpubs to the state. Wasatch will be joined at the festival by Utah Brewers Cooperative partner Squatters Craft Beers, a 27-year-old operation also based in Salt Lake. Wasatch will be pouring its Polygamy Porter, Devastator Double Bock, Ghostrider White IPA, Apricot Hefeweizen and Evolution Amber Ale. Squatters will serve up its Off Duty IPA, Hop Rising Double IPA and Full Suspension Pale Ale.

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LIQUORING UP: The state now has four distilleries, including Core in Springdale, which is opening a new distillery in Rogers, and Rock Town in Little Rock, which may expand its location on East Sixth Street.

Spirits on the move Two Arkansas craft distilleries plan expansions. BY DAVID KOON

W

hile artisan beer brewing has been hot for a while, another niche segment of the drinkable arts that’s coming on strong is craft distilling, featuring quirky companies that put as much thought, chemistry and passion into their small-batch whiskeys, rums, vodkas, brandies and other liquors as craft brewers do their complicated suds. According to the Alcoholic Beverage Control Board, there are four licensed distilleries in the state: White River Distillery in Gassville, Arkansas Moonshine Inc. in Newport, Rock Town Distillery in Little Rock and Core Brewing and Distilling Co. in Springdale. A fifth company, Smithworks American Made Vodka, finishes

and bottles spirits made out of state at a plant in Fort Smith. The biggest news in Arkansasbased distilling now is coming from Rock Town and Core, which are planning or in the process of moving into more spacious digs so they can expand their product lines. Core Brewing and Distilling announced last year that it would purchase a 36,000-square-foot location at 1000 Rogers Ave. in Fort Smith, where the Fort Smith Southwest TimesRecord had previously been printed, to turn it into a new distillery with an attached tasting room. Reached earlier this week, Core vice president Jay Richardson said the Fort Smith project is still on track, with the company

completing a monthslong removal of machinery left over from the new location’s newspaper days so construction for the distillery can begin. “There was so much stuff in that business,” Richardson said. “We’re just finishing up getting it all cleaned out. There were some very, very large printing presses that were roughly three stories tall. There were three of them, and that has taken us awhile to get out of the building.” Richardson said the rough estimate on when the facility will be ready for production is “late 2017.” Core also hopes to open a school for distillers, coopers and brewers in cooperation with the University of Arkansas at Fort Smith; details should be finalized “in the immediate future,” Richardson said. When the distillery begins production, Richardson said, the focus will be on spirits made from predominantly Arkansas-sourced ingredients. Offerings will include bourbons, whiskeys, rums and brandies. He said the plan is to distribute Core liquors everywhere Core brews are sold, including Arkansas and potentially Missouri, Okla-

homa, Georgia and Tennessee. Richardson said the pivot from beer to liquor isn’t that difficult. “If you pay attention, a lot of the spirits are basically beer that is just fermented a different way,” he said. “The process is very similar to us brewing beer, so it’s not that big a stretch for us to go from one to the other.” Back in June, Rock Town founder and owner Phil Brandon announced the distillery would move from its location at 1216 E. Sixth St. to a new, larger space to be constructed on a lot two blocks away, at 1616 E. Capitol Ave. The new digs were to feature a larger warehouse and barrelhouse, plus a 2,000-square-foot room for tastings. But that plan is now on hold: Kelly Gee, tours and events manager for Rock Town, said the company is in talks with their property manager about staying put on East Sixth Street. “We are talking again with MosesTucker about possibly renovating the place we’re currently in and maybe expanding it a little bit, but I don’t know any details yet,” Gee said. “It’s still very much up in the air on what we’re going to do.” arktimes.com

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hen Amy Denton and her husband, Todd, purchased Pediatrics Plus 14 years ago, you could fit the entire company in a garage – employees, clients and all. “A friend of mine actually started [the company] and it was serving about 10 or 12 clients. Very, very small operation,”she said. “I went to work for her after hours because I got off work at 2:30 every day. When she and her husband were looking to sell it, I thought, you know what, I can do this and I can really make it awesome.” Recently married and relocated, it was a period of radical change in Denton’s life, to say nothing of having zero experience running a business. Undeterred, Amy developed a plan that focused on the basics and dug in. “I have very particular ideas on how I like things done,”she said.“I’m very progressive, I like to be forward-thinking and I like to look for new ideas and try to always be improving what’s happening. My experience at places where I’d worked was that these weren’t always welcome attributes. “I just took everything I’d learned from experiences of working at different companies through college and after college, got a core group of people together, and we sat down and created a vision and a mission and some values. We all just said, ‘We’re going to do this.’” Denton’s twofold plan – deliver the utmost in caring service and expertise to the patients and do all you can to take care of your employees – proved to be symbiotic components of the same equation. “What we did in the very beginning was sit down and say, ‘We’re going to put our patients and our families first and we’re going to treat our staff with respect and give them autonomy, lots of flexibility, really try to make sure we set it up where everybody is happy to be here.’ “We set the culture up from the very 42

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beginning with the mindset that we’re going to be all in. It’s a really positive culture which, when you’re serving children with special needs, the last thing they need from us is to not be positive and to not be happy when we’re there.” Denton’s simple philosophy has led Pediatrics Plus to big things in the state. The company now operates four offices throughout Central Arkansas, and grew its staff from around 10 in 2002 to nearly 450 today. The vast majority of executive leadership is homegrown, which has helped the original vison stay intact even as the company has expanded beyond Denton’s ability to manage every aspect. “The biggest challenge has been maintaining consistency and the level of quality across the board without being in control of every little piece. That’s definitely been the hardest part,” she said. “But, we still have the majority of the original crew that started with us 14 years ago and a lot of those people are now our executive team. “Our main goal has always been to create a culture where the kids of the families we serve have the best of the best we have to offer. That’s what we really try to do.”

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my Milholland learned to sew quilts and clothing for her dolls and progressed to making clothes for herself. “One of my grandmothers quilted, and she had us make little doll quilts and doll clothes and other fun things. We would spend a week with her in the summer and she would have projects for all the girls to do – I had mostly girl cousins,” says Milholland, owner of Sew Fast Alterations in Sherwood. “She taught us how to crochet and things that were fun. I think a lot of things like that, if you learn, they just stay with you. I was really young when the interest was instilled.” Milholland started making her own clothes in her teens. “I started buying patterns at Hancock’s when I was in junior high and high school and doing that. I would start drawing what I wanted to make and combining patterns to get what I wanted and just did more creative things than I mostly do now,” she says. Milholland worked in the alterations departments of several stores before she opened her shop in 1985. She doesn’t make custom clothing there, although she tried that the first couple of years she was in business. “I decided I needed to focus on either that or on alterations and I realized there was more of a demand for alterations,” she says. She and the two women who work for her do everything from simple pants hems to more complex alterations, like men’s suits and prom dresses. They promise to have items ready within one week for simple items but may need more than two weeks for more complicated work. They do offer rush jobs on hems or minor repairs. “But for most things, we take our time and we go for quality work, and it really does take time,” she says. “I think people have a notion that we can just zip some-

thing out, and some things we can, but with most things we take our time and make it look just like it did when they bought it. We want to have it professionally finished and we do put a lot of time and thought into it.” Sew Fast’s busy season kicks off in September, with school uniforms and cheerleader uniforms, and that leads into cotillion, homecoming and holiday seasons. As prom nears, the shop bustles again. Milholland grew up in Little Rock, but the time she spent on her grandparents’ farm in Florida makes for precious memories. Besides sewing, she and her cousins got to help with gardening and other projects. “It was kind of like living in the past, kind of like living on the land,” she says. “I remember picking strawberries from the garden and coming in and my grandmother would make biscuits and we would eat those fresh strawberries.” Milholland doesn’t sew as a hobby much anymore, and she rarely finds time to sew things for herself, friends or family. She’s making something special right now, however – a quilt for her first grandchild, due in November.


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WEST LITTLE ROCK PHARMACIST SANDERS FINDS PRESCRIPTION FOR SUCCESS

he vibe you get walking into The Pharmacy at Wellington is one of immediate welcome. With a pleasant interior well-stocked with your daily needs, and smiling faces behind the counter ready to help, you know you’re in a place where quality care is paramount. This is exactly what founder and owner Brittany Sanders is going for. After working for several years in a chain pharmacy, Sanders knew it was time for a change.“I just felt like there were better ways to take care of patients than we were able to in a big-box setting,”she says. What she saw missing in this area was something that offered the convenience of a big-box pharmacy – longer and weekend hours, a drive- through pickup option – combined with the things that make for better service, like quality staffing, free delivery and on-site immunizations. With the goal of providing a better level of service, she and her business partner opened The Pharmacy at Wellington last October. Closing in on their one-year anniversary, the rapidly growing West Little Rock area has enthusiastically welcomed them to the neighborhood. That feeling is mutual. Sanders has loved getting more involved in her patients’lives. She says, “I like knowing what’s going on, that they had surgery last week and how that’s going. It’s nice to be able to help them manage more aspects of medication than just handing them something over the counter.” That personal interaction was what led Sanders to her profession in the first place. “I always knew I wanted to be involved with health care,” she says. “I loved people and the natural chemistry, so pharmacy was a natural fit.” Sanders graduated from UAMS in 2005, so with more than a decade of experience in pharmacy, along with management and front-end retail experience on her resume, she was ready for the challenges of running a business.

“It’s managing every little aspect, taking responsibility for things like hiring and health care benefits for my employees,” she says. But Sanders also has found unexpected help along the way. For example, information from the Arkansas Small Business and Technology Development Center at the University of Arkansas was invaluable in writing the business plan for The Pharmacy at Wellington. Sanders says, “There are a lot of resources out there that you don’t know about until you go and look for them and use them.” This pervasive sense of collaboration in the pharmacy is what Sanders thrives on. As a wife, mother of a 7- and a 9-year-old, and frequent foster parent, teamwork is important in her family life, too. The kids might roll their eyes when they have to stop at the pharmacy on the way home from church, but“they get it, they’re supportive,” Sanders says fondly. Being a business owner has expanded horizons for the Wellington community and for Sanders herself, who is getting used to looking at the bigger picture as a manager and care-provider. “Life doesn’t just happen from 9 to 5,” she says, “and I want to be there for people.”

WOMEN Entrepreneurs

Eason T

EASON PARLAYS SERVICE, FINANCIAL SKILLS INTO SUCCESSFUL WORK

here was never a time in Erin Eason’s professional life that she wasn’t working with money. “Actually, I’ve never done anything else,” she said. “I started out as a teller in a bank right out of high school.” That humble first job sustained her through her time earning a degree in management at UALR and into the full-time working world. Eason steadily worked her way up the management ladder at local banks until she landed as an assistant to a financial adviser and discovered her true passion. “I like helping people and being able to tell people they have enough money to live the rest of their life,”she said.“And, being able to problem-solve when they don’t and figure out how we’re going to get there.” Eason, 45, moved into financial advising exclusively in 2002, and to say she did things the hard way is an understatement, trying as she did to manage clients’ money in one of the worst market slumps since the Great Depression. But the times also sharpened her instincts and her drive to succeed, allowing her to take advantage of opportunities. “It’s a very male-dominated field. I think the first time I walked up to a door for a cold call I realized I was 100 percent female,” she said. “In my client’s age range of 70 to 85, the majority of the women in couples ultimately make the decision on who to hire as a financial adviser. If you are able to relate financial information to both of them in layman’s terms without making them feel as though they are asking stupid questions, you can be successful. “A lot of people get into financial advising because of the analytics and stock-picking and number-crunching, but the reality is it’s a sales job. A lot of people like the investment side of it, but you can’t do that if you can’t do the sales part of it.” Eason, a Lonoke native, found a particularly strong toehold among seniors and niche populations such as firefighters, where word about her traveled fast. Her

natural wit and easy conversational style only added to the picture. “Working with municipalities across the state – fire and police – that’s a subculture unto itself,” she said. “They all referred me to their friends and employers because all firemen pretty much work two jobs. It’s just grown from there.” Eason launched her own firm in 2014, and having her name over the door just spurred her on. As a customer service, she regularly crisscrosses the state to call on clients who appreciate her straight-ahead style and measured investment approach. “I’m ultra-conservative,” she said. “I try and protect money with the slow, steady rate of growth rather than try and knock the cover off the ball.” Male-dominated and heavily regulated though her industry is, Eason can compete with the best of them, another payoff of years of experience in the business. “It’s not an impress-your-clients thing as much anymore as it is a down-to-business, cut-and-dried, here’s-what-I-can-do-foryou,” she said. “The reality is you can buy stock anywhere. It’s completely about trust and selling yourself and getting somebody to trust you.”

