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VOLUME 43, NUMBER 47 ARKANSAS TIMES (ISSN 0164-6273) is published each week by Arkansas Times Limited Partnership, 201 East Markham Street, Suite 200, Little Rock, Arkansas, 72201, phone (501) 375-2985. Periodical postage paid at Little Rock, Arkansas, and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to ARKANSAS TIMES, 201 EAST MARKHAM STREET, SUITE 200, Little Rock, AR, 72201. Subscription prices are $42 for one year, $74 for two years. Subscriptions outside Arkansas are $49 for one year, $88 for two years. Foreign (including Canadian) subscriptions are $168 a year. For subscriber service call (501) 375-2985. Current singlecopy price is 75¢, free in Pulaski County. Single issues are available by mail at $2.50 each, postage paid. Payment must accompany all single-copy orders. Reproduction or use in whole or in part of the contents without the written consent of the publishers is prohibited. Manuscripts and artwork will not be returned or acknowledged unless sufficient return postage and a self-addressed stamped envelope are included. All materials are handled with due care; however, the publisher assumes no responsibility for care and safe return of unsolicited materials. All letters sent to ARKANSAS TIMES will be treated as intended for publication and are subject to ARKANSAS TIMES’ unrestricted right to edit or to comment editorially.

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COMMENT

For universal health care While the U.S. Senate twists itself into a pretzel not passing a health care bill, I’m pleased to see that more and more people are looking seriously at universal health care. A single-payer system is no longer a fringe idea. It makes sense. Medicare for all works for everyone. Of course, paying for it is the elephant in the room. No one wants to raise taxes, and the people who buy our lawmakers and the powerful lobbies of the companies that would lose business won’t allow it to happen. They will go to any lengths to protect their profits at the expense of the average citizen. But the real power lies in “we the people.” A groundswell of support from the bottom up for a system that works for all the other industrialized countries in the world could make it happen here. It’s time we seriously consider a better option for health care in this country. Maya Porter Johnson

Concerned about Medicaid Millions of Americans have let out a simultaneous sigh of relief as the Senate’s health care reform plan essentially failed as written. However, the House

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ARKANSAS TIMES

and Senate’s actions have exposed an alarming reality: Our Congress is willing to do whatever it takes, no matter the harm to their constituents, to further a partisan agenda. I’m deeply concerned about the future of Medicaid. I’m deeply concerned for the 300,000 Arkansans who stand to lose coverage should the program be rolled back or capped. I’m deeply concerned for the 70,000 seniors and nearly 400,000 children who rely on coverage to maintain a healthy, dignified quality of life. I’ve learned what Medicaid means to people. It is more than just health care assistance: It is a lifeline of hope and opportunity to the needy and the vulnerable. I am an Arkansan first and an advocate second. I was raised to be proud of where I’m from, and to remember who raised me. It’s with this conscience that I protested the Better Care Reconciliation Act. I would encourage fellow Arkansans to do the same. Lindsay Bencick Little Rock

legislation that would make permanent the warrantless surveillance of every citizen in this country by the NSA. SB 1297 permanently enshrines Section 702 of the Foreign Surveillance Intelligence Act, which normally goes up for legislative review every few years. His rationale is that we’re at permanent war with Islamist terrorists and that somehow, by violating the privacy rights of millions of American citizens, we’ll prevent someone from running their car into a crowd. This bill constitutes a gross violation of our Fourth Amendment right to privacy. This isn’t what free states and democracies do. This is what totalitarian states do. It makes the Stasi in former East Germany look like the good guys. If you really value freedom and liberty, if you value your right to privacy, your right to simply be left alone, then call, email or write Cotton and all the Arkansas delegation in D.C. and tell them you oppose this bill. Brad Bailey Fayetteville

Cotton and warrantless surveillance

Hard work

U.S. Sen. Tom Cotton has introduced

I am writing in regard to your article “2017 LR Confidential” and explicitly

about the section describing the work of an LPN in a long-term facility. I worked as an LPN in long-term care facilities for five or six years. I found much of the descriptions to be accurate. The CNAs do provide the majority of resident care and are woefully underpaid. However, I feel that the work of the LPN was somewhat understated. The LPN is required to push very heavy machinery through the halls. There were two medication passes during my shift. There were 60-70 residents and the medication pass was supposed to last no more than two hours. That left the nurse only about two minutes to consult the medication administration record, which was voluminous, punch out the prescribed medication, give it to the resident and attempt to form some impression of the resident’s status. There was very little time left to actually talk to the resident. Very often, one medication pass was completed just in time to start the next one. I would suggest that even though the pay is generally better, any nurses over the age of 40 consider another care setting. The work at a long-term care facility is no walk in the park. Catherine Lamb Little Rock


The Arkansas Times, in partnership with First Security Bank, will honor its fourth class of Women Entrepreneurs this October, and we want to know who you believe should be in the spotlight. Here’s what to keep in mind: • Your nominee must be a woman who started her own business or took over a business and is still the owner/operator. • She must be an Arkansan. • She must be in business currently and have at least one year in business by the time of your nomination. • We welcome nominees who are LGBTQ.

• She must fit in one of these industry categories: food, professions (teachers, doctors, attorneys, financial advisors, etc.), nontraditional, retail and design, and two new categories - trailblazers (women who do not have their own business but have led their profession to success – pastors, teachers, CEOs, writers, etc.), and those women entrepreneurs outside of Pulaski County.

NOMINEES WILL BE ACCEPTED UNTIL SEPTEMBER 1, 2017 Submit your nominee and her contact information to Kelly Jones, kelly@arktimes.com, and we will announce our honorees in September. A panel of judges will determine the finalists, and they will be announced by industries in the following issues:

OCTOBER 5, 12, 19, AND 26

PAST HONOREES: WOMEN ENTREPRENEURS CLASS OF 2016 COMMUNITY BUSINESS Heather Smith Mary Jo Siikkema Javonne Jordan Lindsey Gray Bernice Osei-Danquah Lisa Marshall Rene Hooper Collin McReynolds

PROFESSIONAL & DESIGN Sarah Catherine Gutierrez Erin Eason Brittany Sanders Amy Milholland Gina Radke Kristi Dannelley Amy Denton Mary Nash

TRAILBLAZERS Sarah Anne Vestal Maggie Young Erma Jackson Jan Ham Berlinda Helms Nicole Hart Mireya Reith Supha Xayprasith-Mays

ARTS & EDUCATION Tina McCord Helen Scott and Cindy Scott Huisman Kristy Carter Vicki Farrell Nicole Winstead Bess Heisler Ginty Shamim Okolloh Kathryn Tucker

A luncheon hosted by First Security Bank is planned.

First Security Bank and The Arkansas Times are not affiliated arktimes.com JULY 27, 2017

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KARK

WEEK THAT WAS

Quote of the week “This is a tough, tough day for me. For my family, for my friends, my supporters. I would like to think I am much, much more than this. The portrayal of me has not been kind this last almost four years. But anybody that knows me — anybody that knows me — knows that I’m not what’s been reported.” — Mike Maggio, the former circuit judge from Conway, to a KARKTV, Channel 4, reporter just before he reported to U.S. marshals to begin serving a 10-year sentence. Maggio pled guilty to bribery for reducing a $5.2 million jury award in a nursing home negligence case to $1 million, to the benefit of Greenbrier nursing home owner Michael Morton. Maggio later tried, unsuccessfully, to rescind his guilty plea.

Nutt chills Freeze's career Ole Miss football coach Hugh Freeze resigned under duress last week. By most accounts, Little Rock native and former University of Arkansas and Ole Miss football coach Houston Nutt’s unhappiness about being blamed for an Ole Miss recruiting scandal led to the unearthing of phone records that did in Freeze. Nutt sued Ole Miss earlier this month, alleging defamation of character related to an NCAA investigation into the university. Nutt’s Little Rock attorney, Tom Mars, later pointed Ole Miss to phone records, obtained through the Freedom of Information Act, that suggested that Freeze had called an escort service. Freeze initially said it was a misdial, but Ole Miss officials said they found a pattern. The episode brings to mind Nutt’s own problems at the University of Arkansas — derived from his itchy cell-phone finger and the state public records law.

Reversal Huge legal news from the 8th U.S. 6

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ARKANSAS TIMES

Circuit Court of Appeals on a highly publicized case in which federal Judge P.K. Holmes disciplined lawyers for working out a class-action settlement in a lawsuit against an insurance company that involved dropping long-running litigation in his court for a settlement in state court. The 8th Circuit said the lawyers had not abused the judicial process or broken a rule when they dismissed the federal action. As a result, the appeals court reversed the disciplinary action against the lawyers. Some have argued the settlement was more favorable to class-action lawyers and the insurance company than to members of the class that sued over payments on auto claims. The case drew huge attention in part because of the high-powered classaction lawyers involved in the settlement. They included John Goodson of Texarkana, a political player, University of Arkansas trustee and husband of state Supreme Court Justice Courtney Goodson. Holmes’ discipline of offending lawyers was a reprimand, but it was a negative brand that affected their ability to handle similar cases in the future.

The 8th Circuit said it understood Holmes “frustration,” but said the lawyers had a “colorable” argument that a voluntary dismissal of the case was outside rules he could enforce and that he’d abused discretion in punishing the lawyers. Holmes has broad authority to discipline lawyers on his own volition, but this case didn’t meet the standard, the 8th Circuit held. Holmes found that the attorneys were looking for a more favorable forum. But the 8th Circuit said rules allow parties to ask for dismissal for “any reason,” and other cases had overturned sanctions in similar cases where a different forum was being sought.

Sanders in the spotlight Sarah Huckabee Sanders, daughter of former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee, is the new White House press secretary. Her promotion was announced last week after news of former press secretary Sean Spicer’s resignation. Spicer resigned, it was reported, over his unhappiness over President Trump’s choice of Anthony Scaramucci as com-

munications director. It’s a hot seat. Sanders seems to have been better liked by the press corps than Spicer, though she’s had plenty of sharp interchanges as deputy, recently in briefings in which recordings haven’t been allowed. Sanders had some supporting roles as a character in the “Saturday Night Live” depiction of the Trump White House. It remains to be seen if there’s a player ready to do for her what Melissa McCarthy did for Spicer in her portrayal of him.

Poll of the week In response to a Talk Business/Hendrix College poll of Arkansas residents on the way President Trump is doing his job:

50 percent approve 47 percent disapprove Trump won more than 60 percent of the vote in Arkansas in November. In February, 60 percent of respondents to the same poll approved of Trump, while 35 percent disapproved of him.


OPINION

Head-shaking

A

nother edition of so-much-badnews-so-little space:

* Jerry Guess built one helluva resume as the appointed superintendent of the Pulaski County Special School District. He broke relations with intractable union leaders. He fixed its fiscal distress. He oversaw a big building program and won a tax increase to pay for it. He engineered successful separation of the breakaway Jacksonville School District. He was a key player in an omnibus settlement of the Pulaski County school desegregation case. He made great strides toward resolving the few points on which the district remained under court supervision. All his work led to return of local control and an elected school board, which fired him last week. What the heck? The school board didn’t like his lawyer, Allen Roberts, who was critical in Guess’ achievements. But Roberts is viewed as too friendly with John Walker, the civil rights lawyer. His ability to work with Walker brought results, which was precisely why Guess wanted to keep him around. For that, Guess

was fired. The catalyst was the fact — pointed out by Roberts and Guess — that resolution of the desegregation MAX case would open BRANTLEY the door to state maxbrantley@arktimes.com Board of Education consideration of realignment of the unwieldy district, whose disparate components include Chenal Valley, Wrightsville, Maumelle, Sherwood and Scott. A particular problem point is the unwillingness of mostly white, upscale Chenal residents to consider the practicalities of fusing Little Rock and the part of the Pulaski district south of the Arkansas River. Its separation from the majority black Little Rock School District was a prerequisite for development of the area. The state of desegregation law today is that people are safe in segregated neighborhoods from busing and racial balance plans. But the mere prospect of consideration of a district realignment in two or three years was enough

Not Whitewater

J

ust think: If Democrats had turned out 78,000 more votes in three states in November, people could be reveling today in the prospect of impeaching and convicting President Hillary Clinton, not Donald Trump, as some Republican lawmakers had promised to try to do if she won. Trump himself seemed to offer that intriguing observation on a day when he demanded that his lousy attorney general — nearly his words — order the Justice Department and the FBI to start a criminal investigation of Clinton, the private citizen, and get her locked up, and stop the probe of his Russian connections. He told kids at the ritual presidential speech to the Boy Scouts’ national Jamboree that he won because she was too lazy to campaign in three states Democrats normally win. The Donald vs. Hillary criminalization becomes more relevant as Trump each day impels his Republican Congress toward that fateful decision, whether a special counsel’s investigation of the president and his men obliges it to take on that onerous burden itself, as happened with three previous presidents who faced impeachment, Andrew Johnson, Richard Nixon and Bill

Clinton. You can be certain that his party is not about to impeach Donald Trump, much less ERNEST convict and expel DUMAS him from office, despite widespread private revulsion for him in the ranks — unless the special counsel comes up with a devastating indictment or else Trump overplays his hand and reenacts the Saturday Night Massacre by firing his attorney general and deputy and making his loyal solicitor general, Noel Francisco, dismiss the special counsel, as Robert Bork did for Richard Nixon and to Archibald Cox. It took the court-ordered release of Nixon’s incriminating secret White House tapes to send Republican leaders to the White House to tell Nixon that he had to resign to save his supporters from having to do what all of them despaired of doing, impeaching and removing him. Unlike Trump, Nixon had never disparaged even one of his senators and congressmen. Reigniting the popular hatred of Hillary Clinton is Trump’s best gamble. The

for many to push the panic button. So Guess was fired to protect the status quo.

people in favor of a health bill so bad Donald Trump called it “mean.”

* Defrocked judge Mike Maggio of Conway went to federal prison for admitting he had viewed campaign contributions from a nursing home owner, arranged by a former state senator, as an inducement to knock down a jury’s nursing home negligence award by $4.2 million. He said he was sorry he pleaded guilty. He said he was a better man than media accounts represented. He said he hadn’t received a fair trial. He was not a sympathetic figure as he embarked on a 10-year stretch.

* The Arkansas Lottery had another year of flat revenue. Poor folks’ dreamchasing, thanks to new state legislation, now disproportionately helps higherincome, whiter students. Yes. Arkansas subsidizes college costs for higherincome families with lottery ticket purchase by poor folks.

* Politico reported that U.S. Rep. French Hill was chatted up by a couple of key Russian figures in Russia a few weeks before they joined that infamous Trump Tower meeting with Donald Trump Jr. Hill reportedly was told Russia would reopen the door to U.S. adoptions if Congress would lift economic sanctions. This puts Hill in the middle of the hottest political intrigue of the day. He refused to talk to us about the subject or anything else. Some constituents just don’t count for much. But we knew that from his vote against tens of thousands of sick, elderly, disabled and working poor

* A dynamic, progressive transit director, Jarod Varner, took a big job with an international transit management company. But it wasn’t too surprising, particularly because voters here are stuck in the 20th century. They defeated a small dedicated tax for the improving Rock Region Metro. Varner stood alone in a Metroplan vote on the Arkansas Department of Highways (D’OH) plan to widen the city-destroying Interstate 30 concrete gulch through the heart of downtown. This old-school thinking comes at a time when evidence shows a decline in commuting because people are finding jobs — not just homes, schools and new shopping centers — in the suburban cites the freeway building (and school white flight) helped create.

New York Times, which badgered her throughout the Clinton presidency with its Whitewater stories and later with the email-server and Clinton Foundation stories that Trump uses to say that she is a crook, last week compared Trump’s attacks on special counsel Robert Mueller to the Clintons’ attacks on the prosecutors who investigated his presidency — seven separate investigations and a dozen chief prosecutors. Actually, Clinton never derogated but one of his prosecutors, Kenneth W. Starr. But lingering on Hillary and Bill Clinton’s investigations doesn’t serve Trump well. Trump was an admirer of Clinton, including his philandering, the source of Trump’s own stardom as a playboy and showman. He said Clinton made one mistake, admitting that his denials of sex “with that woman” were dishonest. He should have continued to deny it no matter the evidence, Trump said. Trump complains that the deputy who appointed Mueller comes from a Democratic-leaning state and that Mueller has hired some investigators who have had ties to Democrats. Trump himself has supported Democrats, including the Clintons. All three Whitewater prosecutors were Republican activists, as were all the members of their team. Trump complains that his private finan-

cial dealings in the tens of billions of dollars and his taxes are absolutely off-limits and investigating them grounds for him to fire Mueller. Whitewater began as an investigation of a foolish $203,000 bank loan that the newlywed Clintons and another couple obtained in 1978 to buy a few acres of remote land in Marion County. The prosecutors found nothing amiss about any of it and then pursued one thing after another until 1998, when they learned about the president’s dalliances with an intern. Here is what should worry Trump, but doesn’t: Starr and the Republican House of Representatives brought an obstruction of justice charge against Clinton because he did not come clean in a public remark and in testimony about the trysts. His purpose in being evasive, they charged, must have been that he intended to influence Monica Lewinsky to lie if ever called to testify or to talk to FBI agents. The sexual trysts themselves were not illegal, only immoral, but his mindset was to influence an investigation. That standard for criminal conduct and removal from office leaves Trump in the wilderness. His efforts to impede or stop an investigation of Russian meddling in the election are not a matter of conjecture. He did it openly and repeatedly and bragged about it. He can talk about emails, but he needs to forget Whitewater.

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Buyer remorse

O

ut here in flyover country, you can’t hardly go by the feed store without running into a reporter doing one of those Wisdom of the Heartland stories. Seems like they could have saved themselves a bunch of trouble by listening to a Hank Williams Jr. song instead: “I live back in the woods, you see/My woman and the kids and the dogs, and me/I got a shotgun, a rifle, and a 4-wheel drive/ And a country boy can survive …” Until a few months ago, that was pretty much my life, although I’d have had a hard time without some real country boys’ help. You know, loading round bales into my truck, teaching me how to keep the transmission running. Making a skittish heifer stand still and teaching her newborn calf to suckle. Stuff like that. On the terrible winter day my horse Rusty colicked and died, my neighbor showed up to bury him without being asked. Somebody down at the One Stop — gasoline, hay, livestock feed, bait, groceries and sandwiches — told him about it. A dead horse was news at the One Stop. He went straight home, put the backhoe on his tractor, and came right over. I can’t tell you how grateful I was. There wasn’t a man on our road that couldn’t do a dozen things I couldn’t. I used to say you could give my neighbor Micky a chainsaw, a hammer and a box of nails and he’d build you a house from scratch. The plumbing and electrical work might require a trip to town, but he’d do that, too. Me, I’m good at catching runaway horses and herding cows back where they belong. I tried to keep an eye out. So I knew damn well the Russian trolls who sent me threatening emails last summer hadn’t talked to anybody I knew. I’d have been warned before they got out of Perry County. That said, except in a couple of cases, I have no idea who my friends voted for. In rural Arkansas, people just don’t talk about politics. Especially if they suspect it might cause bad feelings. Some were aware of my public identity; most were not. My wife went around with a Hillary bumper sticker, but nobody said a thing about it. They already knew she’d grown up in Little Rock. Perry County voted 70-24 percent for Trump; Pulaski County, which includes Little Rock, 56-39 for Clinton. Because here’s the deal: The same urban/rural divide big city reporters are exploring exists within states and regions, too. Some Little Rock neighbors feared we’d be unsafe among the rednecks when we moved to our farm. Perry

County neighbors expressed surprise we’d risk going back. What’s more, it’s as old as civilizaGENE tion: “What can LYONS I do in Rome?” wrote the poet Juvenal around 100 AD. “I never learned how to lie.” So I am unmoved by Gary Abernathy’s hurt feelings. “The reality of life in rural flyover country is lost on those who mock us,” writes the small town Ohio editor in The Washington Post. “These are the places where Donald Trump won the presidency, where people know they are ridiculed by East and West Coast elitists.” Where have I heard that song before? Oh, yeah, Hank Jr.: “I had a good friend in New York City/He never called me by my name, just hillbilly.” Well, boo-hoo-hoo. An elitist, to Abernathy, seems to be anybody who objects that the president of the United States acts like a wholly owned subsidiary of the Kremlin. Ultimately, such cultural paranoia — GOP-style identity politics, if you will — is self-defeating. I find myself more persuaded by New Yorker reporter Peter Hessler’s conclusions. Even after being penned up and screamed at during Trump pro-wrestling-style rallies last summer, he ended up thinking that “people have reasons for the things that they believe, and the intensity of their experiences can’t be taken for granted. … Almost everybody I met in Grand Junction seemed more complex, more interesting, and more decent than the man who inspires them.” Amen. Yes, many Trump voters have undeniable fascist leanings, even if they don’t like you calling them that. Millions of others simply got conned into giving their vote to somebody they saw as crude but honest — a billionaire apostle of the working man. But even here in Darkest Arkansas, buyer remorse is setting in. Last February, voters here gave Trump 60-35 positive over negative rating. By July’s Talk Business & Politics/Hendrix College survey, he’d fallen to 50-47 positive, a sharp drop. A remarkable 40 percent of Arkansas voters “strongly disapprove” of the Trump presidency. And that was last week, before the president’s bullying and berating his own (Southern-accented) attorney general, possibly presaging a constitutional crisis. If Trump starts that fight, I believe he’ll lose it.


