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ISSUE NO. 6 | 2017 ARKANSASWILD.COM #BIKEARMAG

MEET JASON MACOM (PAGE 38)


discover the finest fishing spot in america.

1777 river road | lakeview, arkansas 870-431-5202 | email gastons@gastons.com lat 36 20’ 55” n long 92 33’ 25” w 2 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6

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CRAFTED IN ARKANSAS

2 LOCATIONS IN BENTONVILLE THE 8TH STREET MARKET THE ARTS DISTRICT WWW.BIKERACKBREWING.COM


IN THIS ISSUE

8

FEATURES

12

IT’S ABOUT THE JOURNEY

From the Guest Editor

Braking News: • Conway Bike Share • Bike Playground Opens • Rails to Trails • Governor’s Advisory Council

22

Bike Gear

24

My Kit: Kenny Gober

28

Addie Teo recovers to race again

30

UNEXPECTED ART IN FORT SMITH Tour De Murals

38

52

MY RIDE, MY TRAIL Arkansas River Trail leads the way

60

POLO IN THE ROCK Casual fun

42

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4 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6

Adventure racing in Little Rock

Chasing Tokyo

A messy good time

Jason Macom, Paralympic hopeful, pushes himself toward his goal every day. Photo by Rett Peek.

GET YOUR ROCK ON

JASON MACOM

CROSS BOSS

ON THE COVER

50

AN ARKANSAN IN CRESTED BUTTE Small Colorado town offers great vacation opportunity for mountain bikers

EVERY ISSUE

62 64 70 74

Ride Group Benefits Bike Shops Ride & Race Events Happy Trails

PHOTO BY BOB ROBINSON

Two cyclists take a moment out of their mural tour of The Unexpected in Fort Smith to pop a wheelie in front of a very serious fellow.


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The Arkansas River Valley Tri-Peaks region boasts three premier peaks to test your biking abilities — on road and off. Like the 34-mile Huckleberry Mountain Horse Trail which takes you over the shoulders and summits of Mount Magazine near Paris. Or the Winona Scenic Drive that winds through the Ouachita Mountains near Perryville. Or the adventurous 28-mile Moccasin Gap Trail just off Scenic 7 Byway North near Dover. Whichever path you choose, a fun time in the saddle awaits.

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A special publication of Arkansas Wild arkansaswild.com REBEKAH LAWRENCE Publisher rebekah@arktimes.com ELIZABETH HAMAN Associate Publisher elizabeth@arktimes.com MANDY KEENER Creative Director mandy@arktimes.com LACEY THACKER Editor at Large lacey@arktimes.com ADVERTISING LESA THOMAS Senior Account Executive lesa@arktimes.com RHONDA CRONE Account Executive rhonda@arktimes.com KIMBERLY BENNETT Account Executive kimberly@arktimes.com

For first-class facilities, a convenient location on Interstate 40, and a clean and safe community to enjoy away from the trails, Conway, Arkansas is the perfect location for your next ride. With sharrows on major roadways throughout town, as well as numerous trails through the city and its surrounding areas, Conway is working to be one of the most bike friendly cities in the state. For more information about Conway bike trails, contact the Bicycle & Pedestrian Advisory Board at walkbikeconway.com .

PRODUCTION WELDON WILSON Production Manager/Controller ROLAND R. GLADDEN Advertising Traffic Manager LARISSA GUDINO Advertising Coordinator GRAPHIC DESIGNERS KATIE HASSELL JASON HO MIKE SPAIN OFFICE STAFF ROBERT CURFMAN IT Director LINDA PHILLIPS Billing/Collections KELLY JONES Office Manager/Accounts Receivable ANITRA HICKMAN Circulation Director

CVB@ConwayArkansas.org ConwayArk.com 866.7CONWAY 6 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6

Arkansas Times Publishing 201 E. MARKHAM ST., SUITE 200 LITTLE ROCK, AR 72201 501-375-2985 All Contents © 2017 Arkansas Wild

@bikearmag


FROM THE GUEST EDITOR

Addie Teo is a pediatric occupational therapist for Cabot Public Schools. Addie leads a monthly women’s mountain bike ride in Arkansas, and she organizes an annual women’s mountain bike retreat weekend in October. You can stay informed of the latest women’s mountain bike rides by joining ‘Dame Shredders’ on Facebook.

Addie Teo Brand Ambassador Chainwheel, Orbea, Vanderkitten

A NOTE ABOUT THE CENTRAL ARKANSAS WATER STUDY

Central Arkansas Water and the University of Central Arkansas are teaming up over the next six months to prepare a portion of the Ouachita Trail for mountain biking. If phase 2 is approved in January, a select group of cyclists will be allowed to bike the trail. The impact of mountain biking on the trail will be studied in detail before a determination is made regarding public use of the trail. Bike Arkansas is monitoring the progression of the study and will keep readers apprised. 8 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6

PHOTO BY MATTHEW MARTIN

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ycling has introduced me to many people around the country, and it has prompted me to travel to beautiful, off-the-beaten paths I wouldn’t have normally traveled to. Because of cycling, I am more conscious of my own health and my desire to have balance in my life. Arkansas has become a must-see destination when it comes to cycling, and things are evolving quickly. More trails are being built, more people are becoming interested in the sport and tourism has increased tremendously. Several national magazines and websites have listed Arkansas as one of the bucket list destinations for cycling. I, along with many fellow cyclists, feel very fortunate to be living in this beautiful state that sees the benefits of cycling and encourages people to take up cycling as a sport. In this issue, we share some of the fun open to cyclists of all skill levels. Are you up for an adventure? Try adventure racing, bike polo or cyclocross. Want to take an art tour? Take a trip to Fort Smith and view the murals in The Unexpected Thank you, Bike Arkansas magazine, for the opportunity to be your guest editor. It has been my honor to share with you my favorite places to ride in central Arkansas, including Burns Park, the Arkansas River Trail and Emerald Park. And it’s been my pleasure to write about my summer traveling adventures in Crested Butte, Colorado and Fort Wingate, New Mexico. If you have not ridden any trails outside your hometown, I strongly encourage you to go outside your comfort zone and explore. If you love to travel like I do, I hope you will continue to be in awe of all the breathtaking places we get to see on two wheels.


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BRUCE HUBBARD went everywhere by bicycle as a child. By age 14, he was heavily involved in bicycle racing, a rarity in Arkansas in the early 70s. There was only one club in the state at the time, and only 30-40 people in the state were serious about cycling. Bruce, who always dreamed of opening a bike shop, has participated in adventure and off-road racing in several states in the region over the last decades. He and his wife, Jan, opened Parkside Cycle 22 years ago; Bruce continued working for UPS while Jann ran day-today operations. Bruce worked in the shop doing heavy mechanic work in the evenings until he came to the shop full time a few years ago. Bruce was heavily involved in building Cedar Glades Park in Hot Springs, where the Attila the Hun race is held every year. He has been both an advocate and an educator, passionate about teaching people about the benefits of cycling as a lifestyle. Bruce has been pleased to see the explosion of the cycling community over the last two decades. —Lacey Thacker

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BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6 9


Contributors

RETT PEEK can be found in the saddle

MATTHEW MARTIN , a Little Rock-based

BOB ROBINSON enjoys all things

DAVE ROBERTS is the Vice President

MISTY MURPHY is a fan of all things

JEREMY MACKEY is an Arkansas native

(when he’s not behind the camera). Needless to say he was stoked to work on the Jason Macom feature combining his two passions, cycling and photography.

outdoors. He is the author of three bicycle guidebooks. Bicycling Guide to the Mississippi River Trail, Bicycling Guide to the Lake Michigan Trail and Bicycling Guide to Route 66 can all be purchased at spiritscreek.com.

biking, whether it’s riding the Razorback Greenway with family, hitting the mountain bike trails or cheering on road racers. She has previously worked on trail and downtown revitalization projects and is now focused on growing her family and the state’s only hard cidery. 10 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6

photographer, was grateful for the chance to dust off his bike and ride along with Addie Teo to photograph her My Ride, My Trail adventure.

of Planning at Crafton Tull where he helps communities master plan their bicycle and pedestrian networks. After work and on weekends you will find him riding his bike on the trails and back roads of Central Arkansas.

and outdoor evangelist with 20 years of experience in the outdoor industry who enjoys sharing his passion for adventure.


Trailblazers

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MATT MIHALEVICH has impacted the lives of everyone who’s biked a Fayetteville trail. As the city’s Trail Coordinator for the past 11 years, Mihalevich oversees all facets of trail development in Fayetteville. He’s responsible for planning, funding, design, property acquisition, construction management, maintenance and public involvement.  While the Razorback Greenway was the impetus for most Northwest Arkansas cities to begin building multiuse pathways, Fayetteville and Mihalevich were ahead of the curve. Miles of trail were already on the ground, with Mihalevich spearheading an active building program. He’s become a go-to expert in the region for trail development questions ranging from how much to mow around trails to tunnel width to turning radius. He continues to innovate with the city’s trail system and recently installed the state’s first traffic light with a bike signal integrated into its programming.  Mihalevich has been a cyclist his whole life, starting as a kid pedaling around the neighborhood to visit friends and explore. His favorite bike trips now take him to city parks or local restaurants with his family.  —­Misty Murphy

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BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6 11


Braking News

CONWAY BIKE SHARE

NORTHWEST ARKANSAS BIKE NEWS BIKE PLAYGROUND OPENS

BIKE SHARING COMING 2018 Little Rock and North Little Rock have teamed up with Bantam Strategy Group, a bike share management company, and BCycle, a subsidiary of Trek, to develop a bike sharing program for both cities. Set to launch next spring, LR/NLR hope access to bicycles will contribute to the Complete Streets initiative. The plan calls for 200 bicycles, which will be placed around downtown to support residents without vehicles and employees who work downtown. Program expansion is likely, though the initial placement of bike stations is intended to focus on high-density parking, employment, shopping and restaurant areas. Access to bike stations is controlled through a smartphone app or users may sign up online for an RFID card. Bicycles may be reserved or picked up on the spur of the moment, and bicycles can be returned to any bike station. For more information, contact jlandosky@littlerock.gov.

RAILS TO TRAILS As of last month, The Southwest Trail has officially received enough funding to begin Phase 1. The project has received $1.3 million in federal funding and Pulaski, Garland and Saline counties have all voted to contribute matching funds. The 58-mile project when complete will connect Pulaski County with Garland and Saline Counties through a multi-use path beginning in Little Rock and ending in downtown Hot Springs. 12 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6

Bentonville opened the country’s first-ever bicycle playground last year. The one-acre property consists of bridges, tunnels, a pump track and a bike work station. The Walton Family Foundation and Visit Bentonville both contributed to the park, which is appropriate for children of all ages. According to David Wright, director of Bentonville Parks and Recreation, “Our bike playground has been a huge success for our parks system and our community. The playground had added a diversity in offerings from the traditional slide and swings type of play apparatus. Although we do not have a way to tabulate the number of people who have used the facility, I personally see dozens of people there daily. It’s a great destination for the family and the perfect play to teach your children the basic skills of riding a bicycle.”

