Page 1

ARKANSASTIMES.COM

JUNE 2019

ALSO: RX POT REVIEW A TOAST TO THE MOCKTAIL

ARKANSASTIMES.COM

JUNE 2019 1


Professional Property Management 351 E 4th Street Suite 1 Mountain Home, AR 72653 870-425-6076 http://ppm-inc.vpweb.com Specializing in Quality Affordable Apartments for Families and Seniors throughout Arkansas For more information contact the Apartment Complex listed below or Check us out online at http://ppm-inc.vpweb.com Ash Flat Augusta Berryville Bull Shoals

— — — —

Cabot — Calico Rock — Cave City — Colt — Cotter — Eureka Springs — Fayetteville — Gainsville, MO — Gassville — Green Forest Hampton Hardy Harrison

— — — —

Humphrey —

PROPERTY NAME Homewood Village Apartments Delta Cove Apartments Heritage Park Apartments Lakewind Apartments Merriwood Apartments Woodland Cardinal Apartments Woodland Station Apartments Woodland Station Senior Apartments Calico Pines Apartments Curia Creek Apartments Colt Senior Citizen Apartments River View Village Apartments Cotter Crossing Apartments Walnut Lane Apartments Victoria Woods Apartments Nantucket Apartments Nantucket IV Apartments Jenning Mills Apartments Westridge Apartments.. Summerhill Apartments Summerhill III Apartments Gardengate Apartments Hampton Cove Apartments Spring Woods Apartments Autumn Place Apartments Autumn Village Apartments Big Cedar Apartments Big Oaks Apartments Heritage Heights Apartments Majestic View Apartments Maple Church Apartments Maple Church Senior Apartments Twin Oaks Apartments Cypress Point Apartments **62 years of age or older and/or disabled *55 years of age or older

PHONE NUMBER 870-994-2102 * 870-347-5602 ** 870-423-1051 * 870-445-4980 870-445-4144 ** 501-605-8291 501-605-8291 501-286-7979 * 870-297-4844 ** 870-283-5600 870-633-5222 ** 870-633-5222 ** 870-435-2881 * 870-435-2881 ** 479-253-7266 ** 479-442-4132 * 479-856-6477 * 479-442-4132 417-679-3584 870-435-6040 870-435-6040 ** 870-438-6739 870-798-4850 ** 870-856-4074 * 870-741-5524 * 870-741-5524 ** 870-741-3069 870-741-5524 870-204-5017 870-365-0351 * 870-743-3880 870-743-3880 * 870-741-5524 870-873-4760 **

PROPERTY NAME Jasper — Buffalo River Village Apartments River Bend Apartments Grandview Senior Citizen Apartments Lowell — Lowell Senior Citizen Apartments Park Side Patio Homes. Robinson Apartments Mammoth Spring — Mammoth Spring Estates Mc Gehee — Valley Apartments Mountain Home — Cardinal Apartments Grand Apartments Keystone Apartments Mountain Station Apartments Park Place Apartments Park West Patio Homes Park West Senior Apartments Park West Village Apartments Promenade Apartments Shadow Brook Apartments Southern Heights Apartments Mountain View — Mountain Lodge Apartments Pebble Creek Apartments Newark — Independence Village Apartments Norfork — Norfork Villas Apartments River Valley Apartments Wolf River Lodge Apartments Osceola — Osceola Village Apartments Rogers — Autumnwood Point Apartments Indian Creek Apartments The Meadows of Rogers Patio Homes of Persimmon Springdale — Mill Creek Senior Apartments Thayer, MO — East Meadow Apartments Western Grove — Western Grove Family Apartments Wynne — Ridgeview Apartments Yellville — Stonehill Apartments

PHONE NUMBER 870-446-2406 870-446-2650 870-446-2406 ** 479-659-5383 ** 479-936-9890 * 479-659-5383 * 870-625-7555 ** 870-222-9101 870-425-6085 870-508-6675 870-424-3042 870-425-3376 870-425-7169 870-508-6675 * 870-508-6675 * 870-425-9291 * 870-425-4191 ** 870-424-4929 * 870-424-3042 870-269-8646 ** 870-269-8778 ** 870-799-3427 ** 870-499-7498 870-499-7498 ** 870-499-7498 870-563-4919 ** 479-636-2741 * 479-636-2741 479-936-9890 * 479-372-6222 * 479-927-9790 * 417-264-2188 ** 870-429-5628 870-238-6575 ** 870-449-5206

The Fair Housing Act, as amended, prohibits discrimination in the sale, rental, and financing of dwellings, and in other housing-related transactions, based on race, color, national origin, religion, sex, familial status (including children under the age of 18 living with parents of legal custodians, pregnant women, and people securing custody of children under the age of 18), and handicap (disability). Complaints of discrimination may be forwarded to the Office of Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity, Department of Housing and Urban Development, Room 5204, 451 Seventh Street, SW, Washington, DC 20410-2000 or call (voice) 1-800-669-9777, 1-817-978-5900 or (TTY) 1-817-978-5595. This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer. If you wish to file a Civil Rights program complaint of discrimination, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint form, found online at http://www.ascr.usda.gov/complaint_filing_cust.html or at any USDA office, or call (866)632-9992 to request the form. You may also write a letter containing all of the information requested in the form. Send your completed complaint form or letter to us by mail at U.S. Department of Agriculture, Director, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20250-9410, by fax (202)690-7442 or email at program.intake@usda.gov


ARKANSASTIMES.COM

JUNE 2019 3


JUNE 2019

FEATURES THE STYLE ISSUE 29 THE FELLOWSHIP HALL SOUND

Musicians record and produce in a former church hall. By Lindsey Millar

36 ON TOP

Hatmaker Markia Herron is seeing business boom. By Leslie Newell Peacock

38 SCARVES FOR ALL

You don’t have to be Muslim to shop from Nowara Co. By Rebekah Hall

40 ‘REBIRTH’

A young clothing designer who lost his inventory to a fire is back. By Frederick McKindra

42 STREET STYLE Little Rock’s best-dressed.

44 PAINT ON THE WALL A Fayetteville designer makes oneof-a-kind murals. By Caroline Millar 4 JUNE 2019

ARKANSAS TIMES

9 THE FRONT

Q&A: Eve Jorgensen The Big Picture: AAC 2022 The Inconsequential News Quiz: Quiz of the future! Orval: The singing AG The Month (Or So) That Was: May’s big news

18 THE TO-DO LIST

Erika Wennerstrom, Juneteenth, Adam Faucett, Kevin Kerby, Czech That Film Festival and more.

25 NEWS & POLITICS

Threats to equal education.

70 FOOD & DRINK The rise of the mocktail. By Stephanie Smittle

78 TRAVEL

A pecan plantation retreat. By Molly Mitchell

86 CANNABIZ

First legal marijuana bought, reviewed. By Lew Gasnier

90 HISTORY

The creation science trial. By Guy Lancaster

By Ernest Dumas

96 CROSSWORD

63 CULTURE

98 THE OBSERVER

Filmmaker Mark Thiedeman puts humanity in the frame.

Revisions

By Christian Leus

Q&A: Jimbo Mathus By Stephanie Smittle

ON THE COVER: Markia

Herron and mural by Jessica DeBari. Photography by Brian Chilson and Kat Wilson.


JOIN US FOR DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS FROM $10-$12.

BEST BUSINESS LUNCH

BEST CHEF, PAYNE HARDING BEST DESSERTS BEST SEAFOOD

FREE DELIVERY to your downtown office

JOIN FOR EASTER for lunch ($25 minimum). The complimentary JoinUS Us for HappyBRUNCH Hour Cache Cart will pick you up for lunch or dinner Monday through Friday • 4Bloody p.m. until 7 p.m. Enjoy Regional Brunch Specials, Live Music, Mary and andMimosa take you Specials back to your home or office in the downtown area.

Call THE CACHE CART 501-658-2278 CacheRestaurant | 425 President Clinton Ave., Little Rock | 501-850-0265 | cachelittlerock.com | CacheLittleRock Brunch served every Saturday and Sunday 10am - 2pm


PUBLISHER Alan Leveritt EDITOR Lindsey Millar CREATIVE DIRECTOR Mandy Keener SENIOR EDITOR Max Brantley MANAGING EDITOR Leslie Newell Peacock ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR Stephanie Smittle ASSOCIATE EDITOR Rebekah Hall CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Benjamin Hardy, Mara Leveritt PHOTOGRAPHER Brian Chilson DIRECTOR OF DIGITAL STRATEGY Jordan Little ADVERTISING ART DIRECTOR Mike Spain GRAPHIC DESIGNER Katie Hassell DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING Phyllis A. Britton ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Brooke Wallace, Lee Major, Nathan Stamp, Terrell Jacob ADVERTISING ASSISTANT Hannah Peacock ADVERTISING TRAFFIC MANAGER Roland R. Gladden IT DIRECTOR Robert Curfman CIRCULATION DIRECTOR Anitra Hickman CONTROLLER Weldon Wilson BILLING/COLLECTIONS Linda Phillips

SUPPLYING THE HUMAN CAPITAL TO COMPLETE YOUR TEAM For nearly 30 years, ASAP has had the privilege of delivering superior results and service to our clients on demand. We help find the right people with the right attitude and the right qualifications for your business. 

ASAP PERSONNEL SERVICES STATEWIDE LOCATIONS: 10301 N. Rodney Parham Road Little Rock, AR 72227 501-531-2727

1004 Van Ronkle, Ste. 1 Conway, AR 72032 501-358-6677

1126-B Malvern Ave Hot Springs, AR 71901 501-321-2727

COMING SOON TO JONESBORO AND ROGERS, ARKANSAS 6 JUNE 2019

ARKANSAS TIMES

PRODUCTION MANAGER Ira Hocut (1954-2009)

association of alternative newsmedia

FOR SUBSCRIPTION SERVICE CALL: (501) 375-2985 Subscription prices are $60 for one year.

VOLUME 45 ISSUE 22 ARKANSAS TIMES (ISSN 0164-6273) is published each month by Arkansas Times Limited Partnership, 201 East Markham Street, Suite 200, Little Rock, Arkansas, 72201, phone (501) 375-2985. Periodical postage paid at Little Rock, Arkansas, and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to ARKANSAS TIMES, 201 EAST MARKHAM STREET, SUITE 200, Little Rock, AR, 72201. Subscription prices are $60 for one year. For subscriber service call (501) 375-2985. Current single-copy price is $5, free in Pulaski County. Single issues are available by mail at $5.00 each, postage paid. Payment must accompany all orders. Reproduction or use in whole or in part of the contents without the written consent of the publishers is prohibited. Manuscripts and artwork will not be returned or acknowledged unless sufficient return postage and a self-addressed stamped envelope are included. All materials are handled with due care; however, the publisher assumes no responsibility for care and safe return of unsolicited materials. All letters sent to ARKANSAS TIMES will be treated as intended for publication and are subject to ARKANSAS TIMES’ unrestricted right to edit or to comment editorially. ©2019 ARKANSAS TIMES LIMITED PARTNERSHIP

ARKTIMES.COM 201 EAST MARKHAM, SUITE 200 LITTLE ROCK, AR 72201 501-375-2985


ARKANSASTIMES.COM

JUNE 2019 7


BEST BUTCHER

FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED SINCE 1959! There are many brands of beef, but only one Angus brand exceeds expectations. The Certified Angus Beef brand is a cut above USDA Prime, Choice and Select. Ten quality standards set the brand apart. It's abundantly flavorful, incredibly tender, naturally juicy. 10320 STAGE COACH RD 501-455-3475

7507 CANTRELL RD 501-614-3477

7525 BASELINE RD 501-562-6629

2203 NORTH REYNOLDS RD, BRYANT 501-847-9777

www.edwardsfoodgiant.com SAVE TIME. ORDER ONLINE. DELIVERED TO YOUR CAR.

Your first three order fees are on us. Use promo Code: Welcome. 8 JUNE 2019

ARKANSAS TIMES


THE FRONT

Q&A

Eve Jorgensen Works Overtime For Gun Safety and Sensible Gun Laws Why did you join Moms Demand Action? I went to see [Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America founder] Shannon Watts at the Clinton School in 2016, and that was right before my son started kindergarten. I was a nervous mom. Several of my friends were already involved with Moms, and I decided to do what I could to help. I really jumped in full force.

Demand Action focused much of its energy during the last legislative session ensuring a bill that would have changed that didn’t pass. How’d you pull it off? One of our key successes was having members there at hearing after hearing. They ended up building relationships with lawmakers and becoming friendly with lots of them. Having our red shirts that showed we were all together helped, and we’d sit at the front where the cameras could see us and the lawmakers could see us. We also drove thousands of calls to lawmakers around the state, and we’d do targeted calls to volunteers asking if they knew community leaders, like their mayor or a pastor, who would be willing to make a call. That helped.

BRIAN CHILSON

What does membership look like today? I’d say we have 2,000 members in the state. In 2017, we had active groups in Little Rock and Conway, and Fayetteville was just starting. Now, we have groups in Arkadelphia, Bentonville, Batesville, Cabot, El Dorado, Hot Springs — it’s really grown. That’s what’s most important to me. It’s not just the growth in Little Rock, which has been significant. We’re trying to get volunteers all over the state so we can hold our lawmakers accountable when they’re filing these extreme gun bills. You don’t have to be a mom or a woman to be in Moms Demand Action, right? No, you don’t. We joke that it’s “mothers and others.” Moms Demand Action was sort of modeled after Mothers Against Drunk Driving. Fighting for your kids is a really strong motivator. But we welcome any and everyone to join us. What’s the biggest misconception about the group’s mission? We’re still fighting the misconception that we’re anti-gun or gun grabbers. A lot of our members are gun owners or married to gun owners. We have members who are hunters and members who have their concealed carry license. We just want better gun laws to keep guns away from people with dangerous histories and kids. For instance, we have our Be SMART program, which is all about gun safety and gun storage. So in a community like Cabot, where we’ve had our stuff set up, people were shocked to know, “Oh, you’re a gun owner and you’re giving away gun locks and you just want to talk to me about not having our guns stolen out of our cars or on a bedside table where a toddler can get it?” Arkansas is among a minority of states in the country without a stand-your-ground law. Moms

Name: Eve Jorgensen Birthplace: Fayetteville Age: 37 Job: GIS technician at Central Arkansas Water Volunteer jobs: Chapter leader for Arkansas Moms Demand Action, MLK Reads volunteer tutor Hobbies: Reading, tweeting and thrifting

You’ve got young kids and a full-time job. How do you find time for what seems like a full-time volunteer gig? It has been tough. I do a lot of conference calls from my car on my lunch break and conference calls after the kids are in bed. A lot of weekend work. I also have a great team of other volunteer leaders who help do all of this. We’ve got a pretty sophisticated leadership structure.

There were a number of political candidates in Arkansas who were affiliated with Moms Demand Action who won in 2018. Do you see that as an ongoing trend? On the presidential trail already so many of the Democratic hopefuls are talking about gun sense all the time. That’s totally new. I really hope we’ll have some Republicans apply for the gun sense candidate distinction next election cycle in Arkansas. When are you going to run for office? People keep asking me that. I have really great representatives right now. So, I don’t know. We’ll see. What’s next on your calendar? Our big Wear Orange event is coming up June 7-9. A young woman named Hadiya Pendleton was shot in Chicago when she was 15, and her friends started this Wear Orange campaign to remind people about gun violence. We’re going to have 10 events across the state. You can find out more at wearorange.org or by going to facebook.com/MomsDemandActionAR. — Lindsey Millar ARKANSASTIMES.COM

JUNE 2019 9


THE FRONT

INCONSEQUENTIAL NEWS QUIZ

The Quiz of the Future! Edition Play at home, while feeling cute.

2) The Arkansas Democrat-Gazette recently reported on Arkansas Department of Correction employees’ social media posts to a private Facebook group called Correctional Officers Life. Which of the following was a real post in the group, according to the Dem-Gaz reporting? A) A selfie of a male officer with the caption: “Feeling cute. Might take your girl to [solitary confinement] later, idk.” B) Two female officers in uniform, with the caption: “Feeling cute. Those inmates wish they could have both of us meow.” C) A selfie of a female officer in uniform, with the caption: “Feeling cute. Might lock their asses up today. I don’t know.” D) All of the above. 3) Tragedy struck the Burger King in Beebe in late April with the resulting chaos caught on film. What happened? A) The overflowing grease trap became sentient, requiring a response from The Avengers. B) Panicked customers reported a chemical weapons attack, but that’s how the bathroom always smells. C) Retaliatory drive-by perpetrated by Col. Sanders. D) A pickup truck hauling propane caught fire while idling at the drive-thru window and exploded in a huge ball of flame that rocked the restaurant. 4) A jockey was suspended for 60 days after an incident that investigators say happened in April at Oaklawn Racing Casino Resort in Hot Springs. What, according to investigators, did he do? A) He spilled the beans about the real source of all those delicious corned-beef sandwiches: the losers. B) He distracted slot machine and blackjack players by pointing out that they actually race horses at Oaklawn, too. C) He rode his horse buck nekkid. D) He deliberately whipped a competing jockey while the two were riding neck and neck during a race. 5) Updating a case we’ve previously written about here, in April, a Pine Bluff jury convicted Patricia Hill, 69, of second-degree murder and sentenced her to 16 years in prison for the 10 JUNE 2019

ARKANSAS TIMES

shooting death of her husband, Frank, who she said she shot because he’d subscribed to a porn channel on the couple’s satellite TV service. Which of the following is a detail that was revealed at trial? A) Frank Hill spent most of his spare time in a backyard shed, with his wife saying: “He had his pee bucket out there.” B) She described porn as: “Adultery with pictures.” C) In the couple’s last conversation before Hill was shot, he reportedly said: “What’s the harm?” D) All of the above. 6) In April, Little Rock Mayor Frank Scott announced he would do something that, as far as anyone can recollect, no Little Rock mayor has done while in office. What was it? A) Turn on the Bat Signal. B) Demolish the mayor’s private water slide on the roof of City Hall. C) Take on North Little Rock Mayor Joe “The Dogtown Destroyer” Smith in a no-holds-barred Texas Barbwire Cage Match. D) Citing “serious security concerns,” he accepted the protection of a permanent security detail staffed by Little Rock Police officers.

“FEELI NG CU TE. MIGHT TAKE Y O GIRL T O [SOL UR ITARY CONFIN EMENT ] LATER , IDK.” PHOTO ILLUST RATION

7) A study of the teaching profession in Arkansas published by the Bureau of Legislative Research in April included some shocking conclusions about one of the state’s most important jobs. Which of the following facts did the bureau report? A) The number of college students seeking teaching degrees has decreased by 50 percent in the past five years. B) The number of teachers who quit after serving only one year in the classroom rose from 6.91 percent in 2007 to 16.03 percent in 2015. C) A survey of over 1,000 Arkansas teachers found that one in four was seriously considering leaving the profession. D) All of the above. 8) One aspect of the new Stone’s Throw Brewing taproom at 3015 W. Markham St. has stirred a bit of controversy. What’s the problem, bub? A) Fans of the former Pizza D’Action just down the street complain the new joint just doesn’t have that “As If Somebody Puked Bong Water” smell. B) The location doesn’t have a drive-thru window, but some drunk careening through the intersection of Markham and Kavanaugh will undoubtedly remedy that soon. C) It doesn’t have kombucha mushroom tea on tap. D) A previous mural on the wall outside the taproom said “Welcome to Stifft Station,” but a new mural says “Welcome to Stifft’s Station,” prompting debate over the proper spelling of the neighborhood’s name.

HT TE. MIG U C G N S UP “FEELI R ASSE I E H T LOCK . TODAY ” KNOW. I DON’T N

ATIO ILLUSTR PHOTO

ANSWERS: D, D, D, D, D, D, D, D

1) In late April, a suspect was caught on video after he broke into Fayetteville’s Northwest Arkansas Mall after hours and attempted to rob a business, but he left empty-handed. Which store did he attempt to steal from? A) Polyester N’ Shame Clubwear. B) Endangered Species Jerky Barn. C) Dee’s Nuts Roasted Almonds. D) A kiosk for Dippin’ Dots (The Ice Cream of the Future!).


Little Rock, Conwayis and our ARcare Benton HERE! newest family practice in Benton.

TOAST TOWN OF THE

Benton Family Practice OPENS March 4

FINALIST

630 West South Street www.arcare.net Benton, AR 72015 501-860-7150

We’re8 Here A.M. to 5 for P.M. You. (Next to Westside Pharmacy 501-778-3151)

Foroffering You! The CityWe’re of North LittleHere Rock is now a service to our citizens that we have never offered before.

BIKESHARE HAS LAUNCHED!

B

ikeshare is a service in which bicycles are made available for shared use to individuals on a short-term basis or for that “last mile” transportation. We have partnered with a company called GOTCHA. Gotcha is the only mobilityas-a-service (MaaS) company offering four sustainable micro-transit products—e-bikes, e-scooters, e-trikes, and 100%-electric ride share vehicles—through one proprietary, app-based platform. There are 100 bikes spread around the city at 12-15 hubs that have been planned out by GOTCHA, NLR Fit2Live, Planning and Zoning, and our City Engineering department. PAY AS YOU GO PRICING: $2 to unlock; $0.10 per minute after unlock MEMBERSHIP PRICING: $9.99 per month. One cumulative hour of included usage per day. $79.99 per year. One cumulative hour of included usage per day. (Note: this is a 33% discount from the monthly rate). Low Income Qualifying Members: $5 annually

ARKANSASTIMES.COM

JUNE 2019 11


THE FRONT

Michael Warrick and Nancy Wilson Opening Reception Saturday June 22nd 6 to 9 pm

Show runs through July 13th

Michael Warrick

Nancy Wilson

BOSWELL MOUROT FINE ART Fine Art from local, regional and international artists for the emerging and established collector. Tues. - Fri. 11 to 6 • Sat. 11 to 3 and by appointment 5815 Kavanaugh Blvd • Little Rock, AR 72207 501-664-0030 • www.boswellmourot.com 12 JUNE 2019

ARKANSAS TIMES


WELCOME TO THE

YOUR SUMMER ESCAPE AWAITS. Our newly renovated rooms are just minutes from Crystal Bridges, the Amazeum, and Bentonville’s award-winning restaurant scene. Venture out to experience Arkansas’ scenic beauty, or stay in, relax, and enjoy freshly prepared breakfast at The Garden Grille, complimentary Wi-Fi and our on-site fitness center. 2204 SE Walton Boulevard in Bentonville (479) 464-7300 | www.bentonville.hgi.com

ARKANSASTIMES.COM

JUNE 2019 13


THE FRONT

THE BIG PICTURE

Arkansas Arts Center, 2022

Capital campaign kicks off; Studio Gang architects reveal images.

1

COURTESY STUDIO GANG AND SCAPE

2

3

COURTESY STUDIO GANG COURTESY STUDIO GANG AND SCAPE

4

5

COURTESY STUDIO GANG 14 JUNE 2019

ARKANSAS TIMES

COURTESY STUDIO GANG AND SCAPE


T

he capital campaign to build the redesigned and updated Arkansas Arts Center, to open in 2022, has to date raised $118 million, the co-chairs of the campaign, Warren and Harriett Stephens, announced May 15. The biggest donor is the Windgate Foundation, which is pledging a grant of $35 million. The city of Little Rock will provide $31.2 million from a bond issue, and 42 private donors have pledged a total of $46 million. The campaign goal is to raise another $10 million, for a total of $128 million. Mayor Frank Scott Jr., who introduced the Stephenses, said the new facility would be a bold “catalyst for the New South.” Ground is to be broken this fall. At the announcement, Jeanne Gang of the Studio Gang architecture firm in Chicago presented computer-generated images of the Arts Center of 2022, a facility that embraces MacArthur Park. The entrance will be moved to Ninth Street, from a crescent drive. Visitors will walk under an elevated “cultural living room” with a distinctive folded-plate roof to approach the front door: the 1937 Art Deco entrance to the Fine Arts Museum (now a wall in the permanent collection gallery). A double-height glass atrium that runs from front to back, with the entrances to the Museum School, Children’s Theater, restaurant and shops on either side, will take the guesswork out of the way-finding required in today’s warren-like layout. The Harriett and Warren Stephens Galleries will be on the second floor, beside the “cultural living room,” a gathering place and special event venue. The SCAPE landscape architecture firm of New York and New Orleans will plant 250 trees, creating an oak savannah entrance on the south and cypress trees front and back. Persons interested in giving to the capital campaign should call AAC Development Director Kelly Fleming at 501-396-0345. 1. The Arts Center entrance, a view from the crescent drive at night. The “cultural living room” with the folded-plate roof will be visible to traffic on Ninth Street. 2. Entrance to the galleries and “cultural living room” on the second floor. 3. The south entrance, with new pathways and connections to MacArthur Park and an outdoor dining area. 4. The atrium, looking toward the south entrance; the Museum School is on the right, the theater on the left. 5. A daytime view of the main entrance to the Arts Center.

Please join us in the Hunt for WOW! June 13, 14 & 15 Pleasant Ridge Town Center is teaming up with Women’s Own Worth for three fun filled days of gifts, prizes, food and a scavenger hunt. ART GROUP GALLERY • AT&T • BAR LOUIE • BASSETT FURNITURE • BEEHIVE • BELK BEYOND COTTON II • BLAZE PIZZA • BONEFISH GRILL • CHICK-FIL-A • CHIPOTLE MEXICAN GRILL CLIPS HAIR STUDIO • COBBLESTONE & VINE • COMING HOME INTERIORS EMPHATIC BY DEE ROCCO • FLEET FEET SPORTS/EASY RUNNER • FORSYTHE’S GIANT OF LITTLE ROCK BY SPOKES • HOWSE • HUNTINGTON LEARNING CENTER • IDEAL IMAGE ISTANBUL MEDITERRANEAN • J.DUKE • JUICY SEAFOOD • JUNE’S HALLMARK • JUST BLOW LITTLE GREEK • KRISTIN TODD • MERLE NORMAN • MR. HUI’S CHINESE RESTAURANT NADEAU FURNITURE WITH A SOUL • NEWK’S EATERY • NOOMA • PANERA BREAD PIGTAILS AND CREWCUTS • PINOT’S PALETTE • POUT • POWDER & SMOKE • PURE BARRE RESTORE CRYOTHERAPY • ROSE SPA • SALON SCARLET • SCHICKEL’S CLEANERS ROBERSON’S FINE JEWELRY • SANTO COYOTE • SCARLET • SKY MODERN JAPANESE SALON L • THE EVERYDAY CHEF • THE FRESH MARKET • THE GOOD FEET STORE THE GRIND COFFEE BISTRO • THE RIDGE WINE & SPIRITS • THE ROBUST OLIVE • THE TOGGERY UBREAKIFIX • UNIQUE THREADING SALON • UPS STORE • VANNESS • VESTA’S • WARREN’S SHOES

Pleasant shopping. 11525 CANTRELL ROAD

Pleasant dining.

Pleasant Ridge.

PLEASANTRIDGETOWNCENTER.COM

ARKANSASTIMES.COM

JUNE 2019 15


THE FRONT

THE MONTH (OR SO) THAT WAS

The City Budget Blues $90 MILLION CZECH GUN FACTORY GETS LR PORT DEAL Firearms manufacturer CZ-USA announced plans to build a $90 million factory that it says will employ 500 people at the Little Rock Port. Incentives: The city of Little Rock will issue bonds of up to $120,000 to finance the plant and will own the plant until it is paid for. As a city property, the plant is tax-exempt but will pay a portion of real and property taxes and was given 73 acres of port land for free. The state is providing $24 million in loans and grants; the city and county will pay $1 million toward road improvements. SCOOTERS TO STAY FOR A WHILE Little Rock extended its agreement with the Lime scooter rental business to let it operate 120 days past the original May 15 end date. Lime maintains it is working to increase safety by providing helmets and reducing the scooters’ top speed. Persons actually spotting a Lime rider in a helmet are encouraged to call the Arkansas Times.