Narrow opening

“S

omebody in this room — it’s time to go big or go home.” At the Democratic Party of Arkansas’s Clinton Dinner last weekend, Gov. John Bel Edwards of Louisiana used his platform as keynote speaker to embolden a candidate to step up to run for governor against incumbent Republican Governor Hutchinson. Although rumors have flickered about individuals pondering the race, to date no one has gone public with his interest. Because of the party’s misfortunes across a series of election cycles in statewide races and the high job approval ratings of Hutchinson, this is understandable. It is truly hard to imagine the type of good fortune that propelled Edwards to office in 2015 occurring in the 2018 Arkansas governor’s race. Based on new polling, however, there is a different political leap of faith that has a more likely chance of payoff: a challenge to one of the four Republicans holding seats in the U.S. House of Representatives. Polling from a Talk Business & Politics/Hendrix College survey released this week showed that Arkansans are surprisingly open to considering alternatives to their incumbent representatives in Washington. Only 36 percent of the respondents in the survey were certain they would vote to re-elect their GOP House member while 58 percent asserted they were “open to another candidate.” While partisans broke in the expected directions, independent voters broke 55 percent to 39 percent for contemplating other candidates. It’s important to shout several caveats about these results. First, “openness” to considering another candidate is a good distance away from actually voting for a specific opponent over a year from now; some voters desire to show openness to alternatives even when their voting patterns are clear. Second, the names of the congressmen were not included, reducing the benefit they gain from name recognition and other favorable perceptions. Finally, assuming they run (and there has been no indication they will not), the incumbents will have advantages in political money that incumbents from a majority party typically enjoy. That said, the low percentage of the Arkansas electorate locked into voting for an incumbent congressman is quite similar to the “re-elect” numbers of Democratic Sens. Blanche Lincoln and Mark Pryor one year before being demolished in their re-election campaigns in 2010 and 2014, respectively.

So, it would be a mistake to completely discount these numbers. Moreover, two forces — evaluaJAY tions of PresiBARTH dent Trump and the politics of health care — will most assuredly drive congressional election dynamics nationally in 2018; the Talk Business/Hendrix survey shows warning signs on both fronts for Arkansas Republicans. While Trump’s job approval remains slightly more positive than negative in the state, those who “strongly” disapprove of the president’s performance now slightly exceed those who “strongly” approve in a state where he won easily in 2016. In addition, answers to a series of questions in the survey indicate that Arkansans are paying close attention to the TrumpRussia scandal. Further evidence of collusion between the 2016 Trump campaign and the Russian government could be calamitous for Trump’s fellow partisans. On the health care front, Arkansans — disproportionately dependent upon the Medicaid expansion that is a component of the Affordable Care Act — show deep dubiousness of the Republican attempts to repeal the existing health reform law. All four representatives voted yes on the Republican health care replacement legislation that passed the House in early May. Republican campaigns successfully bashed Democrats’ votes for Obamacare over four election cycles, but the shoe is now on the other foot. All told, it does appear that the inherent gap between the values of the Republican and Democratic brands in Arkansas politics over the last few cycles has diminished greatly, at least in federal races. However, just because voters may be willing to give Democrats a chance to make their case to them, it only matters if high-quality candidates are available for those voters to consider. Democratic candidates for Congress have quietly announced in three of the four congressional districts. At this point, it remains unclear whether any of these three has the pathway to the financial support necessary to build and sustain a vibrant campaign. Other candidates — including a couple considering joining campaign finance reformer Paul Spencer in the 2nd District race against incumbent French Hill — appear better positioned to build such a campaign.

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BOOKS FROM THE ARKANSAS TIMES

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THE UNIQUE NEIGHBORHOODS OF CENTRAL ARKANSAS Full of interesting voices and colorful portraits of 17 Little Rock and North Little Rock neighborhoods, this book gives an intimate, block-by-block, native’s view of the place more than 250,000 Arkansans call home. Created from interviews with residents and largely written by writers who actually live in the neighborhoods they’re writing about, the book features over 90 full color photos by Little Rock photographer Brian Chilson.

Also Available: A HISTORY OF ARKANSAS A compilation of stories published in the Arkansas Times during our first twenty years. Each story examines a fragment of Arkansas’s unique history – giving a fresh insight into what makes us Arkansans. Well written and illustrated. This book will entertain and enlighten time and time again.

arcoding@uca.edu | 501-450-5276 arkansascodingacademy.com

ALMANAC OF ARKANSAS HISTORY This unique book offers an offbeat view of the Natural State’s history that you haven’t seen before – with hundreds of colorful characters, pretty places, and distinctive novelties unique to Arkansas. Be informed, be entertained, amaze your friends with your new store of knowledge about the 25th state, the Wonder State, the Bear State, the Land of Opportunity.

Payment: CHECK OR CREDIT CARD Order by Mail: ARKANSAS TIMES BOOKS 201 E. MARKHAM ST., STE. 200, LITTLE ROCK, AR 72201 Phone: 501-375-2985 Fax: 501-375-3623 Email: ANITRA@ARKTIMES.COM Send _____ book(s) of The Unique Neighborhoods of Central Arkansas @ $19.95 Send _____ book(s) of A History Of Arkansas @ $10.95 Send _____ book(s) of Almanac Of Arkansas History @ $18.95 Shipping and handling $3 per book Name _________________________________________________ Address ________________________________________________ City, State, Zip ____________________________________________ Phone _________________________________________________ Visa, MC, AMEX, Disc # _________________________ Exp. Date _______ 10

JULY 27, 2017

ARKANSAS TIMES


11200 W. Markham 501-223-3120 www.colonialwineshop.com facebook.com/colonialwines

THE OBSERVER NOTES ON THE PASSING SCENE

Twenty

F

orgive The Observer a public love though. Once you reach a certain age, letter, Dear Reader. A gentleman you tend to let go of what you can’t do never kisses and tells, but he is ala damn thing about, because you realize lowed to swoon a bit, and so we will. Last it is that way for everyone. Time does not play favorites. Time is fair. week made 20 years since we wed our beloved in her grandpa’s little church The next day, we got up and hightailed way down in El Dorado, two dumb kids it east, across the pine-scattered sand of south Mississippi, through the tunnel at with nothing but our lives stretching out before us like an open road. Who the Mobile, into Florida and the hotel we’d hell was Yours Truly back then, when paid too much to stay in, so close to the we saw her there in white at the head blue-green Gulf that you could throw a of the aisle? We forget, sand dollar from the balcony and hit the or dare not remember. We have become waves. The Observer While she has old enough that been our rock, The brought spouse there Observer has been a for the first time — her dozen people in 20 a late-night café first trip to saltwater years, and she has suf— when she was pregfered and loved them au lait at Café Du nant with Junior. For a all: enfant terrible, kid, landlocked child, there lover, father, writer, Monde thrilled is a fascination with the reporter, teacher, artsea — the bigness of it, ist, wise man, blow- us more than to strike a Trumpian hard, tyrant, white phrase; the curved horizon line swimknight, certified idiot Bourbon Street. and holy fool. Yes, we ming with pale clouds; have taken a rail grind on the edge of the the waves rising up and rushing over the sand and receding every two seconds. deep, dark abyss a time or two, as all long relationships must, but the only thing Even as a boy, I made the connection The Observer knows for sure is that I with time: that the waves were doing that want to hold that woman’s hand until on the day I was born, they were doing that every day of my life when I wasn’t the day I die. It ain’t much to know this there to watch them, and will be doing late in life, but The Observer has never trusted those who knew too much, for that on the day I die, casting up shells and damn sure. What’s the old saying about seaweed and sand-slicked pieces of green God laughing at mortal plans? glass. As I kid, that’s a scary thought. As an old married fart sitting at the edge of Leaving Junior at home with instructions to clean out the cat box and to be the world, drinking from a sandy can, smart enough to not leave any beer botholding hands with the love of this life, tles in the fish tank after the epic blowit’s less so. out sure to come, we dropped down Even though mortality is closer, there through Vicksburg to sweltering New is the satisfaction of having lived a good life, and loved a truly good person, and Orleans, where we spent a night in a lovely old hotel and soon came to the that there is still time to do more of it realization that we have become old before it all closes down. Time to watch enough that a late night café au lait at the birds fish at the cusp of the water. Café Du Monde thrilled us more than Time to offer a sip of slowly warming Bourbon Street. We strolled the old beer. Time enough to look at the woman lanes, sweated hot beads and rememby my side, and think: Ye gods, whatever bered how we walked all those same in the world did I do right that I should streets when we were youngsters, the be so lucky and have so much? Whatever Quarter still the same, while we are in the world did she do wrong to wind up with a fool like me? so different. Didn’t hurt our feelings,

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arktimes.com JULY 27, 2017

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Arkansas Reporter

THE

Parole and politics Will another high-profile crime derail parole reform? BY JACOB ROSENBERG

I

n the wake of the July 1 Power Ultra Lounge mass shooting, city and state officials have put parole and probation at the center of law enforcement plans to tackle violent crime in Little Rock and clamp down on what’s been described as gang activity. The shooting, which left 28 injured, provided an international headline amid a rise in shootings and murders that threaten to reach the heights of the infamous “Bangin’ in the Rock” gang violence of the 1990s. At a news conference the day of the early morning shooting, Little Rock Police Chief Kenton Buckner conceded that the Power Ultra Lounge shooting “potentially involved gang activity.” Mayor Mark Stodola — who, in the 1990s oversaw a “Gang Prosecution Team” as Pulaski County prosecutor — later mentioned another potential group involved in the violence. “I will predict for you,” Stodola said, “we will find out that a lot of the people — both victims and suspects — [in the shooting] have previous criminal records and probably are on probation or parole.” The mayor called on state government to provide more assistance dealing with parolees and probationers. On July 6, Governor Hutchinson announced a task force of state and city officials to stem the violence; among the agencies included was Arkansas Community Correction, which oversees those on parole and probation. “Some of those that are out on parole have ties to gangs in the area,” Hutchinson spokesman J.R. Davis said when asked about the ACC’s role in the task force. “This is part of a hyper12

JULY 27, 2017

ARKANSAS TIMES

focus on those who have gang affiliations by the task force.” The ACC has been coordinating with the Little Rock Police Department’s Violent Crimes Apprehension Team for several months, according to ACC spokeswoman Dina Tyler. But since the announcement of the task force, two ACC supervision officers have been working with the LRPD’s violent crimes team every day. Ricky Hampton, the Memphis rapper known as Finese2Tymes who was performing during the shooting, was arrested the day after the shooting in Birmingham, Ala., on charges relating to a shooting outside a club in Forrest City. Hampton’s bodyguard, Kentrell Dominique “Dirt” Gwynn, was later also arrested on the potential charges of providing a firearm to a convicted felon, providing armed security to a convicted person and conspiracy. Federal officials have said that evidence ties a gun Gwynn possessed to ammunition used in the Little Rock club shooting. The push to crack down on parolees and probationers in the wake of a high-profile crime is not new for Arkansas. In 2013, Darrell Dennis, a black parolee with a long history of violations, killed a white teenager named Forrest Abrams. Media reports portrayed a parole system in disarray. The state Board of Corrections greatly tightened parole rules in response. By the end of 2013, Arkansas’s prison population grew by nearly 18 percent, making it the fastest growing prison population in the country. The pace has slowed, but since then Arkansas has remained at, or near, the top of states with the fastest growing prison

AFTER THE POWER ULTRA LOUNGE SHOOTING: Mayor Mark Stodola (left) predicted that parolees would be among the suspects. Little Rock Police Chief Kenton Buckner said the shooting "potentially involved gang activity."

populations in the country. A major criminal justice reform bill, Act 423, came out of the legislative session this year. It introduces swift and certain sanctions on parolees and probationers who violate the terms of their supervision or commit nonviolent, nonsexual misdemeanors: They will be sent to an ACC facility for 45-90 days, where they will receive treatment, rather than back to prison. The new policy takes effect Oct. 1. Stodola has been casting blame on the parole system for the city’s rising violence since even before the Power Ultra Lounge shooting. The mayor told a community group gathered at the Thompson Library in June that “the real issue is at the state level.” He said the state government was enamored with “counting [prison] beds” and encouraged people to call

their state legislators to change that. “There’s an inordinate number of people who are paroled to Pulaski County. They like to hide in the shadows of the big buildings. If you overlay where they say they live and you look at where our criminal incidents are occurring — where our violent crimes are occurring — it’s almost hand-in-glove,” Stodola told the Times later. “It’s putting an inordinate amount of pressure on the community and on the police and ultimately on us to have to respond to those issues.” Tyler said the ACC has to balance its role, making sure to not repeat the same mistake of locking up parole violators on small charges while working with city officials to go after those committing felonies. “I think we’ve got the right balance,” she said of ACC’s and the city’s joint efforts. “What we don’t want is


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INCONSEQUENTIAL NEWS QUIZ:

JUST LOCKER ROOM TALK EDITION

Play to pass the time while stuck on the X-Coaster!

A) Shaving alley cats and selling them as more valuable hairless cats. B) Nothing, but they called in the interrogation team from the West Memphis Police Department and got a full confession out of them, anyway. C) Making graphic sex videos in public places, including a Home Depot store, a Cheddar’s restaurant and an Arkansas nature center, which they would then upload to the internet.

BRIAN CHILSON

D) “General libtardary.” 2) Recently, a Bull Shoals man who purchased — sight unseen — the contents of an abandoned storage locker in Little Rock found that the locker contained a surprising literary find. What was in the locker? A) The manuscript of former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee’s unpublished book: “I Sold My Integrity to Trump, and All I Got Was a Lousy White House Press Secretary.”

a knee-jerk reaction where we just scoop up way too many people. We want to be smart about who we send back because there’s only so much room.” “We have to realize 90 percent of them are coming home,” Tyler said. “You can’t lock up everyone forever.” Another fact that’s often overlooked: Arkansas’s parole and probation officers now handle 125 cases on average, far above recommended levels. The Council of State Governments’ Justice Center, a nonprofit that helped shape the new criminal justice reform bill, recommended that the state hire 100 new supervision officers, but Governor Hutchinson’s budget did not provide any new money for them. The governor’s spokesman Davis said there wasn’t room for the new positions in a tight budget.

B) Author George R.R. Martin, busily typing away on the next “Game of Thrones” book. C) 10,000 remaindered copies of state Sen. Jason Rapert’s 2012 “Special Edition” of the Bible, which he edited down to a slim volume containing only the Ten Commandments, Ezekiel 23:20 and all the stuff about hating on gay people. D) Books belonging to the West Memphis 3’s Damien Echols, including at least two personal journals Echols kept during his 18 years on Death Row, the locker apparently having been abandoned by Echols’ wife, Lorri Davis, after his August 2011 release. 3) A recent Talk Business & Politics/Hendrix College poll found something interesting about Arkansans’ attitudes. What did the poll show? A) That Arkansas Sen. Trent “The Union County Giant” Garner (R-El Dorado) really screwed the pooch with his constituency when he lost that steel cage ladder match to arch-rival Rep. David “Nature Boy” Whitaker (D-Fayetteville) back in June. B) That Donald Trump’s job approval rating dropped 10 full points in the state between February and July, going from 60 percent to 50 percent of Arkansas voters who approve of his performance as president. (Also: 56 percent of Arkansas voters disapprove of his activity on

Twitter.) C) That 3-day-old sushi, antibioticresistant chlamydia and no-anesthesia oral surgery are all now more popular than Arkansas Times Senior Editor Max Brantley among registered Republicans. D) That Governor Hutchinson would have an approval rating approximately 4 to 5 points higher if he threw in “gatdamn” as an adjective every once in a while. 4) An issue at the Magic Springs amusement park in Hot Springs recently inconvenienced some guests there. What happened? A) The park’s “X Coaster” ride stopped running, stranding riders high in the air, with workers reportedly climbing the frame of the coaster with water to keep riders hydrated during their sweltering, hour-long ordeal. B) Pranksters dumped 200 pounds of instant fruit punch powder and 100 gallons of vodka into the wave pool, leading to both arrests and the best party Hot Springs has seen since Owney Madden was alive. C) An attempt by two guests to get it on in the log flume as it plunged for an epic splashdown led to both expected tragedy and unexpected pregnancy. D) Special musical guest Cheap Trick burst out of its cage and rampaged through the park for over an hour before the band’s handlers were able to coax it back into its enclosure with sardines and promises of “tummy num-nums.” 5) The city of Fayetteville recently poked a metaphorical stick in the eye of the Trump administration. What did it do? A) Joined 14 other cities across the nation that are working with the city of Chicago to preserve and publish EPA data on climate change, which has been deleted by the Trump regime, via the web portal climatechange.cityofchicago.org B) Cut its illiteracy rate by 8 percent over the past two years, thus denying Trump’s 2020 campaign thousands of potential voters. C) Banned the sale of any bronzing cream more orange than “sweet potato.” D) Passed a law requiring that all “Make America Great Again” hats worn in city limits must include a flashing “Beware the Idiot” sign on the back.

Answers: C, D, B, A, A

1) A couple in Jonesboro was recently arrested and charged with several crimes. What, according to police, were they allegedly doing?

arktimes.com JULY 27, 2017

13


BEST OF ARKANSAS - 2017

BEST OF ARKANSAS

Cream of the shops, and more Our annual Best of Arkansas edition.

T

Editors' picks

Pie, dog-chasing-geese watching, wrecked groceries, etc. BY DAVID KOON, JORDAN LITTLE, LINDSEY MILLAR, JACOB ROSENBERG AND STEPHANIE SMITTLE

Best place to get up close and personal with a pegbox

he best, the greatest, nonpareil, primo, boss, a perfect

10. The Colosseum and the Louvre Museum. The tops! That’s how Arkansas Times readers judge the

businesses, from lingerie shops to veterinarians to HVAC repair,

you'll read about in these pages. (The Best of Arkansas list starts on Page 15.) Use the results of our annual survey for advice, or look for your own business in the list. Send us your disputations or back up what we print here. You may read that our own senior editor, Max Brantley, won best newspaper writer and squeal “Rigged!” (It is not!) You’ll read that Riverfest won best music festival and sigh, “What a shame!” You’ll see our readers’ choice for worst Arkansan is Sen. Jason Rapert and exclaim, “Just so!” You’ll read reporter Jacob Rosenberg’s piece on his trip to Oaklawn and wonder, “Did he come out ahead?” (Answer: Yes.) Along with the Oaklawn feature, we give you a little more info on other winners and finalists, like Bang-Up Betty (artisan), the Crying Weasel (vintage clothing), Flyway Brewing (Arkansasbrewed beer) and WordsWorth Books (bookstore), and our annual editors picks, which include a feature on a business you should know, the Little Rock Violin Shop.

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JULY 27, 2017

ARKANSAS TIMES

“R

achel, are these all done? Are you working your way down?” Joe Joyner, violist and owner of the Little Rock Violin Shop, stands behind a row of violins, each instrument sitting on its side, like dominoes, atop a workbench. Rachel Herman, the shop’s bookkeeper and sales associate (and an award-winning violinist), is photographing one violin after another as part of the shop’s move to offer an increased inventory of restored and repaired violins for sale online. One of the shop dogs — two chocolate longhaired dachshunds named Truffles and Omobono, the latter of whom takes his name from the son of a famous Italian violinmaker, Antonio Stradivari — barks, sensing that the attention has shifted away from him. At first glance, even for someone who’s spent time around orchestras, the violins all look pretty much the same. If you stare at the row long enough, though, variations emerge. One’s a muted amber color; another a ruddy orange. A few have pristine, hard candy complexions, others have been around the sun a few more times. Each instrument contains around 80 pieces of hand-carved wood, and a few of the older models have begun to deepen and mature, as organic materials are wont to do. On those models, there’s a warmer complexity to the wood, and despite an expert restoration — a replaced chinrest, a new bridge — a couple of them look like they’ve been

around long enough to have a few good stories. Joyner and his team do much of their business renting instruments, giving lessons and setting beginners up for a trouble-free first year, but old instruments are their passion. “Every instrument has its own story to tell,” the shop’s website reads, “from the fabled histories of the craftsmen who made them to the remarkable journeys of the musicians, collectors and restorers who have preserved them over the past four centuries. At LRVS we recognize our role as temporary caretakers for these tools of art whose useful life may well exceed our own.” One such temporary caretaker, Josh Wheeler (another accomplished violinist), is seated at another workbench along the shop’s perimeter, violin in hand. Like Joyner, he’s wearing a heavy canvas apron, and the workspace he’s hunched over is lined with at least a dozen plastic bottles, stacks of small cylindrical vials and an assortment of small hand tools. Overhead, violins hang from a rack as if they were pots and pans, and a pegboard lining the wall is equipped with paper merchandise tags, bridges of various sizes and tiny drawers full of tuning pegs and screws. Joyner picks up a violin that Wheeler restored a year or so ago. “For this one, we took it apart. It was a major restoration. It’s from the 1820s, 1830s, probably.” It’s priced at $6,500. “With a lot


BEST OF ARKANSAS - 2017

BOW AND BRIDGE: Violist Joe Joyner, owner of the Little Rock Violin Shop, directs the preparation of a row of repaired and restored violins for sale online.

returning to Little Rock in 2007, Joyner attended the Bow Making School of America in Salt Lake City, where he honed the skills he’d use to start up his workbench operation the Little Rock Bow Shop, now the much more comprehensive (and tenured) LRVS. When it comes to his own choice of instrument, Joyner’s put his trust in the shop’s own luthier, Wesley Rule. Rule makes his home in El Paso (White County), and is in the shop Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays. Like many luthiers, Rule uses measurements from the old Italian masters to make new ones. For Joyner’s instrument, Rule used a pattern based on a viola by the Brothers Amati, two famous luthiers from late 16th century Cremona. “Brothers Amati violas are always my favorite violas to play on. I love the way they sound, so I commissioned him to make one.” SS The Little Rock Violin Shop is open 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. For more information, visit littlerockviolinshop.com.