WALMART HEIRS PURCHASE SHARES IN RAPHA

RZC Investments, run by Walmart heirs, recently purchased controlling shares in Rapha, a British lifestyle brand known for their clubhouses, which is what they call their stores. Members are frequently invited to hang out and watch cycling events. Rapha’s cycling club has local chapters around the world. Steuart Walton, co-founder of RZC Investments, is an avid cyclist.

PHOTOS BY BRIAN CHILSON/BIKE BENTONVILLE

Conway began a bike sharing program last spring, with five locations and 20 bikes total. Bikes may be checked out via text message or smartphone app. The stations, which are run by Zagster, frequently have bikes checked out, indicating healthy usage so far. Erik Leamon of The Ride won the contract to repair and perform routine maintenance on the bicycles. Rates are: Free for rides of an hour or less, $2 per hour thereafter. All fees received go to the Conway Parks and Recreation general fund.


A town of fast bikes, epic trails, and craft beers in Northwest Arkansas For your next cycling experience, contact Andrea at Bike Bentonville. andrea@bikebentonville.com • 479.271.9153 • visitbentonville.com


Trick riders were on display at The Railyard Bike Park in Rogers during day three of the IMBA World Summit.

Assistant trail superintendent Tim Scott rides the single track in Devil’s Den State Park.

NATIONAL BIKE YOUR PARK DAY BY JEREMY MACKEY “NOTHING COMPARES TO THE SIMPLE PLEASURE OF A BIKE RIDE.”

O

Member FDIC

14 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6

—John F. Kennedy

n September 30th cyclists from all over the world will share in that pleasure for the Adventure Cycling Association’s second annual Bike Your Park Day. The goal of the event is simple: to share and explore your local parks and public lands on two wheels. With over three million acres of public land incorporating nearly 1800 miles of trail, Arkansas provides riders with multiple opportunities to participate in one of the largest celebrations in cycling. There are several events already planned here in The Natural State. The VC Trail Ride, sponsored by the local Birdseye Bicycle Club, is being held at Village Creek State Park, near Crowley’s Ridge. It will begin at 10 a.m. and feature two routes. A five mile- and twelve-mile loop will take riders through wide trails, rolling terrain and moderate climbs. The club is inviting cyclists of all skill levels to come and discover the beauty and diversity these trails have to offer. Similarly, the nonprofit Ouachita Explorer will host a ride on one of Arkansas’ newest IMBA Epic trails, The Lake Ouachita Vista Trail. Cosponsored by Ouachita Kayak Tours and Spa City Cycling, this trail is one to see. Ouachita Kayak Tours will be showing off a new fleet of mountain bikes for rent and Spa City Cycles will host an Orbea Demo Day, offering a discount coupon for everyone who test rides a bike. The event will start at 10 a.m. at the Tompkins Bend Pavilion near Mount Ida. Multiple routes will feature mellow and flowing singletrack highlighted with beautiful views of Lake Ouachita. For more information on finding or hosting a local event, visit adventurecycling.org. While on their site, you can also enter for a chance to win a Seldom Seen bike from Advocate Cycles along with a trip for two, with bikes, to Glacier National Park on the Amtrak Empire Builder.

PHOTO NOVO STUDIO

Braking News


All things Arkansas,

all in one place. We’re committed to Arkansas and to the people who live here. That’s why we created an entire site dedicated to our home state. Visit OnlyInArk.com for everything from great road trips and fun festivals to local culture and more. When your bank is only in Arkansas, you know it’s all about you.

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Member FDIC BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6 15


Braking News

THE GOVERNOR’S ADVISORY COUNCIL ON CYCLING

Cyclists on the Arkansas River Trail in Little Rock are able to both recreate and commute on the scenic trail.

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ycling as transportation and recreation is on the rise in Arkansas. Adding trail networks to communities links neighborhoods to parks and schools and connects towns. The popularity and impact the Razorback Greenway and the Arkansas River Trail have had on their regions is phenomenal. The governor created the Advisory Council on Cycling in part to continue the momentum generated from the Arkansas Department of Transportation’s adoption of the Statewide Bicycle & Pedestrian Plan that I was fortunate to work on. Recently, I caught up with the Council’s chairman, Joe Jacobs, to quiz him on the details.

When was the Council formed and for what purpose? Last fall Governor Hutchinson announced at the IMBA (International Mountain Bike Association) event in Bentonville his intention to create a cycling council. On November 10, 2016, by executive order, he followed through on his promise. The Council was established to promote and improve the safety of cycling in Arkansas while focusing on the state’s economy, health and transportation network as related to cycling. If Arkansas can attract a young, educated workforce, the state will also attract new businesses that need these employees. Quality of life is an important part of attracting businesses. According to Arkansas Tourism researchers, expenditures from bicycling-related travel in our state was almost $250 million in 2016. Besides these economic benefits, trails improve the physical health of the community. Arkansas currently has the secondhighest obesity rate in the country; bike trails can help to change those statistics for the better. Recreational cyclists may use large parts or even the entire trail on a visit but the local population will use short sections as transportation corridors.

16 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6

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A bridge crossing Osage Creek on the Razorback Regional Greenway near Horseshoe Park in Rogers.

Who are the Council members? The Governor’s Advisory Council on Cycling consists of 11 members with the following representatives: AR Department of Parks and Tourism, Arkansas Economic Development Commission, AR Forestry Commission and the Arkansas Department of Transportation and seven at-large members with personal and business interests in cycling and tourism. Joseph Jacobs, Little Rock (ADPT) - Chairman Jeff Moore, Sherwood (AEDC) Doug Akin, Little Rock (AR Forestry) Robert Moore, Arkansas City (ArDOT Commissioner) David Knight, Little Rock Jim Dailey, Little Rock Michael Chaffin, Little Rock Jennifer Conner, Portland Paxton Roberts, Fayetteville Michelle Smith, North Little Rock-Vice Chair David Roberts, Maumelle The council meets quarterly at the State Parks office. All members volunteer their time so there is no cost to taxpayers. With no funding appropriated to the initiatives, the council must do its homework on how best to collaborate with foundations and other agencies to move things forward.

What are some of the current initiatives? • • • • •

Promote awareness and expand the cycling infrastructure in the state. Establish a statewide cycling advocacy group. Work to promote the creation of the Southwest Trail stretching from Little Rock (Arkansas River Trail) to downtown Hot Springs. Continue to support the opening of the Ouachita National Recreation Trail to mountain bikes from Hwy. 300 to Hwy. 9. Interstate signs – A city, county, state or national park is allowed a sign on our state highways.

18 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6

PHOTO BY NOVO STUDIO

Braking News

Signs for five IMBA Epic trails. Signs for Big Dam Bridge Signs for Razorback Greenway Signs for the Delta Heritage Trail •

• •

State bicycling website – work with the Tourism department on a state website similar to Ride Oregon. Could include user-generated content and a statewide calendar of events. Minority participation – Work on a proposal to increase minority participation among Marshallese and Hispanic. Education programs needed for proper bicycling laws. Contact the League of American Bicyclists to find out the criteria required for certification of bicycle-friendly communities and businesses.

How does Arkansas rank compared to other states? Arkansas is currently ranked 36th as a bike-friendly state with six Bicycle Friendly Communities. There is a total of twentysix Bicycle Friendly Businesses and three Bicycle Friendly Universities in the state. We currently have five Epic Mountain Bike trails – tied with Colorado. Only California has more, with six. Whether you are a road cyclist, commuter, mountain biker, gravel grinder or adventure cyclist visiting Arkansas – the goals are common. Provide a safe experience that meets the needs of the individual and the greater community. We need to promote the praises of cycling as its potential rewards. A wellplanned bicycle infrastructure will provide transportation and recreational opportunities for Arkansas that will result in economic advantages, reduction of healthcare costs and quality of life benefits for decades to come. The Council welcomes input from the community. Email Joe Jacobs at joseph.jacobs@arkansas.gov or Dave Roberts at dave.roberts@craftontull.com.


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With 23 Arkansas State Parks that offer mountain biking, there’s a trail for everyone. Choose anything from scenic beginner trails to technical routes that will challenge the most advanced riders. And when you hop off the bike, you can enjoy all of the fun that each park has to offer. Browse by difficulty level and plan your next mountain biking trip at ArkansasStateParks.com/things-to-do/trails. #ARStateParks

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BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6 19


Braking News

ARKANSAS GROUP ATTENDS DC SUMMIT ON CYCLING BY HARRISON MADDOX

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n early March, three board members from Bicycle Advocacy of Central Arkansas (BACA) went to Washington, D.C. to attend the 2017 National Bike Summit hosted by the League of American Bicyclists. The event was a dream for cycling enthusiasts: guided bike tours of the city, enthralling speakers from all sectors of the bike world, New Belgium-sponsored happy hours…you get the idea. But fun aside, we were all there to learn about and address very real issues: How do we promote cycling in our communities? How do we do it safely? How do advocacy organizations fund their efforts? How do we get local projects greenlighted? How will the new presidential administration affect cycling infrastructure and policy around the U.S.? All vital questions if you’re trying to build a stronger cycling community. The schedule was packed with engaging workshops and enlightened speakers that covered topics ranging from tourism and Bicycle Friendly Communities to fundraising best practices. Our four days in D.C. were so packed that it was often difficult to choose which sessions to attend when

a scheduling conflict arose. The overarching theme of the summit was to prepare us for “Lobby Day,” on which we would meet with our state representatives and senators to discuss state-specific advocacy and infrastructure issues and lobby for increased federal support for bicycling in the future budget. Our meetings with Senator Boozman, Senator Cotton and Representative Hill were cordial, and they all understood the value of infrastructure and support for alternative transportation. We discussed the Southwest Trail and White River Bridge and highlighted the success story of Northwest Arkansas. Each of us left the National Bike Summit with new friends, new ideas and a fresh appreciation for the value of bicycling infrastructure and policy. And although the 2018 budget coming out of Washington eliminates Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery (TIGER) funding other vital funding sources for alternative transportation projects, we must continue to advocate for more transportation choices in our state and country.

