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ARKTIMES.COM / AUGUST 22, 2013 / NEWS + POLITICS + ENTERTAINMENT + FOOD

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Life under the gun with one of the greatest — and least known — lawmen of all time: BASS REEVES. BY DAV ID KO ON

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VOLUME 39, NUMBER 51 ARKANSAS TIMES (ISSN 0164-6273) is published each week by Arkansas Times Limited Partnership, 201 East Markham Street, Suite 200, Little Rock, Arkansas, 72201, phone (501) 375-2985. Periodical postage paid at Little Rock, Arkansas, and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to ARKANSAS TIMES, EAST MARKHAM STREET, SUITE 200, Little Rock, AR, 72201. Subscription prices are $42 for one year, $78 for two years. Subscriptions outside Arkansas are $49 for one year, $88 for two years. Foreign (including Canadian) subscriptions are $168 a year. For subscriber service call (501) 375-2985. Current single-copy price is 75¢, free in Pulaski County. Single issues are available by mail at $2.50 each, postage paid. Payment must accompany all single-copy orders. Reproduction or use in whole or in part of the contents without the written consent of the publishers is prohibited. Manuscripts and artwork will not be returned or acknowledged unless sufficient return postage and a self-addressed stamped envelope are included. All materials are handled with due care; however, the publisher assumes no responsibility for care and safe return of unsolicited materials. All letters sent to ARKANSAS TIMES will be treated as intended for publication and are subject to ARKANSAS TIMES’ unrestricted right to edit or to comment editorially.

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COMMENT

Why not another drug for lethal injections? I’ve contacted both the governor’s office and the attorney general’s office to get more info on the current lethal injection debacle. I haven’t heard back from the former, and was told by the latter that it only communicated with “state officials.� I agree with Governor Beebe that capital punishment should remain an option for some crimes. What I don’t understand is why our state must rely solely on the use of sodium pentothal as the key drug in lethal injections. My understanding is that its sole manufacturer is overseas and prohibits its use for this purpose. I know also that the European Union forbids its sale internationally for this purpose. U.S. states and other countries that have legalized euthanasia generally use either secobarbital or pentobarbital to cause death in a humane and effective manner without the need of additional drugs to stop respiration and heartbeat. If the European Union or the overseas manufacturer of sodium pentothal won’t allow its use in lethal injections, why not substitute either of the above drugs in its place? Both are readily available in the U.S. and it would be hard to argue against them as humane alternatives to sodium pentothal. Any input from medical professionals on this issue would be greatly appreciated. Brad Bailey Fayetteville

DMV, fooled Here is a license plate that did get by a clueless motor vehicle worker. My son, Matt, upon returning to town after serving in the Marine Corps for six years, and, of course, being full of piss and vinegar, tricked the young DMV person into believing this: GO*NADS, “Go North Atlantic Defense Systems.�

No, I did not make this up. It was issued to him shortly thereafter, then mounted on his car. Naturally, he got lots of horn toots and thumbs up. But mama said, “Don’t hold your breath ’cause it will get stolen.� Sure enough, after enrolling as a student at UALR, the plate disappeared in a week. It’s probably hanging on some kid’s wall. Oh, well. Now my son is a police patrolman. Heaven help the soul should the Marine/cop run into him! Sandy Thomas Little Rock

From the web In response to the cover story, “Hog farm near the Buffalo River stirs controversy� (Aug. 15): Very informative and well composed. The residents of Centerville have a Cargill hog farm situation with the owners wanting to expand a facility in an area that is closely populated. The permit is in the hands of ADEQ now and we are holding our breath and hoping that we have made our point with ADEQ, but I have a feeling that this permit will be rubber-stamped also. There needs to be a moratorium on these permits until there are proper rules and regulations in place. Cargill says that they don’t plan on growing here. Hmmm. ... Trish8487 Do the farm and Cargill have insurance that will cover any clean-up operation if there is a failure anywhere in the chain? What about family water wells? If a family can no longer use their well due to contamination will they receive payment? If the Buffalo is contaminated due to a failure will the farm or Cargill pay for monetary losses to those that make their living from the Buffalo? If the Buffalo is contaminated and it reaches the White River what then? In a perfect world there would never be an issue. This is not a perfect world and factory farms have a very BAD history

in other states for “issues.� I just do not want to paddle down the Poop-a-low. Miss Ellie I have seen the location of the hog farm and doubt seriously it would be capable of polluting the Buffalo, however the fields listed to be sprayed do have the capabilities of causing such damage to the river. What concerns me is when they test for any pollutants how will the Buffalo National River Park Service know the difference in the pollutants from the diluted hog waste and the 300 metric tons of chicken/turkey litter they (Park Service) sprayed on the Gene Rush area and the various hay fields that join directly on the river, which is mandatory to anyone that leases these fields. They must be fertilized each year per the lease agreement. This information can be obtained directly from the park if requested due to FOI act. This is done every spring and is usually prior to the spring floods when the fields joining the Carver area usually end up under water. Arky In response to Max Brantley’s column, “Waltons attack Little Rock School District� (Aug. 15): Is such an emotional outburst acceptable for a column in the Arkansas Times? It is unfortunate that so many adults are unable to have an adult conversation about topics on which they feel strongly. I gather from this column that Mr. Brantley feels very strongly about the topics of charter schools, the Waltons, and education. Certainly, Mr. Brantley’s emotions come through clearly in the vitriol here; however, setting emotion aside for just a moment and speaking as an adult might, one may wonder: 1. What is so evil and prejudicial about setting up additional schools of choice in a city where the school system is widely recognized to be struggling — just as so many other urban school districts across

America are struggling? 2. We know that competition works in other areas. Might it not also work in education? It appears that it has in at least some instances. 3. What is wrong with expanded opportunities for education? Surely if a student and his or her family can choose between options, this improves their opportunities. Particularly, if a student can choose between a struggling school and one that is having more success, would that not be a good thing? 4. Why does Mr. Brantley insist on defining fairness in terms of LACK of opportunity for everyone? 5. What is behind Mr. Brantley’s objection to using private funds — whether from the Waltons or others — to look for ways to improve education and educational opportunities? Would he complain so if the Waltons were spending this money on improving healthcare? On low-income housing? On programs to improve marriages in low-income areas? Why single out education? Terry Chaney In response to “There she is, Miss Gay Arkansas America� (Aug. 15): Arkansas is much more gay friendly than many other places in America. Tortie_Tude Norman Jones “made� Arkansas gay friendly back when gay was not cool. Norman never backed down and supported gays. While at the same time showing Arkansas that being gay does not mean you are stupid either. Norman is a great businessman and will give you the shirt off his back. But in the end he will make money out of anything. MEnLR

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AUGUST 22, 2013

5


EDITORIAL

EYE ON ARKANSAS

For kindness

Wiser heads

N

ot for the first time, level-headed professors at Arkansas’s colleges and universities have saved their students from a mad plot by legislative extremists. “They’re so ideological and irrational,” a philosophy professor at Fayetteville says of the legislators. “We have to be constantly on guard, even the football coaches.” The lawmakers’ latest scheme was to flood the campuses with weaponry, strapping concealed handguns on faculty and staff. A law to achieve this reckless end became effective this month. But the institutions of higher learning took advantage of a provision of the law that allowed them to opt out. They had opposed the bill before this provision was added. So the academics at the colleges and universities will once again be packing good judgment, but not firearms, in the new school year. If only the same could be said of the legislators. Possibly the professors could conduct workshops on Legislative Weekend, exposing the legislators to reason and common sense. It’s said that it’s never too late to learn. 6

AUGUST 22, 2013

ARKANSAS TIMES

DAVID KOON

T

wenty fourteen looks like it could be a particularly tiresome election year in Arkansas. “Republican” today translates to “mean and irresponsible” and yet Republicans will be trying, and with a pretty good chance of succeeding, to increase their majority in the state legislature. A Tea Party whacko with millions of corporate dollars behind him will be out to defeat a fairly dull Democrat who happens to be the only moderate left in the Arkansas congressional delegation. Yet another unpleasant right-winger will seek to win the governorship for the Republicans; he’d be a far worse chief executive than the last Republican to hold that office. His opponent is another uninspiring, quasi-Democrat. In just about every race, it looks like public-spirited electors will be voting against rather than for, and that’s always disheartening. But there’ll apparently be at least one issue on the ballot that kind-hearted citizens can support wholeheartedly. Attorney General Dustin McDaniel has approved the popular name and ballot title of a proposed initiated act to legalize the use of marijuana for medical purposes. Supporters of the act can begin collecting the signatures needed to put the measure on the ballot, and they have until next July to do so. The proposal is similar to one that was narrowly defeated in the 2012 general election. Supporters have revised it to remove what they believe was the principal objection. Many sick people say their suffering is relieved only by marijuana. The opponents of medical marijuana are people indifferent to others’ suffering, like that Republican gubernatorial candidate mentioned above. As a one-time federal drug warrior, he seemed to enjoy siccing cops on cancer patients. As is the case with same-sex marriage, time is on medical marijuana’s side. Younger voters are receptive. Twenty states have approved the use of marijuana for medical purposes; to add Arkansas to that group is worth striving for. Two more states have approved marijuana for recreation as well.

TAKING A DIP: A boy comes up for air after swinging off a rope swing into the Ouachita River near Lake Hamilton.

The bucks don’t stop at Bookout

T

he state Ethics Commission handed down historic fines last week for campaign finance violations by Democratic Sen. Paul Bookout of Jonesboro. The Commission fined Bookout $2,000, the maximum, for four violations of the law: 1) spending campaign money for personal use; 2) failing to keep adequate expenditure records; 3) commingling campaign and personal money, and 4) failing to itemize expenditures of campaign money of more than $100. Bookout, who was unopposed in 2012, raised $80,000 in campaign money and acknowledged in amended campaign filings that some $53,000 was spent for his own benefit — including direct cash payments, clothing, booze, meals, golf pro shop purchases and an $8,000 home entertainment system. Bookout issued a prepared statement accepting the commission’s finding, but vowed to complete his final term in the Senate. The State Police and a special prosecutor will review the file to see whether criminal charges are merited. The laws Bookout was found to have violated can also be prosecuted as misdemeanors, with maximum punishment reaching a year in jail and a $2,000 fine. The standard of proof is higher in a criminal case. And the misdemeanor statute of limitations of one year has already run on some of the expenditures, if not on the filing discrepancies. Tax issues also loom. It’s a mess long in the making. In 2010, when he was preparing to become Senate president pro tempore, Bookout raised $106,350 and, though unopposed, spent the money up, again without itemizing most of the expenditures. He claimed, for example, that he gave $25,000 to nonprofits without listing the payments. He also spent tens of thousands in entertainment and travel expenses, the big category that led Bobby Hester, a conservative political activist in Jonesboro, to complain about Bookout’s 2012 report. Bookout’s reporting on expenditures of his carryover campaign money also seems incomplete. I’ve yet to find a theory for how Bookout’s actions differ (except in shopping list) from the personal use of fed-

eral campaign money that recently sent Jesse Jackson Jr. to prison. Bookout should resign from office. He probably will. It’s possible he’s reserving resignation as a bargaining chip with prosecutors. MAX Bookout is not alone. Sloppy, BRANTLEY maxbrantley@arktimes.com incomplete and suspicious campaign finance reporting is old news at the Arkansas legislature. The legislature created its own temptation. There’s no reason to allow winning candidates to keep a carryover fund equal to their salary except as an incumbent enrichment plan. That money is supposed to be used for official purposes only, but it has been abused. In 2012, Republicans perfected the art of transferring campaign money from the unopposed to candidates in tough races. They dreamed up a cover — sham “ticketed events” — but even mishandled the scam and were found in violation of campaign finance laws. And several THEN used campaign money to pay their fines. If that’s not a personal use of campaign money I don’t know what is. The legislature should (but won’t): 1) End carryover funds for incumbents. 2) End use of campaign money for anything but campaign expenses. No entertainment, except for specific fund-raising events. 3) Specifically prohibit use of campaign money for contributions to other candidates. 4) Give the Ethics Commission more investigators and more power. The tiny agency responds primarily to signed, notarized complaints. It should routinely review campaign finance reports for obvious discrepancies and the staff should be allowed to act unilaterally. Finally, yes, prosecutions would help. Convictions would provide the basis for removal from office under the clear dictates of the Constitution. When you can spend $53,000 on yourself and the maximum civil penalty is $8,000 in fines (Bookout’s planned reimbursements are voluntary), the incentive to cheat is powerful if a legislator knows no one has ever been prosecuted.


OPINION

If Obamacare was overturned

I

f Rep. Tom Cotton and the rest of the tea-party coalition got their way and actually repealed Obamacare before its new insurance market goes into business Jan. 1, would they be the dog that caught the car? Over the past 30 months, the House of Representatives has voted 40 times to repeal the law. Now the strategy is to withhold a budget and shut down the government or, as a last resort, refuse to raise the debt ceiling and shove the country into bankruptcy until the president and the Senate go along and repeal the health law. There is no chance that will happen. Unlike Cotton, most Republicans in Congress don’t want to go to the brink because they have seen how the public reacts to such juvenile politics. But simply to raise the question of what would happen if they overturned the Affordable Care Act illustrates the Hobson’s choice that Republicans face with the law that they convinced most Americans to fear. How would repeal work? Let’s narrow it to Arkansas. The obvious big result is what won’t happen. Some 250,000 Arkansans, mostly working adults and their families whose incomes fall below 138 percent of the pov-

erty line, would not get health insurance wholly subsidized by the government except for some outof-pocket expenses. ERNEST About that many DUMAS more people who make more than 138 percent of poverty but are uninsured could not buy an affordable policy in the new private market set up by the Affordable Care Act. Most of them stand to get government help paying the premiums. That option would disappear. The immediate crisis would belong to the Republican-controlled Arkansas legislature, which will convene in January to adopt a state budget for fiscal 2015, and, of course, to Gov. Beebe. As a result of losing the Medicaid changes in Obamacare, Arkansas’s budget for this fiscal year would suddenly be in arrears, and the budgets for the next four years would be about $550 million short. Remember that Republican lawmakers jumped on the Medicaid expansion in Obamacare, which not only would insure 250,000 of the working poor but save the state’s taxpayers hundreds of millions of dollars over the next few years. Obamacare