BEST LIST OF 2017 Goods and services SHOPPING CENTER

The Promenade at Chenal Finalists: Midtowne, The Outlets of Little Rock, Park Plaza Mall, Pleasant Ridge Town Center GROCERY STORE

Kroger

Local winner: Edwards Food Giant Finalists: The Fresh Market, Natural Grocers, Whole Foods Market WOMEN’S CLOTHING

Dillard’s

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Dillard’s

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BRIAN CHILSON

Fringe Clothing

of older instruments, you can’t really attribute it to a specific maker. The really nice instruments — the old Italian ones that are worth hundreds of thousands of dollars — they spend a lot of time and effort to figure out exactly who made it.” I ask about the frequency of forgeries, instruments meant to pass as an Italian rarity, worthy of a pedestal and glass case in a museum somewhere. “Absolutely,” he said. “That happens, and they’re not always intending to pass instruments off as fakes.” He tells a story about a violinmaker in England (“one of the best in the world,” Joyner says) who used an Italian antique to make what’s called a “bench copy” — a replica of a treasured original made with the original instrument present, or, in violinmaker parlance, “on the bench.” Once in the hands of a new owner, the violin was passed off as the genuine article and picked up by a big-name auction house, making it to the cover of the house’s auction catalog before

the violinmaker, seeing it, recognized his own work and called foul. In the violin world, questions of authenticity are ever-present — and maddeningly subjective. “There are makers today that are every bit as good as Stradivarius,” Joyner said. “But their instruments aren’t 300 years old. They don’t have these fabled histories and they don’t inspire players the way playing a 300-year-old instrument does.” Blind and double-blind studies tend to support what Joyner says about living violinmakers: Most often, new violins aren’t distinguishable or preferred overwhelmingly to those crafted by the old masters. Joyner should know. He’s heard a lot of violins since 1998, when he began playing viola with the Arkansas Symphony Orchestra. After those first two seasons, Joyner headed for school in Houston, where he played with Orchestra X, the Texas Music Festival Orchestra and the Victoria Symphony. Before

Finalists: Box Turtle, Indigo, Maddox, Scarlet

MORE EDITORS' PICKS

Best pie Everyone knows (or should) that Rhoda’s Famous Hot Tamales in Lake Village is an essential stop en route to New Orleans or the Redneck Riviera for Delta-style tamales, but don’t forget pie. Rhoda’s half-and-half pecan and sweet potato pie is unrivaled. The secret ingredient, I suspect, is 20 sticks of butter. Or scoops and scoops of lard. Or something else bad for you. But how can a pie so good you dream about it be bad for you? LM

Best place to see a border collie run after geese

There’s a big, white bird. I’ve been told it is a goose but it looks to me like a swan. It hangs around MacArthur Park, near the pond. This bird is an asshole. Whenever I go running in the park and come anywhere near it, the goose-creature-thing makes eye contact, turns up its ugly face, and

CHILDREN’S CLOTHING

The Toggery

Finalists: Bologna Joe’s, Carter’s, The Children’s Place (Conway), Dillard’s VINTAGE CLOTHING

Goodwill

Local winner: Crying Weasel Vintage Finalists: Habitat for Humanity ReStore, Savers, South Main Creative LINGERIE

Cupids Finalists: Adam and Eve, Dillard’s, Seductions, Victoria’s Secret SHOES

Dillard’s Local winner: Rock City Kicks Finalists: DSW, Shoe Carnival, Warren’s Shoes ANTIQUES

Mid-Towne Antique Mall Finalists: Blue Suede Shoes, Fabulous CONTINUED ON PAGE 20 arktimes.com JULY 27, 2017

15


BEST OF ARKANSAS - 2017

EDITORS' PICKS, cont.

“Hopelessness is a catchy tune we can’t get out of our head,” Isaac Alexander sings on “Silver Line,” one of the many summer bummery pop gems on his new album, “Like a Sinking Stone.” Alexander, a Searcy native who lives in Little Rock, has been making music prolifically since he was a teenager (Screaming Mimes, Big Silver, The Easys, The Boondogs, Greers Ferry), but he’s slowed down in recent years as he’s been putting out solo records. This is his first record in five years. It’s sonically and lyrically of a piece of his previous two highly recommended releases, “Antivenin Suite” (2012) and “See Thru Me” (2008): Like those albums, he recorded it in Nashville with Joe McMahan (Luella and the Sun) and other ace session musicians, and he’s still writing about the sort of things all of us in middle age

A BEST, FROM WHITE COUNTY: Singer Beth Ditto, a native of Judsonia and now under the influence of Bobbie Gentry.

charges me. I run away scared. While fleeing, the lack of support from any of the other geese always pisses me off. I never get an “I’m sorry for my friend doing that” or “Oh man, the goose-swan is such a jerk, it’s actually just working out its own insecurities.” These other geese enable the swan-goose by milling about in total silence near the water or pooping in the grass. Their silence damns them, too. Why can’t we both enjoy the park, geese? You poop; I run and step in your poop. That’s harmony! There does not have to be a conflict! But, there is. So, I called the Little Rock Parks and Recreation Department to learn more about my enemies, to hopefully bridge the gap even. I was only disheartened. I learn these are “resident geese.” They do not migrate, sticking around the area for the entire year. This is their turf and they are not going to adjust to me. Attempts to relocate them have gone poorly, too — a rope around the pond and flashing yellow lights at night both failed. What to do then? (And, no, I am not anti-goose enough to advocate for the idea of hunting them as was proposed a few years back). But, there is a light in the darkness. “Her name is Jill,” Eric Bowden, assistant facilities supervisor for Rebsamen Golf Course tells me. Jill is a border collie that runs after these geese. The geese fly away

16

JULY 27, 2017

ARKANSAS TIMES

when they see Jill (safely to another spot where they can relax). “She’s a certified goose dog,” Bowden told me and “very effective.” The geese are scared of Jill because, to them, she has “got that fox look” and so when they land they think it’s a predator but it’s just Jill and “a scare tactic,” Bowden said. No harm to the geese. He also explained to me how the whole geeseclearing process works, he said, “If we see geese, we get her out.” Here are some perks of being Jill: She has an AC kennel, she has a steady job with good benefits and she is a hero that runs after the damn geese. Go be a certified goose dog watcher and check out Jill at Rebsamen Golf Course. JR

Best summer jams from a White County native you haven't heard In this age of music on demand, does a song of summer have to be one that you can’t escape, that soundtracks every visit to the pool or roller rink or snow cone stand? Can’t you simply decide on your own song of the summer in

the comfort of your headphones at work? Of course! In that spirit, consider the new solo record from Judsonia native Beth Ditto, “Fake Sugar,” especially the first half of it — tracks 1 through 6 could all be on your S.O.S shortlist. Ditto, who led the now defunct pop-punk band Gossip for more than a decade, has a voice as big as anyone this side of Adele, but until now, it’s mostly been used in a kind of agro blues belt. On “Fake Sugar,” the arrangements are stripped down and poppy, leaving plenty of room for Ditto to offer up the full range of her vocals. In an interview with Rolling Stone, she name-checked Bobbie Gentry as an influence on the album, and listening to Ditto’s Southern-accented riffs on the title track, with lines like “hambone, hambone, where you been,” does make me daydream about the possibility of a self-described queer, feminist, fat girl from White County becoming a country pop radio darling. LM

Best summer jams from a White County native you haven't heard, part II

VROOM AT THE STADIUM: Autocross, in the War Memorial parking lot.

obsess over: love, fate, faith, identity, death, boredom. It’s dark in spots, but Alexander has a warm sense of humor and an unwavering commitment to melody — the record sticks to you. LM

Best place for weird pantry supplies

Smoked paprika is some next-level stuff, and they don’t carry it at my neighborhood Kroger. For that — or for beeswax, or mosquito-repellent citronella essential oil, I need to plant myself just downhill from Professor Bowl on Reservoir Road, squarely between Natural Grocers and Drug Emporium No. 240. Between these two businesses, you could score a giant vat of sunflower oil, soy-based meat substitutes you thought went out of print, a few dozen types of flour, bulk spices like cumin and chili powder, and tempeh that tastes like bacon. And, if you’re so inclined, you can choose from a dizzying collection of knock-off designer fragrances the likes of which have not been seen since “Electric Youth” came out. DK


BEST OF ARKANSAS - 2017

Best conspiracy theory Courtesy of Turnt Woolridge on Twitter (@twooldridge): • “2006: Houston Nutt is forced to hire Gus Malzahn in order to land Mitch Mustain. Nutt resents it, treats Malzahn badly. Malzahn leaves. • 2007: In large part due to outrage over Nutt’s treatment of Mustain/ Malzahn, a message board FOIAs phone records that help take Nutt down. • 2011: Freeze coaches ASU for one year, leaving for Ole Miss to replace fired Nutt, and getting replaced by none other than Gus Malzahn. • 2017: Nutt gets Freeze fired using the same message board tactics that got him fired, which were precipitated by his treatment of Malzahn. • If Mitch Mustain hadn’t decommitted from his first commitment to Arkansas, none of this would have happened.”

Best place to go if you have a need for speed The heat off the pavement melts the horizon as tires scream for their lives, forced by the mountainous fury of an 8.4-liter V10. Dozens of bright orange traffic cones denote a winding track. Drivers from all across the region are competing to complete the fastest lap … in the parking lot of War Memorial Stadium. Welcome to Autocross. The ARSCCA (Arkansas Sports Car Club of America) has been putting on Autocross events for years and have held races at War Memorial, Blytheville Aeroplex, Walnut Ridge and other locations featuring large swaths of flat asphalt. The concept is simple: Make your way through a cone track in as little time as possible. The rules

are a bit more complex, however. Cars are inspected and placed into designated classes based on their performance from the factory as well as any modifications installed by the owner. If you’re thinking your family sedan isn’t fit to make the cut, that’s all right. Motorheads of all ages can have a blast at Autocross events even as spectators. If you ask nicely, most of the drivers are happy to oblige a ride-along for those enthusiastic about speed. Stay tuned to arscca.org for scheduling or head up to War Memorial on Aug. 19 for the next event in Little Rock. JL

Best thrifting

The Goodwill store at 16924 Cantrell Road in Little Rock, a.k.a The Good Goodwill (as opposed to The Badwill on Markham), where wage slaves like you and me can pick up McMansionite castoffs galore, including designer clothes, shoes, decent furniture, solid sports equipment and housewares. It’s a bit of a haul out there from downtown, but there’s always a better class of junk to be had at The Good Goodwill than the stuff at your average thrift store, and all just as cheap as you’d expect. DK

Best gastronomic Everest

That would be the “Free Steak” at Brangus Steakhouse in Russellville, a mammoth 4-pound hunk of choice sirloin, which is yours free if you are able to move it from the table to inside your body in less than one hour. Sadly, you have to bring your own wheelbarrow to have yourself hauled out, groaning. The big ’un does come with two side orders and toast, though, in case you really want to tie one on. If you don’t summit Mount Beef in under 60 minutes, no worries: The Free Steak becomes a $60 steak (which, come to think of it, is actually a dang good bargain for a pound of sirloin per person if you want to split that sucker with four friends). Check out their full menu at facebook.com/ BrangusSteak/menu. DK

Best place to buy semiquestionable grub

BEST RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE AGENCY

BEST COMPANY TO WORK FOR

Thank you for voting us Best Residential Real Estate Agency and finalist for Best Company to work for!

When a truck hauling food crashes, the insurance company pays off. It would be a little crazy to throw all that food out, though, which is where Wild West Salvage Grocery, at 215 S.

arktimes.com JULY 27, 2017

17


BEST OF ARKANSAS - 2017

EDITORS' PICKS, cont.

Best beach within reach

While we all wish we could teleport to the white sands of the Redneck Riviera down in Florida whenever we want, that day has not yet come. Until then, you can placate yourself with some of the sand beaches available on various lakes around the state. It’s definitely better than nothing. Though the long, curving beach at DeGray Lake Resort State Park has been our go-to for several years, it can get a bit crowded on weekends. Our secret fallback is the little beach at Crystal Springs Campground, just off Highway 270 west of Hot Springs. Quiet, secluded, situated on a broad, clear, spring-fed inlet a good ways off the main body of the lake, it’s all a bit rustic, but features a combination bathroom and changing house, builtin charcoal grills, a playground for the kiddies and — most importantly — a clean sand beach under the shade trees. The ocean it ain’t, but if you’re looking for a place to do some swimming, lounging and drinking on the sand, it’ll do in a pinch. DK 18

JULY 27, 2017

ARKANSAS TIMES

BEST LOCAL VINTAGE CLOTHING

BRIAN CHILSON

Redmond Road in Jacksonville comes in. The fare changes every week and varies by quality (and expiration date… keep an eye on that), but recent offerings in their store (photos at facebook.com/wildwestsalvagegrocery) include cans of Diet Coke 10 for a buck, jars of Heinz chicken gravy two for a dollar, five- pound bags of fully cooked and frozen popcorn chicken for $6.99, five-pound bags of raw catfish fillets for $9.98, plus grocery-store sized cases of name brand candy, orange juice, Starbucks drinks, Gatorade and more for prices that fairly scream: “Why you cheap, cheap bastard!” Yeah, you have to be a little adventurous to shop there, so if all this skeezes you out a bit, pass on by and head to the boring old grocery store, you wastrel. If you’re looking for a deal, though, it’s an option. DK

Crying Weasel Vintage LIVING THE DREAM: Alex Flanders has made vintage clothing a full-time business.

Making mustardy yellow great again

O

n the south wall of Alex Flanders’ Capitol View workspace, there’s a tintype portrait of Flanders’ grandfather “lookin’ very stoic,” she told me. “He had a really quick wit, and he was also just weird as hell,” she added. He’s responsible for the name of Flanders’ vintage clothing shop, a shortened version of the cryptic (and admittedly meaningless) saying “The weasel cries at midnight.” Flanders has the phrase tattooed on her arm. “The first time I heard him say that was when I was in eighth, maybe ninth grade. He’d wake me up every day for school, and I’d be like, ‘Hey, papa, wake me up at five o’clock, or wake me up at six,” and it’d change every day, so he’d write the time down on a piece of paper. And one day, he didn’t have any paper, so he wrote it down on my banana that he was packing for my lunch. I got to school and was like, ‘What is this? What are these markings on my banana?’ I showed all my friends, thinking it was like, some metaphysical thing.” “Like the face of Mother Mary in the toast?” I asked. “Yeah! And so I told him about it, and the next day, on my banana, he’d written, ‘The weasel cries at midnight.’ ” Her grandpa eschewed explanation, but the phrase stuck around. When I talked with Flanders, she was preparing to take the Crying Weasel show on the road for pop-up events in Nashville, Tenn., and Asheville, N.C., in her SUV. “I need to figure out how I

can reasonably fit all these clothes in my car, plus the racks, plus this table, plus a shelving unit of some sort and an overnight bag. So, we’ll see.” Crying Weasel has been an act of daring for Flanders, who quit her full-time job with the state to do what she’d dreamed of for years: to go full throttle with an Etsy shop for vintage clothing. Before, she’d sold vintage clothes only intermittently. In February, Flanders began accruing pieces from estate sales and thrift shops, cleaning them meticulously, modifying them, photographing models wearing them and shipping them out the door. On the shop’s website, a black blouse sequined in a floral pattern — a la “Designing Women” — gets new life by styling it with cutoff denim shorts. A bolo tie with a 1921 silver dollar as its centerpiece wraps around the neck of a frilly, button-up top. There’s diversity to the items themselves, but also to the bodies wearing them. “Some shops — some really successful shops on Etsy — will have one model, usually someone really skinny, modeling something that’s not her size. It’ll say something like ‘oversized jacket’ or whatever. And it’s like, that’s not oversized to someone who is that size. I want to represent the clothes for who they’re intended for.” Flanders picked up one of her more recent finds, a lacy embroidered tank. “So, this is a little gold floral shell top from probably the ’60s. I assess when

Crying Weasel Vintage mines the past for clothes for now. BY STEPHANIE SMITTLE

I think it’s from and look for any flaws. I’ll probably handwash this because I don’t know how old it is.” Flanders swears by a 20-minute soak in water and Borax, with the occasional splash of white vinegar for “stinky pieces, like mothballs or cigarettes.” She turned the tank top partially inside out. “See how it’s kind of dingy right here on this zipper? That’s probably gonna lift out. Then, if it’s something that I think can go in the washing machine, I’ll do that.” She’s planning to add a slit in a lime green shirtdress, to remove some shoulder pads from a long-sleeved dress. The vibe of the shop changes, she said. “Right now, I’m really into the rugged style and earth tones, but then I have this soft spot for glittery things and wild prints. I try to steer away from the costume-y stuff, and make it to where it looks like you could buy these things at Madewell or Gap, but with a little flair.” The shop’s mission statement, Flanders notes on her website, is to “color the world with orangey-reds and mustardy yellows again, just like our forefathers and mothers of the 1970s would have wanted.” If that sounds like a plan to you, you can “favorite” the shop on Etsy, follow Crying Weasel Vintage on Instagram to see new pieces and find out where the shop will pop up next, or flip through Flanders’ mini-collection, which changes weekly at Moxy Modern Mercantile at 1419 Main St.


BEST OF ARKANSAS - 2017

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ARKANSAS TIMES

bike

LOCAL

WE SPEAK SPANISH, DO YOU NEED HELP? Our sister paper El Latino is Arkansas’s only weekly – audited Spanish language newspaper. Arkansas has the second fastest growing Latino population in the country and smart businesses are targeting this market as they develop business relationships with these new consumers. AD U N ID I S CO M T TR A m GR A S E o U s a s .c DE N

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LOCAL WINNER: Fringe Clothing, in the River Market district, was a winner in the women's clothing category.

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 15

Finds, Sweet Home/Clement, South Main Creative

L! AL” A R T N E S C DO NATUR A S N A K R L “ESTA A A S O ID SOBRE E N E V N E I ¡B RMACIÓN PÁG. 4 INisFOa free publication available at E El U Latino A Í G 185 pickup locations in Central Arkansas. AY: www.ellatinoarkansas.com RIAL D MEMO OS LATINOS D A D L EN O S Facebook.com/ellatinoarkansas TIERON COMBA AS GUERRAS L S A D TO PÁG. 2

FURNITURE

Hank’s Fine Furniture

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EYEWEAR

James Eye Care Finalists: Burrow’s and Mr. Frank’s Optical, Family Eye Clinic, Kavanaugh Eye Care, Little Rock Eye Clinic, Success Vision FRESH VEGETABLES

GARDEN STORE OR NURSERY

The Good Earth Garden Center

9 ág 1Finalists: Botanica Gardens, Hocott’s

S. P

O ENT Contact Luis Garcia today for more information! V E DE AR 201 E. Markham suite 200 • Little ALRock N A M (501) 374-0853 • luis@arktimes.com O SE I R A END CAL

Finalists: Ashley Furniture, Cantrell Furniture Design Center, Galaxy Furniture, Howse

Improvement

20 M AY O

17 1

Garden Center, Plantopia, River Valley Horticultural

HARDWARE/HOME IMPROVEMENT

Fuller and Son

Finalists: Ace Hardware (Cantrell), The Home Depot, Kraftco Hardware and Building Supply, Lowe’s Home

Hillcrest Farmers Market Finalists: Argenta Farmers Market, Bernice Garden Farmer’s Market, Fayetteville Farmers Market, Little Rock Farmers’ Market OUTDOOR STORE

Ozark Outdoor Supply Finalists: Academy Sports and Outdoors, Bass Pro Shops, Gene Lockwood, Gearhead Outfitters CONTINUED ON PAGE 24

20

JULY 27, 2017

ARKANSAS TIMES


BEST OF ARKANSAS - 2017

Thank You for voting us #1 HVAC in the Best of Arkansas Readers’ Awards!

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2017 Best of Arkansas Winner Thank you readers for this honor! —Tanarah & Team

P H O T O G R A P H Y: J A C O B S L AT O N

Your one-of-a-kind life deserves a one-of-a-kind financial plan. At Ameriprise, we know that the best financial plan is the one that’s created just for you. That’s why we work closely with you to help you set and reach goals for every phase of your life. So you can prepare for life’s changes and live confidently on your terms. Larry Root CFP® , CFS® , APMA® Private Wealth Advisor Larry Root & Associates A private wealth advisory practice of Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. 501.975.7999 22 Rahling Circle Little Rock, AR 72223 larry.r.root@ampf.com larryrootadvisor.com AR license #1217350

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EMAIL: INFO@TANARAHLUXEFLORAL.COM 2326 CANTRELL ROAD • LITTLE ROCK arktimes.com JULY 27, 2017

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BEST OF ARKANSAS - 2017

GARDEN STORE OR NURSERY

The Good Earth Garden Center

The Good Earth Garden Center By the Numbers

G

regg and Julie Curtis, owners of The Good Earth Garden Center, provided us some numbers to help us get a mental picture of their sprawling nursery, nestled on 13 acres under tall pines since 1974 at 15601 Cantrell Road. Gregg Curtis adds, “While the numbers are interesting, the best part of our business is the people: our community, guests and staff.”