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WOMEN Entrepreneurs

Sponsored p by y Sponsored by

KRISTI

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Dannelley

Radke “D

LEAN EARLY YEARS FORGED RADKE’S ENTREPRENEURIAL METTLE

o you want it by the hour or the whole night?” Gina Radke remembers the shock at the desk clerk’s question, delivered sober as a Sunday, during a business trip to Seattle. The fledgling CEO had been tearing up the road beating on every door that would open – and a few that didn’t – trying to market the company she and her husband had sunk their last dime into back in Arkansas. And now, she and an intern along for the ride had landed a reservation in a hotel for which the term“business center” had a whole other meaning. “Have you ever seen the movie ‘Tommy Boy,’?” she asked. “That’s what I felt like.” It was 2008 and Radke and her husband, Wade, were living the downside of the American dream. Their company, Gallery Support Innovations, had suffered the one-two punch of a flatlining economy and the rank inexperience of its owners. Wade took a second job as the company sputtered and Gina dove into any source of information she could find trying to turn things around. “Google and YouTube became my very best friends,” she said. “I learned how to run a machine by YouTube, I learned manufacturing software via Google. I began to seek out any kind of education I could get on manufacturing. I went to Arkansas Manufacturing Solutions, SCORE, Small Business Administration, Arkansas Economic Development Commission; I mean, I knocked on every single door that would give me any information, especially if they would give it to me for free.” Gina, 38, regards the Seattle experience as more than just a great story. Looking back on it now, she sees the trip – which also included her contact at Boeing leaving her to rot in a lobby waiting room for eight hours – as a defining moment both personally and professionally. “It definitely taught me perseverance,” she said.“I’m not afraid to lose, at this point. 44

OCTOBER 20, 2016

ARKANSAS TIMES

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I figured when you have stayed in a hotel where they ask you if you want it by the hour, you’re not afraid to get out there and do what you gotta do.” Perseverance paid off with an invitation by the state Economic Development Commission to attend the National Business Aviation Association’s annual trade show. It was the crack in the door the Radkes had been waiting on. “After we got our bearings the first day, it became we’re gonna shake every hand that we have to, meet every person that we have to, knock people over if we have to until we leave with something,” she said. “That show opened up a whole new world for us.” Today, the company is a leading supplier of custom after-market locks and latches for private and commercial planes, trains and yachts. The Sherwood headquarters employs 28 and just stepped up from 8,000 square feet into 20,000 square feet of space, signaling the best part of the company’s story is yet to be written. “I’m not afraid to work hard. I’m not afraid to do what I gotta do,” Radke said. “I know what being broke feels like, and it didn’t kill me, so I’m not scared of it.”

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DANNELLEY ON TARGET AS CO-OWNER OF MAGNA IV

K

risti Dannelley expected her stay at Magna IV to be brief, but 18 years later now, she has no plans to leave. In fact, she’s now co-owner of the growing print and marketing business. “I had been in public accounting as an auditor and I really was tired of traveling. I took a job as the accounting manager for Magna IV and I really thought this would be a stopover and I would go on and work for a private company like an Alltel or a Dillard’s,” she says. “But I really loved it here. I still love it.” She moved up to controller, then chief financial officer and then chief operations officer, joining her partner Kent Middleton in buying the business from his parents. “We do all types of printing, but what we really do well is help customers solve problems by centralizing and streamlining the procurement of their marketing needs,” Dannelley says. “The printing business is very technology-driven and is rapidly advancing so we’re constantly making investments to ensure we’re delivering the most value we can to our customers. Today, I may be researching new equipment to make us more efficient. Tomorrow, I may be meeting with one of our larger client accounts to develop a program that will help them reduce their marketing spend while increasing procurement efficiencies.” Magna IV has full-time programmers and the technological capability to build online marketing portals for clients, effectively creating “one-stop-shops” for businesses’ print and marketing needs. “Our marketing portals are extremely valuable, especially for those big businesses like Dave & Buster’s or Gold’s Gym with multiple locations. The general managers can go to these portals and order brochures, signage or t-shirts—really whatever they need. By ordering it all through one central location, they are able to ensure brand consistency,” Dannelley explains. “Their colors are consistent, their logos are consistent, the sizing is consistent… We are able to do that because we have such varied capabilities. There are very few

printers, even in the nation, that have the breadth of services Magna IV does.” Magna IV has served national clients like Gold’s Gym, Dave & Buster’s, ConAgra Foods and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, along with several well-known local companies such as Dillard’s, Staley Electric and Harding University. Dannelley also founded and oversees Magna IV’s gifts company, Incredibly Charming Paper and Gifts, which offers monogrammed and personalized items, as well as grab-and-go paper goods, foam cups, apparel, sorority lines, tumblers and more. When she’s not creating new product lines or addressing customer’s needs, Dannelley spends her time volunteering and spending time outdoors with her husband, Scott, and their sons, Connor, 10, and Cole, 8. Scott bought her a bow for her birthday a few years ago. “Honestly, I’m always going, from the time I get up in the morning until I get into bed at night,” she says. “So when I started bow hunting and I realized I could sit in a tree, just sit there for hours, it became something that I really look forward to.”


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MARY G.

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MAUMELLE LAWYER NASH PROVIDES PRACTICAL AND EMPATHETIC ESTATE PLANNING

H

ave you given any thought to your own or a loved one’s long-term care and estate planning? It may be an uncomfortable question on the surface, but attorney and author Mary G. Nash of Nash Law in Maumelle makes it easy with her gentle and practical approach. “Estate planning is a major step in one’s life,”Nash says.“The quicker you get it done, it’s something off your mind.” Currently at work on her third book, Nash’s most recent publication is “Helping Hands Across Time: Keeping Family Money in the Family” (2014, Outskirts Press), the title of which nicely sums up the ethos that guides her legal practice. Elder and family law is all about protecting people and their assets as they pass through different phases of life. Nash knows that her clients are concerned with making sure their children are taken care of. “We want what we have accumulated to be our legacy to our children,” she says. Nash was raised in North Carolina by  working-class parents who were instilled with strong work ethic by their own parents. To that legacy, her parents added the value of education, encouraging her to work hard in school. “You weren’t allowed to breathe until you had your homework done,” Nash laughingly remembers. Apparently it worked: Nash has earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees, her Juris Doctor, and a post-doctoral legal master’s in international finance from Georgetown University, for which she spent about nine months in the Czech Republic conducting research. This cross-generational accumulation is how we build our family legacies, Nash says. As a lawyer, she ensures those legacies are protected, putting legal jargon in practical terms and encouraging her clients to establish living trusts for the material elements (“emphasis on living,” she adds). Her goal for clients? Family unity. “We don’t want dissension in the family,” Nash says. Nash herself has a small family and is keenly aware of the importance of building

D

trusting networks. Her grandson (by the name of Nash) is an only child, so she makes sure the both of them have close bonds in the neighborhood. The younger Nash’s crew, or “band of brothers” as Mary calls them, are largely Latino kids whose own grandparents may still be in their home country. “So I have 13 grandkids who’ve adopted me,” she says. She is also followed everywhere she goes, including the Nash Law offices, by Bear, the miniature poodle she rescued a few years ago. As the frontispiece of her second book reads, “You can always tell the character of a person by the way they treat children, animals, and the elderly.” Nash’s empathetic nature means that sometimes her job working with aging clients and their families is tough emotionally. She’s present in some of the most difficult, personal moments of their lives – providing legal counsel, yes, but Nash also says, “Sometimes we truly are counselors.” Whether she’s fighting for veterans and proper treatment of elders or providing vital planning services at sensitive times, Mary Nash is unfailingly committed to her work. In her words: “This is absolutely the best part of the law that anybody can practice because I know when I leave home in the morning that I’m going to do something good for my clients today.”

WOMEN Entrepreneurs

GUTIERREZ DISPLAYS PLANNING APTITUDE WITH APTUS FINANCIAL

uring the financial crisis in 2008, Sarah Catherine Gutierrez noticed that people were suffering because they had taken on too much mortgage debt on the advice of lenders and real estate agents who had vested interests in their purchases. Financial planners weren’t the answer in all cases because most price their services as a percentage of their clients’money, but if people don’t have money to invest they can’t be clients, says Gutierrez, a Harvard University graduate. She started Aptus Financial in 2011 after meeting a longtime financial planner who had been giving financial advice for 20 years, charging by the hour and working out of her home, to help people save more and avoid spending traps that can come with home and car purchases. “When I saw what she was doing and lives she was changing, I realized that an hourly financial planning model could be a significant solution to help this group of people not served by most financial planners,” she says. “We charge for all advice by the hour, the way a lawyer or a CPA charges. It was highly experimental but I can attest to a pretty significant demand for hourly financial planning advice, particularly by young doctors and professionals. We are currently serving clients in 27 states.” In most cases, Aptus is helping people avoid financial pitfalls rather than helping them dig out of financial holes. “Knowing the statistics about high divorce rates caused by financial problems, people unable to retire on their own terms, or parents without a nest egg for their kids’ college education, I know that what we are doing is life-changing,” she says. “We are starting so early in people’s lives that there is still plenty of time to avoid emotionally charged financial mistakes and to better prepare for retirement and other long-term goals.” She learned the rigor of analyzing companies through detailed modeling and research while working at Stephens Inc., and applies the same rigor to clients’ data.

“Along with my business partners, we built our own models that we use for clients to find answers to lots of financial questions, large and small, such as how to allocate investments, how much money to put aside for college, how much house to buy, and the best way to prioritize their spending and charitable giving according to their personal values.” Aptus became a registered investment advisor last year, adding a partner who is a chartered financial analyst with a doctorate in finance so the company could offer investment advice to clients. But Aptus doesn’t sell insurance or profit from clients’investments and makes money strictly through client fees. “We are quite unique because we believe that people can do nearly everything related to investing on their own — they just need a little education and guidance,” she says. Gutierrez and her husband, Jorge, have three children under 3 1/2 years old. Her perspective as a mom – and as a woman – benefits her clients in myriad ways. “I think it makes me a good financial planner,” says Gutierrez. “My passion is for the household budget, and I think I speak that language well. Investing is certainly important as a discipline, but if there is no money saved to invest in the first place, then investment advice is pretty irrelevant.”

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Arts Entertainment AND

MADE AND ERASED: Flour coats the floor at Good Weather Gallery’s September exhibit of the work of Anne Vieux, titled “same window, different day.”

GOOD WEATHER Lakewood pop-up gallery makes a home for art in limbo. BY TARA STICKLEY

R

emember that childhood feeling of impending freedom when a snow day was announced and the elementary school shut down? That’s the elation of stolen time. Snow days, extended layovers in foreign countries — even brutal storms and their accompanying hardships — shut down daily routines and jostle us enough to revive a dormant sense of community, a strange time when people who wouldn’t normally converse do. Good Weather, where curator Haynes Riley stages monthly art shows, is one of those

places that run on weird time. It’s part art gallery, part picnic. It’s high art, but down South. It’s ahead of its time, and yet there’s something old school in the way it fosters camaraderie. Riley makes his home in the areas that lie in between. The native Arkansan and graduate of Cranbrook Academy of Art installed his master’s of fine arts thesis show in the joints and passages between the exhibition halls of Cranbrook, leaving fragile sheets of porcelain folded into the angles where the wall and floor met, as if they were on strike from the wall. He installed an enigmatic neon phrase over the doorway and lowered a light fixture to floor level. This artistic practice of nudging viewers to look where they normally wouldn’t has grown into a daring curatorial initiative in his home state. Good Weather is in a small brickwalled garage of a Lakewood home that belongs to Haynes’ older brother, Zachary Riley. It serves as an 8-by-11-foot exhibit space (the span of a single-car slot). From the gallery, you might see

strolling families or girls doing track practice; most people walking the lakeside promenade below the home in September don’t seem to notice the gallery on the opening night of its 31st show. The people who have noticed dot the lawn and chat about ancient Greek aesthetics and the Razorbacks, enjoying bowls of simmering tomato basil soup crafted by Riley’s mother, Marilyn Riley. Had you opened the mailbox near the garage door during the September exhibit, you’d have found hand-bound pamphlets describing the work of young New York-based artist Anne Vieux, and if you’d ambled into the garage on the night of the opening, you’d have seen a quartet of lush microsuede abstract panels and their creator standing on a floor that she’d dusted in two inches of flour. Vieux “captures light” by bending and photographing holographic and other reflective papers, which she then renders more abstract with software and prints on faux suede panels. Vieux paints over the printed surfaces and leaves further artifacts of her gestures

through disruptions in the suede from tape marks and hand imprints. She talks about “bringing virtual space down into material space” and the “confusion between ... digital and physical, and painting versus print.” At the opening of her installation “same window, different day,” pastel marks in three succinct pale blue stripes extended beyond the canvas onto the fresh white walls. The faux suede of the — let’s just call them paintings — asks to be touched, but we knew we can’t. The artist provides other tactile experiences, though; the cushiony suede benches situated neatly in the center of the gallery and the coating of bleached flour on the floor. Anne calls the flour a “mysterious white powder” related to “the idea of entropy, people’s tracks made and erased, and information lost.” Just before the opening, Vieux, Riley and I talk about the New York art world as we had experienced it. Chelsea, the sterilized main gallery district in New York, we agree, is the baseline for what it means to go see contemporary art. The CONTINUED ON PAGE 62

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ARKANSAS TIMES


ROCK CANDY

Check out the Times’ A&E blog arktimes.com

A&E NEWS A NEW YORK PREMIERE is underway for “Vietgone,” El Dorado native Qui Nguyen’s play about his parents, Quang and Tong Nguyen, meeting at a Fort Chaffee refugee camp after fleeing (or, in Quang’s case, being evacuated) from Vietnam. “Vietgone” was awarded the 2015 Harold and Mimi Steinberg /American Theater Critics Association New Play Award, which included a prize of $25,000. GLASS ARTIST ED PENNEBAKER’S 13-foot-tall sculpture of tall, multicolored glass panels has been chosen for temporary installation in the Carrie Remmel Dickinson Fountain in front of the Arkansas Arts Center. For “Ozark Topography,” installed last week for the 4th annual Fountain Fest, Pennebaker cast hot glass into a steel mold to make the rectangular shapes and pressed objects into the glass while it was hot to create textures representing natural features of the Ozarks, where Pennebaker’s Red Fern Glass Studio is located. The win came with a $1,500 prize. Fountain Fest is sponsored by the Contemporaries, a young group of Arts Center supporters.