Look out for the breast-feeding controversy

A

t the outset of a new school year, lege sociologist conthe news media offer helpful tips fesses made her feel for college students: “Choosing like a cow. (An insult the right major,” “6 tips for surviving dorm I shall refrain from life,” “5 things you should never say to your passing on to my professor,” stuff like that. Rarely do they own cows, diligent GENE offer practical advice for students who find mothers every one.) LYONS themselves enrolled in a course taught by Perhaps not coincia faculty member who’s a total crackpot. dentally, Erickson too teaches classes on Or to put it more succinctly: another year, “Gender and Society” at the Iowa college. another collegiate breast-feeding contro- Her bottle-feeding manifesto appeared versy. Possibly you remember the brief sen- in the Iowa City Press-Citizen, where it sation about this time last year, when Prof. attracted hundreds of incredulous responses. Adrienne Pine suckled her infant daughter After the birth of her first child, she in front of a classroom filled with students explains, Erickson’s life as a mammal struck attending her “Sex, Gender and Culture” her as terribly unfair. Not only did nursing class at American University. The embattled her infant son impose restraints on her own anthropologist explained that she’d brought “spatial mobility and time,” but the “part no the feverish baby to work with her rather one every talks about is that breastfeeding than cancel the first class of the semester. also consolidates pre-existing biological When the child began crying, Pine put her tendencies that privilege the breastfeedto the breast and went on with her lecture. ing parent.” Some of her freshman students were taken Yes, you read that right. Nursing her child aback. was a joyous experience to Erickson, but as Now comes Prof. Karla A. Erickson’s it also gave her an unfair advantage over path-breaking article renouncing breast- her husband in securing the infant’s affecfeeding altogether, which the Grinnell Col- tions, the practice needed to be renounced

will shift much of the state’s share of Medicaid to the federal government and also save the state-supported hospitals tens of millions of dollars a year in charity care. Anticipating the savings, the legislature last spring reduced funding for the University of Arkansas medical center, prisons, the Medicaid division and the Health Department and Human Services Department, which help fund community mental health centers. Then to soak up the budget savings, the legislature enacted Republican-sponsored tax cuts for the rich and manufacturers. So with all the Medicaid savings suddenly lost with Obamacare’s repeal, would the legislature repeal the tax cuts? Not likely, but it would have to raise taxes elsewhere (on working folks) or else make huge program reductions at prisons and colleges or Medicaid programs like nursing homes and children’s health care — some $550 million over the next four years alone. That sum represents the loss of Obamacare’s state savings on Medicaid, the loss of insurance payments to hospitals for indigents and the loss of tax revenue from premium taxes and income taxes that are to flow into the treasury as a result of Obamacare. About 31,500 Arkansans on Medicare have saved $42.9 million on their prescription drugs since 2011 as a result of the discounts ordered by Obamacare, and the

numbers will grow much larger until the infamous “donut hole” is closed in 2020. If the law were repealed, seniors would see big increases in their drug bills. About 120,000 Arkansans have gotten rebates from their insurance companies totaling $11.3 million for premium overcharges. They may have thanked the thoughtful insurance companies, which are ordered by Obamacare to do it every year. Thirty-five thousand men and women ages 19 to 26 got back on their parents’ policies as a result of Obamacare. The insurers could cut them off if the law were repealed. About 1 million insured Arkansans, principally women and the elderly, can get cancer screenings and preventive care free of copays, thanks to Obamacare, but no longer if it were repealed. Firm numbers aren’t available, but up to 170,000 Arkansas children with chronic health problems can no longer be denied insurance coverage on their family’s policies. Repeal would end that protection. Obamacare has lifted the lifetime caps on benefits from the policies of a million Arkansans, and it will remove the annual caps on Jan. 1 — unless it is repealed. Surely, at some point, Cotton and the others will tell people that these are the horrors they are intent on protecting them from.

in the interest of gender equity. Baby gets undergraduate reporter from the campus a boo-boo, baby runs to Mommy. And that newspaper who interviewed her, Pine would never do. emphasized that she had “specifically tried “It’s one thing our bodies do that rein- to distance myself from lactivism, which has forces the social differences between men always seemed hopelessly bourgeois to me and women….Sometimes we have to do — those marauding bands of lactating white a runaround our bodies to ensure equity. women who go to collectively feed their Sometimes we have to do some social engi- babies in places where the right to breastneering to help dislodge our social aspira- feed has been called into question. ... And tions from the dictates of our glands and the whole argument about the breast being more ‘natural’ than the bottle leads down a gonads.” Dislodge our hopes from our gonads? slippery slope of biological determinism.” Must we really? Somebody needs to tell Nothing sacred or natural here, in other Prof. Erickson that few unearned patriar- words. We’re intellectuals. Prof. Pine added, “if there were an easy chal privileges are sweeter than rolling over and going back to sleep while Mommy tends way I could feed my child without calling the baby. attention to my biological condition as a So anyway, if you’re thinking that Ameri- mother, which inevitably assumes primacy can University’s famous lactating anthropol- over my preferred public status as anthroogist would set her Iowa colleague straight, pologist, writer, professor, and solidarity you’d be mistaken. Motherhood’s evidently worker, I would do so.” No biological conditions, please, we’re not a big part of these gender studies classes. There’s no hint that Adrienne Pine found gender specialists existing in a realm of pure breastfeeding particularly joyous at all. theory. What with entire academic disciQuite the opposite. During her moment in plines these days devoted to such quasithe spotlight, Pine made clear her contempt Marxian humbug — a curious combinaof people who see breast-feeding as a “tran- tion of the perfectly obvious and the utterly scendental act,” along with “gendered essen- absurd — the odds of a student’s encountertialism about the naturalness or sacredness ing a Fruit Loop with an attitude and Ph.D. approach certainty. of the mother-child bond.” The thing to do is to consider it a learnIn a Counterpunch article devoted largely to attacking the “biased and sophomoric” ing experience. www.arktimes.com

AUGUST 22, 2013

7


W O RDS

Outraged

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John Wesley Hall noticed the slogan displayed on The Hatcher Agency building in downtown Little Rock: “The Home of Outrageous Service.” Hall writes: “Crimes are outrageous. Things the government does are outrageous. What the hell is outrageous service? Is it really that bad? If so, why brag?” I relayed Hall’s concerns to Challis Muniz of The Hatcher Agency. She said the owner of the company, Greg Hatcher, had written a book, “55 Steps to Outrageous Service,” in which he defined “outrageous service” as “service that is so above and beyond the ordinary that people will talk about it.” Muniz continues: “Has Mr. Hall never heard of anything being outrageously funny? It doesn’t have to be all negative!” At one time, when Mr. Hall and I were young, “outrageous” always had a negative connotation. Times change. The first definition of “outrageous” in the on-line Merriam-Webster is “exceeding the limits of what is usual.” That’s followed by “not conventional or matterof-fact: fantastic.” Only then, does the dark side come into view: “Violent, unrestrained”; “going beyond all standards of what is right or decent”; “deficient in propriety or good taste.” Those who deem this new usage out-

rageous are free to say so, of course. I have an idea Mr. Hall will not be easily moved.

DOUG Oops: SMITH “Tony Abbott, dougsmith@arktimes.com the Australian opposition leader and Rhodes scholar whose coalition is favored to win the Sept. 7 elections, provoked some titters among attendees as he told a gathering of conservative party faithful that no one is ‘the suppository of all wisdom.’ ” An Arkansas Travelers fan steps to the plate: “The second-string radio announcer just said, and I heard it on the radio playing in the bathroom, that the batter ‘has flown out twice tonight.’ ‘Flied out twice’ is also cumbersome but it’s sure better than ‘flown out twice.’ ” On the ballfield, the verb fly means “To bat a ball high into the air that is caught by a fielder before it touches the ground.” The past tense is flied. The noun fly, short for fly ball, has been around since the 1860s, but the verb didn’t appear in print until 1908, according to Dickson’s Baseball Dictionary.

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AUGUST 22, 2013

ARKANSAS TIMES

ARKANSAS’S EXPANDING WAISTLINE. A new study showed that, for the first time in 30 years, the nation’s obesity rate held steady in every state — except Arkansas. We edged closer to Louisiana and Mississippi as the most obese state, with 34.5 percent at that level in 2012, up significantly from 30.9 in 2011. YET ANOTHER CANDIDATE FOR CONGRESS. A third Republican has entered the primary race for 4th District Congress, businessman Tommy Moll, 31. He joins Lt. Gov. Mark Darr and Rep. Bruce Westerman. Moll’s resume notes a lot of schooling — an undergrad degree from William and Mary, a master’s degree from the London School Economics and a law degree from Columbia. We’ll see how that plays next to Darr’s karaoke chops. GUNS IN SCHOOL. Faulkner County Sheriff Andy Shock and Prosecuting Attorney Cody Hiland have been lobbying the Mount Vernon-Enola School Board about a plan to put school administrators through the 110-hour law enforcement officer training program. Then, as certified law officers like other reserve deputies, they could carry guns in school.

It was a bad week for ...

SEN. PAUL BOOKOUT. The state Ethics Commission fined the Jonesboro Democrat $8,000 for four violations of campaign finance law. Bookout was fined, in part, for spending much of the $80,000 he raised for an unopposed campaign on personal expenses. Following the fine, Bookout resigned from his job as administrative director for system relations at St. Bernards Healthcare in Jonesboro. Jonesboro Prosecutor Scott Ellington has asked that a special prosecutor be named to investigate Bookout, who has shown no indication that he’ll resign. GUNS IN SCHOOL. The Arkansas Board of Private Investigators and Security Agencies suspended the security guard commissions it had granted to school districts so that staff members could carry weapons. Several school districts had taken advantage of security licensing over the years to allow a handful of school employees to have guns, but the practice has been limited, perhaps to four dozen people in the state’s 270 or so school districts. The Clarksville School Board, however, recently signed off on Superintendent David Hopkins’ plan to license 20 or so staff members, including a bus driver, administrators and several classroom teachers, so they could carry concealed weapons on the job.


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On fire THE OBSERVER WAS SITTING at his desk on Monday after a long, long weekend of traveling the roads and back roads of Arkansas in pursuit of a story for you, Beloved Reader, when the fire alarm went off: a shrill, electronic, unmusical blare. It was a first for us, and those are getting in short supply these days. By our best, spottiest recollection, we’ve never had a fire alarm here at the Fortress in 11 years, or even a fire drill. That said, as folks made their way to the exits, we found that we were tired enough after our long weekend that we had to consider for a moment whether we’d rather get up and trudge down the stairs to the parking lot or perish in a possible conflagration. Eventually, our sense of self-preservation won out over sloth, though, so we emerged from our burrow and joined the throng. Outside, on the sidewalk, we all milled around and chatted and stared up at the building, watching for the dragon belch of smoke and fire. The offices of the Arkansas Times nearly burned flat once, back in June of ’79 when HQ was a big ol’ house down at 1111 W. Second St. Almost snuffed us out, that blaze did, leaving only the company computer, a sodden subscriber list, one charred coffee table, and a chair. Eventually, that particular fire was found to be the result of arson (but don’t any of you cranks get ideas). While the grayhairs round here have their suspects, the culprit was never brought to justice. Said grayhairs managed to put it all back together, somehow — one of many brushes with death the Old Girl has had over the years — and here we are, a year from the big 4-0, in a building that actually has sprinklers. We’ve come a long way, baby. The Observer, too, is a child of cinders: a blaze in elementary school that reduced our family’s tidy house on Crystal Valley Road to a charred hulk and all our treasured belongings — including every family photo not in the hands of others — to ash: clothes, toys, books, bed, cigar box of boy trinkets, everything but our lives (thankfully preserved by

an out-of-town trip that night) gone, gone, gone. It was a bit of faulty wiring in that case, not a vindictive firebug who wrote his Letter to the Editor in flames. But you can see why both The Observer and the folks we work with might tend to bite their lips and stare up expectantly at the building when the alarms go off once every 11 years or so. The children of fire are always waiting for that yellow monster to return for a second bite of them. The Little Rock Fire Department soon came roaring up in their trucks, sirens rolling and lights turning — pumper truck, ladder truck with the tiller-steering cab way at the back, chief’s Suburban, another pumper — the brave men piling out in their coats and helmets, making The Observer feel for a second like we had wasted our life in timidity, hard hands gone soft as linen paper. The sight of that red and yellow spectacle couldn’t help but remind us of our favorite quote by our favorite writer, Kurt Vonnegut: “I can think of no more stirring symbol of man’s humanity to man than a fire truck.” If The Observer had his way, that quote would be etched in stone over the door of every firehouse in this country, in letters big enough to be seen from the street. We remember our neighbor’s story of more brave men, volunteers, who stood in the dark and poured on the water and tried to save The Observer’s childhood home. The Brave Ones trudged up and down through our building in their boots. Soon, the radio of the chief standing outside squawked back that they’d found nothing. The all clear was given, the men loaded up, the trucks groaned away, and we trudged in with the rest, stuffing the elevators and the stairwell, all the wiseasses joking over who wanted a break bad enough to pull the fire alarm. So too came The Observer, child of cinders, back to our unburned office. There, we sat, and smelled the phantom smoke of memories for the rest of the afternoon, marveling over how, once you get a good whiff, that smell never quite leaves your nose.

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AUGUST 22, 2013

9


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AUGUST 22, 2013

ARKANSAS TIMES

Gazing into the crystal ball

T

he final one-third of this year’s Razorback schedule isn’t quite the thorny gauntlet that Part II represented. In fact, after what we suspect will be a customary dispatching at Alabama on Oct. 19, the Hogs take a needed respite for the bye week before trying to scratch for bowl eligibility in November. Fortunately, I don’t think it’ll take long for this team, inexperienced as it may well be, to hit that six-win mark. When we last left our cardinal-and-white (no anthracite, please) troops, they were in the throes of a three-game losing streak after a projected 5-0 start. Nov. 2 at Reynolds Razorback Stadium brings salve in the form of Auburn. There continues to be a lot of fuss about Gus Malzahn, particularly in this state, but what the offensive wunderkind inherited for his first tour of duty on the Plains is an abject mess. Even the squad Malzahn was de facto coach of in 2009, in Gene Chizik’s first year as the placeholder-in-tracksuits, was in substantially better shape than the remnants of Chizik’s 3-9, 0-8 shipwreck from last fall.   Arkansas had basically one wellrounded effort away from home last season, and that was a commanding beating of a historically inept Tiger team. The Hogs have always been relatively comfortable playing at Jordan-Hare, but they’ve also regained their footing against the Tigers in Fayetteville after Houston Nutt lost his last three home tilts against them. In 2013, the winning streak against Auburn at home reaches three as well, due largely to another banner showing by the Hogs’ defensive line. It doesn’t reach the level of an out-and-out thrashing, but it gets awfully close to that after halftime. Hogs 34, Tigers 14. A 6-3 Razorback team then travels to Oxford for a date with Ole Miss, which, if you really paid attention to what happened last fall, wasn’t quite impressive enough to warrant the fawning treatment it’s receiving this preseason. Yes, firing Nutt was smart. Yes, hiring Hugh Freeze as the successor made sense. But what exactly did the Rebels accomplish last year? They were massively whipped at home by Texas, threw away a potential win over Texas A&M before the Aggies and Johnny Manziel hit high gear and feasted on bad competition (three league wins came against Arkansas and Auburn, teams that combined to go 7-17 a year ago, and Mississippi State in the Egg Bowl).  The Rebs, to their credit, did come a long way from the abyss to which they were driven in 2010-11. But Freeze’s team was far from perfect, and quarterback Bo Wallace was turnover-prone in his first year as starter. Wallace is being

pitched as a possible breakout guy this fall, but the Hogs will fare better against him this time and sniff out BEAU the screen passes. WILCOX Unfortunately, the Rebels’ overhauled defense will also present problems for Arkansas, and this one ends up narrowly on the wrong side of the ledger. Rebels 24, Hogs 20. Arkansas’s last showing in the home state in 2013 is a bow in the capital city against Mississippi State, which is fiendishly close to emerging from the middle of the proverbial pack but still cannot hit those elusive heights under Dan Mullen. The Bulldogs are now regularly securing bowl bids, but last year’s squad started 7-0 and then got roundhoused in a threegame stretch thereafter by Alabama, Texas A&M and LSU in succession. Had it not been for (wait for it) Arkansas limping into Davis Wade Stadium for a 31-point recovery pill last November, the Bulldogs might’ve well ended up jeopardizing Mullen’s long-term standing.  Mullen isn’t going to end up on the hot seat, and Tyler Russell clearly gives the Bulldogs their best pure passing threat since Arkansas joined the SEC, but this is an opportunity for the Razorbacks to finish out the home slate in fine fashion and Jim Chaney’s offense embraces the call. Brandon Allen’s first 300-yard passing day highlights an overall balanced onslaught, and Arkansas cements a winning record in Bielema’s debut campaign. Hogs 41, Bulldogs 23. The 2013 regular season wraps in Baton Rouge on Nov. 29. Put Pearls down as the ultimate LSU cynic at this juncture. For all the bravado that made Les Miles’ first few seasons adventurous, the shtick is wearing thin, and the off-field fiascos are becoming too numerous to discount. By the time Arkansas heads south, there’s growing discontent about an underperforming batch of highly-rated recruits, and it’s possible that if the Tigers drop this one to the Hogs, Miles finds himself squirming in the press room about job security questions. LSU will, after a less than impressive season, finish on a high, however. In what becomes arguably the craziest Golden Boot game in a series already laden with tense moments, the Hogs and Tigers duke it out for 60 minutes plus, and this one closes in the second OT with Miles getting some vindication. A trick play on fourth down scores the winner after the Hogs punch through a go-ahead field goal. It’s a bitter closing moment, but also one that signals optimism going forward. Tigers 39, Hogs 36.