22

1

1

5

8

50

75

British telephone booth

Sasquatch garden feature

Gorilla statues

Glass balls hanging from an oak tree along the road

The number of pounds you must be able to lift to be hired

Employees

18,000

1,800-plus

40,000

41,000

305,000

Too many to name

Perennials grown at the nursery in 2016

Members of the Dirt Dollars club

Cubic yards of bulk materials, such as soil, stone and mulch sold in a year

Bagged goods moved in 2016

Square feet of retail space

Number of azalea species available

JULY 27, 2017

ARKANSAS TIMES


BRIAN CHILSON

BEST OF ARKANSAS - 2017

600

2,000-plus

Years combined horticultural experience

Ceramic pots

2011

2012

the year it merged with Arkansas Garden Center West next door

the year it was named “most revolutionary garden center” by Today’s Garden Center magazine

Also: The top selling tree is the maple, the top selling perennial is the hosta, the top selling plants are annuals and the Curtises favorite native plant is Arkansas Blue Star.

NOW NON-SMOKING

BEST PLACE TO DANCE BEST LATE-NIGHT SPOT arktimes.com JULY 27, 2017

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BEST OF ARKANSAS - 2017

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 20 BICYCLE SHOP

Chainwheel Finalists: Angry Dave’s Bicycles, The Community Bicyclist, The Ride, Spokes GUN STORE

Fort Thompson Sporting Goods Finalists: Arkansas Armory Inc., Bass Pro Shops, Bullseye Guns and Ammo, Don’s Weaponry Inc. COMMERCIAL ART GALLERY

Gallery 26

Finalists: Boswell Mourot Fine Art, Cantrell Gallery, Greg Thompson Fine Art, M2 Gallery MOBILE PHONE

AT&T

Finalists: Sprint, T-Mobile, Verizon INTERNET SERVICE PROVIDER

AT&T

(Bentonville), 1886 Crescent Hotel & Spa (Eureka Springs), Little Rock Marriott, The Waters (Hot Springs) PRIVATE SCHOOL

The Anthony School Finalists: Catholic High School for Boys, Episcopal Collegiate, Little Rock Christian Academy, Pulaski Academy

PUBLIC SCHOOL

The Pointe Brodie Creek

Finalists: Jefferson Elementary, North Little Rock High School, Parkview Arts and Science Magnet High School, Pulaski Heights Elementary

Finalists: Bowman Pointe, Fountaine Bleau West, The Park at Riverdale, The Ridge at Chenal

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Finalists: The Charlotte John Co., CryeLeike, Keller Williams Realty, Pulaski Heights Realty COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE AGENCY

Moses Tucker Real Estate Finalists: Colliers International, Coldwell Banker, Rector Phillips Morse, Flake & Kelley

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AUTO SERVICE

Austin Brothers Tire and Service Finalists: Christian Brothers Automotive, Discount Tire & Brake Inc., Foster’s Garage, Jett’s Gas and Service

Finalists: First Security Bank, Centennial Bank, Regions, Simmons Bank BARBERSHOP

Jerry’s Barber Shop Finalists: The Art of Men’s Cuts (Bryant), The Local Hair Shop, Sport Clips, Sullivan Barber Service SALON

Suite.102.Salon Finalists: Fringe Benefits, Joels, Joey Edwards Salon, Red Beauty Lounge NAIL SALON

Fashion Nails Finalists: Chic Nails, Ethereal Spa, Heights Nail and Spa

12120 Colonel Glenn Rd., Suite 5200 The Janet Jones Co.

BANK

Arvest Bank

Finalists: Centurylink, Comcast, Conway Corp., Hyperleap RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE AGENCY

APARTMENT COMPLEX

Central High School

SPA

Wellness Revolution Finalists: Ava Bella Day Spa, Caracalla Salon and Body Spa, Indulgences Day Spa, Rejuvenation Day Spa DIET/WEIGHT LOSS CENTER

Onyx Nutrition and Fitness Finalists: Diet Center, Nutrition Hub, TruBalance Health, Wellness Revolution JEWELER

BEST RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE AGENCY

Sissy’s Log Cabin Finalists: Cecil’s Fine Jewelry, Jones & Son Fine Jewelry, Kyle-Rochelle, Roberson’s Fine Jewelry PHARMACY

AUTO STEREO

Arkansas Car Stereo

Cornerstone Pharmacy

Finalists: Auto Audio, Best Buy, Bryant Audio

Finalists: CVS, Kroger, Rhea Drug Store, Walgreens AUTO DEALER

TRAVEL AGENCY

Poe Travel

Steve Landers Toyota

Finalists: AAA Travel (Fayetteville), Small World Big Fun, Sue Smith Vacations, The Travel Shop

Finalists: Everett GMC, McClarty Nissan, Russell Honda, Parker Lexus

KW Realtors helped over 1,000 clients close in 2016!

CAR

HOTEL

Capital Hotel Finalists: 21c Museum Hotel 24

JULY 27, 2017

ARKANSAS TIMES

501-907-5959 | 12814 Cantrell Road www.kwlittlerock.com

Subaru Outback Finalists: Honda Civic, Honda Pilot, CONTINUED ON PAGE 26


THANK YOU FOR VOTING BURNS PARK THE BEST PARK IN ARKANSAS AND THE BEST PLACE TO MOUNTAIN BIKE!

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JOSHUA ASANTE

BEST OF ARKANSAS - 2017

BEST PHOTOGRAPHER: A self-portrait by the winner, Joshua Asante, who is also a well known local musician (Velvet Kente, Amasa Hines).

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 24

Toyota Camry HOME ENTERTAINMENT STORE

Best Buy

Local winner: Arkansas Record and CD Exchange Finalists: Audio Dimensions, Bedford Camera, Walmart

FLORIST

Hillcrest Animal Hospital

Finalists: About Vase, Empty Vase, Frances Flower Shop, Tipton & Hurst

Finalists: ALLPETS Animal Hospital, Bellevue Animal Clinic, Bowman Road Animal Clinic, Pleasant Valley Animal Clinic, Pinnacle Valley Animal Hospital

PLUMBER

Ray Lusk Plumbing Finalists: Advantage Service Co., Don Houff Plumbing, Brad Peoples, Russell & LeMay, Sanders Plumbing

SPORTING GOODS

Academy Sports + Outdoors Local winner: Ozark Outdoor Supply Finalists: Bass Pro Shops, Fort Thompson, Gene Lockwood’s

HVAC REPAIR

Local winner: The Toggery Finalists: Box Turtle Kids, The Knowledge Tree, Target

26

JULY 27, 2017

ARKANSAS TIMES

DRY CLEANERS

Moose Cleaners Finalists: Hangers Cleaners, Max Cleaners, Oak Forest Cleaners, Schickel’s Cleaners

Middleton Heat and Air Finalists: Bob & Ed’s Heating & Air Conditioning Co., Chenal Heat and Air, Dash Heating & Air, Russell & LeMay

TOYS

Toys “R” Us

VETERINARIAN

Tanarah Luxe Floral

GIFT SHOP

ARTISAN

Bang-Up Betty (jeweler) Finalists: Bella Vita (jewelry), Sarah DeClerk (baker), Katherine Strause (painter), V.L. Cox (mixed media)

Box Turtle Finalists: Bella Vita Jewelry, The Crown Shop, The Full Moon, Green Corner Store, Moxy Modern Mercantile

DESIGNER/DECORATOR

Debi Davis Interiors Finalists: Tom Chandler, Tobi Fairley,

Garry Mertins Design Inc., Jill White Designs HOBBY SHOP

Hobby Lobby Local winner: The Water Buffalo Finalists: Art Outfitters, Game Goblin, Michaels MUSIC EQUIPMENT

Guitar Center Local winner: Dogtown Sound Finalists: Best Buy, CKC Music, Jacksonville Guitar Center BOOKSTORE

WordsWorth Books & Co. Finalists: Barnes & Noble, Dickson Street Bookshop (Fayetteville), Nightbird Books (Fayetteville), River Market Books and Gifts CONTINUED ON PAGE 28


Thank you To our patients and families...for allowing us to serve, care and heal. To our donors and volunteers...for your gracious gifts, time and talent. To our team members...for being champions for children, making them better today and healthier tomorrow.

We thank you for voting Arkansas Children’s Hospital Best Place to Work!

archildrens.org | #iloveach

Thanks again to Arkansas Times readers for your continued support and for recognizing Brave New Restaurant among the best in Arkansas year after year.

LITTLE ROCK'S ORIGINAL FARM TO TABLE, FINE DINING RESTAURANT. BEST BEST BEST BEST

CHEF, PETER BRAVE BUSINESS LUNCH OUTDOOR DINING SEAFOOD

BEST OUTDOOR DINING

Farm to Table

Founded in 1991

arktimes.com JULY 27, 2017

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BEST OF ARKANSAS - 2017

PAWN SHOP

iPawn

Finalists: A-1 Gun and Pawn Inc., Braswell & Son Pawnbrokers, Cbay Trading & Loan, Pawnderosa Pawn Shop FUNERAL HOME

Ruebel Funeral Home Finalists: Olmstead Funeral Home, North Little Rock Funeral Home, Roller Funeral Homes, Smith Funeral Home RETIREMENT COMMUNITY

Parkway Village

Finalists: Fox Ridge Assisted Living, Good Shepherd Community, The Manor, Woodland Heights PLACE TO TAKE A YOGA CLASS

VAPE SHOP

Rogue Vapors Finalists: Abby Road, RAO Video, Vapor World INVESTMENT ADVISER

Heath Harper (Morgan Stanley) Finalists: Brian Bush (Stephens), Barry Corkern, Kelly Ross Journey (Edward Jones), Larry Root (Ameriprise Financial Services) COMPANY TO WORK FOR

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Finalists: The Janet Jones Co., Inuvo, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Youth Home Inc.

Barefoot Studio

Recreation

Finalists: Arkansas Yoga Collective, Blue Yoga Nyla, Little Rock Athletic Club, Wellness Revolution

Little Rock Racquet Club

CHIROPRACTOR

Brady DeClerk Finalists: Beverly Foster, John Vincent, Natural State Health Center, Rose Livingston (Hot Springs) TATTOO

7th Street Tattoos & Piercing Finalists: Black Cobra, Forever Yours, The Parlor, Tried and True Tattoo Co. by Rick Medina (Russellville)

PLACE TO SWIM

Finalists: Little Rock Athletic Club, Greers Ferry Lake, Lake Ouachita, Wild River Country PARK

Burns Park Finalists: Allsopp Park, Pinnacle Mountain State Park, Riverfront Park, Two Rivers Park CHEAP DATE

Movies in the Park CONTINUED ON PAGE 34

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JULY 27, 2017

ARKANSAS TIMES

BRIAN CHILSON

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 26

GALLERY 26: The Hillcrest gallery was chosen best place to buy fine art.


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arktimes.com JULY 27, 2017

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BEST OF ARKANSAS - 2017

BEST LOCAL BOOK STORE

WordsWorth Books

BEST ARKANSAS BREWED BEER FINALIST

BRIAN CHILSON

Flyway Brewing

SOARING SUCCESS: Flyway, in Argenta, has produced tens of thousands of gallons of its Bluewing Blueberry ale this year.

The beer of summer Flyway’s Blueberry Wheat is a hit. BY JACOB ROSENBERG

C

ompiling our recent bar issue, we talked to every bar we could to ask about the drink they sell the most. The answer, over and over: Flyway’s Bluewing Blueberry. Flyway has produced almost 37,200 gallons of the stuff so far this year. They devote two 30-barrel fermenters just to the one beer. So far, that’s just for the sales around Central Arkansas. A distributor in Memphis uses the Flyway recipe to brew the beer that’s sold in the cans marked with a bird floating across a golden sunset. There’s not too much secrecy around the beer, though. “It’s just a standard blonde wheat ale with blueberry puree,” Tim Berkley of Flyway told the Arkansas Times.

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ARKANSAS TIMES

“It’s a good entry beer,” Berkley said, “very approachable and easy drinking.” For us, the beer is a bit crisper than others and fruity, but not overly so. It’s refreshing and especially appealing when drinking at Flyway’s North Little Rock brewery, which is often filled with natural light from the many windows along its walls. The recipe for the beer came from Ryan Frank, who began his brewing career in Asheville, N.C., before relocating to Little Rock to join Flyway. His connection to Flyway coowner Matt Foster? In Foster’s previous career as a full-time teacher, he taught Frank's wife, Elenore Vena, a Little Rock native. Berkley was a student of Foster’s, too.

Turning the page Heights’ venerable WordsWorth Books finds new owners; there’s hope for the local bookstore. BY DAVID KOON

I

t looked for a while like even the most beloved of local bookstores would go swirling away down the Amazon, swamped as they were by cheap online sales and the rise of convenient e-books. There are, however, still a few examples that have hung on, mostly through a combination of customer service and local loyalty. Luckily for Little Rock, that increasingly short list includes WordsWorth Books & Co. in the Heights. In business for over 35 years, WordsWorth has not only weathered the

economic storms that have buffeted and sunk many independent booksellers, it has managed to attract new owners who are committed to keeping the friendly, cozy feel that has kept the place alive, even with two Barnes & Noble Bookstores within a five-mile radius. Lia Lent and Tom McGowan, both longtime WordsWorth customers, bought the bookstore from owner Jean Cazort and officially took the reins June 1. Lent, who has been shopping at WordsWorth for over 20


IN THE BOOK BUSINESS: Lia Lent and Tom McGowan, the new owners of WordsWorth Books in the Heights.

years, said things have been going smoothly so far as they learn the business from Cazort, who has stayed on

as an employee to help them learn the ropes. Lent said she decided to buy the

BRIAN CHILSON

BEST OF ARKANSAS - 2017

bookstore for a reason that will be familiar to any bibliophile who has ever wished upon a star: Running a bookstore sounded like fun. “If you like to read books and you like to talk about books, what could be better than owning a bookstore?” she said. “There’s the business end of it, which is not so dreamy. Was it the draw of becoming rich? No. … I think it was the opportunity to bring in good books, bring in new customers, serving the needs of existing customers.” Little Rock, Lent said, deserves a great independent bookstore. That doesn’t mean, however, that she and McGowan are sitting around in easy chairs, reading all day. There are still real challenges for the business. “I think things have stabilized somewhat for bookstores,” she said. “The economic headwinds are still pretty strong. Ten years ago, they were closing hundreds and hundreds [of bookstores] a year, but there’s been a resurgence. It seemed like it was an opportune time.” Lent said her goal is to build on the legacy of the store, continuing to cultivate the community of local readers while expanding opportunities for customers to share, talk about and experience new books. Lent said changes will be coming, but they will be small and undramatic. For example, they’ve changed the hours — from

9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. to 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. — to allow people coming home from work to stop in and browse. The name will subtly change, too, from WordsWorth Books & Co. to WordsWorth Bookstore. They’ll also rearrange the store somewhat to set aside space for classes and workshops. Lent said she plans to survey customers to identify areas where the store can expand its titles, and may host topical book clubs. “We still want to focus, as Jean has, on Arkansas writers and give them a prominent place,” Lent said. “We’re planning to do more in-store events and activities.” Lent said the store will also continue to build on its close relationship with the Clinton School of Public Service, partnering with it on author events and readings by the nationally known writers who lecture there. Lent said the fact that WordsWorth has survived past challenges — including the rise of big-box booksellers, Amazon.com, the 2008 recession and the shift to e-books — is remarkable, and it says a lot about the customers who frequent the store and their support for local businesses. “The exciting thing,” Lent said, “is that people are reading — reading and talking and sharing; talking about new ways of writing. It all contributes to the quality of life in our community.”

Thanks for voting us the BEST! BEST ANTIQUES

105 N. Rodney Parham • Little Rock •

501.223.3600 • midtownantiquemall.com arktimes.com JULY 27, 2017

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One of the Top 10 Restaurants in Arkansas

Thank you for voting Moses Tucker the best Commercial Real Estate Company two years in a row!

GYPSY BISTRO

Locally owned since 1996.

Campy, funky and interactive, Dizzy’s is a refreshingly engaging blend of unique, from scratch international and southern comfort foods, craft beer, world wines, art and music.

BEST CHEESE DIP

Find The Best Cheese Dip In Arkansas Here!

200 S. River Market Ave, Ste. 150

TUE - THU: 11AM - 9PM • FRI - SAT: 11AM - 10PM • SATURDAY BRUNCH

mosestucker.com | 501-376-6555

501.375.3500

Photo courtesy of NRHA

Love Learning ADVANCING INDEPENDENT & EXCITED LEARNERS SINCE 1944 BEST HARDWARE HOME IMPROVEMENT

TourAnthony.com (501) 225-6629 7700 OHIO STREET LITTLE ROCK AR 72227 PreK3 - 8th Grade

Thank you for voting us BEST PRIVATE SCHOOL!

THANK YOU ARKANSAS FOR MAKING US #1! Visit our 6 locations in central Arkansas! 5915 R Street 916-9677

9815 West Markham 227-4440

900 South Main 604-7575

7311 Baseline Rd. 562-2345

14710 Cantrell Rd. 868-8080

9728 Maumelle Blvd. 771-9229

www.fullerandson.com arktimes.com JULY 27, 2017

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BEST OF ARKANSAS - 2017

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 28

Finalists: Arkansas Arts Center, Arkansas Travelers, Big Dam Bridge, Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art (Bentonville)

RESORT

ATHLETIC CLUB

Finalists: Arlington Hotel (Hot Springs), Gaston’s White River Resort, The Lodge at Mount Magazine, Mountain Harbor Resort & Spa

Finalists: 10 Fitness, Little Rock Racquet Club, Omnis Crossfit, Wellness Revolution Crossfit

Red Apple Inn

WEEKEND GETAWAY

Little Rock Athletic Club

HIKING TRAIL

Hot Springs

GOLF COURSE

Finalists: Eureka Springs, Mount Magazine, Bentonville, Petit Jean State Park

Pleasant Valley Country Club Finalists: Chenal Country Club, Country Club of Little Rock, Rebsamen Golf Course, War Memorial Golf Course

Pinnacle Mountain State Park Finalists: Allsopp Park, Ouachita Trail, Petit Jean Mountain, Two Rivers Park

Finalists: Allsopp Park, Camp Robinson, Pinnacle Mountain, Slaughter Pen (Bentonville) MARINA

Mountain Harbor Resort & Spa (Lake Ouachita) Finalists: Fairfield Bay (Greers Ferry Lake), Heber Springs Marina (Greers Ferry Lake), Jolly Roger’s Marina (Lake Maumelle), Brady Mountain Marina (Lake Ouachita)

PLACE TO MOUNTAIN BIKE

Burns Park

Entertainment MUSICIAN OR BAND

Amasa Hines

Finalists: Chris DeClerk, Adam Faucett, Rodney Block and the Real Music Lovers, Tragikly Whit DJ

Gforce Finalists: DJ Mario Luna, Seth Baldy, Kramer, rob O. PLACE FOR LIVE MUSIC

Revolution Music Room Finalists: Cajun’s Wharf, South on Main, Stickyz Rock ’N’ Roll Chicken Shack, White Water Tavern PLACE TO DANCE

Club Sway

Finalists: Club Level, Discovery, Electric Cowboy, Ernie Biggs LIVE MUSIC FESTIVAL

THANKS FOR VOTING US BEST INTERIOR DESIGNER!

Riverfest

Finalists: Hot Water Hills Festival (Hot Springs), King Biscuit (Helena/West Helena), Legends of Arkansas, Toad Suck Daze (Conway), The Valley of the Vapors (Hot Springs) NEIGHBORHOOD FESTIVAL

Hillcrest HarvestFest Finalists: Block Street Block Party, Cornbread Festival, Chili Fights in the Heights, Patio in Park Hill LATE-NIGHT SPOT

BEST DESIGNER/DECORATOR

DEBI DAVIS INTERIOR DESIGN (501) 221-2032 • 2222 Cantrell Rd, Little Rock, AR 72202

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JULY 27, 2017

ARKANSAS TIMES

Midtown

Finalists: Discovery, Ciao Baci, Ernie Biggs, Four Quarter Bar GAY BAR

Club Sway


BEST OF ARKANSAS - 2017

Thank you, Arkansa s!

BEST HOME ENTERTAINMENT

STORE

Shop shop LOCAL ARKANSAS TIMES

Arkansas’ Largest Vinyl Store 4212 MacArthur Dr., North Little Rock 501-753-7877 • arcd.com

THE POINTE BRODIE CREEK BEST APARTMENT COMPLEX

PAST LR MARATHON CHAMP: Leah Thorvilson.

Finalists: 610 Center, Discovery, Triniti SPORTS BAR

The Tavern Sports Grill Finalists: Dugan’s Pub, Prospect Sports Bar, Twin Peaks, West End Smokehouse & Tavern MOVIE THEATER

Riverdale 10 Finalists: UA Breckenridge 12, Cinemark Colonel Glenn 18 (Rave), Chenal 9, Ron Robinson Theater MUSEUM

THANK YOU FOR MAKING US YOUR HOME!

Museum of Discovery Finalists: Arkansas Arts Center, Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art (Bentonville), Clinton Presidential Center, Historic Arkansas Museum PERFORMING ARTS GROUP

Arkansas Repertory Theatre

501-221-3377 | 3400 S Bowman Rd www.pointebrodiecreek.com

501-725-9055 | 3321 S Bowman Rd www.bowmanpointe.com

Finalists: Arkansas Symphony Orchestra, Ballet Arkansas, Red Octopus, River City Men’s Chorus PLACE TO GAMBLE

Oaklawn Racing & Gaming Finalists: Gold Strike Casino (Tunica, Miss.), Southland Park Gaming and Racing (West Memphis), Choctaw Casino (Oklahoma), Cherokee Casino (Oklahoma)

Food and Drink CONTINUED ON PAGE 40

BOWMAN POINTE

BEST APARTMENT COMPLEX

arktimes.com JULY 27, 2017

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BEST OF ARKANSAS - 2017

EVEN BETTY WHITE'S IN ON THE GAME: A slot machine, a.k.a. "game of skill," features the actress' voice.