NINE ARKANSAS CONTRIBUTORS to the arts were honored this week with rooms to be named after them in Robinson Center Music Hall, which reopens Nov. 10 after a $70 million renovation. The rooms are named for Gail Davis, Lawrence Hamilton, Art Porter Sr., Art Porter Jr., Ben Piazza, Dr. William Grant Still, Florence Price, Stella Boyle Smith and Barry Travis. TWO INAUGURAL POETRY prizes were awarded from the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville this month — the CantoMundo Poetry Prize to Costa Rican American poet, fiction writer and translator Jacob Shores-Argüello for his collection “Paraiso,” and the Etel Adnan Poetry Prize to Lebanese poet and illustrator Jess Rizkallah for her collection “the magic my body becomes,” to be published in the fall of 2017.

Arthur Miller’s chilling dramatization of the historic Salem Witch Trials.

Play by arthur Miller DirecteD by Paul barnes Produced by ces & drew Kelso

OctOber 26 - NOvember 13 (501) 378-0405 | therep.org

ARKANSAS REPERTORY THEATRE arktimes.com

OCTOBER 20, 2016

Michael Stewart Allen as John Proctor in The Rep’s production of The Crucible. Photo by John David Pittman.

MORTUUS PATER PICTURES, the film production collaborative created by Gary Newton, Daniel Campbell and Graham Gordy, has set up operations at the Arkansas Regional Innovation Hub for work on the feature-length film “Antiquities,” Gordy’s adaptation of Campbell’s 2010 Charles B. Pierce Award-winning short film. The film, expected to be completed in early 2017, explores the life of Walt, a young man who returns home after his father’s death, taking a job at the antique mall where his father worked as a teenager. It’s to be shot on a rigorous schedule in November.

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THE

TO-DO

LIST

BY STEPHANIE SMITTLE

THURSDAY 10/20-SATURDAY 10/22

RED OCTOPUS THEATER: #SQUADGHOULS

8 p.m. The Public Theater. $10.

The comedy troupe whose spoof of documentary filmmaker Ken Burns suddenly went “trending” earlier this year on the Funny or Die website — which brought us “Between Two Ferns” and, this week, “Danny Elfman’s Trump Stalks Hillary” — is preparing for its annual Halloween show, #Squadghouls. Red Octopus has been making raunchy, low-budget slapstick comedy for over 25 years, a longevity owed to the tenacity and devotion of a core group of performers, a loyal local audience and to the late, great Sandy Baskin, the troupe’s longtime driving force and muse. #Squadghouls has a runtime of about two hours with intermission and, like other Red Octopus shows, the comedic material can get pretty blue, so it’s recommended for mature audiences only. Come in costume and get $2 off your ticket.

FRIDAY 10/21

ALCEE CHRISS III

Organist Alcee Chriss III earned a bachelor’s degree in organ performance and a master of music degree in historical performance at Oberlin Conservatory of Music, collecting a few first prizes in organ competitions along the way. He’s also a harpsichord player, a jazz pianist and a conductor who’s now earning his doctorate at McGill University. Fortunately for Central Arkansas listeners, he’s keeping up a rigorous performance schedule, including a trip here to play the ornate pipe organ at Little Rock’s First Presbyterian Church, an oak and burl eucalyptus behemoth built in 2004 by Little Rock’s own Nichols & Simpson Inc. Chriss’ program comes to Arkansas courtesy of the Central Arkansas Chapter of the American Guild of Organists. He’ll perform works by Bach, Schumann, Faure and a 1930 “toccata” (literally, “touch,” and usually involving a highly technical display of an organist’s speed and dexterity) by French composer Guillou, as well as works from American organists and composers Leo Sowerby and Calvin Taylor. 48

OCTOBER 20, 2016

ARKANSAS TIMES

AUBREY EDWARDS

8 p.m. First Presbyterian Church. Free.

SABOUGLA VOICES: Leo Bud Welch, whose gospel blues style remained largely unheralded during his 30-year tenure as a logger in Mississippi, joins Robert Bilbo Walker, R.L. Boyce, Terry “Harmonica” Bean, Lightnin’ Malcolm and Anthony “Big A” Sherrod for a Delta blues night at the White Water Tavern, 8 p.m., Oct. 22, $15.

SATURDAY 10/22

MISSISSIPPI BLUES SHOW

8 p.m. White Water Tavern. $15.

Most of the time, the way we see and hear music that characterizes the Delta blues tradition is in the rearview mirror, on a scratchy record or a remastered historical album. We’re left to speculate, for example, on the power Robert Johnson’s performances had on the women he seduced while playing

shows across the Delta under alias surnames, or the electrifying effect Memphis Minnie had on her audiences when she famously upstaged Big Bill Broonzy in a 1930s “battle of the bands” at a Chicago nightclub, winning a bottle of whiskey and a bottle of gin. So, if you get the chance to put aside your Robert Palmer documentary and hear the Delta blues in the flesh — and in a place that

resembles a juke joint more than it does a festival lawn — you should probably do so. The list of legendary names on this bill is the stuff of history, the kind of lineup worth ditching your camping weekend for: Leo Bud Welch, Robert Bilbo Walker, Lightnin’ Malcolm, R.L. Boyce, Terry “Harmonica” Bean and Anthony “Big A” Sherrod. For tickets, visit lastchancerecords.us.


IN BRIEF

THURSDAY 10/20

SATURDAY 10/22

WEDNESDAY 10/26

HARVESTFEST

WILDFLOWER REVUE

Every year, the Hillcrest Merchants Association organizes an all-day neighborhood festival, essentially an excuse to hang around on Kavanaugh in crisp fall weather while you listen to local bands play and let the kids run rampant in the bouncy house (there will be two this year). Though the festival officially kicks off at 11 a.m., early birds — and early birdwatchers — can tag along on the Audubon Bird Walk that departs from the ballfield at Allsopp Park at 7 a.m., or head to the Hillcrest Farmers Market in front of Pulaski Heights Baptist Church, where there will be a pancake breakfast at 9 a.m. If you don’t make it for breakfast, buy a $2 ticket to sample the entries in a gumbo cookoff from noon to 2 p.m. The music lineup spans across two stages and includes Adam Faucett, Mojo Depot, Little Joe and the BKs, Paul Morphis, Runaway Planet, Bombay Harambee, Good Time Ramblers, Dangerous Idiots, Rock Candy, The Uh Huhs, mömandpöp, New Motto and Kevin and Gus Kerby. Partial proceeds from sales of beer and wine at this year’s shindig benefit The Allen School, a prekindergarten program for kids with special needs.

Like the shared vocabulary among the members of The Highwaymen or between the Emmylou Harris/Dolly Parton/Linda Ronstadt trio, the sound of the Wildflower Revue was born of years of the singers listening to one another, of professed mutual admiration. Amy Garland, Mandy McBryde and Bonnie Montgomery — each solo artists in their own right — made the

11 a.m. Hillcrest Neighborhood. Free.

8:30 p.m. South on Main.

trio official while working on music for the film “Valley Inn,” and are putting the finishing touches on an album of originals, collaborations and covers, featuring the all-star band that typically accompanies Garland live — Nick Devlin on guitar, Brent LaBeau on bass, Bart Angel on drums and the Arkansas Symphony Orchestra’s Geoff Robson on fiddle — as well as Jeff Coleman and Matt Stone.

FRIDAY 10/21 Praeclara, Arkansas Festival Ballet and Wildwood Park for the Arts present their collaboration on Meredith Wilson’s “The Music Man,” 7:30 p.m. Fri.-Sat., 3 p.m. Sun., $15-$25. The Cedric Burnside Project brings hill country blues to the White Water Tavern, 9 p.m., $10. The UALR Trojans women’s soccer team takes on Georgia Southern at the Coleman Sports and Recreation Complex, 7 p.m. Across the UALR campus at the Jack Stephens Center, the women’s volleyball team plays a match against the Troy Trojans, 6:30 p.m. Maxine’s in Hot Springs hosts New Orleans’ Secondhand Street Band with the Foul Play Cabaret Burlesque Troupe, 8 p.m., $10-$15. The Weekend Theater presents “The Wiz,” 7:30 p.m. Fri.-Sat., 2:30 p.m. Sun., through Nov. 19, $16-$20.

SUNDAY 10/23

ARKANSAS TIMES HOG ROAST 1 p.m. Argenta Plaza. $18-$22.

You can do a lot of things with a pile of cinder blocks (see: the internet). One of those things will be demonstrated this Sunday when, in a doggedly porcine and substantially less dusty version of Burning Man, temporary installations of concrete will be constructed for the purposes of roasting whole pigs for our collective enjoyment. Farm Girl Meats outside Perryville will supply humanely raised whole hogs for 12 professional teams, to be served with sides from Ben E. Keith. Edwards Food Giant will supply nine amateur teams (who will craft their own sides for tasting) with pork butts for aspiring pitmasters. Lost Forty Brewing will be on site with a beer and wine garden, the Cooking Channel’s “Big Bad BBQ Brawl” will be filming onsite and The Salty Dogs and Bonnie Montgomery will be holding down the honky-tonk on a live music stage. Samples from the competitors will be served at 2 p.m. (a few on your plate makes for a sizable meal; eat a light breakfast). A $1,000 first prize goes to the best professional team, judged by local food bloggers.

Fingerstyle guitarist Ken Bonfield brings his litany of harp and baritone guitars to The Joint as part of the Argenta Arts Acoustic Music Series, 7:30 p.m., $10. Lost Forty Brewing and The Idle Class Magazine host Experience Films, a set of experimental shorts, accompanied by a performance from live glitch artist Popsicle of Doom, 6 p.m., $15. Ashley McBryde plays a free show as part of the “Live at Laman” series, Laman Library, 7 p.m., free. The Arkansas Regional Innovation Hub hosts “Maker’s Summit,” a day of workshops exploring the history and future of the maker movement, 9 a.m., free. Community Theater of Little Rock stages “Young Frankenstein: The Musical” at The Studio Theater, 7:30 p.m. Fri.-Sat., 2:30 p.m. Sun., $8-$16.

QUITE STRONG: Victoria Pater, Paypal product design lead and founder of the female design collective Quite Strong, is among the speakers at this year’s Made By Few design conference Oct. 26-29 in downtown Bentonville.

WEDNESDAY 10/26-SATURDAY 10/29

MADE BY FEW

Various Times. Downtown Bentonville. $187-$425.

On Sally Nixon’s vibrant tableau that serves as the welcome banner for the Made By Few conference’s website, a Brian Posehn lookalike wears a gray shirt emblazoned with the slogan “Make Epic Shit.” That’s a fairly accurate summary of how the element of play is incorporated into the annual gathering of designers and developers. This year’s conference moves from Central Arkansas to downtown Bentonville so visiting speakers and creatives like Mozilla’s Cassie McDaniel, Codepen’s Chris Coyier and Cards Against Humanity’s Amy Schwartz can experience places like the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, the 21c Museum Hotel and the winery at

Sassafras Springs Vineyard. “There’s a ton of stuff going on there. For the people coming in for the conference, we feel like it’s a duty of ours to give them new experiences in the state,” founder Arlton Lowry said. This year’s conference features an outdoor session called “Fireside Talks,” themed this year toward “the connection between our work and play”; a “Handmade by Few” artisan craft expo organized by The Little Craft Show; a design competition; workshops with titles like “Stuck: How to Manage Change Without Dying Inside”; and a killer afterparty in Ropeswing Hospitality Group’s new event space, the Record Building, in the former home of the Benton County Daily Record. For tickets and a full schedule, visit madebyfew.com.

SATURDAY 10/22 Guest conductor Martin Panteleev joins the Arkansas Symphony Orchestra for a program featuring works by Beethoven, Wagner and Panteleev himself, 7:30 p.m. Sat., 3 p.m. Sun. Maumelle Performing Arts Center, $14-$67. Arkadelphia hosts its annual catfish cook-off, Arktoberfest, with performances from Notice To Quit, Logan Lind, John Neal Rock and Roll and Bluesboy Jag and the Jukejoint Zombies, $25-$35.

SUNDAY 10/23 Guts Club, the haunting and creaky lo-fi folk project of Brooklyn/New Orleans transplant Lindsey Baker, comes to Vino’s with William Blackart and Mailman, 8 p.m., $5. R&B group After 7 caps off the last night of the Arkansas State Fair, 6 p.m., $15-$25.