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THE

IN S IDE R

A Hog insider told us months ago that the Razorback athletic department, through its nominally private surrogate, the Razorback Foundation, was dickering to buy an expensive new private jet. An athletic department spokesman denied it each time the Times checked. Last week came a new tip — deal was done. Questions were again sent to the athletic department and the Razorback Foundation. No response. At the close of business, the Times sent a second request for information, in the form of a Freedom of Information Act request. Coincidentally or not, an answer arrived minutes later from Kevin Trainor, top spokesman for the athletic department. “The Razorback Foundation is finalizing purchase of a used 2007 LearJet40 for a purchase price of $4.7 million. The jet will replace a 1988 BeechJet currently owned by the Razorback Foundation. The Foundation anticipates delivery of the Jet in September. At that time, the current BeechJet will be sold.” Both jets seat seven, Trainor said. He explained the purchase, from Bombardier, maker of the plane. “The primary reason for the purchase was to replace an aging aircraft that would require additional significant investments, including an engine overhaul, in the near future and increasing maintenance costs to maintain. The safety of the pilots and passengers is of the utmost importance and with a model nearly 25 years old, a decision was made to invest in a more recent model aircraft. As I believe you cited in one of your previous e-mails, a new model of the LearJet 40 runs for around $12 million.” Flying commercial is, of course, not an alternative when a coach has to get quickly to a meeting with a top recruit. The Times has still not had a return call or message from the Razorback Foundation, though our note to director Sean Rochelle noted that the Foundation operates with significant public financial support and coordination with the athletic department on collecting “scholarship contributions” in return for priority seats at Hog athletic events. Speaking of priority seats: The Foundation last week rolled out, in conjunction with the athletic department, which handles ticket sales, a

CONTINUED ON PAGE 13

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AUGUST 22, 2013

ARKANSAS TIMES

How much oil spilled in Mayflower? Unlike in Michigan spill, the EPA is relying on Exxon’s tally in Arkansas. BY ELIZABETH MCGOWAN

H

omeowners whose lives are still in limbo after thousands of gallons of oil streamed into their neighborhood from a ruptured pipeline on March 29 might never know precisely how much of the sticky black goo actually spilled. The working SPECIAL estimate is that REPORT 5,000 barrels — 210,000 gallons — of Canadian heavy crude oil poured from a 22-foot break in ExxonMobil’s Pegasus pipeline on that Good Friday afternoon. But officials with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Exxon say the actual amount can’t be figured until the Pegasus is up and running again. That will allow Exxon to do a mathematical calculation while the line is operating at the same flow as it was when it broke open. However, that scenario could prove problematic. It’s quite possible that the beleaguered pipeline, which stretches 850 miles across four states from Patoka, Ill., to Nederland, Texas, will never re-open. And, even if it does someday pump oil again, federal regulators have ordered Exxon to permanently reduce its operating pressure. Karen Tyrone, vice president for operations of ExxonMobil Pipeline Co. told the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette last week that retiring Pegasus “is within the realm of possibilities.” The 65-year-old line was manufactured using a welding process that’s now known to be defective and with a type of pipe that is inherently brittle and prone to cracking, according to documents filed with federal regulators. Figuring out an accurate count on barrels spilled is crucial because that number will help determine the size of the fines

EPA

High flying

Exxon will face under the federal Clean to do that,” EPA spokeswoman Jennah Water Act. Civil penalties could range from Durant said. “As far as I know, nobody from $1,100 to $4,300 per barrel, depending on our region was involved in the cleanup in whether Exxon is found guilty of negli- Michigan.” gence or willful misconduct. Penalties for Nicolas Brescia, the EPA’s Region 6 a 5,000-barrel spill could range from $5.5 on-scene coordinator for the Mayflower million to $21.5 million. cleanup, said the agency is keeping tabs on The size of an oil spill can be determined the amount of oil collected, but isn’t doing its own tally. in several ways. Calculations can be made from data that “We are showing the waste collected the pipeline operator collected at the time and disposed of, but it’s impossible to figure of the spill. A count also can be based on the out the amount of oil in the debris,” he said. amount of oil collected during a cleanup, as “You lose some oil to evaporation, some gets the EPA’s Chicago-based Region 5 is doing absorbed into soil and plants, and some has in Michigan, where the nation’s largest oil to biodegrade on its own.” pipeline spill occurred in 2010. Brescia is confident that the 5,000-gallon In Michigan, the EPA’s on-scene coordi- estimate provided by Exxon is as accurate nator devised a formula to track how much as possible at this point. “Until the investigation is done with the oil was being recovered, whether it was skimmed off the surface of the water or Department of Transportation and until embedded in vegetation, soil, sediments they refill that line, we won’t know the exact or debris. The agency says more than 1.1 number of barrels lost,” Brescia said. “Five million gallons of oil have been recovered thousand is what we’re going with because so far in the ongoing cleanup. The Cana- that’s the best number we have. dian company responsible for that rupture, “If we felt maybe that [ExxonMobil] was Enbridge Inc., disputes that figure, claiming not 100 percent correct, we could give them only 843,444 gallons spilled. an order to answer questions. But we typiWhen asked why the Arkansas and cally don’t run into that. There’s no value Michigan spills are being handled so dif- for them to tell us an incorrect number.” Most of the spill site in Mayflower has ferently, an EPA spokesperson for Dallasbased Region 6, which includes Arkansas, progressed from the “response” to the said managers make their own decisions “remediation” stage. That means that while based on the unique factors associated with the EPA is still involved in the cleanup, the each cleanup. Arkansas Department of Environmental “These are two completely different inci- Quality (ADEQ) is directing day-to-day CONTINUED ON PAGE 19 dents, so to compare the two, we aren’t able


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INSIDER, CONT.

THE

BIG PICTURE

BOOKOUT: BALLIN’ WITH BACKERS CASH In 2012, Sen. Paul Bookout was living high on the hog, spending big on Japanese restaurants, home entertainment, clothing, liquor and home improvement. The only trouble is that he was spending a big chunk of $80,000 in campaign money to do so (during an election in which he ran unopposed — that election was in November and he kept right on spending in December). Late last week, Bookout filed a batch of amended campaign finance reports, which detail a highly questionable use of the campaign expense account. The reports show planned reimbursements of around $53,000, meaning contributors would be refunded at about 60 cents on the dollar. The state Ethics Commission reprimanded Bookout last week and fined him $8,000, citing four violations of campaign finance law. Early this week, prosecuting attorney Scott Ellington asked that a special prosecutor be named to determine whether a criminal prosecution should be pursued. Bookout thus far has shown no intention of resigning. Some highlights from Bookout’s hard-fought campaign: 12/26 Fuji Steakhouse $244.83 12/10 Brookstone 227 $185.71 10/15 Sound Concepts $8,402.47 10/2 Home Depot $389.41 10/1 Harmony Gardens (custom landscaping) $107.37 8/30 Kimono Japanese Steakhouse $140.17 8/20 Payment to himself $2,000 8/20 Shogun Japanese Steakhouse $107.79 7/30 Doe’s Eat Place $169.98 7/13 Barbara Jean’s (women’s clothes) $350.83 7/5 Brave New Restaurant $287.13 6/25 Ridgepoint Country Club $150.00 6/4 Walmart $114.84 5/26 Poinsett Package Store $212.75 5/23 Best Buy $107.40 5/14 IO Metro (furniture) $720.21 4/30 Hibbett Sporting Goods $251.65 4/20 Loca Luna $159.08 4/4 Diamond Liquor $174.41 4/3 Dillards $250.00 3/16 Gearhead Outfitters $193.67 3/16 Steamroller Blues (women’s clothes) $702.00 3/16 Payment to himself $600.00 3/14 Payment to himself $800.00 3/10 Steamroller Blues (women’s clothes) $1,510.32 3/8 Delta Catfish $102.67 2/25 Apple Store $139.37 2/25 Go Running $199.63 2/25 Warren’s Shoes $341.78

new Priority Points Program for allotting seats. It will be based on dollar amount of contributions, regularity of annual giving and other factors, including points for past Razorback athletes. Points will be searchable on-line and the plan, which most other schools in the SEC already use, is supposed to increase transparency. At least for the part of the Foundation’s work that includes seat assignments. Transparency in other areas is apparently still not part of The Program.

Now it’s Darr in the contribution limelight

The Ethics Commission’s reprimand and fine of Sen. Paul Bookout for multiple campaign finance violations, including use of campaign money for personal purposes, sent people quickly searching through other campaign reports for signs of problems. There are many. Most frequent is a failure of officeholders to provide complete accounting of how they spent carryover campaign surpluses allowed up to the annual salary of the public official. But Blue Hog Report, a blog with a history of delving into state recordkeeping, found a lot more in trying to make sense of Lt. Gov. Mark Darr’s campaign reporting. Darr won election in 2010 thanks to heavy deficit spending. He borrowed $170,000 and spent $305,000 to get elected, finishing the campaign $115,766 in the hole. The law allowed him to continue to raise money to pay off the debt. But Blue Hog detected a pattern of spending — including many payments to consultants and even the University of Arkansas for “fund-raising” that seemed to bear no association to any of the campaign contributions that have continued to trickle in to the Darr account. The Darr records also show numerous charges at convenience stores around the state, most likely to gas up his truck. Again, they were charged to “fund-raising.” The same for a number of $100-range dinners out at various restaurants. Most interesting were several charges to clothing stores. Clothing purchases were required for Darr to pay down his campaign debt? Questions to Darr and his campaign for comment had not been answered at press time. www.arktimes.com

AUGUST 22, 2013

13


ROOSTER COGBURN WAS BORN

A SLAVE

Deputy U.S. Marshal Bass Reeves haunted the nightmares of desperadoes in Indian Territory. BY DAV ID KO O N

Y

ou think you know the West.

Every American thinks they do, conjuring up a fever of dusty towns, quick-draw gunmen, drunks, honkytonk pianos, cowboys, desperadoes, black hat villains and white hat heroes out of bits of John Ford movies and “Lone Ranger” episodes. In that pulp paper West, all Native Americans were the bad guys (other than Tonto, of course) and all women were either wife, nun or saloon girl. If there was a black man, chances are his only job was to hold the horse of the courageous — and very white — sheriff. Deputy U.S. Marshal Bass Reeves is where the fictional West gives way to the actual West, and it was lot more diverse in reality than it is on celluloid. One of several African-American deputy U.S. marshals who rode the bloody trails of the Indian Territory that eventually became Oklahoma — a place Reeves’ biographer unflinchingly calls “The Valley of the Shadow of Death” — Reeves was born a slave in Arkansas, but rose to the status of living legend during his 30-plus years wearing a

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AUGUST 22, 2013

ARKANSAS TIMES

marshal’s star, most of that served as a manhunter for “Hanging Judge” Isaac C. Parker of Fort Smith. With a reputation for going after the baddest of the bad — a giant for his day at 6’2”, a crack shot with both hands, a skilled horseman and master of disguise — Reeves arrested more than 3,000 men, including his own son, and killed more than a dozen in the line of duty, often dragging in criminals a dozen at a whack, lashed to his chuck wagon. Though there are stories of Reeves repeatedly having his hat and even his gunbelt shot off during firefights, he was said to live a charmed life by the Native Americans in the territory, able to walk between the bullets in a land where desperadoes pasted up wanted posters for police instead of the other way around, in a time and place where more than half the U.S. marshals ever killed in the line of duty met their end. While Jim Crow and a general apathy about the history of non-whites worked to try to make sure Reeves’ legend was never known in the modern day, his story has been resurrected fairly recently by a few dedicated researchers. It’s one of the greatest

Old West legends you’ve probably never heard.

H

FINDING BASS

istorian Dr. Art Burton — author

of the Reeves biography “Black Gun, Silver Star,” and the researcher who has probably done the most to save Reeves’ story from obscurity — started researching the life of Bass Reeves more than 20 years ago. Born in Oklahoma into a family that put kids in a saddle from an early age, Burton said there was always a disconnect between his experience as an African American and the West as seen in movies and books. “There are a lot of cowboys in my family,” he said. “I grew up during the cowboy era on television, but you didn’t see blacks in those programs. I felt like, my folks are doing this in Oklahoma because this is what people in Oklahoma do. It wasn’t until later that I found out that African Americans played a role in the Western frontier.” Burton began researching the life of Bass Reeves during work for his 1991 book “Black,


ON PATROL: The Bass Reeves monument at Fort Smith.

