Page 1

su

S T RS S 2 3 BE T O N S A a ge C A P DO A R K i d e s IN l t s In Re

MAY 24, 2018 / ARKTIMES.COM NEWS + POLITICS + ENTERTAINMENT + FOOD


YOUR COMMUNITY. YOUR HEALTH. Creating Healthy Communities in Arkansas OUR VISION: To be an innovative leader, promoting improved health care outcomes and equal access to the highest quality health care for all Arkansans. OUR MISSION: To advocate for and facilitate the success of health centers and promote access to health care in Arkansas. Holiday Island

ARcare Augusta, AR | 870-347-2534 Boston Mountain Rural Health Center Marshall, AR | 870-448-3796 CABUN Rural Health Services Hampton, AR | 870-798-4064 Community Clinic Springdale, AR | 479-751-7417 1st Choice Healthcare Corning, AR | 870-857-3334 East Arkansas Family Health Center West Memphis, AR | 870-735-3842 Healthy Connections Mena, AR | 479-437-3449

Rogers*(2) Siloam Springs(2)

Lincoln

Green Forest Huntsville*(2)

Mainline Health Systems Dermott, AR | 870-538-5414 Mid-Delta Health Systems Clarendon, AR | 870-747-3381 River Valley Primary Care Services Ratcliff, AR | 479-635-0091

Salem Ash Flat

Horeshoe Bend

Mountain Deer Lee County Cooperative ClinicView

Marianna, AR | 870-295-5225

Mountainburg Mulberry

Lamar

Heber Springs Clinton* Mainline Health Systems Bee Branch

Conway

Acorn Mena*(2)

Cabot (3)

Carlisle

Little Rock College Station

Mt. Ida*

Swifton Newport

Augusta(2) Wynne Mccrory

North Care Services Des Arc River Mayflower Valley Primary Little Rock Ratcliff, AR | 479-635-0091 Lonoke Hazen

Waldron

Paragould

Batesville Southside Batesville

Mid-Delta Health Systems Searcy Kensett Clarendon, AR Vilonia | 870-747-3381

Ratcliff*

De Queen

Malvern

Cherry Valley Parkin Earle*

West Memphis*(2)

Marianna*

Helena* Lake View

Altheimer Pine Bluff

Arkadelphia Rison Hope

Trumann* Lepanto*

Clarendon

Redfield Amity

Lake City Blytheville* Jonesboro(3)

Cotton Plant Madison Hughes Brinkley

England

Hot Springs*

Corning

Walnut Ridge

Bald Knob

Dermott, AR | 870-538-5414 Center Ridge

Fort Smith(2) Barling

Pocahontas

Jefferson Comprehensive Care System Jasper* Melbourne Pine Bluff,Marshall AR | 870-543-2380

Springdale*(6) Fayetteville(2) Praire Grove

Jefferson Comprehensive Care System Pine Bluff, AR | 870-543-2380 Lee County Cooperative Clinic Marianna, AR | 870-295-5225

Healthy Connections Mena, ARYellville* | 479-437-3449

Star City*(2)

Bearden Monticello(2) Hampton*

LEWISVILLE

Lewisville

Strong

Dermott* Portland Lake Village(2) Eudora Wilmont*

119 SOUTH IZARD ST., LITTLE ROCK, AR 72201 • (501) 374-8255 • CHC-AR.ORG 2

MAY 24, 2018

ARKANSAS TIMES


RIVERDALE 10 VIP CINEMA ARKANSAS’S SOURCE FOR NEWS, POLITICS & ENTERTAINMENT 201 East Markham Street, Suite 200 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 @ArkTimes

arktimes

arkansastimes

oldarktimes

youtube.com/c/arktimes

W: arktimes.com E: arktimes@arktimes.com

PUBLISHER Alan Leveritt EDITOR Lindsey Millar SENIOR EDITOR Max Brantley MANAGING EDITOR Leslie Newell Peacock

Follow Arkansas Blog on Twitter: @ArkansasBlog

2600 CANTRELL RD 5 0 1 . 2 9 6.9 955 | R I V E R DA LE1 0.CO M

Follow us on Instagram: ArkTimes

ELECTRIC RECLINER SEATS AND RESERVED SEATING

SHOW TIMES: FRI, MAY 25 – THU. MAY 31 10AM SHOW TIMES FRI-MON

SOLO: A STAR WARS STORY PG-13 | 10:15 1:00 4:00 7:00 9:45 SOLO: A STAR WARS STORY PG-13 | 10:00 12:45 3:45 6:45 9:30 POPE FRANCIS: A MAN OF HIS WORD PG | 10:45 1:45 4:00 6:45 9:00 THE RIDER R | 10:30 1:45 4:15 6:45 9:15 DEADPOOL 2 R | 10:45 2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30 DEADPOOL 2 R | 10:30 1:45 4:15 6:45 9:15

BOOK CLUB PG-13 | 10:30 2:00 4:15 7:00 9:05 AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR PG-13 | 10:00 12:45 3:45 6:45 9:45 BREAKING IN PG-13 | 10:15 1:45 4:00 6:45 8:45 DISOBEDIENCE PG-13 | 7:00 9:30 SHOW DOGS PG-13 | 10:15 2:15 4:30 CLASSIC JUNE 5TH:

ANIMAL HOUSE 7PM $9

FULL FOOD MENU • SERVING BEER & WINE• TICKETS & GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE ONLINE AT OUR WEBSITE • LUXURY LEATHER ELECTRIC RECLINERS WITH TABLES IN ALL AUDITORIUMS • RESERVED SEATING • TICKET KIOSK IN LOBBY FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE 2018 REFILL TUB IS HERE: GET FREE POPCORN ON WEDNESDAYS!

NOW TWO CONVENIENT LOCATIONS LITTLE ROCK • NORTH LITTLE ROCK

175ML 175ML 175ML 175ML 750ML

CROWN ROYAL BLACK CROWN ROYAL RESERVE EVAN WILLIAMS BLACK SMIRNOFF BLUE BRECKENRIDGE BOURBON

Every Day

$51.99 $74.99 $20.99 $24.99 $59.99

SALE!

$47.99 $64.99 $19.99 $22.99 $54.99

(From Colorado Rocky Mountains)

750ML COLONEL E.H. TAYLOR SINGLE BARREL $41.99 750ML APOTHIC WINE (ALL FLAVORS) $10.99 12PK HEINEKEN, CORONA, MICHELOB $14.99

$36.99 $8.99 $13.99

ALL CRAFT BEER10% OFF EVERY DAY!

• WE GLADLY MATCH ANY LOCAL ADS HURRY IN! THIS SALE EXPIRES MAY 30, 2018 WEDNESDAY IS WINE DAY 15% OFF WINE CASE DISCOUNTS EVERY DAY!

LITTLE ROCK: 10TH & MAIN • 501.374.0410 | NORTH LITTLE ROCK: 860 EAST BROADWAY • 501.374.2405 HOURS: LR • 8AM-10PM MON-THUR • 8AM-12PM FRI-SAT •NLR • MON-SAT 8AM-12PM

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Mara Leveritt COPY EDITOR Jim Harris ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR Stephanie Smittle CREATIVE DIRECTOR Mandy Keener EDITORIAL ART DIRECTOR Katie Hassell, Jason Ho PHOTOGRAPHER Brian Chilson DIRECTOR OF DIGITAL STRATEGY Jordan Little ADVERTISING ART DIRECTOR Mike Spain DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING Phyllis A. Britton ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Brooke Wallace, Lee Major, Ashley Gill, Traci Berry ADVERTISING ASSISTANT Hannah Peacock ADVERTISING TRAFFIC MANAGER Roland R. Gladden ADVERTISING COORDINATOR Larissa Gudino IT DIRECTOR Robert Curfman CIRCULATION DIRECTOR Anitra Hickman CONTROLLER Weldon Wilson BILLING/COLLECTIONS Linda Phillips OFFICE MANAGER/ACCOUNTS PAYABLE Kelly Jones PRODUCTION MANAGER Ira Hocut (1954-2009)

PHOTO/ILLUSTRATION CREDIT Richard Martin/Jason Ho

association of alternative newsmedia

VOLUME 44, NUMBER 38

ARKANSAS TIMES (ISSN 0164-6273) is published each week by Arkansas Times Limited Partnership, 201 East Markham Street, Suite 200, Little Rock, Arkansas, 72201, phone (501) 375-2985. Periodical postage paid at Little Rock, Arkansas, and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to ARKANSAS TIMES, 201 EAST MARKHAM STREET, SUITE 200, Little Rock, AR, 72201. Subscription prices are $150 for one year. For subscriber service call (501) 375-2985. Current singlecopy price is 75¢, free in Pulaski County. Single issues are available by mail at $2.50 each, postage paid. Payment must accompany all single-copy orders. Reproduction or use in whole or in part of the contents without the written consent of the publishers is prohibited. Manuscripts and artwork will not be returned or acknowledged unless sufficient return postage and a self-addressed stamped envelope are included. All materials are handled with due care; however, the publisher assumes no responsibility for care and safe return of unsolicited materials. All letters sent to ARKANSAS TIMES will be treated as intended for publication and are subject to ARKANSAS TIMES’ unrestricted right to edit or to comment editorially.

©2018 ARKANSAS TIMES LIMITED PARTNERSHIP

FOR SUBSCRIPTION SERVICE CALL: (501) 375-2985 arktimes.com MAY 24, 2018

3


COMMENT

From the web

I don’t believe in encouraging or supporting drug addiction; however, HIV and hepatitis are on the rise. Seems like people would want these diseases controlled instead of spread. One way of doing this is by limiting the sharing or reuse of dirty needles. NiNi F risby In response to Gene Lyons’ May 22 column, “Talking baseball”: Purist here. Baseball is a game for radio. None of those technical niceties have improved the game. If anything they have resulted in creating choppiness by artificially halting the arc and the pacing of the games’ rhythms. But then, I still think designated hitters are wrong. Radio and baseball are a natural fit. Or used to be, anyway. Peewee Reese and Dizzy Dean were TV announcers, but you listened to them as much as you watched the screen back then. Arkansas is still Cardinal country — though not as thoroughly as it once was — because of radio. It’s one of very few games in which the defense controls the ball, except even that has been usurped by the need to 4

MAY 24, 2018

ARKANSAS TIMES

sell advertising. Then there’s the whole had hardballs confiscated because we reality of attempts to speed up the pace were only allowed softballs at recess. and improve hitting/scoring. And how And I still believe that someday there there aren’t just starters and relievers will be a girl who is good enough to play. anymore. There are like a half-dozen Vanessa categories of relievers. I love 1-0 pitching duels and starters who can pitch a Vanessa, amen. In the fourth and whole game. The purity of the game is fifth grades, I would walk home for gone at the Major League level. Minor lunch to watch an inning or two of the league ball and American Legion ball Braves-Yankees World Series games. are still good in person, though. But Regarding radio, your comments call to then I’m someone who got caught try- my mind the Paul Simon song, “Kodaing to sneak a transistor radio in third chrome”: “They could never match grade to listen to the World Series. And my sweet imagination … .” The station

le du f in p. he r o e hi y! Sc ou om ns da a t ew h Tow 01 to n 1 ur lem -5 yo e Sa -258 Old l 501 l Ca

In response to Autumn Tolbert’s May 17 column, “Bad Law,” about an Arkansas law that targets drug users who carry their own needles: Leave it to a lawyer to twist Scripture to benefit criminals. Holding people responsible for their behavior, both good and bad, is also an act of mercy. It is not merciful to help people stay addicted. It is not merciful to create an addict’s paradise like San Francisco or San Diego where the needle problem has become an actual health hazard. Sure, as Autumn noted, some are “functional” addicts, but their function is way down from where it would be if they weren’t addled by drugs. I have seen a mother tend her child while he was bedridden, a quadriplegic since his teens from a spinal stroke. She functioned, most days. Other days, she was absolutely useless, and her 30-yearold son would call me to wipe his ass because he was sitting in his own shit for hours because his mom was out. She is dead, now. Her son is now without parents. Such mercy. If you truly applied the WWJD standard, Jesus would say stop the drugs and look to God for help. Jesus certainly wouldn’t say free needles. Look to San Fran for what happens when you decriminalize needles. Steven E

COME HOME TO OLDE SALEM TOWNSHIP ENERGY EFFICIENT • STATE OF THE ART TECHNOLOGY • LOCATION • Our houses are 40% more efficient than Energy Star Rated houses • Average savings on utilities of $620/year for a 1900 sq ft home. • 100% Fiber Optic Network – internet speeds up to 1 Gbps. • 3.5 miles North of I-30 for easy commuting, shopping, and dining. • Safe neighborhood with 24/7 video surveillance.

• TOP RATED BRYANT SCHOOL DISTRICT For more information, contact Yoni Johnson at 501-258-5101 or yoneko@fiser.com.

7581 SAMPLES RD • BENTON, AR 72019 • WWW.FISER.COM

was 1120 AM out of St. Louis. Wasn’t it KMOX? As to softball, how much do you know about Joan Joyce, Kathy Arendsen or Barbara Rinaldi? Joan pitched to Ted Williams. Fifteen pitches, one foul ball. The online version of this saga is somewhat different, but with the same message. deadseasquirrel

In response to the May 21 Arkansas Blog post “Baker Kurrus will run for Little Rock mayor”: “I think I can be effective in the form of government we have.” Same thing the present mayor told our group in my living room years ago, when we were about to collect enough signatures to call for an election to remove the at-large director positions, in a successful action to torpedo our efforts. So you make your own call on how effective he has been with the at-large running around behind him. I predict the same outcome for any of the present candidates that will run and be elected: The at-large and deeppocket interests will continue to run the show at city hall. Clayton J For the one year that Baker Kurrus was superintendent of the Little Rock School District, everyone said he did a good job and was great at organizing and getting the school district functioning again. Then, out of the blue, Education Commissioner Johnny Key, slave to the charter school lobby, fired him and replaced him with Michael Poore. It would be great if Kurrus could bring some intelligence and sanity to the mayor’s office, like he did the school district. He probably could if obstructionist, bully politicians would stay out of his way. ShineOnLibby Until the Chamber of Commerce crowd realizes that the best interests of the poorest minority residents of Little Rock represent also the best interests of the business community, there will be strife and disunity. One way to change the scenario is to change to a mayorcouncil form of government, where the voters control the political dynamics of city government, where there are no “at-large directors” who always seem to be the Chamber of Commerce candidates. The mayor-council form is the most democratic form of city government and the most responsive to the concerns of the residents. plainjim


PRICED TO BUY

The Wine People

PINOT NOIR Joel Gott $20.99 Francis Coppola $16.19 Napa Cellars $26.79

WINES OF THE WEEK.

SAUVIGNON BLANC Matua $12.99 Honig $17.19 American Thread $22.19

BLACK BOX WINES $17.99 Sauvignon Blanc, Rose, Red Sangria, Shiraz and Riesling

PINOT GRIGIO A to Z $18.09 Chateau St. Michelle $16.29 Estancia $12.99

CABERNET SAUVIGNON Stave & Steel $25.39 Columbia $16.29 Ghost Pines $21.99

Edwards is fully stocked with your favorite wines at LOW prices. 7507 CANTRELL RD • 501-614-3477 • WWW.EDWARDSFOODGIANT.COM

arktimes.com MAY 24, 2018

5


WEEK THAT WAS

Note: The Arkansas Times went to press Tuesday before election results were known.

Hogs to continue at War Memorial The Razorbacks will continue to play football games at War Memorial Stadium through 2024, according to the terms of a new agreement between the University of Arkansas and the state Department of Parks and Tourism, which controls the stadium. The Hogs will play the University of Missouri Tigers in 2019, 2021 and 2023 unless, the university said, “SEC scheduling necessitates playing another opponent.” That game has typically been held the Friday after Thanksgiving. In intervening years, the team will play its Red-White intrasquad game in spring, pending SEC approval. The team will play Ole Miss this Oct. 13 at the stadium. According to the contract, the state guarantees 47,000 tickets will be sold to Missouri games, with guaranteed revenue rising from $2.1 million to $2.5 million over the six-year period. The stadium gets concessions. It is allowed to sell Coca-Cola products, though the UA is otherwise a “Pepsi campus.” The UA controls parking and revenue from it and the state will ask the city to cede control of the War Memorial Golf course for tailgating. The UA will pay the stadium $75,000 for use for the spring games if the off-campus games are approved by the SEC.

BRIAN CHILSON

Rutledge continues to dodge on petitions Attorney General Leslie Rutledge has denied some 70 proposed ballot initiatives and approved none this election cycle. One of those proposals denied would change the sovereign immunity provision by adding the words “unless authorized by the General Assembly.” The group behind the proposal, the Committee to Restore Arkansans’ Rights, sued Rutledge in Pulaski County Circuit Court. The suit was later joined 6

MAY 24, 2018

ARKANSAS TIMES

by other ballot groups. Circuit Judge Wendell Griffen had ordered Rutledge to appear in his courtroom last week, but just before her scheduled appearance, Rutledge requested that the lawsuit be removed to federal court because she said it raised, among other things, a question of violation of the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. U.S. District Judge Kristine Baker had scheduled a hearing on that request for Thursday, May 24. The question now is whether a removal to federal court essentially would put an end to any petition drives this election cycle. For petitions to be circulated, the attorney general must approve the wording and the proposals must be published by June 6, with petitions due the first week in July. Alex Gray, an attorney for the plaintiffs, spoke to reporters last week. He said the plaintiffs will fight Rutledge’s attempt to remove the case to federal court and predicted it would soon land back in state court. The attorney general’s motion to move to a federal venue was an effort to “stonewall,” he said. “This was a procedural move by the attorney general’s office. To say it’s done

in good faith is probably not an accurate statement. This is just an attempt to further delay Arkansans’ right to petition for a constitutional amendment,” Gray said. “Our claim is that the statute is unconstitutional, but we also claim the AG is acting unconstitutionally in the way she’s applying it. I think it’s pretty evident she doesn’t want to have a hearing, she doesn’t want to testify.”

Kurrus throws in for mayor’s race Baker Kurrus, the former Little Rock School District superintendent, has announced he will run for mayor. Kurrus, 63, is a lawyer, business consultant and farmer, growing soybeans, rice, trees and other crops on a farm between Hazen and Des Arc. A longtime Little Rock School Board member, he won attention (and appreciation in many quarters) for a year spent as superintendent after the state takeover. He was fired by Education Commissioner Johnny Key for speaking forcefully against the proliferation of charter schools in the district. He also worked for a number of years managing automotive dealerships of the Rockefeller

family and was a close adviser to the late Lt. Gov. Win Rockefeller. Kurrus, a Pine Bluff native who moved to Little Rock in 1980, said he’d received encouragement from friends to run and “I just finally decided it is time to step up if you want to help out.” He’ll talk more about specifics later. He said his first step would be to pick up the city budget: “It’s a great place to start.” Yes, he’ll talk about schools — the Little Rock District, the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences and UA Little Rock, all of which face challenges. “It’s important for them to survive and thrive and I think the mayor has a role to play on this.” Kurrus spoke of an interest in the “problem-solving process” of government. But he said that wasn’t in the context of form of government. Some have talked recently of an interest in changing the current blended city manager/ mayor government form. “I’m running for the job that’s out there. I think I can be effective in the form of government we have.” State Rep. Warwick Sabin (D-Little Rock) and banker Frank Scott are also running. Mayor Mark Stodola has said he would not seek re-election.


OPINION

Now, the main event

I

write Tuesday morning, before polls moderate in the general election against close on primary and judicial elec- likely Democratic tion contests. primary winner It’s anybody’s guess how $2 million Jared Henderson, in dark money will influence races for but his record will Supreme Court and Court of Appeals. I reveal the truth. fear the slime campaigns for partisan I also have some candidates for nonpartisan judgeships hope that another MAX will be successful. We should move to tactic of the anti- BRANTLEY maxbrantley@arktimes.com appointment of judges. Hutchinson forces I’m confident in predicting a vic- could bear fruit for Democrats in the tory by Governor Hutchinson in his fall — ethical government. Republican primary race with Jan MorConduit for Action, an ultra-congan, whose grassroots campaign has servative interest group that wants to been lively and built on the notion that kill Medicaid expansion in Arkansas, Hutchinson is some sort of liberal in worked to harm Hutchinson with a varidisguise. That’s nonsense, of course. ety of messages, including an extensive Morgan’s attack has had a positive report headlined “Asa and The Corresult. It forced Hutchinson to demon- ruption State.” It was an encyclopedic strate just how conservative he is. The rehash of political embarrassments list of particulars is long, from depriv- and corruption during the Hutchining women of the family planning and son administration. Conduit’s spin is a health services of Planned Parenthood fair one: If Hutchinson wasn’t directly to adding ever more punitive conditions implicated in all the ethical and legal on health assistance for poor and the lapses, he’s been too silent about them. disabled. He’ll be back impersonating a Four former legislators have pleaded

Like wrestling

S

o, what’s it going to be, America: a democratic republic, or Trumpistan? A nation governed by the rule of law, or an oversized kleptocracy, whose maximum leader uses the decayed shell of government to punish his political enemies and reward friends and family? “Kleptocracy,” of course, means rule by thieves. The United States government increasingly resembles a professional wrestling spectacle — all scripted feuds and melodramatic revenge plots enacted by a cast of alternately sinister and clownish figures skirting the edge of self-parody. Consider the evidence from the last week alone: According to The Washington Post, President Trump has personally intervened with the postmaster general in a fruitless effort to double the rates Amazon.com pays the U.S. Postal Service to ship packages. Postmaster General Megan Brennan has explained to Trump “in multiple conversations” that its deal with the online retailer is bound by contracts monitored by a regulatory commission — and a profitable deal for the post office. Kevin Drum explains: “Everyone —

everyone — knows why Trump is doing this. He hates The Washington Post, which is owned by Jeff Bezos, and he’s trying to exact some revenge by going after Bezos’ main business, Amazon. In any other presidency, this would be a major scandal. … With Trump, however, this bit of retribution is so trivial that it’s hardly worth notGENE ing.” Indeed, it’s LYONS chicken feed by comparison. Also last week, Trump tweeted the remarkable news that “President Xi of China, and I, are working together to give massive Chinese phone company, ZTE, a way to get back into business, fast. Too many jobs in China lost.” ZTE had been under U.S. sanctions for, among other violations, selling forbidden technology to North Korea and Iran. One day later, the Chinese government announced a $500 million investment supporting a Trump Corp. hotel, theme park and (naturally) golf course development in Indonesia. During the campaign, remember, Trump pledged to divest himself from the family busi-

guilty to crimes involving use of state pany chose to hire a former Republican money. Another pleaded innocent but officeholder and party insider, Betty was convicted. Hutchinson’s former Dickey, to be its intermediary with state chief of staff, Michael Lamoureux, and government. his nephew, Sen. Jeremy Hutchinson Hutchinson has had little to say (R-Little Rock), have been linked to ethi- about the massive kickback scheme to cally questionable legislative business aid Ecclesia, a tottering Bible college in and state spending. Jeremy once rep- Springdale, with state money. Where’s resented as a divorce lawyer the for- the call for a full accounting of that mer lobbyist indicted in a massive fraud boondoggle? scheme that involves hundreds of thouThere’s much more. Hutchinson has sands of dollars in illicit campaign con- stocked state government with former tributions and kickbacks to aid a health Republican legislators in cozy, highercare company that has done tens of mil- paying, retirement-enriching state jobs. lions of dollars worth of business with His legislative allies have managed to the state Medicaid program. There’s defeat efforts to require more disclosure even an allegation of murder-for-hire of business arrangements between legagainst Jeremy’s former lobbyist client. islators and outfits with interest in legisAnd yet, that criminally corrupt lation. Legislators may not legally lobby, health care enterprise still retains but it hasn’t stopped people like Rep. millions in state business. It’s a sharp James Sturch (R-Batesville), a Hutchincontrast to the Beebe administration’s son ally, from landing a job working for decision to stop doing business with a lobbying outfit. The legislature could another mental health firm almost the do much to require more transparency minute it was implicated in a bribery in campaign expenditures, more finanscheme. The company still operating cial disclosure by legislators and more under Hutchinson says it has rid itself protection against self-dealing. of bad executives and says it has hired The state Capitol is, to borrow from a lawyer to assure proper operation. It Donald Trump, a swamp. And the govis swamp-like, however, that the com- ernor has done little about it.

ness, which also he vowed would make until after Trump secured the GOP nomno new deals in foreign countries. ination. A technically accurate, albeit He’s broken both promises. Every dol- deceptive July 26 Trump tweet — “For lar that goes into the Trump Corp. goes the record, I have ZERO investments in directly into the pockets of the presi- Russia” — informed the two men that dent’s baggy, oversized suits. their efforts had come to nothing. Also, remember when Trump had no Everything depends, see, on what the business ties to Russia during the 2015- meaning of “have” is. 16 presidential campaign? His admiraIt may bear pointing out, though, tion for Vladimir Putin had nothing to that the prospect of Trump Tower Mosdo with self-interest. Even the Russian cow was definitely still in the works on dictator’s practice of having rivals jailed June 16 when Donald Trump Jr., Paul and journalists murdered failed to affect Manafort and Jared Kushner met in Trump’s admiration. Trump Tower New York with Russian Alas, that, too, was deceptive. lawyer Natalia Veselnitskaya seeking It turns out that under the guidance of “dirt” on Hillary Clinton. lawyer Michael Cohen and Russian-born, So, I guess it also depends upon what mob-connected go-getter Felix Sater, the meaning of “collude” is. the candidate signed a letter of intent Now we learn through The New to build a “Trump Tower” skyscraper York Times that Donald Jr. had a secin Moscow on Sept. 28, 2016 — the day ond Trump Tower meeting on Aug. 3, of the third GOP presidential debate. 2016, with emissaries bearing the happy On Sept. 29, Trump appeared on Bill news that “the princes who led Saudi O’Reilly’s Fox News program, where Arabia and the United Arab Emirates he commented that “I think in terms were eager to help his father win elecof leadership, [Putin] is getting an ‘A,’ tion as president.” and our president [Obama] is not doing It’s never been clear if an egotistical so well.” dunce like Donald Jr. understands that If you think skyscrapers get built in it’s a serious federal crime for foreignMoscow without Putin’s say-so … . Well, I ers to be involved in American elections, expect you’ll believe just about anything, much less that persons named Trump bless your heart. are theoretically equal before the law. New reporting shows Cohen and But by all means, let’s investigate the Sater kept beavering away on the project FBI. Follow Arkansas Blog on Twitter: @ArkansasBlog

arktimes.com MAY 24, 2018

7


DRIVERS PLEASE BE AWARE, IT’S ARKANSAS STATE LAW: USE OF BICYCLES OR ANIMALS

Every person riding a bicycle or an animal, or driving any animal drawing a vehicle upon a highway, shall have all the rights and all of the duties applicable to the driver of a vehicle, except those provisions of this act which by their nature can have no applicability.