THE LITTLE ROCK BUDGET Little Rock leaders are scrambling to cover a shortfall in the last half of the year. New Mayor Frank Scott Jr., angling to act more like a strong mayor than his predecessor, declared control over the budget and tried to take charge, but his initial proposals for what he called “right-sizing” city spending were met with resistance from the City Board. Everybody has things they want to protect. They’re sure to eventually reach a solution that includes job losses and the use of general reserves and street money to finish in the black this year. Next year? The problem only gets worse. And there’s no money in sight to pay for one of the mayor’s big campaign promises: more cops. Meanwhile, Scott has drawn attention for his own spending, including for an expensive police security detail, a city-paid inauguration party, an expensive city vehicle and hiring pal Charles Blake in a newly created and high-paying chief of staff spot. ESTEMMERS OUT OF COLLEGE CENTER UA Little Rock persuaded eStem Charter High School to disallow use of the Donaghey Student Center by its students, who attend school on the college campus. College students have strongly objected to the presence of the younger students crowding the union and a decline in UA Little Rock enrollment has been partly blamed on eStem’s presence on campus. The situation was a “powder keg,” Chancellor Andrew Rogerson said. QUAPAWS FILE FOR CASINO PERMIT The Quapaw Tribe of Oklahoma was the first to apply for a permit to operate the Saracen Resort Casino, to be built in Pine Bluff. Tribal President John Berrey said he hopes to have the casino open by Valentine’s Day 2020.

16 JUNE 2019

ARKANSAS TIMES

POLICE OFFICER FIRED, BUT PROTESTS CONTINUE Overruling a sergeant, lieutenant, captain and the assistant chief of police, new Little Rock Police Chief Keith Humphrey fired Officer Charles Starks. Starks fatally shot driver Bradley Blackshire on Feb. 22 after Blackshire refused orders to get out of a car and began to drive away. Pulaski County Prosecuting Attorney Larry Jegley declined to prosecute Starks, saying he had reason to believe his life was in danger from the moving car. Jegley’s decision prompted several organized protests; in mid-May, police arrested 10 protesters for blocking traffic outside the prosecutor’s office. Starks is appealing.

MARIJUANA IS SOLD LEGALLY IN ARKANSAS FOR THE FIRST TIME Two dispensaries of medical marijuana, both in Hot Springs, opened for business the second week of May, selling product from the state’s only operating grower, BOLD Team. In less than a week, 31 pounds of medical marijuana (14,066 grams) had been sold. Estimated dollar value: $200,000.

LRSD BEGINS LAYOFFS The Little Rock School District will cut as many as 100 jobs to address the loss of $10 million in state and federal funding, Superintendent Mike Poore confirmed. Declining enrollment is the culprit. The beleaguered district cut funding by $5 million last year; it remains under state Department of Education control, leadership that has not been able to improve results at schools but will not relinquish its hold. PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIAN CHILSON


ARKANSASTIMES.COM

JUNE 2019 17


SATURDAY, JUNE 22

THE PINE BLUFF CONVENTION CENTER PRESENTS

BLUES, BATTER AND BREW 2019 ANTHONY HAMILTON

REGIONAL PARK AMPHITHEATER 1101 REGIONAL PARK DR • PINE BLUFF LIVE MUSIC – FIREWORKS – KIDS ZONE – VENDORS FORWARD FEST BLUES BATTER AND BREW is an all-day event

featuring local, regional, and national artists, created by Go Forward Pine Bluff, in partnership with the City of Pine Bluff, Arkansas. Bring your lawn chairs! No coolers and no backpacks. Gates open at 12pm. Get tickets at www.forwardfestpinebluff.com | VIP tickets available 18 JUNE 2019

ARKANSAS TIMES

MR. SIPP

KINGFISH OUR SPONSORS

SOUTHERN AVENUE


SPENCER FINCH, “BACK TO KANSAS,” 2015, CCOLLECTION OF CHRISTIAN KEESEE, NEW YORK AND OKLAHOMA

the TO-DO list

By STEPHANIE SMITTLE and LESLIE NEWELL PEACOCK

‘COLOR FIELD’

FRIDAY 5/31-MONDAY 9/30. CRYSTAL BRIDGES MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART, BENTONVILLE. Color field is an art form in which the color itself is the dominant subject matter: Think Mark Rothko, Helen Frankenthaler, Jules Olitski and Ken Noland. “Color Field,” the new exhibition in the North Forest of the grounds of Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art — once the private domain of the Walton family — places along its North Forest trail monumental outdoor sculpture saturated in bright colors, hues not found in nature, but set off by it. Some of the sculpture is interactive — visitors can make music by pushing the nearly 12-foot wind chimes of Sam Falls’ “Untitled (Wind Chimes)” and walk beneath the flying flags of Odili Donald Odita’s “Negative Space.” Other works include an inflatable, bulbous sculpture marked with abstract splashes of color by Claire Helen Ashley, a billboard-sized grid of colors by Spencer Finch (left) that he says was inspired by repeated viewings of “The Wizard of Oz,” and a piece that illustrates the effect of lighting on figures by Amanda Ross Ho. Ashley, Odita and installation artist Typoe Gran will be on hand for a panel discussion 7-8 p.m. May 31 in the Great Hall. The discussion is free, but call 479-657-2335 to register. LNP

ERIKA WENNERSTROM

WEDNESDAY 6/12, 8:30 P.M. STICKYZ ROCK ’N’ ROLL CHICKEN SHACK. $12-$15. Some musicians treat burnout and depression with a self-destructive blaze of glory. Some swear by putting pen to paper every day as practice, inspired or not — the old “no way out but through” approach. Some of them do ayahuasca in the Amazon jungle, record 400 voice notes in their phone, hike through Big Bend National Park and then write a rock ’n’ roll guitar meditation about all of it. The latter approach would be that of Erika Wennerstrom, the frontwoman for Austin ensemble Heartless Bastards whose solo record, “Sweet Unknown,” emerged from a post-hallucinogenic creative period after the ensemble’s announced hiatus in 2015. Wennerstrom’s voice is so elastic and brawny and percussive through the headphones that the mind reels to think about hearing it live. We’ve got a chance to do that locally this June; get tickets at arkansaslivemusic.com. SS

LINDA BEECROFT ARKANSASTIMES.COM

JUNE 2019 19


the TO-DO list

JUNETEENTH

SATURDAY 6/15, NOON-6 P.M. MOSAIC TEMPLARS CULTURAL CENTER. FREE.

ADAM FAUCETT, KEVIN KERBY

MATT WHITE

FRIDAY 6/14, 8 P.M. THE UNDERCROFT, CHRIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH. When Kevin Kerby bid adieu to a still-blissed-out audience in The Undercroft following Bea Troxel’s set there in May, he employed his trademark self-deprecation in announcing this June follow-up. “Next month, Adam Faucett and I will be having a contest to see who the best songwriter in Little Rock is,” Kerby said. “It’s definitely Adam.” The Mulehead frontman and forever Poet Laureate of Pulaski County curates this series in the basement of a 180-year-old church, and a generous handful of Central Arkansans have gotten hip to the venue’s cavernous intimacy and charm. This will be no exception, although with smartasses like Faucett (above) and Kerby swapping songs together on stage, things could get a li’l roast-y. Beer and wine are available for donations. SS

Loathe as the former Confederate States were to relinquish the power structures that facilitated slavery (reluctant still to this day, many would argue), it was a full two and a half years after Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation of 1863 that Union Army General Gordon Granger arrived at Texas’ gulfside doorstep and informed Texans that “in accordance with a proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free.” That day has come to be known as Juneteenth, a time set aside for acknowledging and celebrating black achievement — and for educating ourselves about it. Truth be told, that’s not a focus earmarked for a single day so much as it is a mission statement for this particular venue. Year-round the walls, display cases and gift shop shelves at the Mosaic Templars pay homage to enterprises and creative endeavors of black people in Arkansas and, more broadly, the South. For Juneteenth 2019, the museum’s live music lineup is headlined by Grammy-nominated R&B singer Carl Thomas (above) and Grammy-nominated gospel singer/songwriter VaShawn Mitchell. Festivities include a 3-on-3 basketball tournament with brackets for four men’s, women’s, youth and special abilities divisions; a Level Up Youth Dance Competition with divisions for ages 8-13 and ages 14-19; food trucks; games; a kids zone; and other daytime opportunities for frolic. The day also marks the opening of a new exhibit at Mosaic Templars, “Finding Freedom in the Forest: Opportunities and Challenges for African Americans in the Timber Industry,” with age-appropriate explorations for toddlers and nerdy historians alike. See mosaictemplarscenter.com for details. SS

CZECH THAT FILM FESTIVAL

FRIDAY 6/7, 6:30 P.M.; SATURDAY 6/8, 12:30 P.M. CALS RON ROBINSON THEATER. $5-$10 PER SCREENING. The trailers for the five films in this year’s Czech That Film Festival are an exercise in range: Radim Spacek’s “Golden Sting” follows a Czechoslovakian basketball team caught in the crossfire of sports-external drama. Robert Sedlacek’s biopic “Jan Palach” tracks a philosophy-student-turned-protest leader. And 20 JUNE 2019

ARKANSAS TIMES

Jakub Smid’s “Short Cut” is seen through the eyes of an 11-year-old boy as the discovery of his father’s whereabouts creates an irrevocable family rift. Director Smid will be in attendance for the screening of “Short Cut” that opens the festival’s Little Rock stop, and The Pantry Crest hosts an after-party Friday night. Czech That is

hosted by the Czech Honorary Consulate here in Little Rock, along with the Arkansas Cinema Society, the Arkansas Film Commission, the Arkansas Economic Development Commission, CALS Ron Robinson Theater and The Pantry Restaurant. See arkansascinemasociety.org for details and tickets. SS


SERAPH BRASS

SUNDAY 6/16, 7 P.M. ST. LUKE’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH, 4106 JFK BLVD., NORTH LITTLE ROCK. FREE. This one’s for any young woman who strolled into the first day of junior high marching band with every intention of mastering the tuba and got talked into playing the flute. All due respect to woodwinds, but the brass section has been a dudefest for eons, and it’s high time that changed. Meanwhile, an Episcopal church in North Little Rock has been hosting a series of free concerts under the name “Festival of the Senses,” and this summer they’re bringing a polished brass ensemble made up entirely of women. Seraph Brass, which performs primarily as a quintet or sextet, recorded a debut album in Finland last year called “Asteria.” It takes its name from the piece Seraph commissioned from composer Catherine McMichaels — one of two pieces written by women, for women, on the record. If you can’t catch Seraph Brass Sunday evening, there’s another chance to hear the group Friday, June 14, at First United Methodist Church in Conway, also at 7 p.m. SS

MARY MILLER

WEDNESDAY 6/5, 7:30 P.M. WHITE WATER TAVERN. FREE. In a 2017 interview with Vincent Scarpa of digital literary journal Electric Literature, writer Mary Miller was asked about sentence-making, and whether Southern writers might have their own ways of approaching a sentence’s rhythm. “Southerners value storytelling, humor and rhythm,” Miller said, “though I imagine that’s pretty universal.” Miller came from a family of musicians, she went on to say, with holidays spent churning out sibling renditions of Bonnie Raitt’s “Papa Come Quick” and The Band’s “The Weight” — songs, Miller said, “that are more like novels set to music.” Miller is author of short story collections “Big World” and “Always Happy Hour,” and novels “Biloxi” and “Last Days of California,” a body of sentences that tend to linger in the ear long after you’ve read them. Perhaps that’s because Miller doesn’t shy away from including real-world literary and pop culture references in her characters’ lives — Kurt Vonnegut quotes as tattoos, the Outback Steakhouse, Disney’s “The Little Mermaid,” Walmart. Or perhaps, as Scarpa implied, Miller’s prose is memorable because of its sense of rhythm. Either way, I doubt Miller’s reading in Little Rock will seem out of place at a dive known chiefly for the music that rattles its rafters most nights. Opening readers for this event are The Bookstore at Library Square manager Lilyan Kauffman, author and Argenta Reading Series founder Guy Choate and novelist Elizabeth Ellen of Ann Arbor, Mich., and sponsors are the Argenta Reading Series and the CALS Bookstore at Library Square. SS

MUTANTS OF THE MONSTER

FRIDAY 6/7 VINO’S; SATURDAY 6/8 REV ROOM; SUNDAY 6/9 WHITE WATER TAVERN. $12-$52. Heavy music is in the throes of reinventing itself, and if you want some evidence of that, look at the lineup for this increasingly badass micro-festival engineered by Rwake/ Deadbird frontman Chris Terry (better known as C.T.). There’s a reunited Racetraitor, for example, a Chicago outfit with a post-colonialist, social-justice-at-any-cost bent. There’s our very own Arkansas prophets of powerviolence, Terminal Nation; check out “I.C.E. Watch” from the group’s 7-inch split earlier this year, with righteously indignant lines like, “There is no hero who wears a fucking badge/You target the most vulnerable of people.” There’s my personal bucket list act, Lingua Ignota (above), an experimental, sometimes-operatic project by Kristin Hayter that reckons — confrontationally — with rape culture, abuse and misogyny. Put simply, representation matters, especially in heavy music genres, where racist or misogynistic ideas have often found a foothold. “I am extremely stoked to embrace this diversity for MOTM ’19 and to bring it down South,” C.T. told us. “It’s a beautiful sign of the times.” The festival’s become known for pairing cherished local sounds like Pallbearer, Deadbird and Living Sacrifice with compelling national acts like YOB, and this year is no exception, with performances from Full of Hell, Thou, Genocide Pact, -16, Primitive Man, Jungle Juice, Reserving Dirtnaps, Colour Design, Third Face, Redbait, Crowhurst, Sumokem, Hexxus, Suplex, Crankbait, Ether Coven and more, plus a Sunday afternoon Dark Arts Craft Fair. “I think everyone is surprised to see this lineup in somewhere comparatively small like Little Rock,” C.T. said. “Fans are in for an intense face-to-face interaction with artists who sell out rooms quadruple this size.” In the event metal is Not Your Thing, consider this: The diversity of sounds that make the headlines on metal blogs is so striking it renders the term “heavy” a little useless. In what universe does Blue Cheer get lumped in with Dream Theater or Sepultura? See the Facebook event for announcements about daytime bonus shows, and get tickets at lastchancerecords.us. SS ARKANSASTIMES.COM

JUNE 2019 21


the TO-DO list

IMDB

ARKANSAS TIMES FILM SERIES: ‘CEMETERY OF SPLENDOUR’ TUESDAY 6/18. RIVERDALE 10 CINEMA. $9.

Rotten Tomatoes and Roger Ebert are tried-and-true shepherds for the film unbuffs among us, to be sure, but leave it to the Arkansas Times Film Series’ curator and ambassador Omaya Jones (who I’m still silently thanking for clueing me in to 1989’s grotesque “The Cook, The Thief, His Wife & Her Lover”) to screen this 2015 drama from Thai writer and director Apichatpong Weerasethakul. Therein, a hospital volunteer tends to an ex-soldier with a sleeping syndrome, color takes on a range of layered meanings and ghostly magic seeps through the seams that separate the real world from its ethereal counterparts. (In case you were wondering, Ebert doted wildly on Weerasethakul for this one.) Our April screening of Jonathan Demme’s Talking Heads concert film “Stop Making Sense” sold out, so don’t sleep on this one. Tickets are at riverdale10.com. SS

BEERS & QUEERS ARGENTA PRIDE BLOCK PARTY: STONEWALL 50

SUNDAY 6/30, NOON-6 P.M. FLYWAY BREWING, 314 MAPLE ST., NORTH LITTLE ROCK. FREE. Almost 50 years to the day after the New York Police Department raided Stonewall Inn on Christopher Street in Manhattan’s West Village, Arkansas’s own LGBTQ community returns for a second year of “Beers & Queers,” the all-ages, kid-friendly, pet-friendly Pride celebration in North Little Rock’s Argenta Arts District. Rhiannon Cortez serves as master of ceremonies, and a variety of vendors will be on hand to remind us of a few things: that Argenta is cooler than the River Market; that Flyway Bluewing is the best local summer session beer forever and ever; and that the half-century struggle for the rights of queer and trans people is a landmark but not a finish line. SS

22 JUNE 2019

ARKANSAS TIMES

TED LUDWIG

THURSDAY 6/27, 7 P.M. THE JOINT THEATER & COFFEEHOUSE. $35. Jazz guitarist Ted Ludwig’s longtime stint playing in the corner of the Capital Hotel Bar with his illustrious trio was always sort of a head-scratcher to me. Jovial and gracious as Ludwig (above) always seemed to be about being relegated to background music, something seemed so wrong about those fingers flying across those seven strings while, inches away, smartly dressed travelers conjectured vociferously across the table settings, tempering martinis with crunchy house-made soda crackers and legendary pimento cheese. Maybe that’s too persnickety of me. After all, Ludwig’s a transplant from New Orleans, where it seems food and melody co-exist perpetually on every street corner. At any rate, here’s a chance to hear him in a room built for acoustic nuance and warmth (with a top-notch box dinner included in the ticket price) as Ludwig is next up in the storytelling series Potluck & Poison Ivy. See potluckandpoisonivy. org for tickets. SS


HOPE IS HERE Q

: My wife is rooted in her Christian faith. She and I attend church each Sunday and Wednesday, and we both have a strong relationship with God. My wife’s mother died just over a year ago, and since then she hasn’t been the same. She attempted suicide once, about four months ago. At the time, we visited with our pastor who has been consulting with her. Since the suicide attempt, I have found hidden bottles of alcohol both in our home and in her vehicle. Right now, I’m not sure the pastor is helping her and I’m afraid she may attempt suicide again. Can Rivendell help her?

A

: Rivendell of Arkansas has staff dedicated to walking patients and referring individuals through the entire admissions process, including scheduling a no-cost, in-person assessment at our facility or select locations

A psychiatric and behavioral health professional from Rivendell answers your questions

in the community (schools, community centers, courts, etc.). Our Mobile Assessment and Emergency Response Teams are trained and ready to respond to your specific needs and present the resources/options available. Our 30-to-60-minute assessments are done under the direction of clinical and medical leaders with a physician available by telephone to discuss any specific issues as necessary. Once admitted, a physician will conduct a psychiatric evaluation of the patient; taking into consideration social influences and stressors, education and physical health. The admitting physician will initiate a diagnosis in an emergent situation to stabilize any acute symptoms and continue assessing the patient for further psychiatric conditions throughout treatment. Each patient at Rivendell receives a personalized treatment plan to help get to the

root causes of their emotional and mental distress. Throughout their care, our staff utilizes various treatment modalities to help patients begin the healing process. Family involvement is a vital component of treatment. We encourage family and friends to participate in individual and group therapy, as necessary, to educate them on the dynamics of the patient’s mental issues and teach the skills to build healthy communication and conflict resolution strategies. Our treatment team works closely with our patients and their family (or referring professional) to develop an appropriate discharge and continuing care plan that sets up patients for success as they continue their recovery journey. The continuing care plan may include a referral to a continuing care group, community-based support group, recovery residence or outpatient therapy.  n

Taking the NEXT STEP...

Peace of mind for your family INPATIENT CARE

DAY TREATMENT

• No Cost Confidential Assessments • 24 Hour Emergency Admissions • Psychiatric Evaluation & Physician Supervised Stabilization • Substance Abuse Detox Program • Counseling & Education • 4 Group Sessions per Day • On Site AA/NA Support • Friend & Family Visitation • Discharge Planning

• Monday-Friday 9am-2:30pm • 5 Hours Therapy In Day Treatment • Medication Management by Team Psychiatrist • Lunch & Refreshments included • Recreational Activities • Guided Journaling • Life Skills Seminar • Individual Case Management & Aftercare Plan • Transportation Available to Neighboring Cities Call TODAY. We • Referrals for Follow Up Support Confidential Asses available 24/7 at no

Detox & Acute Psychiatric Care Inpatient Hospitalization for Adults and Children

1-800-264-5640 www.rivendellofarkansas.com Fax: 501-794-4277

Partial Hospitalization & Recovery 2 Week Day Program for Adults (Insurance/Private Pay)

The Joint Comm on Key Quality M

100 Rivendell Dr. - Benton, AR 72019

SPECIAL ADVERTISING CONTENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES


Come see our new expanded showroom, just a few doors west of our old location!

C&F Flooring and Rug Gallery

2322 Cantrell Rd (in front of Cajun’s Wharf) Little Rock, AR • 501.399.9909 • www.candfcarpet.com

24 JUNE 2019

ARKANSAS TIMES


NEWS & POLITICS SCHOOLS FOR OUR PUBLIC: The Republicans’ constitution of 1868 guaranteed equal education for all. The Republicans of today tried, but failed, to threaten that guarantee.

Equal Education in Peril IT’S ABOUT RACE, STILL.

S

By ERNEST DUMAS ure, the legislature, in concert with the governor, for the first time in its 200-year history shifted a substantial part of the Arkansas tax burden from the well-to-do and corporations to the lower classes during the last legislative session, but didn’t the lawmakers also do something for the suffering masses? Good question. Yes, they did, sort of. The Republican assembly didn’t do too much harm to Arkansas’s system of universal, free public education, the cherished legacy of the great Republican Party of the 19th century. When the legislators were in the final stage of their labors in March, I lamented that they were about to pass two bills that mocked the party’s great mandate — inserted into the Arkansas Constitution in 1868 after the war that ended slavery — that the state was duty-bound to provide a free and equal education in public schools for every child, black or white, rich or poor, without favor for any child or family. Governor Hutchinson offered one of those bills, which would have pumped $17.5 million of the taxpayers’ money for the public schools into a five-year scheme to pay for kids in Little Rock and the other three districts in the Pulaski County to leave pub-

lic schools and go to nearly all-white private schools. The governor’s nephew and the Senate president pro tempore, Jim Hendren, had a bill to spend another $3 million a year to send kids to private schools outside Pulaski County, to be expanded, like the governor’s plan, if it proved to be popular. Shockingly, for whatever reason, neither bill mustered enough votes to pass. A handful of Republicans joined the little contingent of Democrats in the legislature in voting against the bills or else abstaining from voting. I prefer to think that the dissident Republicans were honoring the party’s greatest cause. When the GOP ran Arkansas for a time after the Civil War, it adopted a constitution that singled out only one thing that the state was bound to spend money on: a good public school education for every child, including the recent slave children. Here is how the education section began: “A general diffusion of knowledge and intelligence among all classes, being essential to the preservation of the rights and liberties of the people, the General Assembly shall establish and maintain a system of free schools, for the gratuitous instruction of all persons in this State between the ages of five and twen-

ty-one years, and the funds appropriated for the support of common schools shall be distributed to the several counties, in proportion to the number of children and youths therein between the ages of five and twenty-one years … but no religious or other sect or sects [read: private interests] shall ever have any exclusive right to or control of any part of the school funds of this State.” It meant little. The Redeemers, conservative Democrats, soon regained power when Reconstruction ended, watered down the education article in the 1874 Constitution and then rendered it meaningless by creating a public school system that basically educated white kids, particularly those who were lucky enough to live in a school district with lots of taxable property wealth. I was lucky enough in my latter school years to go to those schools, but not my black neighbors. Now, the rage is not universal equality but something called “choice” — no, not for impregnated girls, but for parents who want their children going to school with a better class of kids and where school-average test scores supply a better graphic for their child’s learning. Choice now entails using school funds to operate charter schools that typiARKANSASTIMES.COM

JUNE 2019 25


BRIAN CHILSON

TOWER UP.

NO HELP HERE FOR PRE-K: Lawmakers instead have focused on so-called “choice” issues.

Leasing information: Bill Pendergist, SIOR 425 W. Capitol Ave., Suite 300 Little Rock | 501.375.3200

26 JUNE 2019

ARKANSAS TIMES

cally draw white kids out of majority-black schools or those with a high quotient of poor kids, pay private-school tuition, or else allow parents with the wherewithal to do it to take their kids out of interracial city schools and put them in neighboring school districts with majority white enrollments, where they are supposed to get a better education. It is not a new idea. After the Little Rock school crisis in 1957 proved that schools were indeed going to have to integrate, most Southern states, including Arkansas, adopted a version of North Carolina’s “pupilassignment law,” which eliminated statutory references to race and gave all parents the choice of applying to have their kids enrolled in schools other than those to which they were ordinarily assigned. The only applicants, of course, would be blacks wanting to go to white schools. School officials could use a set of factors to determine who was allowed to transfer to the white schools. One could be the impact of the transfer on the classroom learning environment. Few blacks were approved. But the courts said no, the law requires you to integrate, the only way to assure some measure of equality. The premise of the charter-school and choice movements is that public schools are just somehow genetically flawed. The common theories are that public school teachers are sorrier because they are protected by teachers unions or confounded by government rules imposed as a requirement for getting federal aid for schooling disadvantaged youngsters. In Arkansas, the chief advocate of charter schools is the Walton family, which considers unions a threat to capitalism. Walmart closes stores if employees vote for union representation. Another editorial the other day in the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette cheered the wonderful charter schools, derogated public schools and answered a letter writer’s query about exactly why public schools were so bad and charter schools so good.

First, the editorial said, it’s teachers unions, which intimidate administrators in the public schools so much that they won’t terminate sorry teachers or make them do better and, second, mountains of silly government regulations make it hard for teachers to be good. What teachers unions? Of Arkansas’s 269 school districts, exactly one, Little Rock, has a union that engages in contract bargaining, though it’s done only a little of that since the state Education Department for the fifth year in a row runs the city’s school system. The union has never had the slightest control over firing or disciplining teachers. Administrators can terminate teachers whenever they have a case, which can be their failure to perform. The weakest link in the public schools is administrators, who too often are people who were desperate for relief from the burnout of teaching all day. As for all those regulations that are keeping teachers from being good ones, it is mere legend. Teaching is very hard work, especially when your classroom has a high quotient of kids with physical and mental disabilities or those from poor households that provide less cultural or mental preparation for school. The legislature and the governor this year might have helped those choiceless kids and parents by appropriating money for pre-kindergarten schooling, which has a history of working. Give them a D- for underperformance. The Walton-owned education college at Fayetteville last month produced another of its studies showing the superiority of charter schools over public schools. Nearly every example it cites reflects the class and race of the student body, although the scholars who produce the studies never cite those figures. When they insist that choice is not about race or class, you can be sure that it is about race and class.


ARKANSASTIMES.COM

JUNE 2019 27


28 JUNE 2019

ARKANSAS TIMES


SACRED SOUND: Jason Weinheimer’s Lester upright piano came from a Baptist church. Also on display: a 1960s Harmony guitar, a 1950s Kay and a new Duesenberg.

By LINDSEY MILLAR Photography by MATTHEW MARTIN

ARKANSASTIMES.COM

JUNE 2019 29


30 JUNE 2019

ARKANSAS TIMES


BEHIND THE BOARD: Jason Weinheimer (below, left) records local and national musicians on a recording console once owned by Tom Dowd, on which he’s resting his arm. Dowd was a famed producer/engineer at Atlantic Records. Weinheimer and his wife, Indy Grotto, led the band The Boondogs for more than a decade. They’re now at work on a Grotto solo album. Weinheimer now records his own music as The Libras and expects to cut a new record in the fall. He’s also recently played bass in Allison Moorer’s and Shelby Lynne’s touring band.