MONDAY 10/24 The Film Society of Little Rock hosts “Monday Night Shorts: Fantastically Horrifying Shorts,” The Joint, 7:30 p.m., $8. UCA’s Reynolds Performance Hall hosts the touring dance theater piece “The Aluminum Show,” 7:30 p.m., $27-$40. arktimes.com

OCTOBER 20, 2016

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AFTER DARK All events are in the Greater Little Rock area unless otherwise noted. To place an event in the Arkansas Times calendar, please email the listing and all pertinent information, including date, time, location, price and contact information, to calendar@arktimes.com

THURSDAY, OCT. 20

50

OCTOBER 20, 2016

ARKANSAS TIMES

CRIS TOALA ALIVARES

MUSIC

Ashley McBryde. Part of the Live at Laman concert series. Laman Library, 7 p.m., free. 2801 Orange St., NLR. 501-758-1720. lamanlibrary.org. Blues Traveler. With Waker. George’s Majestic Lounge, 8:30 p.m., $25. 519 W. Dickson St., Fayetteville. 479-442-4226. georgesmajesticlounge.com. Charlotte Taylor. The Tavern Sports Grill, 7:30 p.m., free. 17815 Chenal Parkway. 501-8302100. thetavernsportsgrill.com. Clint Black. Arkansas State Fairgrounds, 8 p.m., $15-$25. 2600 Howard St. 501-372-8341 ext. 8206. arkansasstatefair.com. Couch Jackets. With S.I.N KARAOKE hosted by DJ B-Rock. Kings Live Music, 8 p.m., free. 1020 Front St., No. 102, Conway. kingslivemusic.com. Drageoke. Hosted by Queen Anthony James Gerard: a drag show followed by karaoke. Sway, 8 p.m. 412 Louisiana. clubsway.com. Jim Dickerson. Sonny Williams’ Steak Room, 7 p.m. 500 President Clinton Ave. 501-3242999. www.sonnywilliamssteakroom.com. Karaoke. Zack’s Place, 8 p.m., free. 1400 S. University Ave. 501-664-6444. Ken Bonfield. The Joint, 7:30 p.m., $20. 301 Main St. No. 102, NLR. 501-372-0205. thejointargenta.com. Live music. Ernie Biggs. No cover charge Sun.-Tue. and Thu. 307 President Clinton Ave. 501-372-4782. littlerock.erniebiggs.com. Lou Dog. Cajun’s Wharf, 9 p.m., $5. 2400 Cantrell Road. 501-375-5351. cajunswharf. com. Metro Station. Revolution, 7:30 p.m., $10-$15. 300 President Clinton Ave. 501-823-0090. revroom.com. Open Jam. Thirst n’ Howl, 8 p.m. 14710 Cantrell Road. 501-379-8189. www.thirst-nhowl.com. Open jam with The Port Arthur Band. Parrot Beach Cafe, 9 p.m. 9611 MacArthur Drive, NLR. 771-2994. Open Mic. Faulkner County Library, through May 31: third Thursday of every month, 7 p.m., free. 1900 Tyler St., Conway. 501-3277482. fcl.org. Richie Johnson. Cajun’s Wharf, 5:30 p.m., free. 2400 Cantrell Road. 501-375-5351. cajunswharf.com. RockUsaurus. Casa Mexicana, 7 p.m. 7111 JFK Blvd., NLR. 501-835-7876. Ronnie Millsap. Reynolds Performance Hall, UCA, 7:30 p.m. 350 S. Donaghey, Conway. uca.edu. Ryan Sauders. Ya Ya’s Euro Bistro, 6 p.m., free. 17711 Chenal Parkway. 501-821-1144. www. yayasar.com. Speaking Suns, Vegas Verdes. Maxine’s, 8 p.m., free. 700 Central Ave., Hot Springs. maxineslive.com. Ted Ludwig Trio. Capital Bar and Grill, 8 p.m., free. 111 W. Markham St. 501-370-7013. www.

FLOTUS HISTORIAN: Kate Anderson Brower, whose New York Times bestseller “First Women: The Grace and Power of America’s Modern First Ladies” is to be made into a television series produced by Robin Wright and Reese Witherspoon, gives the Fred K. Darragh Jr. Distinguished Lecture at the Ron Robinson Theater Thursday, Oct. 20, 6:30 p.m., free.

capitalbarandgrill.com.

COMEDY

James Ervin Berry. The Loony Bin, 7:30 p.m., $8. 10301 N. Rodney Parham Road. 501-2285555. loonybincomedy.com.

EVENTS

Antique/Boutique Walk. Shopping and live entertainment. Downtown Hot Springs, third Thursday of every month, 4 p.m., free. 100 Central Ave., Hot Springs. ArkiePub Trivia. Stone’s Throw, 6:30 p.m., free. 402 E. 9th St. 501-244-9154. stones-

FILM

TUESDAY WINE DAY

15% OFF

Excluding wines already on sale!

throwbeer.com. Charity Olive Hour. A benefit for Special Olympics Arkansas. Next Level Events, 6 p.m., $25-$30. 1400 W. Markham St. 501-376-9746. www.nextleveleventsinc.com. Maker’s Summit. A day of panel discussions and sessions on “the maker movement.” Arkansas Regional Innovation Hub, 9:30 p.m., free. 201 E. Broadway, NLR. 501-907-6570. arhub.org.

Experience Films. Experimental shorts, presented by Idle Class magazine. Lost Forty Brewing, 6 p.m., $15. 501 Byrd St. 501-3197335. www.lost40brewing.com. 2516 Cantrell Road Riverdale Shopping Center

366-4406

LECTURES

Kate Anderson Brower. The Fred K. Darragh Jr. Distinguished Lecture. Ron Robinson Theater, 6:30 p.m., free. 1 Pulaski Way. 501320-5703. ronrobinsontheater.org.


VINO’S 7th and Chester All ages*all the time

POETRY

POETluck. Literary salon and potluck. The Writer’s Colony at Dairy Hollow, third Thursday of every month, 6 p.m. 515 Spring St., Eureka Springs. 479-253-7444.

KIDS

Garden Club. A project of the Faulkner County Urban Farm Project. Ages 7 and up or with supervision. Faulkner County Library, 3:30 p.m., free. 1900 Tyler St., Conway. 501327-7482. www.fcl.org.

FRIDAY, OCT. 21

MUSIC

Against the Grain. Markham Street Grill and Pub, 8:30 p.m., free. 11321 W. Markham St. 501-224-2010. markhamstreetpub.com. Alcee Chris III. An organ recital presented by the Central Arkansas Chapter of the American Guild of Organists. First Presbyterian Church, 8 p.m., free. 800 Scott St. All In Fridays. Envy. 7200 Colonel Glenn Road. 501-562-3317. Almost Infamous. Silk’s Bar and Grill, 10 p.m. 2705 Central Ave., Hot Springs. 5016234411. oaklawn.com. “Artistry of the Guitar.” Featuring Steve Davison and Ken Bonfield. Fayetteville Public Library, 7:30 p.m., $15. 401 W. Mountain St., Fayetteville. Big John Miller. Cajun’s Wharf, 9 p.m., $5. 2400 Cantrell Road. 501-375-5351. cajunswharf.com. Blambo, Space Mother, Bible Black. Vino’s. 923 W. 7th St. 501-375-8466. vinosbrewpub. com. Brian and Nick. Cajun’s Wharf, 5:30 p.m., free. 2400 Cantrell Road. 501-375-5351. cajunswharf.com. Brian Mullen. Ya Ya’s Euro Bistro, 6 p.m., free. 17711 Chenal Parkway. 501-821-1144. www. yayasar.com/. Brother & The Hayes, Austin Manuel. Smoke and Barrel Tavern, 10 p.m., $3. 324 W. Dickson St., Fayetteville. 479-521-6880. smokeandbarrel.com. The Cedric Burnside Project. White Water Tavern, 9 p.m., $10. 2500 W. 7th St. 501-3758400. whitewatertavern.com. Denise Donatelli Quintet. The Fowler Center, 7:30 p.m., $18-$28. 201 Olympic Drive, Jonesboro. 870-972-3471. astate.edu/tickets. Dylan Scott. Revolution, 9 p.m., $13-$15. 300 President Clinton Ave. 501-823-0090. revroom.com. Foul Play Cabaret Burlesque Show, Secondhand Street Band. Maxine’s, 8 p.m., $10-$15. 700 Central Ave., Hot Springs. maxineslive.com. Frank Foster. George’s Majestic Lounge, 9:30 p.m., $15. 519 W. Dickson St., Fayetteville. 479-442-4226. georgesmajesticlounge.com. Kenny Wayne Shepherd. Followed by a performance from DeFrance. Arkansas State Fairgrounds, 8 p.m., $15-$25. 2600 Howard St. 501-372-8341 ext. 8206. arkansasstatefair.com. Live music. No cover charge Sun.-Tue. and Thu. Ernie Biggs. 307 President Clinton Ave. 501-372-4782. littlerock.erniebiggs.com. Ryan Sauders. The Tavern Sports Grill, 7:30

p.m., free. 17815 Chenal Parkway. 501-8302100. thetavernsportsgrill.com. Salsa Dancing. Clear Channel Metroplex, 9 p.m., $5-$10. 10800 Col. Glenn Road. 501217-5113. www.littlerocksalsa.com. SoulCom Collective Four Year Anniversary. Featuring Brett Johnson, with Jaeden, Joe Holmes, Joel Allenbaugh and Sleepy Genius. Stickyz Rock ‘n’ Roll Chicken Shack, $10$15. 107 River Market Ave. 501-372-7707. stickyz.com. Susan Erwin. Pop’s Lounge, Oct. 21, 6 p.m.; Oct. 28-29, 6 p.m. 2705 Central Ave., Hot Springs. 501-623-4411. oaklawn.com. Ted Ludwig Trio. Capital Bar and Grill, 8 p.m., free. 111 W. Markham St. 501-370-7013. www. capitalbarandgrill.com/. Upscale Friday. IV Corners, 7 p.m. 824 W. Capitol Ave. Moments Before, Fret and Worry. Kings Live Music, 8:30 p.m., $5. 1020 Front St., No. 102, Conway. kingslivemusic.com.

COMEDY

“Electile Dysfunction.” The Joint, through Nov. 19: 8 p.m., $22. 301 Main St. No. 102, NLR. 501-372-0205. thejointargenta.com. James Ervin Berry. The Loony Bin, through Oct. 22, 7:30 p.m.; Oct. 21, 10 p.m., $8-$12. 10301 N. Rodney Parham Road. 501-228-5555. loonybincomedy.com.

#

Friday, Oct 21st Blambo, Space Mother, and Bible Black

Saturday, Oct 22nd Becoming Saints

CD Release show and Halloween Party

Sunday, Oct 23rd Guts Club, William Blackart, and Peace Boner

Thursday, Oct 27th Malice at the Palace

Friday, Oct 28th

Tweet shop LOCAL

Huey Lux, DMP, Nostalgic Records, Lil Kiri, and more

Saturday, Oct 29th Hot Mess, Mat Smiley, and Crystal World

ARKANSAS TIMES

For more information www.vinosbrewpub.com

DANCE

Contra dance. Park Hill Presbyterian Church, 7:30 p.m., $5. 3520 JFK Blvd., NLR. arkansascountrydance.org.

AFFORDABLE APARTMENTS IN DOWNTOWN LITTLE ROCK

EVENTS

LGBTQ/SGL weekly meeting. Diverse Youth for Social Change is a group for LGBTQ/SGL and straight ally youth and young adults age 14 to 23. For more information, call 501-2449690 or search “DYSC” on Facebook. First Presbyterian Church, 6:30 p.m. 800 Scott St.

All Utilities Included In Rent Predominately Law School Student Residents

BARRISTER COURT APARTMENTS

LECTURES

Call 501-940-3309 For Availability www.barristercourt.com

Erwin Chemerinsky. A talk from the dean at University of California Irvine Law School. Clinton School of Public Service, 12 p.m., free. 1200 President Clinton Ave. 501-6835239. clintonschool.uasys.edu.

DOE’S KNOWS LUNCH & DINNER

SPORTS

UALR Trojans vs. Georgia Southern. A women’s soccer match. UALR, 7 p.m. 2801 S. University Ave. 501-569-8977. lrtrojans.com. UALR Trojans vs Troy. A women’s volleyball match. UALR, 6:30 p.m. 2801 S. University Ave. 501-569-8977. lrtrojans.com.

SATURDAY, OCT. 22

Lunch: Mon- Fri 11am-2pm 3.5” x 2.5” | Maximum Font Size: 30 pt Dinner: Mon-Thur 5:30-9:30pm • Fri & Sat 5:30-10pm FULL BAR & PRIVATE PARTY ROOM 1023 West Markham • Downtown Little Rock 501-376-1195 • www.doeseatplace.net

Knowing our clients personally is what we do.

MUSIC

Alex Summerlin. Cajun’s Wharf, 5:30 p.m., free. 2400 Cantrell Road. 501-375-5351. cajunswharf.com. Almost Infamous. Silk’s Bar and Grill, 10 p.m., 10pm. 2705 Central Ave., Hot Springs. 5016234411. oaklawn.com. Arktoberfest. Featuring a catfish cook-off and live music from Notice To Quit, Logan Lind, John Neal Rock and Roll and Bluesboy Jag and the Jukejoint Zombies. Downtown Arkadelphia, 11 a.m., $25-$35. Arkadelphia,

Knowing our clients personally is what we do.

Kelly R Journey, AAMS®, ADPA®, CRPC®, CRPS® Financial Advisor .