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CURIOSITY Naturally Made

Arkansas is causing a bit of a commotion in the world of mountain biking. First, we managed to produce five Epic Trails and counting. Then, we played host to the 2017 IMBA world summit. And now, bloggers, bike nuts and shredders from around the country are flocking to see if what they’ve heard is true. It is. And it’s waiting to be explored. Read more about the mountain biking boom in The Natural State at Arkansas.com/cycling. What will you make in Arkansas?

THEM

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architecture | engineering | surveying

for more information visit craftontull.com BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6 21


Bike Gear

RACK’EM UP

NEED A BIKE RACK? CONFUSED BY THE OPTIONS? SIMPLIFY THE CHOICE WITH OUR EASY-TO-USE FLOW CHART. BY LACEY THACKER

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MY KIT

PHOTOS BY MATTHEW MARTIN

NAME : Kenny Gober HOMETOWN : McGehee, Arkansas OCCUPATION: Executive Housing Director/ Executive Port Director

WHERE I RIDE: I try to ride on a daily basis in Southeast Arkansas, as we have many paved rural roads and all the major highways, such as 65, have good wide shoulders. Cane Creek State Park has great off road trails. The new Delta Heritage Trailhead in Arkansas City provides beautiful scenery and great riding heading north. In some places, you can even see the mighty Mississippi River. I love to participate in all the charity rides around the State.

THE PLAYLIST: I don’t typically listen to music while riding as I enjoy listening to the smooth operation of my bicycle when it’s in good tune. I think it’s better to be able to hear vehicles approaching from behind when riding on public roads.

THE BIKE: I have several. My daily rider is a Lynskey Helix. For organized events, I have a Cervelo S3, while for overnight camping and multi-day tours when we carry our gear, I ride a Surly Long Haul Trucker. This is the bike I also use to pull my trailer when my dog (Charlie) wants to go for a ride. For off-road, a Jamis 29’er. Then for good ole playing around nothing beats the simplicity of my Jamis Sputnik single-speed. As you can see, I believe the proper number of bicycles to own is N + 1.

WHY I RIDE: I started riding for weight loss many years ago after being encouraged by a friend, Steve Montgomery. Later, I realized the added benefits to my cardiovascular system and discovered the stress relief that cycling brings. Now I just love to get on the bike, enjoy the beauty God made and see how fast I can ride. đ&#x;˜Š Kenny Gober, Big Dam Bridge Foundation member, sits atop his Lynskey Helix on a pitstop just west of the Big Dam Bridge in Little Rock. 24 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6


THE KIT: KENNY GOBER

THE USUAL: I always keep a CO2 cartridge, CO2 tire

WALLET: “I bring my MOJO rubber wallet with $20

inflator, tubeless tire plugs and a plug tool in my seat bag. Priceless

cash and my driver’s license.” $8-10 | Chainwheel Bike Shop, Little Rock

GARMIN 1000: “This device tracks and records my rides GARMIN VARIA: “This gadget is a radar that senses and logs statistics to monitor my progress.” $499.99 | Garmin.com

traffic approaching from the rear.” $199.99| Garmin.com

“I JUST LOVE TO GET ON THE BIKE, ENJOY THE BEAUTY GOD MADE AND SEE HOW FAST I CAN RIDE.” BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6 25


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what he preaches. As the City of Fayetteville’s director of sustainability and resilience, Peter works every day to make the university town a greener, more bikeand pedestrian-friendly city. Those efforts, as part of city-wide strategies, led to Fayetteville becoming Arkansas’ first Silver-designated Bicycle Friendly Community and first Bronze-designated Walk Friendly Community. Peter is an evangelist of the benefits of cycling, noting that more than 23 percent of Fayetteville’s population commutes less than three miles to work. Peter’s love of bikes doesn’t begin and end at the entrance to City Hall. He ditched bus routes in favor of bike routes when he was a middle schooler in Arkadelphia, making the two-mile journey with fellow bike riders from his neighborhood. As an adult, he chose his home because of its proximity to Fayetteville trails and its bike-ability to work. Riding bikes is a family affair in the one-car Nierengarten household. Peter and his wife bike wherever they can. His 6-year-old son, Austin, is a frequent companion on trips around town. —Misty Murphy


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FROM SURGERY TO RACE IN FOUR WEEKS BY ADDIE TEO

Above: Addie Teo and Danessa Rofkahr limp back to the vehicle, not yet realizing Addie will need surgery. Below: Addie received strict orders to rest her knee for ten days after surgery.

I PERFORMED ONELEGGED PEDALING MOST OF THE WAY OUT, THE ENTIRE TIME THANKING MY FORMER CYCLING COACH FOR HAVING ME PERFORM THIS DRILL. 28 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6

PHOTOS COURTESY ADDIE TEO

M

y friends and I had been anticipating the weekend of June 2425, 2017. We had registered to participate in another 24-hour mountain bike race in an unfamiliar town out of state. Four of us were coming from different cities to meet at McGaffey Campground in Fort Wingate, New Mexico, where the race was being held. Team Kittens on the Prowl was ready to have some fun in the Enchanted Forest. As the date approached, I started preparing for the race, working on my hill intervals, riding longer distances and experimenting with nutrition. May 21, 2017 was sunny, a welcome sight after the frequent rains of the preceding month. I had scheduled my monthly women’s mountain bike ride for this day, and the ladies and I were looking forward to a fun bike ride on the Womble trail in Mount Ida. We started from Highway 298 intending to finish at Fisherman’s Village. Two miles into the ride, a large stick got caught in my rear wheel and caused it to bend my derailleur. Luckily, Dan Lysk, our mechanic, was in our midst, and he saved the day. Once Dan straightened out the derailleur, I proceeded with my ride and joined the group. At approximately mile five, a fellow rider got a flat tire. Again, no problem. We had it fixed up, and off we went again. Due to gusty wind and heavy rain earlier in the week, there was quite a bit of debris on the trail. The ladies and I were cautious when we encountered downed trees, branches and other obstacles on the trail, and we also stopped on a few occasions to remove sticks from our drivetrains. Around seven miles in, on one of the infamous narrow, off-camber Womble sections, there was a semi-downed tree blocking the trail. Being cautious, I got off my bike and proceeded to walk toward the downed tree. Unfortunately, before I could reach it, I lost my footing. My knee hit the ground, hitting a sharp rock hidden in the grass. As I stood to clean the dirt off my clothes, I looked down and saw a wide, deep cut on my right knee and blood started to gush out. While waiting for the group to catch up, I pinched my cut skin tightly together to prevent more blood loss. Thankfully, one of the riders, Danessa, was an EMT. With Betadine from her pack and a roll of Coban wrap from mine, Danessa was able to clean and wrap me up the best she could. Due to difficulty bending my right knee, I performed one-legged pedaling most of the way out, the entire time thanking my former cycling coach for having me perform this drill. We all proceeded to ride another 1.5 miles out to our parked vehicles. After the ride, Dan drove me to a walk-in clinic in Hot Springs. Unfortunately, the doctor at the walk-in clinic informed me my injury was too severe for him to treat and that a trip to the E.R was necessary. Our next stop was CHI St. Vincent’s Hospital. Once in the E.R, an orthopedic surgeon was called to consult on the x-ray taken of my knee.


Dr. Cordell, the on-call orthopedic surgeon, was calm and informative when she arrived to look at my injury and study the x-ray. She explained that surgery was necessary to repair my torn retinaculum and to clean and irrigate all debris from the knee. She answered all my questions and explained what she would be looking for during the operation, stating that if the injury was more serious than she thought, she would have to cut the incision larger than the tear. The next day, prior to being discharged from the hospital, Dr. Cordell came into my room and informed me of what she had repaired. She assured me everything went well and I would make a full recovery. After being discharged from the hospital, I was required to wear a long knee brace to immobilize my right knee for ten days. While lying around the house recuperating, panic and self-doubt set in, knowing the 24-hour mountain bike race was less than four weeks away. I underestimated how poorly my active range of motion on my right knee was going to be post-surgery. Having only 30-40 degrees of knee flexion before experiencing pain, I knew I had a lot of work to do. As occupational therapist by trade, I was determined to provide myself with frequent range-of-motion and strengthening exercises on a daily basis. Help came from my massage therapist, Darryl Griffith, who performed an extensive sports massage on me and applied pulsed electrical-magnetic field treatment to my injured area, which dramatically improved my range of motion. Two weeks post-surgery, I was cleared to slowly ride my bike again. I was ecstatic. I spent the first three days riding

on flat, paved ground, rode short distances and had frequent rest breaks. I eventually started to slowly climb hills, paying close attention to my knee for any pain and discomfort. A week prior to the race, I rode my mountain bike off-road for the first time since surgery, wanting to make sure my body and my mind were comfortable riding on trails with plenty of rocks, roots and some drops. It was mentally challenging to convince myself I still had the skills to tackle the obstacles on the trails, and it was also frustrating to see how out-of-shape I had become in just a few short weeks of rest and recovery. Again, panic set in: Can I do this? Can I even complete one lap? Will I fail my teammates? The much-anticipated weekend had arrived. McGaffey was a beautiful campground filled with pine trees, right in the middle of the desert. The venue was well organized by Zia Rides, and the race course consisted of desert terrain, as well as smooth, fast terrain that reminded me of riding in Arkansas. Significantly different from riding back home was the 8,000foot elevation, which required that I constantly monitor myself to ensure I was getting enough oxygen. Before the race started, I started to have doubts, but the constant support from my teammates encouraged me to keep going. “Take it one lap at a time, Addie.” “You can do this.” “Keep pedaling and just enjoy the moment.” With my team motivating me forward, I was able to complete my laps despite struggling. The important thing was, I did it. I completed three laps and 39 miles that weekend. Suffering was part of the joy and it made this accomplishment so much sweeter.

why should I visit an orthopedic specialist for my joint pain? so I can finish all 18 holes with my golf buddies Duke depends on me for his daily walk someone has to chase the grandkids at the park because together we’re healthier

Life is too short to live with hip or knee pain, especially when there is something you can do about it. The sooner you make the decision to get relief, the sooner you can get back to the things you enjoy. Your health, our orthopedic specialists. For more information about orthopedic services offered in Hot Springs, visit chistvincent.com/ortho-hs

Hot Springs Orthopedic Clinic 501.321.2663 Dr. Cari Cordell | Dr. Lawrence Dodd Dr. Robert Olive Jr. | Dr. Justin Walden Dr. Christopher Young | Dr. Michael Young

BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6 29


PHOTOS BY BOB ROBINSON

Campers settle in to their comfortable campsites for a relaxing Ozark night at Devil’s Den State Park.

Unexpected Art in BY BOB ROBINSON 30 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6


D*Face Badlands – the mural is an homage to the wild west that Fort Smith was once known for.