L

ittle Rock’s Fellowship Hall Sound is many things, but first and foremost it’s a recording studio, where Jason Weinheimer has been recording, engineering and producing a wide variety of rock ’n’ roll records since 2007. At least two of them, Tulsa singer/songwriter John Moreland’s “Big Bad Luv” and Little Rock hard-rock act Pallbearer’s “Heartless,” have gotten national acclaim. Many have been big deals locally and regionally, among them: Bonnie Montgomery’s self-titled debut album, John Willis’ “King of the Cocktail Party” and “Bad Boyfriend,” Jesse Aycock’s “Flowers & Wounds” and Jim Mize’s self-titled album. The Hillcrest studio takes its name from its former life as gathering place for the youth congregants of the nearby Presbyterian church that rents Weinheimer the building. But it’s also a fitting name for a space that doubles as a clubhouse of sorts where friends and frequent musical collaborators hang out, work and hoard. The spacious studio and adjoining control room, which takes up the entire first floor, is Weinheimer’s domain. Upstairs, Greg Spradlin, Isaac Alexander and Zach Reeves each rent a large room. Spradlin, a Southern rocker and one of the

state’s most skilled guitarists, runs his consulting business from his studio — sometimes with guitar in hand. He and his wife, Robyn Friday, also have a video production business, Camp Friday Films (it’s done work for the Arkansas Times). Alexander, one of the most prolific and beloved singer/songwriters in Arkansas, works as a graphic designer and co-owns the Eric Rob & Isaac ad agency. He uses his room to work on his music and do his own design work (he’s long been the go-to for promo posters for local shows). Weinheimer asked Reeves to help engineer during Pallbearer’s weeks-long session for “Heartless” in 2016 and, after that wrapped, encouraged him to take an upstairs room. Reeves is something of a Renaissance man. He’s a talented multi-instrumentalist, and regularly engineers and does session work at Fellowship Hall. He has a woodworking business, building cabinets, furniture and cases for clients, including the Historic Arkansas Museum. He assists his wife, Sara Blancett Reeves, in her professional photography work. He builds canvases for and does painting collaborations with artist John Kushmaul. For Fellowship Hall and his own enjoyment, ARKANSASTIMES.COM

JUNE 2019 31


THE PRIDE OF PANGBURN: Many regard Greg Spradlin as the best rock ’n’ roll guitarist in the state. In 2012, he recorded an album’s worth of material as Greg Spradlin and the Band of Imperials, a group that included David Hidalgo (Los Lobos) and longtime Elvis Costello drummer Pete Thomas. We’ve still got our fingers crossed that someday that lineup will play a secret White Water Tavern show. You can hear and buy samplings from that session at gregspradlinoutfit.bandcamp.com. 32 JUNE 2019

ARKANSAS TIMES


THE TECH: Zach Reeves, identifying a tube rectifier for an amplifier circuit, is Fellowship Hall Sound’s in-house repairman. For fun, he likes tinkering with synthesizers/keyboards and drum machine/rhythm makers. For the studio, he’s usually working on amplifiers and tape machines.

ARKANSASTIMES.COM

JUNE 2019 33


34 JUNE 2019

ARKANSAS TIMES


STARS, BARS AND GUITARS: Isaac Alexander is a multi-talent. He illustrates and designs. He plays guitar, drums (a little) and keys (that’s his 1968 “Jetson Model” Fender Rhodes piano above). And he writes and sings widely beloved songs. In 2010, musicians, critics and others in the know voted his 2008 solo album “See Thru Me” No. 6 in the Arkansas Times’ all-time Arkansas Music Poll. Look for a new solo record this summer.

he’s the in-house technician, repairing all the vintage equipment that he and the rest of the guys can’t resist buying from pawnshops and off Craigslist, much of which comes in broken. His most celebrated fix — at least among the Fellowship Hall crew: A 12-channel recording console that was built for Atlantic Records in 1968, used for a time by legendary engineer/producer Tom Dowd (Aretha

Franklin, Charles Mingus, Willie Nelson), sold to a short-lived Memphis studio and traded to a Memphis pawn shop for a truck before it was discovered a decade ago by Mississippi producer and record label head Bruce Watson (Big Legal Mess, Fat Possum), who pointed Weinheimer to it. He carried it around various spaces for a decade as a conversation piece until Reeves figured out how to repair it last year. ARKANSASTIMES.COM

JUNE 2019 35


HAT WOMAN HERRON By LESLIE NEWELL PEACOCK Photography by BRIAN CHILSON 36 JUNE 2019

ARKANSAS TIMES


MARKIA HERRON: Her handmade hat business has “gotten real.”

H

atman Jack’s owner Jack Kellogg in Wichita, Kan., may have seen something in Markia Herron when she told him she wanted to apprentice there to learn the trade. He told her, “Whatever you do, don’t make them in Kansas,” Herron told a reporter recently. The “Hatman to the Stars” apparently didn’t want the competition. Now, Herron, 31, who’s been making hats for the three years since her visit to Hatman Jack’s, is thinking of sending Kellogg one of her fedoras to thank him for what she learned from her four-hour tour (he declined to make her an apprentice) there. When he gets a hat he’ll be in company with soul singer-songwriter Anthony Hamilton, Emmy winner Lena Waithe (“Master of None,” “The Chi”), Carolina Panthers wide receiver and former Razorback Jarius Wright, Cedric the Entertainer and the other admirers of the young hatmaker from Monticello. So, yeah, Jack Kellogg is a white guy from Wichita. But Herron, an energetic businesswoman who also holds down a fulltime job at UA Little Rock, says her hats are for everyone, black or white, man or woman. (In fact, the fedora was popularized by Sarah Bernhardt in the 1880s and worn by women activists.) Herron is an instructional designer, a tech job in which she adapts academic courses to online teaching. But unlike her tech work, she is embracing what she calls a dying art

by making hats by hand, an ageold process that involves forming rabbit and beaver felt over wooden molds, pressing with a steamer, cutting and sewing. Working out of a small studio in the Gans Building downtown, she customizes hats in various ways: lining the rims with printed fabric, distressing them, using ribbons or bandanas for bands, tucking in feathers or safety pins. Some are splattered with paint; the crowns are open, pork pie or teardrop. She says they’re “quality hats” that will last a lifetime with good care. Which is why they run upward of $400; trims add another $100. Herron said her business has “gotten real,” taking off midway through 2018 thanks to social media, which is how she advertises, and the support of a lot of local people. With the help of her sister, she makes about 10 hats a month and wants to crank that up to 20. She’s designing a summer line that will include straw hats and working on the fall line, which she hopes will include wool, a material that requires more expensive equipment to fashion. She’s searching for a storefront where she can show her hats; to buy a hat now, she takes orders by email at the contact link on her website, herronhats.com. She also hopes to figure out a way to make hats “for the masses,” coming in around $200. Recently, someone told Herron that Tyler Perry had been talking about her hats. “I know my hats are major. I know they are a big thing. So that’s why I’m going to keep going with it.” ARKANSASTIMES.COM

JUNE 2019 37


‘NOWARA’ MEANS ‘FLOWER’: Nora Bouzihay said wearing the hijab gave her a “different sense of beauty.”

NOWARA CO. SCARVES ARE FOR ALL By REBEKAH HALL Photography by BRIAN CHILSON 38 JUNE 2019

ARKANSAS TIMES


W

hen Nora Bouzihay launched Nowara Co., the first Arkansas-based hijab and scarf company, in March 2018, she said she did so to honor her late grandmother, who had nicknamed her “nowara” as a child. Bouzihay, 25, said the word means “flower” in Arabic, and her grandmother used the term of endearment to encourage Bouzihay to “blossom into a flower and inspire young women and girls to be something in life.” Bouzihay said Nowara Co.’s mission is to empower women and girls by providing them high-quality scarves they can wear in multiple ways, with emphasis on women being able to choose how they do so. For some, this can mean wearing the scarf in the hijab style, with the scarf wrapped around the head to conceal or partially cover hair, and for others the scarf is a purely stylish choice — one entirely separate from religion. “When [my grandmother] passed away in 2017, I was wondering, ‘How can I keep her legacy going? How do I inspire young women and girls?’ ” Bouzihay said. “And [after] I got my master’s [degree], I thought, ‘Let me bring women and girls together through scarves, empower them through scarves, because women and girls wear them in all kinds of ways.’” In the year since its launch, Nowara Co. has sold scarves at pop-up shops, festivals and markets; through its online shop, the company has received orders from Abu Dhabi, Dubai; Germany; Spain; and Canada. Bouzihay said the scarves are handmade by a vendor in China and then shipped to her home in Jonesboro, where she then sews Nowara Co.’s tags onto the scarves, packages them and sends them out to customers. Nowara Co.’s selection includes several different shades of jersey and chiffon scarves, as well as a grid-patterned viscose collection. Scarves are priced between $10-$20 and arrive packaged in a small reusable drawstring bag. The company’s Instagram account features models wearing the scarves as hair wraps, headbands, turbans, around their necks and in the hijab style. In February, Nowara Co. was selected as a participant in Momentum, a five-week small business accelerator program hosted by Remix Ideas and the Arkansas Women’s Business Center, a part of Winrock International. In March, the company hosted a fundraising gala at the Clinton Presidential Center in collaboration with the authors of “Muslims of the World,” a book based on the popular

Instagram account that shares stories of Muslims living in the U.S. and around the world. Bouzihay, whose family immigrated to the United States from Morocco, said her Muslim and Moroccan heritage, as well as her international travels, have inspired her to ensure Nowara Co.’s mission reaches women and girls around the globe. For every three scarves purchased, one scarf will be donated to a refugee. Bouzihay added that she plans on delivering those scarves herself when she visits a Rohingya Muslim refugee camp in Bangladesh later this year.

women wear scarves, as well as the different meanings behind the garment. Bouzihay said the scarf means something different to every individual who wears it, including those who wear it for nonreligious reasons. “When I [first] wore the scarf, there was a different sense of beauty that came with it,” Bouzihay said. “I never felt [that] confident in my life until I wore a scarf. And some people see me selling them and [think,] ‘It’s a religious thing.’ So it’s redefining what a scarf means, because people wear it in different ways and feel beautiful in [their own] way.”

FOR EVERY THREE SCARVES PURCHASED, ONE SCARF WILL BE DONATED TO A ROHINGYA MUSLIM REFUGEE ON THE BANGLADESH BORDER. “[Nowara Co.’s mission] is beautiful now, and to give a scarf to someone in need is even more beautiful,” Bouzihay said. “That women are coming together to help that cause has been a blessing, for sure. You have to have meaning behind everything. And the meaning is going to connect with your customers. … When you’re genuine, people know that. They recognize that.” Bouzihay said that while she wants Nowara Co. to empower all women and girls, she places special emphasis on being a positive example for young Muslim women. “One thing that I always want to do is to be a role model for young girls, especially young girls that come from my background,” Bouzihay said. “I can say, ‘Hey, I’ve done it, you can do it, too.’ Sometimes [representation] is missing in the media. Now it’s slowly becoming more known, but [I want] to give them that example. You can do something with your life. You can be whatever you want to be. You’ve just got to have faith.” Bouzihay, who began wearing her hijab in 2016, said she hopes the diversity of Nowara Co.’s models and customers will help people understand the multiple ways men and

Wearing the hijab can make her a “walking target” for harassment, Bouzihay said. She’s found it takes “a whole different type of strength” to wear the scarf, and it makes her “even more proud to represent myself in that capacity.” Bouzihay said she is the first woman in her family to graduate from high school. She holds a master’s degree from the Clinton School of Public Service and is a doctoral student in education at UA Little Rock. Bouzihay said her access to education is not something she takes for granted. “My high school diploma was for me, my undergrad diploma was for my mom, my master’s degree was for my grandmother, but my doctorate degree is for everybody that wasn’t able to have an education,” Bouzihay said. “My whole family that wasn’t able to do it — it’s not for me, it’s for them. … Because they can’t, I did it for them.” Bouzihay said she’s finished with her coursework for her doctorate, so she’s now studying for her qualifying exams and beginning her dissertation. She hopes to continue to grow and expand Nowara Co.’s operations by attending more festivals and doing more out-of-state travel with her products.

ARKANSASTIMES.COM

JUNE 2019 39


WORKING IN A POST-FIRE PALETTE: Bruce Davis with his new collection, “Rebirth.”

LIKE A PHOENIX By FREDERICK MCKINDRA Photography by BRIAN CHILSON

40 JUNE 2019

ARKANSAS TIMES


B

efore the Jan. 3 apartment fire that claimed Bruce Davis’ home, design studio and the entire closet of past collections for his budding unisex streetwear label 22nd Element, he’d already settled on “Rebirth” as the theme for his fall 2019 collection. He didn’t know how prescient the name was. Plans for moving his back catalog to a retail storefront had been in the works, but the blaze that claimed eight units at the Sturbridge Townhouses in Little Rock gave no regard to these plans. Davis had shown nerve morphing himself from sartorial sore thumb — a dandified 16-year-old public school student with a penchant for wearing blazers — to freelance stylist for hire while still a student at Hall High School. Now, the flames licked at his unit with an unkind indifference to the buzz surrounding the burgeoning 26-year-old designer. Whatever he could salvage of his dream from the wreckage, the clothes and patterns and sketches, the fabrics and the machine, were all gone. In the four months since that catastrophe, he’s managed to compose a collection that features a more muted color palette than a typical story involving fire would suggest. The fire is still there. It’s just that for Davis, it exists as a part of a larger narrative, before and after the flames. The collection moves from blank white canvas vests, through gold and orange and angry red shirts, gets extinguished by sporadic touches of cool blue, then lands with darker brown and black tops and pants, earth tones that evoke soot. One of 14 children, Davis and his family moved frequently to accommodate his father’s work as an electronic engineer. A member of the Nation of Islam, Davis’ father made an early impression on the budding designer, normalizing formal wear as daily habit. From Chicago, the family moved east before circling back to the Midwest and landing in Olathe, Kan. By then, he’d learned to adapt, and in Olathe that meant taking up skateboarding. “It was one of those things we did for the demographic. It was a big culture shock, from Chicago, New York, New Jersey. Then I moved to Kansas. Everybody skateboarded. I got into it. And it brought so many backgrounds together.” He eventually earned sponsorship, and Davis was thus inducted into the world of skate company merchandising. The products he received to represent skate brands helped the designer take an early interest in clothes. Free clothes will do that to a teen, a likely reason so many former skaters have their own clothing brands. Skater culture also exposed Davis to disparate lifestyles and the distinct styles that came with them. Devising new skateboard tricks stoked his habit of making. The family’s next move brought Davis to Little Rock, where his iteration of prep en-

countered Little Rock’s own legacy with polos and jeans. His classmates had some trouble distinguishing him from their teachers. “They weren’t used to it. The craze at the time was polos with Levi’s jeans, rubber banded at the bottom so the dye wouldn’t stain their Air Forces. They saw me coming in and were like, ‘Is he a professor?’ I carried a briefcase, wore V-necks with blazers and tapered jeans. Of course that attracted women, also guys. But I was like, ‘This is me.’ Some people loved it. Some people hated it. Some people thought I was trying too hard. But that was high school.” Though his family moved again after his senior year, Davis decided to stay on in Little Rock to take advantage of in-state college tuition costs. He enrolled at UA Little Rock, where he majored in biology, a concession to his father, who dreamed of having a doctor in the family. While preparing to attend a wedding in 2015, unsatisfied with his options to fit the event’s theme, Davis made his own bowtie. The accessory drew raves and he resolved to take making clothes more seriously. The brand label came to him in a chemistry class — titanium, the 22nd element, a strong, lustrous metal. Making strong, lustrous accessories for an affordable price was his goal. Once he’d grown his accessories business to include a covetable inventory of bowties, skinny ties and clutches, Davis decided to brave the next step: apparel. He began by cutting patterns from items he bought secondhand at Goodwill and deconstructed. Past 22nd Element collections have showcased Davis’ ability to craft a coherent message and communicate it through themed variations. “I feel like every piece of clothing I make should have a meaning. The fashion world has become so saturated, everybody wants to look alike and there’s no gumption to what designers are making. So I really want to have a message behind everything

I make. Each collection I’ve made has paid homage to a certain group.” Davis doesn’t cower from investing his work with political significance. Fall 2018 referenced the Tuskegee Airmen: Davis juxtaposed the crimson, maroons, creams and golds of the Tuskegee Institute with the olive gray and khaki of the Airmen. The resulting collegiate, prep aesthetic reinvigorated a motif black Little Rockians have been exploring since the early ’90s, when brands like Tommy Hilfiger and Polo Ralph Lauren dominated the black streetwear landscape. As to his taste for this prep sensibility and what has made it such a resilient signifier for black streetwear designers, Davis said, “I think it’s the cleanliness of the lines when it comes to preppiness. The tailoring, it just seems ... acceptable, appropriate. The cleanliness of the lines says so much about a person.” But newer themes assert themselves in “Rebirth.” This season, his jackets — especially a quilted denim jacket that when paired with pants becomes a jumpsuit — play with volume. The clothes resemble comfort items, billowy blankets that surround the wearer, a poignant theme for Davis as he recovers from the trauma of the fire. Using comfortable materials to create a spacious silhouette showcases a softening in Davis. The collection’s use of tactical elements (vests, mesh, flak jackets) aligns with contemporary themes in streetwear, but the silhouette of the clothes is not fitted. Where once his prep formality appeared more rigid, the roominess of “Rebirth” evokes a calm solace throughout — a reminder to be gentle with ourselves and an invocation of another R-word, “resilience.” Davis has also threaded what he calls “structured chaos” throughout the collection, where observers will find unfinished edges and pops of color from cutouts pieced across color fields that feel warm, though not aflame. A profusion of pockets on the front of the clothes suggests the designer was thinking of mobility, maintaining the ability to flee whenever necessary, and thus of the necessity of carrying supplies on one’s person. Buckle enclosures and harnesses throughout also evoke the idea of safety, of things being strapped or tucked in, clung to. Davis’ rebirth will begin in another Sturbridge Townhouse unit, mere feet from the site where his previous one burned. But he’s sowing seeds in Central Arkansas that will aid in redeveloping his label — mentoring aspiring designers, facilitating a free sewing class for a local high school student who expressed interest in design. He knows that representation matters for the next generation of local designers. “With me getting the opportunity to express myself through fashion and inspire people that are younger than me, that are coming up and wanting to do this, it means everything to me,” he said. ARKANSASTIMES.COM

JUNE 2019 41


STREET STYLE

Snapshots of Little Rock’s best-dressed. Photography by BRIAN CHILSON There’s a fleeting, glorious window of time in Arkansas, after what Farmers’ Almanac devotees call the “blackberry winter” but just before the face-melting blaze of 10,000 suns begins its summertime tyranny. That time is now. We toasted the mild climes of spring by asking some of our favorite Little Rock fashionistas to don their beloved springtime duds and soundtrack their personal style with a theme song.

ALAN “DISASTER” WILKINS

Cook, rock ’n’ roller WARDROBE: “Red Dwarf” T-shirt, Swiss paratrooper bag from Bennett’s Military Supplies (RIP), Onitsuka Tiger shoes from Rock City Kicks, Iron Maiden belt buckle. STYLE SOUNDTRACK: Weird Al, “White and Nerdy.”

DAZZMIN MURRY

MELISSA VALENZUELA

Stylist WARDROBE: Skirt from White House Black Market, shoes by Nike Vandal 2K LXX, vintage thrift store bag and top. STYLE SOUNDTRACK: Janelle Monáe, “I Like That.”

42 JUNE 2019

ARKANSAS TIMES

Musician, producer WARDROBE: Hair and makeup by Yosh Howard, faux gold lions ring from T.J. Maxx (“because I’m a Leo,” Murry says), faux Cartier bracelet from a street vendor in Chinatown, watch by Michael Kors, “custom Goodwill” sequin jacket borrowed from bandmate Kabrelyn “Brie” Boyce, leather pants by Zara, shoes by Forever 21. STYLE SOUNDTRACK: Dazz and Brie, “Paranoia” (as it’s “kinda sporadic. There’s a little bit of everything in there”).


JOE LAMPO AND TERRY JEFFERSON

BELA RODGERS

Student, eStem Downtown Elementary School Wardrobe: Jacket and skirt from vendor at Midtown Vintage Market, button-up shirt from H&M, socks from Grandma, kazoo by Blue, checkered kicks by Vans in a blurry pattern (“I don’t even see it anymore. Is that a bad thing?”) Style soundtrack: Current Joys, “Fear.”

Fundraiser (Joe) and physician (Terry) WARDROBE: (Joe) Shoes by Ralph Lauren, slacks and checkered pink shirt by J. Crew, green print tie by Tommy Hilfiger. (Terry) Shoes by Cole Haan, shirt and slacks by J. Crew. STYLE SOUNDTRACKS: (Terry) Rodgers & Hammerstein, “Oh, What A Beautiful Mornin.’ ” (Joe) Cole Porter, “Anything Goes.”

SARAH STRICKLIN

DEREK BROOKS

Validation engineer WARDROBE: Hyperion shirt in mustard by Glitch Gear, jeans by Calvin Klein, custom-fit “Gazelle” shoes by Adidas, Uruguay soccer track jacket by Puma. STYLE SOUNDTRACK: A Tribe Called Quest, “Electric Relaxation.”

General manager, Arkansas Repertory Theatre WARDROBE: Navy knit top from Crying Weasel Vintage, hair by Southern Blonde & Co., earrings from Midtown Vintage Market (a cherished source that Stricklin hesitated to disclose), square button-frame rings from a dress Stricklin’s mother made in high school, black Levi’s and Clarks shoes. STYLE SOUNDTRACK: Dolly Parton’s album “Heartbreaker.” (“Not because of the title, but because of the sound.”)

ARKANSASTIMES.COM

JUNE 2019 43


AN OLD-WORLD TOUCH FOR NEW-WORLD WALLS By CAROLINE MILLAR Photography by KAT WILSON 44 JUNE 2019

ARKANSAS TIMES


DINING AL FRESCO: DeBari painted an atmospheric landscape in her own dining room.

F

rustrated by the small size of the dining room in her historic home, Fayetteville interior designer Jessica DeBari decided to open it up with a landscape mural. A classically trained portrait painter, DeBari drew inspiration from a trip she took to Kyoto, Japan, several years ago, where she saw an exhibition by 18th-19th century artist Katsushika Hokusai. “He did these beautiful, very large-scale screens of trees in the mist, and animals in the mist ... it was so gorgeous and so simple,” she said. Hokusai’s art changed how DeBari approached mural painting: “I felt like it was a big challenge to figure out how to paint so simply but beautifully.” She thought a lot about using a light hand. “Murals can be overwhelming if they’re over-painted,” she said. “You have to be loose and light. Kind of like [Hokusai’s] screens.” For her own trees-in-the mist, DeBari returned to the elements of an English landscape from her fine art background, but brushed them in an “extremely light, Eastern way.” Upon see-

ing the “new” dining room, DeBari said friends and family told her the room felt doubled in size. DeBari, 37, infused a similar but subtler landscape of mountains as the backdrop for her son’s bedroom mural. In this sleepy-boy dream world, the Iron Giant (from the animated film of the same name), a massive ship with white sails and a rocket ship weightlessly drift and bounce off the room’s baseboards and doorways in a scheme of neutral tones so finely textured that the room almost feels alive. Using a restoration technique she learned while in New York, DeBari first treated the walls with a special type of French plaster with specks of reflective metals in it, which became the basis of her work. “I tried to make the color palette inconspicuous to the wall color,” she said. “I kept mixing the wall back into all the paints that I put on it, so that nothing ever varied dramatically, from lightness to darkness.” After living on the East Coast for several years, DeBari returned to her native ARKANSASTIMES.COM

JUNE 2019 45


ADDING AN OLD-WORLD FEEL: DeBari, who is also a portrait painter, was inspired by Japanese art.

DeBARI NEVER PAINTS OUT OF A STORE-BOUGHT CAN. 46 JUNE 2019

ARKANSAS TIMES


BEDROOM FANTASY: DeBari (below) painted a dreamy ship at sea and the Iron Giant character from the movie of the same name in her son’s room. When he first saw the bedroom mural, he said, “I don’t ever want to leave this room.”

Northwest Arkansas with her husband in 2014, and in 2017 started DeBari Home, an interior design and home decor company. Her educational background (she studied in Italy for her master’s in fine art), combined with years of restoration work with decorative painting companies in Washington, D.C., and New York, helped her develop the techniques and keen eye needed to create high-end interiors with an old-world feel. Working on custom jobs in Manhattan for designers like Thomas Pheasant and Darryl Carter, DeBari became accustomed to mixing paint colors by hand, curating a color palette that would work with every aspect of an interior, from the glaze on a piece of antique furniture, to ornate chinoiserie, or reflective brass finishes on lighting fixtures. “You know, the type of work you do for billionaire clients,” she said. DeBari still takes the same approach. She never paints straight out of a store-bought can. “I tend to be a little pickier about colors than most people because of my art background and because it was my job for many years with decorative painting studios to custom-mix colors that would perfectly coordinate with everything that somebody had in their room,” she said. “I thought if I could do that for billionaires, I could do it for myself for free, and for my clients on a lower budget.” ARKANSASTIMES.COM

JUNE 2019 47


Rhea Drug Store

A traditional Pharmacy with Eclectic Gifts Serving Little Rock since 1922 2801 Kavanaugh Little Rock 501.663.4131

M USIC IN J UNE IN A RGENTA !

CONGRATS

Dr. J.D.

Allen

June 10: Tony Dagradi

One of the Best Doctors in Arkansas Orthopaedic Surgery & Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery

w w w . a rg e n ta a c o u s t i c . c o m

We’re proud to have you on our team!

w w w . j a z za t t h e j o i n t . o rg

June 20: Travis Bowman and Kevin Blake Goodwin Contact: Steve Davison

s

501.425.1528

s

steve@stevedavison.com

LITTLE ROCK’S LEADING PEST CONTROL EXPERTS FOR OVER 25 YEARS WRMC ORTHOPAEDIC & SPORTS MEDICINE CLINIC

Batesville, AR | (870) 793-2371

Time to treat for spring pests: termites, ants, spiders, cockroaches, fleas & ticks. FREE PEST CONTROL ESTIMATE Call Today! (501)753-2727 • www.arkansaspest.com

LITTLE ROCK’S INDEPENDENT BOOKSTORE!

“A cozy, carefully arranged shop manned by a staff of bibliophiles quick with help or suggestions — it’s the last of its kind in Central Arkansas. “ — Arkansas Times

Open 10 AM - 6 PM Monday - Saturday, 12-5 PM Sunday 5920 R St, Little Rock • 501-663-9198 • www.wordsworthbookstore.com 48 JUNE 2019

ARKANSAS TIMES


BEST DOCTORS IN ARKANSAS

Founded in 1989 by Harvard Medical School physicians, Best Doctors is a global benefits provider and medical information services company that connects individuals facing difficult medical treatment decisions with the best doctors, selected by impartial peer review in over 450 medical specialty/subspecialty combinations, to review their diagnosis and treatment plans. Best Doctors’ team of researchers conducts a biennial poll using the methodology that mimics the informal peer-to-peer process doctors themselves use to identify the right specialists for their patients. Using a polling method and proprietary balloting software, they gather the insight and experience of tens of thousands of leading specialists all over the country, while confirming their credentials and specific areas of expertise. The result is the Best Doctors in America® List, which includes the nation’s most respected specialists and outstanding primary care physicians in the nation. These are the doctors that other doctors recognize as the best in their fields. They cannot pay a fee and are not paid to be listed and cannot nominate or vote for themselves. It is a list which is truly unbiased and respected by the medical profession and patients alike as the source of top quality medical information.

Best Doctors is part of Teladoc Health, the global leader in virtual care delivering a powerful connected care platform – a single solution for addressing a complete spectrum of medical conditions. Through Teladoc Health’s global footprint of 50,000 medical experts, employers, health plans, and health systems have a comprehensive solution for patients to seek resolution across a wide spectrum of needs with convenient access in the U.S. and around the globe. As part of Teladoc Health, Best Doctors focuses on improving health outcomes for the most complex, critical and costly medical issues. More than a traditional second opinion, Best Doctors delivers a comprehensive evaluation of a patient’s medical condition – providing value to both patients and treating physicians. By utilizing Best Doctors, members have access to the brightest minds in medicine to ensure the right diagnosis and treatment plan. Through its global network of Best Doctors and other critical services, Teladoc Heatlh is expanding access to high quality healthcare, lowering costs and improving outcomes around the world. The company’s award winning, integrated clinical solutions are inclusive of telehealth, expert medical opinions, AI and analytics, and licensed platform services.

“Best Doctors, Inc., has used its best efforts in assembling material for this list, but does not warrant that the information contained herein is complete or accurate, and does not assume, and hereby disclaims, any liability to any person or other party for any loss or damage caused by errors or omissions herein, whether such errors or omissions result from negligence, accident, or any other cause.” BEST DOCTORS, THE BEST DOCTORS IN AMERICA, and the Star-in-Cross Logo are trademarks of Best Doctors, Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries, and are used under license. These lists are excerpted from The Best Doctors in America‰2019-2020 database, which includes close to 40,000 U.S. doctors in more than 450 medical specialty/subspecialty combinations. The Best Doctors in America‰database is compiled and maintained by Best Doctors, Inc. For more information, visit www.bestdoctors.com or contact Best Doctors by telephone at 800-675-1199 or by e-mail at research@bestdoctors.com. Please note that lists of doctors are not available on the Best Doctors Web site.” Copyright 2019, Best Doctors, Inc. Used under license, all rights reserved. This list, or any parts thereof, must not be reproduced in any form without written permission from Best Doctors, Inc. No commercial use of the information in this list may be made without the permission of Best Doctors, Inc. No fees may be charged, directly or indirectly, for the use of the information in this list without permission. Best Doctors, Inc. is the only authorized source of the official Best Doctors in America® plaque and other recognition items. Best Doctors does not authorize, contract with or license any organization to sell recognition items for Best Doctors, Inc. Please contact Best Doctors at plaques@bestdoctors.com with any questions. For more information or to order visit usplaques.bestdoctors..com or call 617-963-1167.