10800 Financial Centre Pkwy Suite 270 Little Rock, AR 72211 501-455-5786 Kelly.journey@edwardjones.com www.edwardjones.com

Member SIPC

arktimes.com

OCTOBER 20, 2016

51


AFTER DARK, CONT. Arkadelphia. arktoberfest.org. Becoming Saints. A Halloween party and album release show. Vino’s. 923 W. 7th St. 501-375-8466. vinosbrewpub.com. Beethoven: Symphony No. 7. With guest conductor Martin Panteleev, featuring works by Panteleev, Beethoven and Wagner. Maumelle High School, Oct. 22, 7:30 p.m.; Oct. 23, 3 p.m., $14-$67. 100 Victory Drive. 501-851-5350. arkansassymphony.org. Blue October. Clear Channel Metroplex, 8 p.m., $25-$30. 10800 Col. Glenn Road. 501-217-5113. Collin Raye. Arkansas State Fairgrounds, 6 p.m., $15-$25. 2600 Howard St. 501-3728341 ext. 8206. arkansasstatefair.com. DJ E-Yo. Smoke and Barrel Tavern, 10 p.m., free. 324 W. Dickson St., Fayetteville. 479521-6880. smokeandbarrel.com. Eric Hutchinson. Revolution, 8:30 p.m., $20$23. 300 President Clinton Ave. 501-8230090. revroom.com. HarvestFest. Hillcrest Neighborhood, 11 a.m. Kavanaugh Blvd. and Hillcrest. harvestfest.us. Joshua Stewart. The Tavern Sports Grill, 7:30 p.m., free. 17815 Chenal Parkway. 501-8302100. thetavernsportsgrill.com. Karaoke at Khalil’s. Khalil’s Pub, 7 p.m. 110 S. Shackleford Road. 501-224-0224. www. khalilspub.com. Karaoke. Zack’s Place, 8 p.m., free. 1400 S. University Ave. 501-664-6444. Casa Mexicana, 7 p.m. 7111 JFK Blvd., NLR. 501-835-7876. Karaoke with DJ Greg. Revolution, 8:30 p.m., free. 300 President Clinton Ave. 501823-0090. www.rumbarevolution.com/new. Kassi Moe. Ya Ya’s Euro Bistro, 6 p.m., free. 17711 Chenal Parkway. 501-821-1144. www. yayasar.com. Live music. Ernie Biggs. No cover charge Sun.-Tue. and Thu. 307 President Clinton Ave. 501-372-4782. littlerock.erniebiggs. com. Mississippi Blues Show. Featuring Robert Bilbo Walker, Leo Bud Welch, R.L. Boyce, Terry Harmonica Bean, Lightnin’ Malcolm and Big A Sherrod. White Water Tavern, 8 p.m., $15. 2500 W. 7th St. 501-375-8400. whitewatertavern.com. Pickin’ Porch. Bring your instrument. All ages welcome. Faulkner County Library, 9:30 a.m. 1900 Tyler St., Conway. 501-327-7482. www. fcl.org. Rock Candy. Cajun’s Wharf, 9 p.m., $5. 2400 Cantrell Road. 501-375-5351. cajunswharf. com. Steam Loco. Markham Street Grill and Pub, 8:30 p.m., free. 11321 W. Markham St. 501224-2010. markhamstreetpub.com. Ted Ludwig Trio. Capital Bar and Grill, 8 p.m., free. 111 W. Markham St. 501-370-7013. www. capitalbarandgrill.com. Vincas, The Diamond Center, Casual Pleasures. Maxine’s, 8 p.m., $5. 700 Central Ave., Hot Springs. maxineslive.com. Wick It the Instigator, with Styles & Complete. George’s Majestic Lounge, 9 p.m., $15. 519 W. Dickson St., Fayetteville. 479-442-4226. georgesmajesticlounge.com.

COMEDY

“Electile Dysfunction.” The Joint, through Nov. 19: 8 p.m., $22. 301 Main St. No. 102, NLR. 501-372-0205. thejointargenta.com. James Ervin Berry. The Loony Bin, 7:30 p.m. and 10 p.m., $12. 10301 N. Rodney Parham Road. 501-228-5555. loonybincomedy.com. 52

OCTOBER 20, 2016

ARKANSAS TIMES

COMING TO MCLEOD FINE ART: This pastel by Jeannie Lockeby Hursley joins works by Dominique Simmons in an exhibition, “Landscapes/Dreamscapes: At the Crossroads of Observation and Memory,” coming Oct. 27 to McLeod Fine Art Gallery at 108 W. Sixth St. A reception is set for 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. and in honor of Halloween candy will be served along with food, beer and wine. Both Hursley and Simmons are Little Rock artists.

EVENTS

Falun Gong meditation. Allsopp Park, 9 a.m., free. Cantrell and Cedar Hill Roads. Hillcrest Farmers Market. Pulaski Heights Baptist Church, 8 a.m.-noon. 2200 Kavanaugh Blvd. Historic Neighborhoods Tour. Bike tour of historic neighborhoods includes bike, guide, helmets and maps. Bobby’s Bike Hike, 9 a.m., $8-$28. 400 President Clinton Ave. 501613-7001. Little Rock Farmers’ Market. River Market pavilions, 7 a.m. 400 President Clinton Ave. 375-2552. www.rivermarket.info. Pork & Bourbon Tour. Bike tour includes bicycle, guide, helmets and maps. Bobby’s Bike Hike, 11:30 a.m., $35-$45. 400 President Clinton Ave. 501-613-7001. World Cheese Dip Championship. River Market pavilions, noon, $8. 400 President Clinton Ave. 375-2552. centralarkansastickets.com.

LECTURES

“Beer on the Border: The History of Hops in Frontier Arkansas.” Curran Hall, 7:30 a.m., $25-$100. 615 E. Capitol. 501-370-3290. preservearkansas.org.

SPORTS

UALR Trojans vs. South Alabama. Women’s volleyball. UALR, 6:30 p.m. 2801 S. University Ave. 501-569-8977. lrtrojans.com.

SUNDAY, OCT. 23

MUSIC

After 7. Arkansas State Fairgrounds, 6 p.m., $15-$25. 2600 Howard St. 501-372-8341 ext. 8206. arkansasstatefair.com. Beethoven: Symphony No. 7. See Oct. 22. Chris DeClerk. Ya Ya’s Euro Bistro, 6 p.m., free. 17711 Chenal Parkway. 501-821-1144. yayasar.com. Delta Symphony Orchestra: “Inspiring our Hearts.” The Fowler Center, 2 p.m., $5-$15. 201 Olympic Drive, Jonesboro. 870-972-3471. deltasymphonyorchestra.org. Ethan Bortnick. Fort Smith Convention Center, 3 p.m., $25-$50. 55 S. 7th St., Fort Smith. aetnfoundation.org/boxoffice. Guts Club, William Blackart, Mailman. Vino’s, 8 p.m., $5. 923 W. 7th St. 501-375-8466. vinosbrewpub.com. Irish Traditional Music Session. Hibernia Irish Tavern, 2:30 p.m. 9700 N. Rodney Parham Road. 501-246-4340. www.hiberniairishtavern.com. Live music. Ernie Biggs. No cover charge Sun.-Tue. and Thu. 307 President Clinton Ave. 501-372-4782. littlerock.erniebiggs.com.

DANCE

“Under the Lights.” Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, 4 p.m., free. 600 Museum

Way, Bentonville. 479-418-5700. crystalbridges.org.

EVENTS

Arkansas Times Whole Hog Roast. Benefiting Argenta Arts District. Contact phyllis@arktimes.com or call 501-492-3994 for entry details. Argenta Plaza, 2 p.m., $18. 502 Main St., NLR. centralarkansastickets.com. Bernice Garden Farmer’s Market. Bernice Garden, 10 a.m. 1401 S. Main St. www.thebernicegarden.org.

SPORTS

Hawthorne Heights. Revolution, 7:30 p.m., $13-$15. 300 President Clinton Ave. 501-8230090. revroom.com. UALR Trojans vs. Troy. Women’s soccer. UALR, 1 p.m. 2801 S. University Ave. 501-569-8977. lrtrojans.com.

MONDAY, OCT. 24

MUSIC

The Aluminum Show. Reynolds Performance Hall, UCA, 7:30 p.m., $27-$40. 350 S. Donaghey, Conway. uca.edu. Astronautalis. With Ceschi & Factor Chandelier and Transit. Stickyz Rock ‘n’ Roll Chicken Shack, 8 p.m., $12-$15. 107 River Market Ave. 501-372-7707. stickyz.com. Live music. No cover charge Sun.-Tue. and


SePtember 11-27, 2015 (501) 378-0405 | therep.org Thu. Ernie Biggs. 307 President Clinton Ave. 501-372-4782. littlerock.erniebiggs.com. Open Mic. The Lobby Bar. Studio Theatre, 8 p.m. 320 W. 7th St. Perpetual Groove. With Friends of the Phamily. George’s Majestic Lounge, 8:30 p.m., $15. 519 W. Dickson St., Fayetteville. 479-442-4226. georgesmajesticlounge.com. Sick Puppies. Presented by 100.3 The Edge, with Devour the Day and One Less Reason. Clear Channel Metroplex, 7 p.m., $8. 10800 Col. Glenn Road. 501-217-5113. metroplexlive.com.

FILM

Monday Night Shorts: Fantastically Horrifying Shorts. The Joint, 7:30 p.m., $8. 301 Main St. No. 102, NLR. 501-372-0205. thejointargenta.com.

LECTURES

“Democracy Goes to College: The Importance of On-Campus Voting Centers”. A talk from Peter Butler and Jay Barth. Clinton School of Public Service, 6 p.m., free. 1200 President Clinton Ave. 501683-5239. clintonschool.uasys.edu.

CLASSES

Scottish Country Dance Classes. Park Hill Presbyterian Church, through Dec. 5: 7 p.m., $60. 3520 JFK Blvd., NLR. arkansasscottishcountrydancing.com/.

TUESDAY, OCT. 25

MUSIC

Ethan Bortnick. Maumelle High School, 6:30 p.m., $25-$50. 100 Victory Drive. 501-8515350. aetnfoundation.org/boxoffice. Jeff Ling. Khalil’s Pub, 6 p.m. 110 S. Shackleford Road. 501-224-0224. www.khalilspub.com. Jim Dickerson. Sonny Williams’ Steak Room, 7 p.m. 500 President Clinton Ave. 501-3242999. www.sonnywilliamssteakroom.com. Karaoke Tuesday. Prost, 8 p.m., free. 322 President Clinton Blvd. 501-244-9550. willydspianobar.com/prost-2. Karaoke Tuesdays. On the patio. Stickyz Rock ‘n’ Roll Chicken Shack, 7:30 p.m., free. 107 River Market Ave. 501-372-7707. www. stickyz.com. Live music. No cover charge Sun.-Tue. and Thu. Ernie Biggs. 307 President Clinton Ave. 501-372-4782. littlerock.erniebiggs.com. Peach Blush, Listen Sister, Los Tirones. White Water Tavern, 9 p.m., donations. 2500 W. 7th St. 501-375-8400. whitewatertavern.com. Schubert Festival. An Arkansas Symphony Orchestra chamber series concert featuring works by Schubert and Golijov. Clinton Presidential Center, 7 p.m., $10-$23. 1200 President Clinton Ave. 370-8000. arkansassymphony.org.

COMEDY

“Punch Line” Stand-Up Comedy. Hosted by Brett Ihler. The Joint, 8 p.m., $5. 301 Main St. No. 102, NLR. 501-372-0205. thejointinlittlerock.com.

EVENTS

Little Rock Farmers’ Market. River Market pavilions, 7 a.m. 400 President Clinton Ave. 375-2552. www.rivermarket.info. Trivia Bowl. Flying Saucer, 8:30 p.m. 323 President Clinton Ave. 501-372-8032. www. beerknurd.com/stores/littlerock.

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 26

MUSIC

Brady Toops. Stickyz Rock ‘n’ Roll Chicken Shack, 8 p.m., $12-$15. 107 River Market Ave. 501-372-7707. stickyz.com. Jim Dickerson. Sonny Williams’ Steak Room, 7 p.m. 500 President Clinton Ave. 501-3242999. www.sonnywilliamssteakroom.com. Karaoke at Khalil’s. Khalil’s Pub, 7 p.m. 110 S. Shackleford Road. 501-224-0224. www. khalilspub.com. Karaoke. MUSE Ultra Lounge, 8:30 p.m., free. 2611 Kavanaugh Blvd. 501-663-6398. Live music. No cover charge Sun.-Tue. and Thu. Ernie Biggs. 307 President Clinton Ave. 501-372-4782. littlerock.erniebiggs.com. Open Mic Nite with Deuce. Thirst n’ Howl, 7:30 p.m., free. 14710 Cantrell Road. 501-3798189. www.thirst-n-howl.com. RockUsaurus. Senor Tequila, 7 p.m. 10300 N. Rodney Parham Road. 501-224-5505. The Wildflower Revue. South on Main, 8:30 p.m. 1304 Main St. 501-244-9660. southonmain.com.

BEER NIGHT

Come try a sampling before the show!

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COMEDY

Daniel Dugar. The Loony Bin, Oct. 26-29, 7:30 p.m.; Oct. 28-29, 10 p.m., $8-$12. 10301 N. Rodney Parham Road. 501-228-5555. loonybincomedy.com. The Joint Venture. Improv comedy group. The Joint, 8 p.m., $8. 301 Main St. No. 102, NLR. 501-372-0205. thejointinlittlerock.com.

DANCE

For tickets, call the Box Office at (501) 378-0405 or visit TheRep.org sponsored by

ARKANSAS TIMES

Little Rock Bop Club. Beginning dance lessons for ages 10 and older. Singles welcome. Bess Chisum Stephens Community Center, 7 p.m., $4 for members, $7 for guests. 12th and Cleveland streets. 501-350-4712. www. littlerockbopclub.