OVERTAKING A BICYCLE

The driver of a motor vehicle overtaking a bicycle proceeding in the same direction on a roadway shall exercise due care and pass to the left at a safe distance of not less than three feet (3’) and shall not again drive to the right side of the roadway until safely clear of the overtaken bicycle.

AND CYCLISTS, PLEASE REMEMBER...

Your bike is a vehicle on the road just like any other vehicle and you must also obey traffic laws— use turning and slowing hand signals, ride on right and yield to traffic as if driving. Be sure to establish eye contact with drivers. Remain visible and predictable at all times.

8

MAY 24, 2018

ARKANSAS TIMES


Trade places

F

ortunately, my daughters share my love of watching movies from my own childhood. Before they ever knew about “Frozen,” “The Gruffalo” or “The Incredibles,” my girls could quote lines from “The Princess Bride,” “The Dark Crystal” and the original “Annie.” But many of the older movies I rewatch with them haven’t always held up, often due to sexist and racist themes. I have to tread carefully when choosing what to share, lest they be convinced that, as portrayed in the old Disney movies, being rescued by one’s true love should be of the utmost importance to a woman. As they age, I’ll probably guide them away from some of the more problematic teen hits that were staples for me and my girlfriends, such as “Heathers,” “Sixteen Candles” and “The Breakfast Club.” One old favorite that I may just have to figure out how to edit myself or wait for the inevitable, likely inferior and more politically correct remake is “Trading Places,” starring Eddie Murphy, Dan Aykroyd and Jamie Lee Curtis. If you haven’t seen it, beware of racial stereotypes, homophobic slurs and lots of sexist jokes. But underneath all that mess is a brilliant retelling of “The Prince and the Pauper.” Only instead of two lookalike boys agreeing to switch places, it tells the story of a rich white man (Aykroyd) and a homeless black man (Murphy) who are pawns in an experiment conducted by two even richer white men in a dispute over nature vs. nurture. Aykroyd’s character, a self-important man of privilege, finds himself incarcerated, homeless and broke after being framed for selling drugs. Murphy’s role is that of rags to riches after being given money and a job. It’s Aykroyd’s character’s arc that gives me the most pleasure. One minute he is smugly sitting in an exclusive, all-white, all-male private club and the next he is facing theft and drug charges, his credit cards canceled, his bank accounts frozen and abandoned by all his fancy friends after being framed as part of the experiment. I confess that over the years I’ve wished a similar fall from grace upon a number of people. I’ve come to call it the “Trading Places Award.” The recipient is someone who has shown no compassion or empathy for someone else in a tough situation. As part of their prize, they, like Aykroyd’s char-

acter, have to trade places, at least for a bit, with those for whom they show such little regard. For example, I’d love to bestow the award upon those Trump supporters who simply say to the undocumented and to DACA and TPS recipients facing deportation, “Become a citizen or leave.” I’d like to see them in a countr y where t hey face few prospec t s a nd i ncrea sed v io AUTUMN lence. I’d like to TOLBERT see them leave everything they know to travel to a foreign country to work for subpar wages to make a better life for their children, only to be harassed and insulted by those who claim to be Christians. I’d like to see them try to navigate the immigration system, only to find out the wait is a decade or more to enter legally. I’d also give the award to men like U.S. Reps. Steve Womack and French Hill after they laughed and celebrated the vote to cut health insurance for many women and children. How would they feel as they hopefully checked the GoFundMe account created to help pay the medical bills and living expenses after a child got sick and the medications were so expensive they couldn’t afford them and pay rent, only to find the donations just weren’t coming in? I think the one that gives me the most satisfaction is imagining President Trump, with all his fancy, albeit incompetent, attorneys, sitting in jail like many men and women across the country, unable to afford bail, unable to afford an attorney, missing out on the lives of his children and grandchildren as he waits for a visit from his overworked and underpaid courtappointed attorney, who has 40 other clients to see before him. Would he then still laugh and encourage police officers to not be “too nice” with those they arrest? I could go on and on. And, yes, there would be suffering by those award winners. But before you think I’m too terrible a person, in the end of the movie, Aykroyd’s character learns from his misfortune and has a sort of redemption. So, maybe that’s what I’m wishing for. Not suffering, but sympathy for others. At least that’s what I’ll tell my girls when they are old enough to watch the movie.

PATIO IS BACK! THURSDAY, MAY 24TH 5PM-10PM Lakehill Shopping Center, NLR 3816 John F. Kennedy, NLR

SPONSORED BY

LIVE MUSIC!

5:15 - 6:30pm - Jamie Lou and Hullabaloo (2018 Arkansas Times Musicians Showcase Winner) 6:45 - 8pm - The Wildflower Revue 8:15 - 9:30pm - Rodney Block Collective THE BEER GARDEN, SPONSORED BY THE NORTH BAR, WILL HAVE ACOUSTIC MUSIC! TH 2 0 18 Y M AY 2 4 T H U R S DA

S, BE E R FOOD TRUCK DORS, GARDE N, VE NRIE N DS! F FAM ILY AN D $3, E NTRY FE E ISN DE R U KIDS 12 AN D E! AR E FR E

5:15 - 6:30pm - Ben Byers 6:45 - 8pm - Joe Darr 8:15 - 9:30pm - Brian Nahlen

• Park Hill Baptist Church on C street and JFK will have a FREE TROLLEY • Dogs are welcome! • Bring your own chairs! Get tickets at centralarkansastickets.com

Proceeds benefit the non-profit organization Park Hill Business and Merchants Association (PHBMA).

www.parkhillbusiness.com for more info or visit our Facebook page!

of Arkansas

arktimes.com MAY 24, 2018

9


PEARLS ABOUT SWINE

Postseason time

A

rkansas fans who have been just the precise mix of short memofocused on enjoying the high ries about bad times two years ago and level of achievement of the Ra- deeper recollection about how frustratzorback baseball team are hopefully ing those losing seasons were. not neglecting the young women on Van Horn’s 2016 team fizzled so badly the softball diamond who are making that it was hard to record progress after years in the dol- figure why, save for drums of a cutthroat conference. the fact that injuries While the Hog baseballers were did deprive the Hogs befuddlingly giving away the out- of their anticipated right SEC West crown in another top starter (Keaton road series loss at Athens, Ga., over McKinney) and BEAU the weekend, Courtney Deifel’s elec- another expected WILCOX tric young group roared through the contributor or two NCAA Softball Regional at Bogle Park from the bullpen. The offense was simwith spotless 3-0 record. Freshman ply lacking without Andrew BenintenSTAY IN AND RaELAX, W E LCOM E TO T H E Mary Haff won OR GO OUTpitching AND star HAVE FU N. all three di’s infectious and dangerous presence, games thanks to throwing two com- and coincidentally both the softball and E N J OY N E W LY R E N O VAT E D R O O M S plete-game shutouts and finishing off a baseball team lost a whopping 23 SEC J U S T M I N U close T E Sfinal F Ragainst O M Wichita State with 4 games that spring. But both programs CR Y S TA L B2/3 R Iinnings DGES & A Mrelief. AZE U team’s M of spotless The emerged the better for it. Pl u s Freshl y Prep ared Br eaupstart, kfa st at Th e Ga r d en Gr i l l e , The baseball Hogs do have a troubleother young Hannah McEwen, C omp l i mentary belted Wi - Fi , her a n d12th On -homer Si te Fiof tness C ent e r some time away from the friendly cona freshman All-American type of season to help fines of Baum Stadium, which is why 2 2 0 4 S E Wal ton B lvd . , B en to nv ille, A R carry the Hogs to a 6-4 win in the finale it is so critical that they simply stay 479. 464.73 0 0 | hilto n g a rd en in n 3 . h ilto n .com against the Shockers, and now Arkansas healthy and preserve Top 8 seeding heads off to Norman, Okla., to face the through the SEC Tournament, which No. 4 Sooners in the Super Regional. remains one of those postseason tourThe numbers aren’t highly sugges- neys that seem to provide no real bentive of a successful trip. Arkansas is 2-23 efits while potentially creating probin head-to-head matchups against the lems for the long term. Arkansas boldly national power, and OU is not only a surged out of the loser’s bracket last two-time defending national champion year at Hoover and made the finals, and the owner of a gaudy 53-3 overall losing narrowly to LSU, to yet again mark (making the Hogs’ 42-15 seem fall short of a conference tournament somewhat pedestrian), but this is eas- championship. ily one of the country’s most balanced It seemed to gas the Hogs a little. teams. The Sooners are, at least on a They were a bit punchless in much statistical plane, still the most dominant of the Fayetteville Regional that folteam nationally, leading the country in lowed and despite a breathtaking comeN AND RSTAY E L A X IN , AND REL AX, runs scored and fielding percentage, back to force a win-or-go-home finale O O UT AND and placing third overall in earned- against Missouri State, the pitching OR HAVE GO O FU U TNA. N D HAVE FUN . run average. staff was running on empty and the Y N EW LYENJOY R E N O VAT ED OENO O M SVAT ED RO O M S NEW LYRR Is this club different? Sure, and bats lacked life. Thus, it’s a cautionary M INUT ES F R O MINU M it isn’t just the freshmen showing thing for these Hogs: Don’t overexert JUST TES FR O M TAL BRID GE S & A M A Z E U M off. Senior leader Autumn Buczek, a in the SEC Tournament, because hisC RYSTAL B R IDGES & AM AZ E U M shl y Pre p ar e d B r e a k f a st a t T h e G a r d e n G ri l l e , Greenbrier product who capped off tory has shown that to be a futile exerPl u s F re s h ly P r e p a r e d B r e a k f a s t a t T he Gard e n Grille , enta ry W i- F i, a nd O n - S i t e F i t n e s s C e n te r the comeback over Wichita State with cise. It’s already a tough league for 30 C o mplim e n tary W i - F i , a nd O n- S i t e F i t n e ss Ce n te r a nifty diving catch of a foul pop up to games worth of the overall schedule, so secure the Hogs’ first-ever Regional there’s no sense taxing the pitching or championship, was a steady cog all year fatiguing the players unduly for a title n .co m STAY INwho AN D R E LAremembers X, undoubtedly being a that doesn’t mean nearly as much as OR GO part OUof T aA N D HAV FU . team that wonEonly 10Ngames getting back to Omaha. overall just two years ago, including a And that’s where the baseball team ENJOY NEWLY RENOVAT ED ROOMS single SEC victory over South Carolina. has its sights squarely set. While JUS T MINUT ES FROM Juniors Katie Warrick and Ashley Diaz the softball team embraces a new chalCRYSTAL BRID GES &sinto AMAZEUM Pl u F contributre shly Pr epa r ed B r ea ksofvery a s tfaraint aThe have steadily matured lenge fearlessly, coming Plus Freshly Prepared Breakfast at The Garden Gri l l e, ing cogs with pop at plate, have rshort time, the baseball team looks theFitne Cthe om p l iand m enta y Wi-Fi, a nd On-Site C omplimentary Wi-Fi, and On-Site Fitness Center been outstanding in the field, too. This part of a seasoned, composed team that is by far Deifel’s most complete team, knows its rightful place, talent-wise, is 22 0 4 S E Wal to n Bl vd., Be nto nvi l l e, AR 2204 SE Wa l ton B l vd., B e n to nv ille, A R and as with Dave Van Horn’s baseball in the heart of Nebraska in a few short 479. 4 6 4 .73 0 0 | hi l to ngarde ni nn3.hi lton.com squad, they resemble a group that has weeks.

garden

S TAY I N AND RE LAX, OR G O OU T AND HAVE FU N.

E N JOY N E W LY R E N O VATE D JU S T M I N U T E S F R O M C R Y S TA L B R I D G E S & A M A Z

479.464.73 0 0 | hi l tonga rd e n in n 3. h ilto n .co m

10

MAY 24, 2018

ARKANSAS TIMES


11200 W. Markham 501-223-3120 www.colonialwineshop.com facebook.com/colonialwines

THE OBSERVER NOTES ON THE PASSING SCENE

Matriculation

S

oon after this issue hits the stands all over town, Junior will join that proud mass of Americans in possession of a high school diploma, having graduated from what in his eyes is the best high school on earth: Little Rock Central. Clearly better than that snootyass high school in “Beverly Hills 90210,” or Sweet Valley High, or Riverdale High in the Archie Comics or Ridgemont High, they of the Fast Times. Yours Truly and Spouse would have long since flown from our digs on Maple Street altogether had it not been for Junior’s t’weenage pleading that he must graduate from Central, which necessitated our remaining in the school zone. It was 1957, of course, that kept him here. He’s like that: strong where it matters, soft where it matters even more, and the thought of being able to count himself with Elizabeth Eckford and Ernest Green as an alumni of the mighty black and gold sang to his heart in a way that his loving parents could not deny him. We have never ever been good at denying him anything. We feared, sometimes, that might hurt him in the long run, but it was a risk we were willing to take for that boy. So, on Thursday night, we will help him don the polyester robe and mortarboard. We will ask the Googlebox which side the tassle is supposed to be on, and then we will sit in the stands with the assembled masses and watch him cross the stage at Verizon Arena with a couple hundred of his closest friends, a sensation that’s bound to be weird for The Observer, who graduated 26 winters ago out Paron way with a grand total of 17 seniors. If you have watched this space for the past 16.5 years or so, you’ve read the tale of Junior growing up, from a babe clad in Huggies’ finest, through daycare and elementary school, into high school, and now to the thoughtful and introspective young man The Observer only wishes we had been at that age. He still has the capacity to surprise his Old Man after all these years — to wow us, to startle us, to make us laugh and cry, to make us shout and scold and then feel bad about

it. He was always that way. Even when he emerged to the world on a December night almost 19 years ago, he came with his eyes open, looking around, hungry for every new experience at once. Where, pray tell, is the boy his father knew? Where is the child who once we could hold in our hands? Where is the boy who slept diagonally like a tiny drunk on his first big-boy bed, towhead hanging off one side, big feet hanging off the other, his Old Man loving him so that sometimes we’d stand in the doorway of his bedroom for as long as a half-hour, trying to see if we could match the slow, tidal pulse of his dreaming breath? If you see him, let us know: our jokester, trickster, scout and warrior, mage and philosopher, keeper of all the hopes of his mother and father, so soon come to manhood, and so soon to be out the door of the little house on Maple Street. By this time next year, he will be living across town, coming by every so often with his laundry and to raid the fridge. But we can’t think about that now. We have to get through Thursday first. The Observer knows we’ve kept harping on all this in the last few weeks and months: Junior, graduation, the slow sweep of the second hand, making us understand that while our time as a father may not be coming to an end, the active part surely is. It’s hard to get your head around the idea you’re someone’s Dad. Even harder, though, is getting your head around the idea that it is no longer your place to be the quarterback to his receiver; that your place is on the sidelines now, offering hopefully wise counsel when he asks for it but otherwise watching him stick and move under the bright lights for as long as you can. All that’s left now is watching what he does with what you gave him, for good or ill. We hope we have done him right. We hope we have given him what he needed, no more and no less. We hope that when we hear his name over the loudspeakers Thursday night, we are able to keep our shit together. That last, however, may be hopeless after all these years.

5/23–5/2

9/18

SCOTCH –WHISKEY – VODKA – RUM

Glenlivet 12yo Single Malt scotch Everyday $89.99 $69.99

Jack Daniel’s Black Label Tennessee Whiskey Everyday $46.99 $41.98 Reyka Icelandic Vodka Everyday $42.99 $32.98

Bacardi Superior, Gold & Black Rum Everyday $22.99 $19.98

CONNOISSEUR SELECTION (750 mL) Oban 14yo Single Malt Scotch Everyday $75.99 $64.98

Old Forester Signature 100prf Bourbon Everyday $24.99 $21.98 Domaine de Canton Ginger Liqueur Everyday $34.49 $24.98 Seersucker Southern Style Gin Everyday $23.99 $19.98

HB 2016 Picpoul de Pinet Everyday $11.99 $8.97

Silk & Spice 2016 Red Blend Everyday $12.99 $9.99

WINE SELECTION (750 mL)

Sonoma Cutrer 2015 Russian River Valley Pinot Noir Everyday $29.99 $22.98 Capitel de Roari 2013 Amarone delle Valpolicella Everyday $35.99 $27.98

Vina Robles 2015 Paso Robles Cabernet Sauvignon Everyday $24.99 $19.98 Roederer Estate Anderson Valley Brut Everyday $31.99 $23.98

1.5L WINE SELECTION Cavit Pinot Noir & Pinot Grigio Everyday $17.99 $13.97

Elouan 2016 Oregon Pinot Noir Everyday $22.99 $16.97

BEST LIQUOR STORE

3FOR THURSDAY – Purchase 3 or more of any 750ml spirits, receive 15% off *unless otherwise discounted or on sale.

WE HAVE BEEN A PART OF THE DOWNTOWN SKYLINE FOR OVER 39 YEARS!

39

arktimes.com MAY 24, 2018

11


Arkansas Reporter

THE

Bike nonprofit in high gear

said King, who has piloted tandems for visually impaired people on a number of occasions. “It’s something they never Recycle Bikes for Kids gives away hundreds of refurbished bikes every year. thought would be possible.” BY MOLLY FINCHER When three-wheel adult tricycles come in, Recycle Bikes save them for housands of bikes and the program. “Lately it’s been kind of hard to community-focused organizations as Arkansas Children’s Hospital, which promise of even more smiles afford things,” she said. “It makes them the program has grown, especially after uses the trikes in a program addressing are crammed into a warehouse happy, you know. It gives them some- King formed a board of directors and obesity in kids. “Some kids, they’re just in North Little Rock, the home thing to do other than sit in the house hired Nate Keltch to serve as the pro- too big to ride a bike. And they’ve never of Recycle Bikes for Kids. There, any kid and play [video] games. It actually gives gram’s director full time in 2016. The done any exercise. So a trike is a good under 16 can get a free bike, a program them something to do, and they get along charity is now a 501(c)(3) nonprofit so place to start them,” King said. that founder Ron King has made possible when they’re riding bikes.” that donations are tax-deductible. Recycle Bikes is pedaling outside thanks to the generosity of donors who King reckons that the success and “We love Recycle Bikes,” Mattie Central Arkansas, too. Board member give and volunteers who repair. growth of the program has to do with the Thacker, an AmeriCorps VISTA worker Chris Schaffhauser, who runs the Tour It all began in 2007 when King, owner near-universal experience of the joy of who is completing a year of service at da Delta bike ride in Helena-West Helof Refurbished Office Panels, saw on riding bikes as a child, and TV a story about the Little Rock Frater- the nostalgia that keeps nal Order of Police fixing unused bikes people holding on to old and giving them to a local ministry for bikes long after they have Christmas. outlived their usefulness. “That just reminded me of my first While it’s true that any bike, which was a used bike that my kid can get a bike at the parents got me, and how important that warehouse, the mission is bike was. And it was just one of those to provide bikes to as many ‘Aha!’ moments where you say, ‘I could kids as possible whose pardo that.’ ” ents couldn’t otherwise King decided to buy 100 used bikes afford it. Anybody over the and fix them by the following Christmas. age of 16 may earn a bike When word spread among his friends by working three volunand acquaintances, he was inundated teer hours. Then they can with 400 bikes within three months. pick out a bike for themFrom there, the program exploded. At selves, repair that one with first, Recycle Bikes lived in part of King’s the help of the other voloffice cubicle refurbishment business unteers, and ride off into on East Sixth Street in downtown Little the sunset. Rock. Because of the new development The earn-a-bike proefforts in the area and the program’s gram has had an espeneed for its own building, Recycle Bikes cially strong impact on the moved to 717 E. 10th St. in North Little homeless of Little Rock. Rock in 2016. Nicholas Gay, a single INSPIRED BY MEMORIES OF HIS CHILDHOOD BIKE: Ron King founded Recycle Bikes for Kids. The As of today, Recycle Bikes for Kids father of three and a resi- nonprofit has given away more than 14,000 bikes since 2007. has given away more than 14,000 bikes. dent of the homeless shel“They couldn’t stop smiling,” said ter Our House, earned his Acthley Campbell of her kids when bike through volunteering. He repaired Our House, said. ena, sees a need in the Delta for bicycle they first came in to get bikes. Camp- his new bike just in time for his first day “Recycle Bikes provides bicycles for advocacy. With Recycle Bikes and partbell, of Little Rock, was at the ware- of work at Interstate Signs. us to keep in the Children’s Center for ners such as UPS and the state Parks house for her third visit — she brought Gay wouldn’t be able to make it on the kids when they play outside. When- and Tourism Department, Schaffhauser her children to get one new bike and time to work without a bike. “I’ve got ever the bikes need to be repaired, we is working to give away 100 bikes to two repaired. “They let other people to be there from 6 [a.m.] to 2 [p.m.], and call Recycle Bikes and they pick up the elementary school kids in Helena who ride their bikes and they get kind of torn the buses don’t start running until about bicycles and either fix them up or bring want bikes but whose parents can’t up,” she explained. “I asked them not 5 something, so I’d be late for work,” other bicycles to replace them,” she said. afford them. to share, but you know kids, they want Gay said. “I’d get there around 7. So, I’ll Recycle Bikes can even provide Even with the thousands of bikes to be nice and share with people who be able to ride my bike if I wake up at bikes to vision-impaired riders: Local given away by Recycle Bikes, there is don’t have a bike.” about 5:40.” bike shops repair tandem bikes that potential for more. “You can see we With five children and two godchilRecycle Bikes, which has had a close Recycle Bikes reserves for the Arkan- have a lot of bikes,” King said. “What dren, Campbell wouldn’t be able to pro- relationship with Our House since 2009, sas School for the Blind. “They can’t we never have enough of is volunteer vide bicycles if not for the Recycle Bikes has continued to form bonds with many believe they’re getting to ride a bike,” labor. That’s our bottleneck. We give

T

MAY 24, 2018

ARKANSAS TIMES

BRIAN CHILSON

12


Tune in to our “Week In Review” podcast each Friday. Available on iTunes & arktimes.com

away 2,000 bikes. We could give away 3,000 if we had enough labor. But, we only have one paid employee, and that’s Nate. We have to rely on volunteers, and that’s what makes our program viable. We’re not out there trying to spend all our time fundraising.” For would-be volunteers, bike repair skills are welcome, but not necessary. There are plenty of jobs to go around, from technical repairs to cleaning the newly refurbished bikes so that their new owners get bikes that look shiny and new. Experienced volunteers are eager to teach new volunteers how to repair the bikes. Andy Gibson and his son, Grant, are two such volunteers. They have been coming every Saturday for a year to volunteer. “When [Grant] first started coming down here, he didn’t know much about fixing bikes. And he has developed really awesome bike repair skills,” Gibson said. “He helps a lot of people. A lot of people come here wanting to volunteer, but they just don’t really know much about bike repair at all. And if they have something a little bit technical, he knows where all the tools are, he knows where all the parts are, he knows what tires and tube sizes go on what. The other day we were out mountain biking in Bentonville, and I jumped off this big drop and I didn’t land very well, and I busted my derailleur. And I was thinking, ‘Man, it’s gonna be expensive to take it to a bike shop.’ So we just ordered the exact part off Amazon and he put it on the bike for me.” Helping kids learn a skill is one more dimension of Recycle Bikes’ program. “Some kids get exposed to bike repair or just tools in general very early — a lot of kids don’t,” King said. “And so we’re trying to get them some exposure. Cause you never know what their aptitude is going to be.” Recycle Bikes’ mission resonates with donors, as well. “People keep these bikes, and they’re in garages, under houses, they’re everywhere,” said King. “People keep them because they remember their experience in them. They know there’s some value in there, they’re not sure how to get it out of them. And that’s what we do. We can take that bike, repair it, and it will be a new bike to a kid. The value they have in it is the experience and the fun they had on it, and to pass that along. We’re the vehicle to make that happen.”