UAMS

ARKANSAS CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL

CONWAY REGIONAL HOSPITAL

LITTLE ROCK ALLERGY AND ASTHMA CLINIC

ARKANSAS DERMATOLOGY

MEDEVCO

A Special Advertising Section

PREMIER GASTROENTEROLOGY

PINNACLE INTERNAL MEDICINE MARTIN ORTHOPEDICS ARKANSAS SURGICAL HOSPITAL

WHITE RIVER MEDICAL CENTER

ARKANSASTIMES.COM

JUNE 2019 49


ALLERGY AND IMMUNOLOGY JENNY CAMPBELL Hedberg Allergy & Asthma Center 700 S 52nd St Rogers, AR 72758 479-464-8887

ANESTHESIOLOGY ROBERT L. OVERACRE Baptist Health Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 9601 Baptist Health Dr Little Rock, AR 72205 501-227-8478

ALLERGY AND IMMUNOLOGY TERRY O. HARVILLE University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Pathology and Laboratory Services 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-526-7511

ANESTHESIOLOGY MICHAEL L. SCHMITZ Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Anesthesiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1100

ALLERGY AND IMMUNOLOGY CURTIS HEDBERG Hedberg Allergy & Asthma Center 700 S 52nd St Rogers, AR 72758 479-464-8887 ALLERGY AND IMMUNOLOGY STACIE M. JONES Arkansas Children’s Hospital Division of Allergy & Immunology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1060 ALLERGY AND IMMUNOLOGY AMY M. SCURLOCK Arkansas Children’s Hospital Division of Allergy & Immunology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000 ANESTHESIOLOGY INDRANIL CHAKRABORTY University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Anesthesiology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-6114 ANESTHESIOLOGY W. BROOKS GENTRY University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Anesthesiology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-320-7601 ANESTHESIOLOGY AHMED H. GHALEB Advanced Spine and Pain Centers 11220 Executive Center Dr, Ste 200 Little Rock, AR 72211 501-219-1114 ANESTHESIOLOGY STACY JONES University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Anesthesiology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-6114 ANESTHESIOLOGY VICTOR MANDOFF University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Anesthesiology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-6114 ANESTHESIOLOGY CHARLES A. NAPOLITANO University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Anesthesiology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-6114 50 JUNE 2019

ARKANSAS TIMES

CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE ZUBAIR AHMED Washington Regional Medical Center Walker Heart Institute Center for Health Services Bldg, Ste 110 3211 N Northhills Blvd Fayetteville, AR 72703 479-571-4338 CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE JOSEPH K. BISSETT Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System John L. McClellan Memorial Veterans Hospital Division of Cardiovascular Medicine 4300 W 7th St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-257-5795 CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE JON P. LINDEMANN Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System John L. McClellan Memorial Veterans Hospital Division of Cardiovascular Medicine 4300 W 7th St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-257-5916 CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE JAMES D. MARSH University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Cardiology Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 2nd Fl 4110 Outpatient Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-5311 CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE DAVID L. RUTLEN University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Cardiology Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 2nd Fl 4110 Outpatient Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-5311 CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE ALLISON M. SHAW-DEVINE University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Cardiology Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 2nd Fl 4110 Outpatient Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-5311 CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE EUGENE S. SMITH III Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System John L. McClellan Memorial Veterans Hospital Division of Cardiovascular Medicine 4300 W 7th St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-257-5866

CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE BARRY F. URETSKY University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Division of Cardiovascular Disease 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-257-6918 CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE SRIKANTH VALLURUPALLI University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Cardiology Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 2nd Fl 4110 Outpatient Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-5311 CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY LAURA P. JAMES Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Pharmacology and Toxicology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1418 COLON AND RECTAL SURGERY J. RALPH BROADWATER, JR. University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute Surgery Clinic 4018 W Capitol Ave, 7th Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-8211 CRITICAL CARE MEDICINE JOHN B. CONE University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Surgery Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 4th Fl 4110 Outpatient Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-526-1033 CRITICAL CARE MEDICINE VICTOR MANDOFF University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Anesthesiology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-6114 DERMATOLOGY RANDALL L. BREAU Arkansas Dermatology Medical Towers Bldg, Ste 860 9601 Baptist Health Dr Little Rock, AR 72205 501-975-7455 DERMATOLOGY MISSY CLIFTON Premier Dermatology & Skin Renewal Center 901 SE Plaza Dr, Ste 5 Bentonville, AR 72712 479-273-3376 DERMATOLOGY SCOTT M. DINEHART Arkansas Dermatology Medical Towers Bldg, Ste 860 9601 Baptist Health Dr Little Rock, AR 72205 501-975-7455 DERMATOLOGY CHRISTOPHER SCHACH Ozark Dermatology Clinic 4375 N Vantage Dr, Ste 305 Fayetteville, AR 72703 479-443-5100 DERMATOLOGY KEVIN ST. CLAIR Ozark Dermatology Clinic 4375 N Vantage Dr, Ste 305 Fayetteville, AR 72703 479-443-5100

DERMATOLOGY HENRY KEUNG WONG University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute Dermatology Cancer Clinic 4018 W Capitol Ave, 2nd Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-8000 ENDOCRINOLOGY AND METABOLISM STAVROS C. MANOLAGAS University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Diabetes and Endocrinology Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 2nd Fl 4110 Outpatient Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-296-1220

GERIATRIC MEDICINE PRIYA MENDIRATTA University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Donald W. Reynolds Institute on Aging Thomas and Lyon Longevity Clinic 629 Jack Stephens Dr Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-6219 GERIATRIC MEDICINE ANN T. RIGGS University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Donald W. Reynolds Institute on Aging Thomas and Lyon Longevity Clinic 629 Jack Stephens Dr Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-6219

FAMILY MEDICINE JIMMY ACKLIN Fort Smith VA Outpatient Clinic Sparks Medical Plaza 1500 Dodson Ave Fort Smith, AR 72917 479-441-2600

HAND SURGERY G. THOMAS FRAZIER, JR. University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Orthopaedic Clinic 600 Autumn Rd Little Rock, AR 72211 501-320-7763

FAMILY MEDICINE KEVIN C. HIEGEL Little Rock Family Practice Central Clinic 701 N University Ave, Ste 100 Little Rock, AR 72205 501-664-4810

HEPATOLOGY MARY K. RUDE University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Gastroenterology Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 2nd Fl 4110 Outpatient Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-5545

FAMILY MEDICINE RALPH FARRIS JOSEPH CHI St. Vincent Family Clinic 4202 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72204 501-562-4838 FAMILY MEDICINE GORDON R. PARHAM Washington Regional Medical Center Hospitalist Services 3215 N North Hills Blvd Fayetteville, AR 72703 479-463-1000 FAMILY MEDICINE WILLIAM H. RILEY, JR. CHI St. Vincent Family Clinic 4202 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72204 501-562-4838 FAMILY MEDICINE KEVIN ROBERTS Little Rock Family Practice Central Clinic 701 N University Ave, Ste 100 Little Rock, AR 72205 501-664-4810 FAMILY MEDICINE ROBERT STEPHEN TUCKER Little Rock Family Practice West Clinic 4208 N Rodney Parham Rd Little Rock, AR 72212 501-228-7200 FAMILY MEDICINE DANIEL W. WATSON Autumn Road Family Practice 904 Autumn Rd, Ste 200 Little Rock, AR 72211 501-227-6363 GASTROENTEROLOGY TERENCE ANGTUACO Premier Gastroenterology Associates 10001 Lile Dr, Ste 200 Little Rock, AR 72205 501-747-2828

A Special Advertising Section

INFECTIOUS DISEASE ROBERT W. BRADSHER, JR. University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Infectious Diseases Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 2nd Fl 4110 Outpatient Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-603-1616 INFECTIOUS DISEASE MICHAEL SACCENTE University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Infectious Diseases Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 2nd Fl 4110 Outpatient Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-603-1616 INFECTIOUS DISEASE KEYUR S. VYAS University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Infectious Diseases Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 2nd Fl 4110 Outpatient Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-5585 INTERNAL MEDICINE MARK A. DYER Little Rock Diagnostic Clinic 10001 Lile Dr Little Rock, AR 72205 501-227-8000 INTERNAL MEDICINE ROBERT HOWARD HOPKINS, JR. University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Internal Medicine Clinic - South Outpatient Center Bldg, 2nd Fl 4110 Outpatient Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-8000

INTERNAL MEDICINE ALLISON M. JOHNSON Washington Regional Medical Center Internal Medicine Associates 688 Millsap Rd, Ste 100 Fayetteville, AR 72703 479-463-3070 INTERNAL MEDICINE ANNA M. KENDRICK Pinnacle Internal Medicine 1400 Kirk Rd, Ste 210 Little Rock, AR 72223 501-404-2384 INTERNAL MEDICINE ROBERT CHARLES LAVENDER University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Internal Medicine Clinic - South Outpatient Center Bldg, 2nd Fl 4110 Outpatient Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-8000 INTERNAL MEDICINE EDWARD J. MARIANO Medical Center of South Arkansas 700 W Grove St El Dorado, AR 71730 870-863-2000 INTERNAL MEDICINE MICHAEL SACCENTE University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Infectious Diseases Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 2nd Fl 4110 Outpatient Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-603-1616 INTERNAL MEDICINE SARA GHORI TARIQ University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Internal Medicine Clinic - South Outpatient Center Bldg, 2nd Fl 4110 Outpatient Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-8000 INTERNAL MEDICINE MITZI ANN WASHINGTON PrimeCare 400 S Main St, Ste 100 Searcy, AR 72143 501-279-9000 MEDICAL GENETICS JENNIFER HUNT University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Pathology and Laboratory Services 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-5170 MEDICAL GENETICS JENNIFER LAUDADIO University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Pathology and Laboratory Services 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-8073 MEDICAL GENETICS G. BRADLEY SCHAEFER Arkansas Children’s Northwest Divison of Medical Genetics 2601 Gene George Blvd Springdale, AR 72762 479-725-6995


MEDICAL ONCOLOGY AND HEMATOLOGY JOSEPH M. BECK II Doctor’s Bldg, Ste 512 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 501-666-7007 MEDICAL ONCOLOGY AND HEMATOLOGY ISSAM MAKHOUL University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute Medical Oncology Clinic 4018 W Capitol Ave, 7th Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-8530 NEPHROLOGY JOHN M. ARTHUR University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Renal Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 2nd Fl 4110 Outpatient Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-661-7910 NEPHROLOGY JAMES T. HENRY Baptist Health Renal Care-Fort Smith Baptist Health Medical Plaza 1500 Dodson Ave, Ste 280 Fort Smith, AR 72901 479-709-7480

NEPHROLOGY NITHIN KARAKALA University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Renal Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 2nd Fl 4110 Outpatient Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-8000

NEUROLOGICAL SURGERY JOHN DIAZ DAY University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Jackson T. Stephens Spine & Neurosciences Institute Neurosurgery Clinic 501 Jack Stephens Dr, 2nd Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-8757

NEPHROLOGY MICHELLE W. KRAUSE University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Renal Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 2nd Fl 4110 Outpatient Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-8000

NEUROLOGICAL SURGERY ALI F. KRISHT CHI St. Vincent Arkansas Neuroscience Institute 6020 Warden Rd Sherwood, AR 72120 501-552-6412

NEPHROLOGY ROBERT F. MCCRARY, JR. Arkansas Renal Group Hot Springs Diagnostic Associates 115 Wrights St Hot Springs, AR 71913 501-321-9803 NEPHROLOGY JOHN WAYNE SMITH Arkansas Renal Group Hot Springs Diagnostic Associates 115 Wrights St Hot Springs, AR 71913 501-321-9803

NEUROLOGICAL SURGERY T. GLENN PAIT University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Jackson T. Stephens Spine & Neurosciences Institute Neurosurgery Clinic 501 Jack Stephens Dr, 2nd Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-5270 NEUROLOGY ROBERT LEROY (LEE) ARCHER University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Jackson T. Stephens Spine & Neurosciences Institute Neurology Clinic 501 Jack Stephens Dr, 5th Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-5838

NEUROLOGY BRADLEY S. BOOP Little Rock Diagnostic Clinic 10001 Lile Dr Little Rock, AR 72205 501-227-8000 NEUROLOGY ROHIT DHALL University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Jackson T. Stephens Spine & Neurosciences Institute Movement Disorders Clinic 501 Jack Stephens Dr, 5th Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-5838 NUCLEAR MEDICINE JAMES E. MCDONALD University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Radiology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-5740 OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY NANCY R. ANDREWS COLLINS University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Women’s Health Clinic Pyramid Place, Ste 900 11300 Financial Centre Pkwy Little Rock, AR 72211 501-686-8000

Congratulations to all the

OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY ALEXANDER F. BURNETT University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute Gynecology Cancer Clinic 4018 W Capitol Ave, 2nd Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-8522 OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY ANDREW A. COLE Conway Obstetrics and Gynecology 2519 College Ave Conway, AR 72034 501-327-6547 OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY STEPHEN RAY MARKS 3343 Springhill Dr, Ste 1005 North Little Rock, AR 72117 501-758-9251 OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY HEATHER OWENS Little Rock Gynecology & Obstetrics 9501 Baptist Health Dr, Ste 770 Little Rock, AR 72205 501-221-9700 OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY PAUL J. WENDEL University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Women’s Health Clinic Freeway Medical Tower, Ste 705 5800 W 10th St Little Rock, AR 72204 501-296-1800

OPHTHALMOLOGY J. DAVID BRADFORD Retina Specialists of Arkansas 5 Saint Vincent Cir, Ste 201 Little Rock, AR 72205 501-978-5500 OPHTHALMOLOGY WADE BROCK Arkansas Oculoplastic Surgery 9800 Baptist Health Dr, Ste 500 Little Rock, AR 72205 501-223-2244 OPHTHALMOLOGY RICKEY D. MEDLOCK Retina Associates 9800 Baptist Health Dr, Ste 200 Little Rock, AR 72205 501-219-0900 OPHTHALMOLOGY JENNIFER T. SCRUGGS Baptist Health Eye Center 9800 Baptist Health Dr, Ste 600 Little Rock, AR 72205 501-221-0123 OPHTHALMOLOGY CHRISTOPHER T. WESTFALL University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Jones Eye Institute 4105 Outpatient Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-5822

in Arkansas

At UAMS, we are honored that more than half of these experts are UAMS College of Medicine physicians who practice at the UAMS Medical Center, Arkansas Children’s Hospital and the Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System. In addition to recognition by their peers, our doctors are highly rated by the patients they serve. Using our online tool, you can see reviews and comments from UAMS patients. Providing information to help you choose the best doctor is one of the ways we are ensuring you have thorough information to make informed decisions about your health care. From common injuries and illnesses to the most complex conditions, our specialists are highly trained and skilled to provide the best in medical care.

Visit doctors.UAMShealth.com or call 501-686-8000

A Special Advertising Section

ARKANSASTIMES.COM

JUNE 2019 51


Get your diagnosis doublechecked. It could save your life. When you have concerns or doubts about a diagnosis, treatment, or surgery, Best Doctors can help. Our world-renowned medical experts can give you the peace of mind you deserve by providing an in-depth review of your diagnosis to either confirm it or recommend a change.

See if you have Best Doctors as a benefit.

 1-80 0 -223-50 03

|

 ask your HR representative

We’re more than just a list

We’re peer-selected as the best medical experts in the world

This can genuinely help people around the world to get the most appropriate diagnosis and therapy, whilst also being of benefit to treating physicians. Dr. Otto A. Smiseth

Professor of Medicine, Director of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Diseases Oslo University Hospital


The report I received from Best Doctors actually confirmed one of my diagnoses was wrong. It has changed my life. Best Doctors member

Reach more lives. Best Doctors is now a part of Teladoc Health, the global leader in virtual care. We garner a nationally recognized group of experts, peer-selected as the best in their field. Our doctors serve nearly 40 million members worldwide with a unique suite of services designed to eliminate medical uncertainty in a very uncertain landscape.

Learn more about the Best Doctors selection process.

ď„ˆ experts@bestdoctors.com

Best Doctors is now part of Teladoc Health, the global leader in virtual care. Best Doctors and the star-in-cross logo are trademarks of Teladoc Health, Inc., in the United States and in other countries, and are used under license. All rights reserved Š 2019. 332687907_04082019


Congratulations DR. ROBERT F. MCCRARY, JR. on being selected to the 2019-2020 Best Doctors in America® List.

From all of us at MEDEVCO

ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY SHAHRYAR AHMADI University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Orthopaedic Clinic 10815 Colonel Glenn Rd Little Rock, AR 72204 501-686-7000 ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY JAMES D. ALLEN Medical Park Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine 501 Virginia Dr, Ste C Batesville, AR 72501 870-793-2371 ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY C. LOWRY BARNES University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Orthopaedic Clinic 2 Shackleford W Blvd Little Rock, AR 72211 501-614-2663 ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY WAYNE BRUFFETT Ortho Arkansas 800 Fair Park Blvd Little Rock, AR 72204 501-663-3647 ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY G. THOMAS FRAZIER, JR. University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Orthopaedic Clinic 600 Autumn Rd Little Rock, AR 72211 501-320-7763 ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY KENNETH A. MARTIN Martin Orthopedics 5320 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-975-5633 ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY COREY O. MONTGOMERY University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Orthopaedic Surgery 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-8404

Congratulations to

DR. TERENCE ANGTUACO

ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY DAVID GORDON NEWBERN Ortho Arkansas 800 Fair Park Blvd Little Rock, AR 72204 501-663-3647

on being elected by his peers for inclusion in the 2019-2020 Best Doctors in America® List for Gastroenterology.

ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY RICHARD W. NICHOLAS, JR. University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute Orthopaedic Cancer Clinic 4018 W Capitol Ave, 7th Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 501-296-1200 ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY THOMAS S. ROBERTS Regional Center for Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Bldg 1, Ste 302 525 Western Ave Conway, AR 72034 501-504-6649 ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY RUTH L. THOMAS Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System John L. McClellan Memorial Veterans Hospital Orthopaedic Clinic 4300 W 7th St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-257-4656

10001 LILE DRIVE, SUITE 200 • LITTLE ROCK (501) 747-2828 • WWW.PGALR.COM

54 JUNE 2019

ARKANSAS TIMES

A Special Advertising Section

ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY JOHN L. VANDER SCHILDEN University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Orthopaedic Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 1st Fl 4110 Outpatient Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-7823 OTOLARYNGOLOGY JOHN L. DORNHOFFER University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Jackson T. Stephens Spine & Neurosciences Institute Ear, Nose and Throat Clinic 501 Jack Stephens Dr, 3rd Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-5878 OTOLARYNGOLOGY MAURICIO MORENO University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute Head and Neck Cancer Clinic 4018 W Capitol Ave, 6th Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 501-296-1200 OTOLARYNGOLOGY GRESHAM RICHTER Arkansas Children’s Hospital Vascular Anomalies Center Division of Pediatric Otolaryngology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000 OTOLARYNGOLOGY BRENDAN C. STACK, JR. University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-8224 OTOLARYNGOLOGY JAMES Y. SUEN University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute Head and Neck Cancer Clinic 4018 W Capitol Ave, 6th Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 501-296-1200 OTOLARYNGOLOGY EMRE VURAL University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute Head and Neck Cancer Clinic 4018 W Capitol Ave, 6th Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-8000 PATHOLOGY NANCY K. DAVIS Advanced Pathology Solutions 4850 Northshore Ln North Little Rock, AR 72118 501-225-1400 PATHOLOGY JERAD M. GARDNER University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Dermatopathology Service 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-8464


PATHOLOGY MURAT GOKDEN University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Division of Neuropathology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-5173 PATHOLOGY NERIMAN GOKDEN University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Pathology and Laboratory Services 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-5170 PATHOLOGY JENNIFER HUNT University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Pathology and Laboratory Services 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-5170 PATHOLOGY C. MATTHEW QUICK Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Pathology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-526-5251 PATHOLOGY FRED G. SILVA II Arkana Laboratories 10810 Executive Center Dr, Ste 100 Little Rock, AR 72211 501-604-2695 PEDIATRIC ALLERGY AND IMMUNOLOGY D. MELISSA GRAHAM Advanced Allergy & Asthma Doctors Bldg, Ste 215 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 501-420-1085 PEDIATRIC ALLERGY AND IMMUNOLOGY JIM M. INGRAM Little Rock Allergy and Asthma Clinic 18 Corporate Hill Dr, Ste 110 Little Rock, AR 72205 501-224-1156 PEDIATRIC ALLERGY AND IMMUNOLOGY STACIE M. JONES Arkansas Children’s Hospital Division of Allergy & Immunology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1060 PEDIATRIC ALLERGY AND IMMUNOLOGY TAMARA T. PERRY Arkansas Children’s Hospital Division of Allergy & Immunology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000 PEDIATRIC ALLERGY AND IMMUNOLOGY AMY M. SCURLOCK Arkansas Children’s Hospital Division of Allergy & Immunology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000

PEDIATRIC ANESTHESIOLOGY JESUS (JOJO) APUYA Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Anesthesiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1100 PEDIATRIC ANESTHESIOLOGY ANNA-MARIA ONISEI Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Anesthesiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1100

Voted the Best in the State. Voted Voted the the Best Best in in the the State. State.

Again. Again. Again. Congratulations to Dr. Andrew Cole for

Congratulations Dr.2019 Andrew for being named one ofto the BestCole Doctors! Congratulations to Dr. Andrew Cole for being named one of the 2019 Best Doctors! being named one of the 2019 Best Doctors! Conway Regional is proud of Dr. Andrew Cole and Conway is proud of in Dr.our Andrew Cole and the workRegional he and his team do Obstetrics and Conway Regional is proud of in Dr.our Andrew Cole and the work he and his team do Obstetrics and Gynecology department. Providing the very best the work he and his team Providing do in our Obstetrics and Gynecology department. the very best care for our patients is the priority of all 200+ Gynecology department. Providing the very best care for ourinpatients is the and priority ofhonored all 200+to physicians our hospital, we’re care for ourinpatients is the and priority ofhonored all 200+to physicians ourand hospital, we’re work with each every one. physicians in our hospital, and we’re honored to work with each and every one. work with each and every one. If you’re looking for a physician, visit ConwayRegional.org/FindDoctor. If you’re looking for a physician, visit If you’re looking for a physician, visit ConwayRegional.org/FindDoctor. ConwayRegional.org/FindDoctor.

PEDIATRIC ANESTHESIOLOGY MICHAEL L. SCHMITZ Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Anesthesiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1100 PEDIATRIC ANESTHESIOLOGY M. SAIF SIDDIQUI Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Anesthesiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1100

One Team. One Promise. One Team. One Promise. One Team. One Promise.

PEDIATRIC CARDIOLOGY THOMAS H. BEST Arkansas Children’s Hospital The Heart Center 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1479 PEDIATRIC CARDIOLOGY RENEE ADAMS BORNEMEIER Arkansas Children’s Hospital The Heart Center 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1479 PEDIATRIC CARDIOLOGY BRIAN K. EBLE Arkansas Children’s Hospital The Heart Center 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1479 PEDIATRIC CARDIOLOGY EUDICE E. FONTENOT Arkansas Children’s Hospital The Heart Center 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1479 PEDIATRIC CARDIOLOGY ELIZABETH A. FRAZIER Arkansas Children’s Hospital The Heart Center 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1479 PEDIATRIC CARDIOLOGY M. MICHELE MOSS Arkansas Children’s Hospital The Heart Center 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1479 PEDIATRIC CARDIOLOGY PAUL MICHAEL SEIB Arkansas Children’s Hospital The Heart Center 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1479

One of the best reasons to choose our hospital. Year after year, our physicians are recognized as some of the best healthcare professionals in the region. Just one more reason why, year after year, more patients choose to make Arkansas Surgical Hospital their hospital.