Fort Smith BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6 31


Roa’s Mole - Roa typically paints in only black and white, laying the base shape with roller and bucket paint, then finishing off the details with spray - each hair on the mole is an individual spray. Facing page: Okuda San Miguel’s Universal Chapel transformed an old office space into a destination to inspire people of all races, ages and genders. The building is now home to La Colmena art school with classes taught by artist Ana Maria. 32 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6


F

ort Smith has become an art destination, generating interest in the art world from such noted international art publications as Arrested Motion, Complex, Hypebeast, Colossal, and Highsnobiety. With art exhibits ranging from trash sculptures to a 100-foot-long multi-dimensional façade to portraits adorning towering grain silos, and with over 20 exterior buildings hosting paintings by world renowned artists, this is not the quiet border town that ‘Hanging Judge Isaac Parker’ once ruled over. The city’s transformation began in the fall of 2014. Steve Clark, founder and CEO of Propak, Inc. and Founder, The Unexpected; John McIntosh, 64.6 Executive Director; and Claire Kolberg, Director, The Unexpected began brainstorming methods to revitalize the city’s downtown district and bring a renewed vibrancy to the riverfront town. Following much deliberation the group believed this could be accomplished through just the right arts medium—street art. Realizing they would need experienced leadership for successful execution of the project, Clark engaged with French art curator Charlotte Dutoit. With Dutoit on board, what had become known as “The Unexpected” gained instant credibility and was jump started on its way to becoming an acclaimed festival of international arts. Art admirers from around the world have viewed The Unexpected’s exhibits online, in magazines and in photographs taken by friends who have visited Fort Smith. However, to

truly experience the depth and scale of street art one has to experience it live, in person. That’s why, at the completion of this year’s festival, the 3rd year for The Unexpected, several friends and I decided there would be no better way to view the exhibits than from the seats of our bicycles. So early one Sunday morning, when we had the streets of downtown Fort Smith to ourselves, we began our Tour de Murals. Having been a volunteer and worked with the artists during the festivals, I am intimately familiar with the exhibits. However, for those who are viewing the murals and other art displays for the first time, you can visit The Unexpected website, unexpectedfs.com, for a map of the locations of the exhibits and interesting tidbits related to the art, artists and the festival itself. Our Tour began at the free parking lot, on the corner of Garrison Avenue and North 2nd Street. From there it was a very short ride across 2nd Street to see ‘War Paint’ by D*Face (pg. 34). Like others he created, this mural was inspired by the city’s early western history. The artist met with leaders of the Choctaw Nation in an attempt to use authentic colors and designs that adorned the female warrior which were true to their culture. This mural is connected to a second piece of art D*Face completed while on site in 2016, which we plan to visit later in our tour. From there it was a short ride along Garrison to visit another mural painted by D*Face during his 2016 visit. Enroute we cycled past two other art pieces.

BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6 33


Fort Smith has become an art destination...

34 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6


Right: Bicicleta Sem Frieo Catira - The artists were inspired by the similarities of their Brazilian cowboys and our American cowboys, and this is an homage to the similarities of our cultures. Catira is a dance the Brazilian cowboys do after a roundup. Facing page top to bottom: D*Face Arrows – inspired by actual authentic Choctaw arrows, D*Face painted the flights on the installation to be an exact replica of the Choctaw arrows. Each arrow took approximately one hour to install. D*Face War Paint – D*Face returned for The Unexpected 2016 to create his third mural in Fort Smith, this time an homage to all Native American’s who faced the plight of relocation/removal.

The first is a unique structure created by Crystal Wagner during 2017’s The Unexpected (pg. 36). Known for her interesting use of materials to create 2 and 3 dimensional works, she was once commissioned to create a large-scale installation for the band Flaming Lips. The project at 300 Garrison Avenue is an extremely complex piece which the artist told me she modeled after ocean coral reef. By hand fastening over 100,000 zipties, Crystal, her two assistance artists and an army of local volunteers grafted some 800 yards of brightly colored hot air balloon fabric to a skeleton of intertwined chicken wire stretching 100’ long by 20’ tall. A block to the east, we paused to view another The Unexpected project, Opossum by Bordalo II. This artist’s trademark is to create art from unwanted trash. I personally was among the volunteers who visited the Fort Smith landfill to collect the busted plastic garbage cans used to make this piece. The ‘Bad Lands’ mural is a great example of D*Face’s trademark popart style (pg. 35). Inspired by the outlaws and US Marshalls of the area’s history, the mural captures the fast-paced, thrilling excitement of the chase scene of the western era. Crossing Garrison we pedaled past ‘Cherokee Women’ by Askew One (pg. 36). Seeking honesty and authenticity in the piece, the artist featured four family members of Cherokee Chief Joe Byrd. Although these murals are not the common depiction of historical events seen in most rural cities, many of these artists’ work were heavily influenced by the history of the area. They are expressed emblematically and using brighter colors. On our ride to what is my favorite piece, we passed ‘Mole’ by Roa (pg. 32). I am amazed how he brought the creature to life using only a BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6 35


UAFS Alphonso Trent – The Unexpected raises funds and manages production each year for the University of Arkansas at Fort Smith student artists. Alphonso Trent is painted in bold and solid color so the spectator will focus on the portrait of Alphonso, while the remainder of the mural is meant to look aged/vintage.

Askew Cherokee Women – Askew met the Byrd family at the National Historic Site where they presented him with a ceremonial blanket prior to Askew taking their picture. In the glasses of the woman on the left, you can see the reflection of the National Historic Site painted, as reflected in the actual photograph. Crystal Wagner’s Lithotroph – this installation took approximately 12 days to construct before it was moved from the construction site to the installation site. Lithotroph is Wagner’s only 3rd outdoor installation.

mixture of black, white, and gray color scales. The next stop was out of our way in relation to the other murals. However, it was a nice ride through the National Cemetery, where both my father and mother are buried. We exited the side gate to view ‘American Heroes’ by Guido van Helten; three 100-foot-tall grain silos, each with a portrait that is so life-like and real you feel it could step away from the silo and walk away. I was Guido’s wingman during the three-week project. Many a night Guido would be high in the lift, painting by the light of his cell phone. I have followed some of his work after his leaving the area, and he is without a doubt in a class of his own. It would require more space than I have here to continue to provide a running commentary of the tour, but visit the website I mentioned above to download a map. There is an app you can download to help you enjoy your tour; it’s called UnexpectedFS. Before I go, I want to tell you about part two of D*Face’s ‘War Paint’ mural. The artist wanted to connect the wall to a sculpture. Located at North 10th Street and B Street are the arrows from the female warrior’s bow (pg. 34. Beautiful works of art, authentic down to the colors and design of the bands decorating the arrows. But don’t get me started on how long it took our team of volunteers to help construct those arrows. Take a close look at the feather fins adorning the tops of the arrows: the side of each feather required about forty, one-inch slats of wood that had to be screwed onto the backboard. That’s forty for each side, two sides for each feather, three feathers on each arrow and five arrows. Do the math. But as I viewed the mammoth arrows I was pleased to have been a part of The Unexpected. Enjoy your Tour de Mural!

36 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6


Opening October 2017

Trout Fishing

FALL IN LOVE WITH THE GREAT OUTDOORS

D

ogwood Canyon Nature Park is proud to announce that they are opening to the public in October 2017. Just in time to enjoy the spectacular colors of the season, visit the 10,000 acre natural paradise and enjoy world-class activities with your family. From wildlife tram tours through the canyon to horseback rides in the hills, Dogwood Canyon offers countless ways to experience autumn in the Ozarks. Call or visit the website to plan your visit.

800-225-6343 dogwoodcanyon.org

Stunning Scenery

Biking BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6 37


38 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6


JASON MACOM CHASING TOKYO

PHOTOGRAPHY BY RETT PEEK BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6 39


J

ason Macom’s Olympic journey began when he was just five years old. We all remember our first, pivotal moments of freedom, and for Macom there was none so significant as riding a bike for the first time. “I remember riding to the store to buy a Tootsie pop so I could find the wrapper with the Indian shooting a star,” Macom recounts, “It was that first taste of freedom, that feeling that I could go anywhere under my own power.” A tattoo now bears the same image as a permanent reminder of that independence—and Macom is still chasing stars. Macom’s story of becoming a Paralympic hopeful has been told, but it’s what he’s chosen to do with his circumstances that has allowed him to break away from the peloton of other adaptive athletes. Instead of only considering his own cycling needs, he wants to help others in need of adaptive technology: “I want everyone who wants to ride a bike to have that opportunity without the struggles I’ve gone through.” Macom remembers laying on the side of the road many times, “…waiting for my wife to pick me up, my prosthetic in pieces because my experiment failed,” and he wants to use his experiences to ease the way for others. Macom is something of a mad scientist when it comes to cycling; working with his prosthetist, he designed and fabricated a prototype cycling prosthetic. He is obsessed with getting better and becoming more competitive; as a result, he is constantly researching the science of cycling, analyzing the geometry and ergonomics that allow his body to become more connected with the bike. “I enjoy the process of discovery in the machine shop figuring it all out. I know it can be better,” Macom says.