LECTURES

“Becoming an Ally: The Role of White Christians in the Struggle Against South African Apartheid.” A talk by Gerald O. West. Hendrix College, 7 p.m., free. 1600 Washington Ave., Conway. hendrix.edu/ events. “Passing the Torch: Planning for the Next Generation of Leaders in Public Service”. A talk by Karl Besel and Charlotte Williams. Clinton School of Public Service, noon, free. 1200 President Clinton Ave. 501-683-5239. clintonschool.uasys.edu.

POETRY

Wednesday Night Poetry. 21-and-older show. Kollective Coffee & Tea, 7 p.m., free. 110 Central Ave., Hot Springs. 501-321-0909. maxineslive.com/shows.html.

With many advisors, plans succeed. There are no great leaders without great teams.

ARTS

THEATER

“At Home at the Zoo.” A play by Edward Albee. Pulaski Technical College, Thu., Oct. 20, 10 a.m. and 2 p.m.; Fri., Oct. 21, 2 and 7 p.m., $5-$7. 3000 W. Scenic Drive, NLR. pulaskitech.edu/CHARTS. “I And You.” Walton Arts Center, through Nov. 6: Wed.-Sat., 7:30 p.m.; Sat., Sun., 2 p.m., $10-$40. 495 W. Dickson St., Fayetteville. 479-443-5600. waltonartscenter.org. “The Music Man.” In partnership with

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OCTOBER 20, 2016

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AFTER DARK, CONT.

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Praeclara. Wildwood Park for the Arts, Oct. 21-22, 7:30 p.m.; Sun., Oct. 23, 3 p.m., $15$25. 20919 Denny Road. wildwoodpark.org. “Rocky Horror Picture Show.” Walton Arts Center, Oct. 25-26, 7 p.m., $10-$15. 495 W. Dickson St., Fayetteville. 479-443-5600. waltonartscenter.org. “#Squadghouls.” Red Octopus Theater. The Public Theatre, Oct. 20-22, 8 p.m., $8-$10. 616 Center St. 501-374-7529. redoctopustheater.com. “The Wiz.” Directed by Danette Scott Perry and Leah Thomas. The Weekend Theater, through Nov. 13: Fri., Sat., 7:30 p.m.; Sun., 2:30 p.m., $16-$20. 1001 W. 7th St. 501-3743761. weekendtheater.org. “Young Frankenstein: The Musical.” Studio Theatre, through Oct. 22, 7:30 p.m.; Sun., Oct. 23, 2:30 p.m.; through Oct. 29, 7:30 p.m.; Sun., Oct. 30, 2:30 p.m., $8-$16. 320 W. 7th St. ctlr-act.org.

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Tickets and competition entry forms at www.arkansascornbreadfestival.com Special Public Program with Caroline Randall Williams, author of Soul Food Love Mosaic Templars Cultural Center, October 28, 12 PM Free and open to the public This project is supported in part by a grant from the Arkansas Humanities Council and the National Endowment for the Humanities. 

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OCTOBER 20, 2016

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BUTLER CENTER GALLERIES, Arkansas Studies Institute, 401 President Clinton Ave.: Studio Art Quilts Associates show, through December; “Fired Up: Arkansas Wood-Fired Ceramics,” work by Stephen Driver, Jim and Barbara Larkin, Fletcher Larkin, Beth Lambert, Logan Hunter and Hannah May, through Jan. 28; “Little Golden Books,” private collection, through Dec. 3; “From the Vault,” work from the Central Arkansas Library’s permanent collection, including works by Win Bruhl, Evan Lindquist, Shep Miers, Gene Hatfield, Ray Khoo and Jerry Phillips, through Oct. 22. 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Mon.-Sat. 320-5790. GOOD WEATHER GALLERY, 4400 Edgemere St., NLR: “Is This My Tongue,” by Institute 193, through Oct. 22; “Death of a Salesman,” Elliott Earls, Oct. 22-Nov. 19. GREG THOMPSON FINE ART, 429 Main St., NLR: “Best of the South,” through Nov. 12, reception 5-8 p.m. Oct. 21, Argenta ArtWalk. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tue.-Fri., 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Sat. 664-2787. MCLEOD FINE ART GALLERY, 108 W. 6th St.: “Landscapes/Dreamscapes: At the Crossroads of Observation and Memory,” work by Jeannie Lockeby Hursley and Dominique Simmons, opening reception 5-8 p.m. Oct. 27.10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tue.-Fri., 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sat. 725-8508. MUGS CAFE, 515 Main St., NLR: “Rorschach’s Buddy,” ink paintings by Diane Harper. 7 a.m.-6 p.m. Mon.-Sat., reception 5-8 p.m. Oct. 21, Argenta ArtWalk. 3799101. THEA FOUNDATION, 401 Main St.: Artwork by patients at Arkansas Children’s Hospital, through October, prints for sale at Argenta ArtWalk, 5-8 p.m. Oct. 21. 379-9512. Bentonville CRYSTAL BRIDGES MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART, One Museum Way: “The Art of American Dance,” 90 dance-themed paintings, prints, sculptures and photographs, including John Singer Sargent, Mary Cassatt, Nick Cave, Faith Ringgold and others, Oct. 22-Jan. 16, lecture by curator Jane Dini 2 p.m. Oct. 22; “Shaking Hands and Kissing Babies,” campaign advertising artifacts, through Jan. 9; American masterworks spanning four centuries in the permanent collection. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Mon., Thu.; 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Wed., Fri.; 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Sat.-Sun., closed Tue. 479-418-5700. Fayetteville

UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS: “ABOUT FACE,” work by Philip Guston, Trenton Doyle Hancock, Rashid Johnson, Mary Reid Kelley, Arnold Kemp, Amy Pleasant and Carrie Mae Weems, Oct. 24-Dec. 4, Fine Arts Gallery, reception 3:30 p.m. Oct. 27, lecture by Hancock 5:30 p.m. Oct. 27; lecture by Pleasant 5:30 Dec. 8, both in Hillside Auditorium, Room 206. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri., 2-5 p.m. Sun. 479-575-7987. Jonesboro ARKANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY, Bradbury Art Museum: “Vicinity,” printmaking by John Knudsen, Oct. 20-Nov. 16; “Embellish,” paintings, fiber art and sculpture by Liz Whitney Quisgard, Oct. 20-Dec. 9; “Tools for Thought: Jewelry,” miniature sculptures by Kiff Slemmons, Oct. 20-Dec. 9, reception and gallery talk, 5 p.m. Oct. 20. Noon-5 p.m. Tue.-Sat., 2-5 p.m. Sun. 870-972-2567.

NEW IN THE MUSEUMS CLINTON PRESIDENTIAL CENTER: “Ladies and Gentlemen … the Beatles!” Records, photographs, tour artifacts, videos, instruments, recording booth for singalong with Ringo Starr, from the GRAMMY Museum at L.A. LIVE, through April 2. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Sat., 1-5 p.m. Sun., $10 adults, $8 seniors, retired military and college students, $6 youth 6-17, free to active military and children under 6. ESSE PURSE MUSEUM & STORE, 1510 S. Main St.: “A Walk in Her Shoes,” women’s footwear from the beginning of the 20th century, through Jan. 15; “What’s Inside: A Century of Women and Handbags,” permanent exhibit. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Tue.-Sat., 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sun. $10, $8 for students, seniors and military. 916-9022. MUSEUM OF DISCOVERY, 500 President Clinton Ave.: “Magnificent Me!” Premiere of interactive exhibit on the human body, Oct. 22-April 23. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Tue.-Sat., 1-5 p.m. Sun., $10 ages 13 and older, $8 ages 1-12, free to members and children under 1. 396-7050. CALL FOR ENTRIES The Central Arkansas Library System is seeking a qualified artist to create a permanent, non-figurative outdoor artwork for the Thompson Library at 38 Rahling Circle. The work should represent the late Central High valedictorian Roosevelt Thompson’s love of learning and public service. Budget for the project is $45,000; deadline to submit a model and other information about the sculpture is Nov. 1. For more information and the Request for Proposals form, contact Colin Thompson, colint@cals.org, at the Butler Center for Arkansas Studies. The Arkansas Arts Council is accepting applications for Arts in Education Mini Grants and Arts for Lifelong Learning Mini Grants, residency programs, through August 2017. Artists must match the grant award of $1,000 with either cash or an in-kind contribution. For more information, go to the Available Grants section of arkansasarts. org. The Arkansas Arts Council is seeking nominations for the 2017 Arkansas Living Treasure Award, which recognizes a craftsperson who has significantly contributed to the preservation of the art form. Deadline for nominations is Oct. 21. Nomination forms are available at Arkansasarts.org or by calling 324-9766. For more information, call Robin Muse McClea at 324-9348 or email her at robin.mcclea@arkansas.gov. The Argenta branch of the William F. Laman Library invites Arkansas art teachers to enter the 2nd annual Juried Arkansas


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Art Teacher Exhibition, to be held Nov. 18-Dec. 10 at the library. Guy Bell, artist and owner of Drawl Gallery, will be juror. Deadline to apply is midnight Oct. 28. Cash prizes will be awarded. For information on how to enter, email Rachel Trusty at rachel. trusty@lamanlibrary.org. Wildwood Park for the Arts invites printmakers to submit works with a theme of nature for the February 2017 “Nature in Print” exhibit. Deadline to submit proposals online is Dec. 1. Find more information at wildwoodpark.org/art. ONGOING GALLERY EXHIBITS ARGENTA GALLERY, 413 Main St., NLR: “Indigena,” Latino Art Project exhibition of work by Anthony Samuel Lopez, Sabrina Zarco, Mark Clark, Susie Henley, Vickie Hendrix-Siebenmorgan, Bobby Martin, Lisandra di Liberto Brown, Michelle Moore, Sergio Valdivia and x3mex, through Nov. 6. ARKANSAS ARTS CENTER, MacArthur Park: “Little Dreams in Glass and Metal: Enameling in America, 1920 to Present,” 121 artworks by 90 artists, and “Glass Fantasies,” retrospective of work by Thom Hall with 40 enamels; “Cut, Pieced and

Stitched: Denim Drawings by Jim Arendt,” through Oct. 23. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Tue.-Fri., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat., 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sun. 3724000. BOSWELL MOUROT FINE ART, 5815 Kavanaugh Blvd.: New works on paper by Anais Dasse. 664-0030. CANTRELL GALLERY, 8206 Cantrell Road: “Always Coming Home,” new paintings by John Wooldridge, through Oct. 29. 10 a.m.5 p.m. Mon.-Sat. 224-1335. CHRIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH, 509 Scott St.: “The Fourth of July and Other Things,” paintings by Diana L. Shearon, through December. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Mon.-Thu., 9 a.m.noon Fri., all day Sun. 375-2342. CHROMA GALLERY, 5707 Kavanaugh Blvd.: Work by Robert Reep and other Arkansas artists. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri., 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sat. 664-0880. GALLERY 221, 2nd and Center Sts.: “Resurrecting Memories,” paintings by Sean LeCrone, through October; also work by William McNamara, Tyler Arnold, Amy Edgington, EMILE, Kimberly Kwee, Greg Lahti, Mary Ann Stafford, Cedric Watson, C.B. Williams, Gino Hollander, Siri Hol-

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AFTER DARK, CONT.

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ARKANSAS TIMES

From your goin’ out friends at

lander and jewelry by Rae Ann Bayless. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Mon.-Fri., 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Sat. 801-0211. GALLERY 26, 2601 Kavanaugh Blvd.: “Binary,” works by Michael Church and V.L. Cox, through Oct. 29. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tue.-Sat. 664-8996. GINO HOLLANDER GALLERY, 211 Center St.: Paintings and works on paper by Gino Hollander. 801-0211. HEARNE FINE ART, 1001 Wright Ave.: “Two Fronts,” multimedia drawings by Alfred Conteh. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri., 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Sat. 372-6822. HISTORIC ARKANSAS MUSEUM GALLERIES, 200 E. 3rd St. “Heinbockel, Nolley and Peterson: Personal Rituals,” watercolors by Amanda Heinbockel, fiber art by Marianne Nolley and mixed media by Brianna Peterson; “Walter Arnold and David Malcolm Rose: Modern Ruins,” constructions from Rose’s “The Lost Highway,” photographs by Arnold; “Tiny Treasures: Miniatures from the Permanent Collection,” through Nov. 6; “Hugo and Gayne Preller’s House of Light,” historic photographs, through October. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Sat., 1-5 p.m. Sun. 324-9351. L&L BECK ART GALLERY, 5705 Kavanaugh Blvd.: 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tue.-Sat. 660-4006. LAMAN LIBRARY, 2801 Orange St., NLR: “Nature and Nurture,” mixed media artwork and sculpture by Carol Corning and Ed Pennebaker, through Nov. 4. 9 a.m.-8 p.m. Mon.-Thu., 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Fri.-Sat. 7581720. M2 GALLERY, 11525 Cantrell Road: Work by Marcus McAllister, Richard Sutton, R.F. Walker and Eric Freeman. Noon-5 p.m. Mon., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tue.-Sat. 225-6257. MATTHEWS FINE ART GALLERY, 909 North St.: Paintings by Pat and Tracee Matthews, glass by James Hayes, jewelry by Christie Young, knives by Tom Gwenn, kinetic sculpture by Mark White. Noon-5 p.m. Tue.-Sat. 831-6200. PULASKI TECHNICAL COLLEGE, 3000 W. Scenic Drive: “Shadows in the Water,” mixed media paintings by Brad Cushman, through Nov. 9, Windgate Gallery, Center for Humanities and Arts. 8 a.m.-9 p.m. Mon.-Thu., 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Fri. 812-2715. RED DOOR GALLERY, 3715 JFK, NLR: “Spiritual Journey,” new work by Paula Jones, 10 percent of sales benefit Pulaski Technical College and will be matched by the Windgate Foundation; also work by Jeff McKay, C.J. Ellis, TWIN, James Hayes, Amy Hill-Imler and Ellen Hobgood.10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Mon.Fri., 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sat. 753-5227. ROCK CITY WERKS, 413 Main St., NLR: Work by Michelle Moore, Debby Hinson, Doug Gorrell, Sheree King, Kimberly Leonard Bingman, Theresa Cates, Vickie Hendrix Siebenmorgen, Ed Pennebaker, Nancy McGraw, Hannah & May pottery. (RCW). 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Tue.-Sat. 258-8991. THE HOUSE OF ART, 108 W. 4th St.: “Stigmatized: The Journey to Black Sovereignty,” featured artist Tobechi Tobechukwu. BENTON DIANNE ROBERTS ART STUDIO AND GALLERY, 110 N. Market St.: Work by Dianne Roberts, classes. 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Wed.-Fri., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat. 860-7467. CONWAY FAULKNER COUNTY LIBRARY, 1900 W. Tyler St.: Friendship quilts from the 1930s and ’40s from the Faulkner County Museum’s permanent collection. 327-7482. EL DORADO SOUTH ARKANSAS ARTS CENTER, 110 E. 5th St.: “American Watercolor Soci-