Dr. Kenneth Martin Orthopedic Surgeon

Make Arkansas Surgical Hospital your hospital by calling (877) 918-7020 to schedule an appointment with one of our specialists. Physician Owned. Patient Focused. 8 7 7- 918 - 7 0 2 0 w w w. a r k s u r g i c a l h os p i t a l .c o m

A Special Advertising Section

ARKANSASTIMES.COM

JUNE 2019 55


PEDIATRIC CRITICAL CARE XIOMARA GARCIA-CASAL Arkansas Children’s Hospital The Heart Center 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1479

PEDIATRIC DERMATOLOGY JAY M. KINCANNON Arkansas Children’s Hospital Dermatology Clinic 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000

PEDIATRIC CRITICAL CARE M. MICHELE MOSS Arkansas Children’s Hospital The Heart Center 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1479

PEDIATRIC DEVELOPMENTAL AND BEHAVIORAL PROBLEMS JILL FUSSELL Arkansas Children’s Hospital Dennis Developmental Center 1301 Wolfe St Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1830

PEDIATRIC CRITICAL CARE PARTHAK PRODHAN Arkansas Children’s Hospital The Heart Center 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1479 PEDIATRIC CRITICAL CARE RONALD C. SANDERS, JR. Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Critical Care Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1845 PEDIATRIC CRITICAL CARE STEPHEN M. SCHEXNAYDER Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Critical Care Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1845

56 JUNE 2019

ARKANSAS TIMES

PEDIATRIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE RHONDA M. DICK Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Emergency Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1050 PEDIATRIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE MARY HUCKABEE Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Emergency Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1050 PEDIATRIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE LAURA P. JAMES Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Pharmacology and Toxicology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1418

PEDIATRIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE REBECCA LATCH Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Emergency Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1050

PEDIATRIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE TONYA MARIE THOMPSON Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Emergency Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1050

PEDIATRIC HEMATOLOGY-ONCOLOGY KIMO C. STINE Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Hematology and Oncology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000

PEDIATRIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE REBECCA A. SCHEXNAYDER Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Emergency Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1050

PEDIATRIC HEMATOLOGY-ONCOLOGY DAVID L. BECTON Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Hematology and Oncology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000

PEDIATRIC INFECTIOUS DISEASE JOSE R. ROMERO Arkansas Children’s Hospital Infectious Diseases Clinic 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1416

PEDIATRIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE STEVEN W. SHIRM Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Emergency Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1050 PEDIATRIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE KENDALL LANE STANFORD Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Emergency Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1050

PEDIATRIC HEMATOLOGY-ONCOLOGY CAROLYN SUZANNE SACCENTE Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Hematology and Oncology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000 PEDIATRIC HEMATOLOGY-ONCOLOGY ROBERT L. SAYLORS III Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Hematology and Oncology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000

A Special Advertising Section

PEDIATRIC INTERVENTIONAL RADIOLOGY CHARLES ALBERT JAMES Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Radiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1175 PEDIATRIC MEDICAL GENETICS G. BRADLEY SCHAEFER Arkansas Children’s Northwest Divison of Medical Genetics 2601 Gene George Blvd Springdale, AR 72762 479-725-6995 PEDIATRIC MEDICAL TOXICOLOGY LAURA P. JAMES Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Pharmacology and Toxicology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1418

PEDIATRIC NEPHROLOGY RICHARD T. BLASZAK Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Nephrology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000 PEDIATRIC ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY ROBERT DALE BLASIER Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Orthopaedics 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000 PEDIATRIC ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY RICHARD E. MCCARTHY Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Orthopaedics 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000 PEDIATRIC OTOLARYNGOLOGY CHARLES MICHAEL BOWER Arkansas Children’s Northwest Division of Pediatric Otolaryngology 2601 Gene George Blvd, 3rd Fl Springdale, AR 72762 479-725-6995 PEDIATRIC OTOLARYNGOLOGY GRESHAM RICHTER Arkansas Children’s Hospital Vascular Anomalies Center Division of Pediatric Otolaryngology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000


PEDIATRIC PAIN MANAGEMENT MICHAEL L. SCHMITZ Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Anesthesiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1100 PEDIATRIC PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHAB VIKKI A. STEFANS Arkansas Children’s Hospital Dennis Developmental Center 1301 Wolfe St Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1830 PEDIATRIC PULMONOLOGY AMIT AGARWAL Arkansas Children’s Hospital Pulmonary Clinic 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000 PEDIATRIC PULMONOLOGY ARIEL BERLINSKI Arkansas Children’s Hospital Pulmonary Clinic 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000 PEDIATRIC PULMONOLOGY JOHN LEE CARROLL Arkansas Children’s Hospital Pulmonary Clinic 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1006

PEDIATRIC PULMONOLOGY SUPRIYA K. JAMBHEKAR Arkansas Children’s Hospital Sleep Disorders Center 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000 PEDIATRIC RADIOLOGY CHARLES ALBERT JAMES Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Radiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1175 PEDIATRIC RHEUMATOLOGY JASON A. DARE Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Rheumatology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000 PEDIATRIC RHEUMATOLOGY TERRY O. HARVILLE University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Pathology and Laboratory Services 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-526-7511 PEDIATRIC SLEEP MEDICINE JOHN LEE CARROLL Arkansas Children’s Hospital Pulmonary Clinic 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1006

PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST/ NEONATAL-PERINATAL MEDICINE ROBERT E. LYLE Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Neonatology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1100

PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST/ NEONATAL-PERINATAL MEDICINE BILLY RAY THOMAS University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Section of Neonatology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-296-1397

PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST/ NEONATAL-PERINATAL MEDICINE ROBERT W. ARRINGTON Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Neonatology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1028

PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST/ NEONATAL-PERINATAL MEDICINE REBECCA H. MORAN Mercy Hospital Northwest Arkansas Neonatal Intensive Care Unit 2710 Rife Medical Ln Rogers, AR 72758 479-338-8000

PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST/ NEONATAL-PERINATAL MEDICINE DONNAL C. WALTER Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Neonatology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000

PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST/ NEONATAL-PERINATAL MEDICINE BRYAN L. BURKE, JR. University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Section of Neonatology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-296-1397

PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST/ NEONATAL-PERINATAL MEDICINE CLARE C. NESMITH University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Section of Neonatology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72202 501-296-1397

PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST/ NEONATAL-PERINATAL MEDICINE R. WHIT HALL Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Neonatology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-603-1255

PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST/ NEONATAL-PERINATAL MEDICINE ASHLEY S. ROSS III Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Neonatology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000

PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST/ ADOLESCENT AND YOUNG ADULT MEDICINE ELTON R. CLEVELAND Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Adolescent Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000

A Special Advertising Section

PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST/ NEONATAL-PERINATAL MEDICINE TERRANCE ZUERLEIN Baptist Health Medical Center Division of Neonatalogy 9601 Baptist Health Dr Little Rock, AR 72205 501-225-8821 PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST/ NEUROLOGY, NEURO-ONCOLOGY JOSEPH M. ELSER CHI St. Vincent Primary and Convenient Care 16221 Saint Vincent Way Little Rock, AR 72223 501-552-8150

PEDIATRIC SURGERY M. SIDNEY DASSINGER Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Surgery 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1446 PEDIATRIC SURGERY RICHARD J. JACKSON Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Surgery 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000 PEDIATRIC SURGERY R. TODD MAXSON Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Surgery 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000 PEDIATRIC SURGERY SAMUEL D. SMITH Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Surgery 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1446 PEDIATRIC UROLOGY STEPHEN J. CANON Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Urology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000 PEDIATRICS/GENERAL MARY E. AITKEN Arkansas Children’s Hospital General Pediatrics Clinic 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1202

ARKANSASTIMES.COM

JUNE 2019 57


PEDIATRICS/GENERAL CHARLES S. BALL Medical Associates of Northwest Arkansas (MANA) Northwest Arkansas Pediatrics 3380 N Futrall Dr, Ste 1 Fayetteville, AR 72703 479-442-7322 PEDIATRICS/GENERAL DEBRA D. BECTON Arkansas Children’s Hospital General Pediatrics Clinic 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1202 PEDIATRICS/GENERAL HANNAH BEENE-LOWDER Arkansas Children’s Hospital General Pediatrics Clinic 1 Childrens Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000 PEDIATRICS/GENERAL LAUREEN BENAFIELD Medical Associates of Northwest Arkansas (MANA) Northwest Arkansas Pediatrics 3380 N Futrall Dr, Ste 1 Fayetteville, AR 72703 479-442-7322 PEDIATRICS/GENERAL CARRIE M. BROWN Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Neonatology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1100 PEDIATRICS/GENERAL BRYAN L. BURKE, JR. University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Section of Neonatology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-296-1397 PEDIATRICS/GENERAL VINCENT CALDERON, JR. CHI St. Vincent Family Clinic 4202 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72204 501-562-4838 PEDIATRICS/GENERAL MEREDITH A. DENTON Medical Associates of Northwest Arkansas (MANA) Northwest Arkansas Pediatrics 3380 N Futrall Dr, Ste 1 Fayetteville, AR 72703 479-442-7322 PEDIATRICS/GENERAL ROSANA DIOKNO Arkansas Children’s Hospital General Pediatrics Clinic 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000 PEDIATRICS/GENERAL JOSEPH M. ELSER CHI St. Vincent Primary and Convenient Care 16221 Saint Vincent Way Little Rock, AR 72223 501-552-8150 PEDIATRICS/GENERAL HORACE L. GREEN The Children’s Clinic 1420 W 43rd Ave Pine Bluff, AR 71603 870-534-6210

58 JUNE 2019

ARKANSAS TIMES

PEDIATRICS/GENERAL JON R. HENDRICKSON Pediatric Partners 7303 Rogers Ave, Ste 201 Fort Smith, AR 72903 479-478-7200 PEDIATRICS/GENERAL CHARLES DAVID JACKSON Medical Associates of Northwest Arkansas (MANA) Northwest Arkansas Pediatrics 3380 N Futrall Dr, Ste 1 Fayetteville, AR 72703 479-442-7322 PEDIATRICS/GENERAL ANTHONY DALE JOHNSON Arkansas Pediatric Clinic 16115 Saint Vincent Way, Ste 320 Little Rock, AR 72223 501-664-4117 PEDIATRICS/GENERAL CARL WESLEY KLUCK, JR. Arkadelphia Clinic for Children and Young Adults 2850 Twin Rivers Dr Arkadelphia, AR 71923 870-246-8036 PEDIATRICS/GENERAL SEAN M. LIVINGSTON Medical Associates of Northwest Arkansas (MANA) Northwest Arkansas Pediatrics 3380 N Futrall Dr, Ste 1 Fayetteville, AR 72703 479-442-7322 PEDIATRICS/GENERAL R. ALAN LUCAS Arkansas Pediatrics of Conway 2710 College Ave Conway, AR 72034 501-329-1800 PEDIATRICS/GENERAL JAMES S. MAGEE Arkansas Children’s Hospital General Pediatrics Clinic 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1202 PEDIATRICS/GENERAL LORI E. MONTGOMERY Arkansas Pediatric Clinic Doctors Bldg, Ste 317 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 501-664-4117 PEDIATRICS/GENERAL EDUARDO R. OCHOA, JR. Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Community Pediatrics 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000 PEDIATRICS/GENERAL TERRY S. PAYTON Medical Associates of Northwest Arkansas (MANA) Northwest Arkansas P ediatrics 3380 N Futrall Dr, Ste 1 Fayetteville, AR 72703 479-442-7322 PEDIATRICS/GENERAL JOE T. ROBINSON Medical Associates of Northwest Arkansas (MANA) Northwest Arkansas Pediatrics 3380 N Futrall Dr, Ste 1 Fayetteville, AR 72703 479-442-7322

PEDIATRICS/GENERAL CHADWICK T. RODGERS Little Rock Pediatric Clinic Doctors Bldg, Ste 400 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 501-664-4044 PEDIATRICS/GENERAL CHRISTOPHER SCHLUTERMAN Pediatric Partners 7303 Rogers Ave, Ste 201 Fort Smith, AR 72903 479-478-7200 PEDIATRICS/GENERAL BRENT (BRENTLY) SILVEY Medical Associates of Northwest Arkansas (MANA) Northwest Arkansas Pediatrics 3380 N Futrall Dr, Ste 1 Fayetteville, AR 72703 479-442-7322 PEDIATRICS/GENERAL A. LARRY SIMMONS Arkansas Children’s Hospital General Pediatrics Clinic 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1202 PEDIATRICS/GENERAL JAMES S. SWINDLE Medical Associates of Northwest Arkansas (MANA) Northwest Arkansas Pediatrics 3380 N Futrall Dr, Ste 1 Fayetteville, AR 72703 479-442-7322 PEDIATRICS/GENERAL DAVID M. WEED Central Arkansas Pediatric Clinic 2301 Springhill Rd, Ste 200 Benton, AR 72019 501-847-2500 PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION KEVIN J. COLLINS Rehabilitation Medicine Consultants of Arkansas Springhill Medical Plaza 3401 Springhill Dr, Ste 460 North Little Rock, AR 72117 501-945-1888 PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION KEVIN M. MEANS University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Jackson T. Stephens Spine & Neurosciences Institute Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Clinic 501 Jack Stephens Dr, 2nd Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 501-221-1311 PLASTIC SURGERY THOMAS R. MOFFETT, JR. Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Associates 11300 N Rodney Parham Rd, Ste 210 Little Rock, AR 72212 501-663-4100 PLASTIC SURGERY KRIS B. SHEWMAKE 10801 Executive Center Dr, Ste 101 Little Rock, AR 72211 501-492-8970

PSYCHIATRY JEFFREY L. CLOTHIER University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Psychiatric Research Institute 4224 Shuffield Dr, 2nd Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 501-526-8200 PSYCHIATRY PEDRO L. DELGADO University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Psychiatric Research Institute 4224 Shuffield Dr, 2nd Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 501-526-8200 PSYCHIATRY LOU ANN EADS University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Psychiatric Research Institute 4224 Shuffield Dr, 2nd Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 501-526-8603 PSYCHIATRY JOSEPH BENJAMIN GUISE University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Psychiatric Research Institute 4224 Shuffield Dr, 2nd Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 501-526-8100 PSYCHIATRY TIM A. KIMBRELL Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System Eugene J. Towbin Healthcare Center Mental Health Clinic 2200 Fort Roots Dr North Little Rock, AR 72114 501-257-3131 PSYCHIATRY IRVING KUO Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System Eugene J. Towbin Healthcare Center Mental Health Clinic 2200 Fort Roots Dr North Little Rock, AR 72114 501-257-3131 PSYCHIATRY LAWRENCE A. LABBATE CHI St. Vincent Infirmary Inpatient Behavioral Health Unit 2 Saint Vincent Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-552-5777 PSYCHIATRY JEFFREY M. PYNE Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System Eugene J. Towbin Healthcare Center Mental Health Clinic 2200 Fort Roots Dr North Little Rock, AR 72114 501-257-3131 PSYCHIATRY G. RICHARD SMITH University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Psychiatric Research Institute 4224 Shuffield Dr, 2nd Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 501-526-8169 PSYCHIATRY JOHN SPOLLEN Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System Eugene J. Towbin Healthcare Center Mental Health Clinic 2200 Fort Roots Dr North Little Rock, AR 72114 501-257-3131

A Special Advertising Section

PULMONARY MEDICINE LARRY G. JOHNSON University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Pulmonary Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 2nd Fl 4110 Outpatient Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-603-1400 RADIATION ONCOLOGY MICHAEL L. TALBERT CARTI Radiation Oncology at Baptist Higginbotham Outpatient Center Bldg, Ste 150 9500 Kanis Rd Little Rock, AR 72205 501-312-1733 RADIOLOGY ALBERT S. ALEXANDER Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 501-664-3914 RADIOLOGY TERESITA L. ANGTUACO University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Division of Body Imaging 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-5762 RADIOLOGY JODI M. BARBOZA Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 501-664-3914 RADIOLOGY BENJAMIN JOSEPH BARTNICKE Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 501-664-3914 RADIOLOGY F. KEITH BELL Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 501-664-3914 RADIOLOGY C. WILLIAM DEATON Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 501-664-3914 RADIOLOGY LEO F. DROLSHAGEN III Mercy Imaging Services 7301 Rogers Ave Fort Smith, AR 72903 479-314-6200 RADIOLOGY STEVE A. DUNNAGAN Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 501-664-3914 RADIOLOGY JONATHAN F. FRAVEL Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 501-664-3914

RADIOLOGY DANNA F. GREAR Medical Associates of Northwest Arkansas (MANA) The Breast Center 55 W Sunbridge Dr Fayetteville, AR 72703 479-442-6266 RADIOLOGY STEVEN E. HARMS Medical Associates of Northwest Arkansas (MANA) The Breast Center 55 W Sunbridge Dr Fayetteville, AR 72703 479-442-6266 RADIOLOGY KEDAR JAMBHEKAR University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Radiology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-603-1595 RADIOLOGY CHARLES ALBERT JAMES Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Radiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1175 RADIOLOGY AARON L. JANOS Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 501-664-3914 RADIOLOGY PHILIP J. KENNEY University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Radiology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-6901 RADIOLOGY DON L. KUSENBERGER Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 501-664-3914 RADIOLOGY BRITTON B. LOTT Medical Associates of Northwest Arkansas (MANA) The Breast Center 55 West Sunbridge Dr Fayetteville, AR 72703 479-442-6266 RADIOLOGY W. JEAN MATCHETT Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 501-664-3914 RADIOLOGY JOHN N. MEADORS Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 501-664-3914 RADIOLOGY ROGERICH T. PAYLOR Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-2614


RADIOLOGY CHRISTIE B. PHELAN Northwest Breast Imaging Center at Willow Creek 5501 Willow Creek Dr, Ste 103 Springdale, AR 72762 479-750-6660 RADIOLOGY KELLY A. PIERCE Medical Associates of Northwest Arkansas (MANA) The Breast Center 55 W Sunbridge Dr Fayetteville, AR 72703 479-442-6266 RADIOLOGY KEVIN L. POPE Medical Associates of Northwest Arkansas (MANA) The Breast Center 55 W Sunbridge Dr Fayetteville, AR 72703 479-442-6266 RADIOLOGY JOHN P. SCURLOCK Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 501-664-3914 RADIOLOGY RAJESH SETHI Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 501-664-3914 RADIOLOGY HEMENDRA R. SHAH University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Radiology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-6901 RADIOLOGY KATHLEEN M. SITARIK Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 501-664-3914 RADIOLOGY AARON M. SPANN Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 501-664-3914 RADIOLOGY DAVID E. TAMAS Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 501-664-3914 RADIOLOGY SHANNON R. TURNER Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 501-664-3914 RHEUMATOLOGY SETH MARK BERNEY University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Rheumatology Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 1st Fl 4110 Outpatient Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-5586

RHEUMATOLOGY CUMMINS LUE Little Rock Diagnostic Clinic 10001 Lile Dr Little Rock, AR 72205 501-227-8000 SURGERY GARY W. BARONE University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Solid Organ Transplant Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 3rd Fl 4110 Outpatient Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-6644 SURGERY JANINA B. BONWICH University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Surgery Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 4th Fl 4110 Outpatient Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-6086

SURGERY JOHN W. WEBB CHI St. Vincent Surgery Clinic Medical Office Bldg, Ste 201 1 Mercy Ln Hot Springs, AR 71913 501-609-2229 SURGICAL ONCOLOGY J. RALPH BROADWATER, JR. University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute Surgery Clinic 4018 W Capitol Ave, 7th Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-8211

SURGICAL ONCOLOGY MICHAEL J. CROSS Breast Treatment Associates 1792 E Joyce Blvd, Ste 1 Fayetteville, AR 72703 479-582-1000 SURGICAL ONCOLOGY RONDA S. HENRY-TILLMAN University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute Breast Cancer Clinic 4018 W Capitol Ave, 2nd Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 501-296-1200

SURGICAL ONCOLOGY KENT C. WESTBROOK University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute Breast Cancer Clinic 4018 W Capitol Ave, 2nd Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 501-296-1200

THORACIC SURGERY JAMES S. COUNCE Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery 3276 N North Hills Blvd Fayetteville, AR 72703 479-587-1114

THORACIC SURGERY FRANK MICHAEL BAUER III CHI St. Vincent Cardiovascular Surgery Clinic 5 Saint Vincent Cir, Ste 501 Little Rock, AR 72205 501-666-2894

THORACIC SURGERY ROBERT C. JAGGERS Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery 3276 N North Hills Blvd Fayetteville, AR 72703 479-587-1114 VASCULAR SURGERY MOHAMMED M. MOURSI University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Vascular Surgery Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 4th Fl 4110 Outpatient Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-6176

Congratulations to Jim Mark Ingram, M.D. on being included in the 2019-2020 Best Doctors in America® List.

SURGERY CHRIS M. CATE The Surgical Clinic of Central Arkansas Hickingbotham Outpatient Center, Ste 501 9500 Kanis Rd Little Rock, AR 72205 501-227-9080 SURGERY JOHN B. CONE University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Surgery Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 4th Fl 4110 Outpatient Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-526-1033 SURGERY MICHAEL J. CROSS Breast Treatment Associates 1792 E Joyce Blvd, Ste 1 Fayetteville, AR 72703 479-582-1000 SURGERY WAYNE A. HUDEC Ozark Surgical Associates 3017 Bob Younkin Dr, Ste 101 Fayetteville, AR 72703 479-521-1484 SURGERY MAURICIO MORENO University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute Head and Neck Cancer Clinic 4018 W Capitol Ave, 6th Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 501-296-1200 SURGERY RONALD ROBERTSON University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Surgery Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 4th Fl 4110 Outpatient Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-6086

18 Corporate Hill Dr. Suite 110 (501) 224-1156 • 1-800-514-4343 www.littlerockallergy.com

Scott Dinehart, M.D.* Randall Breau, M.D.* Michael Osleber, M.D. Matthew Reynolds, P.A.-C. Carmen Meeker, P.A.-C. Annaleigh Harper, P.A.-C. Michelle Gaskin, P.A.-C. Katherine McCrady, P.A.-C. Emilee Odom, P.A.-C. Douglas Clark, P.A.-C. Marcus Webb, P.A.-C.

Call us today to schedule your appointment or visit arkansasdermatology.com

SURGERY EMRE VURAL University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute Head and Neck Cancer Clinic 4018 W Capitol Ave, 6th Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-8000

*Elected by their peers for inclusion in the 2019-2020 Best Doctors in America® List

Conway 501-513-9700

Cabot 501-941-3101

Heber Springs 501-362-3100

A Special Advertising Section

Little Rock 501-907-7330

North Little Rock 501-791-7546

Searcy 501-268-1500

Stuttgart 870-659-8050

ARKANSASTIMES.COM

JUNE 2019 59


A TEAM DEDICATED TO A FULL CONTINUUM Specializing in mental health treatment for children and adolescents OF BEHAVIORAL HEALTHCARE SERVICES. Pinnacle Pointe Behavioral Healthcare System is located in Little Rock and is one of Arkansas’ largest behavioral health facilities. We offer acute inpatient and residential services for children and adolescents ages 5-17 who are struggling with emotional or behavioral health issues.

Our excellent team of providers: We Provide a Full Continuum of

Dr. Benjamin Nimmo, MDHealthcare - Chief Medical Behavioral ServicesOfficer

PinnaclePoint Dr. Kristin Gannoe, MD Hospital.com

•• Day treatment services services •• School-based Partial hospitalization inpatient care •• Acute Outpatient services PinnaclePointe Hospital.com

Dr. Kelsey McClellan, MD

11501 Financial Centre P Little Rock, Arkansas 7221 501.223.3322 | 800.880.33

Dr. Scott Carle, MD

Dr. Scott Hogan, MD

Residential inpatient care Dr. Allan McKenzie, MD

Dr. Laura Conley-Olsen, MD

Dr. John Webber, MD

Dr. David Alan Bagley, MD

Dr. Ryan Helm, MD

Dr. Lynn Thomas, MD

Dr. Jessica Carbajal, MD

Dr. Tad Tillemans, MD

TRICARE® Certified

11501 Centre Parkway • Little Rock, Arkansas 72211 • 501.223.3322• 800.880.3322 60 JUNE 2019 Financial ARKANSAS TIMES


A Special Advertising Section

WHOLE HEALTH CARE

A LOCAL RESOURCE GUIDE TO MAINTAING YOUR TOTAL HEALTH

STROKE AWARENESS WITH DR. ALI KRISHT

CONWAY REGIONAL $40M EXPANSION UNDERWAY Conway Regional Health System is in the beginning stages of a $40 million capital investment that will expand and enhance services throughout the health system. Projects include additional clinic space for women’s services, a new critical care unit with increased beds and expansion of the hospital’s clinic in Greenbrier. The scope of projects also includes investment in the hospital’s pharmacy and lab and renovation of the hospital’s health and fitness center. Construction crews are in the process of creating additional parking on the Conway Regional campus along Robinson Avenue, behind the hospital’s Ambulatory Surgery Center. Additional parking is a requirement before construction can begin late this summer. The new, four-story medical office building will provide 56,000 square feet of space dedicated primarily to women’s health services. It will

house Conway OB-Gyn and Conway Women’s Health, two of the three primary obstetrics/gynecology practices in the city. Construction of the new medical office building will also allow expansion of Conway Regional’s Neuroscience and Pain Management Services. Construction of an additional floor above the hospital’s surgical services area will accommodate expansion of Conway Regional’s critical care unit, which will include new technology and 26 patient beds. One of the most visible parts of this expansion will be a new corridor along the outside of the hospital connecting the new medical office building, ambulatory surgery center and women’s center, which will create ease of access for patients, staff and visitors. The project also includes an expansion of Conway Regional’s clinic in Greenbrier.

Pinnacle Pointe Hospital is Arkansas’s largest behavioral inpatient facility for children and adolescents ages 5-17 who are struggling with emotional or behavioral health issues. The staff is committed to providing quality behavioral health care for patients and extensive support for their families. In addition, The Pointe Outpatient Behavioral Health Services provides a variety of nonresidential services to patients from across the state, including intensive outpatient and school-based programs. Pinnacle Pointe is dedicated to helping all patients find the way to lead happier, more fulfill-

ing lives through individualized mental health treatment provided in a secure and nurturing environment. The 124-bed facility provides people with the resources they need to transform their lives. Pinnacle Pointe Hospital offers no-cost assessments 24/7 to children and adolescents who are struggling with emotional or behavioral issues. To learn more, call 501-223-3322. 11501 Financial Centre Parkway Little Rock, 72211 www.pinnaclepointehospital.com

“Time is Brain” when it comes to treatment and brain health after a stroke, said Dr. Ali Krisht, director of the Arkansas Neuroscience Institute at CHI St. Vincent, when asked about stroke treatment and care. Think of a stroke as a brain attack. Someone who has a stroke either has a clot or a bleeding blood vessel in the brain that blocks oxygen to the brain. Without oxygen, brain cells start to die within minutes. And once they’re dead, they can’t be replaced. TREATMENT OPTIONS For a stroke caused by a blood clot, a drug called tPA (tissue plasminogen activator) is used. It dissolves the blood clots that cause stroke. This drug dramatically reduces the amount of damage caused by stroke when not treated or when treatment is delayed. The sooner the drug is given, the less damage to the brain and the body and less disability to the patient. Surgery is the treatment for bleeding blood vessels that cause stroke. Tiny clamps are used to stop blood flow and to keep the aneurysm from bursting. In a few cases, a bypass surgery on a blood vessel in the brain can be performed to direct blood to a region of the brain. It’s the same type of surgery that is used in heart bypass surgery — just on the brain. The window of time for the best results is within three hours of the first signs of stroke. After three hours, treatment is less effective because brain cells die by the minute. SIGNS OF A STROKE Stroke symptoms often occur suddenly. They include numbness or weakness of face, arm or leg, especially on one side of the body; confusion; and trouble speaking or understanding. A person might have trouble seeing in one or both eyes. They might have trouble walking, become dizzy or lose their balance. And some patients say they have a severe headache that hits like a clap of thunder — the worst headache they’ve had in their life. If you suspect you or someone you love is experiencing stroke-like symptoms, call 911 or visit the nearest emergency room immediately. ARKANSASTIMES.COM

JUNE 2019 61


Presenting Sponsor:

.

R TE N CE J , C I Y DA ON wn S S o d R U MA gie form o E TH o b IK lat P o p t , RT ted attire ! E i v B in o all AL are disc nd E UN

Live Music From:

27

6-

.M 9P

a s t est r bes lamĂŠ u G hei old in t es, g sho

Sponsored by:

BENEFITTING THE ARKANSAS REPERTORY THEATRE. Get tickets at centralarkansastickets.com

Tickets are $40 for an individual and $75 for a couple.

Wristband Sponsor: Collins, Collins & Ray


CLOSE-UP: In Thiedeman’s film work, the emotional expression of the subject is, itself, the atmosphere.

CULTURE

Framing Faces FOR MARK THIEDEMAN, FILMMAKING ISN’T SO MUCH NATURALISTIC AS HUMANISTIC. BY CHRISTIAN LEUS

ARKANSASTIMES.COM

JUNE 2019 63


D

irector Mark Thiedeman’s films all share certain qualities: a predilection for natural light; a soft, worndown graininess; stories that explore youth, coming of age and Thiedeman’s own experiences as a gay man. But beyond that, the films have a wide range of tones and settings. Thiedeman’s first feature, 2013’s “Last Summer,” tells a sweetly melancholic story about two boyfriends separated by the end of high school. Thiedeman’s thesis film “Dragonslayer,” which confronts the pain of love during the AIDS crisis in rural Arkansas, had its first screening in April. It’s slated to be part of a three-part, feature-length narrative, along with Thiedeman’s “Alex in the Morning” and another as-yetunnamed film, to be shot later this year. “The three films are each long shorts,” Thiedeman said, “but together, they paint a picture of life as a gay man in the rural South over the course of 20-ish years, beginning in the ’90s with ‘Dragonslayer’ and ending in the near-future.” In October 2018, Thiedeman teamed up with the Southern Documentary Fund, a nonprofit out of North Carolina, to screen his first documentary, “Kevin,” at the Hot Springs Documentary Film Festival. When the film was screened, it was still a work in progress. Since then, Thiedeman, 37, said, the project has taken on a life of its own. The 12-minute short he originally conceived swelled to a feature-length 70-minute cut — the one shown at HSDFF — and is soon to make the festival rounds. Originally from south Louisiana, Thiedeman’s move to Arkansas in 2010 was a return. He’d gone to high school in Little Rock, then lived in New York for over a decade, where he attended New York University’s undergrad program for film and television production. Since he’s been back, he’s directed 10 films and served as artistic director and feature programming director for Kaleidoscope, Little Rock’s festival of LGBT cinema. He’s now working toward his master’s degree in film at the University of Central Arkansas. “I spent a lot of time in New York just sort of trying to learn how to be a filmmaker,” he

64 JUNE 2019

ARKANSAS TIMES

said. “[It’s] not something that comes naturally to me. So it’s been a constant learning process.” Much of the draw of filmmaking, Thiedeman explains, is the opportunity to creatively explore his own memories and emotions. “It’s an emotional experience, because I see my feelings rendered in color and light and shadow in front of me. But it’s very helpful. It helps me understand why I feel things. It gives me a new perspective.” Of “Kevin,” Thiedeman said the film’s catalyst was a matter of “absolute chance.” Originally, he’d set out to make an entirely different documentary, an experimental essay film that used images of abandoned buildings to explain a past relationship. “And the day before I was going to start that documentary, I realized that it would not be a mentally healthy thing to do and that I should stop that immediately.” Thiedeman then stumbled across a Facebook video of a blond teenager on a skateboard.