“I WANT EVERYONE WHO WANTS TO RIDE A BIKE TO HAVE THAT OPPORTUNITY WITHOUT THE STRUGGLES I’VE GONE THROUGH.” It’s the velodrome, however, that’s his true laboratory. A velodrome is an arena designed for track cycling featuring two straightaways linked with steep turns banked at 45 degrees. “When you’re going 30-plus miles per hour, you and the bike are parallel to the in-field floor. On certain wooden tracks, it feels and sounds exactly like a wooden rollercoaster. It’s exhilarating and terrifying at the same time,” he explains. And that feeling—pushing the limits of his bike and his body—is what keeps him coming back for more. “It’s what I imagine flying would feel like,” he adds simply. While Macom has no problem sharing his knowledge and the solutions to some of para-cycling’s inherent challenges, it’s not an altogether altruistic endeavor. “I want to be on the podium. I want to see my flag raised and hear our anthem played,” Macom says. Make no mistake, Macom is unapologetically competitive. His brutal training schedule is proof that he will stop at nothing to make his dream a reality. He begins his week 40 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6

on the Arkansas River trail with a warmup on his road bike. He then switches to his track bike and practices specific skills, like standing starts and techniques to gain higher output in the aero position. In the gym, he works just as hard. Every Tuesday night, following a two-and-a-half-hour morning session of lunges, leg presses, dead lifts and squats, he begins an interval session he describes as “the worst thing ever.” For twenty minutes, he pushes himself at maximum effort for thirty seconds, followed by a two-minute spin down, and then repeats the sequence four times. “It’s gasping and screaming and at the end I just lay in a puddle on the floor trying to regain any mental faculties I have left.” There’s an added complexity, however, to training as an adaptive athlete. Macom says, “Most athletes set their routine, do it and go home, but there’s always some unexpected challenge or mechanical change that needs to be made. It’s frustrating.” It’s during those arduous moments when he turns to the supportive community he’s surrounded himself with, primarily his wife, to reinforce to him that he has the tools and the know-how to find solutions. Macom says of his everencouraging wife, “You have no idea what I’ve put her through over the years. She’s absolutely incredible.” Training isn’t the only hurdle to overcome on the road to Tokyo in 2020. There are several competitions along the way, and to make the team, he’ll need to do well in all of them. In October, he will compete in the Master’s World Championships, not just against other para-cyclists, but traditional cyclists as well. A race designed to test not only his stamina, but the strategies associated with track cycling. “Watching your opponent and knowing when to push is just as important as your overall time,” he explains. In December, he will travel to Colorado Springs for the Para-cycling National Championships, followed by the Team USA selection event in Los Angles which will secure him a spot for the World Championships in March. Afterward, it’s a continuous series of World Cups determining how many riders the team will carry into the Olympics. This presents its own set of challenges; Team USA isn’t funding him for all the qualifying races required to make the team, and there is the ever-present issue of finding the time to travel and compete. Enter the cycling community. Macom was recently contacted by the owner of The Meteor Bicycle Cafe in Little Rock. Believing in his goals, he offered him a position that allows Macom the flexibility in his schedule to remain competitive. Macom’s newly-found day job provides him access to the resources required as he works toward his goal of inspiring people to experience the joys of cycling. He says, “Whether it’s a casual rider looking for their first bike or someone wanting to get faster, I get to help them. The discounts don’t hurt either.” Macom also began a GoFundMe campaign to help offset some of the costs associated with his journey and will soon have a locally designed t-shirt available for purchase in bike shops around the state. As often is the case, life imitates art. It’s no surprise then, that one of Macom’s favorite movies is A Knight’s Tale. He sees parallels between himself and the main character, saying, “I come from a humble little town in Oklahoma and somehow I’ve figured out how to follow my passion and race bicycles for Team USA almost full time. I never want someone to say, ‘I just can’t do it.’ If you believe enough, you can do anything. You can change your stars.” To support Jason’s Tokyo challenge go to: gofundme.com/jason-macom-project-tokyo.

STORY BY JEREMY MACKEY


BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6 41


42 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6 PHOTOS COURTESY CHASE ERTZBRGER


Clockwise from top: Competitors are sometimes offered adult beverages toward the end of the race. Faction, a local riding club, is on hand to support Cross Boss. Cyclists must sometimes dismount to cross obstacles.

CROSS BOSS

A MESSYBY LACEYGOOD TIME THACKER

C

aroline Poole arrived in Arkansas in August of 2016, but she’s already made an impact on cycling in the state. After moving from Canada so her husband could take a position with Chabelo, Poole was initially concerned about making friends and finding community. Luckily, cycling gave her a way to quickly join the local scene. Poole notes that not only is it incredibly easy to find a group to ride with in Little Rock, the community in general is also very friendly. Even better is the terrain Poole found in Arkansas, which allows for any level difficulty of mountain biking or road cycling. Poole had only been in town for a few weeks when the topic of cyclocross came up. Poole loves the sport and was happy to hear others were interested as well. Despite its growing popularity, Little Rock didn’t have a cyclocross event, and Poole was convinced to start one. Thankfully, she loves event planning. Poole says, “I hooked up with some teammates and some other cross (as it’s also known) enthusiasts, and before I knew it, this event was happening. I was super nervous that no one would show up.” That wasn’t a problem. At the first event in the four-part series, Faction showed up with food and a keg to get the party started, and start it did. Cyclocross, sometimes described as cross-country racing on bicycles, has been around for at least a couple of decades, and enjoys immense popularity in Belgium. Before Pool begins describing it, she warns, “It sounds absolutely ridiculous, but it’s one of the most competitive sports on the Union Cycliste Internationale level.” She then explains that the course takes place on, essentially, a giant lawn. The terrain might be smooth or rocky, steep or flat, and “on the lawn, there’s a trail mapped out for the course. The trail is mapped out with caution tape, and everyone starts together. You just have to go as hard as you can.” There is generally a time limit of around one hour for each team to complete the laps, and the event happens rain or shine. Poole says cyclocross riders generally love the mud and consider a messy race to be a good race. Cross fans are a resilient bunch, since mud is sometimes

the least of their concerns. Weather is a significant variable, since, “It’s always at the end of the road season, so the weather is really temperamental. We’ve had races where it’s been snowing or raining, or it’s been hot and really dry.” Though it might make sense to assume the bikes used are like mountain bikes, they’re actually closer to road bikes. That said, they’re truly in a class all their own. Cyclocross bikes have bigger tires and more clearance in the brake area; the bottom bracket is also higher. Poole says the design is intended to offer more maneuverability for navigating sand, mud, grass—and yes, stairs. In competitive cycling, cyclists work to win points and rise in rank. Cyclocross functions in exactly the same way. Sanctioned events are run through USA Cycling, but there are also unsanctioned events that do not allow riders to rise in competitive rank. That’s the type of event Poole has organized. Her reasoning is simple: “I actually feel it benefits the community so much more, because when you have a sanctioned race, everybody has to have a license,” which changes the feel of the race. Unsanctioned events, in which cyclists participate strictly for fun, have a very different dynamic than professional events. Sanctioned events are also more expensive, ranging anywhere from $30 to $80, while Cross Boss is able to charge only $10, though much of the cost to put on the race is covered by sponsors. By removing the element of ranking, Pool also notes that, “Although there is competition between riders, it’s so much friendlier because it’s not about the points. It’s about coming together with your friends, doing what you love and making a big party of it.” And in every response, that’s the energy Poole projects—that cross is one big party. Even the audience gets in on the fun: Poole was once at an event in which audience members dangled doughnuts from fishing poles, so participants could snag some carbs while on the move. She laughs and adds, “It’s nuts, but it’s so much fun.” Little Rock’s Cross Boss 2017 will commence around November, though dates have not yet been finalized.

BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6 43


Trailblazers

RECYCLE BIKES FOR KIDS is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to provide one free bike to any kid and to offer adults the opportunity to earn a bike by volunteering.

To volunteer or donate come to our shop Mondays 1-7 or Saturdays 9-12, or drop off the bike at any local Little Rock bike shop 717 East 10th St. North Little Rock 501-563-8264 www.facebook.com/recyclebikesforkids

Plan your ride at Iron Mountain...

If you seek out a challenge or prefer a leisurely scenic mountain ride, the Iron Mountain Bike Trails have it all. After the ride, relax in a lakeside cottage equipped with spacious decks, native stone fireplaces, hot tubs and more! 134 Iron Mountain Marina Dr Arkadelphia, Arkansas (870) 246-4310 (800) 243-3396 Iron-Mountain.com

44 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6

TARA KELLY LEAMON and her husband opened The Ride bike shop in Conway 13 years ago, but Tara didn’t begin cycling until about five years ago. At the time, there were not many women cycling in Conway, so she decided to start Women Bike Arkansas, a clinic that introduces road cycling to women. The clinic focuses on teaching cyclists how to ride safely and legally, but it also emphasizes the pleasure of fellowship. The clinic is open to women who haven’t been on a bike since childhood, intermediate riders and advanced cyclists. The Conway Fall Classic serves as the clinic’s graduation ride. Tara enjoys cycling because it allows her to get outside, feel the wind in her hair and see her community. A total extrovert, she also appreciates that cycling opens up an additional opportunity for fellowship. Despite swearing 25 years ago that she would never mountain bike again, she’s recently purchased her first mountain bike and hopes to begin a women’s group in Conway. —Lacey Thacker


JOSH POTTRIDGE ’s young life has already been deeply impacted by mountain biking. He began mountain biking at the age of 12 after he and his dad quit riding motocross. The following year Josh began racing MTB Cross Country. With his background in motocross and his comfort flying off tall ledges and over big jumps, it was a natural migration for him to then switch to downhill racing. Josh truly enjoyed racing downhill and excelled in it from the beginning. However, it wasn’t until he switched to MTB Enduro that he really found a home for his unique skill set. At the Iron Mountain, his first Enduro race, he brought home 1st place in the under-age-21 classification. He moved up to compete in the Pro Series and continues to rack up awards. Josh also makes time to help other mountain bikers improve their skills and would like to become involved with coaching a National Interscholastic Cycling Association team. Josh works at his family’s M & M Lumber and Sawmill, which produced the cedar boards used at Roger’s Railyard Bike Park. —Bob Robinson

S Q HO & UA W O C R IN C RA TZ G T. F , A 13 T Q T , 1 SH UI TH 4 , O LT E 15 W S

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AN ARKANSAN IN CRESTED BUTTE TOUGH CLIMBS, REWARDING SINGLETRACK BY ADDIE TEO

Addie’s friend, Jerome Moreau, at the base of the long climb up the 401 Trail fire road, 11,000 feet above sea level. 46 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6


C

rested Butte, the wildflower capitol of Colorado, is also a mountain biker’s paradise, so when an opportunity came up for me to go mountain biking in Crested Butte, I happily accepted. I boarded a plane and met up with my friend JC in Durango, Colorado. After a four-and-a-half-hour drive, JC and I finally arrived in Crested Butte. The downtown was exactly what I had imagined—small yet lively, with a good selection of restaurants and shops, and happy people all around. After a delicious dinner at The Stash Pizzeria, JC and I planned our mountain bike ride for the next day. I was giddy with excitement as I read about the 401 Trail in detail. The next morning, after a satisfying breakfast at the Sunflower Café, JC and I began our drive to the 401 Trail. The mid-50s morning temperature in Crested Butte was so refreshing. The colorful mountains and green pastures along the way calmed my soul and gave me a sense of peace and gratitude. The 13.7-mile loop began on what we typically call a “fire road” in Arkansas. It was a very scenic five-mile climb. At mile four, we came across a snowfield. As we rode past, we were greeted with the serene, picturesque Emerald Lake, which literally took my breath away. I stopped and spent a few minutes basking in its beauty. When we reached the top of mile five, the narrow singletrack of the 401 Trail began. At this point, the elevation was approaching 11,000 feet. By this time, my breathing was becoming very shallow and I had to stop a couple of times to allow my heart rate to drop a bit. As we reached the top of the mountain on the singletrack, the view was spectacular and the air was crisp. The smooth, swooping-fast downhill on the 401 Trail singletrack reminded me of riding our very own Womble, Iron Mountain and Cedar Glades trails back in Arkansas. I was grinning from ear-to-ear and sometimes let out a few yells as we ripped down the hills and rode past the abundance of tall wildflowers that slapped our wrists and attempted to grab our handlebars. The views on the 401 Trail were simply breathtaking. At times, I just stood there in complete awe of the beauty all around us. There were miles of majestic mountains in the background, with lush valleys and beautiful wildflowers in the foreground. JC and I ended our ride with a high five and big smiles on our faces.

BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6 47


Addie’s friend gives her a pull on the long climb up the Doctor Park Trail, just northeast of Almont, Colorado.

The next morning, JC and I had decided to ride Doctor Park Trail, a much more technical trail than the 401, but I woke with my legs feeling sluggish and tired. I suggested to JC I might take a town shuttle to the top of the mountain while he rode up and both of us could rip down the mountains together. JC had a better idea. Since JC had been training for numerous mountain bike races across the country, he suggested I let him tow me on the climbs. I laughed off his idea, of course, but JC stopped and pulled out a long rope and suggested we try out his idea. He proceeded to tie the rope between my bicycle head tube and his seat post. This was either going to be a big hit or we would both end up crashing. Surprisingly, it went well. I enjoyed my climbs so much more, riding much faster with less effort, and JC got a heck of a workout for quite a few miles. I would happily do it again. When we reached a turnoff for Doctor Gulch Trail, there was a river crossing at least 20 feet wide and thigh deep. The weather was turning cloudy, and the wind was picking up, but we still had more climbing to concentrate on. When we were 3/4 of the way to the top of the ridge, the sky opened up and it rained and hailed on us. It felt like the temperature had dropped 20 degrees since we started the ride and neither of us had our windbreakers. Around mile 15, on a narrow, off-camber section of the trail, my front wheel hit either a stump or a wet root. The bike went off the trail, and I flew off my bike and landed face down in a steep 48 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6

trench. When I rolled myself over, I saw an open wound on my left knee covered in debris. Unable to get myself up, I called out to JC, who was way ahead of me. JC came back to look for me and saw me laying in the wet dirt. He pulled me out of the trench and wrapped my wound with some athletic tape I had in my pack, but without clean water, we were unable to clean the wound. JC and I continued to ride the trail, determined to get to our parked vehicle so I could get this open wound taken care of. Close to an hour later, we finally completed our ride. It took us 30 minutes to drive back to Crested Butte, where we found a local clinic that took me in immediately. Doctor Thorson at The Town Clinic in Crested Butte took excellent care of me. The dirt was mixed with some crystal sand and my wound actually sparkled. We all had a good laugh about it. Dr. Thorson spent a good amount of time cleaning the wound, and he ended up having to use a pair of tweezers to pull out the embedded debris. After extensive irrigating and cleaning, I was sutured up and sent home with some antibiotics. Doctor’s orders? No riding for at least 24 hours. While JC went for another epic 30-mile mountain bike ride the next day, I spent the day shopping at the local shops, racking up cute bicycle-themed gifts, and eating delicious meals at the local restaurants. I look forward to going back to Crested Butte for a do-over on Doctor Park Trail. I am hoping the next ride on Doctor Park will not include a visit to an actual doctor.


THE COLORFUL MOUNTAINS AND GREEN PASTURES ALONG THE WAY CALMED MY SOUL AND GAVE ME A SENSE OF PEACE AND GRATITUDE.

Climbing Mount Crested Butte toward Emerald Lake on the 401 Trail.

Though the ascent of Mount Crested Butte was long, descending the stunning singletrack trail was worth it. Addie is overjoyed at the beauty of the 401 Trail. The snowfield around mile 4 of the climb on the 401 Trail was a stunning sight for an Arkansan in summer.

BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6 49


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aid the Rock, a Little Rock-based adventure race, began in 2001. At the time, there were several adventure races in the state, but now Raid the Rock is one of no more than a couple, according to director Traci Berry, who took over the race in 2012. Adventure races usually require teams, though there are some solo competitions. While cycling is an important component of this multidisciplinary sport, trekking and paddling are the other two-thirds of the required disciplines. In the case of Raid the Rock, Berry says, “We usually have a ropes section. Sometimes we’ll throw in team challenges, whether it’s eating something weird or solving a puzzle or riddle, to get the next set of coordinates.” The adventure course changes each year, and teams don’t know where the race is going to begin until coordinates are released either the night before or the morning of. Teams must be familiar with navigating and reading maps, as each location in the race is given via coordinates. Because orienteering is not as popular in Arkansas as it is out west, Berry says she and the main Raid the Rock course designer, Jed Davis, would like to host an orienteering series to help potential adventure race participants develop their skills. When asked what she loves about adventure racing, Berry says, “I love it because it’s getting to create that adventure for so many other people. They get to do something they wouldn’t do otherwise.”


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MY RIDE, MY TRAIL big dam:gateway ride BY ADDIE TEO

The view at sunset from the bluff at Emerald Park isn’t as well known as the Pinnacle Mountain view, but it’s no less stellar. 52 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6

PHOTOGRAPHY BY MATTHEW MARTIN


BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6 53


Clockwise from top left: Addie begins her after-work ride along the Arkansas River Trail heading toward the Big Dam Bridge just past the dog park. The downtown view at the top of Fort Roots is a favorite of Addie’s. After leaving the Big Dam Bridge and heading toward Victory Lake, Addie enjoys the shade along the River Trail. Riding up to the base of Emerald Park, Addie has an up close view of the Arkansas River.

54 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6


Addie takes a break mid-way along the north side of the Arkansas River Trail.

E

leven years ago, former Pulaski County Judge Buddy Villines was determined to build the Big Dam Bridge despite opposition and setbacks. When the Big Dam Bridge was completed, it stood 4,226 feet (1288 m) in length and it became the longest bicycle/ pedestrian bridge in North America. The Big Dam Bridge created a getaway to many mountain and road cycling destinations in Central Arkansas. It connects the cities of Little Rock and North Little Rock, and it allows cyclists, runners and pedestrians to enjoy both sides of the Arkansas River Trail, a 16-mile loop. It makes me proud to live in a city where bicycles play a big role in so many people’s lives. I often catch myself grinning when I see bicycle traffic on the Arkansas River Trail. I

often note parents riding with their children, elderly couples having the time of their lives while riding their bicycles and cyclists like me who enjoy getting a good workout or just riding along the River Trail and soaking in its beauty. It warms my heart when I see people smiling and greeting each other on the Arkansas River Trail, without a care in the world. Living in Central Arkansas, we are very fortunate to have several nearby mountain bike trails as well the Arkansas River Trail. One of my favorite places to ride is Emerald Park. After a stressful day at work, I often take my mountain bike out for a solo ride to unwind and to meditate. I usually start my ride at Cook’s Landing Park, at the base of the Big Dam Bridge. As soon as I’m on the River Trail, I immediately feel a

BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6 55


Junction Bridge in Little Rock lights up the night. 56 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6


It makes me proud to live in a city where bicycles play a big role sense of calmness engulf me. I often see people fishing, some picnicking, dog guardians watching their fur babies playing in the dog park and people playing golf at Burns Park Golf. My ride continues toward Emerald Park, where I usually choose to climb the dirt side. This short, rocky, multi-switchback trail takes me to the top of Emerald Park. The view from the river bluff at the top is simply amazing. My favorite hideout spot overlooks the river and Pinnacle Mountain. The I-430 bridge can also be seen on the horizon. This is the perfect spot to view the sunset, where the colorful sky and peaceful scenery allow me to rejuvenate my mind, my body and my soul. This is my happy place.

After viewing the sunset, I usually continue my ride on the River Trail, enjoying the serene views of the river. Sometimes, if I am lucky, I will run into a few wild creatures, like the pelicans on the river, deer, albino skunk and, of course, the geese. I then make my way toward the Junction Bridge to enjoy the display of lights before crossing the Clinton Presidential Park Bridge. From the Clinton Presidential Library, there are a few restaurants and stores in the River Market that are open late for a quick bite to eat or drink. After this leisurely ride, I am usually rejuvenated and ready to tackle another workday.

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Trailblazers

THREE TIMES MORE

EPIC

FRANK WEBBER has been riding

The Diamond Lakes region is the only place in the state where you can access three of the state’s five IMBA Epic trails.

1 LAKE OUACHITA VISTA TRAIL (LOViT) Intermediate • 45 Miles Trail Heads: Shangri La • Blakely Dam Near: Mount Ida • Crystal Springs

2 WOMBLE TRAIL

Intermediate • 33 Miles Trail Head: Story Near: Mount Ida • Story

3 OUACHITA NATIONAL RECREATION TRAIL Intermediate to Advanced Near: Hot Springs Village Added Bonus: Camping Shelters every 10 miles

All skill levels are welcome, but these are among the most extreme singletracks in the country. Other trails in the area like Iron Mountain, Cedar Glades and Charlton Recreation Trail are more moderate. CLOSEST IMBA RIDE CENTER IS LOCATED IN HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK, AR. Visit HotSprings.org to view the Bike Hot Springs brochure & request a free Hot Springs/Diamond Lakes Vacation Guide. Ad paid for with a combination of state and private regional association funds.

58 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6

bicycles since he was a kid, and he continued cycling throughout his growing years. When Frank was a college student, he stopped cycling and became overweight. He quickly realized he needed to make a change in his life and picked up cycling again, and that led to competing in the Arkansas mountain bike race series. After competing for a few years with great results, Frank landed a spot on a professional mountain bike team and had the opportunity to race all over the country, meet some amazing people and see some incredible places. He currently manages operations for Orbea USA. Frank loves working for a company that values people and makes some of the best cycling products in the world. Frank and his wife, Sarah, are the race promoters for the Syllamo’s Revenge endurance mountain bike race in Mountain View. Countless volunteer hours have been poured into rebuilding and rehabilitating Syllamo trail from neglect, erosion and natural disasters. One of Frank’s proudest moments was when the Syllamo Trail resecured its IMBA Epic status. —Addie Teo


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PHOTO BY JOE LANE OF ANOINTED MEDIA

The World Hardcourt Bike Polo Championships, rarely held in the United States, are scheduled for Lexington in October.