THE

Inconsequential News Quiz:

Tundra BIG Dasvidaniya, Bean Goose! Edition PICTURE

Play at home, while genuflecting toward your shrine to Dale Earnhardt. 1) Politico reports that U.S. Sen. Tom Cotton seems to be working behind the scenes to try to tank legislation backed by President Trump before it can reach the Senate. What is the legislation about? A) An attempt to codify Asimov’s Three Laws of Robotics, which The Cottonbot 5000 doesn’t like because he injures humans on a daily basis with his votes. B) It would legalize all the stuff from “The Handmaid’s Tale,” which Cotton opposes because it isn’t quite cruel and regressive enough. C) A bipartisan prison reform bill. D) It would bar from public office anyone whose neck is longer than his forearm. 2) The Little Rock Fire Department was called to a building at 319 W. Second St. in Little Rock last week. Why were Little Rock’s Bravest summoned? A) Having seen recent polls on the overwhelming support Donald Trump still enjoys in Arkansas, literally every Democrat in the state was on the roof and threatening to jump. B) Little Rock’s 19th cupcake shop planned to open there, and a good Samaritan firebombed the joint to nip that shit in the bud. C) Pieces of the concrete facade came loose and crashed to the sidewalk below, narrowly missing a pedestrian. D) Your basic basement portal to hell situation. Fixed it up with some chicken wire and Quikcrete and were back at the firehouse before the chili got cold. 3) A Dermott man was recently arrested after a short high-speed chase, after which police say they seized methamphetamine from the man’s vehicle. What was weird about the vehicle in which the man fled? A) It was gubernatorial candidate Jan Morgan’s campaign bus. B) It was a Wienermobile. C) It had a No. 3 painted on the doors, an apparent homage to the late NASCAR driver Dale Earnhardt. D) It was a beige 2004 Pontiac Aztek with New Mexico plates. 4) Scientists with the University of Arkansas at Monticello recently confirmed that a rare tundra bean goose, 6,000 miles from its native habitat on the eastern tip of Russia, had visited the Arkansas Delta near Dumas — apparently the first time the species has been seen in the continental U.S. outside of extremely rare sightings in California and Oregon. How do researchers know the bird was in the area? A) As soon as the goose landed, Donald Trump Jr. and Jared Kushner showed up to collude with it. B) It changed the hometown on its Grindr profile from Vladivostok to Dumas. C) It was promptly shot and killed by local hunters. D) It WOULD NOT shut up about how hot it thinks Vladimir Putin is. 5) Arkansas Attorney General Leslie Rutledge has recently been sued by two different Arkansans over the same issue. What’s the problem? A) Smelt it, but consistently refuses to acknowledge having dealt it. B) She’s just … kinda creepy, you know? C) Rutledge’s critics say a pattern has developed in which Rutledge rejects any proposed ballot initiative she doesn’t personally agree with on the grounds that the language is too vague. D) Satan claims she’s trying to renege on the deal to trade her immortal soul for a way out of her dead-end job at DHS and power over millions. Answers: C, C, C, C, C

LISTEN UP

arktimes.com MAY 24, 2018

13


JOSHUA ASANTE

Under

management

Riverfest gets a revival in its 41st year. BY STEPHANIE SMITTLE

e Sell Fun!” That’s the ing the F in Riverfest upper case). website promise of Whether or not they can sell that Universal Fairs, the Universal Fairs fun in Little Rock — Memphis-based event company tak- as they’ve done for state fairs in ing up the torch for RiverFest in 2018. Alabama, Virginia and Georgia — is After it was announced last July anyone’s (and everyone’s) guess. that Riverfest’s 40th annual event On one hand, RiverFest’s 2018 that spring was its last, RiverFest return has been planned and negoevent director Jack Daniels and tiated on a compressed timeline; Universal Fairs owner Mark Lovell the first string of performers wasn’t had a “very frank” discussion about announced until April 4 — meaning what did and did not work with for- that early-bird ticket buyers were mer Riverfest Executive Director rewarded with discounted rates for Deanna Korte, Daniels said. Since a leap of faith — and it wasn’t until then, they’ve worked to redesign late last week that stage times were RiverFest — keeping some traditions added next to the names of perintact, shedding others (and mak- formers on RiverFest’s website. “I

14

MAY 24, 2018

ARKANSAS TIMES

know other events that just sort of announce and hope it goes right,” Daniels said, but “we’re a little bit of ‘go by the book types.’ ” On the other hand, the Riverfest of the past had, by all accounts, become a behemoth of a nonprofit, with a dedicated board and a massive network of volunteers to coordinate, rally and manage. “When you’re around a long time, that creates a lot of constituencies,” Daniels said. “One of the advantages we have with a small ownership group — Mark [Lovell] and his family — is that we’ve really streamlined the decision-making process. From

an operational standpoint, there’s been a good bit of adjustment.” That doesn’t necessarily mean, though, that Universal Fairs plans to duplicate and airdrop some ready-made business model onto Riverfront Park — the one it uses for Delta Fair, perhaps, the multimillion-dollar, 10-day annual festival in Memphis that Daniels cites as the closest analogy to RiverFest. (Delta Fair attracted its record attendance of 240,000 in 2014, a Universal Fairs communique said. Riverfests past have seen as many as 225,000 attendees in three days.) The RiverFest “map,” for example, will likely seem familiar to past Riverfest attendees. Universal Fairs contracted with both the Little Rock Convention & Visitors Bureau and the Clinton Presidential Center to occupy both spaces and preserve the festival “map” as we know it. Daniels also said he and his team understood early on that preserving


LOCAL HEROES: Little Rock’s Amasa Hines performs Saturday night.

local loyalties was a key to avoiding the brushoff from Central Arkansas residents. “Part of what we understood about Riverfest, and what people respected about it, was how much money it put back into the community,” Daniels said. “So, a local port-a-potty company, local stage and sound and light folks, local folks for security. … Of course, we price-shopped. We do events all around the country. We know what stuff is supposed to cost. So, we negotiate and try to find the best deal to make sure that this event is sustainable, but we made sure for this event specifically that we could find a way to spend the money locally.” So, Riverfest returns as RiverFest, using a hybrid approach that Daniels hopes can overcome the barriers intrinsic to redesigning a festival about which residents have a 40-year cache of preconceived notions — not to mention what Daniels calls “the ‘get off the couch’ barrier.” “We’re a different organization,” he said. “We’re a different group of folks. It’s gonna feel a little bit new, but it’s also gonna feel a little bit the same.” Here’s a snapshot of what RiverFest will look like: Memorial Day Weekend: After two years of holding Riverfest in early June, the festival is back to its original recipe — a three-day, family-friendly music festival over the Memorial Day holiday. The “Footprint”: The RiverFest map will extend from the First Security Amphitheater in Riverfront Park (known in RiverFest sponsorship terms as the Arkansas Federal Credit Union Stage) eastward to the grounds of the Clinton Presidential Center, where the carnival rides (the “Ford Family Fun Zone”) and the AMP Energy Organic Stage will be set up.

No More Riverbucks: A “coupon” be at the gates during RiverFest’s program, as Daniels called it, “is a Family Hours Special: Between 10 great way to manage money, and a.m. and 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunwhen you’re running an organiza- day, the purchase of a single-day tion like Riverfest in the past that ticket for children ages 5-12 is dishas a lot of volunteers and a decen- counted to $5 and gets one adult tralized command system, through in free. (If your child is 4 or under, a volunteer board or volunteers the adult pays $5 to enter). Family handling your cash, the coupon Hours Special tickets do not include system is an easy way to manage re-entry. your money. We take a very differWristbands, wristbands, wristent approach.” That means vendors bands: Gone are Riverfest badges are reimbursing Universal Fairs for and pins. Welcome the new, fiber a percentage of their gross sales, wristbands. “If you’re a true, allDaniels said, so with the “middle in RiverFest patron,” Daniels said, man” cut out, patrons simply pay “you’ll be wearing three wristbands. for their food and beverages with You’ll have your entry wristband, cash or credit. ATMs will be set up your unlimited [carnival] ride wristthroughout the festival. Carnival band and your adult ID-check wristrides in the Ford Family Fun Zone, band.” Patrons who purchased however, are still ticketed, so you’ll entry wristbands directly at one need to find a ticket station near of RiverFest’s ticket outlets — Rock those amusements to purchase City Harley Davidson, Damgoode individual ride tickets or a wrist- Pies or any of 19 regional Hardee’s band that affords you unlimited locations (listed at riverfestarkanrides. sas.com/tickets/ticket-outlet-locaFireworks: Rather than closing tions) will walk through the security the festival, a fireworks display is screening and enter the festival. scheduled for 9 p.m. Friday, May Patrons who purchased a pass 25, just before country star Tracy online will obtain entry wristbands Lawrence’s set. from a station at the entrance and Ticketing/passes: A multiday then enter security screening. weekend pass with no re-entry (Wristbands are also available for is $50. A multiday weekend pass those who purchased passes online with unlimited re-entry is $65. A to pick up at the RiverFest office, VIP weekend package is $250, and 500 President Clinton Ave., Suite includes unlimited re-entry, pre- 20, between noon and 4 p.m. Monmium seating, complimentary beer, day, May 21, through Thursday, May a daily dinner buffet, access to a 24.) All patrons 21 and older who VIP platform near the stage, VIP want to imbibe will need to present bathrooms and more. IDs at an ID check station to get the Single-day tickets for adults are wristband that signifies they’re clear $25 for Friday and $30 for Satur- to purchase alcoholic beverages. day and Sunday and do not include (Beer offerings start at $4/12-ounce re-entry. Single-day tickets for can.) The wristband that gets you children ages 5-12 are $10, free for unlimited rides ($20) may be purchildren 4 and under, and do not chased at a station near the Ford include re-entry. If you’re bringing Family Fun Zone on the grounds the kids, and especially if you plan of the Clinton Presidential Center. to be at RiverFest for only a few For patrons whose passes allow hours, your cheapest option is to for re-entry, or to attend on mul-

tiple days, it’s best to get cozy with those wristbands; cutting them off or tampering with them means you can’t get back in. “We’re pretty clear about the wristband policy,” Daniels said, “and that’s why we made them comfortable, that’s why we made them good lookin’ and that’s why we made them from a material that will last a few days. If you want to swim a triathlon on Saturday, your wristband will still be good for your re-entry on Sunday.” Security: Backpacks, water bottles, certain types of video or recording equipment and a host of other prohibited items are listed at riverfestarkansas.com/information/ rules-of-conduct. Be prepared for a bag search upon entrance. “Really it’s the security that takes the most time,” Daniels said. “And that is just a function of being safe and running a smart event.”

arktimes.com MAY 24, 2018

15


BY COLTON FAULL, BILL PADDACK AND STEPHANIE SMITTLE

YOUNG THE GIANT 9:30 p.m. Friday, Amp Energy Organic Stage.

are immigrants from India. “It’s a rich kid game, didn’t grow up with a throne/ It’s all it really is,” he sings on opening track “Amerika,” contending that you can only achieve the American dream if you’re already born into means. Young the Giant’s style doesn’t ever stay in one place, though. It’s got big rock songs that sound like they were made for an arena (“Crystallized”), catchy sing-alongs (“Silvertongue”) and songs that are just straight-up dancey (“Nothing’s Over.”) Look for a big, energetic, shout-along indie rock set from it. CF

KELLY KENNEY

Young the Giant may not be as prominent as some other indie rockers that have performed at Riverfests past, but it’s just as good. The Irvine, Calif., band started out as The Jakes, but eventually changed its name after releasing “Young the Giant,” its debut album, in 2010. To date, the quintet has three LPs of anthemic indie rock under its belt, the most popular of which is “Cough Syrup,” with an impressive 109,130,005 plays on Spotify. On Young the Giant’s latest album, “Home of the Strange,” the band gets political. Lead singer Sameer Gadhia’s parents

YOUNG THUG

10 p.m. Saturday, AMP Energy Organic Stage.

The other “young” moniker on the RiverFest lineup is a rapper hailing from Atlanta whose real name is Jeffery Lamar Williams. “Thugger,” as he’s also commonly referred to, has an interesting Arkansas connection (besides having performed at the Metroplex Live back in 2016.) Former Arkansas Times entertainment editor Will Stephenson wrote the cover story on Young Thug for The Fader magazine, tracing the rapper’s ascent to household name status, and calling him “Atlanta’s wildest rapper.” Williams got his first big break when he signed on to fellow Atlanta rapper Gucci Mane’s label and, as Young Thug, he’s been praised for his vocal style and unique approach to rapping, warp-

ing and reaching for syllables you didn’t know existed. “Pick Up the Phone” from his 2016 mixtape, “Jeffery,” is as catchy as anything you’ve ever heard, with some great hooks and bubbling synths. Young Thug’s latest mixtape is 2017’s “Super Slimey,” a team-up with fellow Atlanta rapper Future. This year he’s released an EP, “Hear No Evil,” featuring Nicki Minaj, Lil Uzi Vert and 21 Savage — which seems uncharacteristic for someone who perpetually has another mixtape in the works. Expect a high-energy, nonstop set full of hi-hat trap beats and warbling synths perfect for a Saturday night. There may even be the rare ballad here and there, like “Relationship” from “Beautiful Thugger Girls.” CF

LEVELLE DAVISON 3:45 p.m. Saturday, AMP Energy Organic Stage.

Joining locals Amasa Hines and Jamie Lou & The Hullabaloo on the lineup is Levelle Davison, the Little Rock native whose rendition of The Bee Gees’ “To Love Somebody” turned the judge’s heads during a blind audition on NBC’s “The Voice” in February. Davison was eliminated (or robbed, depending on whom you ask) March 20 from the reality vocal competition show, but that means he’s back home with a gospel and R&B-tinged set for this year’s RiverFest. SS

16

MAY 24, 2018

ARKANSAS TIMES


TRACY LAWRENCE

9:30 p.m. Friday, Arkansas Federal Credit Union Stage.

I’ve always liked Tracy Law- and attended Southern Arkansas rence, and not just because of his University in Magnolia before findArkansas roots. He had a slew of ing success in Nashville. Younger hits in the early ’90s that we still country fans may remember him love today. Singles like “Sticks for the 2007 hit “Find Out Who and Stones,” “Alibis,” “My Sec- Your Friends Are” that featured ond Home” and “Texas Tornado” guest vocals by Kenny Chesney have stood the test of time as and Tim McGraw. His latest album great country songs. But it was is “Good Ole Days,” which pairs the 1995 hit “If the World Had many of his iconic hits with some a Front Porch,” which glorified of today’s most popular country “purple hulls” and “distant whip- stars. These include Luke Bryan poorwills,” that I liked the best. He singing along on “Sticks and not only sang it, but co-wrote it Stones,” “Alibis” with Justin Moore, as well. And it’s one that wouldn’t “Paint Me a Birmingham” with hurt us all to listen to, reflect on Easton Corbin and “Texas Torand learn a little something from nado” with Dustin Lynch. It’s not every now and then, with its lines only a great idea, but as Chuck like “if the world had a front porch Dauphin of Sounds Like Nashlike we did back then, we’d still ville pointed out, “This is a great have our problems, but we’d all reminder of how great that time be friends.” Lawrence grew up was, and also how great Lawin Foreman (Little River County) rence’s artistry was — and is!” BP

When it comes to crafting real taste in our blends, two ingredients are all we’ve ever needed. Tobacco Ingredients: Tobacco & Water

Use your smartphone to request paperless gift certificates at AmericanSpirit.com*

CIGARETTES ©2018 SFNTC (2)

*Website restricted to age 21+ smokers

arktimes.com MAY 24, 2018

Arkansas Times 05-24-18 M18NC221 RSD Blue Light Wood.indd 1

17

4/30/18 1:53 PM


BY COLTON FAULL, BILL PADDACK AND STEPHANIE SMITTLE ZACK SMITH

THE SOUL REBELS WITH TALIB KWELI 5:15 p.m. Sunday, Arkansas Federal Credit Union Stage.

The Soul Rebels are an eight-piece brass This year at RiverFest, they will be performing ensemble from New Orleans that play every- with Brooklyn rapper Talib Kweli, one half of thing from funk and hip-hop to rock and pop. the hip-hop duo Black Star with Mos Def (who New York’s Village Voice once described them now goes by Yasiin Bey). Streaming services as “the missing link between Public Enemy and won’t help you out if you’re looking to become Louis Armstrong.” They’re more known for their acquainted with their music and performances very impressive list of collaborators: The Roots, beforehand — it’s best to go to YouTube to get Metallica, Green Day, Nas, Marilyn Manson. The a glimpse of their impressive resume (there’s list just keeps going. The Soul Rebels are no even some with Talib Kweli). Out of all the acts strangers to the festival circuit; they headlined at this year’s RiverFest, The Soul Rebels’ will the Summer Sonic Tokyo Festival, Metallica have something for everyone, uniting old heads Orion Music + More Festival and Electric Forest. and new alike. CF

MARGO PRICE

7 p.m. Sunday, AMP Energy Organic Stage Country music might profess to love an outsider, but that love hinges delicately on the question “Outside of what?” Outside of the Nashville establishment, a la Sturgill Simpson busking outside the 2017 Country Music Awards, taking donations for the ACLU? Outside the patriarchal establishment, a la “The Pill” — the 1975 anthem that got Loretta Lynn in hot water with radio stations and the conservative country contingent? Folk heroes aren’t often named as such until their careers are seen in the rearview mirror, or until they’re dead, and it’s wildly exciting that a ballbuster like Margo Price is making waves now, in her prime. Even better? Her brand of ballbuster doesn’t

18

MAY 24, 2018

ARKANSAS TIMES

involve playing part of the rowdy, unhinged revenge artist we know from songs like “Before He Cheats,” but the kind where you take genuine risks, calling out gender-based double standards and big banks and pay gaps in your lyrics. It sure doesn’t hurt that all that protest comes part and parcel with a darling of a croon, a penchant for turning out surprise shows at American Legions, big choruses cradled by sweet ’70s-era string sections (as in “Hands of Time”) and solid autobiographical songwriting that draws on Price’s jail time, the loss of her newborn son, her battle with the bottle and her childhood as the daughter of a farmer-turnedcorrectional officer. SS


JAMEY JOHNSON 8:45 p.m. Sunday, AMP Energy Organic Stage

Jamey Johnson was the latest voice with some gritty lyrics. Back successful country male vocalist in 2010, Ann Powers put it this way with scraggly long hair and a bushy for the Los Angeles Times: “Jamey beard before Chris Stapleton took Johnson’s music is hard, like a metal over that mantle. You gotta admire slide on a pedal steel guitar; it’s real, both of them for their individual- like the kernel of truth within the ism in the current Nashville trend tall tales swapped by studio musiof mostly clean-cut guys. Regard- cians after much Jack Daniel’s has less of his appearance, though, it’s been consumed. It’s a consummate Johnson’s music that makes you blend of artifice and self-revelation, stand up and take notice. He’s ter- an intricately crafted container for rific at pairing his great baritone elemental stuff — the dirt of work,

the sweat of love, the tears of a duets, including “Make the World particularly bad hangover.” Like his Go Away” with Alison Krauss, “I hero Willie Nelson, Johnson is an Fall to Pieces” with Merle Haggard, outlaw of sorts in country music, “Don’t You Ever Get Tired of Hurting but he’s found his place. You may Me” with Nelson and, my favorite know him for hits “The Dollar,” “In of the bunch, a terrific version of Color” and “High Cost of Living,” “This Ain’t My First Rodeo” with the but it was his 2012 album “Liv- always incredible Lee Ann Woming for a Song: A Tribute to Hank ack. Yep, Jamey Johnson belongs, Cochran” that completely won us and we’re glad he does, long hair, over. Timeless songs and excellent beard and all. BP collaborators gave us some super

KIP MOORE

9:30 p.m. Saturday, Arkansas Federal Credit Union Stage.

The story goes that a certain ing in a sleeveless T-shirt and a smash hit “Somethin’ ’Bout a Truck” former college golfer named Kip backward baseball cap — attire as well as “Beer Money” and “Hey Moore packed up his belong- that should be excellently suited Pretty Girl” — songs that we loved. ings and headed from Georgia to singing outdoors in Arkansas in Speaking of pretty girls and love, to Hawaii, where he lived in a hut, late May. In a review of his music, Moore has explained how he tries surfed, backpacked and wrote Billboard once noted that “Moore to approach romance in his music. songs. Fast-forward a few years spends much of his debut album, “I am not drawn to the fairytale kind and that vagabond of sorts is ‘Up All Night,’ outlining the plea- of love,” he has said. “I am drawn to now making a living in the world sures to be had from hot women the real-life experiences between of country music. But he’s left the and cold beverages.” Well, so a woman and a man. I try to sing golf shirts behind, often perform- be it. That album brought us the about the way it is, but yet at the

Friday, May 25 AMP ENERGY Organic Stage 3:30 p.m.: The Brummies 5 p.m.: Cannibal Kids 6:30 p.m.: Knox Hamilton 8 p.m.: Chelsea Cutler 9:30 p.m.: Young the Giant

Arkansas Federal Credit Union Stage 2:45 p.m.: Low Society 4:15 p.m.: Chinese Connection Dub Embassy

5:45 p.m.: The Lacs 7: 15 p.m.: Roots & Boots Tour — Sammy Kershaw, Collin Raye, Aaron Tippin 9:30 p.m.: Tracy Lawrence

Saturday, May 26 AMP ENERGY Organic Stage 2:15 p.m.: Rad Horror 3:45 p.m.: Levelle Davison 5:15 p.m.: KelsOh 6:45 p.m.: Amasa Hines 8 p.m.: Highly Suspect 10 p.m.: Young Thug

Arkansas Federal Credit Union Stage 1:45 p.m. Jamie Lou & The Hullabaloo 3 p.m. Mainland 4:30 p.m.: Steel Union 6 p.m.: The Band Camino 7:45 p.m.: LANY 9:30 p.m.: Kip Moore

Sunday, May 27 AMP ENERGY Organic Stage 1:30 p.m.: Luke Williams Band

same time, what you can hope for between a couple.” Moore’s second and third albums have shown his versatility, and he continues to earn critical praise. CMNB (Country Music News Blog) put it like this: “From his gravelly voice to his honest, well-written lyrics, you cannot help but be drawn into the stories he tells in each one of his songs.” BP

2:45 p.m.: Matt Stell 4 p.m.: Jacob Bryant 5:30 pm.: Muscadine Bloodline 7 p.m.: Margo Price 8:45 p.m.: Jamey Johnson

Arkansas Federal Credit Union Stage 2:15 p.m.: Lyon Gospel Choir 3:45 p.m.: Thomas Wynn & The Believers 5:15 p.m.: The Soul Rebels, featuring Talib Kweli 7:15 p.m.: Echosmith 9 p.m.: Peter Frampton

arktimes.com MAY 24, 2018

19


Enjoy an Over the Top Hollywood Inspired Night as the Arkansas Times Honors the Winners and Finalists Of the Best of Arkansas Readers Poll.

20

MAY 24, 2018

ARKANSAS TIMES


LOCAL RECREATION Place to Swim Cheap Date Park Resort Golf course Weekend Getaway Gym/Place to Work Out Hiking trail Place to mountain bike Place to canoe/kayak/tube Marina LOCAL ENTERTAINMENT Rock band or artist Country band or artist Hip-hop artist or group Jazz band or artist DJ Live music venue Dance club Karaoke Trivia Live music festival Local actor/actress Local theater Artist Author Poet Photographer Comedian Filmmaker Neighborhood festival Late-night spot Gay bar Sports bar Bowling alley Movie theater Museum Performing arts group Place to gamble LOCAL FOOD AND DRINK Food festival French fries Onion rings Cheese Dip Ribs Wine list Arkansas-brewed beer Liquor store Sushi Salad Business lunch Brunch Happy hour Cocktail Baked goods

Milkshake Vegetarian Caterer Outdoor dining LOCAL PEOPLE AND POLITICS Politician Athlete Liberal Conservative Best Arkansan Worst Arkansan Best Little Rocker Worst Little Rocker Best Little Rock City Board Member Worst Little Rock City Board Member Charity Charity event Philanthropist Misuse of taxpayer funds/property LOCAL MEDIA Radio station Radio personality TV station TV personality TV meteorologist TV sports Newspaper writer Blog Website Podcast Twitter feed Instagram feed LOCAL GOODS AND SERVICES Grocery store Women’s clothing Men’s clothing Hip clothing Children’s clothing Vintage clothing Lingerie Shoes Antiques Furniture Garden store or nursery Landscaper Hardware/home improvement Eyewear shop Farmers market Outdoor store Bicycle shop Gun store Commercial art gallery Mobile phone provider Internet service provider

Residential real estate agency Commercial real estate agency Pest control and termite service Auto service Auto stereo Travel agency Hotel Private school Public school Apartment complex Bank Home, Life, Car Insurance company Commercial insurance agency Lawyer Barbershop Hair Salon Nail salon Spa Diet/Weight Loss Center Jeweler Pharmacy Physical therapist Massage therapist Med spa Cosmetic dentist Auto dealer RV/camper dealer Motorcycle dealer Home entertainment store Sporting goods Toys Florist Plumber HVAC Repair Gift shop Veterinarian Dry cleaners Artisan Designer/decorator Hobby shop Music store Bookstore Pawn shop Landscape design Funeral home Retirement community Yoga studio Chiropractor Tattoo shop Vape shop Investment adviser Company to work for

arktimes.com MAY 24, 2018

21


PRESENTING SPONSOR

EARLY BIRD

TICKET PRICE

Includes Whiskey Samples and Pork Dishes

$20

FRIDAY, JUNE 15 | 6-9PM | LITTLE ROCK | THE PAVILIONS AT HEIFER VILLAGE AND URBAN FARM Enjoy Whiskey samples from various agings of Knob Creek along with Basil Hayden and Jim Beam Black! Plus we will have creative and delicious pork dishes prepared by a dozen local chefs for you to taste.