BEST PLACE TO GAMBLE

Oaklawn

‘Bet more, win more’

O

n the approach to Oaklawn Racing & Gaming in Hot Springs, you will start to feel surrounded by the hotels. These lodges, on both sides of Central Avenue, have advertisements for quick stays and clean rooms. Pass them and look for Boll Weevil Pawn & Superstore south of the racetrack and glide into the parking lot. It is large. So large, in fact, that there’s a vehicle that will come to your car and take you to the track. You can walk if you want, though. It might be a beautiful night, the sun setting over the fields surrounding Oaklawn, where horses are stabled. At the door, someone will welcome you. You go up the escalator. And here, my friends, is the bounty. Look around: electronic “games of skill” as far as the eye can see. 36

JULY 27, 2017

ARKANSAS TIMES

Your brain will bend from the buzzing color, but it will adjust. There are blackjack tables and a bar and a lounge where people might be yelling along to karaoke. But nothing catches the eye like the giant arcade stacks of those socalled games of skill. Flashing columns of fortune, everywhere. The games have spinning images: puppies, panthers, the number 7, Jurassic Park, Betty White (she speaks to you when you spin). You put cash in the machine, pull a lever or push a button, the images spin, and at the bottom of the screen a number shows your winnings or losses. The number of pulls you get depends on the amount of money you’ve put in the machine. Even when your winnings drop, the cacophony of video game beeps and

A night of electronic ‘games of skill’ at Oaklawn.

boings and bells will have you feeling like a winner. The more you play, the more you begin to recognize what patterns emerge: Three T-Rexes are good; two are only OK. You also notice, perhaps, the sign on top of each slot machine that says, “BET MORE, WIN MORE.” You bet more. And you maybe start winning more. You maybe start winning a lot. Or, more likely, you lose more; you maybe start losing a lot. Either way, the game begins to infect you. It is entertainment. You can start believing that you are good at this kind of thing. You know how to bet on a slot machine. It is not just fate. You lose $30 in 10 minutes. Take a break. Head toward the back, past a security guard, and there is the area where people bet

BY JACOB ROSENBERG

on horses. During the main season, starting in January, it is pageantry and fun. It is what makes Oaklawn famous. It is what most people know this place for. But, right now, it is just TVs set up with men clamped to wooden seats watching horses racing somewhere else, and they bet on the pixels. Probably better to hold off on all this. You re-emerge to the electricity of the slots, and the security guard who let you into the horse area says, “Pretty boring, huh? This is better.” And, yes, for all that people talk about the horses, there is joy in the slots, too. There are no windows, really, and the only lights drawing you, like a bug, are those slots. Sit down. Chat with people. Pull the lever. Order a drink. Watch the number go up or down. Let the hours go.


Thanks For Voting Us The Best!

Thank you for recognizing Red as one of your favorites! BEST SALON

We’ll Buzz your hair and Shine your shoes! Best Barbershop 1996-2004, 2006-2017

Mon-Fri 8am-5:30pm • Sat 8am-1pm Closed Sun 5815 Kavanaugh • In the Heights

BEST LINGERIE

Naughty or Nice?

663-9875

BEST BARBERSHOP

BEST TRAVEL AGENCY

Voted Best Travel Agency since 1995

Thanks, now please go away! www.poetravel.com

501-664-4RED 1923 N. University Ave redbeautylounge.com

At Cupids you can find something for every mood!

Lingerie Toys Games Party Supplies Adult DVDs

Conway Little Rock South 2585 Donaghey Ave 3920 W 65th St Conway, AR 72032 Little Rock, AR 72209 (501) 764-0404 (501) 565-2020 Open 24 Hours Little Rock West 9700 N Rodney Parham Rd Little Rock, AR 72227 (501) 227-8282 North Little Rock 5400 John F Kennedy Blvd N Little Rock, AR 72116 (501) 753-3353 Hot Springs 1910 Albert Pike Rd Hot Springs, AR 71913 (501) 623-1250

Customer Appreciation: Realized We’re proud to be named a finalist for Best Bank in Arkansas Times’ Best of Arkansas 2017. We want to thank our customers who voted for us — it’s because of you this honor is possible.

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arktimes.com 7/18/17 JULY 27, 4:30 2017PM37


BEST OF ARKANSAS - 2017

BEST ARTISAN

Bang-Up Betty

Doing a bang-up business BY LESLIE NEWELL PEACOCK

'TOO FUN': That's what Stacey Bowers calls her jewelry venture.

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B

ang-Up Betty, Stacey Bowers’ stamped jewelry business, is what she calls an “overgrown side hustle.” That is, it’s what she does, and does with great success, in the hours after her full-time job as marketing and communications director at the Thea Foundation. It’s time-consuming, she says — “Christmas is bonkers” — but also “too fun.” Stamped necklaces, cuffs, earrings bearing sentiments like “love” or “mom” have been in vogue for some time now. Bowers, 28, who has a deceptively shy demeanor, has hammered out her place in the market with an appeal to feminist sensibilities. “People will lean in” to read her bar necklace — a rectangular bar on a slender chain — expecting to see something sweet, she said smiling, “and they’ll see ‘shit


Frances Flower Shop Thank you for choosing us as one of your favorites! BEST FLORIST

PROUD TO HAVE BEEN SERVING YOU FOR OVER 64 YEARS! 1222 WEST CAPITOL • LITTLE ROCK • 501.372.2203 •FRANCESFLOWERSHOP.COM

BEST RETIREMENT COMMUNITY

Exceptional Living for Extraordinary Seniors The Manor Senior Living Communities are committed to providing Central Arkansas seniors with a beautiful and safe place to call home. Through local ownership and dedicated staff, our goal is to provide our residents, and their families, relief from the daily stresses of life, and give them more time to focus on the enjoyable things that are important to them. We welcome you to stop by and see The Manor Difference! Level II Assisted Living

Memory Care

Independent Living Cottages

BENTON 4727 Boone Road • Benton, AR 72022 • 501-404-9934

LITTLE ROCK

Senior Living Communities

1401 Labelle Drive • Little Rock, AR 72204 • 501-708-4494

ARKANSASMANOR.COM arktimes.com JULY 27, 2017

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BEST OF ARKANSAS - 2017

BEST LATE-NIGHT SPOT

A n A r k A n s A s F Av o r i t e . YeAr AFter YeAr. Dr. Bev Foster has been named to numerous “best of” lists for Best Chiropractic Physician since she opened her doors. Ask her loyal patients and you’ll hear comments like: “Her staff are both professional and always helpful,” “I would trust her skills with anyone in my family.” “…loves what she does and cares for her patients,” or our favorite, “Best chiropractor in the world!”

We appreciate our loyal patients who support better health through chiropractic medicine.

Get Well. Stay Well.

THANK YOU, Arkansas Times Readers!

BEST VEGETARIAN

BEST FRENCH FRIES BEST BRUNCH BEST OUTDOOR DINING

NOW SERVING BREAKFAST, LUNCH AND DINNER BUILDING COMMUNITY THROUGH LOCAL FOOD 1500 S. Main St. • Little Rock · 501.414.0423 · therootcafe.com

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JULY 27, 2017

ARKANSAS TIMES

show,’ or ‘nasty woman.’ ” (She can customize, too). This appeal to the progressive has gotten her noticed outside Arkansas as well as to her hometown fans who voted her Best Artisan in this year’s Best of Arkansas issue: Her “shit show” necklace was proclaimed by a BuzzFeed writer as one of 19 “completely fucking exquisite pieces of jewelry for your best friend who curses a lot,” and her work has been praised by other BuzzFeed writers as well. This year, she was hired by theoutrage.com, which donates a portion of its proceeds to progressive causes, to design and produce an enamel pin commemorating the Women’s March on Jan. 21 (a woman symbol with the date). Sadly, they are sold out. Bang-Up Betty also produces “gifts that give back,” among them an enamel lapel pin with the words “Nasty Woman” over Lady Liberty’s face ($1 per sale to the ACLU); “I believe in science” necklaces ($4 per sale to the Natural Resources Defense Council); a pin honoring singer George Michael ($1 to Lucie’s Place); and others. Bang-Up Betty donates 100 percent of proceeds from a bracelet that reads “strong as hell” to the nonprofit Arkansas Women’s Outreach for homeless women; she’s raised $1,100 for the nonprofit so far. Bowers started Bang-Up Betty in 2013 after some Christmas presents she made for friends were admired. She started selling them on Etsy and then began to sell from her own website, bangupbetty.com. Since then, she’s sold “thousands” of pieces of jewelry. “I’ve always had an entrepreneurial spirit,” the Lakewood resident said. She’s also long combined her verbal and artistic bent; at North Little Rock High School she headed up the literary magazine and was president of the Art Club. After graduating from Centenary College in Shreveport with a degree in communications, she designed and sold notecards for her business Betty Pearl. She has also worked as an intern at the Arkansas Times. “Everyone is really speaking their minds right now,” Bowers said, “and I think people like doing that with what they wear.” By the way, Bowers is not Betty; Betty is her cat. And Betty is not a girl; he was named prematurely. And while Bowers is not supporting herself with her business, it’s still a bang-up, “very profitable” venture.

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 35 FOOD FESTIVAL

Greek Food Festival Finalists: Chili Fights in the Heights, Cornbread Festival, Jewish Food Festival, Main Street Food Truck Festival FRENCH FRIES

Big Orange Finalists: Buffalo Grill, David’s Burgers, McDonald’s, The Root Cafe ONION RINGS

Sonic Drive-In Finalists: Arkansas Burger Co., Cheddar’s Scratch Kitchen, Dugan’s Pub, Leo’s Greek Castle CHEESE DIP

Dizzy’s Gypsy Bistro Finalists: El Porton, Heights Taco & Tamale Co., La Hacienda, Mexico Chiquito RIBS

Whole Hog Cafe Finalists: Sims Bar-B-Que, Corky’s Ribs and BBQ, McClard’s Bar-B-Q, Penguin Ed’s Bar-B-Que (Fayetteville) WINE LIST

So Restaurant-Bar Finalists: By the Glass, Crush Wine Bar, Samantha’s Taproom, Zin Urban Wine and Beer Bar ARKANSAS-BREWED BEER

Lost Forty

Finalists: Diamond Bear Brewing Co., Flyway Brewing, Ozark Beer Co., Rebel Kettle LIQUOR STORE

Colonial Wines and Spirits Finalists: 107 Liquor (Sherwood), Legacy Wine and Spirits, O’Looney’s Wine and Liquor, Sullivant’s Liquor Store SUSHI

Sushi Cafe Finalists: Hanaroo Sushi Bar, Kemuri, Kiyen’s, Mt. Fuji, Oceans at Arthur’s SALAD

ZAZA Fine Salad and WoodOven Pizza Co. Finalists: Cheers, Jason’s Deli, Taziki’s CONTINUED ON PAGE 42


NOW TWO CONVENIENT LOCATIONS

A few tips to keep us all safe while enjoying the Arkansas River Trail! When preparing to pass others, speak an audible warning in advance. Always pass on the left side, while leaving two feet of clearance. Cyclists and skaters should travel at safe and appropriate speeds. Keep an eye on your children at all times. Keep pets on a short leash and under control at all times. Always clean up after your pets.

s Cy cli st s a lwa yet wea r th e ir h e lm s!

LITTLE ROCK • NORTH LITTLE ROCK Every Day

4t Birtday Bash

BLOCK ON

rock

4-10 pm • sat. juLy 29 402 E.9th st. • $5 fOOd truCKs giant BiErgartEn LivE musiC BEnEfits

Look for more etiquette and safety tips at arkansasrivertrail.org

175ML BEEFEATER GIN 175ML COURVOISIER VS 750ML OBAN SINGLE MALT 18 YR 750ML JOHNNIE WALKER GOLD RESERVE 4PK 200 BLUE, GOLD, PLATINUM, BLACK GIFT PACK 3L BOTA BOX WINE 3L BLACK BOX WINE 12PK FLYWAY BLUEWING BEER

$31.99 $57.99 $81.99 $74.99 $84.99 $16.99 $20.99 $16.99

SALE!

$25.99 $48.99 $69.99 $62.99 $79.99 $14.99 $15.99 $13.99

ALL CRAFT BEER10% OFF EVERY DAY! • WE GLADLY MATCH ANY LOCAL ADS HURRY IN! THIS SALE EXPIRES AUGUST 2, 2017 WEDNESDAY IS WINE DAY 15% OFF WINE CASE DISCOUNTS EVERY DAY!

LITTLE ROCK: 10TH & MAIN • 501.374.0410 NORTH LITTLE ROCK: 860 EAST BROADWAY • 501.374.2405 • Tasting Redemption Bourbon, Thursday 3 to 7 pm. HOURS: LR • 8AM-10PM MON-THUR • 8AM-12PM FRI-SAT •NLR • MON-SAT 8AM-12PM

Congratulations to Brady DeClerk on his selection as Best Chiropractor!

BEST CHIROPRACTOR

12120 Colonel Glenn Rd Suite 6200 w w w. o m n i s r e h a b . c o m 501.313.2844

THANK YOU FOR VOTING US ONE OF THE BEST INTERNET PROVIDERS IN THE STATE! Basically, thanks to all of our clients at these locations and if you live here and need a new service provider, we would love your business.

Broadway Manor Apartments

The Row at Legion Village

Riveria Condos

Melmore Apartments

Arkansas Building

The Clayton on Scott

MacArthur Commons

River Market Tower

916 & 920 Scott St. Apartments

Lafayette Bldg

923 Cumberland St. Apartments

Arkansas Democrat Lofts

1004 Scott St. Apartments

Riverfront Plaza

Phillips Apartments

Olsen Apartments

1503 Scott St. Apartments

Heritage West

Columbia Apartments

1522 Scott St. Apartments

ACCC Bldg

503 E. 7th St. Apartments

SOMA Lofts

Sterling Bldg

518 E 7th Apartments

Trapnall Place

Simmons Tower

Gracie Mansion

Tuf Nut

Argenta Place

KLOFTS

Village at the Gateway

Plaza West

Kramer School

Quapaw Tower

Rock Street Lofts

Lafayette Square

River Cliff Apartments

622 Rock St. Apartments

WWW.HYPERLEAPNETWORK.COM

Riviera

BEST INTERNET SERVICE PROVIDER arktimes.com JULY 27, 2017

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BEST OF ARKANSAS - 2017

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 40

Mediterranean Cafe, The Root Cafe

Finalists: Boulevard Bistro, Lost Forty, The Root Cafe, YaYa’s Euro Bistro

Finalists: Big Orange, Loblolly Creamery, Sonic Drive-In, Shake’s Frozen Custard

COCKTAIL

BUSINESS LUNCH

Cache Restaurant

Cajun’s Wharf

Finalists: Capital Bar and Grill, Samantha’s Taproom, South on Main, Trio’s Restaurant

Finalists: Big Orange, Capital Bar and Grill, The Pizzeria, South on Main MILKSHAKE

Purple Cow

BRUNCH

Red Door Restaurant

VEGETARIAN

The Root Cafe Finalists: North Bar, Star of India, Three Fold Noodles and Dumpling Co., The Veg

BREAD

Boulevard Bread Co. Finalists: Arkansas Fresh, Community Bakery, Old Mill Bread and Flour Co., Mylo Coffee Co., Panera Bread CATERER

Catering to You Finalists: Alan Bennett, RX Catering, Simply the Best, Trio’s Restaurant OUTDOOR DINING

Brave New Restaurant Finalists: Cajun’s Wharf, Local Lime, The Root Cafe, U.S. Pizza Hillcrest

People and Politics ARTIST

V.L. Cox Finalists: Guy Bell, Kevin Kresse, John Kushmaul, Matt McLeod CELEBRITY

Mary Steenburgen Finalists: Beth Ditto, Bill Clinton, Judge Reinhold, Jeff Nichols PHOTOGRAPHER

Joshua Asante Finalists: Brian Chilson, Lily Darragh, Rita Henry, Matt White POLITICIAN

Joyce Elliott Finalists: Tom Cotton, Clarke Tucker, Warwick Sabin, Kathy Webb ATHLETE

Rawleigh Williams III Finalists: John Daly, Hunter Henry, Darren McFadden, Leah Thorvilson LIBERAL

Max Brantley Finalists: Matt Campbell, Joyce Elliott, Warwick Sabin, Kathy Webb CONSERVATIVE

Tom Cotton Finalists: Asa Hutchinson, Jeremy Hutchinson, Rex Nelson, Bill Vickery WORST ARKANSAN

Jason Rapert

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BEST OF ARKANSAS - 2017

Finalists: Wendell Griffen, French Hill, Mike Huckabee, Leslie Rutledge

Max Brantley

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Kevin Brockmeier Finalists: Bryan Borland, Garrard Conley, Mara Leveritt, Nate Powell

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THE

TO-DO

LIST

BY STEPHANIE SMITTLE, HEATHER STEADHAM AND LINDSEY MILLAR

FRIDAY 7/28

‘ORGAN ... PLUS: A UNIQUE MUSICAL EVENT’

7:30 p.m. St. James United Methodist Church. Free.

be awarded first prize and audience prize in the American Guild of Organists’ National Competition in Organ Improvisation in 2006. A graduate of the Cleveland Institute of Music and the Eastman School of Music, Tren-

ney, who’s performed in various venues across the country from California to Maine, will host a sing-a-long as well as accompany a silent film starring Buster Keaton. HS

JOHN DAVID PITTMAN

Creating a fantastic fugue of highbrow classicism and popular culture,

St. James United Methodist Church presents this free musical event for the community. Leading is special guest Tom Trenney, minister of music at First Plymouth Church in Lincoln, Neb., and the first organist to

HIGH FASHION TRAP: Dazz & Brie, winners of the 2017 Arkansas Times Musicians Showcase, perform at "Crown: The Final Curtain Call," a party and fashion show at The Castle on Stagecoach.

SATURDAY 7/29

‘CROWN: THE FINAL CURTAIN CALL’ 3 p.m. The Castle on Stagecoach. $25-$45.

If “fancy day party” has a sadly empty checkbox next to it on your summer checklist, here’s your chance. Don’t blow it. DJ Nic Hudson is spinning tunes for a “high fashion trap” runway

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show at The Castle — a picturesque spot for weddings and Disney-themed “princess tea parties” that bills itself proudly as “Arkansas’s Only Castle Venue.” Organizers have arranged for a red carpet hosted by Jas Chyrel and a runway show (7:30 p.m.) hosted by Tap The Connector and Kaylon Blake, ripe for showing off your take on the theme. (Asked what to wear, organizer Gerald

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Thomas characterized “high fashion trap” as “a pair of ripped denim from Acne” and “an Adidas shirt with some Stan Smith Adidas.”) Tickets include dinner from On the Border and other food vendors; popcorn; snow cones; and three complimentary drinks for ticketgoers, including an adult beverage called “trap punch,” which Thomas told us is made up of “all those bad, inex-

pensive drinks we drank in college that weren’t good for us but got the job done.” And, if all that leaves you straddling the fence, the winners of the 2017 Arkansas Times Musicians Showcase are performing, and hearing Dazz & Brie’s “Concept” in a castle is probably the best evidence we have right now that living in Little Rock can be a bowl of cherries sometimes. SS


IN BRIEF

MARSHALL FOSTER

THURSDAY 7/27

RED DIRT COUNTRY: Jason Boland and his band The Stragglers land at the Rev Room on Friday night.

FRIDAY 7/28

JASON BOLAND & THE STRAGGLERS

9 p.m. Rev Room. $15.

Jason Boland & The Stragglers have been doing the “red dirt” country thing a long time. Their debut, “Pearl Snaps,” came out in 1998, and since then the band’s worked with Shooter Jennings and Dwight Yoakam churning out honky-tonk along the lines of Turnpike Troubadours and Cross Canadian Ragweed. In an interview last Septem-

ber with guitarist blog “Pedal of the Day,” Boland was asked how he got into music. Referencing the 1986 film “Crossroads,” he responded with characteristic deference: “I figured if Ralph Macchio could cut heads with Steve Vai, so could I.” The Stragglers’ last album came out on the Thirty Tigers label in 2015, and they’re still touring on the popularity of button-pushers like “Fat and Merry” and “Christmas in Huntsville,” a narrative about injustice in the

SATURDAY 7/29

SATURDAY 7/29

THE REP’S COSTUME AND PROP SALE

WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP CARDBOARD BOAT RACES

As a child, I had elaborate Halloween costumes. I was the caterpillar from “Alice in Wonderland” and a slice of cheese-less pizza (I’m lactose intolerant). Somewhere in my teenage years, I grew lame and quit dressing up and haven’t really recovered. But I have a small desire to go big at some not-toodistant Halloween party. Also, I have young children who dress up in robes and capes and masks nearly every day of their lives. If you relate to any part of that, the Rep’s annual Costume and Prop Sale could be just the ticket for you or your less-lame children. The theater’s costume and prop shops will have items from “Peter and the Starcatcher” (including mermaid costumes!), “Beauty and the Beast” and “Elf” on sale. Cash, check and cards will be accepted. LM

Too anchored to head to an America’s Cup location? Not fancy enough to attend a local regatta? Try an appropriately Arkansas alternative: the 31st Annual World Championship Cardboard Boat Races. Boat registration begins at 8 a.m. Saturday, July 29, at Sandy Beach. This year’s theme is DC vs. Marvel: Boat engineers are encouraged to show their creativity by designing vessels that are perfect incarnations of their favorite comics. The first heat of races begins at 10 a.m., with a second heat just after. Supposedly, the Second Annual Grand Finale Race comes just after that, but how can a cardboard boat survive more than a few seconds, much less two full heats? But the

9 a.m.-noon, Arkansas Repertory Theatre lobby. Free.