POLO IN THE ROCK

B

BY LACEY THACKER

ike polo may sound strange, but the fact is, it’s a sport gaining popularity across the world. It offers players a chance to hop on their bikes and hang out with friends—and what more could a cyclist ask for? Competition? Well, the sport offers that, too. The game itself has evolved over the years, after first appearing in the Pacific Northwest in the mid-2000s, according to Jared Rickman, a founding member of Little Rock Bike Polo. The game began as a moderately high-impact sport, but has since mellowed into almost no contact. Bike polo is played three-on-three, on high-geared, single-speed bicycles. Players must not touch the ground, and the game continues until the first team reaches five points or time has been reached. Though the game has rules, Rickman also notes that it can be pretty random, depending on the needs of the particular group playing. The game is played in nearly every country in the world, though dedicated courses are more likely to be found in New Zealand or Europe. When the game was originally created, the DIY ethic was almost a requirement of participation. Players had to make their own mallets and play the game in parking garages or other appropriated spots. Today, there are several companies that make and sell the appropriate equipment. The Little Rock Bike Polo club has been around for nearly ten years. The club has gone through several membership phases, as clubs are wont to do. Currently, membership sits at around six people, a couple of whom are originals. There are also groups in Fayetteville and Russellville. Though it might seem counterintuitive, Rickman recommends bike polo for new cyclists, saying, “I try to guarantee this is the 60 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6

safest way to ride your bike.” Since there are no cars and the game occurs at a low speed, there are rarely injuries. While he acknowledges the game might be frustrating at first, Rickman says, “Once people make their first goal, they’re hooked.” Back at home, Rickman points out that the Parks Department has been very willing to do their part in making a safe, accessible spot for bike polo in MacArthur Park. Lights were installed a couple of years ago, and the park has become more popular since, though Rickman says frequent visitors know who plays which night and try to respect others’ unofficial reservations. Josh Carey, a member of the River Valley Bike Polo club, has similar sentiments regarding his city. Though the Russellville and Dardanelle area doesn’t enjoy as much cycling popularity as other parts of the state, the club has found a permanent home at Merritt Park in Dardanelle. “The City of Dardanelle,” Carey says, “has been super supportive of our sport, allowing us to convert an unused tennis court with a great surface and awesome lights. They even bought us materials to adapt the court to better suit our sport. They have also shown enthusiasm when we have hosted tournaments in their park.” Carey says a place to play is the biggest hurdle most clubs have to overcome, so they’re grateful to have the space they do. River Valley Bike Polo focuses on casual games where people of all ages, genders and athletic abilities are welcome. River Valley Bike Polo Plays every Thursday from 6-9 p.m., while Bike Polo Little Rock plays every Tuesday evening at MacArthur Park. The clubs are co-ed and welcoming of newcomers. Check their Facebook pages for more information.


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PHOTO BY LANCE GREGORY

Riders with RevRock Cycling Club practice group riding skills.

8 BENEFITS OF JOINING A CYCLING CLUB BY DAVE ROBERTS

So, you’re an avid cyclist and enjoy riding the roads and trails in your area. You’re curious about riding clubs but aren’t sure they are for you. After all, why should you pay dues to join a group that wears matching jerseys? Well – there may be more to a cycling club than you think. Here are my top eight benefits of joining a cycling club (from a road cyclist and club member in Central Arkansas):

1. COMRADERY with like-minded enthusiasts is the main

reason I decided to join a club. When I improved on my own from beginner to novice, I was ready to go to the next level. After attending some Tour de Rock training rides hosted by various Central Arkansas cycling clubs, I found my home. A good group of club riders will motivate each other to get out and ride more. Some riders gain confidence and improve their endurance simply by riding together more often.

2. TEAMWORK on long rides is a bonus. I didn’t know much

about single or double pace lines years ago. I knew the basics from watching the Tour de France but had not mastered the ins and outs until I joined a club. Many club rides are nodrop group rides with a designated leader. Typically you can find organized rides three times a week March thru October (weather permitting) on Tuesday & Thursday evenings and Saturday mornings.

3. TRAINING for a ride or race can be more effective in a

group. Central Arkansas has three major cycling events: Tour de Rock, Wampoo Roadeo (which is a RevRock event), and Big Dam Bridge 100. Most clubs conduct numerous training rides to master the routes and prepare the group for a safe and enjoyable ride. 62 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6

4. SKILL-BUILDING CLINICS are offered by many clubs. My

club organizes and subsidizes (using club dues) training classes to have a professional coach work with us to improve our group riding skills. We like to do these clinics prior to a big event like the Big Dam Bridge ride.

5. NETWORK for info and updates on road and weather

conditions: Communication through social media (Facebook) and emails is the best way to disseminate information. Sometimes it is about hazardous weather, but more often it’s about trail or road conditions, like after a flood event or when Arkansas Department of Transportation resurfaces a road on a popular route. Sometimes it’s the details on an upcoming ride concerning proposed a route, total miles, pace, etc.

6. INSURANCE: Some clubs pay for liability and accident

insurance through the League of American Bicyclists. This benefit ensures that if a member is struck by a motorist or incurs property damage, they have some recourse since some home and auto and even health insurance may not provide similar coverage.


7. ADVOCACY to promote a cycling lifestyle in Arkansas. Clubs like to rally

around a bicycle-related cause, whether it’s to support expansion of trail networks (like the Southwest Trail votes) or to provide input on safety issues and enforcement.

Do something good for yourself

8. COMMUNITY OUTREACH is the right way to pay it forward. Many clubs in Central Arkansas support Recycle Bikes for Kids, the local charity that build bikes and donate them to kids and disadvantaged individuals. Rev Rock buys helmets to go with the second-life bikes. We also volunteer time at Miracle League – baseball for special needs kids in the Spring and Fall.

Cycling clubs may not be for everyone. I have friends who only ride solo, and that works for them; however, it’s hard to argue the benefits listed above. If you are on the lookout for a club, find out what they offer (most have a website) and better yet, join them for a group ride to see if the style is a good fit for you. The old adage “the more the merrier” certainly applies when deciding if you should join a cycling club.

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May 19-25, 2018

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3775 N. Mall Ave. 479-966-4308 phattirebikeshop.com Bike Brands: Trek, Santa Cruz, Electra, Foundry, Stromer, Salsa In-House Specialties: Full service department with Shimano Certified techs. Works on all levels of bikes, specializing in tubeless tire setup, electronic shifting and professional bike fits. Offers a massive rental bike fleet ranging from high-end carbon to hybrid and kids’ trailers. Everything is backed with a 100-percent, no questions guarantee. Open seven days.

THE BIKE ROUTE

3660 N. Front St., Suite 2 479-966-4050 facebook.com/thebikeroute Bike Brands: Cannondale, Cervelo, Pinarello, Moots, Niner, Electra In-House Specialties: Full service mechanics/repair, rental of bikes and race wheels

THE HIGHROLLER CYCLERY When you’re done riding the trail . . . Our lodge, cottages, hot tubs and condos will provide you with a home base. Located just minutes from the LOViT - an IMBA EPIC Model Trail – one of only 40 in the world.

Check out our Trail Adventure Packages on our website! Spring & Fall trail packages start at $383.25 for a WEEK! 870-867-1200 • 800-832-2276 MountainHarborResort.com 66 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6

322 W. Spring St. 479-442-9311 highrollercyclery.com Bike Brands: Specialized, Yeti, Pure Fix, Pure City Cycle, Reid Cycles In-House Specialties: Repairs all types, suspension overhaul services, bike fittings (using the Body Geometry fit system with motion capture software), bike path use rentals, bike financing available through Synchrony Bank.

FORT SMITH

CHAMPION CYCLING & FITNESS

8201 Rogers Ave. 479-484-7500 championcycling.com Bike Brands: Specialized In-House Specialties: Full service and repair to all brands, 0% financing for 24 months.


America has fallen in love with cycling, and cyclists have fallen in love with the Arkansas Delta. Who wouldn’t be passionate about a region that offers miles of stunning scenic beauty in a gently rolling landscape that is easily pedaled, yet challenging enough to do your body a world of good? Whatever type of ride gets your heart pumping, we’ve got it. Visit our website for everything you need to know about our routes, trails and tours. Come ride with us!

Riders enjoy a scenic stretch along the Tour Da Delta which originates in Helena.

deltabyways.com/cycling This ad paid for with a combination of state funds and private regional association funds. BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6 67


PHAT TIRE BIKE SHOP

1700 Rogers Ave. 479-222-6796 phattirebikeshop.com Bike Brands: Trek, Santa Cruz, Electra, Foundry, Stromer, Salsa In-House Specialties: Full service department with Shimano Certified techs. Works on all levels of bikes, specializing in tubeless tire setup, electronic shifting and professional bike fits. Offers a massive rental bike fleet ranging from high-end carbon to hybrid and kids’ trailers. Everything is backed with a 100-percent, no questions guarantee. Open seven days.

OZARK BIKE SHOP

Cash Village Shopping Center 400 S. 8th St., Ste. K 479-636-0394

THE HIGHROLLER CYCLERY

Southwest Arkansas

HOT SPRINGS

PARKSIDE CYCLE

719 Whittington Ave. 501-623-6188 parksidecycle.com Bike Brands: Trek, Felt, Salsa In-House Specialties: Full service repair and fitting.

HEBER SPRINGS

402 S. Metro Parkway 479-254-9800 highrollercyclery.com Bike Brands: Specialized, Yeti, Pure Fix, Pure City Cycle, Reid Cycles In-House Bike Specialties: Repairs for all types, suspension overhaul services, bike fittings (using the Body Geometry fit system with motion capture software), bike path use rentals, bike financing available through Synchrony Bank.

SULPHUR CREEK OUTFITTERS

SILOAM SPRINGS

TEXARKANA (TX)

DOGWOOD JUNCTION TRIKES & BIKES

BERRIDGE BIKES

625 S. 7th St. 501-691-0138 screekoutfitters.com Bike Brands: Kona, Surley, All City In-House Specialties: Full service, sales and rentals.

MOUNTAIN HOME

MOUNTAIN HOME BICYCLE COMPANY

1310 E. Side Centre Ct. 870-425-2453 mountainhomebicyclecompany.com Bike Brands: Trek, Electra In-House Specialties: Full service repair, Shimano certified techs.

ROGERS

GPP CYCLING

318 S. 1st St. 479-372-4768 gppcycling.com Bike Brands: Cannondale, Scott, Felt, Cervelo, BMC, Masi, Ellsworth In-House Specialties: Coaching services, bike fitting, full-service repairs, fitness center and rentals.

LEWIS & CLARK OUTFITTERS

2530 Pinnacle Hills Parkway 479-845-1344 lewisandclarkoutfitters.com Bike Brands: Giant, Liv, Kona In-House Specialties: Full-service bicycle repair, rack install, 6- and 12-month financing.