PROCEEDS BENEFITING HEIFER VILLAGE & URBAN FARM LIVE MUSIC BY

22

MAY 24, 2018

ARKANSAS TIMES


Arkansas Times Best Doctors in Arkansas

ABOUT BEST DOCTORS

These lists are excerpted from The Best Doctors in Americaâ 2018 database, which includes close to 40,000 U.S. doctors in more than 40 medical specialties and 450 subspecialties. The Best Doctors in Americaâ database is compiled and maintained by Best Doctors, Inc. For more information, visit www. bestdoctors.com or contact Best Doctors by telephone at 800-675-1199 or by e-mail at research@ bestdoctors.com. Please note that lists of doctors are not available on the Best Doctors Web site.” “Best Doctors, Inc., has used its best efforts in assembling material for this list, but does not warrant that the information contained herein is complete or accurate, and does not assume, and hereby disclaims, any liability to any person or other party for any loss or damage caused by errors or omissions herein, whether such errors or omissions result from negligence, accident, or any other cause.” “Copyright 2018, Best Doctors, Inc. Used under license, all rights reserved. This list, or any parts thereof, must not be reproduced in any form without written permission from Best Doctors, Inc. No commercial use of the information in this list may be made without the permission of Best Doctors, Inc. No fees may be charged, directly or indirectly, for the use of the information in this list without permission. Best Doctors, Inc. is the only authorized source of the official Best Doctors in America® plaque and

other recognition items. Best Doctors does not authorize, contract with or license any organization to sell recognition items for Best Doctors, Inc. Please contact Best Doctors at plaques@bestdoctors. com with any questions. For more information or to order visit usplaques.bestdoctors..com or call 617963-1167.” “BEST DOCTORS, THE BEST DOCTORS IN AMERICA, and the Star-in-Cross Logo are trademarks of Best Doctors, Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries, and are used under license.” “Founded in 1989 by Harvard Medical School physicians, Best Doctors is a global benefits provider and medical information services company that connects individuals facing difficult medical treatment decisions with the best doctors, selected by impartial peer review in over 450 subspecialties of medicine, to review their diagnosis and treatment plans. Best Doctors seamlessly integrates its services with employers’ other health-related benefits to serve more than 40 million members in every major region of the world. More than a traditional second opinion, Best Doctors delivers a comprehensive evaluation of a patient’s medical condition – providing value to both patients and treating physicians. By utilizing Best Doctors, members have access to the brightest minds in medicine to ensure the right diagnosis

and treatment plan. Best Doctors’ team of researchers conducts a biennial poll using the methodology that mimics the informal peer-to-peer process doctors themselves use to identify the right specialists for their patients. Using a polling method and proprietary balloting software, they gather the insight and experience of tens of thousands of leading specialists all over the country, while confirming their credentials and specific areas of expertise. The result is the Best Doctors in America® List, which includes the nation’s most respected specialists and outstanding primary care physicians in the nation. These are the doctors that other doctors recognize as the best in their fields. They cannot pay a fee and are not paid to be listed and cannot nominate or vote for themselves. It is a list which is truly unbiased and respected by the medical profession and patients alike as the source of top quality medical information. Best Doctors’ innovative services include access to an unrivaled database of physicians who have been selected as the best in their field by other leading physicians, analytics and technology. With every service offered, the goal remains the same: to help people in need get the right diagnosis and treatment, significantly improving health outcomes while reducing costs.

■ UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS FOR MEDICAL SCIENCES, ARKANSAS CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL, CENTRAL ARKANSAS VETERANS HEALTHCARE SYSTEM; ■ CHI ST. VINCENT; ■ MEDICAL PARK ORTHOPAEDIC AND SPORTS MEDICINE; ■ ARKANSAS SKIN CANCER CENTER, ARKANSAS DERMATOLOGY; ■ CONWAY REGIONAL HEALTH SYSTEM; ■ ARKANSAS PEDIATRIC CLINIC

SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES MAY 24, 2018 23 arktimes.com MAY 24, 2018 23


ALLERGY AND IMMUNOLOGY JENNY CAMPBELL Hedberg Allergy & Asthma Center 700 S 52nd St Rogers, AR 72758 479-464-8887 TERRY O. HARVILLE University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Pathology and Laboratory Services 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-526-7511 CURTIS HEDBERG Hedberg Allergy & Asthma Center 700 S 52nd St Rogers, AR 72758 479-464-8887 STACIE M. JONES Arkansas Children’s Hospital Division of Allergy and Immunology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1060 AMY M. SCURLOCK Arkansas Children’s Hospital Division of Allergy and Immunology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000 ANESTHESIOLOGY INDRANIL CHAKRABORTY University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Anesthesiology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-6114 W. BROOKS GENTRY University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Anesthesiology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-6114 AHMED H. GHALEB Advanced Spine and Pain Centers 11220 Executive Center Dr, Ste 200 Little Rock, AR 72211 501-219-1114

STACY JONES University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Anesthesiology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-6114

HAKAN PAYDAK University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Cardiology Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 2nd Fl 4110 Outpatient Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-5311

VICTOR MANDOFF University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Anesthesiology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-6114 CHARLES A. NAPOLITANO University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Anesthesiology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-6114 ROBERT L. OVERACRE Baptist Health Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 9601 Baptist Health Dr Little Rock, AR 72205 501-227-8478 MICHAEL L. SCHMITZ Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Anesthesiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1100 CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE JON P. LINDEMANN Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System John L. McClellan Memorial Veterans Hospital Division of Cardiovascular Medicine 4300 W 7th St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-257-5916 JAMES D. MARSH University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Cardiology Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 2nd Fl 4110 Outpatient Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-5311

CRITICAL CARE MEDICINE JOHN B. CONE University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Surgery Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 4th Fl 4110 Outpatient Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-6086

ROBERT S. WEINSTEIN University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Diabetes and Endocrinology Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 2nd Fl 4110 Outpatient Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-296-1220

DAVID L. RUTLEN University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Cardiology Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 2nd Fl 4110 Outpatient Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-5311

VICTOR MANDOFF University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Anesthesiology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-6114

FAMILY MEDICINE JIMMY ACKLIN Fort Smith VA Outpatient Clinic Sparks Medical Plaza 1500 Dodson Ave Fort Smith, AR 72917 479-441-2600

ALLISON M. SHAW-DEVINE University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Cardiology Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 2nd Fl 4110 Outpatient Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-5311

DERMATOLOGY RANDALL L. BREAU Arkansas Skin Cancer Center Medical Towers Bldg, Ste 860 9601 Baptist Health Dr Little Rock, AR 72205 501-975-7455

EUGENE S. SMITH III Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System John L. McClellan Memorial Veterans Hospital Division of Cardiovascular Medicine 4300 W 7th St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-257-5866 BARRY F. URETSKY University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Division of Cardiovascular Medicine 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-257-5795 CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY LAURA P. JAMES Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Pharmacology and Toxicology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1418 COLON AND RECTAL SURGERY J. RALPH BROADWATER, JR. University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute Surgery Clinic 4018 W Capitol Ave, 7th Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-8211

SCOTT M. DINEHART Arkansas Dermatology Medical Towers Bldg, Ste 860 9601 Baptist Health Dr Little Rock, AR 72205 501-975-7455 HENRY KEUNG WONG University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute Dermatology Cancer Clinic 4018 W Capitol Ave, 2nd Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-8000 ENDOCRINOLOGY AND METABOLISM DONALD L. BODENNER University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute Thyroid Cancer Clinic 4018 W Capitol Ave, 6th Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 501-296-1200 STAVROS C. MANOLAGAS University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Diabetes and Endocrinology Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 2nd Fl 4110 Outpatient Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-296-1220

J. CRAIG CUMMINS Banister-Lieblong Clinic 2425 Dave Ward Dr, Ste 401 Conway, AR 72034 501-329-3824 RALPH FARRIS JOSEPH CHI St. Vincent Family Clinic 4202 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72204 501-562-4838 GORDON R. PARHAM Washington Regional Medical Center Department of Family Medicine 3215 N North Hills Blvd Fayetteville, AR 72703 479-463-1000 WILLIAM H. RILEY, JR. CHI St. Vincent Family Clinic 4202 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72204 501-562-4838 KEVIN ROBERTS Little Rock Family Practice Clinic 701 N University Ave, Ste 100 Little Rock, AR 72205 501-664-4810 STEVE L. SIMPSON CHI St. Vincent Primary Care 10000 N Rodney Parham Rd Little Rock, AR 72227 501-221-0888

ROBERT STEPHEN TUCKER Little Rock Family Practice Clinic 4208 N Rodney Parham Rd Little Rock, AR 72212 501-228-7200 DANIEL W. WATSON Autumn Road Family Practice 904 Autumn Rd, Ste 200 Little Rock, AR 72211 501-227-6363 GERIATRIC MEDICINE ANN T. RIGGS University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Donald W. Reynolds Institute on Aging Thomas and Lyon Longevity Clinic 629 Jack Stephens Dr Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-6219 JEANNE Y. WEI University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Donald W. Reynolds Institute on Aging Thomas and Lyon Longevity Clinic 629 Jack Stephens Dr Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-6219 HAND SURGERY G. THOMAS FRAZIER, JR. University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Orthopaedic Clinic 600 Autumn Road Little Rock, AR 72211 501-526-1046 INFECTIOUS DISEASE ROBERT W. BRADSHER, JR. University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Infectious Diseases Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 2nd Fl 4110 Outpatient Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-603-1616 JOHN E. DIETRICH Infectious Disease Resource Group 1 Saint Vincent Cir, Ste 160 Little Rock, AR 72205 501-661-0037

congratulations dr. j.d. allen One of the Best Doctor’s in Arkansas; Orthopaedic Surgery & Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery

We’re proud to have you on our team!

24 24

MAY 24, 2018 MAY 24, 2018

SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES ARKANSAS TIMES

A Department of White River Medical Center


THOMAS P. MONSON Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System John L. McClellan Memorial Veterans Hospital Division of Infectious Disease 4300 W 7th St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-257-5866 MICHAEL SACCENTE University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Infectious Diseases Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 2nd Fl 4110 Outpatient Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-603-1616

ANNE R. TRUSSELL 10310 W Markham St, Ste 202 Little Rock, AR 72205 501-228-6122 SUE A. ULMER Little Rock Diagnostic Clinic 10001 Lile Dr Little Rock, AR 72205 501-227-8000 MITZI ANN WASHINGTON PrimeCare 400 S Main St, Ste 100 Searcy, AR 72143 501-279-9000

PAUL WILLIAM ZELNICK Physicians Group Doctors Bldg, Ste 615 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 501-666-3666

MEDICAL ONCOLOGY AND HEMATOLOGY JOSEPH M. BECK II Doctor’s Bldg, Ste 512 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 501-666-7007

MEDICAL GENETICS G. BRADLEY SCHAEFER Arkansas Children’s Hospital Lowell Clinic 2601 Gene George Blvd Springdale, AR 72762 479-725-6995

PETER D. EMANUEL University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute Medical Oncology Clinic 4018 W Capitol Ave, 7th Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-8000

ISSAM MAKHOUL University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute Medical Oncology Clinic 4018 W Capitol Ave, 7th Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-8530 NEPHROLOGY JOHN M. ARTHUR University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Renal Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 2nd Fl 4100 Outpatient Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-661-7910

INTERNAL MEDICINE ROBERT T. CHEEK University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Internal Medicine Clinic - South Outpatient Center Bldg, 2nd Fl 4110 Outpatient Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-8000 MARK A. DYER Little Rock Diagnostic Clinic 10001 Lile Dr Little Rock, AR 72205 501-227-8000 WILLIAM E. GOLDEN University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Internal Medicine Clinic - South Outpatient Center Bldg, 2nd Fl 4110 Outpatient Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-8000 ROBERT HOWARD HOPKINS, JR. University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Internal Medicine Clinic - South Outpatient Center Bldg, 2nd Fl 4110 Outpatient Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-8000 ALLISON M. JOHNSON Washington Regional Internal Medicine Associates 688 Millsap Rd, Ste 100 Fayetteville, AR 72703 479-463-3070 ROBERT CHARLES LAVENDER University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Internal Medicine Clinic - South Outpatient Center Bldg, 2nd Fl 4110 Outpatient Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-8000 MICHAEL SACCENTE University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Infectious Diseases Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 2nd Fl 4110 Outpatient Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-603-1616 SARA GHORI TARIQ University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Internal Medicine Clinic - South Outpatient Center Bldg, 2nd Fl 4110 Outpatient Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-8000 SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES MAY 24, 2018 25 arktimes.com MAY 24, 2018 25


JAMES T. HENRY Renal Care Associates Sparks Medical Plaza 1500 Dodson Ave, Ste 280 Fort Smith, AR 72901 479-709-7480 MICHELLE W. KRAUSE University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Renal Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 2nd Fl 4110 Outpatient Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-8000 ROBERT F. MCCRARY, JR. Arkansas Renal Group Hot Springs Diagnostic Associates 115 Wrights St Hot Springs, AR 71913 501-321-9803 JOHN WAYNE SMITH Arkansas Renal Group Hot Springs Diagnostic Associates 115 Wrights St Hot Springs, AR 71913 501-321-9803 NEUROLOGICAL SURGERY STEVEN L. CATHEY 3500 Springhill Dr, Ste 201 North Little Rock, AR 72117 501-771-2000 JOHN DIAZ DAY University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Jackson T. Stephens Spine & Neurosciences Institute Neurosurgery Clinic 501 Jack Stephens Dr, 2nd Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-8757 ALI F. KRISHT CHI St. Vincent Arkansas Neuroscience Institute 5 Saint Vincent Cir, Ste 210 Little Rock, AR 72205 501-552-6412 T. GLENN PAIT University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Jackson T. Stephens Spine & Neurosciences Institute Neurosurgery Clinic 501 Jack Stephens Dr, 2nd Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-5270 NEUROLOGY ROBERT LEROY (LEE) ARCHER University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Jackson T. Stephens Spine & Neurosciences Institute Neurology Clinic 501 Jack Stephens Dr, 2nd Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-5838 BRADLEY S. BOOP Little Rock Diagnostic Clinic 10001 Lile Dr Little Rock, AR 72205 501-227-8000

26 26

MAY 24, 2018 MAY 24, 2018

ROHIT DHALL University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Jackson T. Stephens Spine & Neurosciences Institute Movement Disorders Clinic 501 Jack Stephens Dr, 5th Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-5838 NUCLEAR MEDICINE JAMES E. MCDONALD University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Division of Nuclear Medicine 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-5740 DAVID W. WEISS Radiology Consultants of Little Rock Baptist Medical Towers 1, Ste 1100 9601 Baptist Health Dr Little Rock, AR 72205 501-227-5240 OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY NANCY R. ANDREWS COLLINS University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Women’s Health Clinic Pyramid Place, 1st Fl, Ste 900 11300 Financial Centre Pkwy Little Rock, AR 72211 501-686-8000 ALEXANDER F. BURNETT University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute Gynecology Cancer Clinic 4018 W Capitol Ave, 2nd Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-8522 ANDREW A. COLE Conway Obstetrics and Gynecology 2519 College Ave Conway, AR 72034 501-327-6547 EVERETT F. MAGANN University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences University Women’s Health Center Freeway Medical Tower, 7th Fl 5800 W 10th St Little Rock, AR 72204 501-526-7425 STEPHEN RAY MARKS 3343 Springhill Dr, Ste 1005 North Little Rock, AR 72117 501-758-9251 HEATHER OWENS CHI St. Vincent Women’s Clinic 500 S University Ave, Ste 815 Little Rock, AR 72205 501-552-5550 PAUL J. WENDEL University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences University Women’s Health Center Freeway Medical Tower, 7th Fl 5800 W 10th St Little Rock, AR 72204 501-296-1800

SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES ARKANSAS TIMES

OPHTHALMOLOGY J. DAVID BRADFORD Retina Specialists of Arkansas 5 Saint Vincent Cir, Ste 201 Little Rock, AR 72205 501-978-5500 WADE BROCK Arkansas Oculoplastic Surgery 9800 Baptist Health Dr, Ste 500 Little Rock, AR 72205 501-223-2244 CAROL W. CHAPPELL Arkansas Ophthalmology Associates 5 Saint Vincent Cir, Ste 200 Little Rock, AR 72205 501-661-1123 RICKEY D. MEDLOCK Retina Associates 9800 Baptist Health Dr, Ste 200 Little Rock, AR 72205 501-219-0900 JENNIFER T. SCRUGGS Baptist Health Eye Center 9800 Baptist Health Dr, Ste 600 Little Rock, AR 72205 501-221-0123 CHRISTOPHER T. WESTFALL University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Jones Eye Institute 4105 Outpatient Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-5822 ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY SHAHRYAR AHMADI University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Orthopaedic Clinic 10815 Colonel Glenn Rd Little Rock, AR 72204 501-686-7000 JAMES D. ALLEN Medical Park Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine 501 Virginia Dr, Ste C Batesville, AR 72501 870-793-2371 C. LOWRY BARNES University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Orthopaedic Clinic 2 Shackleford W Blvd Little Rock, AR 72211 501-526-1046 WAYNE BRUFFETT Arkansas Specialty Orthopaedics 800 Fair Park Blvd Little Rock, AR 72204 501-663-3647 G. THOMAS FRAZIER, JR. University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Orthopaedic Clinic 600 Autumn Road Little Rock, AR 72211 501-526-1046

KENNETH A. MARTIN Martin Orthopedics Rivercrest Bldg, 3rd Fl 5320 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-975-5633 DAVID GORDON NEWBERN Arkansas Specialty Orthopaedics 800 Fair Park Blvd Little Rock, AR 72204 501-663-3647 RICHARD W. NICHOLAS, JR. University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute Orthopaedic Cancer Clinic 4018 W Capitol Ave, 7th Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 501-296-1200 RICHARD A. NIX OrthoArkansas 10301 Kanis Rd Little Rock, AR 72205 501-604-6900 RICHARD D. PEEK Arkansas Specialty Orthopaedics 800 Fair Park Blvd Little Rock, AR 72204 501-663-3647 THOMAS S. ROBERTS Conway Regional Health System Conway Regional Center for Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Bldg 1, Ste 302 525 Western Ave Conway, AR 72034 501-504-6649 RUTH L. THOMAS University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Orthopedics Clinic - Colonel Glenn 10815 Colonel Glenn Rd Little Rock, AR 72204 501-406-9227 JOHN L. VANDER SCHILDEN University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Orthopedic Clinic 10815 Colonel Glenn Little Rock, AR 72204 501-526-1046 OTOLARYNGOLOGY JOHN L. DORNHOFFER University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Jackson T. Stephens Spine & Neurosciences Institute Ear, Nose and Throat Clinic 501 Jack Stephens Dr, 3rd Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-5878 MAURICIO MORENO University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute Head and Neck Cancer Clinic 4018 W Capitol Ave, 6th Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 501-296-1200

GRESHAM RICHTER Arkansas Children’s Hospital Vascular Anomalies Center Division of Pediatric Otolaryngology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-2656 JAMES Y. SUEN University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute Head and Neck Cancer Clinic 4018 W Capitol Ave, 6th Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 501-296-1200 EMRE VURAL University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute Head and Neck Cancer Clinic 4018 W Capitol Ave, 6th Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-8000 PATHOLOGY MURAT GOKDEN University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Division of Neuropathology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-603-1963 AUBREY HOUGH, JR. University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Pathology and Laboratory Services 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-526-6990 JENNIFER HUNT University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Pathology and Laboratory Services 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-5170 FRED G. SILVA II Arkana Laboratories 10810 Executive Center Dr, Ste 100 Little Rock, AR 72211 501-604-2695 PEDIATRIC ALLERGY AND IMMUNOLOGY D. MELISSA GRAHAM Advanced Allergy & Asthma Doctors Bldg, Ste 215 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 501-420-1085 JIM M. INGRAM Little Rock Allergy and Asthma Clinic 18 Corporate Hill Dr, Ste 110 Little Rock, AR 72205 501-224-1156 STACIE M. JONES Arkansas Children’s Hospital Division of Allergy and Immunology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1060

TAMARA T. PERRY Arkansas Children’s Hospital Division of Allergy and Immunology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000 AMY M. SCURLOCK Arkansas Children’s Hospital Division of Allergy and Immunology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000 PEDIATRIC ANESTHESIOLOGY JESUS (JOJO) APUYA Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Anesthesiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1100 JAMES GRADY CROSLAND Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Anesthesiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1100 JAYANT K. DESHPANDE Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Anesthesiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-8005 ANNA-MARIA ONISEI Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Anesthesiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1100 MICHAEL L. SCHMITZ Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Anesthesiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1100 M. SAIF SIDDIQUI Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Anesthesiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1100 PEDIATRIC CARDIOLOGY THOMAS H. BEST Arkansas Children’s Hospital The Heart Center 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1479 RENEE ADAMS BORNEMEIER Arkansas Children’s Hospital The Heart Center 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1479 BRIAN K. EBLE Arkansas Children’s Hospital The Heart Center 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1479


EUDICE E. FONTENOT Arkansas Children’s Hospital The Heart Center 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1479 ELIZABETH A. FRAZIER Arkansas Children’s Hospital The Heart Center 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1479 M. MICHELE MOSS Arkansas Children’s Hospital The Heart Center 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1479

PEDIATRIC DERMATOLOGY JAY M. KINCANNON Arkansas Children’s Hospital Dermatology Clinic 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000 PEDIATRIC DEVELOPMENTAL AND BEHAVIORAL PROBLEMS JILL FUSSELL Arkansas Children’s Hospital James L. Dennis Developmental Center 1301 Wolfe St Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1830

ELDON GERALD SCHULZ Arkansas Children’s Hospital James L. Dennis Developmental Center 1301 Wolfe St Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1830

MARY HUCKABEE Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Emergency Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1050

REBECCA LATCH Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Emergency Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1050

PEDIATRIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE RHONDA M. DICK Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Emergency Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1050

LAURA P. JAMES Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Pharmacology and Toxicology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1418

REBECCA A. SCHEXNAYDER Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Emergency Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1050

PAUL MICHAEL SEIB Arkansas Children’s Hospital The Heart Center 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1479 PEDIATRIC CLINICAL GENETICS STEPHEN G. KAHLER Arkansas Children’s Hospital West Little Rock Clinic 16101 Cantrell Rd, Ste 114 Little Rock, AR 72223 501-364-4000 PEDIATRIC CRITICAL CARE XIOMARA GARCIA-CASAL Arkansas Children’s Hospital The Heart Center 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1479 M. MICHELE MOSS Arkansas Children’s Hospital The Heart Center 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1479 PARTHAK PRODHAN Arkansas Children’s Hospital The Heart Center 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1479 RONALD C. SANDERS, JR. Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Critical Care Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1845 STEPHEN M. SCHEXNAYDER Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Critical Care Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1845

SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES MAY 24, 2018 27 arktimes.com MAY 24, 2018 27


WE’RE MORE THAN JUST A LIST Best Doctors identifies and partners with the best medical experts across over 450 specialties and subspecialties to solve misdiagnosis and eliminate medical uncertainty.

28

MAY 24, 2018

ARKANSAS TIMES


“Most Americans will encounter at least one medical error in their lifetime.”

“When it seemed like nothing was working, Best Doctors showed me that there was another cause for my problem.”

Institute of Medicine

Best Doctors Member

WE’RE THE SOLUTION Best Doctors is an employer-provided benefit that gives over 12 million eligible members in the U.S. and an estimated 40 million members worldwide a unique suite of services designed to do one thing: eliminate medical uncertainty in a very uncertain landscape. Best Doctors not only identifies the very best clinicians, it partners with them to review members’ medical diagnoses and treatment plans as well as answer any questions a member may have—providing unparalleled clinical quality as an integral part of employers’ benefits offerings. Are you a Best Doctors member? Ask your HR representative if Best Doctors is a benefit.