REEVES UNCHAINED

B

ass Reeves was born a slave in Crawford County in July 1838, the son of a woman owned by William S. Reeves. A prominent figure on the frontier, William Reeves had served in the Tennessee legislature before moving to Arkansas, and would eventually serve in both the Arkansas state legislature and the Texas state legislature. When Bass was 8 years old, William Reeves moved his family and slaves to north Texas, where Bass worked as a stable hand and a blacksmith’s apprentice. Eventually, according

BRIAN CHILSON

Red and Deadly,” which presented profiles of African-American and Native-American outlaws and lawmen of the Old West. Burton said that most people who base their understanding of the West on popular culture just don’t appreciate how diverse it was. “African Americans were pretty much written out of that whole history,” Burton said. “But if we look at the real Western frontier, we find blacks that were mountain men, blacks who were scouts, blacks who were entrepreneurs and cowboys... . You also found blacks who were in law enforcement across the West, in Montana and Colorado and New Mexico. Twenty percent of the military on the Western frontier were African Americans. So Hollywood just totally left out African Americans in the telling of the West, sad to say.” Burton has worked his whole life to try and correct the perception of a monochromatic West. When the Coen Brothers made their movie remake of Charles Portis’ “True Grit” a few years back, Burton tried to reach out to them, without success, to encourage them to get the complexions more in line with history. “They positioned their film for 1878,” Burton said. “The majority of the federal workers for Fort Smith court in 1878 were African Americans. The majority. Many of the people who sat on the juries were African Americans. There’s a case where a criminal was being tried in Fort Smith before Judge Parker’s court, and the jury was majority black.” The more he learns about Reeves, Burton said, the more amazing his story becomes. Early on, his research was slow going, because the history of blacks wasn’t often preserved, forcing him to go back to sources like court records, oral histories and newspaper stories. (He starts off “Black Gun, Silver Star,” with an anecdote about an Oklahoma historical society writing to him with apologies, saying they didn’t keep the history of black people). Before “Black, Red and Deadly” came out, the latest mention of Reeves in a book that Burton could find was a short item in an Oklahoma City School System textbook. “Previous to that book, he wasn’t mentioned in a book since 1899,” Burton said. “He had pretty much been left out of the discourse and discussion on the American West and frontier.” Though most of the people who actually remembered Bass Reeves were gone by the time Burton started his research (“I ran into a ton of folks who told me that I should have talked to so-and-so who passed away five years ago who knew quite a bit. That was really disappointing. I thought, man, if I’d done this 10 years earlier, I could have got a lot more oral stories.”) Burton kept digging. Slowly, Reeves began to emerge from the mist.

to a book by Bass Reeves’ great-grandnephew, former federal Judge Paul Brady, Bass became William Reeves’ manservant, following him everywhere. When William Reeves joined the 11th Texas Cavalry as an officer just before the Civil War, Bass followed him to battle, with Reeves later telling a newspaper interviewer that he’d accompanied his master to the battles at Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge and Pea Ridge in Arkansas (though Burton believes including Missionary Ridge and Chickamauga may have been a bit of subterfuge on Reeves’ behalf, added to conceal his true activities during the war). CONTINUED ON PAGE 16

www.arktimes.com

AUGUST 22, 2013

15


OVER THE DEAD LINE

W

ith the Indian Territory on the verge of anarchy, the federal court for the Western District of Arkansas was moved from Van Buren to Fort Smith in 1871, with former U.S. Congressman Isaac C. Parker confirmed as the federal judge there in

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AUGUST 22, 2013

ARKANSAS TIMES

crimes, including murder, assault, arson, rape, robbery, theft and incest. Marshals were paid by the arrest, plus a per-diem fee and a fee for feeding the prisoners they arrested. They had a set time limit of 30 days (with allowances for high water) to make their rounds in the territory and return to Fort Smith, with the time limit serving to keep them from padding their perdiem account — a temptation that many deputy marshals appear to have succumbed to. In a 1907 article from an Oklahoma City newspaper, reprinted in Burton’s book, a recently retired Reeves talked about the dangers of his career to a reporter, who wrote: “Eighty miles west of Fort Smith, it was known as ‘The Dead Line,’ and whenever a deputy marshal from Fort Smith or Paris, Texas, crossed the Missouri, Kansas and Texas [Railroad] track, he took his life in his hands and he knew it. On nearly every trail would be found posted by outlaws a small card warning certain deputies that if they ever crossed The Dead Line they would be killed. Reeves has a dozen of these cards which were posted for his special benefit, and in those days such a notice was no idle boast.” Historian Dan Littlefield, the director of the Sequoyah National Research Center at the University of HAVE Arkansas at Little Rock and a friend GUN, WILL of Art Burton, wrote the foreword to TRAVEL: Reeves’ Burton’s book “Black Gun, Silver Star.” gun and Littlefield said the Indian Territory badge, on was a place where those fleeing the display in law could quickly disappear. Rogers. “The Indian Territory was notorious for people going there and changing their names,” Littlefield said. “The Indian kids had a little song that Many times, they would be ambushed at night they sang. It went something like: ‘Oh, what while they were sleeping in their camps. They was your name in the States? Was it Johnson would be assassinated.” or Thompson or Bates? Did you kill your wife, Deputy marshals for the Fort Smith court and fly for your life? Say, what was your name in would have ridden as far as Fort Supply in the States?’ It was just common knowledge that far western Oklahoma in pursuit of fugitives. many of the people in the Territory were crooks Amazingly, Reeves was illiterate his whole who went from one jurisdiction to another to avoid capture.” life, so he memorized the warrants when he received them. The secret to Reeves’ longevity in those It was a difficult, dangerous place to try conditions, Littlefield said, was his toughness. and enforce the law, beset both by entrenched “I think he was just meaner than anybody he criminals and jurisdictional quirks, such as the tried to catch. That’s what the qualifications one that allowed a deputy marshal to arrest a were for the marshals in those days,” Littlefield Native American who had committed a crime said. “Some of them were former outlaws who against a white or black, but not another Native got a badge. But [Reeves] earned a reputation American. Though the deputy marshal’s primary and a lot of respect, certainly among Indian job was tracking down and bringing in those nations. I think he got more cooperation from sought under warrants, they were also allowed local people in the tribes than some of the other to make on-the-spot arrests for most serious people did. I think that was part of his survival.”

1875. Parker acted quickly, ordering his chief U.S. marshal to hire 200 deputy marshals to uphold the law and serve warrants in the Indian Territory and most of western Arkansas — almost 75,000 square miles. One of those hired was Bass Reeves, making him one of the first — if not the first — black deputy U.S. marshals west of the Mississippi. In that world before radios to call for assistance, Reeves would have ridden out into the Indian Territory with only a pocketful of warrants from the federal court, a cook, a chuckwagon and a single “posseman” for backup (Reeves himself often worked as a posseman in his early days as a deputy marshal). Beyond that, Burton said, he would have been on his own. “When you rode into the Indian Territory, you couldn’t call for backup,” Burton said. “It was you against the elements and desperadoes.

COURTESY OF THE ROGERS HISTORICAL MUSEUM

Though the historical records are unclear as to when or why Reeves fled his master and took off for the lawless Indian Territory — family history says it was over an argument during a card game in which he slugged Col. Reeves — he did just that at some point during the Civil War. Burton believes Reeves ran away after Northwest Arkansas’s Battle of Pea Ridge in March 1862, which would have put Reeves in close proximity to sanctuary in the Indian Territory. As a fugitive slave, Reeves took up with the Creeks and Seminoles, eventually learning to speak the Muscogee language and becoming relatively conversational in languages spoken by other tribes. In “Black Gun, Silver Star,” Burton recounts that he found at least one legend that says Reeves served as a Union sergeant during the Civil War, with Burton suggesting that Reeves may have taken up with a unit made up of blacks and Native Americans that fought Confederate-allied tribes. After the Civil War, Reeves and his wife, Jennie, moved back to Van Buren, where he bought a farm. Though he set out to become a farmer and horse breeder, Reeves employed his knowledge of Indian languages and the wilds of the Indian Territory gained as a fugitive slave by working as a tracker and guide for the U.S. Marshals’ Office at Van Buren. In the years after the Civil War, the Indian Territory became increasingly lawless, with many criminals fleeing there from all over the U.S. It made for a hellish place where death was always close. Burton said the closest analogy he can come to the Indian Territory is “modern day Afghanistan.” “You could just lose your life over your hat, your horse, your gun, your woman, any damn thing,” Burton said. “The Indian Territory was where the majority of deputy U.S. marshals had been killed in the line of duty in the history of the Marshals Service. You’re looking at a little over 200 who have been killed in the line of duty to this date right now. On record, over 130 were killed in the Indian Territory. You also had Indian policemen getting killed. You had town municipal policemen getting killed. It had to be the greatest battleground between crime and law in the history of the United States of America.”


T

hough the history of the Wild West

is full of fluffed resumes, Reeves was a figure who seems to live up to the hype. Story after story uncovered by Art Burton reads like something out of pulp fiction, with papers as far away as Galveston and St. Louis marveling over Reeves’ skill and daring in the 1880s and ’90s. Fort Smith papers regularly carried news of Reeves dragging back 15 prisoners or more at a time — many of them murderers — to face justice. In one case, after Reeves had left the Fort Smith court and moved to the court at Paris, Texas, he and another deputy marshal singlehandedly put down a 1902 “race war” in Braggs, Texas, arresting 25 men, both black and white, who had participated. In another instance, related to Burton by an Osage woman, Reeves came across a lynch mob on the high prairie, rode into the middle of the angry mob, took their prisoner without a word, then rode off without a shot fired. Reeves’ commitment to the law was so great that Reeves arrested the minister who baptized him for selling illegal liquor. Later, he arrested his own son, Ben, after he was charged with killing his wife. After his conviction, Ben Reeves was sentenced to life in prison at Leavenworth. Eventually, Reeves became so much larger than life that he started chasing criminals into their nightmares according to an article, one of Burton’s favorites, that appeared in a Texas newspaper. “I found a story where a guy tried to burn his fiance up. He tried to set her on fire,” Burton said. “When he went to bed that night, he had a nightmare that Bass shot him while he was trying to get away. The first thing he did the next morning is go to the federal office and turn himself in.” Reeves’ career wasn’t without blemish, however, though that blemish may have been racially motivated. In April 1884, Reeves shot his cook, William Leach, while out on patrol in the Territory. Wounded in the shoulder, Leach eventually died. An inquest met, and no charges were filed. After a regime change that saw the U.S. attorney’s seat filled by a Democrat and former Confederate, however, Reeves was arrested in 1886 in the killing of Leach. Stripped of his badge and charged with murder, he was held in jail for more than three months. Though there was some testimony that the shooting might have been about an argument over

a stray dog, Reeves and others testified that the shooting was accidental, with his rifle going off while Reeves was trying to pry a faulty cartridge from the chamber with a knife. Though he was acquitted of murder after a headline-grabbing trial, all accounts point to Reeves being financially ruined by the experience, forced to sell his home, presumably to help pay his legal fees and other expenses. Sebastian County Circuit Judge Jim Spears is on the committee of the Bass Reeves Legacy Initiative, and has studied the transcripts from Reeves’ murder trial. He believes that while the charges against Reeves were politically and racially motivated, Reeves’ character is shown by the fact that he decided to continue his career after his acquittal. “It cost him everything he had, but he had the character to put his badge back on and go back into

vanishing Wild West. Though several stories commented on the pomp and honor with which Reeves was laid to rest, strangely, none of them mentioned where he was buried. With many of the old tombstones in Muskogee worn down to illegibility over the years, by the time Art Burton began searching for Reeves’ grave, it couldn’t be found. He believes Reeves may be buried in a small cemetery outside Muskogee, but the location of the great lawman’s final resting place is, at this writing, lost.

MEMORIAL

T

hough it looks like even the elements have conspired to erase Bass Reeves from history, thanks to historians like Art Burton, his legend is poised to thrill a whole new generation of history buffs. In May of last year, a 25-foot bronze statue of Reeves on horseback, accompanied by his dog, was unveiled in Fort Smith’s Ross Pendergraft Park, and his story is sure to be front and center at the $50 million National U.S. Marshals Museum, set to open in Fort Smith in 2016. Reeves’ gun and badge, donated to the Marshals Museum by his great-grandnephew Brady, are currently on display at the Rogers Historical Museum. Judge Jim Spears was instrumental in raising the $300,000 needed to get the LARGER THAN bronze of Reeves cast and LIFE: A portrait placed in Fort Smith. Spears of Reeves on horseback. said he started out just looking for a piece of public art for Fort Smith, but wound up fascinated by the life and the Indian Territory capturing bad guys,” Spears legend of the lawman he calls an inspiration for said. “To me, that shows a lot of character ... . If everyone. “What I want it to show is that it’s a new he lets them run him off, they win. I think he had day,” Spears said. “That a city in Arkansas could erect a statue to a former slave, so little black kids enough character and native intelligence to say: I don’t think I’ll let them win. I think it hurt him can come down with their mother and father and deeply, though.” say, ‘Who is that?’ and Momma and Daddy swell with pride to tell them.” Times were changing, however. Burton said many of the black employees of the Fort Smith Art Burton said that a slew of famous actors have federal court were pushed out of their jobs by the shown interest in making the Bass Reeves story early 1890s as former Confederates came back into into a movie over the years, most notably Morgan power. Reeves transferred to the federal court at Freeman. He remains hopeful that a film biography Paris in the years after his trial. He retired from will happen. In the meantime, though, Burton is happy to have been a part of making Reeves’ story the Marshals Service in 1907, edging into semiretirement by joining the police force in Muskogee, more known. He’s been chasing Reeves for 20 years, Okla. and the story is a part of him now. “As I got deeper and deeper into it, it became He died there in January 1910 from Bright’s more and more of a passion to find out who this disease, a disorder of the kidneys. Newspapers man was,” Burton said. “He’s with me every day across the country carried Reeves’ obituary, lauding now. It’s just like he’s a part of the family.” him as a symbol of law and order in a rapidly BRIAN CHILSON

REEVES AND THE L AW

www.arktimes.com

AUGUST 22, 2013

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Avoiding Core meltdown Where other states see government conspiracy, Arkansas embraces Common Core as a way forward for education. BY BENJAMIN HARDY

M

aybe the problem is in the name: something that sounds so bland just has to be sinister. From Michigan to Tennessee, conservative groups are mobilizing against Common Core, the new K-12 education standards that spell out what students at each grade level should know in math and English. Until earlier this year, all but four states had agreed to adopt these new achievement goals. Now, in the face of a grassroots backlash against the standards, Michigan and Indiana have paused implementation of Common Core, Ohio is considering a halt, and efforts are afoot in other states to do the same. Arkansas is one of them. The first thing to understand about Common Core is that it is not a curriculum. The standards dictate to states and school districts not what material to teach but rather the skills students should be able to demonstrate — for example, a fifth grade student should be able to multiply fractions, and an eighth grader should be able to identify gerunds and infinitives. If we imagine a teacher as a chef and the week’s lessons as a menu, Common Core would be the equivalent of the food pyramid. The standards don’t tell teachers what meals to serve; they just describe the outline of a healthy diet. Arkansas already has a set of such guidelines, which the state Department of Education (ADE) calls the “Curriculum Framework.” But there’s widespread bipartisan agreement that our standards need to be more rigorous. Standards should also be the same across state lines to allow for accurate comparison of student performance — if Algebra I end-of-course tests in Massachusetts and Arkansas shoot for different objectives, it’s meaningless to compare data between the two states. This is the point of Common Core, which asks students of each grade to demonstrate more advanced skills than Arkansas currently demands. ADE began to replace the old Framework with Core standards in 2011-12 and the change will be complete across all K-12 classrooms by this fall. Teachers have been trained in the new standards statewide, but for most veteran educators this is less of a sea change than a shift in what to emphasize — not a new menu, simply an adjusted one. So why are Michigan and Indiana now hesitating? And why, at the Education Committee’s interim July meeting — normally a sleepy time of the year, legislatively speak18