“I’ll stop myself before I get too sentimental, but I really feel like this was a divine occurrence. There was just something as soon as I saw this video. I was like, ‘This person should be in a movie.’ ” The skater in the video turned out to be Kevin Wands, an iconoclastic 18-year-old from Paragould with dreams of becoming a professional skateboarder. When Thiedeman messaged him about the idea for a documentary, Kevin agreed enthusiastically — “Hell yeah, I’d be stoked!” — and Thiedeman starting filming in Paragould the next day. From there, Thiedeman said, “His story revealed itself to us very, very quickly.” Kevin dropped out of high school in ninth grade to pursue skating and work toward a life outside of Paragould. The film follows Kevin as he navigates through the hardships of coming of age and then some — from dealing with the effects of drug abuse on his friends and family, to trying to hold down a job, to undergoing open-heart surgery. Kevin and his friends constitute their own kind of counterculture in their town, one that responds to adversity not with resentment, but with optimism, hard work and plainspoken belief in their own dreams. “ ‘Kevin’ is my kind of feel-good movie,” Thiedeman said. “I know that it’s a movie about circumstances that many other people might find unpleasant, but that isn’t the film to me. The film to me is this very, very hopeful story, made by someone who’s generally hopeless, catalyzed by the spirit of this highly cinematic person.” Paragould, like many other rural towns in Arkansas and beyond, is blighted by industrial decline, poverty and drug abuse. It’s the kind of place that, when it makes it into cinema at all, is often played for its downsides, the abandoned buildings mined for their aesthetic forlornness, and the residents either elided entirely or used as props for a filmmaker’s political argument. “It’s a world we choose to ignore,” Thiedeman said. But his film neither exploits nor ignores it to tell Thiedeman’s own story. “The film is at once a portrait and a document of America today,” he said. “I think the movie


Arkansas Times local ticketing: CentralArkansasTickets.com

UPCOMING EVENTS JUN

JUN

River Market Pavilions Knob Creek presents Pig & Swig — A Premium Whiskey Tasting and Pork Event

6-9 13-16 20-23

The Studio Theatre Matilda the Musical

JUN

Rebsamen Golf Course 11th Annual UCP Golf Scramble

JUN

St. James United Methodist Church, Worship Center The Raleigh Ringers

JUN

21

South on Main AJ Ghent

JUN

The Mixing Room Preservation Conversation: Historic Stained Glass Windows by Jay King

JUN

Albert Pike Masonic Center Arkansas Times Best Of Arkansas 2019: Boogie Nights!

7

9

13

14 JUN

14-16, 21-23, 28-30

27

The Weekend Theater Avenue Q

Go to CentralArkansasTickets.com to purchase these tickets and more! Arkansas Times local ticketing site! If you’re a non-profit, freestanding venue or business selling tickets thru eventbrite or another national seller – email us phyllis@arktimes.com or hannah@arktimes.com – we’re local, independent and offer a marketing package! ARKANSASTIMES.COM

JUNE 2019 65


has to be both things. Those two things work hand in hand. But the emotional core of the movie is to be found in Kevin and his friends.” That said, Thiedeman’s sentiments do show up onscreen. The film never loses hope in its protagonist, allowing Kevin’s dogged optimism to resonate. “Kevin is like the antithesis of all of the negative things that happen in his town around him,” Thiedeman said, “but I think through watching him and patiently observing his story, we learn a lot about a type of America that we, even as liberal Democrats, just are completely unfamiliar with.” Fans of cinema verite documentaries will recognize many of Thiedeman’s strategies. There’s no voiceover narration or orchestral soundtrack. Thiedeman shoots in natural light with a handheld camera and interviews his subjects without appearing on screen. But while the verite movement deemphasized the personalities of their subjects (think JFK lost in a crowd of voters in “Primary”), Thiedeman does the opposite. “It’s shot with human faces in the center of the frame so that our attention is always on a person, a face, rather than an environment,” Thiedeman explained. “There’s something to be said about how we frame a face or how we compel somebody to observe the feelings that register on someone’s face. And I do that the same way whether it’s an actor or whether it’s Kevin.” It’s Thiedeman’s way of framing faces that sets his work apart. He cites atmospheric directors like Claire Denis (“High Rise,” “Chocolat”), Lucrecia Martel (“Zama,” “The Holy Girl”), and Kelly Reichardt (“Certain Women,” “Wendy and Lucy”) as personal influences, and it’s easy to see how their sense of pace and tone inform his work. For Thiedeman, though, the emotional expression of the subject is, itself, the atmosphere. His filmmaking isn’t so much naturalistic as it is humanistic, creating images that literally put emotion in the foreground. In his fiction films, characters often explain what they’re thinking at length while the camera watches them in close-up. In 2012’s “Cain and Abel,” the film opens with Cain (played by recurring Thiedeman favorite Samuel Pettit) telling a spiritual leader (Tucker Steinmetz) how he feels betrayed by God; in “Last Summer,” Luke (Pettit again) talks to his summer school teacher (Deb Lewis) about his boyfriend, Jonah, leaving for college. The result is that Thiedeman’s films, whether they’re set in small-town Arkansas, a Biblical wasteland or a magical, mythological forest, all feel grounded in emotional experience. The same is true for “Kevin.” It’s Kevin’s experiences, expressed in his own words and through his own face, that get screen 66 JUNE 2019

ARKANSAS TIMES

“I think that being young is inherently dramatic.”

RURAL ARKANSAS IN THE 1990S: Thiedeman’s thesis film “Dragonslayer” confronts the pain of love during the AIDS crisis in rural Arkansas. It had its first screening in April.


New June Workshops

Sign up in store or online

108 W. 6th St. Suite A, Little Rock, AR 501.396.9146 www.bellavitajewelry.net

time, and Thiedeman’s camera presents them to the audience in their full complexity. When I first started talking with Thiedeman, I was thinking about his camera’s lingering gazes on its subjects, their lives and their faces, as a form of generosity, a decision to eschew editorial control and allow people to speak for themselves. Thiedeman didn’t quite agree. “I don’t know that it’s generosity so much as it is fascination and admiration. And when you’re fascinated by a person you become very patient, you know? “That’s where it all starts with me. In fact, if I’m writing a fictional film, I usually start because there’s some actor that I want to work with, because I want to observe that person,” Thiedeman said. “And so if I find somebody that I’m that interested in, that I find that compelling, then I don’t need to impose myself very much at all.” With “Kevin,” Thiedeman’s growing relationship to his subjects over the course of filming shaped how the story unfolded onscreen and, he says, the movie made itself. “Unlike a normal documentary in which you have all of this footage that you’re cobbling together and reordering and all of this kind of stuff, we actually included everything, and we included it chronologically. Because the story that you see unfolding is the exact story that I saw unfolding in the order that it happens. It’s the story of me becoming friends with a guy I admire more than anybody. “I think that being young is inherently dramatic, and I think that we as adults can learn a lot about ourselves by going back to our childhood, to our fears, our traumas, towards the events that shaped us and made us who we are, and to understand that everything that we go through in life molds and shapes us. … I’ve always been very interested in young people because they can live their lives with a smaller set of rules.” In the images Thiedeman captures, the viewer must trust Kevin’s own agency to change his own life. “I’m there to create a portrait of someone, and that’s what ‘Kevin’ is. It’s a portrait of Kevin. It is not my opinion of Kevin, it is not a manipulation of any truth, it is me with a camera allowing Kevin to tell his story as he wants it told.”

Serving Dinner Monday-Thursday 5 pm - 9:30 pm Friday & Saturday 5 pm - 10 pm

www.Riverfront-Steakhouse.com Located in the Wyndham Hotel 2 Riverfront Place, North Little Rock, AR 501 375 7825 ARKANSASTIMES.COM

JUNE 2019 67


JOHN DRIVER

OUR NEW MENU IS HERE! Come See Us. ‘REFUSE AND WELLHEADS’

Jimbo Mathus talks petroleum and the human spirit.

J

CHINESE CAFÉ

Authentic Sichuan Cuisine and Cantonese Dim Sum served daily

Catering • Take Out • Delivery CHI’S FINE CHINESE CUISINE 1 7 2 0 0 C H E N A L PA R K WA Y • L I T T L E R O C K 501-821-8000 3421 OLD CANTRELL RD • LITTLE ROCK 501-916-9973 MON-SUN 11AM-9:30PM chisasiancafe 68 JUNE 2019

ARKANSAS TIMES

imbo Mathus — wild-eyed Mississippi mystic, founder of swing revivalist outfit Squirrel Nut Zippers, creative cohort to late Little Rock pianist/producer Jim Dickinson — played a show at the White Water Tavern last December, a few days before Christmas. That morning, the venue posted a quote from Mathus on its Facebook page: “On all of my solo work,” Mathus said, “you’ll hear that same combo of honky tonk, blues and gospel. It’s sort of like ancestor worship on my part.” Those who know that catalog well won’t be shocked to know that Mathus’ latest, “Incinerator,” dabbles in that same blues/gospel/honky tonk triumvirate. They might be surprised, though, about some of those ancestors, and about just how far back in the family tree they go. The title track, inspired by Mathus’ time working on petroleum barges in Louisiana in the 1980s, traces the fire curling from an industrial incinerator to its logical, chemical and cosmological conclusion. “The bright flames from the flare stacks of the refineries and chemical plants we’d pass made me think about the spirits of the dead,” he said in a press release accompanying the album. “I thought: After we die, our energy is released like that burn-off, and then, where does it go?” Mathus talked with us from New Orleans, where he was posted up ahead of a solo tour, about incineration. You are so prolific, and you’ve got so many musical projects going simultaneously. How do you keep track of your ideas? It’s kinda my No. 1 job, ya know? Truth be told. And I’ve been doing it so long it’s kind of routine for me to juggle all those ideas and be able to access ’em when I need ’em for particular jobs. So it’s kinda what I do. ... And the ideas for the songs mutate. I’m patient with my songs. I’m not ever in a big hurry to record ’em or do anything with ’em. Once they come to me, they just kinda hang out until they’re needed. … And I think on “Incinerator,” I was just looking to see, like, who’s with me? Who’s really with me? I’m gonna let y’all into a thought process here, and be very exposed. It is very exposed. And while there’s almost always an element of mysticism on your records, I’m not sure I knew how dark things

might get. There’s this lyric on the title track, “Acadian rhythms, refuse and wellheads,” which just reads to me like this really spooky collage. I understand this song comes from a time when you worked on petroleum barges, and that looking at that smoke and fire sort of made you think about, well, the idea that we’re all headed to the same place. Yeah. Well, it’s a song, really, about the human spirit, and how it relates to [the] petroleum industry in the swamps. (Laughs.) It’s quite odd. The human spirit has — imagine how much energy it possesses. Like, who could measure it? In the petroleum plants, in the storehouses, in the wellheads, there’s an incredible pressure. It’s a whole system, an infrastructure. It’s like the respiratory system or the blood system in humans. It has a power. It supplies power. It burns off and goes away into other things. The atoms that burn off in those pipes — you see the flames shooting up. That’s the burn-off of what they’re distilling there. And I started to see this parallel in this funny way — way back then, in the ’80s, when I was doing this — to the human spirit, and the way it supplies energy and then burns and burns and dissipates. So, it’s something I remembered that I’d thought of, 30 some-odd years ago. It began to intrigue me and fit into the concept of the album, you know. The human spirit, and how it can become song. This album was cut in two days, yes? That’s basically it. Two sessions. The boys had never rehearsed, had never heard the songs. I had never heard them. Most of ’em I learned on the piano that day, and they just sat around and listened, and by the time they got the bass and drums [set], we cut ’em. Most of ’em in one take, two takes. It just speaks to the producers, Bronson Tew and Matt Patton, and how much we got a good thing goin’ on. Someone wanted me to ask: Got any plans to collaborate with [Arkansas actress/writer] Jennifer Pierce? You’re still married, yes? Oh, yeah! This is our ninth-year wedding anniversary. Yeah, she’s from down there in Jonesboro. She spent a lot of time in Red Octopus [Theater]. So she stayed in Little Rock quite a bit. And we collaborate every day, man. This life is a collaboration. —Stephanie Smittle


WHEN A BANK SHARES YOUR PASSION FOR YOUR BUSINESS, IT’S A FORMULA FOR SUCCESS. As an SBA Preferred Lender, we secure your government-guaranteed loan in less time so your business can get growing faster. Visit us in person or online to see how Stone Bank can work for you. 900 S. Shackleford Three Financial Centre, Little Rock STONEBANK.COM • 833.253.2265

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE’S

THE COMEDY OF ERRORS JUNE 7–JULY 4

MCALISTER LAWN AT UCA — “PAY WHAT YOU CAN”

PRESENTS

GUYS AND DOLLS BASED ON A STORY AND CHARACTERS OF DAMON RUNYON

MUSIC AND LYRICS BY FRANK LOESSER BOOK BY JO SWERLING AND ABE BURROWS

JUNE 15–JULY 6 A MUSICAL FABLE OF BROADWAY

REYNOLDS PERFORMANCE HALL

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE’S

MACBETH

JUNE 21–JULY 7

REYNOLDS PERFORMANCE HALL

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE’S

ROMEO AND JULIET

GET LUCKY WITH OUR 13TH SEASON

A ONE-HOUR FAMILY-FRIENDLY PRODUCTION TOURING THROUGHOUT ARKANSAS! DETAILS AT ARKSHAKES.COM

JUNE 26–JULY 4

REYNOLDS PERFORMANCE HALL THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS:

Tickets on sale now! 866-810-0012 · arkshakes.com ·

FOLLOW US! ARKANSASTIMES.COM

JUNE 2019 69


FOOD & DRINK

Zero Proof Shirley Temple’s got some company.

U

By STEPHANIE SMITTLE

nlike the chef at the saucier station, the bartender typically whips up her artwork in plain view, with no chance to taste what she’s serving before it’s passed across the counter. In other words, she needs to know what she’s doing, and there are some beguiling corners of YouTube — near the intersection of booze and science — devoted to those at the cutting edge of the craft. Patrons at The Botanist in Shanghai, China, can consume pear liqueur and rose water from a suspended lightbulb. There’s a bar in Las Vegas that will, with proper notice, encase a wedding suitor’s engagement ring in a martini glass made out of ice for a proposal cocktail. Gracias Madre in Los Angeles once offered a tequila blanco mix in a bong, served with hemp seeds smoked tableside. There’s been a lot of buzz about one trend in particular that stands out, and it’s popular

70 JUNE 2019

ARKANSAS TIMES

in bars from Melrose to Manhattan. That trend: mixing a drink without alcohol. For what’s got to be the first time in years, concoctions like cold brew coffee juleps and juniper tonics are proliferating faster than small-batch pale ales, giving clever bartenders room to show off house-made syrups and smoke clouds and edible flowers. There are sophisticated spirit-free brands like Seedlip and Kin Euphorics online, too, hawking botanical distillations like “Grove 42” and “Hibiscus Rhodiola,” each promising a blissful, boozeless buzz, sans the headache, to all who sip it. So, whether you’re trying to pace yourself with a “NoGroni” on a marathon night out or you’re just thrilled we’ve all found occasion to ditch that uber-problematic “virgin” terminology, here’s to the mocktail, and to a handful of the Little Rock bars doing it justice.


RADUNO’S “FOR YOUR HEALTH” AND “CHERRY BASIL TONIC” First things first: Raduno’s bartenders definitely win the zero-proof game for having a dedicated mocktail menu. They also win for understanding that leaving out the booze doesn’t mean you have to pile on the sugar. Quite the opposite, in fact — the bite of the Barrit’s Jamaican-style ginger beer in the pizzeria’s “For Your Health” (opposite page) drink mimics the bite its alcoholic equivalents get from tequila or rum, and the Yerba mate syrup, lemon juice, local mint and flowers are bracing in the best of ways. The beauty queen of the Raduno mocktail menu, though? That’d be the Cherry Basil Tonic (left), with a jolt of Fever Tree tonic and an ombre effect that happens when the crimson Pink House Alchemy dark cherry grenadine therein fades to a clean, crisp coral at the top of the glass.

Dr. Anthony Fletcher mD, FAcc HEIGHTS TACO & TAMALE’S “TESOTE” Like Raduno, Heights Taco & Tamale has carved out a permanent space for handcrafted mocktails on its hardback wooden menu, where you’ll find a housemade “Mexican Fruit Punch,” an invigorating cucumber-water-based delight called “Mercantile Soda No. 1” and the “Tesote.” For the “Tesote,” the Heights spot starts with an ultraconcentrated black tea — steeped until it’s dark, bartenders Sarah Burns and Shayla Lewis told us — and adds to that a mint simple syrup; a blend of pineapple, orange, lemon and lime juices; and honey and cinnamon.

Dressing Generations of Men Custom to Casual For 100 Years in Arkansas 8201 Cantrell Road 501-227-8797 • 800-231-0086 The Capital Hotel 501-370-7080 www.baumans.com

PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIAN CHILSON ARKANSASTIMES.COM

JUNE 2019 71


STEPHANIE SMITTLE 72 JUNE 2019

ARKANSAS TIMES


THIS UNIQUE MUSICAL PERFORMED BY A MULTI-TALENTED CAST IS A SALUTE TO A MUSICAL LEGEND!

JUNE 5 – JULY 6

MURRYSDP.COM • 562-3131

PETIT & KEET’S “DANDELION” A deep, abiding love for pineapple is a definite prerequisite for this drink, but if that sounds like you, Petit & Keet might be your new happy hour spot. The “Dandelion” (top left) is summer in a martini glass — lemon, lime, pineapple and cucumber, served with the cuke peels as garnish, flopping over the rim like they’re drunk on springtime chlorophyll. ALLSOPP & CHAPPLE’S SPIRIT-FREE “PIÑA COLADA” Even in its former life as Ira’s, this Main Street venue was known for a strong bar program. That hasn’t changed with Executive Chef Bonner Cameron at the helm; he’s fashioned the Rose Building restaurant and bar after its literary roots as a bookstore. Holding the gin on the bar’s “Great Gatsby” is a strong contender, but bartender Jared Browner mixed up a decadent (and somehow still frothy and light) spirit-free Piña Colada (top right) from an almond-rich Orgeat syrup, pineapple juice, lime and a housemade bourbon vanilla coconut cream. A drink that’s engineered to be both milky and acidic might sound digestively dreadful on paper; this cloudy summer concoction is anything but.

BEST STEAK

CIAO BACI’S “STRAWBERRY SEASON” This drink (bottom left) does not, as far as we know, bear this name officially, but it may as well. Bartender Mailyn Schneider makes the most of strawberries sourced from Dunbar Garden when they’re available, pairing a strained puree with fresh lime juice and simple syrup. Thanks to a clever strawberry-and-mint garnish, you can smell the berries before you taste them, and as soon as that thermometer outside hits a brutal 98 degrees with 80 percent relative humidity to boot, this ruby red drink — and maybe some gazpacho — is all a reasonable Little Rock resident will want for supper. SOUTH ON MAIN’S PECAN, GINGER BEER AND CRANBERRY JUICE South on Main’s go-to mocktail (bottom right) is based on a pretty safe assumption — that most of its competitors don’t keep a ready supply of pecan simple syrup lying around. As it turns out, the pecans the restaurant uses to top salads and whatnot produce a delicious byproduct when they’re candied in-house, and that pecaninfused syrup gets paired with cranberry juice and Gosling’s ginger beer for a killer mocktail. “We’ve never had a formal mocktail menu,” bartender Scott Foltz told us, “but I always like it when I’m behind the bar and someone orders one.”

LITTLE ROCK’S MOST AWARD-WINNING RESTAURANT 1619 Rebsamen Rd. 501.663.9734 • thefadedrose.com

PATIO WEATHER IS HERE!

DOE’S KNOWS LUNCH & DINNER. Lunch: Mon- Fri 11am-2pm Dinner: Mon-Thur 5-9pm • Fri & Sat 5-10pm FULL BAR & PRIVATE PARTY ROOM

BEST STEAK

BEST CATFISH

1023 West Markham • Downtown Little Rock 501-376-1195 • www.doeseatplace.net ARKANSASTIMES.COM

JUNE 2019 73


Salsa Dancing

Tuesdays and Fridays

Starts with a one-hour lesson, no partner or experience required

Event Venue

Corporate Events, Weddings, Birthday Parties, Christmas Parties, And More

serving better than bar foodall night long June

1 - Rikki Dandthe Crew 3 - StruggleJennings 7 - ElDub 8 - Mess + LocalSupport 9 - GarrettT CappsandtheTenderThings 14 - Robert Kimbrough Sr. 15 - Kadela 21 - Brick Fields 22 -The GoingJessiesw/Amy GarlandAngel 28 - Dirtfootw/ Polyester Robot 29 - CosmOcean

Cometry out our updated menu! Check out upcoming bands at Fourquarter.com

Open until 2am every night! 415 Main St North Little Rock (501) 313-4704 • fourquarterbar.com 74 JUNE 2019

ARKANSAS TIMES

BRIAN CHILSON

614 President Clinton Ave, Little Rock Facebook/club27lr www.club27lr.com

Sip and savor

MAKE PLANS FOR PIG AND SWIG.

I

t’s the time of year for seersucker suits, sipping whiskey and watching the river flow by. You can be that laid-back and party, too, at the third annual Arkansas Times Pig and Swig, coming to the River Market on Friday, June 14. Knob Creek is sponsoring this busy workweek-capping event, where you can smooth your way into the weekend with wee drams of five whiskeys from the Jim Beam Distillery. As the river flows, so will these whiskeys: Jim Beam Peach, Basil Hayden Bourbon, Basil Hayden Dark Rye Bourbon, Knob Creek Double Barreled Rye and Knob Creek Bourbon. (Beer, wine and bourbon-based cocktails will be available for purchase.)

Arkansas restaurants are putting the Pig in the Swig: Making sure sippers stay upright will be Whole Hog North Little Rock, Old Chicago North Little Rock, Taco Mama Hot Springs, Ginger’s Handlebar Grill, The Root Cafe, Catina Laredo and others. Vegan drinkers have no fear: The Raw of Hot Springs will serve up porcine-free bites. After you partake of pork, lick the grease off your fingers and grab your partner to dance to classic rock ’n’ roll from the Electric 5. Other event sponsors are the Collins, Collins & Ray law firm (wristbands), Orion Federal Credit Union and Colonial Wines and Spirits (photo booth). The event runs 6-9 p.m.; early-bird tickets are $25.


L A U N N A D R I TH SPECIAL THANKS TO Club 27 CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR WINNERS!

SECOND PLACE FIRST PLACE - THREE YEARS IN A ROW! SAMANTHA’S TAP ROOM & WOOD GRILL STARLITE CLUB OF HOT SPRINGS THIRD PLACE: SILKS BAR & GRILL AT OAKLAWN THE COMPETING BARS AND RESTAURANTS

Arlington Resort Hotel & Spa (Hot Springs) Atlas Bar Bleu Monkey Grill (Hot Springs) Capo’s Tacos (Hot Springs) Colonial Wines & Spirits

Doubletree’s Bridges Restaurant & Lounge Dos Rocas Beer & Tacos La Terraza Rum & Lounge Prospect Sports Bar and Grill The Ohio Club (Hot Springs)

Samantha’s Tap Room & Wood Grill Silks Bar & Grill at Oaklawn (Hot Springs) Starlite Club (Hot Springs) Taco Mama (Hot Springs) Turner Bartending — Professional Mobile Bartenders

A SPECIAL THANKS TO LA TERRAZA RUM & LOUNGE, TACO MAMA, AND THE ROCK BRICK OVEN PIZZA FOR THEIR GREAT FOOD! ARKANSASTIMES.COM

JUNE 2019 75


PRESENTS

SPONSORED BY

EARLY BIRD

TICKET PRICE

Includes Whiskey Samples and Pork Dishes

$25

FRIDAY, JUNE 14 | 6-9PM | LITTLE ROCK | RIVER MARKET PAVILIONS Enjoy Whiskey samples from Knob Creek, Basil Hayden and Jim Beam Black, and pork dishes from Ginger’s Handlebar Grill, The Root Cafe, Cantina Laredo from Little Rock, Whole Hog, Old Chicago from North Little Rock, Taco Mama, In The Raw from Hot Springs, and more to come!

SPONSORS

PROCEEDS BENEFITING ARKANSAS UNITED LIVE MUSIC BY ELECTRIC 5

PHOTO BOOTH SPONSOR WRISTBAND SPONSOR

BEAM - SUNTORY SOUTHERN GLAZERS WINE & SPIRITS

76 JUNE 2019

ARKANSAS TIMES


BRIAN CHILSON

Electrify your Event!

BRING YOUR BOOGIE SHOES: The Dizzy 7 will get you dancing at the Best of Arkansas 2019 party.

The Best Party SAVE THE DATE FOR BOOGIE NIGHTS.

T

o celebrate the winners of the Arkansas Times’ annual Best of Arkansas poll, which will be revealed in our July issue, we’re getting down, getting down on it for the Best of Arkansas 2019: Boogie Nights party. On Thursday, June 27, at the Albert Pike Masonic Center (712 Scott St.), we’ll be celebrating the dancing kings and queens in entertainment and politics, the brightest (discoball) lights in media, and the grooviest places to eat, drink, see and do. Come strut your stuff with all those winners while enjoying disco-themed cocktails and food. DataMax Arkansas is the presenting sponsor, Orion Federal Credit Union is the overall sponsor and Collins, Collins, & Ray is the wristband sponsor. The event runs from 6-9 p.m. Tickets are $40 in advance or $75 per couple. Come dressed in your best disco garb — platform shoes, gold lamé, spread collars, bell-bottoms, jumpsuits — or (if you’re feeling unfun) cocktail attire.

Bring high voltage to your next private party, corporate event, wedding or festival with Electric5! Playing the songs you love the most, from oldies to current hits, Electric5 will get your party goers on the dance floor!

“Electric5 knocked it musically all the way out of the park! Such a great, fun, exciting dance band playing all the songs you want to hear!” – Phyllis Britton, Arkansas Times, Advertising Director

www.Electric5.rocks bookingElectric5@gmail.com

ARKANSASTIMES.COM

JUNE 2019 77


TRAVEL

Sit and Visit Awhile AT CHARLOTTE THERESA PLANTATION. BY MOLLY MITCHELL 78 JUNE 2019

ARKANSAS TIMES


“I

CHARLOTTE THERESA: A retreat in Pope County is fashioned after a historic Louisiana plantation. PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIAN CHILSON

’m not saying this is the ‘Get Out’ house. I’m just saying, if it was … this would be a good place to put it,” my husband remarked on the road to Charlotte Theresa Plantation in Atkins. Between the isolated gravel roads leading us to our destination and the relative lack of information about the bed and breakfast online, we were feeling a bit jumpy. In light of the fact that the Charlotte Theresa Plantation is not, in fact, a historical plantation, but a relatively new orchard and farmhouse inspired by a plantation house, I’m still trying to figure out if the “Get Out” film reference was more or less apropos. Regardless, the similarities to horror movies ended there and we had a lovely time. Inspired by the historic Oak Alley Plantation in Vacherie, La., where an enslaved gardener named Antoine first successfully grafted pecan trees, owners Charlotte and Billy Wilchman planted a 300-acre pecan orchard and modeled the outside of their B&B after Oak Alley. I’m not so sure Antoine (his last name isn’t known) would appreciate his homage being in the form of his owner’s home, but there it is. The pecan orchard itself, on the other hand, is a fine tribute: The Wilchmans use grafting techniques that Antoine pioneered. The Charlotte Theresa house (as in Charlotte Theresa Wilchman) features the signature high ceilings, large windows and doors, dormers and Doric columns signature to the Greek Revival architectural style of antebellum Southern plantation homes, including the classic wrap-around porches complete with rocking chairs. Billy Wilchman has added his own piece of nostalgia to the picture in the form of a red vintage Ford pickup truck parked out front. Inside, the design shifts to a more contemporary style. It ticks all the boxes of the popular modern-farmhouse aesthetic: open-concept kitchen and living area, crown molding, lots of natural light and pleasantly light colors, and faux-hardwood floors made from a more practical tile better suited to lots of foot traffic. Outside the back door is a picturesque patio with lights strung up and a fire pit. Five guest rooms are situated up the spiral staircase on the second floor. An open common area on the second floor has a small coffee bar and a large TV with couches and chairs for groups of guests. Each room has its own TV and faux fireplace for the introverts who prefer to relax in their own rooms. Charlotte Wilchman is an avid quilter, and one room of the house is devoted to her quilting studio. ARKANSASTIMES.COM

JUNE 2019 79


FOR A TOUCH OF NOSTALGIA: A vintage Ford pickup is parked in the pecan grove.

BUCK WAGON BACKDROP: Charlotte Theresa’s grounds attracts prom photographers and wedding parties, while rockers beckon guests to the porch for a relaxing place to sit and view the pecan plantation.