Bestdoctors.com 1.800.223.5003 arktimes.com MAY 24, 2018

29


STEVEN W. SHIRM Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Emergency Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1050

TONYA MARIE THOMPSON Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Emergency Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1050

KENDALL LANE STANFORD Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Emergency Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1050

PEDIATRIC GASTROENTEROLOGY GLENN GOURLEY Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Gastroenterology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1004

PEDIATRIC HEMATOLOGYONCOLOGY DAVID L. BECTON Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Hematology and Oncology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000 CAROLYN SUZANNE SACCENTE Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Hematology and Oncology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000

ROBERT L. SAYLORS III Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Hematology and Oncology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000 KIMO C. STINE Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Hematology and Oncology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000 PEDIATRIC INFECTIOUS DISEASE JOSE R. ROMERO Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Infectious Diseases 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1416 PEDIATRIC INTERVENTIONAL RADIOLOGY CHARLES ALBERT JAMES Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Radiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1175

PROVIDERS: Scott M. Dinehart, M.D. • Randall L. Breau, M.D. Michael F. Osleber, M.D. • Annaleigh Harper, PA-C Matthew T. Reynolds, PA-C • Katherine McCrady, PA-C Douglas A. Clark, MPAS, PA-C • Emilee Odom, PA-C Kendyl Bryan, PA-C • Marcus Webb, PA-C Carmen Meeker, PA-C

www.arkansasdermatology.com 30 30

MAY 24, 2018 MAY 24, 2018

SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES ARKANSAS TIMES

PEDIATRIC ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY JAMES D. ALLEN Medical Park Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine 501 Virginia Dr, Ste C Batesville, AR 72501 870-793-2371 ROBERT DALE BLASIER Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Orthopaedics 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000 RICHARD E. MCCARTHY Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Orthopaedics 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000

PEDIATRIC MEDICAL GENETICS STEPHEN G. KAHLER Arkansas Children’s Hospital West Little Rock Clinic 16101 Cantrell Rd, Ste 114 Little Rock, AR 72223 501-364-4000

PEDIATRIC OTOLARYNGOLOGY CHARLES MICHAEL BOWER Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Otolaryngology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000

G. BRADLEY SCHAEFER Arkansas Children’s Hospital Lowell Clinic 2601 Gene George Blvd Springdale, AR 72762 479-725-6995

GRESHAM RICHTER Arkansas Children’s Hospital Vascular Anomalies Center Division of Pediatric Otolaryngology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-2656

PEDIATRIC MEDICAL TOXICOLOGY LAURA P. JAMES Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Pharmacology and Toxicology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1418 PEDIATRIC NEPHROLOGY RICHARD T. BLASZAK Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Nephrology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000 EILEEN N. ELLIS Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Nephrology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000

Little Rock • North Little Rock (pictured) Heber Springs • Cabot • Stuttgart • Conway • Searcy

PEDIATRIC NEUROLOGICAL SURGERY GEORGE T. (TIM) BURSON Neurosurgery Arkansas Baptist Medical Towers 1, Ste 750 9601 Baptist Health Dr Little Rock, AR 72205 501-224-0200

THOMAS G. WELLS Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Nephrology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000

PEDIATRIC PAIN MANAGEMENT MICHAEL L. SCHMITZ Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Anesthesiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1100 PEDIATRIC PULMONOLOGY ARIEL BERLINSKI Arkansas Children’s Hospital Pulmonary Clinic 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000 JOHN LEE CARROLL Arkansas Children’s Hospital Pulmonary Clinic 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1006 SUPRIYA K. JAMBHEKAR Arkansas Children’s Hospital Sleep Disorders Center 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000

PEDIATRIC RADIOLOGY CHARLES ALBERT JAMES Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Radiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1175 PEDIATRIC RHEUMATOLOGY JASON A. DARE Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Rheumatology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000 TERRY O. HARVILLE University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Pathology and Laboratory Services 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-526-7511 PEDIATRIC SLEEP MEDICINE JOHN LEE CARROLL Arkansas Children’s Hospital Pulmonary Clinic 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1006 PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST/ ADOLESCENT AND YOUNG ADULT MEDICINE ELTON R. CLEVELAND Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Adolescent Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000 PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST/NEONATALPERINATAL MEDICINE ROBERT W. ARRINGTON Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Neonatology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1028 BRYAN L. BURKE, JR. University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Section of Neonatology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-296-1397 R. WHIT HALL Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Neonatology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72205 501-603-1255

ROBERT E. LYLE Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Neonatology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1100


REBECCA H. MORAN Mercy Hospital Northwest Arkansas Neonatal Intensive Care Unit 2710 Rife Medical Ln Rogers, AR 72758 479-338-8000 ASHLEY S. ROSS III Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Neonatology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000 BILLY RAY THOMAS University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Section of Neonatology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-296-1397

PEDIATRIC UROLOGY STEPHEN J. CANON Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Urology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000 PEDIATRICS/GENERAL MARY E. AITKEN Arkansas Children’s Hospital General Pediatrics Clinic 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1202

SHELLY L. BALDWIN Arkansas Children’s Hospital General Pediatrics Clinic 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1202

DEBRA D. BECTON Arkansas Children’s Hospital General Pediatrics Clinic 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1202

CHARLES S. BALL Medical Associates of Northwest Arkansas (MANA) Northwest Arkansas Pediatrics 3380 N Futrall Dr, Ste 1 Fayetteville, AR 72703 479-442-7322

HANNAH BEENE-LOWDER Arkansas Children’s Hospital General Pediatrics Clinic 1 Childrens Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000

LAUREEN BENAFIELD Medical Associates of Northwest Arkansas (MANA) Northwest Arkansas Pediatrics 3380 N Futrall Dr, Ste 1 Fayetteville, AR 72703 479-442-7322 CARRIE M. BROWN Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Neonatology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1100

DONNAL C. WALTER Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Neonatology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000 PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST/NEUROLOGY, GENERAL GREGORY B. SHARP Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Neurology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000 PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST/PEDIATRIC METABOLIC DISEASES STEPHEN G. KAHLER Arkansas Children’s Hospital West Little Rock Clinic 16101 Cantrell Rd, Ste 114 Little Rock, AR 72223 501-364-4000 PEDIATRIC SURGERY M. SIDNEY DASSINGER Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Surgery 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1446

Congratulations to all the in Arkansas At UAMS, we are honored that more than half of these experts are UAMS College of Medicine physicians who practice at the UAMS Medical Center, Arkansas Children’s Hospital and the Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System. In addition to recognition by their peers, our doctors are highly rated by the patients they serve. Using our online tool, you can see reviews and comments from UAMS patients. Providing information to help you choose the best doctor is one of the ways we are ensuring you have thorough information to make informed decisions about your health care. From common injuries and illnesses to the most complex conditions, our specialists are highly trained and skilled to provide the best in medical care.

RICHARD J. JACKSON Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Surgery 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000 R. TODD MAXSON Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Surgery 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000 SAMUEL D. SMITH Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Surgery 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000

Visit doctors.UAMShealth.com or call 501-686-8000 SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES MAY 24, 2018 31 arktimes.com MAY 24, 2018 31


BRYAN L. BURKE, JR. University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Section of Neonatology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-296-1397

JON R. HENDRICKSON Pediatric Partners 7303 Rogers Ave, Ste 201 Fort Smith, AR 72903 479-478-7200 CHARLOTTE A. HOBBS Arkansas Center for Birth Defects Research and Prevention 13 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-5001

VINCENT CALDERON, JR. CHI St. Vincent Family Clinic 4202 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72204 501-562-4838

CHARLES DAVID JACKSON Medical Associates of Northwest Arkansas (MANA) Northwest Arkansas Pediatrics 3380 N Futrall Dr, Ste 1 Fayetteville, AR 72703 479-442-7322

MEREDITH A. DENTON Medical Associates of Northwest Arkansas (MANA) Northwest Arkansas Pediatrics 3380 N Futrall Dr, Ste 1 Fayetteville, AR 72703 479-442-7322

ANTHONY DALE JOHNSON Arkansas Pediatric Clinic Doctors Bldg, Ste 200 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 501-664-4117

ROSANA DIOKNO Arkansas Children’s Hospital General Pediatrics Clinic 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000 JOSEPH M. ELSER CHI St. Vincent Primary and Convenient Care 16221 St Vincent Way Little Rock, AR 72223 501-552-8150

CARL WESLEY KLUCK, JR. Arkadelphia Clinic for Children and Young Adults 2850 Twin Rivers Dr Arkadelphia, AR 71923 870-246-8036

DIANE FREEMAN Arkansas Pediatric Clinic Doctors Bldg, Ste 200 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 501-664-4117

SEAN M. LIVINGSTON Medical Associates of Northwest Arkansas (MANA) Northwest Arkansas Pediatrics 3380 N Futrall Dr, Ste 1 Fayetteville, AR 72703 479-442-7322

HORACE L. GREEN The Children’s Clinic 1420 W 43rd Ave Pine Bluff, AR 71603 870-534-6210

R. ALAN LUCAS Arkansas Pediatrics of Conway 2710 College Ave Conway, AR 72034 501-329-1800

JAMES S. MAGEE Arkansas Children’s Hospital General Pediatrics Clinic 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1202 MERLE E. MCCLAIN Mercy Kids 3224 S 70th St Fort Smith, AR 72903 479-314-4810

CHRISTOPHER SCHLUTERMAN Pediatric Partners 7303 Rogers Ave, Ste 201 Fort Smith, AR 72903 479-478-7200 MITZI S. SCOTTEN The Children’s Clinic 800 S Church St Jonesboro, AR 72401 870-935-6012

LAURA R. MCLEANE Arkansas Children’s Hospital General Pediatrics Clinic 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1202

BRENT (BRENTLY) SILVEY Medical Associates of Northwest Arkansas (MANA) Northwest Arkansas Pediatrics 3380 N Futrall Dr, Ste 1 Fayetteville, AR 72703 479-442-7322

LORI E. MONTGOMERY Arkansas Pediatric Clinic Doctors Bldg, Ste 200 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 501-664-4117

A. LARRY SIMMONS Arkansas Children’s Hospital General Pediatrics Clinic 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1202

EDUARDO R. OCHOA, JR. Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section of Community Pediatrics 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-4000

JAMES S. SWINDLE Medical Associates of Northwest Arkansas (MANA) Northwest Arkansas Pediatrics 3380 N Futrall Dr, Ste 1 Fayetteville, AR 72703 479-442-7322

TERRY S. PAYTON Medical Associates of Northwest Arkansas (MANA) Northwest Arkansas Pediatrics 3380 N Futrall Dr, Ste 1 Fayetteville, AR 72703 479-442-7322 JOE T. ROBINSON Medical Associates of Northwest Arkansas (MANA) Northwest Arkansas Pediatrics 3380 N Futrall Dr, Ste 1 Fayetteville, AR 72703 479-442-7322

PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION KEVIN J. COLLINS Rehabilitation Medicine Consultants of Arkansas Springhill Medical Plaza 3401 Springhill Dr, Ste 460 North Little Rock, AR 72117 501-945-1888

KEVIN M. MEANS University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Jackson T. Stephens Spine & Neurosciences Institute Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Clinic 501 Jack Stephens Dr, 2nd Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 501-221-1311 PLASTIC SURGERY KRIS B. SHEWMAKE 10801 Executive Center Dr, Ste 101 Little Rock, AR 72211 501-492-8970 GARY E. TALBERT Arkansas Plastic Surgery 9500 Kanis Rd, Ste 502 Little Rock, AR 72205 501-219-8388 PSYCHIATRY JEFFREY L. CLOTHIER University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Psychiatric Research Institute 4224 Shuffield Dr, 2nd Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 501-526-8200 PEDRO L. DELGADO University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Psychiatric Research Institute 4224 Shuffield Dr, 2nd Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 501-526-8200 TIM A. KIMBRELL Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System Eugene J. Towbin Healthcare Center Center for Mental Healthcare and Outcomes Research 2200 Fort Roots Dr North Little Rock, AR 72114 501-257-3131

JEFFREY M. PYNE Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System Eugene J. Towbin Healthcare Center Center for Mental Healthcare and Outcomes Research 2200 Fort Roots Dr North Little Rock, AR 72114 501-257-1000 G. RICHARD SMITH University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Psychiatric Research Institute 4224 Shuffield Dr, 2nd Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 501-526-8169 JOHN SPOLLEN Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System Eugene J. Towbin Healthcare Center Center for Mental Healthcare and Outcomes Research 2200 Fort Roots Dr North Little Rock, AR 72114 501-257-3131 PULMONARY MEDICINE LARRY G. JOHNSON University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Pulmonary Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 2nd Fl 4110 Outpatient Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-603-1400 RADIATION ONCOLOGY MICHAEL L. TALBERT CARTI Radiation Oncology at Baptist Higginbotham Outpatient Center Bldg, Ste 150 9500 Kanis Rd Little Rock, AR 72205 501-312-1733

Newest Location at 16115 St. Vincent Way in WLR MEET OUR DOCTORS DEDICATED TO YOUR CHILD’S HEALTH CARE:

Anthony D. Johnson, M.D. • Diane H. Freeman, M.D. • Lori E. Montgomery, M.D. Eugene Lu, M.D. • Anton L. Duke, M.D. • Scott M. Sanders, M.D. Kristi M. Hawkins, M.D. • Stacy L. Sax, M.D.• Sarah C. Bone, M.D. •Elizabeth Guidry, M.D. 16115 St. Vincent Way, Ste. 320, WLR 11749 Maumelle Blvd., NLR

500 S. University Ave., Ste. 200, Midtown Bryant Elementary, Bryant

501-664-4117 ARPED.COM 32 32

MAY 24, 2018 MAY 24, 2018

SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES ARKANSAS TIMES


RADIOLOGY ALBERT S. ALEXANDER Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 501-664-3914

DANNA F. GREAR Medical Associates of Northwest Arkansas (MANA) The Breast Center 55 W Sunbridge Dr Fayetteville, AR 72703 479-442-6266

EDGARDO J. CHUA ANGTUACO University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Division of Neuroradiology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-526-5941

STEVEN E. HARMS Medical Associates of Northwest Arkansas (MANA) The Breast Center 55 W Sunbridge Dr Fayetteville, AR 72703 479-442-6266

TERESITA L. ANGTUACO University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Division of Body Imaging 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-5762 JODI M. BARBOZA Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 501-664-3914 BENJAMIN JOSEPH BARTNICKE Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 501-664-3914 F. KEITH BELL Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 501-664-3914 C. WILLIAM DEATON Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 501-664-3914 STEVE A. DUNNAGAN Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 501-664-3914 EREN ERDEM Baptist Health Neurosurgery Arkansas Baptist Medical Towers 1, Ste 750 9601 Baptist Health Dr Little Rock, AR 72205 501-227-0963 JONATHAN F. FRAVEL Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 501-664-3914 JEROME J. GEHL Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 501-661-9766

KEDAR JAMBHEKAR University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Radiology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-603-1595

AARON L. JANOS Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 501-664-3914

DON L. KUSENBERGER Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 501-664-3914

CHARLES ALBERT JAMES Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department of Radiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 501-364-1175

PHILIP J. KENNEY University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Radiology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-6901

W. JEAN MATCHETT Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 501-664-3914

The best in Conway. The best in the state. Dr. J. Craig Cummins - Family Medicine Dr. Andrew Cole - Obstetrics & Gynecology Dr. Thomas Roberts - Orthopaedic Surgery Dr. R. Alan Lucas - Pediatrics Dr. T. Michael Stanton - Surgery

At Conway Regional, we are honored to work with these physicians and more than 200 other outstanding doctors who deliver exceptional care across a wide range of specialties. If you’re looking for a physician, visit www.ConwayRegional.org/FindDoctor.

One Team. One Promise.

SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES MAY 24, 2018 33 arktimes.com MAY 24, 2018 33


COMING SOON! G N I S NUR ARE THE C

ER

ADVERT

2017 E ETIM A LI F R FO

MENT SUPPLE ISING

T S TIM AS SAS SA NSA ANS A KA K TO ARK T TO MENT PLEMEN PPL SUP SU G SUP NG ING SING ISIN TIMES ERT RTIS A AD ADV ANSAS TO ARK

NURSES GUIDE 2018 Sept. 27th Call Phyllis at 501-492-3994 for more info!

JOHN N. MEADORS Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 501-664-3914

DAVID E. TAMAS Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 501-664-3914

DARRYL W. ECKES Mercy Clinic Surgery Center of Excellence 7001 Rogers Ave, Ste 501 Fort Smith, AR 72903 479-274-5100

ROGERICH T. PAYLOR Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-2614

JENNIFER TURNER Medical Associates of Northwest Arkansas (MANA) Fayetteville Diagnostic Clinic 3344 N Futrall Dr Fayetteville, AR 72703 479-521-8200

WAYNE A. HUDEC Ozark Surgical Associates 3017 Bob Younkin Dr, Ste 101 Fayetteville, AR 72703 479-521-1484

CHRISTIE B. PHELAN Northwest Breast Imaging Center at Willow Creek 5501 Willow Creek Dr, Ste 103 Springdale, AR 72762 479-750-6660 KELLY A. PIERCE Medical Associates of Northwest Arkansas (MANA) The Breast Center 55 W Sunbridge Dr Fayetteville, AR 72703 479-442-6266 KEVIN L. POPE Medical Associates of Northwest Arkansas (MANA) The Breast Center 55 W Sunbridge Dr Fayetteville, AR 72703 479-442-6266 JOHN P. SCURLOCK Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 501-664-3914 RAJESH SETHI Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 501-664-3914 HEMENDRA R. SHAH University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Department of Radiology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 501-603-1595 KATHLEEN M. SITARIK Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 501-664-3914 AARON M. SPANN Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 501-664-3914

arktimes.com 34 34

MAY 24, 2018 MAY 24, 2018

SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES ARKANSAS TIMES

SHANNON R. TURNER Radiology Associates (RAPA) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 501-664-3914 RHEUMATOLOGY SETH MARK BERNEY University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Rheumatology Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 1st Fl 4110 Outpatient Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-5586 RICHARD W. HOUK Houk Rheumatology 9101 Kanis Rd, Ste 200 Little Rock, AR 72205 501-224-6366 THOMAS M. KOVALESKI Little Rock Diagnostic Clinic 10001 Lile Dr Little Rock, AR 72205 501-227-8000 CUMMINS LUE Little Rock Diagnostic Clinic 10001 Lile Dr Little Rock, AR 72205 501-227-8000 SURGERY GARY W. BARONE University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Solid Organ Transplant Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 3rd Fl 4110 Outpatient Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-6644 CHRIS M. CATE The Surgical Clinic of Central Arkansas Hickingbotham Outpatient Center, Ste 501 9500 Kanis Rd Little Rock, AR 72205 501-227-9080 JOHN B. CONE University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Surgery Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 4th Fl 4110 Outpatient Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-6086

MAURICIO MORENO University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute Head and Neck Cancer Clinic 4018 W Capitol Ave, 6th Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 501-296-1200 RONALD ROBERTSON University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Surgery Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 4th Fl 4110 Outpatient Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-6086

JERRI SUZANNE FANT Breast Health Clinics of Arkansas 3401 Springhill Dr, Ste 470 North Little Rock, AR 72117 501-955-9466 RONDA S. HENRY-TILLMAN University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute Breast Cancer Clinic 4018 W Capitol Ave, 2nd Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 501-296-1200 KENT C. WESTBROOK University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute Breast Cancer Clinic 4018 W Capitol Ave, 2nd Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 501-296-1200 THORACIC SURGERY FRANK MICHAEL BAUER III CHI St. Vincent Cardiovascular Surgery Clinic 5 Saint Vincent Cir, Ste 501 Little Rock, AR 72205 501-666-2894

T. MICHAEL STANTON Surgical Associates of Conway 525 Western Ave, Ste 203 Conway, AR 72034 501-327-4828

JAMES S. COUNCE Cardiovascular Surgical Clinic 3276 N North Hills Blvd Fayetteville, AR 72703 479-587-1114

WILLIAM EVERETT TUCKER The Surgical Clinic of Central Arkansas Hickingbotham Outpatient Center, Ste 501 9500 Kanis Rd Little Rock, AR 72205 501-227-9080

ROBERT C. JAGGERS Cardiovascular Surgical Clinic 3276 N North Hills Blvd Fayetteville, AR 72703 479-587-1114

EMRE VURAL University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute Head and Neck Cancer Clinic 4018 W Capitol Ave, 6th Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-8000 JOHN W. WEBB CHI St. Vincent Surgery Clinic Medical Office Bldg, Ste 201 1 Mercy Ln Hot Springs, AR 71913 501-609-2229 SURGICAL ONCOLOGY J. RALPH BROADWATER, JR. University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute Surgery Clinic 4018 W Capitol Ave, 7th Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-8211 MICHAEL J. CROSS Breast Treatment Associates 1792 E Joyce Blvd, Ste 1 Fayetteville, AR 72703 479-582-1000

H. GARETH TOBLER University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Cardiology Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 2nd Fl 4110 Outpatient Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-7884 VASCULAR SURGERY GARY W. BARONE University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Solid Organ Transplant Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 3rd Fl 4110 Outpatient Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-686-6644 MOHAMMED M. MOURSI University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Vascular Surgery Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 4th Fl 4110 Outpatient Cir Little Rock, AR 72205 501-257-6917


WHOLE CARE

A LOCAL RESOURCE GUIDE TO MAINTAINING YOUR TOTAL HEALTH

Evergreen Acupuncture “RELAXING” IS NOT THE FIRST THOUGHT that many people have to hearing about acupuncture, but that is how most of Martin Eisele, L.Ac., patients describe their experience. When people first hear the word “acupuncture”, they may balk at the thought of having tiny needles used to treat their ailments, but they have great experiences with acupuncture and great results. The sterile, disposable needles are so small that several can fit into the hole of a hypodermic needle. Acupuncture is great at treating pain anywhere in the body, from head to feet, and it’s better for you than pain pills. Most of his patients have already tried prescriptions, physical therapy, chiropractic, even surgery, and have found no relief until they try acupuncture. Acupuncture is a part of traditional Asian medicine, and it treats much more than pain. Patients come in with problems involving breathing (asthma, allergies, coughing), digestion (abdominal pain, constipation, IBS), infertility, skin issues, autoimmune disorders, stress/anxiety, and many other problems. People of all ages love acupuncture, from young kids to 100 years old, and they come from all walks of life. Arkansas Licensed Acupuncturists (L.Ac.) have the most lengthy and intensive training and use acupuncture and Chinese herbs as their primary modality. As a Licensed Acupuncturist, Martin Eisele had four years of academic training in Asian medicine, extensive training in China, and trained for 10 years with a Taiwanese acupuncture master. In his 20 years of practicing Asian medicine, he has treated thousands of patients with great results. He lectures regularly at UAMS and teaches tai chi at Inner Flow Tai Chi/Unity Martial Arts. “When patients arrive at Evergreen Acupuncture for an initial visit, we sit down and talk about their main complaint and history. We also talk about their sleep, stress, diet, energy, and a number of other things that will lead us to the proper treatment approach. After the needles are inserted, patients rest for about an hour. The majority of patients will enter a deep relaxed state or fall asleep. Typically, a patient can expect 3-10 treatments,” says Eisele. There are no major side effects with acupuncture, but there are side benefits. Patients find they are calmer and more centered, have more energy, better sleep, and better digestion. Many patients have treatments on a regular basis because of how it makes them feel. 501-663-3461 Martin Eisele, L.Ac., Evergreen Acupuncture 2 Van Circle, Ste. 1, Little Rock, AR 72207 www.evergreenhealth.net

Dr. Bev Foster

CHIROPRACTIC HEALTH & REHABILITATION DR. BEV FOSTER, A CHIROPRACTIC PHYSICIAN certified in Chiropractic Orthopedics, provides first-line conservative treatment of non-surgical neck and back pain.  She is experienced and trained to provide practical solutions for neck, back and joint problems and works closely with other care providers for your benefit.  Dr. Foster’s skilled, hands-on techniques have helped many over 27 years of practice. She currently serves on the Arkansas Board of Health and is an officer of the Academy of AP Chiropractic Physicians.  When it comes to finding a reliable Chiropractor, Dr. Foster is mindful that integrity and results are paramount.  Voted “Best Chiropractor” in central Arkansas by readers of the Arkansas Times, the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, Arkansas Life, and AY Magazine, Dr. Foster is located across from the Arkansas School for the Blind on Markham street.  501-371-0152 Dr. Bev Foster Chiropractic Health & Rehabilitation 2701 W Markham St. Little Rock, AR 72205 drbevfoster.com

Tranquil setting at Evergreen Acupuncture. SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES MAY 24, 2018 35 arktimes.com MAY 24, 2018 35


WHOLE CARE

A LOCAL RESOURCE GUIDE TO MAINTAINING YOUR TOTAL HEALTH

North Little Rock Doctor Now Community Health Center Believer, Ambassador BY NATE OLSON

THE WORDS “COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTER” were immediate red flags for longtime doctor Marcus Crouther. Crouther, a veteran of emergency rooms, was practicing at the Nayles Medical Center near downtown Little Rock with Dr. Lee Nayles. Nayles’ wife, Lana, is friends with Jefferson Comprehensive Care System, Inc. chief executive officer Sandra Brown. When Lana discovered Brown needed a doctor to practice at a new North Little Rock site, she referred Crouther. However, Crouther wasn’t excited about a meeting with Brown at Community Bakery. In fact, he showed up clad in jeans and a T-shirt.

sion and eager to squash misconceptions of community health centers. “I love my job,” he said. “It is the best thing that could have happened to me. It was really the job I was looking for when I finished my residency. At that time in 1990, the hospitalist concept was just coming in, so if you were going to be a family doctor, you were going to have to take calls and see people in the hospital. I didn’t like the idea of being on-call and having to get up and go out, so that is why I did ER, so you can work your shift and go home and not take calls. “Now with hospitalists, you don’t have to admit anybody. I take calls at home, and I don’t mind. It has been a great situation doing family practice now.” Crouther grew up in Flint, Mich., the son of two teachers. While his parents naturally steered him toward reading and studying in his spare time, Crouther was passionate about basketball. His long, slender frame makes it easy to believe he thrived on the hardwood. After graduating from high school in nearby Grand Blanc, Crouther enrolled at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. He transferred for his sophomore year to the General Motors Institute back in Flint and graduated with a degree in medical technology from the University of Michigan at Flint in 1983. He headed back to Ann Arbor for medical school at Michigan. After graduating in 1987, he moved to Little Rock, his father’s hometown, for his residency. His grandfather still lived in Little Rock and had been diagnosed with dementia the year before. He was admitted to a nursing home before Crouther arrived so he lived in the house alone. He met his wife of 27 years, Deveta, in Little Rock, and they settled in Texarkana, Texas while he worked for six years in the emergency room at St. Michael hospital on the Texas side. He took a job as the medical director at a small hospital in Texarkana, Ark., that went bankrupt in four months. “When my last contract in the ER ended, I was in my late-50s and I thought maybe I needed to do something different with the shifts changing day and night. It was getting harder,” Crouther said. “I decided I wanted to work in a clinic. [Nayles] was looking for somebody, and I worked with him for over a year. But it wasn’t as lucrative as I needed to support my family.’” And that’s where Brown surprised Crouther with a competitive offer. Brown wasn’t surprised by Crouther’s apprehension. CHC proponents in Arkansas spend much of their time dispelling the myth that the sliding fee scale the organizations offer equate inferior care or doctors who are inexperienced or not board certified. Brown tells a story of a patient who was a regular at the JCCSI Open Hands homeless clinic in Little Rock. The patient eventually got back on his feet and acquired health

insurance. He went to a regular family practice clinic but after two visits returned to a JCCSI site in College Station because the care was better. In some places in Arkansas a health center is the only option for family medicine so patients of all socioeconomic levels are treated there. JCCSI and other health centers statewide feature physicians and dentists and specialists with experience similar to Crouther’s 31 years. Thanks to Crouther’s extensive ER experience he can perform many procedures such as drain abscesses and stitch wounds. Many family practice doctors would send those patients to the ER. “That’s the advantage to having someone like me in a community health center, but people don’t know I’m there because they are blind. At least I was,” Crouther said. Word has traveled fast about Crouther’s quality of care. But more than that, patients are raving about the short wait to be seen and Crouther’s affable personality. “He is very patient and wants to take the time to examine the patients the best he can, and he relates well to them and is up front,” Brown said. “He isn’t a pain prescriber, but he takes care of them.” Nurses and office staff notice the doctor drives a 2001 Ford Explorer with more than 340,000 miles on it as well a simple peanut butter sandwich lunch he enjoys most every day after swimming a few laps at the nearby Henry Hayes senior center. Being a native of the notoriously downtrodden Flint, Crouther relates well to his patients and doesn’t fit physician stereotypes. “I realize a lot of people don’t have medical training, so if I use a lot of big medical words, it doesn’t mean anything,” he said. I try to talk to them in a way an average lay person would understand.” The past year, he and his patients have realized how valuable community health centers can be to so many. “I never had a high opinion of community health centers,” he said. “I thought they were low-paid, entry-level jobs – a place where you go to get your feet wet and go get a more lucrative position. “I think the community health center is the best-kept secret in the medical community, period.” Crouther is financially secure and enjoying the slower pace of family medicine. He’s found a home at JCCSI and doesn’t plan to hang up his stethoscope soon. “I am going to practice until I get too old or am not able to,” Crouther said.“I want to keep doing it. The stress level, especially compared to the emergency room, is so much lower that I could see myself being 69 or 75.”