ety’s 149th annual International Exhibition,” through Oct. 27. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays. 870-862-5474. FAYETTEVILLE GEORGE DOMBEK, 844 Blue Springs Road: “Open Studio and Gallery,” paintings and works on glass by George Dombek, every Sat.-Sun. through Oct. 30. 479-442-8976. FORT SMITH REGIONAL ART MUSEUM, 1601 Rogers Ave.: “Dancing Atoms: Barbara Morgan Photographs,” through Oct. 30. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Tue.-Sat., 1-5 p.m. Sun. 479-784-2787. HOT SPRINGS ALISON PARSONS GALLERY, 802 Central Ave.: Paintings by Polly Cook and Patrick Cunningham and photographs by Jim Pafford. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Wed.-Sat. 655-0604. GALLERY CENTRAL, 800 Central Ave.: Sculpture by Rod Moorhead, watercolors by Doyle Young, glass ornaments by James Hayes. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Sat. 318-42728 GARLAND COUNTY COMMUNITY LIBRARY, 1427 Malvern St.: “Macros and Minis,” large and miniature paintings, through Nov. 26. GARVAN WOODLAND GARDENS: “Traditional Art Guild,” work by local artists, Month of October, Magnolia Room. JUSTUS FINE ART, 827 A Central Ave.: “Fall Color,” works by Virmarie DePoyster, Robert Fogel, Matthew Hasty, Dolores Justus, Tony Saladino, Rebecca Thompson, Dan Thornhill and others, through October. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Wed.-Sat. 321-2335. PERRYVILLE SUDS GALLERY, Courthouse Square: Paintings by Dottie Morrissey, Alma Gipson, Al Garrett Jr., Phyllis Loftin, Alene Otts, Mauretta Frantz, Raylene Finkbeiner, Kathy Williams and Evelyn Garrett. Noon-6 p.m. Wed.-Fri, noon-4 p.m. Sat. 501-766-7584. YELLVILLE PALETTE ART LEAGUE, 300 Hwy. 62 W: Work by area artists. Noon-6 p.m. Wed.-Sat. 870656-2057.

HISTORY, SCIENCE MUSEUM EXHIBITS ARKANSAS INLAND MARITIME MUSEUM, North Little Rock: The USS Razorback submarine tours. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Fri.-Sat., 1-5 p.m. Sun. 371-8320. ARKANSAS NATIONAL GUARD MUSEUM, Camp Robinson: Artifacts on military history, Camp Robinson and its predecessor, Camp Pike, also a gift shop. 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Mon.-Fri., audio tour available at no cost. 212-5215. ARKANSAS SPORTS HALL OF FAME MUSEUM, Verizon Arena, NLR: 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Mon.-Sat. 663-4328. CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL MUSEUM VISITOR CENTER, Bates and Park: Exhibits on the 1957 desegregation of Central and the civil rights movement. 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. daily. 374-1957. HISTORIC ARKANSAS MUSEUM, 200 E. 3rd St.: Renovated and replicated 19th century structures from original city, guided tours Monday and Tuesday on the hour, self-guided Wednesday through Sunday, $2.50 adults, $1 under 18, free to 65 and over. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Sat., 1-5 p.m. Sun. 324-9351. MacARTHUR MUSEUM OF ARKANSAS MILITARY HISTORY, 503 E. 9th St. (MacArthur Park): “Waging Modern Warfare”; “Gen. Wesley Clark”; “Vietnam, America’s Conflict”; “Undaunted Courage, Proven Loyalty: Japanese American Soldiers in World War II. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Mon.-Sat., 1-4 p.m. Sun. 3764602.


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AFTER DARK, CONT.

‘BEST OF THE SOUTH’: That’s the name of the exhibition at Greg Thompson Fine Art, which is showing works by Ida Kohlmeyer (above, “Composition”), Dan Nichols, Steven Schneider, Mark Blaney, William Dunlap, Pinkney Herbert, Glennray Tutor, Arless Day, Don Lee and others. The gallery, 429 Main St. in downtown North Little Rock, will be one of several open 5-8 p.m. Friday, Oct. 21, for the monthly Argenta ArtWalk.

ARKANSAS GRASS FED LAMB ARKANSAS GRASS FED LAMB ARKANSAS GRASS FED LAMB

We offer first quality one-year-old lamb raised on our farm in North Pulaski County. Our meat is free of steroids or any other chemicals. The only time we use antibiotics is if the animal has been injured which is extremely rare. All meat is USDA inspected. You can pick up your meat at our farm off Hwy 107 in North Pulaski County (about 25 miles north of downtown Little Rock) or we can meet you in downtown Little Rock weekdays. All meat is aged and then frozen. We offer first quality one-year-old lamb raised on our farm

PRICE LIST

in North Pulaski County. Our meat is free of steroids or any other chemicals. The only time we use antibiotics is if the animal has been injured which is extremely rare. All meat is USDA inspected.

You can pick up your meat at our farm off Hwy 107 in North WeROAST offer first quality one-year-old lamb raised on our farm RIB NECKBONES Pulaski County (about 25 miles north of downtown Little Rock) or we can meet you in downtown Little Rock weekdays. in North is free of steroids or any contains aboutPulaski eight ribs County. Our meat (for stew or soup) $5 lb All meat is aged and then frozen. (lamb chops) $17 lb. TESTICLES $10 lb other chemicals. The only time we use antibiotics PRICE LIST:is if the LEG OF LAMB has been injured which isHEARTS, LIVERS, KIDNEYS , $5 lb meat is RIB ROAST TESTICLES animal extremely rare. All (about 4 to 5 lbs) $12 lb. HEARTS, LIVERS, KIDNEYS, TANNED SHEEPSKINS , USDA inspected. SHOULDER LEG OF LAMB $100-$150 TANNED SHEEPSKINS, $100-$150 (bone cook this slow, like a pot roast. (Our sheepskins are on tanned a Wein, offer first quality one-year-old lamb raised ourininfarm You can pick up your meat at our farm off Hwy 107 North SHOULDER Meat falls off the bone). $11 lb. Quaker Town, Pa. tannery that has in North Pulaski County. Our meat is free of steroids or any Pulaski (about 25 miles north of in downtown BONELESS LOINCounty $8 lb specialized sheep-skins forLittle generations.) other chemicals. The only time we use antibiotics is if the BONELESS LOIN Rock) or$20we Little Rock weekdays. TENDERLOIN lb can meet you in downtown animal beenand injured is extremely rare. All meat is TENDERLOIN LAMB BRATWURST All meathas is aged thenwhich frozen. LAMB BRATWURST USDA inspected. LINK SAUSAGE  LINK SAUSAGE  India (one-lb package) $10 lb You can pick up your meat at our farm off Hwy 107 in North NECKBONES Blue PRICE LIST: 12407 Davis Ranch Rd. | Cabot, AR 72023 Pulaski County (about 25 miles north of downtown Little 12407 Davis Ranch Rd. | Cabot, AR 72023 Call Kaytee Wright 501-607-3100 Call Kaytee Wright 501-607-3100 Rock) or we can meet youalan@arktimes.com in downtown Little Rock weekdays. RIB ROAST TESTICLES $10 lb alan@arktimes.com All meat is aged and then frozen. contains about eight ribs contains about eight ribs (lamb chops) $17 lb.

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58

(lamb chops)ARKANSAS TIMES $17 lb.

OCTOBER 20, 2016

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MOSAIC TEMPLARS CULTURAL CENTER, 9th and Broadway: “Treasured Memories: My Life, My Story,” debut of new works in museum’s 2016 Creativity collection by Barbara Higgins Bond, Danny Campbell, LaToya Hobbs, Delita Martin, Aj Smith, Scinthya Edwards and Deloney, through December; permanent exhibits on African-American entrepreneurship in Arkansas. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Tue.-Sat. 683-3593. OLD STATE HOUSE MUSEUM, 300 W. Markham St.: “We Make Our Own Choices: Staff Favorites from the Old State House Museum Collection,” through December; “First Families: Mingling of Politics and Culture” permanent exhibit including first ladies’ gowns. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Sat., 1-5 p.m. Sun. 324-9685. WITT STEPHENS JR. CENTRAL ARKANSAS NATURE CENTER, Riverfront Park: Exhibits on fishing and hunting and the state Game and Fish Commission. 907-0636. BENTONVILLE MUSEUM OF NATIVE AMERICAN HISTORY, 202 SW O St.: 1930s sandpainting tapestry by Navajo medicine man Hosteen Klah, from the collection of Dr. Howard and Catherine Cockrill, through December. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Sat. 479-273-2456. CALICO ROCK CALICO ROCK MUSEUM, Main Street: Displays on Native American cultures, steamboats, the railroad and local history. www. calicorockmuseum.com. ENGLAND TOLTEC MOUNDS STATE PARK, U.S. Hwy. 165: Major prehistoric Indian site with visitors’ center and museum. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Sat., noon-5 p.m. Sun., closed Mon. $3 for adults, $2 for ages 6-12. 961-9442. JACKSONVILLE JACKSONVILLE MUSEUM OF MILITARY HISTORY, 100 Veterans Circle: Exhibits on D-

Day; F-105, Vietnam era plane (“The Thud”); the Civil War Battle of Reed’s Bridge, Arkansas Ordnance Plant (AOP) and other military history. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon-Sat., 1-5 p.m. Sun. $3 adults; $2 seniors, military; $1 students. 501-241-1943. MORRILTON MUSEUM OF AUTOMOBILES, Petit Jean Mountain: Permanent exhibit of more than 50 cars from 1904-1967 depicting the evolution of the automobile. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 7 days. 501-727-5427. PINE BLUFF ARTS AND SCIENCE CENTER FOR SOUTHEAST ARKANSAS, 701 S. Main St.: “Exploring the Frontier: Arkansas 1540-1840,” Arkansas Discovery Network hands-on exhibition; “Heritage Detectives: Discovering Arkansas’ Hidden Heritage.” 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tue.-Fri., 1-4 p.m. Sat. 870-536-3375. POTTSVILLE POTTS INN, 25 E. Ash St.: Preserved 1850s stagecoach station on the Butterfield Overland Mail Route, with period furnishings, log structures, hat museum, doll museum, doctor’s office, antique farm equipment. 10 a.m.4 p.m. Wed.-Sat. $5 adults, $2 students, 5 and under free. 479-968-9369. ROGERS ROGERS HISTORICAL MUSEUM, 322 S. 2nd St.: “A House in Mourning,” through Nov. 6, Hawkins House. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon. and Wed.-Sat., 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Tue., 1-5 p.m. Sun. 479-621-1154. SCOTT PLANTATION AGRICULTURE MUSEUM, U.S. Hwy. 165 and state Hwy. 161: Permanent exhibits on historic agriculture. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Tue.-Sat., 1-5 p.m. Sun. $4 adults, $3 children. 961-1409.