AUGUST 22, 2013

ARKANSAS TIMES

KEY

ing — was the Arkansas Capitol’s largest committee room packed with dozens of parents and other activists wearing “STOP COMMON CORE” buttons? There are valid concerns about the way Common Core is being rolled out. First, Arkansas faces logistical problems with administering new computer-based Corealigned tests because many rural districts possess insufficient Internet bandwidth to administer online exams. Second, more rigorous targets in themselves do little to help those students already failing to meet the state’s current Framework standards, who are overwhelmingly poor and minority children. At the July meeting, Rep. John Walker (D-Little Rock) argued the standards would “lift the bar higher for kids who can’t meet the bar where it is now.” Finally, and most importantly, Core standards are intimately tied to the martial regimen of exams required by No Child Left Behind and championed by education reformers. That’s the “standardized” part in “standardized tests.” However, Common Core itself does not increase the testing burden on students or affect how teachers are evaluated, which is one reason teachers’ unions have supported the policy. “Evaluations are a different question than Common Core itself,” said E.C. Walker, the interim director of the Arkansas Education Association (AEA). But to explain the current wave of opposition, you have to look to Glenn Beck. The right wing entertainer is fighting his own slide into irrelevance by fostering a crusade demonizing Common Core as a federal takeover of public education. Common Core “nationalizes” what kids should know, he says, despite the fact that this is a state initiative, not a federal one. “Your kids are going to be poked and prodded like in ‘1984,’ ” Beck has told parents on his radio show, warning of iris scans, leftist indoctrination, and “computers monitoring their facial expressions.” The claims are preposterous, but the message resonates with

conservatives suspicious of big government. On the first day of July’s testimony, Arkansas seemed as if it might be the next front for this fear-driven campaign. Parents and anti-Core academics spoke for about six hours. There was plenty of ominous talk about federal authorities usurping local and state control, along with more sympathetic complaints of a public education system overwhelmed by testing requirements. When testimony resumed the following morning, though, it became clear that the Core is safe in Arkansas. Teachers, high school students, and administrators told the committee that higher standards are needed. ADE officials assured lawmakers that nothing in Common Core shifts control of education away from the state and local levels. Other voices underscored the breadth of establishment support for the Core, among them the Chamber of Commerce, the AEA, and representatives from the Walton Family Foundation, which is one of the nation’s leading advocates for school reform. The Committee’s questions were nuanced and mostly friendly, and no member seemed especially interested in pursuing Monday’s arguments. Though the room was still crowded with anti-Core activists, the mood was decidedly subdued. Two weeks later, Education Committee Chairman Sen. Johnny Key (R-Mountain Home) said that while discussion about the Core continued, he had not “heard from any member...saying ‘we definitely we need to put a stop to this.’ ” In retrospect, the legislature never had much of an appetite for the Common Core controversy. As one education official pointed out to me, the General Assembly barely mentioned the subject during the spring session. But why? One would think that if an isolationist push to assert state sovereignty could gain traction in purple states like Michigan and Ohio, it would positively bloom in Arkansas. Instead, it seems to have fizzled. What happened? One speculative answer is that the Walton family happens to be deeply invested both in Common Core and the Republican party. In other states, the surprising traction gained by anti-Core activists is a testament to divisions within the GOP: While the party’s rightward fringe reviles the standards as one more piece of a big government conspiracy, business-friendly Republicans such as Jeb Bush are among their loudest supporters. But Northwest Arkansas, home base of the state’s Republican party, is also Walton

territory. Maybe the family has counterbalanced the effort to dismantle a key piece of school reform in its home state. Another, larger explanation lies in the past decade of Arkansas education policy and its bipartisan efforts to correct the failures of the school system spotlighted by the Supreme Court’s Lakeview decision. As vice-chair of the Education Committee and a former teacher, Sen. Joyce Elliott (D-Little Rock) has long been on the front lines of debates over public schools. She pointed to the state’s “history of investment in education” when asked why Common Core has fared better here than elsewhere. “Things came to a head in 2003 when we had to decide how to meet the dictates of Lakeview,” said Elliott. “We raised taxes in a major way for the first time that I can remember in 2004 in the interest of education — which was Governor Huckabee’s work. And there was not a big outcry about that because we knew it had to be done.” Key echoed Elliott’s assessment. “We’ve spent a lot of taxpayer dollars over the past 10 years on improving education,” he said. “The thought has been ‘Common Core will keep Arkansas from falling behind in education again.’ People view this as another step Arkansas is taking towards being competitive.” Ironically, it may be Arkansas’s deficiencies in public education that caused even the most right-wing lawmakers to hesitate before setting fire to the Common Core. Now it’s up to the state to make sure the standards are implemented in a way that genuinely meets student needs and includes parents and teachers in the process. In New York, tougher exams based on Core standards recently caused student scores to drop. This decline was expected, but it worries parents and alarms teachers, who are often evaluated by student performance. Some unions have called for states to place a moratorium on teacher evaluations using Core-based exams, and observers worry that jitters on the left and paranoia on the right could join forces to derail the Core in more and more states. That seems less likely to happen here. Walker, the AEA director, said that his group considered pushing for a delay of the Core-based tests in Arkansas for another school year but decided against it because such a step “would have given too much credence to the detractors” of Common Core. He is also optimistic about the Core’s implementation, citing “evidence of a tradition of collaboration here [on education]” that he hasn’t seen in other states. Sen. Elliott said much the same thing. “We have a hardcore group of people who do not want to go backwards [on education]. They remember the struggles. They remember what it took to get Arkansas on this trajectory. And this shows why it’s so important that even when we disagree, we should do it respectfully.”


HOW MUCH OIL SPILLED, CONT. operations on the ground. Brescia, who spent two months in Mayflower after the spill, still makes occasional trips to Arkansas and participates in weekly conference calls. Philadelphia attorney Andy Levine, a former senior assistant regional counsel for the EPA, said the agency’s approach to oil spills can depend on the dynamics of the individuals involved. “Some people might ask how you can trust any polluter,” said Levine, who is not involved in the Mayflower case. “But the reports I hear is that Exxon is being highly cooperative. I think ExxonMobil may have stumbled a bit at first. But the company got in line fast and gained the respect of the government.” Levine said the EPA on-scene coordinators he knows are savvy about how they handle oil companies. “They’re very cynical and they are also highly trained and highly educated,” he said. “They’re not on the site looking for rainbows and lollipops. In working with these companies, they will develop a sense of trust or mistrust. And that is what’s reflected here.”

Spills never easy to quantify Pipeline expert Richard Kuprewicz said spills are difficult to measure, whether it’s at the time they happen or after a ruptured pipeline is functional again. The method that the EPA and Exxon say they are relying on in Arkansas — refilling the line and operating it at the same flow — would indeed help to produce an estimate of the volume that spilled from the Pegasus, he said. But that calculation alone doesn’t factor in such variables as how long it took operators to discover the leak, shut down the pump and then close the valves to isolate the ruptured portion of the pipeline. Oil is still leaving the line as those procedures are going on. Kuprewicz is the president of Accufacts Inc., a consulting firm that provides pipeline expertise for government agencies and industry. Central Arkansas Water, the Little Rock utility that wants the Pegasus pipeline removed from its watershed, is among his clients. “You never get an exact number,” Kuprewicz said. “If [ExxonMobil] can measure within a few hundred barrels then that’s a good start.” The EPA and the Department of Justice don’t need to prove how much spilled at this point in the litigation, said David Uhlmann, a professor at the University of Michigan Law School and former chief of the U.S. Department of Justice’s environmental crimes section. “That day will come in court,” Uhlmann said. “It is enough to allege that the spill occurred and violates the Clean Water Act.” Just as the government isn’t required to accept an oil company’s estimate of the

number of barrels spilled, neither is an oil company required to agree to the government’s estimate. If the federal government and Exxon go to court, the number of barrels spilled would be determined at trial. If an out-of-court settlement is reached, the number of barrels spilled and the fine levied per barrel are negotiable. Levine, the former EPA lawyer, said having an accurate estimate is vital not only to levy fines but also to gauge what the remediation effort will entail. “They are never going to get every billionth of a particle of oil out of the environment in a spill,” Levine said, “but they need to know the quantity so they can answer how clean is clean.”

Spill amount varied at first The spill estimate fluctuated in the first week after the pipeline ruptured. At first, Exxon said only “a few thousand barrels” spilled from the break that forced 22 families from their homes in Mayflower’s Northwoods subdivision. The EPA said as many as 7,000 barrels had spilled. However, an early April corrective action order issued by the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) said between 3,500 and 5,000 barrels spilled. Eventually, Exxon and the EPA agreed on the 5,000-barrel figure. In an Aug. 12 email, Exxon spokesman Aaron Stryk disputed his company’s earlier lower estimate by stating that “we never changed our preliminary estimate of 5,000 [barrels].” He also said the oil company wouldn’t be “changing the official estimate because we wouldn’t be able to know for sure until the investigation is finalized and after the line is refilled. Again, we are keeping the official estimate at 5,000.” So far, roughly 2,000 barrels of oil have been recovered in Mayflower, Stryk said. That figure includes only oil measured in liquid tanks, where it is mixed with water also pulled from the spill site. Oil recovered from soil, vegetation, booms, pads, wipes and other debris is not included in that measurement. Pegasus, which is 20 inches in diameter, moved more than 90,000 barrels of crude oil daily when it was operating. That translates to four million gallons of diluted bitumen. The section of the line that ruptured on March 29 was operating at a pressure of 708 pounds per square inch. That’s well below its maximum operating pressure of 820 psi, according to PHMSA, which regulates most of the country’s liquid fuel pipelines. U.S. Attorney Chris Thyer, on behalf of the EPA, and Arkansas Attorney General Dustin McDaniel filed a lawsuit against ExxonMobil in mid-June, less than three

months after the spill. It accuses the oil com- to the cove of Lake Conway. More than 1.1 million gallons of oil and pany of violating not only the federal Clean Water Act but also the Arkansas Hazardous water also had been removed from the site Waste Management Act and the Arkansas through mid-August, according to ADEQ Water and Air Pollution Control Act. records. That breaks down to 814,800 galAaron Sadler, a spokesman for McDaniel, lons of nonhazardous oil and water shipped said the amount of oil spilled isn’t directly to a refinery in Baton Rouge where some of related to the state’s case against Exxon- the oil is being reclaimed. Also, 158,802 galMobil. lons of unusable oil and water and 164,388 “The state statutory penalties are tied to gallons of water used to decontaminate the number of days of each violation, not the cleanup equipment have been shipped to total volume of oil,” Sadler said. For air and a hazardous waste facility in Saline County. water violations, the penalty clock began Five homes in the Northwoods subdiviticking on the day of the spill and the days sion — ground zero for the spill — still have are counted until the harm is remediated. oil in and around the foundations in the U.S. Department of Justice spokes- “response,” stage. man Wyn Hornbuckle said the federal “Exxon is not finished as long as there government can’t comment on how spill is recoverable oil,” said Brescia, the EPA’s calculations might affect the federal law- on-scene coordinator. “That’s the standard. suit because of the pending litigation. He That’s how EPA does it. That’s how ADEQ expects Exxon’s response to the govern- is doing it. We made it clear to Exxon that as ment’s complaint to come as early as Friday. long as people were out of their homes, they were going to be in the response stage.”

12,855 tons of debris removed so far

Numbers compiled by the ADEQ reveal that through Aug. 15, crews collected 12,855 tons of contaminated soil, vegetation, wood chips and debris such as used absorbent pads, wipes and booms from the cleanup site. That area stretches about nine-tenths of a mile from the Northwoods subdivision

This story is part of a joint investigative project by the Arkansas Times and InsideClimate News. Funding for the project comes from people like you who donated to an ioby.org crowd-funding campaign that raised nearly $27,000 and from the Fund for Investigative Journalism.

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THE COLLEGE ISSUE 2013

Messages From The Presidents

TIM HUDSON, CHANCELLOR

DR. STEVE COLE, CHANCELLOR

ARKANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY “At Arkansas State University, we have a formula for student success: Educate – Enhance – Enrich. It keeps us focused on the value of the education we provide and on our goal of challenging students to be known for their achievements. Innovation at A-State begins with faculty research, but includes how that work impacts classroom instruction. This fall, the iPad initiative for first-year students is an example of putting e3 to work by responding to the way our students learn and engage in a digital environment. Jonesboro is the classic college town in one of Arkansas’ fastest growing business and manufacturing regions. We invite you to see why we are a destination university.”

COSSATOT COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS “Cossatot Community College of the University of Arkansas has a history rich with growth and progress. Our college is home to over 1500 students each fall and spring semester. We are always seeking opportunities for improvement and strive to make ourselves better for our students and communities. Within the next year, we will make great progress in our facilities and technology. Our number one goal, however, will remain the same–offering what our students want. As a high performing community college, we must never forget our purpose. We provide a relevant education to students and we provide opportunities to our community for employable skills.”

DR. DAVID RANKIN

DR. PAUL B. BERAN, CHANCELLOR

SOUTHERN ARKANSAS UNIVERSITY “Southern Arkansas University is a quality, comprehensive, regional university. Since 1909, our outstanding graduates have impacted our state, the region, and beyond. The addition of new facilities in Science, Agriculture, and Student Housing is helping to provide students with the latest in academic and auxiliary facilities. The School of Graduate Studies has grown dramatically and offers a wide variety of programs, both online and traditional. We are here to serve students and help them develop to their full potential as they prepare to impact the future of all of us.”

UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS FORT SMITH “The University of Arkansas – Fort Smith serves the greater Fort Smith region and Western Arkansas as a leader in higher education, workforce development, quality of place opportunities, and economic development activities. The university is committed to educating individuals for the 21st century through internships and an international focus. Our faculty and staff are, first and foremost, committed to our students and their undergraduate success, giving them lifelong skills in critical and creative thinking and problem solving while preparing them for a fulfilling career when they graduate.”

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EAST ARKANSAS COMMUNITY COLLEGE “East Arkansas Community College is a learning-centered community committed to providing quality lifelong education opportunities for the diverse citizenry of the Arkansas Delta. We’re creating exciting educational opportunities with a focus on the future. EACC provides students with the academic, technical, and personal skills that will prepare them for a successful career or for transfer to a four-year college. Our students are being enriched by new perspectives, new academic and technical programs, and by a sense of community that encourages and inspires. The faculty, administration and staff at EACC are dedicated to the success of all of our students.”