“I think the community health center is the bestkept secret in the medical community, period.”

Marcus Crouther “Ms. Brown said she wanted to talk to me about something, and I thought, ‘Oh, here we go because I had a very poor impression of community health centers,’” Crouther said. “I thought they were a low-wage government job. I thought I was doing her a favor by talking about the position.” Crouther, 59, was surprised as Brown explained what the job entailed the benefits package and salary. About a month later, Crouther was beginning work for JCCSI. “He wanted to talk to his wife about [the job], and the next time I saw him he was all dressed up with a bow tie on,” she said. “He said he came back for a second meeting because I was a good person, and he saw something different about me and the mission of the clinic.” A year later, North Little Rock Community Health Center on Willow Street near North Little Rock High School is thriving and Crouther is happy about his deci36 36

MAY 24, 2018 MAY 24, 2018

SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES ARKANSAS TIMES

For more information on JCCSI and Crouther visit http://www.jccsi.org/. For more information on community health centers statewide and Community Health Centers of Arkansas visit www.chc-ar.org.


WHOLE CARE

A LOCAL RESOURCE GUIDE TO MAINTAINING YOUR TOTAL HEALTH

Improving Quality of Care Improves Payment Rates FREE TECHNICAL SUPPORT FOR ARKANSAS PHYSICIANS BY JULIA KETTLEWELL, MPH, BSN, RNP AND ELDRINA EASTERLY, BS

YEAR TWO OF THE QUALITY PAYMENT PROGRAM (QPP) brings new eligibility thresholds and greater potential payment adjustments. The QPP gives providers two participation tracks, the Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) or the Advanced Alternative Payment Models (APMs). Clinicians choosing not to participate in 2018 will receive a 5 percent Medicare payment reduction. Clinicians who successfully report can earn up to a 5 percent positive payment adjustment. To be eligible to participate in MIPS, clinicians must annually bill more than $90,000 in Medicare Part B claims and provide care to more than 200 Medicare patients. Clinicians are exempt from MIPS if they are newly enrolled in Medicare, fall below the lowvolume threshold or participate in an Advanced APM. Advanced APMs include accountable care organizations, patient-centered medical homes

and risk-bearing models. MIPS has four performance categories with weighted percentages of the total score: Quality (50%) Improvement Activities (15%). Promoting Interoperability - formerly Advancing Care Information (25%) Cost (10%) The 2018 performance period is from Jan. 1 - Dec. 31, 2018. Payment adjustments begin Jan. 1, 2020, for 2018. CMS has established a network to provide direct, no-cost technical assistance to clinicians to enhance successful QPP participation. All eligible clinicians, regardless of practice

A N A R K A N S A S F AV O R I T E . YEAR AFTER YEAR.

size or specialty, can receive free technical support. The Quality Innovation Network-Quality Improvement Organizations (QIN-QIOs) provide support for large practices of 16 or more and QPP Small, Underserved and Rural Support (SURS) contractors serve practices of 15 or fewer clinicians. In Arkansas, TMF Health Quality Institute serves as both the QIN-QIO and QPP-SURS contractor. TMF subcontracts with AFMC to provide one-on-one technical assistance to MIPSeligible clinicians in Arkansas and Mississippi. MIPS/QPP technical support information at https://tmfqin.org/qpp, email QPP-SURS@tmf. org or phone 1-844-317-7609. Mrs. Kettlewell is AFMC’s director of outreach quality, and Ms. Easterly is AFMC’s manager HealthIT and HIT lead for QPP-SURS.



ŽLJŽƵŚĂǀĞWĂƌŬŝŶƐŽŶ͛ƐŝƐĞĂƐĞ͍

BEV FOSTER

Dr. Bev Foster has been named to numerous “best of” lists for Best Chiropractic Physician since she opened her doors. Ask her loyal patients and you’ll hear comments like: “Her staff are both professional and always helpful,” “I would trust her skills with anyone in my family.” “…loves what she does and cares for her patients,” or our favorite, “Best chiropractor in the world!”

We appreciate our loyal patients who support better health through chiropractic medicine.

GET WELL. STAY WELL.

COMING UP: MENTAL HEALTH GUIDE

SEPTEMBER 20TH • CALL PHYLLIS AT 501-492-3994 FOR MORE INFO!

/ĨLJŽƵĂƌĞϭϴLJĞĂƌƐŽƌŽůĚĞƌ͕ĐƵƌƌĞŶƚůLJƌĞĐĞŝǀŝŶŐĂƌďŝĚŽƉĂͬ >ͲŽƉĂ ĂŶĚ ƐƟůů ĞdžƉĞƌŝĞŶĐĞ ƉĞƌŝŽĚƐ ŽĨ ƟŵĞ ǁŚĞƌĞ LJŽƵƌ ƐLJŵƉƚŽŵƐ ǁŽƌƐĞŶ ;͞K&&͟ ƉĞƌŝŽĚƐͿ͕ LJŽƵ ŵĂLJ ďĞ ĞůŝŐŝďůĞ ƚŽ ƉĂƌƟĐŝƉĂƚĞ ŝŶ ƚŚĞ d,ͲϯϬϭ ƌĞƐĞĂƌĐŚ ƐƚƵĚLJ ŝŶǀŽůǀŝŶŐ ĂŶ ŝŶǀĞƐƟŐĂƟŽŶĂůĚƌƵŐ͘

ϱϬϭͲϮϮϳͲϲϭϳϵ ŝŶĨŽΛĐůŝŶŝĐĂůƚƌŝĂůƐŝŶĐ͘ĐŽŵ

SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES MAY 24, 2018 37 arktimes.com MAY 24, 2018 37


WHOLE CARE

A LOCAL RESOURCE GUIDE TO MAINTAINING YOUR TOTAL HEALTH

Clinical Trials, Inc. VICTOR BITON, MD

DIRECTOR CLINICAL TRIALS, INC. CONTACT INFO: 2 LILE COURT, SUITE 100, LITTLE ROCK, AR 72205 501-227-6179 CLINICALTRIALSINC.COM HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN PRACTICING MEDICINE? 30+ years WHAT KIND OF PRACTICE DO YOU SPECIALIZE IN? Neurology, Epilepsy and Clinical Research. Research specialties are Epilepsy, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Diabetic Neuropathy Pain. In 1993, Dr. Biton founded the Arkansas Epilepsy Program, P.A. (AEP) and Clinical Trials, Inc. (CTI) to offer world-class expertise in the care and investigation of life-endangering neurological diseases. Throughout the course of more than 20 years as Director of AEP and CTI, Dr. Biton has developed long-standing partnerships with Little Rock’s foremost hospitals, assisting in the leadership of Arkansas Neuroscience Institute at St. Vincent Infirmary and serving as a neurologist on staff at Baptist Hospital and Baptist Health Rehabilitation Institute. For decades Victor Biton, MD has been a passionately dedicated source of trustworthy insight at the cutting edge of patient care, pharmaceutical development, and academic advancement. WHAT DO YOU WANT PEOPLE TO GET OUT OF READING ABOUT YOU AND THE CLINIC? If you want to make important discoveries, work on important problems. All treatments/medications currently available would not have been possible without research volunteers. Research is completely voluntary and there are no costs involved for participants. “For those who agree to take part, they have an active hand in medical advancement to potentially help generations of future patients.” Clinical trials are necessary in order to gain adequate understanding of an investigational treatment so that it may be submitted to the U.S. FDA for evaluation and, perhaps, approval for future medical use. HOW DO YOU WANT CUSTOMERS TO FEEL ONCE THEY HAVE MADE THE DECISION TO GO WITH YOUR CLINIC? Confident and hopeful. Dr. Biton says while some of the clinical trials might contain some side effects, he says participants are provided with the required expert medical care and are compensated for time and travel expenses. WHY DO YOU WORK IN THIS FIELD? Our moto is “hope through research.” I would like to provide patients with more than the available treatments for their disease. Give them hope.

38 38

MAY 24, 2018 MAY 24, 2018

SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES ARKANSAS TIMES

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE PART OF WORKING IN THIS FIELD? The “thank you for changing my life” statements, the smiles and the sense of being helpful in improving the patients’ life. WHAT DO YOU LIKE MOST ABOUT THE CLINIC BEING IN THIS COMMUNITY? Being able to provide more options for patients with cutting edge potential disease treatments and being at the forefront of medical progress. WHAT ALL DO YOU GUYS OFFER? Clinical Trials, Inc. is a privately owned multi-specialty research center with over 20 years of experience in conducting high quality research with an emphasis on CNS studies for the treatments of Alzheimer’s disease, diabetic neuropathy pain, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson’s disease. Our mission is to offer hope through research. We specialize in phase 1-3 industry sponsored clinical trials and have conducted over 300 studies since 1993. Dr. Biton is among the foremost experts in neurological disorders with an emphasis in epilepsy. ANYTHING YOU’D LIKE TO ADD? We are a very devoted company, passionate about bringing new drug and device treatment to those in our community who suffer. Our staff is dedicated to caring for our patients, quality care and safety are our top priorities.


WHOLE CARE

A LOCAL RESOURCE GUIDE TO MAINTAINING YOUR TOTAL HEALTH

Pinnacle Pointe Hospital PINNACLE POINTE HOSPITAL is Arkansas’ largest behavioral inpatient facility for children and adolescents ages 5-17, who are struggling with emotional or behavioral health issues. The entire staff is committed to providing quality behavioral healthcare for patients and extensive support for their families. In addition, The Pointe Outpatient Behavioral Health Services provides a variety of non-residential services to patients from across the state, including intensive outpatient, school-based, outpatient and day treatment programs. Pinnacle Pointe is dedicated to helping all patients find the way to lead happier, more fulfilling lives, through individualized mental health treatment, provided in a secure and nurturing environment. The 124-bed facility provides people with the resources they need to transform their lives. Pinnacle Pointe Hospital offers no-cost assessments 24/7 to children and adolescents who are struggling with emotional or behavioral issues. To learn more, call 501.223.3322. 11501 Financial Centre Pkwy., Little Rock, AR 72211 www.pinnaclepointehospital.com

Arkansas’ largest behavioral inpatient facility for children and adolescents.

ACUPUNCTURE WORKS! C A LL TO D AY TO F I N D O U T H OW A T R A D ITI O N A LLY T R A I N E D A CU P U N CT U R I S T C A N H E LP Y O U ! Specializing in Traditional Acupuncture and Chinese Herbal Medicine • Cupping, Moxabustion, Ear Needles/Beads, Dry Needling • Effective pain relief and healing from many ailments without drugs or surgery • Scientifically proven, safe and relaxing

MARTIN EISELE, L.Ac.

2 VAN CIRCLE, SUITE 1 • LITTLE ROCK • 501-663-3461 • WWW.EVERGREENHEALTH.NET SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES MAY 24, 2018 39 arktimes.com MAY 24, 2018 39


Arts Entertainment Hail the Hullabaloo AND

Catching up with Jamie Lou Connolly. BY STEPHANIE SMITTLE

became homeless, an exotic dancer, a hitchhiker, a mountain climber and a vagabond in a matter of eight months. It took me a long time to get on my feet and I learned a lot about who I was, how my every move would affect that survival and how who you surround yourself with affects what you see in the world. I’m grateful for those experiences, and I’m grateful for the highs and the lows of it all, because it has made me a better mother and a better person.

answer to the political climate of the election in 2016 and my relationship to the world and its discourse. “Don’t Think” was originally written sarcastically about jumping into a relationship without thinking, which I had done at a young age. “When Someday” was written about a short relationship with a best friend and about independence in that relationship. “Femi-Socialite” is a complicated title, because the song itself is not just about one thing. The takeaway from the song is to be a bet-

You’re from Florida, originally, and started writing at age 15, but, as your bio reads, “the songs and most everything took a back seat to survival, as tragedy left [you] homeless in a cold and snowy Colorado.” Can you talk about that time in your life a little?

BRIAN CHILSON

A

rkansas’s Fleetwood Mac, a woman-led Wilco — those are a few of the comparisons listeners have made to Jamie Lou Connolly’s outfit Jamie Lou & The Hullabaloo, and anyone who’s heard them live in the last year knows that’s not hyberbole. There are slow builds and bluegrass-precise harmonies that still manage to feel completely lived in and easy. There’s the feeling of utter investment in the sound from every person on stage (nearly everyone sings, whether there’s a microphone in front of them at the time or not). Most of all, though, there’s Connolly’s tremendous voice at the core. “She goes from a lilting Judy Garland to full-on Joplin-esque wild child in the same song,” 2018 Arkansas Times Musicians Showcase judge Mandy McBryde noted. We caught up with Jamie Lou & The Hullabaloo — winners of this year’s Showcase — ahead of the band’s upcoming performances (alomg with The Wildflower Review, Dazz & Brie, Ben Byers, Joe Darr and Brian Nahlen) at 5 p.m. Thursday, May 24, at the Lakehill Shopping Center on JFK Boulevard for North Little Rock’s Patio on Park Hill, and at RiverFest, 1:45 p.m. Saturday, May 26.

VELVET VOICE: Jamie Lou & The Hullabaloo join Dazz & Brie, The Wildflower Revue and other musicians at Patio on Park Hill Thursday, May 24, then Jamie Lou and Co. are off to play at RiverFest on Saturday, May 26.

any other experience in my life. I grew up idolizing my dad’s experiences in the ’60s as a hippie in Boulder, Colo. He traveled all over the country in a VW Bus, played music and followed the Guru Maharaj Ji, so when I graduated high school in 2006 in Fort Walton Beach Fla., I wanted to go see the world and I wanted to go on my own hippie I’m glad you ask, because the expe- adventure. At first it was wonderful rience I had then has affected my per- and exciting, and then quickly turned sonality and the way I live more than into turmoil and a fight for survival. I

40

MAY 24, 2018

ARKANSAS TIMES

Your latest EP, “Femi-Socialite,” tends lyrically toward relationships. Or maybe a specific, single relationship? What’s behind the title? What is a “femi-socialite?” Most of the songs on the EP are a bit older, so they span the many relationships I have had over the previous five years. “You Can’t” was my final stand in an abusive relationship with my daughter’s father. “It Is What It Is” was my

ter friend. I wrote it about a girl, and how I had become a bad friend to her when she would always be there for me: “Nothing I could ever say could ever make you turn away/Why do I turn away from you?” The title lends to her vulnerability as a true feminist and as an empath to a hard world of people who don’t know how to give back. It’s difficult to talk about your music at all without talking about


ROCK CANDY Check out the Times’ A&E blog arktimes.com

A&E NEWS this voice of yours, which can be so soft and velvety, and can then get wildly big. Any particular singers you grew up listening to that might have informed your vocals? My favorite singer/songwriter is Michael Franks, and I truly believe he taught me how to sing and harmonize through his many albums. My dad and I took a lot of trips around the country, and Michael Franks was on repeat on those trips. Similarly, your harmonies are up front and center in the band’s sound, and when that comes up in conversation, y’all have mentioned influences like Crosby, Stills & Nash and Jan and Dean. So, pick your fave: Crosby, Stills, Nash or Young? Yes. One thing I love about your harmonies, specifically, is that Garrett Brolund’s voice is often situated above yours, and they just intertwine so sweetly. And, we should say, you and Garrett are about to get married! Was the beginning of your musical relationship connected to your romantic one? It was a pretty magical time when I met Garrett. He sent me a Facebook message asking if I wanted to help him put on a backyard concert and if I would like to jam sometime. I had not met him in person, but I knew of him in the music community. So, we planned a jam session at his house with a couple of friends. The moment I walked into the room I knew I liked him. Later on in the session I played a song called “Always” that I had just written the day before, and Garrett started harmonizing and playing along — it’s recorded somewhere — but I think it was in that song that we fell in love.

AFTER ITS PURCHASE by AMC and closure for renovations in June 2017, the movie theater at the Promenade at Chenal (17825 Chenal Parkway) reopened for business Friday, May 18. A press release notes the return of the IMAX screen as well as new additions: plush power recliners; new screens, sound systems and speakers; ticketless entry; an “AMC Feature Fare” menu with chicken & waffle sandwiches and such; and, coming May 25, a MacGuffin’s Bar & Lounge with beer, wine and film-inspired cocktails. For showtimes and tickets, visit amctheatres.com. LOCAL PLAYWRIGHTS, TAKE NOTE: The Weekend Theater is accepting submissions until July 11 for one-act plays to be featured during a Playwrights Week, a new outreach event to take place Oct. 28-Nov. 3. “We hope to give playwrights from Pulaski County and nearby areas a safe space to produce their work and to promote the production of socially relevant original theater,” Weekend Theater Board of Trustees member Candrice Jones said. All scripts must address a social justice issue, have casts of two to four members, and not have had a full production in Arkansas. For submission details, visit weekendtheater.org. THE FAULKNER PERFORMING ARTS CENTER at the University of Arkansas announced its 2018-19 season this week: Among the artists on that lineup are mezzo-soprano Sarah Mesko, Sept. 7; Latin-folk singer Gina Chavez, Nov. 13; the Peacherine Ragtime Society Orchestra performing Scott Joplin tunes, Nov. 15; singer-songwriter Ruthie Foster, Jan. 29; ‘The Other Mozart,” Sylvia Milo’s play about Amadeus’ sister Nannerl, March 7; Colorado bluegrass quintet Trout Steak Revival, March 29; Sudanese vocalist Salma El Assal, April 19; and Russian pianist Ilya Yakushev, April 16. For tickets and details, visit faulkner. uark.edu. THE WALTON FAMILY FOUNDATION has awarded a grant of $50,000 to the Delta Cultural Center to implement the theater and history-focused DCC Arts and Cultural Education Program at KIPP-Delta Preparatory School, the Helena-West Helena School District and Desoto Academy. The program, a press release states, is slated to begin this summer and is designed to improve students’ literacy skills “by exposing them to the fundamentals of commercial, film and television scriptwriting,” a press release said.

22nd Annual Operation Skyhook HOSTED BY THE BLACK PILOTS OF AMERICA, INC.

MEMORIAL DAY WEEKEND MAY 25-27

• Daily Competitions begin at 10:00 a.m. • Free Airplane rides for kids following competitions (weather permitting) • Grider Field Restaurant open 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday & Sunday PINE BLUFF REGIONAL AIRPORT, GRIDER FIELD 709 HANGAR ROAD, PINE BLUFF

Free Admission Call 870.534.4131 for more information • www.PineBluffCVB.org

Follow Rock Candy on Twitter: @RockCandies

arktimes.com MAY 24, 2018

41


THE

TO-DO

LIST

BY STEPHANIE SMITTLE AND LESLIE NEWELL PEACOCK

THURSDAY 5/24

THURSDAY 5/24

PATIO ON PARK HILL

THE GREYHOUNDS

5 p.m.-10 p.m. Lakehill Shopping Center, JFK Boulevard, North Little Rock. $3.

9 p.m. White Water Tavern. $10.

Pros? This is early on a Thursday ing lot of the Lakehill Shopping Cennight, it costs $3, you can bring your ter. There will be food trucks, a beer dog and it involves not only The Wild- garden, sets also from Brian Nahlen, flower Revue, but also the winners of Joe Darr and Ben Byers, and a free the last two Arkansas Times Musi- trolley from the parking lot at Park cians Showcases: Dazz & Brie and Ja- Hill Baptist Church (201 E. C Ave.). mie Lou & The Hullabaloo. Cons? You Bring foldout chairs if you like, some have to leave your house, I guess? I’m cash to spend with the vendors on-site sure you’ll get over it. Patio on Park and, if you bring your pup along, a bag Hill, for the uninitiated, is a super ca- for his or her excretions and (the NLsual neighborhood block party, except RPD requests) a leash no more than 6 instead of on a block, it’s in the park- feet long. SS

It’s hard not to fall in love with anyone who manages to find something new and greasy to do with blues riffs, and it’s even harder when they seem to have a sense of humor about the whole endeavor. See The Greyhounds’ “No Other Woman,” whose star, Bobby Perkins (billed as “The Most Interesting Man Around Town”), sashays around Austin, Texas, on horseback, wearing a white suit and heart-shaped sunglasses, wiggling his eyebrows, snapping his fingers, lip-syncing lines like “Your sweat tastes just like lemonade, nuhnuh-nuh-nuh-nade, nade” and examining the eggs of a chicken who has just been made to do a demonstrative

wiggle before his eyes. The latest from these former JJ Grey & Mofro sidemen, “Cheyenne Valley Drive,” was recorded directly to tape at Memphis’ Sun Studios over the course of three days, and it shows; swampy horns and fat riffs fit like a glove with the live-recorded analog vibe, and the sticky DNA of bygone Sun Studios legends seeps through to the final product, sorta like the ambient magic of decades-old seasoning on an heirloom cast-iron skillet. I can’t imagine a more fitting floor from which to observe Anthony Farrell and Andrew Trube’s ZZ Top-ish silly swagger than the White Water Tavern’s; this will be a fun one. SS

BENJAMIN KRAIN IN THE ‘DELTA’: His photograph “Trains.”

FRIDAY 5/25

60TH ANNUAL ‘DELTA EXHIBITION’ PUBLIC OPENING 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Arkansas Arts Center. Free.

The “Delta Exhibition,” a competitive show of works in all media by artists with ties to Arkansas and contiguous states, celebrates its diamond anniversary at the Arts Center this year with

42

MAY 24, 2018

ARKANSAS TIMES

works ranging from the sublime to the … well, a startling trompe l’oeil watercolor of a two-headed snake. Three art professionals whittled 1,424 entries by 618 artists to 52 artworks by 46 artists for

Follow us on Instagram: ArkTimes

this favorite annual show. actually all his own; and This year, 28 Arkansans Brian Young, director of the are represented, including Baum Gallery at the Unisuch Delta familiars as Da- versity of Central Arkansas vid Bailin, Warren Criswell, and a former curator at the Neal Harrington, Lisa Arts Center. They’ll give Krannichfeld, Louis Watts, a talk at 6 p.m. Thursday Jason McCann, Jeff Horton, night before the members’ Aj Smith, Aaron Calvert, opening reception; nonRobyn Horn, Tim Hursley members may attend the and Benjamin Krain; if you talk for $15. After the talk, know their work, you know awards will be presented: A the show will be a good $2,500 Grand Award, two one. Jurors were Les Chris- $750 Delta Awards, and a tensen, a sculptor and di- $250 Contemporaries Delta rector of the Bradbury Art Award. A wine reception at Museum at Arkansas State 5:30 p.m. precedes the talk; University; conceptual art- tickets can be purchased ist Shea Hembrey, famed at arkansasartscenter.org/ for his project “seek” in tickets or by calling 372which he presented works 4000. The exhibition runs ostensibly by 100 artists but through Aug. 26. LNP


IN BRIEF

THURSDAY 5/24

KATIE CHILDS

Potluck and Poison Ivy and the Artists Inc. program present “Pecha Kucha” at The Joint, with music from Treble in the Village and stories from Rah Howard, Kevin Kresse and Dominique Simmons, 7 p.m., $35, see potluckandpoisonivy.org for tickets. Jason Lee Hale plays for Dunbar Garden’s “Music in the Garden” series, 6 p.m., $5. The Lewd Awakening Revue Burlesque tantalizes at Stickyz Rock ’n’ Roll Chicken Shack, 9 p.m., $10. Arkansas Symphony Orchestra musicians Kiril Laskarov, Carl Anthony and others perform works by Michael Fine, De Falla, Marcello, Vieuxtemps and more at Trinity Episcopal Cathedral for “Spanish Nights,” 7 p.m. Some Guy Named Robb entertains for a pre-weekend happy hour at Cajun’s Wharf, 5:30 p.m., free; after dinner catch RVS, 9 p.m., $5.

FRIDAY 5/25

‘A FEW MORE MILES’: A Rowdy Faith, led by duo Alisyn Reid and Cate Davison, plays a show at Hibernia Irish Tavern Friday night.

FRIDAY 5/25

A ROWDY FAITH 8 p.m. Hibernia Irish Tavern. Free.