68 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6

200 Progress Ave., Ste. 5 (Signature Plaza) 479-524-6605 dogwoodjunction.biz Bike Brands: Terra Trike, Catrike, KHS, ICE Trikes, Bacchetta recumbent In-House Specialties: Repair, service, sales, limited rentals, financing, layaway, test rides, winter storage and recycled bikes.

SPRINGDALE

LEWIS & CLARK OUTFITTERS

4915 S. Thompson St. 479-756-1344 lewisandclarkoutfitters.com Bike Brands: Giant, Liv, Momentum, Kona In-House Specialties: Full-service bicycle repair, rack install, 6- and 12-month financing.

PHAT TIRE BIKE SHOP

101 W. Johnson Ave. phattirebikeshop.com Bike Brands: Trek, Santa Cruz, Electra, Foundry, Stromer, Salsa In-House Specialties: Full service department with Shimano Certified techs. Works on all levels of bikes, specializing in tubeless tire setup, electronic shifting and professional bike fits. Offers a massive rental bike fleet ranging from high-end carbon to hybrid and kids’ trailers. Everything is backed with a 100-percent, no questions guarantee. Open seven days.

SPA CITY CYCLING

879 Park Avenue Ste. B (501) 463-9364 Bike Brands: Orbea, Scott In-House Specialties: Bike Service & Repair, Parts & Accessories

321 Texas Blvd. 903-794-2453 berridgebikes.com Bike Brands: Felt, Giant, Intense, Electra, Sun, Torker, Redline, Phat Cycles, Trek In-House Specialties: Service and repairs, custom builds.

BICYCLE REPAIR & SERVICE ONLY

BICYCLE OUTFITTER

110 N. Walnut St. Harrison 870-741-6833 Bike Brands: Trek, Diamondback In-House Specialties: Parts, accessories and service on all makes and models of bikes.

MOTIVE BIKE SERVICE

Mobile repair service to the Little Rock Metro Area and beyond 479-366-7926 motivebikeservice.com

OZARK BICYCLE SERVICE

W. New Hope Road Northwest Arkansas Area 479-715-1496 ozarkbicycleservice.com


WHENYOUFEEL THENEEDTO SWITCHGEARS

Mt. Kessler

winners announced in the summer issue BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6 69


EVENTS

Slaughter Pen Jam 2016

SEPTEMBER BIG DAMN BRIDGE 100 Thebigdamnbridge100.com 23 SLAUGHTER PEN JAM bikereg.com

NOVEMBER TOUR DUH SUNKEN LANDS racesonline.com 4 NOVEMBER ATTILA THE HUN bikehotsprings.org 22 Red Mango proudly supports cycling in Arkansas.

5621 Kavanaugh Blvd, Little Rock, AR 72207 | (501) 663-2500 70 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6

PHOTO BY MEGAN SEBECK PHOTOGRAPHY

OCTOBER 7-8


AVID BIKER?

PULASKI COUNTY HAS YOU COVERED!

BIG DAM BRIDGE AT 4226 FEET THE BIG DAM BRIDGE IS THE LONGEST PEDESTRIAN/BICYCLE BRIDGE IN THE WORLD! TWO RIVERS PARK ALLOWS VISITORS TO EXPLORE AND RELAX WHILE ENJOYING NATURE'S BEAUTY. THE 1000-ACRE PARK, LOCATED JUST SIX MILES OUTSIDE OF DOWNTOWN LITTLE ROCK, HAS MANY AMENITIES TO INCLUDE BIKE TRAILS, WALKING TRAILS, GARDENS, AND ABUNDANCE OF WILDLIFE. JUNCTION BRIDGE PROJECT WILL ADAPT THE JUNCTION RAILROAD BRIDGE FOR PEDESTRIAN AND BICYCLE USE, LINKING BOTH SIDES OF THE ARKANSAS RIVER. IT WILL BE AN INTEGRAL PART OF THE SIX BRIDGES PLAN AND RIVERFRONT DEVELOPMENT IN BOTH CITIES. FOR MORE INFORMATION, VISIT WWW.PULASKICOUNTY.NET

OUTDOOR ADVENTURES WITH A

SOUTHERN ACCENT.

SM

Like our ride along the Arkansas River Trail, our memories of Little Rock are filled with wonderful discoveries. The breathtaking views from the top of Pinnacle Mountain. Touring the city’s downtown by Segway, and its neighborhoods, barbecue joints and breweries by bike. Enjoying the charm and convenience of riding the trolley from our hotel to explore the great shops, restaurants and clubs in the River Market, and being mesmerized by the city’s beautiful illuminated bridges. These are the memories of a new Southern style. You can experience it all here. You can experience it all in Little Rock.

Big Dam Bridge > To see more visit LittleRock.com

BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6 71


GOING OUT OF BUSINESS SALE!

EVERYTHING MUST GO • DOORS CLOSE OCTOBER 31 Located 100 yards from the north end of the Clinton Park Bridge - Right off the Riverfront Trail!

SALES SERVICE ALL BRANDS

SEPTEMBER 15 29TH ANNUAL MOUNTAIN BIKE RACE Arkansasstateparks.com/ devilsden/events

SEPTEMBER 16 CONWAY FALL CLASSIC Cycleconway.com

10am to 6pm Closed on Wed. • Open Sun. 2pm to 6pm • (501) 372-2727 800 E. Washington Ave, Suite B, North Little Rock, Arkansas

INNER-CITY CLASSIC arkansasbicycleclub.org

SEPTEMBER 24 ARKANSAS HIGH SCHOOL CYCLING LEAGUE RACE SERIES

SALES SERVICE ALL BRANDS

arkansasmtb.org

SALES SERVICE ALL BRANDS

SALES SERVICE ALL BRANDS SALES TRAIL MAPS AVAILABLESERVICE ALL BRANDS HOT SPRINGS IS AN IMBA RIDE CENTER

SEPTEMBER 30 ARKANSAS DELTA FLATLANDER BIKE RIDE Arkansasdeltaflatlander.com

WHEEL-A-MENA RIDE TO THE TOP wheelamena.org

OCTOBER 7 ARKANSAS HIGH SCHOOL CYCLING LEAGUE RACE SERIES arkansasmtb.org

TRAIL MAPS AVAILABLE 719 WHITTINGTON AVE., HOT SPRINGS, AR TRAIL MAPS AVAILABLE TUESDAY-FRIDAY 11 AM-6 PM G SATURDAY 10 AM-4 PM N PARKSIDE CYCLE I T PARKSIDE CYCLE 719 WHITTINGTON AVE. CELEBRAARS! 501.623.6188 719 WHITTINGTON AVE. HOT SPRINGS, AR HOT SPRINGS, AR E Y 2 2 WWW.PARKSIDECYCLE.COM TUESDAY-FRIDAY TUESDAY-FRIDAY 11 AM-6 PM PARKSIDE_CYCLE@HOTMAIL.COM SATURDAY 11 AM-6 PM 10 AM-4 PM

501.623.6188 WWW.PARKSIDECYCLE.COM PARKSIDE_CYCLE@HOTMAIL.COM

TRAIL MAPS AVAILABLE

PARKSIDE CYCLE

719 WHITTINGTON AVE. HOT SPRINGS, AR

TUESDAY-FRIDAY 11 AM-6 PM SATURDAY 10 AM-4 PM 501.623.6188 WWW.PARKSIDECYCLE.COM PARKSIDE_CYCLE@HOTMAIL.COM

72 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6

SATURDAY 10 AM-4 PM

501.623.6188 WWW.PARKSIDECYCLE.COM PARKSIDE_CYCLE@HOTMAIL.COM

TOUR DA DELTA Tourdadelta.net

OCTOBER 15 JOE WEBER ARKY 100 arkansasbicycleclub.org

OCTOBER 19 FALL BICYCLE TOUR arkansasbicycleclub.org

OCTOBER 21 PEDESTAL ROCK ROAD BIKE RIDE AND LICK FORK GRAVEL GRIND pedestalrock40ride.com

CROSS BOSS SERIES 1 facebook.com/pg/ crossboss2017


NOVEMBER 5 ARKANSAS HIGH SCHOOL CYCLING LEAGUE RACE SERIES arkansasmtb.org

OCTOBER 29 RIVER VALLEY RUMBLE ozarkcyclingadventures.com

NOVEMBER 11 PLAYING IN THE DIRT

From training wheels to big wheels, we have a ride for you! CANNONDALE | RALEIGH | GT | SCHWINN | REDLINE Tune Ups • Checkovers • Tire & Tube Replacement • Brake & Gear Work • Wheel Work • Lifetime adjustment policy on new bikes Financing Available! No down payment. No interest for 12 months W.A.C.

7910 John F. Kennedy Blvd. (Hwy 107), Sherwood (501) 835-4814

www.jandpbikeshop.com

bikenwa.org

NOVEMBER 18 2ND ANNUAL CRANKSGIVING NWA facebook.com/ CranksgivingNWA

CROSS BOSS SERIES 2 facebook.com/pg/ crossboss2017

DECEMBER 2 CROSS BOSS SERIES 3 facebook.com/pg/ crossboss2017

DECEMBER 9 CYCLOFROST FAYETTEVILLE fayetteville-ar.gov/raceseries

DECEMBER 9-10 RAID THE ROCK ADVENTURE RACE Raidtherock.com

JANUARY 26 BUFFALO HEADWATERS CHALLENGE ozarkoffroadcyclists.org

BETTER BIKES BETTER SERVICE BETTER PRICES

FEBRUARY 17 THE BRUTE thebikelane.cc/thebrute.html

MARCH 11 SYLLAMO’S REVENGE syllamosrevenge.com

2104 S. Walton Blvd Bentonville, AR 479-271-7201 mojocycling.com BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6 73


Happy Trails

Jim Allen, Rett Peek, Robbin Rahman take turns using eclipse glasses to view the moon as it slowly covers the sun.

On August 21, the United States experienced its first solar eclipse in 26 years. Its path went across the country from Oregon to South Carolina. While the path of totality—the path across which the entire sun and its light would be obscured from view—did not cross Arkansas, many still noted the dimming daylight and birds singing as though it were dusk. The Meteor (formerly known as Spokes) hosted an eclipse ride from the shop to the Big Dam Bridge, where a group gathered to view the eclipse as it hit its peak around 1:15. Those with glasses rotated them among those without.

74 | BIKE ARKANSAS issue no. 6

PHOTO BY COLE TININENKO

TURN AROUND BRIGHT EYE


Over 30 years of experience. We design and build all varieties of single-track mountain bike trails, bike parks, pump tracks, hiking trails, and more! 21954 Devils Gap Rd., Rogers, Arkansas • 479.445.8212


Bike Arkansas | Issue No. 6 | 2017