10 a.m. Sandy Beach, Greers Ferry Lake, Heber Springs.

criminal justice system: “They ask if I have anything to say/As I think of the letter they brought me yesterday/From the mother of the man I didn’t kill/I hope you burn in hell on this Christmas in Huntsville.” Count Jason Boland & The Stragglers among groups who will be “red dirt” when it’s not cool anymore, making Waylon-style cultural commentary with workmanship and nuance, cleverly disguised in radio-ready pedal steel riffs. SS

awards! The Pride of the Fleet prize goes to the boat that best combines innovative engineering with artistic design, and the Captain’s Award goes to the team with the greatest spirit and crowd involvement. The Titanic Award — reserved for the boat with the most dramatic sinking — might be the hardest of all to bestow. When it’s all over, and the luckily biodegradable cardboard sits soaking at the bottom of Greers Ferry, you can enjoy a children’s treasure dig, the World Championship Watermelon Eating Contest and, much later in the day, the Rock the Dock Concert Series featuring Stillwater Hardy, at the Dam Site Marina. You’re even allowed to listen to this free music from your boat — though you might want to sit in one made of something other than a paper product. HS

String players Cindy Woolf and Mark Bilyeu (formerly of Big Smith) bring their Ozark folklore-inspired songs to Four Quarter Bar, 6 p.m., free. The Museum of Discovery hosts “Science After Dark: ‘Stranger Things’ and Totally Rad Science,” with pizza from Damgoode Pies and beer from Stone’s Throw Brewing, 6 p.m., $5. Ned Perme, chief meteorologist for KATV, Channel 7, entertains at the piano for Arkansas Sounds’ “Sounds in the Stacks” series, 6:30 p.m., Maumelle Library, free. All The Eyes, Eraser Field and Casual Pants take the stage at Vino’s, 8 p.m., $5. Brian Ramsey performs at Cajun’s Wharf, 5:30 p.m., free, and later, Tragikly White takes its party set to the stage, 9 p.m., $5. Comedian Skip Clark of The Bronx brings his stand-up to The Loony Bin, 7:30 p.m. Thu.-Sat., 10 p.m. Fri.-Sat., $8-$12. The Wildflower Revue and The McBryde Family Singers play a benefit show for the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, with a silent auction and raffle featuring art, 8 p.m., White Water Tavern, $5. KUAR-FM, 89.1, Arkansongs host Stephen Koch leads Arkansascentric trivia at Stone’s Throw Brewing, 6:30 p.m., free.

FRIDAY 7/28 Priscilla Rock and friends host a drag show for “Rock the Night! The Women of Classic Rock,” with a performance from Dazz & Brie and karaoke with Jeremy Brasher, 9 p.m. White Water, $5. Rodney Block plays “Junebug Jam Session,” a birthday celebration for Patrick Pettus, at South on Main, 9 p.m., $15. Fayetteville’s self-described “funktronica” band Cadillac Jackson takes the stage at Four Quarter Bar, 9:30 p.m., $7. Jon Reep, winner of NBC’s Last Comic Standing, joins Angry Patrick and Laura Beam for Really Awful Terrible Night of Comedy V, 8 p.m., Clear Channel Metroplex, $20-$60. Boom Kinetic brings its party sound to Stickyz Rock ’n’ Roll Chicken Shack, 10 p.m., $10-$12. Notice to Quit, Age of Man and Carlton Heston are on the lineup for a rock ’n’ roll show at Maxine’s in Hot Springs, 9 p.m., $5. Michael Shipp, Pulse and Iron Glide play a self-described “dad rock” show at Vino’s, 8 p.m., $8. Trey Johnson & Jason Willmon bring their blues duo to Kings Live Music in Conway, with an opening set from Deshon Washington, 8:30 p.m., $5. Lance Daniels entertains at Cajun’s for happy hour, 5:30 p.m., free, followed by The Brian Ramsey Band, 9 p.m., $5. Nashville’s Foreverandnever, Cleveland, Ohio’s Leav/e/arth and locals Slow Panda and Cosmic Farmer put on a show at The Cavern in Russellville, 8 p.m., donations. “The Secret Life of Pets” gets a screening above the wave pool at Magic Springs Theme & Water Park, 7 p.m., $35-$55. Splendid

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THE

TO-DO

LIST

BY STEPHANIE SMITTLE, HEATHER STEADHAM AND LINDSEY MILLAR

TUESDAY 8/1

‘NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD’

MATT WHITE

6 p.m. Ron Robinson Theater. $2.

'CELEBRATE': Big Piph's final album gets a release party this Saturday at the Rev Room, with Faron Rashelle & The Kosher Sound, DJ Code Red, Virghost and host Sean Fresh.

SATURDAY 7/29

‘CELEBRATE’ RELEASE PARTY 10 p.m. Revolution Room. $15.

A teaser video for the next Big Piph (Chane “Epiphany” Morrow) album, “Celebrate,” is a time-traveling montage of people dancing, put together by Piph’s go-to videographer, Kenneth Bell. There’s a baby shakin’ it, a grandma, pallbearers dressed in white with a princely coffin doing a stylish aboutface, some Soul Train revelry. Then, some familiar faces pop out: Neil DeGrasse Tyson. Rosie Perez. Barack Obama. Dr. Cornell West. When I asked Big Piph about the inspiration for those faces, he eschewed the idea that it was a way for people involved in civil rights struggles to cope with adversity. “It wasn’t like, this is how you’re coping and how you survive. This is just another shade of who you are,” he said. It’s Piph’s self-declared “final

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album,” and one he says he was inspired by the idea that people can resist being defined by the struggles in which they’re engaged, and that those best equipped to make a difference are whole and well-rounded, not one-dimensional. Speaking of making a difference, the rapper and emcee is headed to Myanmar (formerly Burma) as part of a program called Next Level, a program of the U.S. Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs that, through hip-hop, seeks to engage “underserved communities in six countries around the world and uses artistic collaboration and social engagement to enhance people-to-people diplomacy, especially among young audiences,” as the program’s website states. For this release concert, Big Piph is joined by Faron Rashelle & The Kosher Sound, DJ Code Red, Virghost and host Sean Fresh. SS

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George Romero’s “Night of the Living Dead” premiered in October 1968, just before the Motion Picture Association of America replaced a selectively enforced Production Code — the so-called “Hays Code” — with a rating system like the one we use today. The last lines of Roger Ebert’s 1969 review of the film read as follows: “I supposed the idea was to make a fast buck before movies like this are off-limits to children. Maybe that’s why ‘Night of the Living Dead’ was scheduled for the lucrative holiday season, when the kids are on vacation. Maybe that’s it, but I don’t know how I could explain it to the kids who left the theater with tears in their eyes.” It’s remarkable that, in the era of “Saw” and “Human Centipede,” a film from 1968 can still terrify and repulse as this one can. It’s maybe even more remarkable that it continues to be relevant; see Renee Graham’s poignant July 21 essay for the Boston Globe, “What ‘Night of the Living Dead’ Taught Me About Race,” or Alissa Wilkinson’s July 22 piece on the film for Vox, in which she argues that without “Night of the Living Dead,” we’d have no “Get Out.” Those pieces came along in the wake of Romero’s death on July 16, but its screening at Ron Robinson this Tuesday, scheduled in May, is a testament to the grotesque power of the film. “Night of the Living Dead” is part of the Central Arkansas Library System’s Terror Tuesday series. If you’ve seen it, see it on the big screen. If you haven’t seen it, see it on the big screen. (And, if your kids aren’t quite ready for, as Ebert says, “ghouls eating people up” and “little girls killing their mothers,” maybe leave them at home.) SS

TUESDAY 8/1

GRATEFUL DEAD MEET-UP AT THE MOVIES

7 p.m. UA Breckenridge Stadium 12. $14.

Since 2011, Deadheads began gathering for Fathom Events’ one-night-only “meet-ups”: screenings of restored audio and video from the band’s heydays. They’ve screened Dead documentaries some years (“Sunshine Daydream” and “The Grateful Dead Movie”) and archival concert footage other years. This year marks what would be Jerry Garcia’s 75th birthday, and to celebrate, a previously unreleased 1989 performance at RFK Stadium in Washington, D.C., goes up on the big screen, complete with “Touch of Grey” as an opener, a visit from Dead collaborator Bruce Hornsby and one of the only versions of “Black Muddy River” to be committed to film. Breckenridge will be among the nearly 500 theaters in the U.S. to screen the film; this is probably your best chance to run into that guy from the Wiz Khalifa show whose phone number you lost. SS


IN BRIEF Chaos plays for the late crowd at West End Smokehouse, 10 p.m. Fri.-Sat., PRINT $7. The duo Illustrada hosts an album release show at Capitol View Studio, 8 p.m., $15.

‘THEN AND NOW’

5:30 p.m. Stella Boyle Smith Concert Hall, UA Little Rock. $15.

String quartets are sort of the soprano saxophone of the ensemble world. That is, unless you’re a regular symphony patron, you’ve most likely heard them as background music. They’re the soundtrack to a White House fete or a political drama, or a scene device in a movie where a black-tie affair is about to go terrible awry. Or, just a ritzy hotel’s way of signaling its luxury to its elevator passengers, courtesy of Haydn’s “Opus 76.” Maybe it’s because our ears are accustomed to processing string sounds as auxiliary, but something exciting happens when string quartets are given the whole stage, when we’re allowed to listen to them for their own sake. That’s the idea behind the Chamber Music Society of Little Rock’s “Then and Now,” a faculty concert that’s part of the Little Rock Chamber Music Festival. In this listener’s opinion, this is the sort of program that tends to fly under the radar despite its organizers’ intentions — the kind that people find out about later and sorely regret missing. First, there’s the repertoire. The “then” gets a nod with the program’s opener, Beethoven’s “String Quartet in B-flat, Op. 18, No. 6,” an exercise in contrasts that composer Robert Simpson called “a work of genius,” with a famous final movement full of “amazing modulations and gripping pathos.” Then, there’s the “now:” a string quartet from Yevgeniy Sharlat called “Moth,” the sheet music for which would read as frenzied to even the least musical among us. Shar-

lat — whose resume includes degrees from Curtis Institute of Music and precollege studies at The Juilliard School — used Rainer Maria Rilke’s poem “Farfallettina,” depicting the death of a moth “like a miniature lady who is having a heart attack on the way to the theater,” as the piece’s basis. Finally, there’s a work from the It Girl of the Brooklyn classical scene, Missy Mazzoli. The composer who rendered the life of Swiss explorer Isabelle Eberhardt in her acclaimed debut opera, “Song from the Uproar,” is featured here with “Harp and Altar for String Quartet and Electronics,” a haunting piece commissioned by the Kronos Quartet in 2009 that resembles Radiohead’s “OK Computer” more than anything Haydn or Mozart ever cranked out. Also, the players are wicked good: There’s our own violinist Geoff Robson, associate conductor of the Arkansas Symphony Orchestra since 2008 and winner of the 2017 Respighi Prize for conducting; Katherine Williamson, an adept violinist who’s spent the last several years bouncing between playing with the ASO and the Rockefeller Quartet here in Little Rock and the Minnesota Orchestra in her home state; Ryan Mooney, who plays viola with the ASO and the Quapaw String Quartet; cellist Caitlin Sullivan, a New Yorkbased member of Decoda, an affiliate of Carnegie Music Hall that pioneers outreach projects in Japan, South Africa and in the U.S.; and Yaira Matyakubova, a superstar Uzbekistani violinist who’s currently serving as first violinist in The Haven String Quartet of New Haven, Conn. SS

CW: CD: AD: AE: PM: PO:

Job/Order #: 294001 Operator: cs

Closing Date: 4/14/17

Publication: Arkansas Times

Trim: 2.125" x 5.5" Bleed: none"

Live: 1.875" x 5.25"

TUESDAY 8/1

Brand: Bud Light Iconic Item #: PBL2017086

KELLY HICKS

'THEN AND NOW': Violinist Katherine Williamson joins Geoff Robson, Ryan Mooney, Caitlin Sullivan and Yaira Matyakubova for "Then and Now," a faculty recital for the Chamber Music Society of Little Rock's Faulkner Chamber Music Festival.

MUST INITIAL FOR APPROVAL

New Orleans brass-driven funk ensemble Chapter: Soul makes a visit to Four Quarter Bar, 10 p.m., $8. Dangerous Idiots, Heels and Way Away share a bill at White Water, 9 p.m. Scholarship winners for the Central Arkansas Library System’s summer reading club will be announced and celebrated with the End of Summer Reading Club Bash, featuring food trucks, a petting zoo and live music, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Hillary Rodham Clinton Children’s Library & Learning Center, 4800 W. 10th Street, free. Whitman & Joel pump the tunes in Discovery Nightclub’s discotech, with Big Brown in the lobby, 9 p.m., $10. Chris Long plays an acoustic set at Hibernia Irish Tavern, 7:30 p.m., free. Arkansas Hunger Relief Alliance and Mazon: A Jewish Response to Hunger host “This Is Hunger,” a traveling exhibit on hunger in America, 1 p.m.-5 p.m. Sat.-Sun., 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Sun., Sturgis Hall, Clinton School of Public Service, free. Broderick Daniels and J. Rod perform at The Joint Theater & Coffeehouse, 7:30 p.m., $10-$15. 360 Fight Club presents “Psycho Dynamite Girl Fight Night” at the Clear Channel Metroplex, 7:30 p.m., $25-$125. Randall Shreve and The Devilles bring their “vaudeville rock” to Stickyz, 9 p.m., $10-$12. Landrest, Speedlights, Switchblade Razors and Spirit Cuntz share a bill at Maxine’s, 9 p.m., $7. Guitarist Chris DeClerk plays for happy hour at Cajun’s, 5;30 p.m., free, and later, catch RVS, 9 p.m., $5. The MacArthur Museum of Arkansas Military History hosts the 5th annual Vintage Military Vehicle Show, 9 a.m.-2 p.m.

QC:

SATURDAY 7/29

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SUNDAY 7/30 The Simple Pleasure, a duo project of Admiral Grey (of Cellular Chaos), plays a free show at Maxine’s, 9 p.m. The Salty Dogs play an early show at White Water, 6 p.m., $6. The Loony Bin combines comedy, magic and bellydancing for “Jest Kidding: A Variety Show,” 7 p.m., $15. Wightman and Karen Harris duet at the Faulkner County Library for the library’s summer concert series, 2 p.m., free.

WEDNESDAY 8/2 Michael Hibblen, KUAR-FM, 89.1, news director, discusses his new book, “Rock Island Railroad in Arkansas,” as part of the Legacies and Lunch series, noon, free.

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ALSO IN THE ARTS

A&E NEWS HARRY POTTER FANS can look forward to the Arkansas Symphony’s next season, which will include “The Magical Music of Harry Potter,” a concert of selected orchestral versions of music from all eight Harry Potter films composed by John Williams, Patrick Doyle, Nicholas Hooper and Alexandre Desplat. Audience members are encouraged to dress as their favorite character from J.K. Rowling’s saga about the boy wizard. Tickets for the two concerts, 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 7, and 3 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 8, at the Robinson Center Performance Hall go on sale at 10 a.m. Sunday, Sept. 24, at arkansassymphony.org/magic. AS PART OF the three-day series of events commemorating the 60th anniversary of the integration of Central High School, the Oxford American magazine presents the world premiere of the “No Tears Suite,” a 30-minute composition for large jazz ensemble from Little Rock composer and pianist Chris Parker, a music teacher at Booker Arts Magnet Elementary School in Little Rock. Parker took inspiration for the piece from “Warriors Don’t Cry,” the 1994 memoir from Melba Patillo Beals, a journalist and one of the Little Rock Nine. Parker’s ensemble for the premiere includes Grammy Awardwinning drummer Brian Blade, bassist Bill Huntington, tenor saxophonist Bobby LaVell, trumpeter Marc Franklin, alto saxophonist Chad Fowler, vocalist Kelley Hurt and vocalist/arranger I.J. Routen. The premiere begins at 6 p.m. and is a part of a 90-minute set including “a variety of Arkansas- and civil rights-inspired jazz tunes, including works by Pharoah Sanders, Sam Rivers, John Stubblefield and Charles Mingus,” a press release said. Before the premiere, from noon to 6 p.m., student ensembles from local high schools and colleges will perform. For more information about the “No Tears Suite” premiere, visit oxfordamerican. org/events, and for more information about the commemoration events, to take place Sept. 23-25, visit uca.edu/ cfac/central60. FAYETTEVILLE-BASED HONKY-tonk outfit Dylan Earl and The Reasons Why are the only Arkansas band to be featured at the Secret Stages Music Discovery Festival, a showcase for rising Southern musicians, to be held in Birmingham, Ala., Aug. 4-5. For more information, visit secretstages.net. THE BUTLER CENTER for Arkansas Studies’ “Arkansas Sounds” series has added the acclaimed western swing trio Hot Club of Cowtown to its fall lineup. The trio will perform at the Ron Robinson Theater at 7 p.m. Friday, Sept. 29, $20. For tickets, visit arkansassounds.org. 48

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ARKANSAS TIMES

COMING TO PULASKI TECH: "Sign of the Times: The Great Political Poster 1844-2012," an exhibition featuring the above image of Ronald Reagan and other posters, opens Aug. 18 in the Windgate Gallery of UA-Pulaski Technical College's Center for Humanities and Arts. Hendrix College professor Dr. Jay Barth will speak at an opening reception at 6 p.m. Aug. 17.

THEATER

“Sweet Charity.” Argenta Community Theater’s production of Cy Coleman’s Tony Award-winning musical. 7 p.m. Thu., 8 p.m. Fri.-Sat., 2 p.m. Sun. through July 29. $30. 405 Main St., NLR. 501-353-1443. “Willy Wonka.” A production of the Roald Dahl classic from the Arts and Science Center for Southeast Arkansas. 7:30 p.m. Wed.-Sat. $5-$22. 701 S. Main St., Pine Bluff. 870-536-3375. “The Pervert and the Pentecostal.” The Main Thing’s summer musical comedy. 8 p.m. Fri.-Sat., through Sept. 1. $24. The Joint Theater & Coffeehouse. 301 Main St., NLR. 501-372-0205. “Heathers: The Musical.” A musical adaptation of the 1988 film. 7:30 p.m. Thu.Sat., 2:30 p.m. Sun. The Studio Theater. 320 W. 7th St. 501-410-2283. “The Wizard of Oz.” Murry’s Dinner Playhouse presents the family classic. 7:30 p.m. Tue.-Sat., dinner at 6 p.m.; 12:45

p.m. and 6:45 p.m. Sun., dinner at 11 a.m. and 5:30 p.m., through Aug. 26. $15-$37. 6323 Colonel Glenn Road. 501-562-3131. “Comedy Yet Magic: An Evening with Scott Davis.” A 90-minute family production from Five Star Dinner Theatre. 7 p.m. dinner, 8 p.m. curtain Wed., Fri.Sat., through Aug. 9. $17-$38. 701 Central Ave., Hot Springs. 501-318-1600.