Graduate school has meant so Reid and Davison’s gentle “A Few More Miles,” a song I’m that longtime friends and col- harmonies have made a return pretty sure Amy Ray and Emlaborators Cate Davison and to Central Arkansas, with a full ily Saliers, given the opportuAlisyn Reid have spent a lot of band in tow for this show. For an nity, would have snatched up in time writing papers — with little introduction, check out the deli- a heartbeat. Also, word is that time, I’d imagine, for writing cate “Wide River” from the duo’s there may be a vegan paella spesongs. Happily, summer months 2017 self-titled release and follow cial available for supper at Hibermean hiatus for scholarly types, that up with the not-so-delicate nia this particular evening. SS

FRIDAY 5/25

THE MATCHSELLERS 10 p.m. Four Quarter Bar. $7.

The video for The Matchsellers’ “Bluegrastronauts” is part vehicle for whimsical cutout animation, part showcase for the string band’s goofy sensibility and part homage to its musical predecessors. Over the mile-a-minute sounds of dobro, banjo, fiddle, guitar and standup bass, paper doll versions of Bill Monroe and Earl Scruggs are hurled into the atmosphere where, presumably,

they continue picking away in some metaphorical bluegrass ether/heaven, encircled by a dog named “Old Pete,” the raccoon Old Pete is pursuing, a couple of comely green aliens and, eventually, the real-life versions of fiddler Julie Bates (who also created the video) and frontman Andrew Morris. They’re fun to watch for many reasons — because Morris’ nerdy auctioneer delivery meshes so

well with the genre (see their take on “What I’ll Do With the Baby, Oh”), because they have the good sense to understand that humor and authenticity don’t preclude one another and because Morris and Bates’ musical chemistry is the kind where the tempo, even when it stays exactly the same, feels like it’s getting ever faster. They’re joined for this Argenta show by The Chemtrailblazers. SS

Houston rockers Doomstress join Mortalus and Tire Fire for a heavy bill at Vino’s, 8 p.m. Global Kids Arkansas ambassador and hip-hop sensei Big Piph returns to The White Water Tavern, 9:30 p.m. “Blow: All White Affair” kicks off at Little Rock’s newest club, Empire, 3315 W. Roosevelt Road, 8 p.m. Lincoln Durham plays at least a dozen instruments (many of them simultaneously) at Stickyz, 9 p.m., $10. Canvas (Light) entertains at Copper Grill, 5:30 p.m. The Arkansas Travelers baseball team takes on the Frisco Roughriders in a three-game series, 6 p.m. Fri., 6:10 p.m. Sat., 2:10 p.m. Sun., $7-$13. Adam Faucett, Jamie Lou & The Hullabaloo, Moonshine Mafia and more perform for Big Piney Creekfest in Dover (Pope County), 7 p.m. Fri., 2 p.m. Sat., noon Sun., $20-$80, see bigpineycreekfest. com for details. At South on Main, the Untapped tap dance ensemble performs for a special “tappy hour,” 5 p.m. Guitarist Amy Andrews gives a concert at The Undercroft, 8 p.m., $10. The Cons of Formant form their harmonies at Kings Live Music in Conway, 8:30 p.m., $5. At the Clear Channel Metroplex, Christian metal outfit Underoath joins Dance Gavin Dance, Veil of Maya and Limbs for a show, 7 p.m., $35. Ten Penny Gypsy joins Buddy Case for an early show at Ya Ya’s Euro Bistro, 6:30 p.m. Good Foot plays a set at the Blue Canoe Brewing Warehouse, 9 p.m. Turtle Rush and the Westking String Band team up for a bill at Maxine’s in Hot Springs, 9 p.m., $7. 109 & Co. kicks off the weekend with Reggae Night, 9 p.m. The Zebbler Encanti Experience pairs psychedelic visuals on three custom projection screens with bass-heavy EDM at the Rev Room, 9 p.m., $10-$15. Guitarist Brian Martin (of Sad Daddy) entertains at SQZBX

Follow Rock Candy on Twitter: @RockCandies

CONTINUED ON PAGE 45 arktimes.com MAY 24, 2018

43


THE

TO-DO

LIST

BY STEPHANIE SMITTLE AND LESLIE NEWELL PEACOCK

MADE IN AFRICA: Thursday night’s kickoff event for Saturday’s Africa Day Fest features a showcase of garments from African designers.

SATURDAY 5/26

AFRICA DAY FEST 11 a.m. South Main Street, between 13th and 17th streets. Free.

Thousands turned out for the inaugural Africa Day Fest this time last year, event chairman Benito Lubazibwa said in an interview earlier this week, and even more

are expected in the festival’s second year. Africa Day is named for the date May 25, 1963, when a summit in Ethiopia concluded with the formation of the Organisation

of African Unity, spawning subse- from Philly Fresh Water Ice and quent liberation movements like more. A welcome message at 11:15 the Lagos Plan of Action (1980) a.m. is followed by dance sets from and The Abuja Treaty (1991) that Summer Sprite and Artistically sought to improve life in post- Bold, noon; storytelling and drumcolonial Africa. For Little Rock’s ming by Zinse Agginie, 12:15 p.m.; a African and Africa-connected drum circle with Afrique Aya, 1 p.m. communities, this annual festival and 2:30 p.m.; Gwara Gwara Dance from Afrika House is a chance to from Hothouse Gruv, 2 p.m.; dance “celebrate African arts and cultures by Studio 501, 3:30 p.m.; an African through music, food, dance perfor- Dance Competition, 3:45 p.m.; an mances and children’s activities,” African Fashion Show with designs the event website reads, “to high- from Korto Momolu, Missy Temelight the strong connections be- ke, Irene Chedjieu, Bernice-Oseitween Arkansas and African coun- Danquah and others, 4 p.m.; live tries” and “to create a platform to reggae from Tim Anthony and Butshare African history with the rest terfly; with DJ sets throughout the of the world.” It’s free to attend, day from DJ Emmanuel, DJ Goods but bring some cash to spend with and from Bibi and DJ Prophet vendors: There’s Candley’s Cookin’ (Charles Ray) of Bantunauts Radio barbecue, Candy Butta shea butter (tune in to KABF-FM, 88.3, Saturmoisturizer, Artlysium Inc. canvas days at 10 p.m. for a regular dose). art, What On Earth vegan cosmet- To get an early start or to support ics, Wanunu necklaces, Monique Africa Day Fest with your wallet, Couture clothing, wearables from visit madeinafricafashionshow. Damaris African Jewelry & Curio, eventbrite.com and get tickets to black soap from FloEssence Natu- the kickoff event, “Made in Africa: rals, vegan “Kaliflower ChickUn Fashion Show” at 6 p.m. Thursday, Wings” and vegan Philly sand- May 24, at the Junction Bridge, wiches from The House of Men- where there will be African wine/ tal, shoes from PeacePeace Love design/hors d’oeuvres. Tickets are Exchange, nondairy “ice cream” $25. SS

SATURDAY 5/26

TUESDAY 5/29-SATURDAY 7/7

‘ON THE RUN: THE FAREWELL SHOW’

‘MENOPAUSE: THE MUSICAL’

9 p.m. Discovery Nightclub. $10.

7:30 p.m. Tue.-Sat., dinner at 6 p.m.; 12:45 p.m. and 6:45 p.m. Sun., dinner at 11 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. Murry’s Dinner Playhouse, 6323 Colonel Glenn Road. $15-$37.

In a video from the Q&A segment of the Miss Gay Arkansas 2012 pageant, Dominique Sanchez pauses thoughtfully before taking the microphone, subsequently bringing the house down with an explanation of why Yolanda Adams’ “Never Give Up” is her trademark song. Despite being born in prison, shuffled through foster care and being told she’d never amount to anything, Sanchez says, “Here I stand before you, ladies and gentlemen, as a high school graduate, as a college graduate and as a professional female impersonator, and I am very proud of that fact. I have been Miss Gay US of A and I have been Miss Gay America.” For the last 20 years, 44

MAY 24, 2018

ARKANSAS TIMES

Sanchez has performed in, hosted and directed weekly drag shows at Triniti and Discovery nightclubs with poise, barely-there leotards, spot-on choreography for everything from “Single Ladies” to “It Don’t Mean a Thing (If It Ain’t Got That Swing”) and consistently impeccable shade (of both the eyeshadow and side-eye varieties). She’s got a list of pageant titles a mile long, and she’s taking that resume with her as she moves to St. Louis. Nightclub colleagues and fellow drag artists bid adieu to Sanchez with this show, a bash that includes performances from Abs Hart, Chloe Jacobs, Taylor Madison Monroe and Victoria Rios. SS

Follow us on Instagram: ArkTimes

Hey, if big pharma’s getting in on its cut of the baby boomer-menopause-onset market, why shouldn’t the women actually going through it? “Menopause: The Musical” was born of the genuine life experience of Jeanie Linders, then an advertising maven (and not yet a playwright) who found herself mid-hot flash one evening while dressed in a formal gown, moments before she was expected to depart for an NAACP gala. Standing in front of an open freezer door, she changed the words to Rod Stewart’s “Hot Legs” in a moment of inspiration/

desperation, and the “Menopause: The Musical” shtick began to take form — with Martha and the Vandellas’ “Heat Wave” eventually standing in for Stewart. Erudite it is not, but, as Linders says in the musical’s promotional reel: “ ‘Menopause: The Musical’ was never written to be about theater. Let’s face it, it’s not ‘Macbeth.’ ‘Menopause: The Musical’ was written to be about women, and the great thing about it is [that] across the country, women get it.” Murry’s takes up the parody revue in the play’s 17th year. SS


IN BRIEF, CONT. Brewery & Pizza Joint in Hot Springs, 6 p.m. Fri.-Sat. Richie Johnson plays the early set at Cajun’s, 5:30 p.m., or catch Just Sayin’ at 9 p.m., $5.

SATURDAY 5/26

CAMERON GOTT

Big Piph, Dazz & Brie and Table of Mahogany share a dynamite bill at Maxine’s, 9 p.m., $7. The Big Dam Horns make big dam sounds at Stickyz, 9 p.m., $8-$10. Club Sway reprises an audience-curated drag show with a 1960s-themed edition of Total Request Live, 9 p.m. Over at Cajun’s, trumpeter/bandleader Rodney Block performs, 9 p.m. Canadian songwriter Jon Brooks returns to Hibernia Irish Tavern as part of the Little Rock Folk Club’s concert series, 7:30 p.m., free-$15. Big Red Flag takes its rock-with-a-Celtic punk-sensibility to Kings Live Music, 8:30 p.m., $5. Moxie entertains at Oaklawn Racing & Gaming’s Silks Bar & Grill, 10 p.m. Fri.-Sat. Strange Brue takes the stage at West End Smokehouse, 10 p.m., $7. The concert season at Magic Springs Theme and Water Park in Hot Springs kicks off with a show from Vertical Horizon and Sister Hazel, 7 p.m., $44.99-$59.99, see magicsprings.com for tickets, details and (required) park passes.

SUNDAY 5/27

‘THINGS CHANGE’: A reconfigured American Aquarium returns to the Rev Room.

The Five Star Dinner Theatre presents “A Memorial Day Salute,” 6 p.m., 701 Central Ave., Hot Springs, $40. Thespians and theater patrons bid farewell to former Arkansas Repertory Theatre production guru Rafael Castanera with a gathering at The Lobby Bar, 6 p.m.

MONDAY 5/28 SATURDAY 5/26

AMERICAN AQUARIUM 9 p.m. Rev Room. $15-$20.

Halfway through the second of wash their hands of me was a big verse of American Aquarium’s rock- thing for me,” Barham told CMT. “I er “Crooked + Straight,” which pre- had two or three weeks of just feeling miered on CMT’s website earlier this sorry for myself. But my wife put it week, frontman B.J. Barham waxes very easily, ‘You can either complain on the musician’s life, and on hav- about it, or you can change it.’ ” That ing traded in youth “for three chords he did, and the new band is on tour in and the truth.” He continues: “And support of a June 1 release, aptly tiwe made all these plans/We were tled “Things Change.” Not all things, gonna take a stand/Set out and rise though. In the tradition of American above the noise/But after all those Aquarium’s Jason Isbell-produced shows we played their fight began to “Burn. Flicker. Die.,” the new record fade … .” It’s not exactly cryptic writ- was put together under the direction ing for someone who traded out his of John Fullbright, a razor-sharp entire band lineup just over a year (and mostly underappreciated) songago, a fracture Barham attributed to writer from the same hometown as burnout. “Watching five of my best Woody Guthrie. SS friends for damn near a decade kind

The Main St. Station in Benton hosts a Memorial Day food truck meet-up with live music and Stone’s Throw brews, 3 p.m.-6 p.m., 303 N. Main St., free. In Hot Springs’ Whittington Park, the Hot Springs Concert Band plays a patriotic concert in honor of Memorial Day, 3 p.m., free.

TUESDAY 5/29 DJ Halfdead (Everett Hagen) spins records at White Water, 9 p.m. “Beautiful: The Carole King Story” opens at the Robinson Center, 7:30 p.m. Tue.-Sat., 2 p.m. Sat.-Sun., $28-$83.

WEDNESDAY 5/30 The World Series of Comedy kicks off at The Loony Bin, 7:30 p.m. Wed.-Sat., 10 p.m. Fri.-Sat., $12. The Dave Matthews Band brings its polyphonic rock to the Walmart AMP in Rogers, 8 p.m., $325-$350. The Creek Rocks brings its banjoforward, musicological mix to South on Main, 8 p.m., $10. Follow Rock Candy on Twitter: @RockCandies

arktimes.com MAY 24, 2018

45


Dining WHAT’S WHAT’S COOKIN’ COOKIN’

KATMANDU MOMO HAS added a brick-and-mortar restaurant, at 1018 Oak St. in Conway, to its enterprises. The restaurant, in a storefront previously occupied by Natural State Olive Oil and Spice Co. (now at 463 Elsinger Blvd. in Conway) had its soft opening last week and its real opening Monday. Owner Kyler Nordeck said Conwegians were “excited and welcoming” to the Nepalese restaurant, where you can get such exotic and delicious items as chatamari (rice crepes) with different toppings, turmeric fried rice, momos (Tibetan dumplings), thukpa (Tibetan noodle soups), chow meins and more. The restaurant can seat 50 people. Lunch is 11 a.m.-2 p.m. weekdays and 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday; dinner is 5 p.m.-9 p.m. weekdays and 5 p.m.-10 p.m. Saturday. Nordeck and co-owner (and wife) Saroja Shrestha also operate the Katmandu Momo food truck and a manager operates the Momo booth in the River Market. A full bar is planned for the Conway eatery. JUST LIKE MOM’S, which is serving takeout from a steam table in the Union Plaza at 124 W. Capitol Ave., is one-fifth of the way toward completion of its sit-down restaurant, owner Flent Flenoy said last week. “I’m just trying to bring simple, great food back to downtown,” said Flenoy, who worked for 14 years at the old Flight Deck restaurant and later ran his own restaurant for a while in Marianna. Flenoy said the dining area will seat around 60 and will have booths and two-tops. He’s shooting for a mid-June opening. Meanwhile, Flenoy is serving breakfast from 7 a.m. to 10:15 a.m. and meatand-twos from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. and is keeping his grill running 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. for his catering service. MORE PRIZES FOR Arkansas alcohol: Rock Town Distillery of Little Rock won a Gold Medal for its Arkansas Bourbon Whiskey at the 2018 San Francisco World Spirits Competition in April. The results were announced May 15. Along with the gold, Rock Town also brought home silver, for its Straight Bourbon, Single Barrel Bourbon, Four Grain Sour Mash Bourbon and Rye Whiskey. Find a list of winners at sfspirits.com/results/search. Earlier in May, Little Rock’s Lost Forty Brewery won two bronze medals for its beers at a competition in Tennessee. Next thing you know, you’ll be able to buy alcohol on Sunday in Little Rock, like you can in such urban strongholds of sophistication as Pyatt (Marion County) and Diamond City (Boone County). 46

MAY 24, 2018

ARKANSAS TIMES

FRESH FROM THE COLUMBIA RIVER: Wild-caught salmon, pan seared and served over lentils.

Trio’s: tried, true, tasty Salads, fresh fish, reliable dishes keep people coming back.

T

rio’s Restaurant is a Little Rock mainstay, and for good reason. For over three decades, Capi Peck, Brent Peterson and their team have focused on creating dishes that highlight seasonal, local ingredients. They’ve got creative cocktails, highquality food and well-executed dishes: everything that draws hipsters out in droves. But there are no hipster trappings here — just a team of professionals going about the business of serving great food. On a recent Saturday night, the dining room was mostly full of what we assume to be regulars by a quarter past 6. Trio’s avoids the air of stuffiness that sometimes comes at some restaurants at a similar price point. From the staff to the menu, everything is approachable. The menu provides thorough descriptions of each plate, and there

Follow Eat Arkansas on Twitter: @EatArkansas

are a couple of suggested wine pairings for each dish. The cocktail list is extensive, with some drinks that change seasonally. Bourbon lovers will want to give the Paper Plane ($7) a try. Bourbon, Aperol, Amaro Nonino and lemon juice are shaken and served up. This is not a kick-you-in-the-throat cocktail. The bourbon is masked by the other liqueurs, but the overall effect is pleasing, if a little tart. On the other hand, you won’t have any trouble tasting the liquor in The Artist ($7). The harsh edges from Hayman’s London Dry Gin is smoothed over by floral notes from Rothman & Winter creme de violette, along with Dolin Blanc vermouth and orange bitters. This is a gin lover’s drink. Trio’s offers a good selection of salads. The San Miguel Salad ($7.50) is a

light option, aside from the bacon and cheese, which could have been halved. Spinach, mango, avocado, radishes and toasted pumpkin seeds are tied together with an agave dressing with just a hint of jalapeno. Trio’s adds new things to the menu monthly, but we wanted to make sure we tried one of the mainstays: the Shrimp Enchiladas ($16). The cream sauce and cheeses made for a rich, flavorful and satisfying plate of food. It’s clear the chef puts thought into the little things, like rice and beans. What could have been completely forgettable sides were tasty and well seasoned. We don’t come across many restaurants in Little Rock that are committed to serving wild-caught fish, but our server mentioned that Chef Shanna Merriweather and Capi Peck are picky about the seafood they serve. The Left


BELLY UP

Check out the Times’ food blog, Eat Arkansas arktimes.com

messtival after dark

(making messes in the name of science) thursday, may 31 6-9 p.m. $10

21 & up

museumofdiscovery.org/event/tbt-2/

GET IT WHILE IT LASTS: Strawberry shortcake made with Arkansas berries.

Bank Salmon ($24) special, wild-caught Trio’s Restaurant Columbia River salmon from the Pacific 8201 Cantrell Road, No. 100 Northwest, was a no-brainer. 221-3330 The salmon is pan-seared, finished triosrestaurant.com with a Dijon mustard and herb butter, and served over French Le Puy lentils Quick bite and leeks, along with sauteed spinach. If you like gin, but you’re not a big fan of its punch, you can try a more Everything was simply prepared so the toned-down gin cocktail in the Fool Me quality ingredients could shine. The Once ($7). This smooth, orange-pink spinach, normally not something to get drink is made of Hayman’s London Dry excited about, had a peppery taste remi- Gin, lemon juice, Aperol, orgeat and prosecco: great for patio sipping on a niscent of arugula. hot day. We finished with the Strawberry Shortcake ($6.50) special, a true celHours ebration of a seasonal favorite. This isn’t 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. and 5:30 p.m. to 9 your aunt’s angel-food-cake-and-Cool- p.m. Monday through Saturday. Whip concoction. A buttery shortbread cookie provides a base for a mound of Other info Full bar, credit cards accepted. freshly whipped cream and a generous serving of sliced and sweetened Arkansas strawberries. It’s simple and sublime. It’s easy to approach long-established at Trio’s. With its thoughtful, seasonal Little Rock restaurants with a bit of menus, well-executed food and drinks, skepticism. Is the place good or has it and friendly, accommodating service, just been around so long that people we’d happily put Trio’s up there with return out of a sense of comfort? But newer “hipper” places in trendier neighthere’s not a bone to pick with anything borhoods.

TOAST TOWN OF THE

FINALIST

BUILD MUSCLE • BURN FAT HEAL INJURIES IMPROVE PERFORMANCE We use advanced technology

to accelerate your body’s internal processes. JP FITNESS AND RECOVERY exists to help willing individuals activate the potential that is present inside of them. Our neurologically-based system is designed to help you achieve greater levels of neurological activation and control in order to heal faster, get fitter, and perform better.

Jean-Paul Francoeur

Fitness and Recovery

jpfitness.com

NEUFIT CERTIFIED THERAPY/TRAINING

APPOINTMENT ONLY! • Call or text 501-952-5735 or email jp@jpfitness.com arktimes.com MAY 24, 2018

47


MOVIE REVIEW

NEVER DIE: Ryan Reynolds and Zazie Beetz co-star in “Deadpool 2,” an X-Men installment stacked with so many jokes it feels like a pinball machine about to tilt.

Superviolence

‘Deadpool 2’ is rapid-fire smart/stupid. BY SAM EIFLING

D

eadpool is the perfect character for people who’ve seen 15 Marvel movies and still will say they’re not really all that into Marvel movies. He’s vulgar, orgiastically violent, R-rated and flat-out hilarious. That’s why reading the nighubiquitous Marvel card before a “Deadpool” movie takes some of the sting out of the subversion. It’s a bit like when two arms of Harvey Weinstein’s production empire (Miramax and Dimension Films, respectively) distributed “Scream” and then, a few years later, its send-up, “Scary Movie.” Or maybe it’s like when your parents give you a beer before you turn 21. Sure, it’s a beer, but what’s even the point now, right? “We get you,” says Marvel. “Our movies are too uptight, so

48

MAY 24, 2018

ARKANSAS TIMES

here they are deconstructed and aggressively raw!” Cue Dr. Evil voice: “I’m hip. I’m with it.” Trouble is — for the haters, anyway — “Deadpool” is actually really damn funny, and in “Deadpool 2” the writers (Rhett Reece, Paul Wernick and Ryan Reynolds) cram such a quantity of jokes into the script that you feel your ears pop if 10 seconds pass without crazy shit going down. Someone is constantly wisecracking or getting blown up or shot or dismembered or catching fire or advancing the story marginally, with a bit of dialogue interspersed with fourth-wall-breaking in-jokes and innuendos. Or, doing all of the above. Stuntman-turned-director David Leitch (“Atomic Blonde,” co-director on “John Wick”) gives the movie

the feel of a pinball machine about to tilt. He may as well be Tex Avery dangling Bugs Bunny through wry repartee with the audience while he barely survives, again and again, in a gleeful miasma of superviolence. In this go-round, Deadpool (Ryan Reynolds, smartassily) is stacking up the corpses of dispatched gang members around the world, until he goes after a particular scumbag too close to his home. At the moment, he’s actually, for a change, demonstrably happy — trading anniversary gifts with his lady friend, Vanessa (Morena Baccarin, playing every Deadpool fan’s up-for-anything dream girl), planning to make a baby. Then goons bust in and shoot up the place. Vanessa bleeds out on the floor, and Deadpool decides he’d rather be plain ol’ Dead. Trouble for him, though, is his outrageously active healing ability; aside from running his mouth and a healthy amount of cartoonish acrobatics, about all he’s good for is never dying. Depressed, he falls in once again with the X-Men, or at least the couple of X-Men who will hang out with him: the Boy Scout-earnest metal giant Colossus (pure CGI voiced in Ruskie accent by Stefan


㈀ ㄀ 䔀⸀ 䴀愀爀欀栀愀洀 匀琀⸀Ⰰ 匀琀攀⸀ ㈀  Ⰰ  䰀椀琀琀氀攀 刀漀挀欀Ⰰ 䄀刀 㜀㈀㈀ ㄀

䔀洀愀椀氀㨀 愀渀椀琀爀愀䀀愀爀欀琀椀洀攀猀⸀挀漀洀

Kapicic), with the angsty Negasonic troubled youngster. There are earnest Teenage Warhead (Brianna Hildeb- discussions of family and love and loyrand) and her girlfriend Yukio (Shioli alty and all that. I’ll spot you that a bit Kutsuna). For a hot second Deadpool of Mothership Disney creeps in, yes, joins them (as a trainee, anyway) to but if you’re so down on it, perhaps you intervene when a fire-throwing teen- could find a better plot device to nudge aged mutant named Russell (a kiwi Deadpool to form X-Force, his ragtag named Julian Dennison) is threaten- X-Men spinoff? Doing so gets us two ing to torch his skeevy mutant reform key things. One: the superhero Domino, school. One thing leads to another, played by the inestimable Zazie Beetz, and both ’pool and the kid wind up whose only power, aside from blaststripped of their powers and sent to a ing onto the screen like a Pam Grier/ mutant prison. This is, for Deadpool, a Beyoncé hybrid, is a perpetual string of death sentence: His cancer roars back, one-in-a-million luck, which is played and he waits for tumors to overtake for a relentless string of laughs. Two: him. Then, a steel-armed gunslinger watching the X-Force try to deploy. I’m from the future, by the name of Cable not that into Marvel movies, despite (Josh Brolin, gruffly), tracks them having seen probably 15 of them, and down, aiming to kill the kid. all I can say is it’s the perfect encapsulaWhat follows, you could argue, tion of what makes “Deadpool” such a undermines the chipper nihilism of the subversive, absurd lark. You’ll be hardfranchise: Deadpool fighting Cable for pressed to find smarter stupid at the the next hour-plus on behalf of some movies this summer. arktimes.com MAY 24, 2018

49


ALSO IN THE ARTS

SUPPORT

THE TIMES

GET FREE STUFF

THEATER “Orange Is the New White.” The twoact political comedy show from The Main Thing. 8 p.m. Fri.-Sat., through June 16. $24. The Joint Theater & Coffeehouse. 301 Main St., NLR. 501-372-0205. “Southern Fried Nuptials.” A followup to Dietz Osborne and Nate Eppler’s “Southern Fried Funeral” from Murry’s Dinner Playhouse. 7:30 p.m. Thu.-Sat., dinner at 6 p.m. $15-$37. 6323 Colonel Glenn Road. 501-562-3131. “Menopause: The Musical.” Murry’s Dinner Playhouse puts “the change” to the tune of hits from the ’60s and ’70s for this parody revue. 7:30 p.m. Tue.-Sat., dinner at 6 p.m.; 12:45 p.m. and 6:45 p.m. Sun., dinner at 11 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. May 29-July 7. $15-$37. 6323 Colonel Glenn Road. 501-562-3131.