80 JUNE 2019

ARKANSAS TIMES


The Wilchmans’ pecan orchard is 14 years old; they built the home in 2017. New-house smell still clings to the premises, and by definition the fresh construction lacks the history and accompanying sense of character that comes with truly old homes. That’s a good thing: As something of a blank canvas, Charlotte Theresa, which is gaining popularity as a photo-op and event destination, is a place that party planners can define. We thankfully missed the prom crowd scheduled to come take photos the next day — the Wilchmans did not charge in the past for prom-goers looking for a nice photo backdrop, but they had to start charging a minimal fee in the face of the damage that hordes of hyped-up teenagers inevitably do to the premises. As word gets around, the B&B is gaining popularity for weddings, too. The pecan orchard may be relatively young, but it bears fruit and even in the off seasons would make for beautiful walking grounds if you’re of a mind to take the air. We stayed on a rainy weekend, which prevented much exploration, but we enjoyed front porch sittin’, sweet tea drinkin’ and watching the sun set behind Petit Jean Mountain. The B&B’s proximity to Petit Jean and other state parks makes it a great springboard for an outdoorsy weekend. While the house may still be building its character, the Wilchmans take up the slack with their salt-of-the-earth vibe, openness and hospitality. Grizzly, good-natured Billy and warm Charlotte put guests at ease and are happy to shoot the breeze. You’ll get a chance to chat over a classic country breakfast of fried eggs, bacon and biscuits n’ gravy, just like Grandma used to make. The Wilchmans have lots of life experience from which to draw interesting conversation. In addition to their military and medical careers, they used to raise chickens and cows. The pecan orchard is their retirement endeavor. Apparently, for the couple at least, running a working pecan farm, plus growing muscadines and keeping bees, acting as event hosts, and running the B&B side of it all by themselves counts as a relaxing break from their former pace. Before the Wilchmans bought the property, the farm was being used by the community as an unofficial dump for trash, ranging from the everyday to broken-down combines and other derelict farm equipment. Hearing about how they made something beautiful out of it and chatting about their plans for the future is heartwarming and left me, for one, feeling encouraged and refreshed. If you don’t find yourself in Pope County in the near future, get a small taste of the B&B by heading to the Hillcrest Farmers’ Market in Little Rock next pecan season. Billy sets up shop there on the weekends to sell the pecans from Charlotte Theresa; he calls himself Paw Paw and his business Paw Paw’s Pecans.

Wardrobe ready? Walk in to Wicks.

5924 R Street, Little Rock 501.664.3062 • www.mrwicks.com

Make Rush Hour Your Happy Hour!

FOOD • DRINKS • FUN

1224 Main Street | atlassoma.com

WE DO IT ALL Upholstery | Pillows | Drapery Headboards | Wallpaper Home Accessories 10:00-5:30 Mon-Fri, Sat 10:00-4:00 1523 Rebsamen Park Rd • Little Rock • 501-663-0460 cynthiaeastfabrics.com ARKANSASTIMES.COM

JUNE 2019 81


WHAT'S HAPPENING HOT SPRINGS! JUNE 2019

SPONSORED BY OAKLAWN RACING CASINO RESORT AND VISIT HOT SPRINGS

ALL MONTH LONG IN JUNE

THE 8TH ANNUAL HOT SPRINGS FISHING CHALLENGE

More money. More fish. It’s back and it’s going to be the biggest ever! Seventy-one fish will be tagged and released into the lakes by Visit Hot Springs’ partner, the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission’s Andrew Hulsey Fish Hatchery.  Beginning at 6 a.m. May 1 and running through 5 p.m. on July 31, anyone who catches one of the tagged fish stands to win a prize. Clues will be given out during June and July about Big Al if he has not been caught by then. The prize fish will include this distribution: $15,000-1, $5,000-4, $1,000-46, $500-20. For additional information, call 501321-2277.

NEW AT OAKLAWN

Chick-Tac-Toe is at Oaklawn every Monday, Wednesday and Saturday from noon–10 p.m. Guests can play Tic-Tac-Toe against a real chicken for 10 points the first time and earn additional plays for every 50 points, with a max of 3 additional plays.

JUNE 1

WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP RUNNING OF THE TUBS

Join us for Hot Springs’ Steuart Pennington Running of the Tubs. along world-famous Bathhouse Row in the Downtown Historic District. Teams will compete starting at 9 a.m. Spectators are encouraged to bring water balloons and super soakers! Presented by The Bathhouse Soapery & Caldarium. It will be the 14th annual Running of the Tubs and the second time with the World Championship at stake.

Bring the family!

JUNE 29

MAGIC SPRINGS CONCERT: THE NEWSBOYS

Christian rock band Newsboys will be performing at Magic Springs Timberwood Amphitheater. Venue gates open at 6 p.m. and the opening act starts at 7 p.m. The Newsboys will perform at 8 p.m. The concert is free with park admission or a season pass. Bring your blankets and chairs, and enjoy the show! RESERVED SEATING AVAILABLE. For more information, go to magicsprings. com or call 501-624-0100

82 JUNE 2019

ARKANSAS TIMES

JUNE 7

THE KINFOLK FOLK FEST

Red Light Roastery Coffee House, 1003 Park Ave., is bringing folk back to Hot Springs with The Kinfolk Folk Fest, an afternoon of folk music, noon6 p.m. The schedule of events features an open jam from noon-2 p.m. Feel free to bring your acoustic instruments and lawn chairs to join in the fun.  Scheduled to perform are Jenny and Tom and Friends and the Evie Ladin Band. Superior Brewery will be serving beer and Itz Gud Fud truck will be set up at 910 Park Ave., along with local artists. This event is free to attend; donations will benefit Park Avenue Community Association and The Hot Springs Cultural Alliance. Call 501-609-9357 for more information.


JUNE 2

HOT SPRINGS MUSIC FESTIVAL, SEASON 24

The Hot Springs Music Festival celebrates 24 years of world class music with musicians from around the world the first two weeks in June. The festival pairs world-class mentor musicians from major orchestras, chamber ensembles and conservatory faculties with talented preprofessional apprentices, all of whom receive full instructional scholarships. For more information about the Hot Springs Music Festival, visit hotmusic.org or call the Hot Springs Music Festival office at 501-623-4763.  All performances are designed to be casual, classical and fun!

EST. 1988

EVERY THURSDAY IN JUNE

MOVIES AT THE MARKET

Movies at the Market is a free outdoor movie series that will be held every Thursday in June. The movies are screened at sunset in the Farmers Market, 121 Orange St., next to Transportation Plaza. Visit  weather.com for the sunset time each Thursday. The audience is allowed to enter the venue starting at 7:30 p.m. Picnics are welcome, but glass containers are prohibited. Popcorn, soft drinks, candy and other snacks are available for purchase. Movies at the Market is sponsored by Visit Hot Springs and the Hot Springs Young Professionals. 

BEST MEXICAN FOOD AROUND THE STATE (HOT SPRINGS) BEST MEXICAN FOOD (LITTLE ROCK)

Serving up the BEST MEXICAN FOOD in Central Arkansas year after year.

Little Rock • Benton • Hot Springs

lahamex.com

MOVIE SCHEDULE June 6

RALPH BREAKS THE INTERNET Sponsored by the Diamond Lakes Travel Association June 13

THE LITTLE MERMAID

Sponsored by Oaklawn Racing Casino Resort June 20

AVENGERS INFINITY WAR

Sponsored by Mid-America Science Museum June 27

MARY POPPINS RETURNS

Sponsored by Diamond Gymnastics Academy ARKANSASTIMES.COM

JUNE 2019 83


SPONSORED BY OAKLAWN RACING CASINO RESORT AND VISIT HOT SPRINGS

JUNE AT OAKLAWN RACING CASINO RESORT

FRESH LUNCH

MONDAY FUNDAY

Guests 50 and older get 5 times the entries into a $3,000 travel voucher drawing June 24, a $5 Silks Menu and free Chick-Tac-Toe play.

TUESDAYS

$1.99 Short Rib Night in Lagniappe’s from 4-9 p.m.

WEDNESDAYS

Girls Night Out, all ladies get 5 times the entries into a $1,000 Lauray’s gift card drawing June 26, $5 Silks menu and $3 drink specials from 5-9 p.m.

THURSDAYS

Hot Springs Village Days: All Hot Springs Village residents receive $4 Bistro Meal, 5 times the entries for June 27, $1,000 Visa card drawing and free ChickTac-Toe play.

FRIDAYS

Jumbo Jenga Tournament style Jenga competition in Pop’s.

FRIDAYS

Blackjack Party Pit Party beads, $3 drink specials and drawings for guests in the Party Pit from 8 p.m.-midnight.

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT SCHEDULE

LA HACIENDA

We have 11 lunch specials to choose from $6.25 to $8.99 and all made fresh just for you. Tuesday’s imported beers are $2.50 all day and Wednesday’s margaritas are $5.99. 3836 Central Ave., Hot Springs National Park, AR 71913. 501-525-8203.

FOR THE GRILL

POP’S LOUNGE Every Wednesday Karaoke, 8-11 p.m. Every Thursday Trivia, 7-9 p.m.

WELDON’S MEAT MARKET

Fire up the grill, summer is here! Head to the best butcher in the state for the best cuts of meat for your grill. 911 Central Ave., Hot Springs National Park. 501-525-2487.

FLIGHTS & GROWLERS

SILKS BAR & GRILL

Live music 10 p.m.-2 a.m. every Friday and Saturday. May 31-June 1 The Brandon Butler Band June 7-8 Mister Lucky June 14-15 Highway 124 June 21-22 Bobby Degoria June 28-29 The Shotgun Billys

84 JUNE 2019

ARKANSAS TIMES

SQZBX BREWERY & PIZZA JOINT

The beer list at SQZBX is a perfect fit for the Arkansas summer that lies ahead! Beers are served in custom glassware: 1/4 liter ($4), 1/2 liter ($7), pitcher ($15), growler ($16) or by the flight (four brews for $6). 236 Ouachita Ave., Hot Springs National Park. 501-609-0609.


PATIO IS OPEN!

TA C O S AT A N O T H E R L E V E L

Mon-Thur 11-9 • Fri-Sat 11-10 • Sun: 11-3 Brunch Only

ROLANDO’S

200 Higdon Ferry Rd. • Hot Springs • Across the street from the racetrack. (501) 623-TACO (8226) • capostacoshs@gmail.com

Join Rolando’s VIP Club and get a half price appetizer. Text ROLANDOS to 51660 and stay updated on exclusive offers! Rolando’s has Martini Monday, any liquor for $6.75 and Wine Down Wednesday on the patio, any glass of wine for $5 and a bottle for $20! 210 Central Ave., Hot Springs National Park. 501-318-6054.

We Have The #1 Customers In The State!

TREAT YOURSELF!

AROUND THE STATE:

Open Daily at 11am 7 Days A Week 210 Central Ave. Hot Springs 501.318.6054

BEST BUSINESS LUNCH BEST DESSERTS BEST DOG FRIENDLY BEST GLUTEN FREE BEST HEALTHY BEST OTHER ETHNIC, BEST WINE LIST BEST RESTAURANT IN HOT SPRINGS

rolandosrestaurante.com

AROUND THE STATE: BEST VEGETARIAN

SINCE 1981

SUPERIOR BATHHOUSE BREWERY

For centuries people have come to Hot Springs to heal in our famous, mineral-rich spring water. At Superior Bathhouse Brewery, we use that very same water to make amazing craft beer and root beer. Come wash away your stress with a visit to Hot Springs National Park and a Beer Bath at Superior Bathhouse Brewery. 329 Central Ave., Hot Springs National Park. 501-624-.2337.

ON THE GO!

BLEU MONKEY

The Bleu Monkey Grill offers orders to go perfect for any express lunch or office lunch, family dinner on the go, etc. Plus, we offer catering that is second to none. No event is too large or too small. Monkey Business Happy Hour is 4-7 p.m. Mon.-Thu. 4263 Central Ave., Hot Springs National Park. 501520-4800.

W

’S MEAT MARK N O D EL“QUALITY TELLS, QUALITY SELLS” ET BEST BUTCHER AROUND THE STATE

EVERYTHING IS CUT TO YOUR SPECIFICATION, AND WE’RE BIG ON CUSTOMER SERVICE! 3911 CENTRAL AVE. • HOT SPRINGS • (501) 525-2487

It’s All New! ARKTIMES.COM ARKANSASTIMES.COM

JUNE 2019 85


BRIAN CHILSON

CANNABIZ

BOLD BOX OF BUDS: Doctor’s Orders RX sells in prepackaged containers.

Once, There Were Two

WE VISIT — AND BUY FROM — ARKANSAS’S FIRST TWO MEDICAL CANNABIS DISPENSARIES, IN HOT SPRINGS. By LEW GASNIER

T

here were 913 days between Arkansas voter approval of medical cannabis on Nov. 8, 2016, and the day the first bud of legally grown, marijuana was legally sold to a card-holding patient. That’s a long time, and — given that we’ve got a deadly, pain-born opioid epidemic going on and all — a crying shame. Whatever the case, after literally years of foot dragging and application scoring, red tape and hinky-ashell shenanigans from the state Medical Marijuana Commission, the age of medical cannabis in Arkansas is finally here. Doctor’s Orders RX, a dispensary at 4897 Malvern Ave., between Malvern and Hot Springs, was the first to sell legally in the state on May 10. Green Springs Medical, at 309 Seneca St., within the city limits of Hot Springs, opened shortly thereafter. Both were mobbed in those first days by patients eager to sample what years of frustrated waiting had wrought. While we wait for the state’s other cultivators and dispensaries to come online in the next weeks and months, the Arkansas Times decided to get over to both Green Springs Medical and Doctor’s Orders RX, buy from both, and see what they’re all about.

86 JUNE 2019

ARKANSAS TIMES

Located about a mile behind Oaklawn Racing Casino Resort, Green Springs Medical is inside a large metal building on a hill, with a colorful awning, flags and a sign painted in a calming teal out front. The reviewer visited on a weekday evening less than a week after the grand opening. By then, the long lines and crowds had dissipated. Security, as you might imagine, is tight. Every external window is heavily barred. In the entryway, patrons are met with a metal detector inside its own, sweltering glass room. Go through it and you’ll find yourself before another glass door, which you must be buzzed through by staff once you’ve cleared the detector. Through that door is a clean and welllit waiting room, with upholstered chairs for patients to sit in while filling out paperwork or waiting their turn to enter the actual dispensary floor. As is the case at Doctor’s Orders RX, no one without a state-issued medical cannabis patient or caregiver card can enter Green Springs, even to sit inside. While that seemed a little harsh to me, given that a lot of patients are driven to the dispensary by friends and relatives, one of the Green Springs owners — who was walking around the lobby with a

chrome-plated handgun on his hip, chatting with waiting patrons while sporting the smile of a man who had figured out how to grow money — said the entry prohibition for all but licensed patients was an edict that had come down from the state. Sorry, lookie loos. On one wall of the waiting area were two glass windows, where I was asked for my cannabis card and driver’s license and given a very basic medical form to fill out. The cards were photocopied, my cannabis card was scanned and, once I’d handed in the form, I was buzzed through yet another security door that led into the actual sales floor. Glass cases lined the edges of the room. A large sculpture of a writhing dragon stood in one corner. While the decor of Green Springs was clearly still coming together and evidence of the mad dash to open was plentiful, the place already looks like you’d imagine a dispensary: clean, bright and locked down to the hilt. Some cases held a few dry herb and oil vapes for sale, though vape oil cartridges were not available. I stepped to a counter and was met by my “budtender,” a young man with a beard, clearly living the dream. Inside the case before us, the four or five strains of cannabis Green Springs had on hand after the


2 Freeway Dr. Little Rock, AR 501-666-7226 • pettusop.com

REAL RADIO. REAL FUN.

ARKANSASTIMES.COM

JUNE 2019 87


WE SPEAK SPANISH, DO YOU NEED HELP? LA VOZ DE NUESTRA COMUNIDAD www.ellatinoarkansas.com

GRATIS

4 DE ABRIL 2019 • VOLUMEN 18 • EDICIÓN 45

ALCALDE DE LITTLE ROCK, FRANK SCOTT JR. SE REÚNE CON LA COMUNIDAD LATINA PÁG. 4 AMÉRICA LATINA Y EL DESAFÍO DE REDUCIR EL EMBARAZO ADOLESCENTE PÁG. 8

MÉXICO REACTIVA SISTEMA DE BÚSQUEDA ANTE TRAGEDIA DE 40.000 DESAPARECIDOS PÁG. 14

CALENDARIO SEMANAL DE EVENTOS. Pág. 11 www.ellatinoarkansas.com • 4 DE ABRIL 2019 1

Our sister paper El Latino is Arkansas’s only weekly – audited Spanish language newspaper. Arkansas has the second fastest growing Latino population in the country and smart businesses are targeting this market as they develop business relationships with these new consumers. El Latino is a free publication available at 185 pickup locations in Central Arkansas. www.ellatinoarkansas.com Facebook.com/ellatinoarkansas Contact Luis Garcia today for more information! 201 E. Markham suite 200 Little Rock AR (501) 374-0853 luis@arktimes.com

88 JUNE 2019

ARKANSAS TIMES

long opening-day lines had cleared out were displayed in screw-top mason jars. My budtender had clearly done his homework, reeling off THC percentages and commonly accepted medical uses of each strain, along with the genetic split between indica and sativa, inviting me to look at the structure of each strain and even open the jars for a heady whiff of the buds inside. We marveled together over the wide range of smells between strains, from subtle to skunky. Eventually, I settled on an eighth-ounce of Holy Roller OG, a sativa-dominant hybrid with a stout 25 percent THC content. As I watched, my budtender weighed my order out into a green, childproof bottle sitting on a countertop scale, plucking the small, sturdy buds out of the jar with tongs. A label was slapped on the bottle that included my name, strain information and patient number, and after being buzzed through a series of security doors, I was out, having successfully purchased legal cannabis in Arkansas. At $15 a gram and about $7 in state, county and local taxes, my order came to $59.59. All told, the visit took me less than 15 minutes. Later, at home, I reweighed the cannabis on my own scale, and found it to be spot on at 3.5 grams (equivalent to 1/8th ounce). While officially in Hot Springs, Doctor’s Orders RX is far enough out from the Spa City that it makes more sense for Little Rock-area visitors to drive up Interstate 30 and come in from Malvern. The dispensary is in a low cinderblock building that has been painted white and is at the edge of a gravel lot. As was the case at Green Springs, the evidence of a thrash to open was plentiful. Though the lines had cleared out by the time we visited, there was still a row of folding chairs just outside the door. The front door opened onto a small, bare room with a window set into one wall. The window was trimmed in unpainted lumber, with a worker behind the glass. The room was hot the day we were there, crowded with two ice chests, a dog bed and a single folding chair to sit in while filling out a required form that asked me to list my name, doctor and the conditions that led me to seek medical cannabis. Once my card was scanned and the form was handed in, I was buzzed through to the dispensary, where I was greeted by a friendly budtender behind a glass case. While Doctor’s Orders RX had many of the same strains to be had at Green Springs, and my budtender was similarly versed in the effects and benefits of the strains on offer, the main difference — and, in my opinion, drawback — to Doctor’s Orders RX was that all the cannabis for sale the day I visited was prepackaged and sealed by grower BOLD Team (the only legal grower in Arkansas at the time) in tidy white cans, each bearing a label on the bottom listing the strain, harvest date, THC percentage and more. That, of course, negates actually seeing and smelling the cannabis before it is dispensed, while also limiting you to buying the prepackaged amounts

they have on hand. Too, BOLD Team’s cans, while attractive and likely to foil a curious child, were a bit tough to open, requiring you to press the can between your palms and then simultaneously twist your hands in opposite directions. I can guarantee you there are some patients with limited strength, mobility or other impairments who will have to get an assist to get their can open. From the available strains, I chose a 3.5 gram can of Cookies and Chem, an indica-dominant hybrid with up to 30 percent THC, said to be good for stress, relaxation, inflammation and chronic pain. After making my choice, the budtender relayed my decision to a worker behind a nearby window, who then retrieved the product. When I asked my budtender and another worker present if I could have smelled the cannabis before purchase, they told me that wasn’t possible because of the prepackaging. My can was retrieved by the worker behind the window, the one hiccup being that the woman mistakenly thought that I’d selected two 3.5 gram cans instead of only one. After the mistake was corrected, I paid (like Green Springs, Doctor’s Orders is cash only), a sticker with my name and patient number was put on the can, and I was ushered out through what will be the main dispensary area at some point: a large room with a bare concrete floor, framed photos leaning against the wall and several new glass cases awaiting installation. After going through a few more security doors, I was outside again. Doctor’s Orders RX is outside the Hot Springs city limits, so the total price was $58.80. When I got out to the parking lot and opened the can, I found that the tamper resistant foil seal inside was lifted along one edge, though it looked like that was possibly a sealing error. Whatever the case, when I weighed the cannabis from Doctor’s Orders RX at home, it came in a hair over the official amount, at 3.6 grams. While it is hard to judge businesses so early in the game, when both had just gone through the crucible of an all-hands-ondeck opening followed by a days-long crush of patients, Green Springs was the clear winner at this point when it came to location, ambiance and buying experience. Folks at both dispensaries were friendly and knowledgeable about their wares, but being able to see and smell the cannabis before you buy it, and watch while it is parceled out and weighed, added greatly to the experience and the trust factor. If the owners of Doctor’s Orders RX are wise, they’ll ditch the prepackaged cans and invest in some jars. Too, there’s the inescapable fact that Green Springs just looks a lot more finished, and thus feels a lot more welcoming inside. While it will be interesting to return to both establishments in a few months to see how their processes, decor and operations have been refined, for now Green Springs Medical will be my personal go-to, at least until dispensaries open closer to home.


CANNABIS REVIEW:

Cookies and Chem and Holy Roller OG

T

he first thing to say about the cannabis you’ll buy at a medical marijuana dispensary in Arkansas is: Go slow. While it’s still green and smokable, the product you’re going to buy is not the weed you may have smoked in the back of your friend’s van in high school. Today’s marijuana has been bred and cross-bred until it is pretty much weaponized, making even storied old school strains like Panama Red and Acapulco Gold look like backwater ditch weed by comparison. Bogart the joint with this shit, and you’ll wind up on the dark side of the moon for a few hours, as your friendly reviewer — a legendary marijuana lightweight, even in our prime —has found out a few times now when we overindulged. It’s not harmful (in our lay opinion at least), but it can be very uncomfortable, so when you’re starting out with a new strain, take your time and smoke less than you think you need.   I had long heard about the differing properties of Cannabis indica vs. Cannabis sativa, with indica strains said to offer a deep and relaxing “body high” that is great for pain, insomnia and depression. Sativa, meanwhile, is said to be more of a “head high,” leaving you energized and uplifted, with anti-inflammatory and de-stressing properties. Given that, I purposely selected two hybrids that went heavy in each direction, just to see if I could discern a difference. At Green Springs Medical, I purchased Holy Roller OG, which the internet tells me is a cross between classic Big Sur Holy Weed and Do-Si-Dos, featuring 60 percent sativa with a THC content of 25 percent. It’s not the weed talking when I say: The buds of Holy Roller are genuinely beautiful to look at — small, dense and a lovely mottled orange and green. My nose is old and tired, but the smell is pretty great, too: lemony, without the almost chemical harshness you can get from some high-grade cannabis. From Doctors Orders RX, meanwhile, I tried Cookies and Chem, another powerhouse strain created by crossing Girl Scout Cookies (the cannabis variety, not the actual cookies), Starfighter and Stardawg. The resulting strain is 65 percent indica, 35 percent sativa and has a staggeringly high THC content of up to 30 percent. While not as pretty as the Holy Roller, Cookies and Chem makes up for that with smell: a heavy weed scent that is front and center even when BOLD Team’s childproof can is sealed, and almost overpowering when it’s opened. The first night, I tried the Holy Roller OG, and this is where the abundance of caution I encouraged earlier came from. Grinding a

bud of the Holy Roller unleashed a bouquet of fragrances. I packed a bowl, fired up and inhaled deeply. The first thing to note is the delicious flavors, strangely nutty with a piney aftertaste. From there, though, I don’t remember much for a few hours, because I somehow slipped off my couch and fell down a well, with no Lassie to fetch help. I am confident that Jim Morrison was never that high in his entire life. I might even have had John Belushi beat. What I can tell you, however, is that even in the depths of being absolutely glued in place, floating on a warm cloud of careless nothing, there was none of the paranoia I’ve experienced in the past from cannabis. Whether that was a trait of the Holy Roller strain or just the fact that I was doing it legally, I don’t know, but I can say that Holy Roller would likely be great for anxiety and pain. Holy Roller melted mine away entirely for a few hours, along with my name, phone number and, for a little while there, the ability to walk without looking like I suspected the dining room was heavily land-mined. Having learned my lesson, I smoked less of the Cookies and Chem on my initial test flight of that strain the following night. Similarly delicious when smoked through a clean bong, the Cookies and Chem was a somewhat harsher smoke for me, burning my lungs with a sensation similar to fivealarm heartburn that disappeared as soon as I let the smoke out. As the cannabis kicked in, I was instantly sold on the differing properties of various strains. Where the Holy Roller was like having a mild stroke while drunk, the Cookies and Chem was beautifully mellow: a warm, sexy hug that left my mind almost completely clear, completely non-narcotic. Cannabis I’ve tried in the past made me want to go to sleep, but the Cookies and Chem affected me in almost exactly opposite, making me talkative and energetic while deep-sixing all my normal aches and pains. As a bonus, I could actually carry on a coherent conversation, which my spouse surely appreciated. Your mileage may vary, but for me Cookies and Chem would be the ultimate winddown weed, knocking out mental and physical ailments while still allowing you to get some work done around the house. For that reason, I’m much more likely to be a repeat customer on Cookies and Chem than the Holy Roller, and look forward to testing the waters of other indica-heavy strains as they become available. Until then: happy toking, Arkansas. Just take your time. You’ll thank —LEW GASNIER me later.  