NATIONAL PARK COMMUNITY COLLEGE “NPCC’s administrators, faculty, and staff work to bring the college’s mission statement, “Learning is our Focus; Student Success is our Goal,” to life. NPCC offers programs of study for students: pursuing two-year associate degrees that lead to a rewarding career or enhance career mobility; planning to continue their college education at four-year institutions; and seeking a variety of short term certificate programs designed to upgrade technical skills and knowledge. NPCC’s goal is to deliver the education and training that meets the community’s needs and the students’ career plans, while creating the optimal learning environment necessary to educate and produce a diverse graduate population ready to meet the demands of today’s workforce and world.“

DR. EVELYN E. JORGENSON

ROBERT CHARLES BROWN, PH.D.

NORTHWEST ARKANSAS COMMUNITY COLLEGE “NorthWest Arkansas Community College serves and strengthens our region by providing quality, affordable instruction at locations throughout Benton and Washington counties. In January, we opened the Center for Health Professions, allowing us to expand existing degree and certificate offerings and add programs in high-demand areas such as Health Information Management. Including credit offerings, non-credit, corporate learning, GED and other programs provided by NWACC, nearly 19,000 students per year are served by our caring faculty and staff.”

ARKANSAS TECH UNIVERSITY “Academic innovation is the lifeblood of higher education. Arkansas Tech University is committed to providing relevant programs so that we may produce graduates who are prepared to lead the economic development of our state in the 21st century. Arkansas Tech is the best value among the five largest universities in Arkansas and we have the second-highest graduation rate among public, four-year universities in our state. We are fulfilling our institutional mission to provide students with access to the life-changing benefits of a college education. We invite you to learn more about Arkansas Tech University at www.atu.edu.”

DR. DONALD WEATHERMAN LYON COLLEGE “Lyon College offers students in Arkansas and the nation an outstanding undergraduate education in a personalized setting. Our wide-ranging outdoor program provides mountain bike trails, a zip line, climbing grotto, and much more. Next fall, we are adding men’s and women’s wrestling, followed by football in 2015. Our student-run Honor and Social System is dedicated to developing the character of the students we serve. Of course, education remains our highest priority. Lyon faculty members have won 14 Arkansas Professor of the Year awards. We provide young men and women immediate access to one of America’s strongest and most dedicated faculties.”

DR. GLEN FENTER MID-SOUTH COMMUNITY COLLEGE “Mid-South is a learning college, dedicated to student access and goal achievement, and our mission is to facilitate transformations in the lives of the people and in the economy of our region. For an institution that is just two decades old, MSCC has enjoyed phenomenal enrollment and campus facilities growth as well as amazing local support. While our campus has expanded dramatically, our focus remains the same – to provide accessible, affordable, employmentrelevant, world-class education. We remain dedicated to offering quality learning opportunities strategically designed to prepare our students for the jobs of today and tomorrow. Simply stated, Mid-South Community College is uniquely positioned to take higher education and training to the next level.”


DR. JOEL E. ANDERSON, CHANCELLOR UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS AT LITTLE ROCK “UALR serves the people of Arkansas, our country, and the world. It is known for excellent graduates, innovative research, bold ideas, and its willingness to tackle tough community and state issues. Our students are wonderfully diverse and hardworking, and they leave UALR with a greatly expanded understanding of our complex world. Our faculty hold degrees from the finest graduate schools in the nation and the world including MIT, University of Michigan, Russian Academy of Sciences, Harvard, Duke, Stanford, and Yale. The faculty and staff at UALR stand ready to help you meet your highest goals. Our purpose is to help you come to value the process of learning and make it your own. UALR is the powerhouse university the state needs in its capital city. I hope you will see for yourself how much UALR has to offer you.”

DR. CORBET LAMKIN

O. JEROME GREEN, ESQ.

SOUTHERN ARKANSAS UNIVERSITY TECH

SHORTER COLLEGE “Shorter College, founded in 1886, is a private two-year, non-residential liberal arts institution located in North Little Rock, Arkansas. With the institution-wide mantra of “You Fit Here”, the faculty, staff and administration of Shorter College have committed themselves to embracing an open-enrollment policy that provides opportunities that bridge the gap for individuals who would not be considered at other institutions to gain a quality education. Shorter College offers a caring and nurturing environment that will prepare them to succeed and excel onward to a four-year college experience. We believe that Shorter College’s mission fills a large void and serves the needs of the community-at-large by creating a transformative experience that impacts a student’s life through our “4 C’s; Culture, Citizenship, Character and Competency! Welcome to the new Shorter College! You Fit Here!”

“SAU Tech is a two-year college accredited by the North Central Association’s Higher Learning Commission and provides a fully transferable two-year general education degree. SAU Tech provides statewide technical training through the Arkansas Fire Training Academy and the Arkansas Environmental Training Academy. SAU Tech offers programs in graphic design, web design, film and video production, teacher education, nursing, aviation maintenance, industrial technology and more. We offer on-campus housing, online degrees and a comprehensive workforce training program. Located inside one of the largest privately owned industrial parks in the southern United States. For these reasons, and many more, SAU Tech is the perfect choice for YOU!”

DR. STEPHEN SCHOONMAKER COLLEGE OF THE OUACHITAS “As a top ten community college in the nation, as recognized by the Aspen Institute, we are transforming our students’ lives by inspiring excellence. Throughout our 44-year history we have prepared students with high demand skills for jobs that businesses and industries in the region need. Excellent faculty and caring staff create effective learning environments, offering a high quality education that is both accessible and affordable to all. College of the Ouachitas is the smart choice for students; whether they aspire to enter - or be promoted within - the regional job market, or seek to transfer for a bachelor’s degree after obtaining one of our nationally recognized and accredited associate degree programs. Come experience ‘a higher degree of you!’ ”

TOM COURTWAY

DR. GLENDELL JONES

W. ELLIS ARNOLD III

DR. REX M. HORNE, JR.

UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL ARKANSAS

HENDERSON STATE UNIVERSITY “Henderson State University is Arkansas’s Public Liberal Arts University. Founded in 1890, the university continues to enhance its focus on teaching excellence and service to the community by providing a comprehensive, high-quality education within a caring family environment. This year, the university offers new degree programs in criminal justice and engineering physics, representative of Henderson’s continuing commitment to provide students with innovative career options for the 21st Century.”

HENDRIX COLLEGE “Your Hendrix Odyssey has attracted national attention toArkansas. Through Odyssey, students combine critical thought with action. It is why U.S. News has five times placed Hendrix on its list of liberal arts colleges that are ‘making the most promising and innovative changes in the areas of academics, faculty, and student life.’ Your Hendrix Odyssey is changing the lives of those who can change the world. I invite you to visit the Hendrix campus and discover where Odyssey can take you.”

OUACHITA BAPTIST UNIVERSITY “For more than 125 years, Ouachita Baptist University has been equipping students for meaningful careers and service. With a 13-to-1 student-tofaculty ratio, our faculty members are dedicated to teaching and mentoring the next generation of difference makers. Ranked among America’s top colleges by U.S. News and Forbes, Ouachita pursues the twin pillars of a love of God and a love of learning. Our seven academic schools provide studies in business, Christian studies, education, fine arts, humanities, natural sciences and social sciences.”

”The University of Central Arkansas promotes the intellectual, professional, social, and personal development of students. With a vibrant campus life and outstanding academics, UCA students enjoy the complete collegiate experience. Many programs provide students with opportunities to conduct research and travel nationally and internationally. UCA dedicates itself to academic vitality, integrity and diversity (AVID). To learn more about the University of Central Arkansas, please visit www.uca.edu.“

CHRIS THOMASON, CHANCELLOR

DR. MARGARET A. ELLIBEE PULASKI TECHNICAL COLLEGE “As a leader in higher education in Arkansas, Pulaski Technical College is here to meet the educational needs of students, business, industry and the entire community we serve. Whether a student wants to further his or her education at a four-year institution with our university-transfer curriculum or desires to enter the workforce with an in-demand skill set, Pulaski Tech is committed to improving the quality of life for the people of central Arkansas. The college empowers our students with the knowledge and skills that give them the ability to transform their futures. And as our students succeed, the entire community benefits.”

DR. LAURENCE B. ALEXANDER UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS AT PINE BLUFF “As the second oldest public university in Arkansas, the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff is the only institution in the state that offers a program in Aquaculture/Fisheriesfrombachelor’sto doctorate levels which speaks directly to our passion for being student focused, success driven and mission based. This is achieved with a 15:1 student to faculty ratio, rigorous academic programs and diverse out-of-class experiences. If you are looking for a rewarding college career, become a part of the pride at the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff.”

UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS COMMUNITY COLLEGE AT HOPE “Since 1965, UACCH has been committed to connecting students and community partners to a high quality education, and committed to supporting a culture of academic, occupational, personal growth and enrichment programs throughout southwest Arkansas. With campuses in Hope and Texarkana, Arkansas, UACCH continues to be one of Arkansas’s fastest growing colleges. Our faculty and staff pride themselves on the quality, student-focused education we provide our students. Whether you are seeking your first two years of a traditional college education or seeking to gain needed training in a specialized field, UACCH is ready to help you succeed. We are committed to expanding opportunities for the region we serve while remaining one of the most affordable higher education institutions in Arkansas. To learn more, visit www.uacch.edu or come by one of our campuses and let us show you around.”

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Major Trends is why community colleges across the state, as well as ARKANSAS TECH UNIVERSITY the country, are a vital force in economic development With the second-highest graduation rate among public for the communities they serve. four-year universities in the state, Arkansas Tech University “I haven’t met anyone who isn’t for more jobs; better has proven its ability to connect students with the lifepaying positions and more satisfying work that stimuchanging benefits of a college degree. lates the economy and produces a stronger Arkansas. As Arkansas Tech is also the most affordable option among the economy recovers, and more businesses are thinkthe five universities in the state with 10,000 or more stuing about more than mere survival, they are looking to dents. All five areas of study that most incoming fresheither stay in Arkansas or move to Arkansas. And the first men seek -- business, engineering, teacher education, the biological and physical sciences, and the social sciences -- are among the more than 100 programs of study at Arkansas Tech. Enrollment at Arkansas Tech has grown by 158 percent since 1997, and with more than 60 new programs of study added over the past two decades, the university has demonstrated a commitment to developing academic offerings that translate to career opportunities in the modern economy. Online course offerings through eTech let students attend Arkansas Tech on their schedule. The Arkansas Tech Accelerated Degree Program allows students with 60 or more transferable credits an opportunity to earn a Bachelor of Professional Studies degree in 18 months or less. Fraternities and sororities, intramural sports, NCAA Pulaski Technical College’s new Culinary Arts and Hospitality Management Institute. intercollegiate athletics and outdoor recreation are just thing businesses look for in making the decision to stay some of the opportunities available to students seeking here or move here is an educated workforce. If we don’t the personal enrichment that comes from participation have that, we won’t have business. Period.” in campus life. In recent meetings with industry, COTO learned of 60 businesses in the state with high-skill, high-wage jobs COLLEGE OF THE OUACHITAS being left vacant because these companies could not The College of the Ouachitas (COTO) is committed to find a qualified workforce to fill these jobs. The college strengthening links to close educational attainment and listened, and its new mechatronics program is filling a economic develop gaps in Arkansas. need economic development partners identified. “It isn’t enough just to educate Arkansans,” Dr. Stephen “These partnerships work,” Schoonmaker said. “They Schoonmaker, president of COTO, said. “Without fammust work for the future of Arkansas. While education ily wage jobs for our educated workforce to be gainis the answer, it isn’t just any kind of education; it is the fully employed, we are only creating a population more right skills trained at the right time that makes the real aware of the dissonance between what they know and difference. And community colleges, like College of the what they can achieve through work and career. This

Ouachitas, are providing that kind of relevant education. Not just for the skills needed today – but the ones that will be needed tomorrow for the economic health of Arkansas, Arkansas’ businesses and industries, and Arkansans.” LYON COLLEGE Known for its strong liberal arts curriculum and its preprofessional programs in the health sciences, it’s not surprising that many Lyon students pursue degrees in

those areas. The most popular majors of graduating seniors in 2011 were biology and history, both at 14 percent of the graduating class, followed by business administration at 13 percent and psychology at 11 percent. Lyon also has a track record of producing graduates who successfully reach the next level of education. The college’s pre-med graduates have an acceptance rate into medical school of more than 90 percent, almost twice the national average. Lyon graduates who apply for law school also have an acceptance rate of more than 90 percent. NATIONAL PARK COMMUNITY COLLEGE National Park Community College (NPCC) maximizes

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THE COLLEGE ISSUE 2013 statewide and regional partnerships to ensure local success. Diminishing resources requires educators to unite through a variety of consortiums and partnerships with local, regional and state agencies. Recently, seven community colleges from around the state formed a consortium to assist the Arkansas Insurance Department develop and deliver training for the Arkansas Health Connector Training Program. NPCC was an integral part in creating the curriculum and cur-

rently teaches classes throughout southcentral Arkansas. NPCC partnered with the Arkansas Women’s Business Center, the Small Business Administration and Winrock International to provide entrepreneurial training classes to new and future businesses through Operation Jump Start. This program has helped numerous businesses in Garland County, providing training and offering seed money. NPCC recently wrapped up a three-year statewide aerospace consortium partnership

that provided a number of local aerospace workers the training needed to either get a job in aerospace or enhance the skills of existing workers. Collaboration is a key to success: Our business and industry partners help identify the skills that workers need to be competitive, and regional partnerships provide opportunities to share resource and state partnerships with agencies such as the Arkansas Economic Development Commission.

OUACHITA BAPTIST UNIVERSITY Ouachita Baptist University (OBU) is expanding its course offerings related to new aspects of ministry: worship arts and recreation/sports ministry. Founded in 1886, OBU combines a rich legacy as a leading liberal arts university with a steadfast passion for ministry, the arts, and missions. A key example of Ouachita’s investment in effective ministry preparation is the university’s worship studies program, which features three innovative majors designed to develop skilled and scholarly musicians, ministers and artists. Students in the worship studies program have the opportunity to earn a Bachelor of Music in worship arts, Bachelor of Arts in worship ministry or Bachelor of Arts in church/media production arts. Each of the

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The University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff (UAPB) has a particular focus on technology and engineering.

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three interdisciplinary majors is designed to prepare graduates for a range of worship leadership opportunities in diverse ministry settings. The three degree programs engage students in challenging and creative courses of study with renowned faculty members in a close-knit campus environment. According to Dr. Rob Hewell, associate professor and director of Ouachita’s worship studies program, “The expectations facing ministers and leaders for skills and knowledge in worship, the arts and ministry have grown dramatically in recent years. That growth will only continue in the coming years.” Ouachita’s worship studies program is a unique, collaborate program that draws on the expertise of the university’s highly regarded School of Fine Arts, Division

of Music and Pruet School of Christian Studies. Academic opportunities range from graphic design, digital media and theatre arts to musicianship, theology and global mission, all with a focus on hands-on experience. The kinesiology and leisure studies major with an emphasis in recreation and sports ministry is a new program at OBU that grew out of students’ desire to pursue a vocation in recreation ministry.