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Dining WHAT’S COOKIN’

LAUREN MCCANTS, THE Southern Salt Co. food truck founder and chef, is now serving food at the White Water Tavern Tuesday and Thursday through Saturday. McCants has wanted to open a restaurant for some time; Southern Salt at the White Water was the solution. It’s her business, just run through the bar. On the menu: hamburgers and cheeseburgers (of course) as well as deep fried pork tenderloin sandwiches, deep fried chicken sandwiches, a smoked bologna and over-easy egg sandwich (real good, she says), chicken nachos and a special, like coconut curried chicken. There are vegetarian options, as well: Deep-fried tofu sandwiches, prepared with avocado and like a fish taco; and sweet potato and avocado tacos. Once people start coming to the White Water for the food she’ll serve every night, and if things go as planned, the tavern may open for lunch in the future. For now, hours are 8 p.m. “until people stop eating” Tuesdays; 4 p.m. (happy hour) until 8 p.m. (or later, if there’s a show) Thursdays; and 7 p.m. until midnight on Fridays and Saturdays. McCants is still catering from the food truck; her wedding business has gotten big, she said, since so many “kids are getting wed on farms these days.” THERE’S FOOD NEWS AT Kent Walker’s Artisan Cheese: Now, you can get a number of cheese-laden panini sandwiches there, all on sourdough bread. Randi Romo, the tasting room and pub manager, gave us a rundown on the menu: There’s a basic house grilled cheese, made up of a blend of Walker cheeses; Melinda’s Pimiento, named for the wholesaler who created the recipe; the Bonta, a blend of house cheeses with Bonta Toscana, Amy Bradley-Hole’s unparalleled tomato sauce; a Not-Your-Mama’s bologna sandwich, house-blend cheeses, spring mix lettuce and tomatoes with a special spread; the Woo Pig, like the bologna but prepared with smoked ham; and a seasonal special, Pumpkin Spice and Everything Nice, Beemster gouda with pumpkin spices and peach preserves from the House of Webster in Rogers. Romo said you can put ham on the latter, “which ramps up that savory-sweet thing.” Walker has four craft beer taps, with local beers in rotation. On tap now: Three beers from Lost Forty and the Fat Boy stout from Vino’s. It also serves wine. Hours are the same as Walker’s: 11 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday and 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sunday. “It’s a cool new thing to do for Saturday Sunday brunch,” Romo said. 60

OCTOBER 20, 2016

ARKANSAS TIMES

THE BUTCHER’S PIE: You can put any two meats you want on this pie; we chose homemade meatballs and Vermont smokehouse pepperoni and added portobello mushrooms.

Perfect pizza DeLuca’s is the jewel of Hot Springs.

F

oodie friends light up our Facebook feed with restaurant recommendations, and we act on as many as we can. Only a few times has the buzz been louder than the raves friends, chefs and restaurateurs alike are making about DeLuca’s Pizzeria Napoletana in Hot Springs. DeLuca’s is the creation of Anthony Valinoti, a Brooklyn-born Italian-American whose love of Hot Springs compelled him to move there and whose love for Neapolitan pizza compelled him to open DeLuca’s. You’ll meet Valinoti when you visit: He works the room with energetic friendliness and more than likely will express wonder at why his pizzeria has become all the rage, stressing his lack of a formal culinary education. No need to wonder. Valinoti has

insisted on the very best ingredients and combined them in fairly simple but delightful ways. He makes all the dough and he assembles and cooks in a brick oven every pizza DeLuca’s serves. His menu is straightforward: an antipasto platter and meatballs for appetizers, salads, pizza and two desserts. Don’t miss the antipasto platter ($10 small, $20 large), your first introduction to the focus on world-class ingredients. It includes five meats (mortadella, prosciutto, soppressata and two other salamis); two cheeses (fresh mozzarella and Gorgonzola); olives; sweet and spicy red peppadew peppers; and two housemade jams (ham and tomato), served with toasted bread. Each ingredient was best-in-class, the thin, salty prosciutto wrapped around long, crispy bread sticks, the

sopressata delightfully spicy, the mortadella mild and lean like upscale bologna. The mild, creamy mozzarella offset the pungent blue. The stars of the show were the jams; the ham was salty and smoky, and a little went a long way; the tomato was sweet and dosed with just the right amount of basil. The salads ($7 to $13) are pretty basic. The Gorgonzola ($10) features Arkansas greens, dozens of cubes of cheese and homemade dressing. We could have used a bit more dressing and a bit less cheese. All the pizzas are 18 inches and have the same base: fresh whole-milk mozzarella, Parmigiano Reggiano, extra virgin olive oil, homemade tomato sauce and fresh basil ($20). There are 14 specialty pies ($22 to $28) with predetermined ingredients, or you can build your own using the 10 meats ($4 to $5 apiece) and eight vegetables ($1 to $3). We got the Butcher’s Pie (any two meats) with homemade meatballs and Vermont smokehouse pepperoni and added portobello mushrooms ($28.50).


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We adored the thin, light, crisp-butchewy crust. The tomato sauce was applied sparingly, letting the taste of the creamy cheeses and peerless meats and mushrooms shine through. The meatballs were mild and succulent and the salty pepperoni was so far above what most Arkansans are used to on their pizzas that it’s almost not even the same animal. The chunky-cut mushrooms were firm and meaty. Interestingly, three ingredients are about all the staff will let you put on your pizza: They are all so hefty and rich, the crust just won’t stand much more. After the large antipasto platter and a split salad, our three pizza eaters each had only one piece. For dessert, there is cannoli ($4) and tiramisu ($7, a slab big enough for two). DeLuca’s has the cinnamon-flavored cannoli shells sent from New York and stuffs them with a cool, rich, ricottabased filling. The tiramisu is rich and huge, with strong coffee notes. When Valinoti opened DeLuca’s, he had only six tables, figuring that would be all he needed. But lines out the door

prompted him to add booths and tables to an adjacent room (once a hallway), more than doubling capacity. He still seems shocked so many people love his food. Surely someday he’ll get used to the adoration.

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61


GOOD WEATHER, CONT. globalized nature of the art world and the homogenizing force of big money give that locale a sense of groundlessness. The frenetic pace of the city — the day jobs that support the off-hour artistic practice and the rent-to-income ratio — means you rarely feel in complete ownership of the experience of viewing art; rarely do you have the time or mind space to fully succumb to the demands of the artwork. Riley views all gallery spaces as a sort of purgatory: Art has “left somewhere and it’s not sure where it’s going next,” and it’s true — galleries can be alienated and alienating. The artworks are far from the context in which they were made. Work is often hung in a standardized way, although it’s common practice now to play with the idea of where art belongs, as long as it’s still inside the safe confines of the gallery space. “How you approach Good Weather, how you get to Lakewood, these are all things that show inequity and accessibility to the public,” Riley says. “The white cube is not a pure space, but it is the accepted model of exhibiting work, and that’s shifting.” Artists generally get these distinctions and bring into their curatorial practices the aesthetic and conceptual rigor of their art-making. As master’s of fine arts graduates flee the untenable economic circumstances of the major coastal art hubs, artist-run spaces are cropping up. Simply put, only rich people can afford to indulge in art-making in a place like Los Angeles or New York — or, increasingly the case, afford to be there at all. Artist-run galleries like Holiday Forever in Jackson, Wyo., Yeah Maybe in Minneapolis, Green Gallery in Milwaukee and Tops Gallery in Memphis are making the best of it. Michelle Grabner’s The Suburban, an art space that began wedged between a home and a garage in the Chicago suburbs, seems to be the model, but the link between the artist-run space and the avant-garde goes back to the Fluxus movement, the Situationists, the Bauhaus and further back still. Good Weather comes off at first like an idealized version of home, a place where uninhibited conversation thrives: good food and company are abundant. At the Anne Vieux show, members of the Riley family convivially drift in and out of the house. Marilyn Riley garnishes the kitchen table with pineapple chunks and cookie-crumble peanut butter; her husband, John, a formidable talker, rhapsodizes about everything from local lawn care services to the vibrant installation downstairs as guests track pale powder footprints all around. Haynes’ cousin, Erin Weindorf, describes the “neat dance” of pro-wrestling, the “precision 62

OCTOBER 20, 2016

ARKANSAS TIMES

of combat without hurting another person” and the difficulties of pursuing that profession during a gender transition. She regales with her bad-guy persona “Joey T” and demonstrates a very effective arm bar, perfected during her days on the Oklahoma circuit. Camden Riley, a younger brother, sets up some visitors in the TV room with the football game and tries to minimize the extrusion of flour through the house. Zachary Riley didn’t know precisely what his little brother was doing in his garage until the first exhibition, paintings by Tony Garbarini. He calls himself an “anxious host,” and laughs at the incongruity of artists hanging out with his family. He worries someone might “shut it down,” like an unsanctioned house

a functioning network, you have to create real relationships.” Good Weather exhibits only one artist at a time and only those with whom studio visits have been conducted; when the art and artists arrive in Arkansas, they live at the house during the week of installation. On the topic of the decentralization of the art world, Johnson chimes in: “It all comes down to the fact that for our generation it’s really hard; a lot of people are moving home ... . A large portion of [artist-run spaces] pop up where their parents live — [a] general symptom of the economy and student debt. It’s not sexy. Not like Donald Judd in Marfa.” He noted that Marilyn makes an entire pot of vegan soup for him each show; this

party. When the night’s over, Zachary lives with the work of artists like Sondra Perry, Devin Farrand, Ezra Tessler and Michael Assiff for a month and half, mirthfully eyeing it each time he takes his bike out for a ride. On the travails of hosting, he says, “In New York, you’ll visit 12 galleries in a night, no problem. People linger in Arkansas ... . We’re competing with the Razorback game. In the South, if you want people to come over at 6, that’s eatin’ hour.” And so, the Rileys provide dinner. Popping his head in through the kitchen door, local artist Layet Johnson joins the conversation. His drawings were exhibited at Good Weather in 2013, and he talks about the difference between showing there vs. more traditional galleries in Brooklyn and Manhattan: “Nobody talked to me about my work ... . I don’t know who showed before or after me ... . People talk about how you don’t have to live in the big art cities now because of the internet, but without forming a sincere community it’s really hard to be connected to anyone. In order to create

time it’s 15-bean. Another artist-curator, Ian Breidenbach, is hanging out on the porch. He runs a gallery called Neon Heater in “very tiny” Finley, Ohio. Ian was born in Finley and explains, “I don’t know how I ended back up there. I didn’t mean to.” He is certain that the $100 rent on his gallery space was a big draw and that he wants his artists to have complete freedom from the pressure to make something salable. “The community comes into these spaces ... . Art isn’t always for art people. There’s actually no reason to show art to art people. They get it; they know it. They’ve seen everything before. But when you open it up to a neighborhood, maybe even a poorer neighborhood that doesn’t see that on the regular, that’s when you can make a difference, that’s when you can start to change the narrative about what art is.” On the “blue-chip” galleries, he says: “You get a lot of people that don’t have an art background, they’ll walk into really sterile fluorescents and be really scared to ask questions and feel out of place, but when it’s in a homey space,

they feel OK and like they can ask those questions. I definitely don’t think those people would ever go to a gallery in Chelsea and ever ask a question. They would feel like they were lesser or like they were being talked down to somehow, which is a very institutional way of showing art.” And wouldn’t they be right about being talked down to? “Totally. If you can’t purchase that painting on the wall because you make less than that in a year, what’s the point of even going in to look at it? … But I think artist-run spaces don’t have that narrative as much; there’s an openness with the community. These are the people you’re trying to give that conversation to.” When I ask Haynes to describe an ideal night at the gallery, he tells me about a dialogue between his family and Sondra Perry, who has in “the past four or five years trail-blazed a space among other black, queer, feminist artists.” (“netherrrrrr,” the artist’s video installation, was up last spring.) “When Sondra was here, CAPTURED the conversation we LIGHT: For had was so impor“same window, tant. It helped form different day, Vieux manipulated different thoughtphotographs of tracks that we go holographic and on now as a famreflective papers ily.” For that show, and printed them Good Weather in on faux suede, its entirety was satblurring the line between the urated with chromadigital and the key blue paint, the physical. hue that filmmakers use when they want to superimpose a setting. The color is a cousin to the mind-numbing indigo that accompanies a system malfunction on PCs. For the video projection of “netherrrrrr,” a Windows logo faded into a rotating “blue screen of death,” during which we saw an avatar of the artist’s beautiful brown face emerge in place of lines of code. She recounted to us the fatal system errors of Microsoft ’98 software. Another robotic voice recited “the blue code of violence ... denote[s] the unwritten rule that exists among police officers not to report on a colleague’s errors, misconducts or crimes.” The video then transitioned to a YouTube tutorial on chroma-key blue, which demonstrated how the color is used in film editing to render needless objects invisible. Snapshots of black women who died in confrontations with police hovered, spun and disappeared from the screen. The video veered to a narration of a “troubleshooting tutorial.” And then emerged footage of Micky Bradford, a black trans woman, encircled by exuberant supporters as she vogues defiantly and majesti-


cally just in front of a police line at the end of a frustrating day of protest. “Zach and my father are very informed thinkers,” Haynes Riley says. “But if you don’t have an experience like that which Sondra has had in America, then how can you include that person’s experience in your understanding of inequality and injustice? That proximity and inaccessibility ... to wealth built over periods of generations is an important factor: We’re a supposedly desegregated society, but are we? … In the suburbs — any suburbs — New York suburbs or Arkansan, we don’t live next to people who are different than us. What Good Weather is doing is bringing different people into that space and forcing a conversation to occur, where — if not changing people’s minds — at least we’re having the conversation.” “Death of a Salesman,” a solo exhibition by Elliott Earls, opens Oct. 22 at Good Weather, 4400 Edgemere Road, North Little Rock. There will be a reception at 6 p.m. Sondra Perry’s work will be featured at “SighFi,” an exhibition curated by Haynes Riley at UALR Gallery I, in January 2017.

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Arkansas Times - October 20, 2016  

TOAST OF THE TOWN - Our annual survey of beer, booze and bars in Arkansas. Plus a preview of the 5th annual Arkansas Times Craft Beer Festiv...

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