FOR A LIMITED TIME, SUBSCRIBE ANNUALLY TO ARKTIMES.COM OR EXTEND YOUR CURRENT SUBSCRIPTION BY A YEAR FOR $110 AND STAY UP-TO-DATE ON THE POLITICAL, CULTURAL AND FOOD NEWS THAT MATTERS TO YOU AND GET… • A ONE-YEAR ARKANSAS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA CONCERT MEMBERSHIP (ONE FREE TICKET TO EVERY ASO REGULAR SEASON CONCERT), A VALUE OF $108. • THREE TICKETS TO THE MUSEUM OF DISCOVERY, A VALUE OF $60. • FOUR TICKETS TO THE LITTLE ROCK ZOO, A VALUE OF $40. • TWO TICKETS TO THE ARKANSAS ARTS CENTER'S CHILDREN'S THEATRE, A VALUE OF $25.

ARKANSAS TIMES SUBSCRIBE TODAY AT MY.ARKTIMES.COM

50

MAY 24, 2018

ARKANSAS TIMES

“Beautiful:The Carole King Musical.” The touring Broadway production of Carole King’s biography in song. 7:30 p.m. Tue.-Sat., 2 p.m. Sat.-Sun., May 29June 3. $28-$83. Robinson Performance Hall, 426 W. Markham St. 501-244-8800. “The Hound of the Baskervilles.” TheatreSquared performs Steven Canny and John Nicholson’s take on the Sir Arthur Conan Doyle tale. 7:30 p.m. Thu.Sat., 2 p.m. Sat.-Sun. $10-$44. Walton Arts Center’s Studio Theater, 495 W. Dickson St. 479-443-5600. “Stick Fly.” The Weekend Theater stages Lydia R. Diamond’s “meet the parents” drama/comedy. 7:30 p.m. Thu.-Sat. $12$16. 1001 W. 7th St. 501-374-3761.

FINE ART, HISTORY EXHIBITS

MAJOR VENUES

ARKANSAS ARTS CENTER, MacArthur Park: 60th annual “Delta Exhibition,” works by artists from Arkansas and contiguous states, May 25-Aug. 26; 57th “Young Arkansas Artists Exhibition,” through July 22; “Strokes of Life: Recovering from a Stroke,” twelve works by C.J. Duvall Jr., through May. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Tue.-Fri., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat., 11 a.m.5 p.m. Sun. 372-4000. ARTS & SCIENCE CENTER FOR SOUTHEAST ARKANSAS, 701 S. Main St.: “Fire and Fiber,” works by metalsmith David Clemons and fiber artist Sofia Gonzalez; “UAPB & ASC: Five Decades of Collaboration,” work by Tarrence Corbin, Earnest Davidson, Fred Schmidt, Dr. William Detmers and others from UA Pine Bluff in the ASC permanent collection, through Nov. 3. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tue.-Fri., 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sat. 870-536-3375. ARTS CENTER OF THE OZARKS, 214 S. Main St.: “Octavio Logo: Exodus,” artist reception and conversation about immigration, 6-10 p.m. May 24. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tue.-Fri., 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sat. 479-751-5441. BUTLER CENTER GALLERIES, Arkansas Studies Institute, 401 President Clinton Ave.: “Mid-Southern Watercolorists

Juried Exhibition,” through June 30; “Howard Simon: Art and Illustrations,” through June; “Arkansas and WWI,” documents, photographs and artifacts, through May 26. 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Mon.-Sat. 320-5790. CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL MUSEUM VISITOR CENTER, Bates and Park: Exhibits on the 1957 desegregation of Central and the civil rights movement. 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. daily. 374-1957. CLINTON PRESIDENTIAL CENTER, 1200 President Clinton Ave.: “Louder than Words: Rock, Power & Politics,” through Aug. 5; permanent exhibits on the Clinton administration. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Sat., 1-5 p.m. Sun., $10 adults, $8 seniors, retired military and college students, $6 youth 6-17, free to active military and children under 6. 374-4242. CRYSTAL BRIDGES MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART, One Museum Way, Bentonville: “All or Nothing,” works from the permanent collection in black and white, through May 28; “The Garden,” works from the collection, through Oct. 8; American masterworks spanning four centuries in the permanent collection. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Mon., Thu.; 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Wed., Fri.; 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Sat.-Sun., closed Tue. 479-418-5700. DELTA CULTURAL CENTER, 141 Cherry St., Helena/West Helena: “Over Here and There: the Sons and Daughters of Arkansas’s Delta at War,” commemorating the centennial of World War I. 870-338-4350. ESSE PURSE MUSEUM & STORE, 1510 S. Main St.: “What’s Inside: A Century of Women and Handbags,” permanent exhibit. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Tue.-Sat., 11 a.m.3 p.m. Sun. $10, $8 for students, seniors and military. 916-9022. FORT SMITH REGIONAL ART MUSEUM, 1601 Rogers Ave.: “Will Barnet: Forms and Figures,” through June 3; “The Essence of Place: David Halpern Photographs from the Gilcrease Collection,” through July 29. 18. 11 a.m.6 p.m. Tue.-Sat., 1-5 p.m. Sun. 479-7842787. HISTORIC ARKANSAS MUSEUM, 200 E. 3rd St.: “Secret Stories: Anais Dasse and Holly Laws,” paintings and sculpture, through Aug. 5; “The Medium is the Message: Experimental Photography in Arkansas,” photographic works by Esther Nooner, Kristoffer Johnson, Helen Maringer, Kaia Hodo and Grace Ann Odom, through July 8. Ticketed tours of renovated and replicated 19th century structures from original city, guided Monday and Tuesday on the hour, self-guided Wednesday through Sunday, $2.50 adults, $1 under 18, free to 65 and over. (Galleries free.) 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Sat., 1-5 p.m. Sun. 324-9351. MacARTHUR MUSEUM OF ARKANSAS MILITARY HISTORY, 503 E. 9th St. (MacArthur Park): Closed through August for renovation. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Mon.-Sat., 1-4 p.m. Sun. 376-4602. MOSAIC TEMPLARS CULTURAL CENTER, 9th and Broadway: “Arkansas Divine 9: An Exhibit of Arkansas’s


African-American Greek Letter Organizations”; permanent exhibits on African-American entrepreneurship and work by African-American artists. 9 a.m.5 p.m. Tue.-Sat. 683-3593. MUSEUM OF DISCOVERY, 500 President Clinton Ave.: Interactive science exhibits and activities for children and teenagers. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Tue.-Sat., 1-5 p.m. Sun., $10 ages 13 and older, $8 ages 1-12, free to members and children under 1. 396-7050. OLD STATE HOUSE MUSEUM, 300 W. Markham St.: “A Piece of My Soul: Quilts by Black Arkansans,” through fall 2019; “Cabinet of Curiosities: Treasures from the University of Arkansas Museum Collection”; “True Faith, True Light: The Devotional Art of Ed Stilley,” musical instruments, through 2017; “First Families: Mingling of Politics and Culture” permanent exhibit including first ladies’ gowns. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.Sat., 1-5 p.m. Sun. 324-9685. RIVER MARKET BOOKS AND GIFTS (COX CREATIVE CENTER), 120 River Market Ave.: “The Spider Who Didn’t Like Flies,” paintings by Sulac. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat. SOUTH ARKANSAS ARTS CENTER, 110 E. 5th St.: “Back to Basics,” drawings by Mike Means, through May; recent works by Gay Bechtelheimer, through June 28. 870-862-5474. UA PINE BLUFF, 1200 University Drive: “Live or Not to Live, That Is the Question,” paintings by Markeith Woods, John Brown Watson Memorial Library, through August. 870-575-8896. UA PULASKI TECHNICAL COLLEGE, 3000 W. Scenic Drive: “Champion Trees of Arkansas,” color pencil drawings by Linda Williams Palmer, through July 27, Windgate Gallery, Center for Humanities and the Arts (CHARTS), 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Mon.-Thu., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Fri., 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Sat. 812-2760. WALTON ARTS CENTER, 495 W. Dickson St., Fayetteville: “Adornment: Beauty in Excess,” work by April Dauscha, Carson Fox, Roberto Mannino, Matt Neft, Piper Shepard and Kayte Terry, Joy Pratt Markham Gallery, through May 25. 479-571-2766. SMALLER VENUES ARGENTA GALLERY, 413 Main St.: “About Face,” photographs by Larry Pennington, sales benefit the Argenta Arts Foundation. 416-0973. ART GROUP GALLERY, Pleasant Ridge Shopping Center: “Scenes from Arkansas,” postcards by Arkansas artists, through May. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Sat., 1-5 p.m. Sun. 690-2193. ARTISTS WORKSHOP GALLERY, 610A Central Ave., Hot Springs: Paintings by Jan Briggs and Bonnie Ricci. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Sat., noon-5 p.m. Sun. 6236401. BOSWELL MOUROT FINE ART, 5815 Kavanaugh Blvd.: New works in glass by Kyle Boswell, paintings by Kathy Bay. 11

a.m.-6 p.m. Tue.-Fri., 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Sat. 664-0030. CANTRELL GALLERY, 8208 Cantrell Road: “… to be cont’d,” retrospective of the art of the late founder of the gallery, N. Scott, through June. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Sat. 224-1335, CHANCELLOR HOTEL, 70 N. East Ave., Fayetteville: “Fenix at the Chancellor,” work in all media by members of artists’ collective, through July 3. CHRIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH, 509 Scott St.: “Polaroid, Pinholes, Photograms and Processes,” photographic art by Blue-Eyed Knocker Photo Club members Allan Ballard Bryan, Cindy Adams, Darrell Adams, Lynn Frost, Mary Chamberlain, Rachel Worthen, Rita Henry and Vince Griffin, through June 28. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Mon.Thu., 9 a.m.-noon Fri., 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Sun. 870-538-7414. EMERGENT ARTS, 341-A Whittington Road: “The V Show — Subtle and Explicit Female Imagery,” works that highlight the female form, artists reception 6-8 p.m. May 25, gallery walk reception 5-8 p.m. June 1. ERIC FREEMAN GALLERY, 708 W. Charles Bussey Ave. (20th and Gaines streets): “Spring Mix,” new paintings by Eric Freeman, through May 27. 350-5629. FENIX GALLERY, 16 W. Center St., Fayetteville: “From the Ashes,” works by artists in collective in new gallery space, through May. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Wed.-Fri., 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Sat., 1-4 p.m. Sun. GALLERY 221, 2nd and Center Sts.: “Art as Speech,” works by area artists. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. weekdays, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Sat. 801-0211. GALLERY 26, 2601 Kavanaugh Blvd.: “You Are Not Alone,” new drawings by Robert Bean and Diane Harper, through July 12. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tue.-Sat. 6648998. GALLERY CENTRAL, 800 Central Ave., Hot Springs: Work by artist Bob Snider and others. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Sat. 318-4278.

PRESENTED BY:

MEMORIAL DAY WEEKEND

MAY 25-27 LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS

2018 LINEUP PETER FRAMPTON YOUNG THE GIANT  YOUNG THUG KIP MOORE  HIGHLY SUSPECT JAMEY JOHNSON  LANY  MARGO PRICE TRACY LAWRENCE  ECHOSMITH SAMMY KERSHAW  COLLIN RAYE  AARON TIPPIN THE SOUL REBELS ft. TALIB KWELI  THE LACS MUSCADINE BLOODLINE  CHELSEA CUTLER  THE BAND CAMINO KNOX HAMILTON  STEEL UNION  AMASA HINES  MAINLAND

LEVELLE DAVISON  THE BRUMMIES  THOMAS WYNN & THE BELIEVERS

LOW SOCIETY  RAD HORROR  JACOB BRYANT  MATT STELL LUKE WILLIAMS  JAMIE LOU & THE HULLABALOO  KELSOH  CANNIBAL KIDS

SAVE $10

GEORGE DOMBEK STUDIO, 844 Blue Springs Road: “Spring Open Studio,” 1-6 p.m. May 26-28. 479-442-8976. GREG THOMPSON FINE ART, 429 Main St., NLR: “Southern Abstraction,” work by regionally recognized artists.10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tue.-Fri., 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Sat. 664-2787. HEARNE FINE ART, 1001 Wright Ave.: “Rural Artistry,” mixed media sculpture and paintings by Sylvester McKissick, May 29-June 28; “Then and Now,” mixed media and illustration by Frank Morrison, through May 29. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Sat. 372-6822. JUSTUS FINE ART GALLERY, 827 A Central Ave.: Work by Kristin DeGeorge, Randall M. Good, Robyn Horn, Dolores Justus, Jill Kyong, John Lasater, Sandra Sell, Gene Sparling, Jason Sacran,

NTED

ADVANCE TICKETS AVAILABLE ONLINE

RIVERFESTARKANSAS.COM

PRESE

BY:

PRES

ENTE D BY:

W ED EN EKEN WEEK D

PAPSASSS

USE COUPON CODE ONLINE:

ARKTIMES

FOR $10 DISCOUNT ON MULTI-DAY RE-ENTRY PASS CODE VALID UNTIL MAY 24

CONTINUED ON PAGE 52 arktimes.com MAY 24, 2018

51


ALSO IN THE ARTS, CONT.

UPCOMING EVENTS Lakehill Shopping Center Patio on Park Hill

MAY

24

Neighborhood Festival, Live Music, Food Trucks!

MAY 24-26

The Weekend Theater Stick-Fly

Rebsamen Golf Course 10th Annual UCP Golf Scramble

JUN

1

Fairfield Bay Conference Center South Fork Nature Center Fundraising Concert

JUN

9

JUN 14-17, 21-24, 28-30 JULY 1

The Studio Theatre Tuck Everlasting Heifer Village Arkansas Times presents Pig & Swig - A Premium Whiskey Tasting and Pork Event

15

LAMAN LIBRARY ARGENTA BRANCH, 420 Main St., NLR: “Flowers and Facades,” work by Dustyn Bork and Heidi Carlsen-Rogers. 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Sat. 687-1061. LEGACY FINE ART, 804 Central Ave., Hot Springs: Blown glass chandeliers by Ed Pennington, paintings by Carole Katchen. 8 a.m.-5 LOCAL COLOUR GALLERY, 5811 Kavanaugh Blvd.: Artists collective. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Sat. 265-0422. M2 GALLERY, 11525 Cantrell Road: “Ink,” printmaking by Evan Lindquist, Warren Criswell and Neal Harrington, with photographs by Linda Harding and Austin printmaker Annalise Gratovich. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tue.-Sat., noon-5 p.m. Mon. 225-6257. MYLO COFFEE CO. ROASTERY, 3604 Kavanaugh Blvd.: “In Between the Lines,” artwork by Raque Ford and Jerry Phillips, through June 9. 7 a.m.-9 p.m. daily. 7471880. THEA FOUNDATION, 401 Main St., NLR: “Meet Me in the Water,” paintings and a mural by Katherine Rutter. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. (closed noon-1 p.m.) weekdays.

JACKSONVILLE MUSEUM OF MILITARY HISTORY, 100 Veterans Circle, Jacksonville: Exhibits on D-Day; F-105, Vietnam era plane (“The Thud”); the Civil War Battle of Reed’sosage Bridge, Arkansas Ordnance Plant (AOP) and other military history. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon-Sat., 1-5 p.m. Sun. $3 adults; $2 seniors, military; $1 students. 501-2411943.

LAKEPORT PLANTATION, 601 Hwy. 142, Lake Village: Antebellum mansion; exhibits on plantation life from before, during and after the Civil War. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. weekdays. $5 general admission. 870-265-6031. MUSEUM OF AUTOMOBILES, Petit Jean Mountain: Permanent exhibition of more than 50 cars from 19041967 depicting the evolution of the automobile. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 7 days. 501727-5427. MUSEUM OF NATIVE AMERICAN HISTORY, 202 SW O St., Bentonville: Native American artifacts. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Sat. 479-273-2456. PLANTATION AGRICULTURE MUSEUM, Scott, U.S. Hwy. 165 and state Hwy. 161: Permanent exhibits on historic agriculture. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Tue.Sat., 1-5 p.m. Sun. $4 adults, $3 children. 961-1409. POTTS INN, 25 E. Ash St., Pottsville: Preserved 1850s stagecoach station on the Butterfield Overland Mail Route, with period furnishings, log structures, hat museum, doll museum, doctor’s office, antique farm equipment. 10 a.m.4 p.m. Wed.-Sat. $5 adults, $2 students, 5 and under free. 479-968-9369. S COTT PLANTATION SETTLEMENT, Scott: 1840s log cabin, one-room school house, tenant houses, smokehouse and artifacts on plantation life. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Fri.-Sat. 351-0300. www. scottconnections.org. TOLTEC MOUNDS STATE PARK, U.S. Hwy. 165, England: Major prehistoric Indian site with visitors’ center and museum. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Sat., noon5 p.m. Sun., closed Mon. $4 for adults, $3 for ages 6-12, $14 for family. 961-9442. OTHER VENUES 21C MUSEUM HOTEL, Bentonville: “Labor & Materials,” installation by Lina Puerta, photographs by Katrin Korfmann and more.

Clinton Presidential Center Lawn East Village Street Food Jam presented by RICELAND

JUN

16

Go to CentralArkansasTickets.com to purchase these tickets and more! Arkansas Times new local ticketing site! If you’re a non-profit, freestanding venue or business selling tickets thru eventbrite or another national seller – call us 501.492.3994 – we’re local, independent and offer a marketing package!

LOCAL TICKETS, ONE PLACE MAY 24, 2018

L&L BECK ART GALLERY, 5705 Kavanaugh Blvd: “Backyard Birds,” works by Louis Beck, giclee giveaway 5:30 p.m. May 31. 660-4006.

OTHER MUSEUMS

JUN

52

Rebecca Thompson and others. 10 a.m.5 p.m. Wed.-Sat. 321-2335.

ARKANSAS TIMES

shop LOCAL Shop ARKANSAS TIMES


S)

K

B U RG

E

WE R E

ROCK(

JUNE 9-17 (2 WEEKENDS!)

WHO DOESN’T LOVE A GOOD BURGER?

From beef or turkey to portabella or veggie—or even with a gluten-free bun!—we really know how to ROCK burger week in central Arkansas. This event gives readers a chance to taste all of the best burgers that the Rock has to offer. THE BEST PART? Optional burger pricing: $10 or under (sides are an additional cost). WHAT ELSE DO READERS NEED TO KNOW ABOUT BURGER WEEK ROCK(S)? ¶ Restaurants WILL be busy, so: get there early, have a backup plan and maybe try again the next day. ¶ There will be a wait, since we’ve been talking about delicious burgers since May. ¶ You will tip as though the burger is regular price. This should go without saying, but step up to the plate with a 20% tip, and say “Thank you” for the sweet deal. ¶ Buy a beverage and maybe some other delectable food to enjoy with your burger. So, when appropriate, have a beer or cocktail. ¶ Stay updated with Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and (of course) arktimes.com

JOIN THESE FINE RESTAURANTS FOR THIS EXCITING EVENT!

Doe’s Eat Place • Stickyz Rock-n-Roll Chicken Shack • Big Orange Grumpy’s Too Neighborhood Bar & Grill • Black Angus • Burger 21 Lazy Pete’s • Ciao Baci • EJ’s Eats and Drinks • The Box AND MORE TO COME! Four page section in the JUNE 7 ISSUE. The event is limited to 30 participating restaurants. Posters and social media promotional materials will be provided.

DEADLINE IS MAY 30.

Let’s show off that delicious burger.

WWW.ARKTIMES.COM • 201 E. MARKHAM, SUITE 200 • (501) 492-3994 arktimes.com MAY 24, 2018

53


THE UNIQUE NEIGHBORHOODS OF CENTRAL ARKANSAS

ARKANSAS TIMES

MARKETPLACE TO ADVERTISE IN THIS SECTION, CALL LUIS AT 501.375.2985

Full of interesting voices and colorful portraits of 17 Little Rock and North Little Rock neighborhoods, this book gives an intimate, block-by-block, native’s view of the place more than 250,000 Arkansans call home. Created from interviews with residents and largely written by writers who actually live in the neighborhoods they’re writing about, the book features over 90 full color photos by Little Rock photographer Brian Chilson.

Payment: CHECK OR CREDIT CARD Order by Mail: ARKANSAS TIMES BOOKS 201 E. MARKHAM ST., STE. 200, LITTLE ROCK, AR 72201 Phone: 501-375-2985 Fax: 501-375-3623 Email: ANITRA@ARKTIMES.COM

ADOPTION

Loving, Financially Secure Designers Hope To Be Stay-Home Mom & Devoted Dad. Expenses paid. Victoria & Paul.

Send _______ book(s) of The Unique Neighborhoods of Central Arkansas @ $19.95 Send _______ book(s) of A History Of Arkansas @ $10.95

ALSO AVAILABLE

1-800-352-5741

Send _______ book(s) of Almanac Of Arkansas History @ $18.95 Shipping and handling $3 per book

Name ____________________________________________________________ Address ___________________________________________________________

City, State, Zip _______________________________________________________ Phone ____________________________________________________________

Visa, MC, AMEX, Disc # __________________________________ Exp. Date __________

For Sale 2005 Dodge Durango SLT $4,690 3RD SEAT, REAR A/C, 200K MILES, ONE OWNER. LOOKS AND DRIVES AWESOME. SERVICED. Call or text (501) 259-1209

POSITION AVAILABLE: Director of Ministry to Families with Children at Trinity United Methodist Church in Little Rock. Contact Don, pastordon@tumclr.org or Richard, rhhanson@ualr.edu .

LEAD MAINTENANCE LUXURY APARTMENTS * Licensed M-F; 8-4:30; On-Call flexibility

501-663-2000

PORTER/MAINTENANCE FOR LUXURY APARTMENTS M - F; 8-4:30 Competitive Pay + Benefits

501-663-2000

Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Essex Probate and Family Court 36 Federal Street Salem, MA 01970 (978) 744-1020 Docket No. ES18A0027AD In the matter of KAITLIN TAYLOR HAWES-TYNDALL CITATION G.L.c. 201 §6 To Justin Charles Tyndall L.K.A. Little Rock, Arkansas and persons interested in a petition for the adoption of said child and the Department of Children and Families of said Commonwealth, 280 Merrimac Street, 2nd Floor, Lawrence, MA 01843. A petition has been presented to said court by Bobby James Rand of Lynn, MA, Kristen Lee Hawes of Lynn, MA requesting for leave to adopt said child. If you object to this adoption you are entitled to the appointment of an attorney if you are an indigent person. An indigent person is defined by SJC Rule 3:10. The definition includes but is not limited to persons receiving TAFDC, EACDC, poverty related veteran’s benefits, Medicaid, and SSI. The Court will determine if you are indigent. Contact an Assistant Judicial Case Manager or Assistant Judicial Case Manager or Adoption Clerk of the Court on or before the date listed below to obtain the necessary forms. IF YOU DESIRE TO OBJECT THERETO, YOU OR YOUR ATTORNEY MUST FILE A WRITTEN APPEARANCE IN SAID COURT AT SALEM ON OR BEFORE TEN O’CLOCK IN THE MORNING (10:00 AM) ON JULY 23, 2018. Witness, JENNIFER M. R. ULWICK First Justice of this Court Date: April 26, 2018 Pamela Casey O’Brien, Register of Probate

MIZAR

PAINTING AND SERVICE COMPANY For all your interior - exterior painting needs Residential & Commercial Free Estimates 30 years experiance Will provide references

Mike Morris 501-541-6662

Mizarpainting1@gmail.com 54

MAY 24, 2018

ARKANSAS TIMES


Are you a

MD or DO? AFMC NEEDS YOU! Join our team of Arkansas licensed physicians for periodic electronic medical reviews in all specialties. • Work remotely on your own schedule • Determine the amount of time you want to devote • Earn extra income

Learn more at afmc.org/ review/physician-reviewers/, email review@afmc.org or call 479-573-7632.

E/O/E M/F/V/D arktimes.com MAY 24, 2018

55


A TEAM DEDICATED TO A FULL CONTINUUM OF BEHAVIORAL HEALTHCARE SERVICES.

Our excellent team of providers: Dr. Benjamin Nimmo, MD - Chief Medical Officer Dr. Kelsey McClellan, MD Dr. Scott Hogan, MD Dr. John Webber, MD Dr. Lynn Thomas, MD Dr. Scott Carle, MD

56

MAY 24, 2018

ARKANSAS TIMES

Dr. Allan McKenzie, MD Dr. David Alan Bagley, MD Dr. Donna Brown, MD Dr. Jessica Carbajal, MD Dr. Laura Conley-Olsen, MD

Dr. Kristin Gannoe, MD Dr. Ryan Helm, MD Dr. Tad Tillemans, MD Dr. Jeffrey Neal, MD

Arkansas Times - May 24, 2018  

Reboot - Young Thug rides into town for a revived Riverfest.

Arkansas Times - May 24, 2018  

Reboot - Young Thug rides into town for a revived Riverfest.