The university estimates that 100 or more OBU students work at camps dealing with some form of recreation and sports ministry each summer. The recreation and sports ministry concentration is an interdisciplinary effort through the Department of Kinesiology and Leisure Studies, the Pruet School of Christian Studies and the Rogers Department of Communication that is designed to prepare graduates for camp, sport, outdoor, and church-related ministries.

PULASKI TECHNICAL COLLEGE Pulaski Technical College’s new 60,000 square-foot Culinary Arts and Hospitality Management Institute opens its doors at the beginning of the fall semester this year. This facility will allow the programs to educate students in a state-of-the-art learning environment. Our accreditation has demonstrated that we are nationally competitive. With a facility rivaling the best in the nation, Pulaski Tech’s hospitality and culinary programs will be a magnet

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THE COLLEGE ISSUE 2013 for aspiring chefs and other professionals both in the state and nation. SOUTHERN ARKANSAS UNIVERSITY TECH The major trends in higher education include a drop in overall college enrollments. This can be attributed to many graduates unable to find employment upon graduation, giving the impression that paying for a degree may not be worth the investment. However, the job forecast indicates a high demand for per-

sons with technical training, which is just what Southern Arkansas University Tech and other two-year colleges in Arkansas can offer. UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS Sustainability continues to be a priority for the University of Arkansas, with both the interdisciplinary Foundations of Sustainability minor and interdisciplinary graduate certificate in sustainability recently established. The U of A is a founding member and lead partner institution

in the Sustainability Consortium. Distance learning is another area of emphasis. Since 2006, the university has tripled its online offerings, and the College of Engineering and the College of Education and Health Professions are leading the way with new courses. The University of Arkansas Institute for Nanoscience & Engineering is at the forefront of research in nanoscience and nanotechnology, and is one of the university’s six research strengths. Other interdisciplinary research strengths include:

health; energy and the environment; supply chain logistics and transportation; food safety; and American art, architecture and humanities. Diversifying our campus continues to be a priority, as well as an ongoing success story. Not only have we seen impressive increases among African-American, Latino and Asian students, we’ve also reached record highs in the percentage of first generation college students and those who are eligible for Pell grants.

Webster University n this competitive job market, having just an undergraduate degree can be a disadvantage if career advancement is the goal. With the demands of full-time work, family and relationships, juggling graduate school may seem like an insurmountable task for someone who wants to get ahead. Fortunately through a variety of class options and schedules, Webster University Little Rock Area has made a high-quality education attainable for people from all walks of life. Webster University Little Rock Area is part of the Webster University system, the only Tier 1, private, nonprofit university with campus locations around the world including metropolitan, military, online and corporate, as well as American-style traditional campuses in North America, Europe and Asia. Founded in 1915, Webster University’s main campus is in St. Louis, Mo., and has been named one of the best schools by U.S. News and World Report in 2012 and 2013.

I

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y

UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS AT LITTLE ROCK Online education is one of the biggest trends in higher education, and the University of Arkansas at Little Rock (UALR) has been an online education leader for many years, delivering quality and affordable credentials to working professionals and those who need extra flexibility in order to advance their education. “UALR offers a way for people to complete their degree without interrupting

their life,” said Accelerated and Online Programs Director Robin M. Smith. In addition to offering students traditional semester-length online degree programs, Smith said UALR now offers new accelerated online programs that can be completed in seven-and-a-half week increments. They are another great way to earn a degree while combining family, work and school responsibilities. Concentrating on only two courses at a time, students can still complete 12 hours within the semester.

This fall, UALR is offering six accelerated online bachelor’s and master’s degree programs. These are in addition to the numerous semester-length online certificate and degree programs for undergraduate and graduate students. And even traditional, face-to-face courses have an online component, making access to class materials as close as the click of a mouse. Several courses are also offered at the UALR Benton Center and the Arkansas Studies Institute in downtown Little Rock.

James Edwards is a recent UALR graduate whose rehabilitation counseling coursework was primarily completed online. Today, Edwards is in a senior management position at Greenhope Services for Women in New York City. The agency seeks to rehabilitate women with substance abuse and mental health issues. Edwards is more than prepared for his role, thanks to what he refers to as “great teaching’ on the part of his UALR professors. “The degree program made me focus

Webster University Little Rock Area offers a variety of graduate degree programs personalized for those who work full-time.

With two locations in Central Arkansas – one at 200 W. Capitol Ave. in Little Rock and one at the Jacksonville Education Center just outside the Jacksonville Air Force Base – Webster University Little Rock Area offers numerous master’s level degree programs that include health administration, finance, environmental management, human resources management, international business, information technology and media communications. Webster can personalize your education to meet your specific needs and schedule, so that getting your degree while working full-time or actively serving in the military is a smooth, positive experience that advances your career. Webster’s agile, adaptable learning environment is designed for the flexibility that military service so often demands. Coursework and locations are designed to accommodate changing deployments and scheduling needs. For more information about Webster University Little Rock Area, visit www. webster.edu/littlerock/.

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THE COLLEGE ISSUE 2013 and work independently while also giving me the support I needed when I had questions or challenges with the curriculum,” said Edwards. UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS AT PINE BLUFF The University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff (UAPB) has a particular focus on aquaculture/fisheries and science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) areas which include biology, chemistry, computer science and industrial technology. UAPB’s performing arts programs also continue to experience success with the internationally recognized vesper choir, marching band and award-winning theatre program. UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS COMMUNITY COLLEGE AT HOPE The University of Arkansas Community College at Hope (UACCH) is currently piloting online classes as part of the University of Arkansas online consortium. UACCH is part of the UA online consor-

tium, made up of three community colleges in Arkansas (Batesville, Hope and Phillips community colleges). The online consortium provides an Associate of Arts Degree through a partnership of classes offered online by these three colleges. UACCH provided its first online course in 1998 and continued to improve on these offerings. Since the spring 2002, the UA online consortium has had more than 22,700 students enroll in classes. For fall 2012, the online enrollment was 788 students, and that enrollment grew 23 percent in spring 2013 to 974.

area of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education. UCA students can enroll in UCA STEMTeach, a program that allows students to earn a degree and become licensed in their chosen STEM discipline. Students majoring in the College of Business Innovation and Entrepreneurship program generate new ideas and business plans to start their own businesses upon graduation. UCA faculty members are preparing to incorporate more service learning into the curriculum, which provides addi-

tional opportunities for students to connect with the community and non-profit organizations. UCA’s residential college program provides students with a living and learning environment for any discipline. And, with a solid demand for online education, UCA is increasing its degree offerings online. UCA steadily appears in U.S. News & World Report’s annual rankings of universities and colleges with a current ranking of 26 in the category of “Top Public Schools” among regional universities in the south for 2013.

UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL ARKANSAS The University of Central Arkansas (UCA) continues to be a leader in the area of health sciences and provides a full range of health sciences degrees and programs, including nursing, physical therapy, occupational therapy, communication sciences and disorders. UCA is also increasing its emphasis in the

The University of Central Arkansas provides a full range of health sciences degrees

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d e k n a R

www.COTO.edu 501.337.5000 Malvern, AR facebook.com/coto4me twitter.com/coto4me THE COLLEGE ISSUE 2013 • ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES • AUGUST 22, 2013 33


THE COLLEGE ISSUE 2013

In Demand Careers ARKANSAS NATIONAL GUARD One of the fastest-growing jobs in the U.S. is physician assistant. Physician assistants, also known as PAs, practice medicine under the direction of physicians and surgeons, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. They are formally

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Physician assistants and nurses are always in demand.

trained to examine patients, diagnose injuries and illnesses, and provide treatment. In order to become a physician assistant, students must complete a bachelor’s degree, plus a minimum of two-years of post-graduate study, which usually leads to a master’s degree, and the Arkansas National Guard (ANG) can help pay for the education. With a minimum three-year commitment to the ANG, physician assistants and those studying to become physician assistants can receive a $20,000 bonus and up to $75,000 in student loan repayments. Licensed PAs also receive a direct commission to the rank of captain. ARKANSAS TECH UNIVERSITY What do firms such as ABF Freight System, Acxiom, Bank of America, Ducommun LaBarge Technologies, Entergy, IC Bus and Sherwin Williams have in common? They all hire employees with the skills that are being taught in the newest undergraduate degree program in the Arkansas Tech University College of Business. Arkansas Tech launched its Bachelor of Science in Business Administration degree in business data analytics during the 2012-13 school year. It is the first baccalaureate degree program in Arkansas that approaches data analytics from a business perspective. Data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics indicates that employment in the closely related management analyst field is expected to grow 24 percent by the year 2018. The average salary for management analysts in Arkansas is $60,000 per year. The development of the business data analytics program is further evidence of the fact that Arkansas Tech is a leader for science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education in the state. Arkansas Tech is one of only two public universities in the state to offer accredited programs in both electrical engineering and mechanical engineering. Engineering students from Arkansas Tech are regularly awarded internships from NASA and other prestigious organizations. Arkansas Tech offers a Master of Engineering degree for individuals seeking an advanced credential in a field that will help drive economic development during the 21st century. Reducing risk and mitigating potential crises is at the core of modern business planning. Arkansas Tech was the first institution in the world to have its emergency management degree programs accredited by the Foundation on Higher Education in Disaster/Emergency Management and Homeland Security. Students may pursue a Bachelor of Science degree in emergency management and a Master of Science degree in emergency management and homeland security at Arkansas Tech.

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Arkansas Tech also offers a broad range of pre-professional degree programs -- including pre-medical, predental, pre-law, pre-pharmacy, pre-physical therapy and pre-veterinary medicine. BAPTIST HEALTH SCHOOLS Baptist Health Schools Little Rock (BHSLR) has served the central Arkansas area since 1921. The private, not-for-profit, Christian institution offers nine unique and employable health care educational programs in nursing and allied health. We offer programs that lead to licensure and/or registry in registered nursing, practical nursing, histotechnology, medical technology, radiography, nuclear medicine technology, occupational therapy assistant, sleep technology and surgical technology. These nine programs give individuals great starts to their careers with plenty of room for future growth and advanced degrees. BHSLR prides itself in the quality of the classroom and clinical experiences provided to students. HENDERSON STATE UNIVERSITY Henderson State University now offers degrees in criminal justice, engineering physics and education technology leadership: Criminal justice: After recognizing there are not many in-state options for those in southwest Arkansas to seek bachelor-level options in criminal justice, Henderson worked with criminal justice and human service professionals to develop a plan that would allow students pos-

Part of the commitment by Arkansas Tech University to offer STEM educational opportunities is its accredited programs in both electrical engineering and mechanical engineering, a distinction shared by only one other public university in Arkansas.


sessing a minor or associate’s degree in criminal justice to seamlessly complete a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice. Engineering physics: The engineering physics degree prepares students to tackle complex problems in multidisciplinary areas at the forefront of 21st Century technology, such as solid state devices, quantum optics and photonics, materials science, nanotechnology, electromechanical systems, energy systems and any engineering field that requires a solid background in physics. Master of Science degree in education technology leadership (online): Henderson will offer the only program in Arkansas designed specifically for school administrators who must have an awareness of how leadership and curriculum impact a school’s or district’s ability to design technology appropriate for its unique needs.

NATIONAL PARK COMMUNITY COLLEGE

NORTHWEST ARKANSAS COMMUNITY COLLEGE

the average for all occupations.”

National Park Community College (NPCC) is well-known for its RN and LPN nursing programs, but its criminal justice and computer information system programs are two that are also achieving high employment rates in the central Arkansas region. These programs, along with those in accounting and teaching, promise a bright future for area students planning to attend college.

Northwest Arkansas Community College is beginning its health information management program this fall. Tina Cikanek, the college’s health information management program director, said it’s a rapidly growing field. “The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics says job openings for medical records and health information technicians are expected to increase by 21 percent from 2010 to 2020,” she said. “That’s a rate faster than

PULASKI TECHNICAL COLLEGE The college offers more than 76 degree and certificate programs in allied health and human services, aviation, business, culinary arts, information technology, manufacturing, and industrial and automotive technology, as well as continuing education and community services. The college awards Associate of Arts and Associate of Science degrees to graduates

HERITAGE COLLEGE Heritage College provides educational training in the allied health and wellness fields, and the Heritage Campus in Little Rock operates as a massage therapy school, a personal trainer school, an x-ray medical technician-medical assistant school, a hospital and health administration school, and a pharmacy technician school. The training is designed to lead to entry-level positions in meaningful careers and jobs in those professions. Future endeavors include adding an EMT basic program and a veterinarian technician program, bringing Heritage’s programs offered to seven.