MIDTOWN MUSIC LINE-UP FOR JUNE June 1 Fanstar June 7 Luke Williams Band June 8 Ed Bowman & The Rock City Players June 15 Delta Project June 21 Vanimal Kingdom June 22 Lipstick Hand Grenade June 28 Big Shane Thorton June 29 The Big Dam Horns BEST LATE-NIGHT SPOT

LIVE TRIVIA

EVERY TUESDAY AT 6 P.M. 1316 MAIN ST. • (501) 372-9990

$9.00 RIVERDALE 10 VIP CINEMA 2600 CANTRELL RD

APICHATPONG WEERASETHAKUL’S

CEMETERY OF SPLENDOUR

7 P.M. TUESDAY JUNE 18

501.296.9955 | RIVERDALE10.COM ELECTRIC RECLINER SEATS AND RESERVED SEATING ARKANSASTIMES.COM

JUNE 2019 89


HISTORY

Creationists v. Arkansas COURTESY OF THE MUSEUM OF AMERICAN HISTORY/CABOT PUBLIC SCHOOLS

RE-EVALUATING THE 1981 “MONKEY TRIAL.” By GUY LANCASTER

D

o you have a right to your beliefs? It’s a question that sounds strange, almost heretical to us Americans, but in his 1874 essay “The Ethics of Belief,” Cambridge philosopher and mathematician William K. Clifford argued that personal beliefs are only legitimate if acquired honestly through patient investigation. This is a radical notion: the idea that a belief, especially one that might affect other people, must withstand the encounter with reality in order to be considered ethical. Such radicalism has emerged into our public discourse only a few times in our history. One of those was Arkansas in 1982, with U.S. District Judge William Overton’s ruling in McLean v. Arkansas Board of Education. The McLean v. Arkansas case centered upon the constitutionality of Act 590, a law that mandated equal time for so-called “creation science” in public school classrooms where the theory of evolution was taught. Although the people of Arkansas had, back in 1928, outlawed the teaching of evolutionary theory in public schools through an initiated act (a law overturned in the 1968 U.S. Supreme Court case Epperson v. Arkansas), the driving force behind what became Act 590 was from out of state. Wendell Bird of the Institute for Creation Research in San Diego, had drawn up a model bill for teaching creationism alongside evolutionary theory, and this model was picked up by respiratory therapist Paul Ellwanger of South Carolina, founder of the organization Citizens for Fairness in Education. He tinkered with Bird’s original work and sent it to state legislators across the country hoping to get a bite, thus making Act 590 a clear example of what we call today “cookie-cutter legislation.” Multiple Arkansas legislators received copies of Ellwanger’s model bill and passed on it. But not James L. Holsted, a state senator from North Little Rock and a “born again” Christian. He introduced the legislation, Senate Bill 482, without ever once consulting with the Arkansas Department of Education

90 JUNE 2019

ARKANSAS TIMES

HE SIGNED THE BILL BUT DIDN’T READ IT FIRST: Gov. Frank White, who defeated Bill Clinton for governor in 1980, was famously drawn holding a banana by cartoonist George Fisher for his promotion of creation science.

or any educators or scientists, and the bill passed the Senate on March 13, 1981, without going through a committee for hearings and with only a few minutes of discussion on the Senate floor. The House of Representatives conducted only a 15-minute hearing before passing the bill 69-18. At this point, alarm bells were sounding among the more liberal denizens of the state with the awareness that Arkansas was about to perform another act of self-inflicted harm. The bill now went to Frank White, whose bid the previous year to be only the second Republican Party governor since the death of Reconstruction was initially regarded as a long shot at best. But this obscure Little Rock banker hammered first-term wonderkid Bill Clinton relentlessly over “Cubans and car tags” — that is, the discord at Fort Chaffee due to an influx of Cuban refugees and Clinton’s increase of automobile licensing fees. After eking out a 32,000-vote margin of victory, White proclaimed his win “a victory for the Lord,” and so perhaps it was not at all surprising that the new governor signed the creation-science bill into law on March 19, making it Act 590 of 1981. Nor was it surprising that he later admitted not having read

the bill before signing it. White had not really expected to become governor and entered office without the sort of legislative program that might guide the bills coming to his desk. This bill no doubt spoke to his own religious sentiments. After signing it, the governor extravagantly exclaimed to assembled reporters that Arkansas had assumed the scientific leadership of the known world. From this point onward, Arkansas Gazette cartoonist George Fisher would depict White holding a half-eaten banana in one hand. Some things just stick like that — you enter office without a legislative plan and end up being forever defined by a bill you didn’t even read. Suddenly, national media attention was focused upon Arkansas, with the inevitable lawsuit fostering predictions of a sequel to the famous Scopes Monkey Trial. In response, some state legislators pleaded ignorance about the bill they had just passed. Sen. Holsted himself acknowledged knowing very little about the subject of his bill, saying that if he had foreseen so many people asking him about creationism, “I might have gotten scared off because I don’t know anything about that stuff.” But he stuck to


his guns, unlike others who had turned around to denounce Act 590 as unconstitutional. Sure, they had voted for it, but they had not expected it to actually pass — they just wanted to make sure they were on the right side of religious issues when the next election rolled around. As Matthew McNair noted in his essay in the 2016 UA Press anthology “First Amendment Studies in Arkansas,” “This casts dubious light on the assertion by some that [Act 590] was purely a bill to promote science education.” Some legislators floated the idea of a special session in order to revoke the law, but White pledged to veto any such bill. When the ACLU and others filed suit, Act 590 became the new cause celebre for the Moral Majority. Arkansas had stumbled right into a new monkey trial with national attention fixated upon the goings-on in Little Rock. The trial opened Dec. 7, 1981, and concluded 10 days later. Among the plaintiffs were a number of clergy representing Methodist, Catholic, Episcopalian, Presbyterian, Jewish and other groups whose inclusion was designed to counter the Moral Majority framing of the debate as one of atheism vs. Christianity (the name of the court case takes itself from a United Methodist minister, Rev. William McLean). Other plaintiffs included biology teachers and organizations like the Arkansas Education Association. The ACLU took a two-pronged approach, with a “religious team” of witnesses arguing that creationism was an explicitly religious doctrine, and a “scientific team” whose job was to undercut the supposed scientific claims of creationism. The state had the more difficult job, and not just because it was forced to defend a law that had undergone no debate and that few of those who voted for it even understood it. Attorney General Steve Clark was seen as, at best, a reluctant defender of Act 590, and a number of state and national groups attempted to sign on as institutional defendants, citing a statement of Clark’s that he had “personal qualms” about the constitutionality of the act as a sign that he would not represent the case for creationism with full fervor. However, Judge Overton refused to allow any outside intervention. A Sept. 2, 1981, Gazette cartoon by George Fisher, titled “The Intervenors,” depicts Clark wearing old-fashioned riding gear and driving the sort of car that carried the Clampetts to California in “The Beverly Hillbillies.” The car is labeled, “Creation Science Case,” and in the voluminous back seat is a rowdy assemblage of men (along with one woman and a monkey), one at a pulpit, one throwing leaflets into the wind, and one, with a steering wheel of his own, shouting, “Judge Overton or no Judge Overton — I just don’t trust that driver!” Then, it came to light in December 1981, in the very midst of the trial, that Clark had allowed the ACLU to auction off a dinner with him as part of a fundraising campaign. This raised the ire of the Moral Majority. On “The 700 Club,” Pat Robertson

Come taste what you’ve been missing!

BEST ITALIAN AROUND THE STATE (CONWAY)

Downtown Conway 915 Front Street | 501-205-8751 Downtown Russellville Downtown Van Buren 319 West Main | 479-747-1707 810 Main Street | 479-262-6225 pastagrillrestaurant.com

ARKANSASTIMES.COM

JUNE 2019 91


On Display April 27 - October 27 This interactive exhibit features giant sea life sculptures made entirely of trash!

www.ClintonPresidentialCenter.org @ClintonCenter Sponsored by:

described Clark as “crooked,” while Jerry Falwell accused him of “collusion or worse.” Adherents of creationism felt that the fix was in. From the moment Act 590 was passed up through the trial later that year, many supporters of creationism equated their advocacy with democracy itself. Holsted, who introduced the bill, said, “My job as a politician and as a senator from North Little Rock is to introduce something that represents my beliefs and the beliefs of the majority of my constituents, which I am convinced that bill does.” According to Dorothy Nelkin, a sociologist of science who testified on behalf of the plaintiffs in the McLean trial, many state witnesses accused “evolutionary biologists of ‘censorship,’ of ‘country club exclusion,’ of keeping those theories which were incompatible with their personal or philosophical views ‘out of the marketplace of ideas.’ ” White liked to brag that the mail he received was 5-to-1 in favor of Act 590. Letters to the Arkansas Gazette regularly echoed the democratic rhetoric of those who promoted the bill, with one being titled, “Can 22 State Senators Be Wrong?” And when a judiciary not subject to democratic limitations dared to sit in judgment upon a popular idea, it

A letter to the editor of the Arkansas Gazette was titled “Can 22 State Senators Be Wrong?” evoked a great deal of ire; or as one correspondent to the Gazette wrote: “The majority did not vote these judges or laws, but enemies and subversives have infiltrated the security and legal systems, the courts, the schools, including Communists and the Mafia and evil moral perverts in every form of disguise and deception.” Even Attorney General Clark could not help implying that popular acclaim somehow legitimized the law, saying of the religious leaders testifying against Act 590: “I don’t think they represent the cross-section of Christians in our state.” So, while creationists like to accuse scientists of constituting a “country club” set with an undemocratic hold upon education, is creationism democratic? No. As one of the founders of modern young-earth creationism, Henry M. Morris, whose work was cited in the McLean ruling, wrote in an early textbook of his: “... it is ... quite impossible to determine anything about Creation through a study of present processes, because present processes are not creative in character. If man wishes to know anything about Creation (the time of Creation, the duration of Creation, the order of Creation, the methods of Creation, or anything else) his sole source of true information is that of divine revela-

92 JUNE 2019

ARKANSAS TIMES

tion.” Likewise, Duane Gish of the Institute for Creation Research, and a prominent witness for the defense, once wrote, “God used processes which are not now operating anywhere in the natural universe. This is why we refer to divine creation as special creation. We cannot discover by scientific investigation anything about the creative processes used by God.” Harold Coffin, a creationist writer and witness for the defense, acknowledged in a deposition that scientific inquiry would lead to the conclusion that the earth was billions of years old but that his view “is not so much based on scientific evidence as on Scriptural-historical information” — or counting backward through the generations listed in the Bible to determine when God created the world. The scientific method, on the other hand, is fundamentally democratic. Anyone can, for example, test the rate of acceleration due to gravity on Earth, regardless of the experimenter’s nationality, age, race, religion or gender, and come up with the same answer. Renowned astronomer Carl Sagan once wrote: “The whole idea of a democratic application of skepticism is that everyone should have the essential tools to effectively and constructively evaluate claims to knowl-

edge.” However, according to creationists, the only people who have access to the truth are those who not only believe in a God, but believe in the right kind of God the right kind of way, and the only way to evaluate claims of knowledge is via one of these self-appointed emissaries of God. It surprised no one when Overton ruled, on Jan. 5, 1982, that Act 590 was unconstitutional. As expected, he based a large part of his ruling on the establishment clause of the First Amendment, finding that creationism was a religious doctrine that could not be supported by the state, and that no amount of public support justified its inclusion in educational curricula: “The application and content of First Amendment principles are not determined by public opinion polls or by a majority vote. Whether the proponents of Act 590 constitute the majority or the minority is quite irrelevant under a constitutional system of government. No group, no matter how large or small, may use the organs of government, of which the public schools are the most conspicuous and influential, to foist its religious beliefs on others.” But Judge Overton also took the time to expound upon the nature of science and thus illustrate just how far creationism was re-


moved from actual scientific method. Namely, he listed five essential characteristics of science: (1) It is guided by natural law; (2) It has to be explanatory by reference to natural law; (3) It is testable against the empirical world; (4) Its conclusions are tentative, i.e., are not necessarily the final word; and (5) It is falsifiable. In other words, science is the pursuit of understanding reality, and in that, science is not so different from other pursuits of ours. Harvard University biologist Stephen Jay Gould, who testified in the McLean trial, recounted later how, when he returned to his hotel room in preparation to leave Little Rock, he encountered a plumber looking for the source of a water leak that had caused the ceiling in the room below to collapse. Said plumber gave the biologist “a fascinating disquisition on how a professional traces the pathways of water through hotel pipes and walls” that “was perfectly logical and mechanistic.” However, when Gould asked the plumber his opinion on the trial across the street, “he confessed his staunch creationism, including his firm belief in the miracle of Noah’s flood.” Apparently, the plumber did not recognize the fact that the principles underlying his own work — tracing effects back to causes — also served as the foundation of evolutionary biology. In the Book of Genesis, there is the story of Joseph, whose jealous half-brothers conspire to sell him into slavery. He undergoes a series of adventures and ends up right-hand-man to the pharaoh of Egypt. Many years later, a famine sends Joseph’s half-brothers to Egypt to seek food, and Joseph finds that he is in the perfect position to help his family. As he tells them of their original crime, “But as for you, ye thought evil against me; but God meant it unto good, to bring to pass, as it is this day, to save much people alive.” In like manner, those who foisted Act 590 upon Arkansas intended evil for its citizens; they intended to inaugurate a reign of ignorance that would leave the state crippled and its citizenry without the tools to understand reality. But the result of their efforts was, in Judge Overton’s eloquent ruling, a full-throated defense of the scientific method, one that would remain unparalleled in jurisprudence until the 2005 Kitzmiller v. Dover case out of Pennsylvania that similarly destroyed the intellectual pretensions of intelligent design (and, like the McLean ruling, was never appealed to the Supreme Court). Many who lived through the trial remember McLean as a blight upon Arkansas, an embarrassment for a state that perennially lingered at the bottom of any national ranking (save for, maybe, rice production and teen pregnancy). But we should remember, instead, the rousing vindication of rationality and democracy that emerged from this time of trial. For although the creationists meant it for evil, Act 590 — in the hands of the plaintiffs and Judge Overton — was turned into an opportunity for good. ARKANSASTIMES.COM

JUNE 2019 93


WHAT YOU NEED THIS MONTH!

94 JUNE 2019

ARKANSAS TIMES

A special advertising promotion


LimitLess FLavor

For a Limited time! Take a break from your usual and grab a slice of something new! They’re unique, delicious, and won’t be around forever, so try one today!

The Pollinator The bees are back in town! 1. WONDERFULLY WOVEN This Water Hyacinth Market basket from Indonesia is the perfect carry-all for the beach, farmers market or everyday. Add a pop of color to the bag or yourself with one of our gorgeous scarves. Bella Vita Jewelry, 501-3969146, bellavitajewelry.net 2. FOR THE GENTLEMAN IN YOUR LIFE Peter Millar looks great on everyone — whether it’s for your father or your recent graduate who is off to college. Come shop Mr. Wicks for more colors and styles to fit the men in your life. Mr. Wicks, 501-664-3062, mrwicks.com 3. DADS: WE HAVE YOU COVERED! Hop in for the perfect grilling items for dad. We have sauces, cookbooks, aprons — you name it! Golf lovers? We have your gear, too. Come shop with us today. Rhea Drug Store, 501-663-4131, rheadrugstore.com 4. SUMMER IS HERE! The Uptown Girl Pocket Tote has four exterior pockets and a max-capacity breakaway zipper, which makes this tote well suited for multiple uses: files, a laptop, beach towels, lotion and anything else you can think of. Cynthia East Fabrics, 501-663-0460, cynthiaeastfabrics.com 5. MAN BOOKS These titles take the guesswork out of shopping for your Weekend Warrior, and will make up for his Mother’s Day Envy. WordsWorth Books, 501-663-9198, Wordsworth.com 6. SCENTS SINCE 1760 Creed Aventus and Creed Viking, founded in 1760, make fragrances that are the perfect Father’s Day gifts. Baumans Men’s Store, 501227-8797, baumans.com

Garlic glaze, mozzarella, salami, spicy capicola, cup ’n’ curl pepperoni, banana peppers, Parmesan-herb shake, and drizzled with honey.

The 3rd Street Special Red sauce, mozzarella, cup ‘n’ curl pepperoni, meatballs, Italian sausage, red onion, mild cherry peppers, oregano, provolone, and Parmesan-herb shake.

The Fort

BBQ sauce, mozzarella and cheddar cheese, smoked burnt ends, polish sausage, red onion, crushed BBQ potato chips, topped with a light drizzle of BBQ sauce. Served with a side of pickles. Seriously.

BBQ Burnt Ends Sandwich

Smoked burnt ends covered in our tangy BBQ sauce and topped with a melted blend of mozzarella and cheddar cheese. Served on a Hawaiian bun with a pickle spear, along with your choice of cole slaw or potato chips.

NORTH LITTLE ROCK | CONWAY | HIDEAWAYPIZZA.COM ARKANSASTIMES.COM

JUNE 2019 95


1

MUSICAL REMIXES

2

3

4

5

6

19

BY JOEL FAGLIANO / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ

96 JUNE 2019

ARKANSAS TIMES

10

39

40

45

42

46

51

66

83

36

48

49

58 63

68 73

78

74

98

99

76 80

89 95

90

105

106 114

91

92

96 101

113

81 86

100

112

65 70

75

85

94

64

69

79

93

37

50

62

88

18

54

61

84

17

44

57

87

104

35

53

72 77

16

30

67 71

15

43

52

60

14

26

34

47

59

13

22

29 33

41

56

12

25

32

55

11

21

28 31

82

9

24

27

38

8

20

23

AC ROSS 1 Paintball sound 6 City between Turin and Genoa 10 Padlocks lock them 15 Nothing, slangily 19 Spot check? 20 ____ Air 21 Egg producer 22 Drivetrain part 23 Alternative band that sounds like every other alternative band? 25 #1-selling artist that’s an anagram of 23-Across 27 Check time 28 “Wicked Game” singer Chris 30 Showroom display 31 Documentarian Morris 33 They’re new to the family 36 Mystery writer Deighton 38 Deli order 41 Like some drinks and emotions 43 “Nonsense!” 44 Full of frills 45 Invitation for musical plagiarism? 48 #1-selling artist that’s an anagram of 45-Across 51 Like first editions, often 52 Quirk 54 Cell in a 21-Across 55 Frilly trim 57 Rebels’ school 58 Remote possibility? 59 “… ____ other name would smell as sweet”: Juliet 60 Cellar setup 62 Good deal 63 Carrier letters 66 Greeting to a conductor? 68 #1-selling artist that’s an anagram of 66-Across 71 Till bill 72 Turn to mush 73 Acrylic container 76 Welcome to the fold? 77 Tide type 79 Enormous 80 Coffeehouse entertainers 82 Excite 85 Oil change, brake test, etc. 86 Performance often in Italian 87 Friendly music genre? 89 #1-selling artist that’s an anagram of 87-Across 93 Spellbound 94 It’s often set at night 96 Kimchi is its national dish 97 See 124-Across 98 Botanist Gray 99 Alternative to an Oscar 102 Pepper ____, Iron Man’s love interest 104 “Family Guy” baby 106 Mythical weeper 108 Sea creatures with beaks

7

97 102

103

107 115

108

109

110

111

116

117

118

119

120

121

122

123

124 No. 0519

112 Part of a hospital playlist? 115 #1-selling artist that’s an anagram of 112-Across 117 Play thing 118 Emmy-nominated FX comedy 119 “Ohhh, O.K.” 120 Ready for use 121 Count (on) 122 Punch in 123 Banks with a lot of money 124 With 97-Across, back some time DOWN 1 Make a mistake 2 Enrique ____ Nieto, Mexican president elected in 2012 3 Word after leading or cleaning 4 Digression 5 Private sector? 6 Hurt 7 Caution in a movie review, maybe 8 Whips

9 “____ are like beards; men do not have them until they grow up”: Voltaire 10 Face wear for Jason Voorhees in “Friday the 13th” 11 Old greeting 12 ____ acetosella (KHC2O4) 13 Human, for one 14 Church council 15 Light blue-green 16 Armpit-related 17 Like military hairstyles 18 Actor Jeong of “The Hangover” 24 Saint with an alphabet named after him 26 Newsroom workers, for short 29 Twenty something? 32 California school attended by Obama, familiarly 34 N.L. East team, to fans 35 New Year’s Eve host Carson 37 Org. with a closing bell 38 Triumphant cry 39 Together 40 “Heavens!”

42 Dough used for tortillas, maybe 44 Aristotle’s school 46 “Whatever” 47 Head case? 49 “Et tu?” 50 Bunkhouse feature 53 Karaoke need 56 Maa in “Babe,” e.g. 57 Leading 58 Turn (into) 61 Jacob’s name after he wrestled with the angel 62 Makeshift weapon in a murder mystery 64 Epitome of desolateness 65 Making known 67 ____ coeptis (phrase on the back of a dollar bill) 68 Hooded jacket 69 Nascar sponsor 70 Tries 73 Figure in a Yogi Bear cartoon 74 “The Walking Dead” channel 75 Computer that sounds like a theater when pluralized 78 That: Sp.

79 Noisy talker 81 Virginia’s ____ Hill Academy, alma mater of 20+ N.B.A. players 82 Taj Mahal city 83 Comfort 84 Keeping the beat? 85 ____ wars 88 Persists, as a forest fire 90 Spanish gold 91 Reveal 92 Lose face 95 Hosp. procedure 99 Winter Olympics powerhouse: Abbr. 100 Congressional divider 101 Loaf 103 Something skipped 105 Spot 107 Ornate 109 Bone: Prefix 110 Hit a high point 111 AT&T and Comcast, for short 112 “Science Friday” airer 113 Unseen winning card, in poker lingo 114 Never, in Berlin 116 Limitless quantity


MARKETPLACE MEDICAL TECHNOLOGISTS

San Damiano

CHI St. Vincent seeks two (2) Medical Technologists for positions in Little Rock. Job duties include collecting specimens and analyzing fluid and tissue samples. Requires bachelor’s degree in Medical Technology or alternatively bachelor’s in Chemistry, Biology or Physical Science and 1 yr exp in a clinical, analytical, or environmental laboratory. Submit resume to: KBloodsaw@stvincenthealth.com.

Ecumenical Catholic Church

The open, thinking, healing, welcoming faith community you’ve been looking for.

BOOKKEEPER POSITION

ARKANSAS TIMES is now hiring a full-time bookkeeper. The ideal candidate will have experience processing Accounts Payable, Accounts Receivable and Payroll; and must have a working knowledge of basic accounting software and Excel. Duties will include the following: ACCOUNTS PAYABLE: 1) Coding, entry and filing of vendor invoices. 2) Processing weekly vendor checks. 3) W-9 and 1099 management. ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE: 1) Printing and mailing of customer invoices and statements. 2) Processing daily cash receipts. 3) Collection of past due invoices. 4) Customer and Media database management. PAYROLL: 1) Processing semi-monthly payroll. 2) Calculation and processing of monthly commissions. 3) Preparation of payroll tax returns – monthly, quarterly and annual. 4) New hire orientation.

Come and see.

OFFICE MANAGEMENT: 1) Management of office supply inventory. 2) Minimal reception duties.

Mass Saturdays • 5:00 PM 12415 Cantrell Road Little Rock

Please send your resume to weldon@arktimes.com or call 501-375-2985 for more information.

501-613-7878 LRCatholic.org

ANSWERS TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE G O T O P L E S S

S K O S H S T A T E

A D A P T E D T O

S I T U A T I O N

P E A S

F A J I C A T A T A D E E A B T M L A P A C A N K S T I H I S A C H

M O L A S S E S

S P I T A T S T N A A N E D I N N Y U P O G O

E X A C T A S

D O E S T N A P B E N

D I N E S

W A D S I N C L E M E N T

A Y D E D S S A S P P I I N N G D L A Y U N E T A S S T S A W S E I E A P

D E N S

M I I

C H A I B U T N S M E A S O F S F U C S N U P K B I G A N N A D A D A R T I M Y O A I S Z E N E X C O A R N S M E E T I M O N E N K E N Y E S T E

M O R A S S E S B E N I G N I A D A S

E D A M

C A B O S T A C Y N O I E V D E E O D T K P O I S S I B S R Y C A S C O I K M I A S H H A

I N I T I A T E D

G O T O P R E S S

O N T O E

S T U N S

W A G O N

S N O O D

Research Systems Analyst Senior, INFO Research Systems CLARA, UAMS in Little Rock, AR:

Analyze, design, develop, test & implement custom software applications to solve complex healthcare business, patient care, healthcare regulatory, and medical research problems using state of the art software development tools and methods, considering computer equipment capacity & limitations, operating time, computer-user interfaces and form of desired results; Perform project tasks such as software development/implementation/ upgrades/testing, application maintenance/ troubleshooting and custom report writing in individual and team member roles; Define user requirements with process-mapping methodology and design/implement/enhance clinical research application systems utilizing cutting edge Java programming and J2EE software development technologies (e.g. Spring, JPA and Hibernate) on various application servers (e.g. Tomcat, JBoss and Jetty); Build friendly user interface using frontend development technologies (e.g. JavaScript, HTML, CSS); Maintain the application security; Manage multiple projects and work closely and effectively with co-workers and end-users. Req: MS in Computer Science or closely related field. Must have sound knowledge of software development lifecycle, web development technologies (e.g. JavaScript, HTML, CSS, SQL, XML), paradigms & network security (e.g. authentication, key management and standard/security protocols); Proficient in Object Orient/multithread programming with Java, development documents writing & automation test (e.g. JUnit); Ability to work with Linux OS & Windows OS. Apply online at https://jobs.uams.edu Requisition ID: 2019-59914 UAMS is an Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity Employer of individuals with disabilities and protected veterans and is committed to excellence.

TO ADVERTISE IN THIS SECTION, CALL LUIS at 501.492.3974 OR EMAIL LUIS@ARKTIMES.COM ARKANSASTIMES.COM

JUNE 2019 97


THE OBSERVER

Revisions

T

he Observer has been a lover of books since before we can remember, a reader since our earliest memories and a writer shortly thereafter, when we came to the thunderclap realization that the stories in our Little Golden Books weren’t fetched up out of the river with a hook or grown on a bush, but thunk up and written down by a plain ol’ human being, just like Yours Truly. There’s quite a bit of power in learning that lesson, though we’ve since learned a lot of people never do. Unfortunately for the vast majority of folks, the act of sitting down, pen in hand, to create full-fledged worlds

going on at work or home, an argument with your mother or how you got that promotion, just listen to yourself. What you’ll hear is: beginning, middle, end. Introduction, instigating incident, escalation of tension, climax, resolution. Showing, not telling. It’s all in there, and we just do it, as natural as breathing. The Observer, who taught creative writing out at the college for many a year, tried our damnedest to convince people that they could just write stories the same way they’d tell that story to a friend, in the same old voice they use to speak, without all the flowery horseshit people get up to when someone asks them to Create Art! The Observer has

and people to live within those worlds and emotions to live within those people is an idea as crazy as waving a magic wand and attempting to do the same in real life. It seems more than a little crazy. Maybe it is. The Observer, by the way, tossed in that “unfortunately” there because we happen to believe the idea that telling stories is hard is one of the biggest misconceptions around. The truth is we are all born storytellers. Day to day, hour to hour, the stories of our own trials and travails roll off our tongues so quick and easy that most of us never realize we’re performing a miracle, spinning the soggy straw of our dull old lives into narrative gold, full of intrigue and remorse, comedy and tragedy, heroes and villains, dramatic rises and sickening falls, always with ourselves as the ultimate protagonist, striving ever after some distant mountaintop lost in the clouds. The next time you sit a friend down over beers or a coffee to dish on the latest and greatest crap

more than a few cockamamie theories upstairs, and one of them is a steadfast belief that half this planet could be cranking out work to rival the greats if they’d just let go of their fear, shut out the voice of whoever told them they couldn’t possibly do it, and put ass to chair for an hour a night with the scribbling utensil of their choice close at hand. But another heartfelt belief is dovetailed to that one: that it is not a lack of talent that keeps most people from becoming artists. It is a lack of courage. To reveal your true self is to risk being found wanting. And so, most of us would rather wait out the clock and regret on our deathbeds that our stories were never told.    The Observer has been thinking of all this recently because we’ve been revisiting a series of stories we wrote way back in college about a town called Blind River, which is situated roughly where England, Ark., is now. The Observer’s people on our father’s side

were all from the England area, eventually washed out by the Great Flood of 1927 to seek their fortunes in Little Rock as roofers. Owing no small debt to the stories Yours Truly loved as a kid, in our version of that place, reality is a bit more threadbare than elsewhere, the town and surrounding woods full of ghostly dogs, phantom brides and mute Tarot card readers who can actually see the future. It is a strange and wondrous thing to read those old stories these days, written by a 22-year-old version of the 45-year-old old fart The Observer is now. Yours Truly used to tell folks: The reason I can read the same novel 20 times or more is because the words in the book don’t change, but I do, and that changes the book. We find that the weird, topsy-turvy feeling of reading again anew is even more pronounced in rereading old work of one’s own, not unlike visiting a city you moved away from as a child. All of it is the same, but all of it is somehow changed, with the biggest changes of all inside of you.  The Observer isn’t sure yet what will become of those old stories, whether we’ll spiff ’em up and do something with them, or put them back in the box under the bed to stew another decade or two. There are problems galore, of course, but we hesitate to fix ’em. Right now, those stories are a mirror in which we can see our own, younger face, and we haven’t seen that fella in a while. Whatever the case, reading that kid’s words has triggered the itch to walk the streets of that town again, where we spent so much time in our 20s that we began visiting it in our dreams. The need to tell new stories of that place is in us now like a second heartbeat, growing stronger every day, which means it’s only a matter of time. You, by the way, have your own worlds inside you as well, and a voice. Promise. So tell us: What’s stopping you?

“It is not a lack of talent that keeps most people from becoming artists. ”

98 JUNE 2019

ARKANSAS TIMES


ARKANSASTIMES.COM

JUNE 2019 99


2.50

BUSINESS CHECKING Score more for your money. 1

5 0 1 . 4 5 7.0 2 5 0 | a f c u . o r g /s c o r e m o r e Fe d e r a l l y i n s u r e d b y N C UA 1. APY = Annual Percentage Yield. 2. $10.00 monthly fee waived is for a limited time. Business Premier Checking is a tiered variable rate product, currently all tiers earn 2.50% APY as of 11/8/2018. Fees could reduce earnings. Offer and rates subject to change. Certain exclusions may apply. Membership with Arkansas Federal Credit Union is required for this offer. $100 minimum opening balance. ARKANSASTIMES.COM

JUNE 2019 100

Profile for Arkansas Times

Arkansas Times | June 2019  

The Style Issue Also: RX Pot Review A Toast To The Mocktail

Arkansas Times | June 2019  

The Style Issue Also: RX Pot Review A Toast To The Mocktail