FINE ART, HISTORY EXHIBITS MAJOR VENUES ARKANSAS ARTS CENTER, MacArthur Park: 59th annual “Delta Exhibition,” through Aug. 27; “Drawing on History: National Drawing Invitational Retrospective,” works from the permanent collection, through Sept. 24. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Tue.-Fri., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat., 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sun. 372-4000. ARTS CENTER OF THE OZARKS, 214 Main St., Springdale: “Sensory Icono-

clast,” paintings by chefs, through Sept. 10, reception 6-8 p.m. Aug. 8, to be followed Aug. 23 by a dinner prepared by painters, Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tue.-Fri., 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sat. 479-751-5441. ARTS & SCIENCE CENTER FOR SOUTHEAST ARKANSAS, 701 S. Main St., Pine Bluff: “Color in Space: The Art of Justin Bryant,” through Sept. 9. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tue.-Fri., 1-4 p.m. Sat. 870-536-3375. BUTLER CENTER GALLERIES, Arkansas Studies Institute, 401 President Clinton Ave.: “Sammy Peters: Then and Now,” abstract paintings, through Aug. 26; “Historic Bridges of Arkansas,” photographs by Maxine Payne, through Aug. 26. 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Mon.-Sat. 320-5790. CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL MUSEUM VISITOR CENTER, Bates and Park: Exhibits on the 1957 desegregation of Central and the civil rights movement. 9 CONTINUED ON PAGE 51


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ART NOTES

Why abstract art? Because Peters. BY LESLIE NEWELL PEACOCK

S

ammy Peters, now in his late 70s, has been making abstract paintings for a half-century. If you are an Arkansan and familiar with our native talents, or if you are a lover of abstract art anywhere, you know Peters’ work well. Still, you may ask yourself, as I do on occasion, what is it with abstract art? What am I supposed to appreciate about it? It doesn’t tell a story, nor does it portray people, things that prompt an emotional response to art. In the 1950s, the answer might have been that abstract art is about color, not history; shape, not people; composition, not emotion; that it is devoid of political comment, and evolved naturally from impressionism. (Or that’s what they would have said in the art history class of my youth). But the mind — or at least the unlearned mind, such as mine — yearns for narrative, the human form, sadness, sex, the spiritual. Where is the fleshy maiden of Rubens or, more to my liking, the irony of de la Tour? Where is the lush portrayal of folded satin, the inexpressible beauty in Mr. Rembrandt’s self-portraits? Here’s the thing. You can have all that and like abstraction, too. Why compare? Here’s what I like about Sammy Peters’ paintings, which happen to be hanging in two different exhibitions in Little Rock right now — one at the Butler Center Galleries in the Arkansas Studies Institute and the other at Greg Thompson Fine Art in Argenta: I see narrative in these abstractions. I see landscapes. I see sexy color; the satisfyingly drawn line. And, often, joy. I confess that what draws me to “Existence: isolation, reason” (2005) is the off-center rectangular form that to me says “Door. Enter here.” Step into this mud-green-brown-over-brick redscumbled surface. See the black back50

JULY 27, 2017

ARKANSAS TIMES

EMERGENCE: SHADOW, MEMORY: Painting by Sammy Peters at Greg Thompson Fine Art, which, like the Butler Center, is featuring several of his works.

and-forth brush strokes that, while they describe nothing tangible, are beautiful in themselves. See the indefinable colors created by layers of paint, the smartly placed ovals of brown intruding into the picture plane from the top. That’s where the door leads. Peters works geometrically, with blocks of color overlain with strips of fabric, repeating parallel lines, objects that look like chairs, paint through which he’s drawn his fingers. There is

always movement. Sometimes, multiple elements and hues jostle one another, as in “Emergence: shadow, memory” (2015) at Thompson: If you took the drip can and loaded brush and cigarette butts away from Jackson Pollock, he might have made this Peters. If you confined de Kooning, he might have made a Peters, too. If you must have a landscape, look also at “Tentative: underlying, spaces” (2013, at Thompson), in which a bit of

David Bailin has snuck in, or “Relation: determined, paradigm” (2012, at Thompson). Peters is not a landscape painter, but I sometimes see perspective within what should be an overall, flat picture, especially in his more line-heavy works. The atlatl shape in “Relation” begins to feel like foreground and the white and yellow lines above and on either side as receding to a point just above center. There is so much to look at. You might yearn for an unadulterated color here and there, but seldom will Peters accommodate. His paints are layered so he can produce what his friends say are “colors with no name,” so he can scratch into them, mess with them. An exception is, surely coincidentally, “Exception: attempted, acceptance” (Butler Center), a luminous work with an aqua blue across the top, a line of royal blue beneath, an only slightly scumbled yellow in the middle and a wedge of green at the bottom left. Walking into the picture frame on the right is a brown shape that, forgive me, Sammy, looks like a chubby dog. It’s not a dog, of course, but just a strange brown shape with black quarter-notes coming off its, er, haunches. Like all of Peters’ works, it is astoundingly composed. Most of Peters’ works are large — some of them truly monumental, their gestures big and bold — but there also are smallish, tuck-inyour-purse-sized works at both galleries (not that I would suggest you do that). Abstraction works best on a big scale; the smaller works feel like souvenirs. Though if you don’t have 20 grand burning a hole in your pocket, these might be just the ticket if you want to own a work by Sammy Peters. And who doesn’t? The show at Thompson closes Aug. 12; the Butler Center exhibition runs through Aug. 26.


ALSO IN THE ARTS, CONT. a.m.-4:30 p.m. daily. 374-1957. CLINTON PRESIDENTIAL CENTER: Permanent exhibits on the Clinton administration. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Sat., 1-5 p.m. Sun., $10 adults, $8 seniors, retired military and college students, $6 youth 6-17, free to active military and children under 6. CRYSTAL BRIDGES MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART, One Museum Way, Bentonville: “Chihuly: In the Gallery and in the Forest,” works by the glass artist Dale Chihuly, through Aug. 14, $20, ticket required (tickets.crystalbridges. org); “Animal Meet Human,” 16 works, including Adonna Khare’s 40-foot-long pencil drawing, “Elephants,” and Helen Frankenthaler’s “The Bullfight,” through Oct. 30; “Not to Scale: Highlights from the Fly’s Eye Dome Archive,” drawings and models of Buckminster Fuller’s geodesic dome, through March 2018; “Roy Lichtenstein in Focus,” five large works, through July; American masterworks spanning four centuries in the permanent collection. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Mon., Thu.; 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Wed., Fri.; 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Sat.-Sun., closed Tue. 479-418-5700. ESSE PURSE MUSEUM & STORE, 1510 S. Main St.: “Take Your Purse With You: The Reimagined Work of Katherine Strause,” paintings, through Aug. 27; “What’s Inside: A Century of Women and Handbags,” permanent exhibit. 11 a.m.4 p.m. Tue.-Sat., 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Sun. $10, $8 for students, seniors and military. 9169022. FORT SMITH REGIONAL ART MUSEUM, 1601 Rogers Ave.: “Carlos Luna,” mixed-media on wood, paintings and Jacquard tapestries, through Sept. 18; “K. Nelson Harper: Lasting Impressions,” art of the letterpress, through Sept. 3. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Tue.-Sat., 1-5 p.m. Sun. 479784-2787. HISTORIC ARKANSAS MUSEUM, 200 E. 3rd St.: “Gordon and Wenonah Fay Holl: Collecting a Legacy,” through Feb. 4, 2018; “Traces Remain,” installation by Dawn Holder and works on paper by Melissa Cowper-Smith, through Aug. 6; “Portraits of Friends” by Dani Ives, through Aug. 6. Ticketed tours of renovated and replicated 19th century structures from original city, guided Monday and Tuesday on the hour, self-guided Wednesday through Sunday, $2.50 adults, $1 under 18, free to 65 and over. (Galleries free.) 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Sat., 1-5 p.m. Sun. 324-9351. MacARTHUR MUSEUM OF ARKANSAS MILITARY HISTORY, 503 E. 9th St. (MacArthur Park): “Work, Fight, Give: American Relief Posters of WWII,” through Aug. 16; “Waging Modern Warfare”; “Gen. Wesley Clark”; “Vietnam, America’s Conflict”; “Undaunted Courage, Proven Loyalty: Japanese American Soldiers in World War II. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Mon.Sat., 1-4 p.m. Sun. 376-4602. MOSAIC TEMPLARS CULTURAL CENTER, 9th and Broadway: “Not Forgotten: An Arkansas Family Album,” photographs by Nina Robinson; permanent exhibits on African-American entrepreneurship in Arkansas. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Tue.Sat. 683-3593. MUSEUM OF DISCOVERY, 500 President Clinton Ave.: “Human Plus,” low

and high-tech tools that extend human abilities, through Sept. 10; also interactive science exhibits. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Tue.Sat., 1-5 p.m. Sun., $10 ages 13 and older, $8 ages 1-12, free to members and children under 1. 396-7050. OLD STATE HOUSE MUSEUM, 300 W. Markham St.: “A Confused and Confusing Affair: Arkansas and Reconstruction,” seminar, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Aug. 5, with speakers Jay Barth, Carl Moneyhon, Ken Barnes, Col. Damon Cluck, Blake Wintory, Tom DeBlack and Rodney Waymon Harris, $15, registration deadline July 28, call 324-0685 or email tanya.canada@ arkansas.gov for tickets; “Cabinet of Curiosities: Treasures from the University of Arkansas Museum Collection”; “True Faith, True Light: The Devotional Art of Ed Stilley,” musical instruments, through 2017; “First Families: Mingling of Politics and Culture” permanent exhibit including first ladies’ gowns. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Sat., 1-5 p.m. Sun. 324-9685. SOUTH ARKANSAS ARTS CENTER, 110 E. 5th St., El Dorado: “2017 Juried Art Competition,” 69 works by 47 artists chosen by Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art curator Dylan Turk, through July 28. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri. 870-862-5474. TOLTEC MOUNDS STATE PARK, U.S. Hwy. 165, England: Major prehistoric Indian site with visitors’ center and museum. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Sat., noon-5 p.m. Sun., closed Mon. $4 for adults, $3 for ages 6-12, $14 for family. 961-9442. UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS AT LITTLE ROCK: “Nasty Woman,” work by 35 women artists from Arkansas and across the nation, including Heather Beckwith, Susan Chambers, Melissa Cowper-Smith, Norwood Creech, Beverly Buys, Nancy Dunaway, Margo Duvall, Melissa Gill, Mia Hall, Louise Halsey, Diane Harper, Tammy Harrington, Heidi Hogden, Robyn Horn, Jeanie Hursley, Catherine Kim, Kimberly Kwee and Jolie Livaudais, through Aug. 25, closing reception 5-7 p.m. Aug. 18. Weekdays 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 569-8977. WALTON ARTS CENTER, Fayetteville: “Glacial Shifts, Changing Perspectives,” large-scale paintings and photographs documenting glacial melt by Diane Burko, through September, Joy Pratt Markham Gallery. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. weekdays, noon-4 p.m. Sat. 479-443-5600. WILLIAM F. LAMAN LIBRARY, 2801 Orange St., NLR: Arkansas League of Artists 2017 “Members Show,” through July 28. 416-4729.

INGREDIENTS:

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SMALLER VENUES ARGENTA ART GALLERY, 413 Main St., NLR: “Requiem Dreams,” mixed media by Jessica Carder, through Aug. 5. @argentagallery. ARTISTS WORKSHOP GALLERY, 610 Central Ave., Hot Springs: Jim Reimer and Caryl Joy Young, paintings, through July. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Mon.-Sat., noon-6 p.m. Sun. 623-6401. BARRY THOMAS FINE ART & STUDIO, 711 Main St., NLR: Paintings by Thomas. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Tue.-Sat. 3492383. CONTINUED ON PAGE 60 arktimes.com JULY 27, 2017

Arkansas Times 07-27-17_09-07-2017.indd 1

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7/6/17 1:43 PM


WHAT’S COOKIN’ THE BIG DAM HORNS and the Rackensack Folklore Society will provide the tunes at this year’s Block on Rock Birthday Bash, Stone’s Throw Brewing’s fourth annual festival, to be held from 4 p.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday, July 29. The bash will take over the 700 and 800 blocks of Rock, including the grounds of the PikeTerry-Fletcher House, and besides local brews and Rock Town spirits, will include Black Hound Bar B Q, Hot Rod Wieners, Desiacs Sandwiches, Katmandu Momo, Loblolly Creamery, Luncheria Mexicana Alicia, Reggae Flavas, Slader’s Alaskan Dumpling Co. and The Southern Gourmasian food trucks. Besides Stone’s Throw, Rebel Kettle, Flyway Brewing, Damgoode Brews, Buffalo Brewing and A Lively Brew Kombucha provide the beverages. A portion of gate revenues, food and alcohol sales will go to Preserve Arkansas. Admission to the party is $5, but you can get discounted armbands for $3 Thursday and Friday, July 27-28, at Rock Town. Entrance gates will be located at the Seventh, Eighth and Ninth street intersections with Rock. Beer will be available at the brewery, 402 E. Ninth; at an outside bar on Rock Street; and from a biergarten at the Terry Mansion, where the Rackensack musicians and others will play on the porch from 4 p.m. to 10 p.m. The Horns will play a double set on the main stage near Stone’s Throw starting at 6 p.m. Preserve Arkansas is a nonprofit that works to protect the state’s architectural resources and culture. THE LITTLE ROCK franchise of Burger 21 opens at 10:30 a.m. Monday, July 31, at 12319 Chenal Parkway, just south of Chenal’s intersection with West Markham Street. The first 100 guests will receive a swag bag and a gift certificate to the restaurant. Those who dine Monday will get a chance to win a year’s supply of free “Cheesy Burgers.” Burger 21, first opened in Tampa, Fla., sells “crafted” burgers, including seafood burgers (the Ahi Tuna with Srirachi), hormonefree turkey burgers, chicken burgers and, of course, beef burgers, paired with such things as applewood smoked bacon (on several), Gouda cheese (the Tex-Mex Haystack), crimini mushrooms (the Shroom), etc. Order up a burger and a “S’mores Shake” made with Ghirardelli chocolate, and you’ll B-full. RYAN HAMRA OF Little Rock is officially opening Little Rock’s second Potbelly Shop, which features live music with its food, on the first floor of the Lyon Building, 401 W. Capitol, on Tuesday, Aug. 8. But first, the public is invited to an “Oven Warming Event” from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday, Aug. 7, a benefit for Little Rock’s ACCESS schools for children with learning disabilities; cost is $5 for a sandwich, chips and a fountain drink. The Potbelly chain, which got its start in Chicago, serves up sandwiches on fat multigrain buns, soups, salads, shakes, smoothies and desserts. The other Potbelly, which is also Hamra’s franchise, is at 314 University Ave., in the Park Avenue shopping center. Hamra has plans to open two more Potbelly Shops in Central Arkansas. 52

JULY 27, 2017

ARKANSAS TIMES

Dining

KFC AND WAFFLES: That's Korean Friend Chicken, and it's drizzled in a spicy Guilin chili sauce.

Brunch with a punch The Southern Gourmasian’s brunch may be the best-kept secret in town.

T

he Southern Gourmasian boasts one of the more interesting menus in town. It’s an elegantly executed mix of Asian cuisine and good old-fashioned Southern comfort food. And it’s pulled off without the slightest bit of pretension. During a weekday lunch hour, the place is absolutely humming. But for brunch on a Saturday you’ll likely have your pick of any table you like. “It’s one of our slowest services of the week,” says Justin Patterson, whose business card reads: chef/owner/problems solver. “We’ve always done brunch at the restaurant. When I started the food truck, I called the Hillcrest Farmers Market and asked them about bringing the truck out. A few weeks later, at about 4 o’clock in the afternoon they called to invite me out for the next morning. So I had a few hours to make up a breakfast menu. That’s what it’s

Follow Eat Arkansas on Twitter: @EatArkansas

evolved from.” The brunch menu is consistent with the spirit of the restaurant and the truck that came before it. You get something that feels fresh and a little exotic for a really reasonable price. Start with the Biscuits & Fixings ($8). Each order comes with three biscuits, which might leave you elbowing each other for the last half if you’re a group of four or more. The biscuits are buttery and sturdy enough to handle whatever you can pile on top of them. You’ll have pickles, pickled onions, apple butter, sorghum and a couple of bacon slices to choose from. You can concoct your own sweet and savory bites. Bacon with apple butter was a table favorite. The KFC and Waffles (Korean Fried Chicken, $8) is a standout. The crispy orange batter that surrounds the boneless breast is spicy and has a slight

crunch to it, and the chicken is juicy. It sits on top of a buttermilk waffle and is drizzled with a sticky, spicy sauce made up of soy sauce, grated ginger, garlic, rice vinegar and Guilin chili sauce. We could’ve used a bit more sauce, to be honest. The side of syrup paled in comparison. The Country Hash ($8) was one of the menu items on that first brunch outing at the farmer’s market. It’s got staying power for a reason: It’s a plate full of roasted potatoes, pears and peppers,

The Southern Gourmasian 219 W. Capitol Ave. 313-5645

Quick bite We suggest anything that comes with Ninja sauce. It’s chef/owner/problem solver Patterson’s concoction of mustard, soy sauce, lots of garlic and black pepper, among other things. It comes atop the Steak and Eggs ($10), which is a formidable dish even without the sauce. Korean barbecue-marinated beef comes with Okinomiyaki vegetable pancakes (delish) and two eggs. It’ll cure what ails you. Hours 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Saturday. Closed Sunday. Other info Local beers on tap. Credit cards accepted.


BELLY UP

Check out the Times’ food blog, Eat Arkansas arktimes.com

Little Rock’s Most Award-Winning Restaurant 1619 REBSAMEN RD. 501.663.9734 thefadedrose.com

serving better than bar food all night long July

HASH, GOURMASIAN STYLE: With roasted pork shoulder over potatoes.

7/27 - The Creek Rocks (Free show 6-8) 7/28 Cadillac Johnson 7/29 Chapter Soul

AUGUST coated in a subtle, mustardy sauce and topped with tender roasted pork shoulder and an over-easy egg. A drizzle of hoisin sauce adds a nice tart zip to this hearty dish. The pork was nicely done — in that sweet spot between too greasy and too dry. It’s salty, it’s a little sweet and it’s somehow not too rich to enjoy. Someone at the table needs to order the Moco Loco ($7). In fact, two people could share it. What you get is a bowl loaded with sticky rice and a mound of roasted pork shoulder, covered with Southern Gourmasian’s Korean chili gravy. The gravy is a dream: a little lighter than what you’re used to (but not by much), spiced to a pale, creamy orange and flecked with Korean chili powder. It’s delicious and balanced, not overly hot. The rice helps to neutralize the richness of the pork and gravy. This is stick-to-your-ribs goodness with the

right amount of Asian kick. For a solid few minutes after the plates hit the table, our group of happy, chatty people stopped talking. We left feeling a little shocked that we were some of the only folks in the place. Downtown is a bit of a ghost town on the weekends, which is good for brunch-goers (you won’t have to wait to be seated), but not always great for business. We had a great time. The service was prompt and friendly. There are local beers on tap and the prices are infinitely reasonable. We had a table for four, got an appetizer, and had a couple of beers, all for $62 (before tip). The food is so good you almost wouldn’t fault The Southern Gourmasian for being a little more pricey or pretentious. Luckily for us, that doesn’t seem to be part of its ethos.

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53


Hey, do this!

OXFORD AMERICAN AND SOUTH ON MAIN present AUGUST 26, 8:00 PM

RODNEY CROWELL [AMERICANA SERIES]

THIS IS THE FIRST SHOW IN THEIR 2017-18 CONCERT SERIES, AS WELL AS THE FIRST CONCERT OF THE AMERICANA SERIES. DOORS OPEN AT 6:00 PM.

JULY 27

Rebel Kettle hosts 4:30 Thursday with BLONDE AMBITION, dry hopped blonde ale. Check out daily specials and upcoming events this month online at www.rebelkettle.com.

AUGUST Food, Music, Entertainment and everything else that’s

JULY 29

MacArthur Military Museum hosts the fifth annual VINTAGE MILITARY VEHICLE SHOW from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. in downtown Little Rock’s MacArthur Park. Admission is free with food for purchase from local food trucks. For more info, or to register a vehicle, visit www. arkmilitaryheritage.com. ■ Stone’s Throw hosts its annual BLOCK ON THE ROCK PARTY from 4-10 p.m. Festivities include food trucks, live music and craft beer.

AUGUST 1-5

Wildwood Park for the Arts hosts WILDKIDS COOK for kids 8 years old and up. Cost is $200 and includes a recipe book and all food. Campers will receive hands-on training in the kitchen and basic cooking and food prep while exploring cuisine from around the world. It also includes a field trip to the Historic Arkansas Museum garden and will culminate in a camper-prepared lunch for friends and family. For more info, visit www.wildwoodpark.org.

AUGUST 11

AUGUST 8

Riverdale 10 hosts the classic 1977 PAUL NEWMAN FILM SLAP SHOT. Reserve your seats online and check out current showings and coming attractions at www. riverdale10.com.

AUGUST 19

Verizon Arena hosts WINGSTOCK from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. More than 30 local restaurants and vendors will be on hand with wings, beer, music and games. Tickets are on sale through Ticketmaster at www.ticketmaster. com.

HOT AUGUST CONCERTS!

AUGUST 21-22

Club Sway hosts an OPEN CASTING CALL from 6-8 p.m. Monday and Tuesday nights seeking talent for the third annual production of the cult classic Rocky Horror Picture Show to take place October 26-30. Rehearsals will begin after Labor Day. Visit www.clubsway.com for details and for info on upcoming parties and events.

AUGUST 26

Robinson Center hosts the third annual LIP SYNC BATTLE for Makea-Wish-Mid South on Saturday, August 26 from 7-9 p.m. Local celebrities will compete against each other for a good cause. Tickets are on sale now via Ticketmaster at www. ticketmaster.com.

AUGUST 3

FAITH HILL AND TIM MCGRAW return to North Little Rock’s Verizon Arena for the Soul 2 Soul Tour. Tickets are $69.50-$119.50 and on sale now through Ticketmaster at www.ticketmaster.com ■ THE SALTY DOGS perform live at Four Quarter Bar where there’s a full lineup of live music this month. Check out www.fourquarterbar.com for upcoming shows.

Pharmacology University hosts a MEDICAL CANNABIS SEMINAR at the Marriott from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Join the ranks of the fastest growing industry in the U.S. This seminar is approved for continuing education for attorneys. Basic enrollment is $300. VIP is $400 and for 6.5 CLE credits it’s $425. Enroll now at www. pharmacologyuniversity.com.

AUGUST 23-SEPT 10

WAR MEMORIAL STADIUM, LITTLE ROCK, AR AUG 26, 7:00 PM

LIP SYNC BATTLE

ROBINSON CENTER MUSIC HALL, LITTLE ROCK, AR AUG 29, 8:00 PM

FUN!

AUGUST 12

Bella Vita Jewelry hosts its SUMMER SHINDIG from 5-8 p.m. as part of 2nd Friday Art Night. Make an evening of 2nd Friday Art Night – checking out the latest finds at local shops or viewing a new exhibit at a downtown gallery. Grab dinner and drinks afterwards, and ride the trolley for free for beautiful views of the city at night. Also participating in 2nd Friday Art Night are The Old State House, Central Arkansas Library, Cox Creative, Butler Center, Copper Grill (drinks and bites), Historic Arkansas Museum, Bella Vita Jewelry, and Matt McLeod Gallery. Free wheeled trolley!

AUG 5, 6:30 PM

GUNS N’ ROSES: NOT IN THIS LIFETIME TOUR

The Southern drama, THE HEART IS A LONELY HUNTER, an adaptation of Carson McCullers’ debut novel, will be performed at the Arkansas Repertory Theatre. Opening night is August 25 with a few preview events, including Beer Night with Lost 40 and the Arkansas Times on August 24, which includes a complimentary pre-show beer tasting at 6 p.m. For a complete list of show times, events and ticket info, visit www. therep.org.

BEN FOLDS

ROBINSON CENTER MUSIC HALL, LITTLE ROCK, AR

Faith Hill and Tim McGraw

AUGUST 5

TAB BENOIT at The Rev Room. 8:00 p.m. rumbarevolution.com

AUGUST 17

RICHARD LEO JOHNSON performs live at The Joint in North Little Rock as part of the Argenta Arts Acoustic Music Series. Tickets are $25 and available online at www.centralarkansastickets. com. ■ LEOPOLD AND HIS FICTION at Sticky’z Rock ‘N’ Roll Chicken Shack. 8:30 p.m. Stickyz.com

AUGUST 29

WWE SMACKDOWN LIVE takes place at Verizon Arena. Tickets start at just $18 and are available through Ticketmaster at www.ticketmaster. com.

THIS SUMMER

SOUTHERN TABLE is opening soon. This concept is brought to you by Margie Raimondo, of Raimondo Winery in Mountain Home, and will be a “boards and bites” tapas-style restaurant with yummy cheeses, meats and other delicacies. Follow SouthernTableFoods on Facebook to stay tuned.

SOUTHERN TABLE

Leopold and his Fiction

DRIVERS PLEASE BE AWARE, IT’S ARKANSAS STATE LAW:

USE OF BICYCLES OR ANIMALS

Every person riding a bicycle or an animal, or driving any animal drawing a vehicle upon a highway, shall have all the rights and all of the duties applicable to the driver of a vehicle, except those provisions of this act which by their nature can have no applicability.

OVERTAKING A BICYCLE

The driver of a motor vehicle overtaking a bicycle proceeding in the same direction on a roadway shall exercise due care and pass to the left at a safe distance of not less than three feet (3’) and shall not again drive to the right side of the roadway until safely clear of the overtaken bicycle.

Every Tuesday and Friday, Club 27 hosts LITTLE ROCK SALSA. Tickets for UCA REYNOLDS PERFORMANCE HALL SEASON go on sale this month, go to uca.edu/Reynolds for the full line-up.

THROUGH AUGUST 26

Murry’s Dinner Playhouse presents THE WIZARD OF OZ. Don’t miss the greatest musical of all time performed on the Murry’s stage. For show times and tickets, visit www. murrysdp.com.

54

JULY 27, 2017

ARKANSAS TIMES

Labor Day Weekend kicks off the HOT SPRINGS JAZZ FESTIVAL and Spa City Blues Festival in Hot Springs.

DON’T MISS HOT SPRINGS HAPPENINGS ON PAGE 55!

AND CYCLISTS, PLEASE REMEMBER...

Your bike is a vehicle on the road just like any other vehicle and you must also obey traffic laws— use turning and slowing hand signals, ride on right and yield to traffic as if driving. Be sure to establish eye contact with drivers. Remain visible and predictable at all times.


HOT SPRINGS HAPPENINGS

AUGUST 2017 Hot Springs For a complete calendar of events, visit hotsprings.org

AUG 4 HOT SPRINGS GALLERY WALK A continuous tradition for 25 years and counting, galleries stay open late for Gallery Walk on the first Friday of each month to host openings of new exhibits by local, regional, national and international artists. See the new mural commissioned by Hot Springs National Park Rotary and painted by Italian artist, Guiseppe Percivati, depicting Quapaw Tribe members. The mural can be found on the wall in front of the Exchange Street Parking Deck, just off Central Avenue.   AUG 12 3 DOORS DOWN

3 Doors Down performs at Magic Springs’ Timberwood Amphitheater. Formed in 1995, Grammy Award®-nominated, multiplatinum Mississippi rock band 3 Doors Down consistently captivates audiences worldwide. The quintet’s many accolades include 16 million albums sold globally, three Grammy nominations and two American Music Awards, and five BMI Pop Awards for songwriting—including “Songwriter of the Year.”Their debut album The Better Life became certified six-times RIAA platinum in 2000 and was fueled by the success of juggernaut hit “Kryptonite.” Concerts

are FREE with any paid park admission or Season Pass. Reserved seating tickets may still be available, so please visit  magicsprings. com or call 501-624-0100.

AUG 13 THE STARDUST BIG BAND

Join some of the best ballroom dancers in Arkansas and surrounding states at this monthly dance evening. The music starts at 3 p.m.; admission is $10 (free for students K-12). For more information call 501.767.5482 or visit stardustband.net.

AUG 18 HAPPY TOGETHER TOUR The “Happy Together”Tour brings together six of the most popular rock bands of the 1960s and 70s: The Turtles featuring Flo & Eddie, The Association, Mark Lindsay, former lead singer of Paul Revere & the Raiders, The Grass Roots, The Buckinghams and The Cowsills. Tickets go on sale Tuesday, August 1 at 9 a.m.

SEPT 1 RONNIE MILSAP Country music star Ronnie Milsap performs at the Oaklawn Finish Line Theater. A Grammy-award winning country music artist, Milsap is one of Nashville’s most dynamic entertainers in rock, pop and R&B music. The Country Music Hall of Fame inductee and Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee performs his greatest mega hits. Tickets will go on sale Tuesday, August 15 at 9 a.m.

AUG 21 GREAT AMERICAN TOTAL SOLAR

ECLIPSE Come to the Mid-America Science Museum to watch this year’s special solar eclipse! Members of the Hot Springs Village Stargazers will be joining educators to present

BEGINNING AUG 31 HOT SPRING JAZZ AND BLUES FESTIVALS

Hot Springs will be overflowing with great music on Labor Day Weekend for the Jazz and Blues Fests. Events will run from August 31 through September 4. Stand-out performances include the New Breed Brass Band, Nikki Hill, Leo “Bud” Welch, and the U Nikki of A at Monticello Jazz Band. Hill Visit hotsprings.org for more information. The 26th Hot Springs JazzFest, sponsored by the Hot Springs Jazz Society is presented in venues spread throughout Hot Springs National Park with tickets ranging from Free to $35. Artists from Arkansas and the nation are scheduled for concerts including an intimate concert in the historic New Ohio Club with the Clyde Pound Trio and the unique Classical and Jazz Blow Out with a twist combining the best of jazz with classical music including the Arkansas Brass quintet. For a full schedule and to purchase tickets, visit HSJazzSociety.org or email HSJazzSociety@gmail. com or call 501-627-2425.

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special astronomy programs in the Oaklawn Foundation Digital Dome Theater! MASM will be hosting special eclipse shows in the digital dome, but guests are welcome to visit the museum for free between 12pm2pm and encouraged to go outside to view the actual eclipse. We have custom solar eclipse viewing glasses available while supplies last. For more information about educational programming and other upcoming events at Mid-America visit us at midamericamuseum.org. 11:10 a.m. Saturday, Arkansas Alligator Farm and Petting Zoo

AUG 26 THE CIGAR BOX MEN The Cigar Box Men looks back at Hot Springs during the prohibition days of the 1930s when moonshining was the predominant

industry in Hot Springs. Those moonshine operators became known as “the cigar box men,” because they were always seen carrying their ‘ill-gotten’ gain in a cigar box. Join us at Horner Hall, in the Hot Springs Convention Center, for a fantastic, star-filled musical presentation with the The Fun City Chorus, along with Roxanna Collingwood, Clyde Adams and the always fabulous Top of the Rock women’s chorus. Showtime is 7 p.m., but you’ll want to show up early to join Jimmy Young, author of The Cigar Box Men, and other historians as we take a stroll through some of the wild, wild days of Hot Springs history. Contact Steve Spakes at 501-282-6081 for more information.

Live Music Calendar

FAMILY. FOUR-LEGGED FRIENDS. ONE-OF-A-KIND WEEKENDS. f ind t his place.

SUNDAYS, WEEKLY

AUG 13

AUG 22

Karaoke with Chucky D, The Big Chill

Tara & Brent, The Big Chill

Moxie (withTara & Brent),The Big Chill

TUESDAYS, WEEKLY

AUG 14

AUG 24

Grayson Goff Band, The Big Chill

Earl & Them, The Big Chill

Karaoke State Championship, 1-9 p.m, Silks Bar and Grill, Oaklawn Capyac, Maxine’s Live

WEDNESDAY, WEEKLY

AUG 15

Karaoke with Chucky D, 7 p.m., Pop’s Lounge, Oaklawn Blues Night, 8 p.m., The Ohio Club

Earl & Them, The Big Chill

THURSDAYS, WEEKLY Jazz Night, 7 p.m., The Ohio Club

AUG 17 Drag Show, Maxine’s Live

AUG 18

Karaoke with Corey, 6 p.m., Oaklawn

Magnolia Brown, Maxine’s Live Moxie, 10 p.m., Silks Bar and Grill, Oaklawn

AUGUST 3

AUG 19

Freakshow Peepshow, Maxine’s Live

Spa City Blues Society Blues Jam, The Big Chill Foul Play Cabaret Burlesque Show, Maxine’s Live Relentless, 9 p.m., Boogies Bar and Grill Moxie, 10 p.m., Silks Bar and Grill, Oaklawn

FRIDAYS, WEEKLY

AUG 4 Cosmocean, Maxine’s Live Pamela K. Ward and the Last Call Orchestra Band, 10 p.m., Silks Bar and Grill, Oaklawn

AUG 5 Susan Erwin Prowse, 6 p.m., Pop’s Lounge, Oaklawn Spa City Blues Society Blues Jam, The Big Chill Kalo, Maxine’s Live Pamela K. Ward and the Last Call Orchestra Band, 10 p.m., Silks Bar and Grill, Oaklawn

AUG 20 John French, The Big Chill

AUG 21 Moxie (withTara & Brent),The Big Chill

AUG 25 Karaoke State Championship, 1-9 p.m, Silks Bar and Grill, Oaklawn Dikki Du and His Zydeco Crew, Maxine’s Live Sol Def, 10 p.m., Silks Bar and Grill, Oaklawn

AUG 26 Lightnin’Lee Langdon, The Big Chill Sol Def, 10 p.m., Silks Bar and Grill, Oaklawn

AUG 27 Girls With Guitars, The Big Chill

AUG 28 Grayson Goff Band, The Big Chill

AUG 29 Grayson Goff Band, The Big Chill

HOTSPRINGS.ORG

AUG 6 Dave Almond, The Big Chill

AUG 7 R & R, The Big Chill

AUG 11 Deadbeat Beat, Maxine’s Live Hwy 124, 10 p.m., Silks Bar and Grill, Oaklawn

AUG 12

HotSprings.org. 1-888-SPA-CITY. 56 JULY 27, 2017 56 JULY 27, 2017

ARKANSAS TIMES ARKANSAS TIMES

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Coming Sept. 22-24: Spa-Con 2017 Save money, buy early. Be frugal. Plan ahead! Celebrity appearances will include the actors who played Audrey Horne and Laura Palmer in the Twin Peaks series.

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arents in the Hot Springs area now have more convenient options for making sure their children see a pediatrician, now that CHI St. Vincent Convenient Care-Hot Springs is offering pediatric appointments on Saturday and Sunday mornings. Starting this month, CHI St.Vincent pediatricians have accepted appointments at the clinic from 9 a.m. to noon every Saturday and Sunday. This provides parents with more flexibility for scheduling important doctor visits for their children. Now, on Saturdays and Sundays, pediatric services are provided in one convenient location, with consistent hours. CHI St. Vincent Convenient Care-Hot Springs is located at 100 McGowan Court in Hot Springs. “For working moms and dads, sometimes it’s impossible to schedule a pediatric appointment during the week,” said Jennifer Thompson, regional practice manager for CHI St. Vincent Medical Group. “These new weekend hours will make it easier for parents to make sure their children are seen by a pediatrician. And, as always, the

Convenient Care Clinic is open to walk-in patients of any age who need treatment for minor illnesses.” Pediatricians will schedule weekend appointments at the clinic on a rotating basis.

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LITTLE ROCK CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU

This week’s featured district (July 31-Aug 6):

DISCOVER DOWNTOWN

Downtown Little Rock is alive and well with a wide variety of fantastic restaurants, cultural attractions, a presidential library, a purse museum and much more. Explore Downtown Today!

Visit DineLR.com for additional information. Next Week: Head out West.

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ALSO IN THE ARTS, CONT.

NASTY WOMAN: UA Little Rock photography professor Joli Livaudais' work "The Mother, Exhumed," a life-sized casting of a woman's torso formed with wax and beehive photos, is part of the show "Nasty Woman" in the Fine Arts Gallery on campus.

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CANTRELL GALLERY, 8205 Cantrell Road. “Chasing the Light, from Arkansas to California,” photographs by Paul Caldwell, through Sept. 2. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Sat. 224-1335. CHROMA GALLERY, 5707 Kavanaugh Blvd.: Work by Robert Reep and other Arkansas artists. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sat. 664-0880. CORE BREWERY, 411 Main St., NLR: “Faces by Chalino,” work by Luis “Chalino” Atilano. COX CREATIVE CENTER, 120 River Market Ave.: “Kaleidoscope,” work by Sandra Marson. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat., 1-5 p.m. Sun. 918-3093. DRAWL GALLERY, 5208 Kavanaugh Blvd.: Work by regional and Arkansas artists. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tue.-Fri., 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Sat. 240-7446. GALLERY 221, 2nd and Center Sts.: Work by William McNamara, Tyler Arnold, Amy Edgington, EMILE, Kimberly Kwee, Greg Lahti, Sean LeCrone, Mary Ann Stafford, Cedric Watson, C.B. Williams, Gino Hollander, Siri Hollander and jewelry by Rae Ann Bayless. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. weekdays, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Sat. 801-0211. GALLERY 26, 2601 Kavanaugh Blvd.: Recent works by members of the Arkansas Printmakers Society. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tue.Sat. 664-8996. GALLERY CENTRAL, 800 Central Ave., Hot Springs: Paintings by Janis Polychron and other artists. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Sat. 318-4278. GREG THOMPSON FINE ART, 429 Main St., North Little Rock: “Southern Abstraction,” works by Sammy Peters, Gay Bechtelheimer, James Hendricks, Pinkney Herbert, Robyn Horn and Don Lee. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tue.-Fri., 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Sat. 664-2787. HEARNE FINE ART, 1001 Wright Ave.: “XXIX Prime,” anniversary exhibition, through Aug. 5. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Sat. 372-6822. JUSTUS FINE ART GALLERY, 827 A Central Ave., Hot Springs: “Summer Series II,” work by Taimur Cleary, Robert Fogel, Robyn Horn, Rebecca Thompson and others, through July. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Wed.-Sat. 321-2335. KOLLECTIVE COFFEE + TEA, 110 Central Ave., Hot Springs: “Dreams and Shadows,” drawings by Kirk Montgomery, through Aug. 3. 7 a.m.-7 p.m. Mon., Tue., Thu., Fri., 7 a.m.-9 p.m. Wed., 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Sat., 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Sun. 7014000. L&L BECK ART GALLERY, 5705 Kavanaugh Blvd.: “The Wild Ones,” July. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tue.-Sat. 660-4006. LAMAN LIBRARY ARGENTA BRANCH, 420 Main St., NLR: “Three Stories,” mixed media work by Jeannie Fry, Suzzette Patterson and Barbara Rhodes. 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Sat. 687-1061. LEGACY FINE ART, 804 Central Ave., Hot Springs: Blown glass chandeliers by Ed Pennington, paintings by Carole Katchen. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Tue.-Fri. 762-0840. LOCAL COLOUR GALLERY, 5811 Kavanaugh Blvd.: Artists collective. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Sat. 265-0422. MATTHEWS FINE ART GALLERY, 909 North St.: Paintings by Pat and Tracee Matthews, glass by James Hayes, jewelry


by Christie Young, knives by Tom Gwenn, kinetic sculpture by Mark White. Noon-5 p.m. Tue.-Sat. 831-6200. MATT McLEOD FINE ART, 108 W. 6th St.: Work by Arkansas artists. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tue.-Fri., 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sat. 725-8508. MUGS CAFE, 515 Main St., NLR: “Three Dollar Icon,” paintings by Melissa Wilkinson. 7 a.m.-6 p.m. Mon.-Sat. 379-9101. THE HOUSE OF ART, 108 E. 4th St.: Mixed media work by Kesha Lagniappe and Lilia Hernandez. WALKER-STONE HOUSE, 207 W. Center St., Fayetteville: “Summer Art Exhibition,” works by Fenix artists Cindy Arsaga, Carol Corning, Michael Davis, Amber Eggleton, Jan Gosnell, Corey Johnson, Leilani Law, Ed Pennebaker, Meikel S. Church and Jason Sacran, through Aug. 5. Noon-7 p.m. Wed.-Fri., 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Sat. @fenixfayetteville. OTHER MUSEUMS JACKSONVILLE MUSEUM OF MILITARY HISTORY, 100 Veterans Circle, Jacksonville: Exhibits on D-Day; F-105, Vietnam era plane (“The Thud”); the Civil War Battle of Reed’s Bridge, Arkansas Ordnance Plant (AOP) and other military history. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon-Sat., 1-5 p.m. Sun. $3 adults; $2 seniors, military; $1 students. 501-241-1943. LAKEPORT PLANTATION, 601 Hwy. 142, Lake Village: Antebellum mansion; exhibits on plantation life from before, during and after the Civil War. 9 a.m.-3

p.m. weekdays. $5 general admission. 870-265-6031. MUSEUM OF AUTOMOBILES, Petit Jean Mountain: Permanent exhibition of more than 50 cars from 1904-1967 depicting the evolution of the automobile. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 7 days. 501-727-5427. MUSEUM OF NATIVE AMERICAN HISTORY, 202 SW O St., Bentonville: Native American artifacts. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.Sat. 479-273-2456. PLANTATION AGRICULTURE MUSEUM, Scott, U.S. Hwy. 165 and state Hwy. 161: Permanent exhibits on historic agriculture. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Tue.-Sat., 1-5 p.m. Sun. $4 adults, $3 children. 961-1409. POTTS INN, 25 E. Ash St., Pottsville: Preserved 1850s stagecoach station on the Butterfield Overland Mail Route, with period furnishings, log structures, hat museum, doll museum, doctor’s office, antique farm equipment. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Wed.-Sat. $5 adults, $2 students, 5 and under free. 479-968-9369. ROGERS HISTORICAL MUSEUM, 322 S. 2nd St.: “On Fields Far Away: Our Community During the Great War,” through Sept. 23. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Sat. 479621-1154. SCOTT PLANTATION SETTLEMENT, Scott: 1840s log cabin, one-room school house, tenant houses, smokehouse and artifacts on plantation life. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Fri.-Sat. 351-0300. www.scottconnections.org.

Drivers Please be aWare, it’s arkansas state laW: Use of bicycles or animals

Every person riding a bicycle or an animal, or driving any animal drawing a vehicle upon a highway, shall have all the rights and all of the duties applicable to the driver of a vehicle, except those provisions of this act which by their nature can have no applicability.

overtaking a bicycle

The driver of a motor vehicle overtaking a bicycle proceeding in the same direction on a roadway shall exercise due care and pass to the left at a safe distance of not less than three feet (3’) and shall not again drive to the right side of the roadway until safely clear of the overtaken bicycle.

anD cyclists, Please remember...

You’re vehicles on the road, just like cars and motorcycles and must obey all traffic laws— signal, ride on the right side of the road and yield to traffic normally. Make eye contact with motorists. Be visible. Be predictable. Heads up, think ahead.

Redefining Luxury in the Heart of Little Rock!

Convenient to downtown Little Rock, the River Market district, and only 15 minutes away from Pinnacle Mountain State Park, Fountaine Bleau West offers city living with the serenity of a natural setting. Take the scenic route home, travel down country roads, enjoying the simple sights of farmland lined by white picket fences or hop onto I-430. Whichever route you choose, Fountaine Bleau West welcomes you home.

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A Fascinating History of Arkansas’s 200 Year Battle Against Disease and Pestilence

This is a great history of Arkansas that tells how public attitudes toward medicine, politics and race have shaped the public health battle against deadly and debilitating disease in the state. From the illnesses that plagued the state’s earliest residents to the creation of what became the Arkansas Department of Health, Sam Taggart’s “The Public’s Health: A Narrative History of Health and Disease in Arkansas” tells the fascinating medical history of Arkansas. Published by the Arkansas Times.

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sip LOCAL ARKANSAS TIMES

Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families is seeking a part-time (20 hours a week) Development Associate in its Little Rock office. Will assist Development Director with administrative duties, solicitations, donor stewardship, and donor events. Salary based on experience ($20 to $22/hr). Send cover letter, resume, and references to jferguson@aradvocates.org. AACF is an equal opportunity employer.

These puppies are part English bulldog and pit. The dad is a full pit and very very loving, great with other dogs and kids. The mother is a beautiful English bulldog. Two boys and one girl left. The puppies are 12 weeks old, they’ve had their eight week shots and are due for their next and have been wormed. Selling for $75 a piece. Looking for wonderful homes, please call Jimmy @ 870-613-5824

Grow ride grow Ride LOCAL LOCAL ARKANSAS TIMES

ARKANSAS TIMES

arktimes.com JULY 27, 2017

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Around here it’s AT&T. Thank you for voting AT&T the Best Cell Phone Provider and Best Internet Provider in Arkansas!

1.866.MOBILITY att.com/wireless 64

JULY 27, 2017

ARKANSAS TIMES

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Arkansas Times - July 27, 2017  

The annual Best of Arkansas results are here!

Arkansas Times - July 27, 2017  

The annual Best of Arkansas results are here!