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THE COLLEGE ISSUE 2013 of the university-transfer program, as well as Associate of Applied Science degrees, technical certificates and certificates of proficiency. SOUTHERN ARKANSAS UNIVERSITY In the fall 2013 semester, Southern Arkansas University (SAU) launched a new, unique and high-demand program for computer gaming and animation design. SAU recently became the first and only university in Arkansas and region to offer

a complete program dedicated to providing instruction from the technical as well as the artistic points of view. SAU is gearing up to produce graduates who will be ready to fill the ever-growing demands for mobile apps, 3-D designs and lifelike animations. The university anticipates interest from students from across the U.S. who are interested in this growing field as SAU’s program is dramatically more affordable than other programs across the states. SAU now offers a Bachelor of Fine

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SCHOOLS LITTLE ROCK

36 AUGUST 22, 2013 • ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES • THE COLLEGE ISSUE 2013

sonal care, office and administrative staff, Arts degree in art and design for game, maintenance and repair, and construction animation and simulation design and a and extraction, among others. Training for Bachelor of Science in computer science many of these fields can be obtained at a with an option in computer gaming and two-year college such as Southern Arkansas animation design. University Tech. The college has seen high “We already have freshman students demand for its new welding academy and planning to attend SAU and others planning has expanded the hours for classes. to transfer here this fall to take advantage of this innovative new program. This new UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS major and option at Southern Arkansas will Academic minors are very often indicative be unlike any other in the state,” said Dr. Trey Berry, SAU vice president for academic affairs. “The market for game and There are growing animation designers and demands for mobile game programmers is one apps, 3-D designs of the fastest growing in the and lifelike computer United States.” animations. Gaming is part of a larger field of software development, a field that is not only growing and rewarding, but also pays well. According to the 2012-13 Occupational Outlook Handbook provided by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median annual salary in the U.S. for software developers is $90,530, with a 30 percent faster than average job outlook for the years 2010-2020. The median salaries for visual artists start at $61,000, as listed in the Bureau of Labor Statistics under multimedia artists and art directors and multimedia artists and animators. The technical side of SAU’s gaming program will offer of swings toward emerging job markets. The students experience in the highly competiUniversity of Arkansas added two minors tive introductory and advanced topics of this year, one in nanotechnology and a game development, such as 3-D rendersecond in regional and urban planning, ing, graphics algorithms, game scripting, the latter coordinated by the departments artificial intelligence, human-computer of landscape architecture and political interaction and interface design. science. The department of biomedical Students will be educated to create apps engineering in the College of Engineering for mobile devices, games for the gaming added a master’s program and doctoral industry and animation in traditional and program because of the continued growth 3-D aspects of the entertainment industry. in that job sector. The possibilities do not end there. A student will be able to learn to use techUNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS AT LITTLE nological software in this program to not ROCK only create a 3-D model, but also print As the Baby Boomer generation ages, fedtheir creations in 3-D. eral labor statistics project an increased One 3-D printer is already in place need for nursing and other health care. This and being used by students at SAU, and fall, nursing students at the University of more are being shipped to campus soon Arkansas at Little Rock (UALR) will learn in preparation for the fall semester. from excellent faculty in a state-of-the-art facility that holds a simulation lab for stuSOUTHERN ARKANSAS UNIVERSITY dents to practice life-and-death situations. TECH Licensed practical nurses and paramedLong-term employment projections for ics may take advantage of UALR’s LPN/ Arkansas include jobs in health care, per-


throughout the program. “This is a cutting-edge method of teaching business and soft skills employers want, and it is available right here in Little Rock,” said Dr. Jane Wayland, Stephen Harrow Smith dean of the College of Business. Finally, students considering in-demand careers should consider these two words: Big Data. Whether through digital pictures, cellphones, or social media posts, data is hurling at us at an accelerating pace. All that data and technology will continue to produce a need for people who are highly skilled in engineering and information technology and other related areas. UALR has one of the most vibrant and highly regarded computer science programs in the state, housed in the state-of-the-art Donaghey College of Engineering and Information Technology (EIT). The EIT program prepares students for careers as computer scientists in business and industry, with the ability to deliver software and hardware design and development. UALR offers undergraduate and graduate degrees in computer science as well as the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree in Integrated Computing. UALR graduates hold excellent jobs in national and international companies and have pursued advanced degrees at prestigious institutions. “We are continually responding to an urgent need for fundamental changes in the education of future computer scientists to ensure that they are well prepared for their evermore demanding professional roles,” said Dr. Eric Sandgren, dean of the College of EIT. PHOTOS.COM, JUPITERIMAGES ©

Paramedic to RN program, while other students may find the online RN to BSN program beneficial to their careers. UALR also offers a four-year ladder program that enables first-time entering freshmen meeting nursing entry requirements guaranteed placement in nursing courses by sophomore year. Freshmen living-learning communities for nursing are also available. “We are exited about the expanded

learning experiences we offer in our SimCare Interdisciplinary Health area and encourage anyone considering a career in nursing or continuing their education to contact us,” said Ann Bain, interim dean of the College of Science. UALR’s College of Business is also the place for preparing for in-demand careers in which financial services play a key role. Located in the high-tech Reynolds Center for Business and Economic Development, students find a quality education enriched by applied learning experiences. New this fall is a revamped MBA program, with an emphasis on the soft skills such as leadership, teamwork, and communication – skills highly recommended by a group of Little Rock business leaders. While a few other prestigious business schools offer these skills through coaching or brief seminars, UALR takes this instruction a step further by integrating the coaching model into the curriculum and assessing students at different points

UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS AT PINE BLUFF The University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff (UAPB) is known internationally for its aquaculture/fisheries program; however, the institution has also graduated a large number of students in criminal justice, business administration, biology, human sciences and industrial technology. The merchandising, textile and design program from the human sciences department made a memorable impression on the community this summer when they offered institutes for teachers and students.

works to meet the academic needs of its students and the demands of the work force. As the state endures a shortage of qualified personnel in health-related fields, UCA continues to produce highly-skilled graduates in the fields of nursing, physical therapy, occupational therapy and communication sciences and disorders. UCA has also begun a comprehensive study on adding degree programs in health information technology, health services administration and optometry. The bachelor’s and mas-

ter’s degrees in digital filmmaking remain the only programs of their kind among the state’s four-year schools and has produced many graduates who work in the film and television industry in Arkansas and Texas, Louisiana and California. Student enrollment in UCA’s degree program of innovation and entrepreneurship, through the College of Business, maintains growth, and the University continues to have strong programs for teacher education in the College of Education.

ARKANSAS A RKANSAS C COLLEGE OLLEGE For F or Men Men and and W Women omen

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UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL ARKANSAS The University of Central Arkansas (UCA) THE COLLEGE ISSUE 2013 • ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES • AUGUST 22, 2013 37


G U I DE TO COLLEG ES AN D U N IVE RSITI ES

FOUR YEAR SCHOOL

CITY

PHONE

YEARS

PUBLIC PRIVATE

ENROLLMENT SEM

PER FEMALE

PER MALE

SEM TERM

HRS SEM

TUITION SEM

HOUSING SEM

Arkansas Baptist College

Little Rock

501-370-4000

4-year

4-year Private

1082

38%

62%

Semester

12-17 hours

$3,900

$3,975 (double occupancy: 19 Meals/week)

Arkansas State University

Jonesboro

870-972-2100/800-382-3030 (in-state only)

4-year

4-year Public

13,877

61%

39%

Semester

12 hours-full time undergraduate

$2,244 (in-state)

$3,735.00

Arkansas Tech University

Russellville

479-968-0343/ 1-800-582-6953

4-year

4-year Public

10,950

56%

44%

Semester

15

$3,459.00

starting at $2,501 (includes meals)

Central Baptist College

Conway

501-329-6872/1-800-205-6872

4-year

4-year Private

832

48%

52%

Semester

15

$5,925.00

$3,150.00

Crowley’s Ridge College

Paragould

870-236-6901

4-year

4-year Private

200

51%

49%

Semester

12 or more

$4,650.00

$3,050 (includes meal plan)

Harding University

Searcy

800-477-4407

4-year

4-year Private

7,200

53%

47%

Semester

15

$7,845.00

$3,182.00

Henderson State University

Arkadelphia

870-230-5028/1-800-228-7333

4-year

4-year Public

3,770

56%

44%

Semester

12-15 hours

$2,292.00

$2,818 (including room & board)

Hendrix College

Conway

800-277-9017/ 501-450-1362

4-year

4-year Private

1,403

55%

45%

Semester

4 courses/semester

$18,758 (including fees)

$5,310 (including meals)

John Brown University

Siloam Springs

877-528-4636/ 479-524-7157

4-year

4-year Private

2,215

57%

43%

Semester

12-18 hours

$10,868.00

$4,131.00

Lyon College

Batesville

1-800-423-2542/ 870-698-4242

4-year

4-year Private

600

55%

45%

Semester

12

$11,685.00

$3,780.00

Ouachita Baptist University

Arkadelphia

1-800-DIAL-OBU/ 870-245-5110

4-year

4-year Private

1,532

54%

46%

Semester

up to 18

$11,185 (including fees)

$3,320 (room and board)

Philander Smith College

Little Rock

501-370-5221

4-year

4-year Private

700

66%

34%

Semester

12-16 hours

$5,902.00

$4,425.00

Southern Arkansas University

Magnolia

870-235-4040

4-year

4-year Public

3,330

60%

40%

Semester

15

$3,060.00

$2,511.00

University of Arkansas at Little Rock

Little Rock

1-800-482-8892

4-year

4-year Public

12,958

60%

40%

Semester

12

$197.32/hr

$4,236 (including room & board)

University of Arkansas at Monticello

Monticello

870-460-1026/800-844-1826

4-year

4-year Public

3,945

60%

40%

Semester

12-15 hours

$136.77/credit hour

$1,220-$2,200

University of Arkansas Pine Bluff

Pine Bluff

870-575-8000

4-year

4-year Public

2,828

56%

44%

Semester

15

$2,145.00

$3,733 (20 meals)

University of Arkansas

Fayetteville

479-575-5346/1-800-377-8632

4-year

4-year Public

24,537

50%

50%

Semester

15

$3,909 (including fees)

$4,521.00

University of Central Arkansas

Conway

501-450-5000

4-year

4-year Public

11,107

60%

40%

Semester

15

$3,798.00

$2,775.00

University of Arkansas at Fort Smith

Fort Smith

1-479-788-7120/ 1-888-512-LION

4-year

4-year Public

7,337

58%

42%

Semester

15

$182.25/credit hr- $71 fees per semester

$3600/Semester + meal plan (average)

University of the Ozarks

Clarksville

479-979-1227/ 1-800-264-8636

4-year

4-year Private

600

55%

45%

Semester

12-17

$11,875.00

$3,450.00

Williams Baptist College

Walnut Ridge

1-800-722-4434/ 870-759-4120

4-year

4-year Private

650

55%

45%

Semester

12-17

$6,450.00

$3,100.00

TWO YEAR SCHOOL

CITY

PHONE

YEARS

PUBLIC PRIVATE

ENROLLMENT SEM

PER FEMALE

PER MALE

SEM TERM

HRS SEM

TUITION SEM

HOUSING SEM

Arkansas Northeastern College

Blytheville

870-762-1020

2-year

2-year Public

1,900

70%

30%

Semester

12

$54/hr

N/A

Arkansas State University

Beebe

501-882-3600

2-year

2-year Public

4,888

58%

42%

Semester

12

$85/hr

Residence Halls

Arkansas State University at Newport

Newport

1-800-976-1676

2-year

2-year Public

2,100

60%

40%

Semester

12

$86/hr

N/A

Arkansas State University at Mountain Home

Mountain Home

870-508-6100

2-year

2-year Public

1,413

64%

36%

Semester

12

$87/hr

N/A

Arkansas State University

Searcy (a technical campusofASU-Beebe)

501-207-6200

2-year

2-year Public

350

45%

55%

Semester

18

$83/hr

double room $2310, single room $2710 - Beebe campus

Baptist Health Schools Little Rock

Little Rock

501-202-6200/800-345-3046

2-year

2-year Private

900

85%

15%

Semester

12

Varies By Program

No Campus Housing

Black River Technical College

Pocahontas

870-248-4000

2-year

2-year Public

2,500

63%

37%

Semester

12

$77/hr **

N/A

Cossatot Community College of the University of Arkansas

De Queen

870-584-4471/ 1-800-844-4471

2-year

2-year Public

1,500

70%

30%

Semester

12

$57/hr **

N/A

East Arkansas Community College

Forrest City

870-633-4480 877-797-EACC

2-year

2-year Public

1302 Fall Semester 2012

28%

72%

Semester

12

$72 per credit hour (In-County) $81 per credit hour (Out of County)

N/A

ITT Technical Institute

Little Rock

501-565-5550

2-year

2-year, 4-year Private

Continual

N/A

N/A

Quarters

12

$493/ hr

N/A

Mid-South Community College

West Memphis

870-733-6722/ 866-733-6722

2-year

2-year Public

1980 (Fall 2012)

64%

36%

Semester

1-21 hours

$90/hr (in county), $110/ hr (out of county/in state), $300/hr (out of state)

N/A

National Park Community College

Hot Springs

501-760-4222

2-year

2-year Public

3,559

64%

36%

Semester

12

$85/hr $1,530 max indistrict; $95/hr $1,710 max out-district

N/A

North Arkansas College

Harrison

870-743-3000 or toll free at 1-800-679-6622

2-year

2-year Public

2,315

60%

40%

Semester

12

$948 (in county) $1,236 (out of county)

N/A

North West Arkansas Community College

Bentonville

479-636-9222/ 1-800-995-6922

2-year

2-year Public

8,300

57%

43%

Semester

15

$1125 ($75 per credit hr) in district / $1,837 ($122 per credit hr) out of district

N/A

College of the Ouachitas

Malvern

1-800-337-0266/ 501-337-5000

2-year

2-year Public

1,400

60%

40%

Semester

12

$1,020

N/A

Ozarka College

Melbourne

870-368-7371

2-year

2-year Public

1,550

70%

30%

Semester

12-15 hours

$79/hr

N/A

Phillips Community College

Helena

870-338-6474

2-year

2-year Public

2,158

67%

33%

Semester

15

$62/hr

N/A

Pulaski Technical College

North Little Rock

501-812-2200

2-year

2-year Public

11,619

64%

36%

Semester

Varies

$95/credit hr

N/A

Remington College

Little Rock

501-312-0007

2-year

2-year Private

370

80%

20%

Contact Campus

12 hours full - time student

Contact Campus

N/A

Rich Mountain Community College

Mena

479-394-7622

2-year

2-year Public

1,000

71%

29%

Semester

15

$930

N/A

Shorter College

North Little Rock

501-374-6305

2-year

2-year Private

n/a

75%

25%

Semester

12-16

$1,800.00

N/A-non-residential

South Arkansas Community College

El Dorado

870-864-7142

2-year

2-year Public

1,774

70%

30%

Semester

15

$1,110/$1,260/$2,280

N/A

Southeast Arkansas College

Pine Bluff

870-850-8605/888-SEARKTC

2-year

2-year Public

2,300

70%

30%

Semester

up to 18

$80/hr

N/A

Southern Arkansas University Tech

Camden

870-574-4500

2-year

2-year Public

2,487

54%

46%

Semester

15

$108/hr in state $156/hr out of state

$1100/semester double [On-Campus]; $1300/semester double [Off-Campus]; $1850/ semester single

University of Arkansas Community College at Batesville

Batesville

870-612-2000

2-year

2-year Public

1,574

70%

30%

Semester

12

$63/hr in district $75/hr out of district

N/A

University of Arkansas Community College at Hope

Hope

870-777-5722

2-year

2-year Public

1,500

69%

31%

Semester

12

$65.50 per credit hour

N/A

University of Arkansas Community College at Morrilton

Morrilton

1-800-264-1094

2-year

2-year Public

2,376

60%

40%

Semester

12

$78/hr** $85/hr In-State

N/A

38 AUGUST 22, 2013 • ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES • THE COLLEGE ISSUE 2013

INFORMATION CURRENT AS OF AUGUST 2013. **IN COUNTY. ***OUT OF COUNTY. †IN-DISTRICT. ††OUT OF DISTRICT. †††OUT OF STATE.


TOTAL SEM COST

AIDDEADLINE

PER ON AID

SCHOLARSHIPDEADLINE

REQUIREDEXAMS

APP DEADLINE FEE

RELIGIOUS AFFILIATION

CREDIT EXAM ACCEPTED

COMMENT AND WEBSITE

$7,875 (Tuition + room and board)

Open

NA

None

ACT/SAT/COMPASS

None

Baptist

CLEP

Arkansas Baptist College . . . It’s a GOOD thing! www.arkansasbaptist.edu

$6,746.00

July 1st

74%

Feb. 1st

ACT/ASSET/SAT

1st day of classes/ $15-Undergraduate; $30-Graduate/Masters Specialist;$40 International Students; $50 Doctoral

None

AP/CLEP

In-state tuition available to out-of-state students residing in counties in contiguous states. www.astate.edu

$5,960 (not including books)

Open

83%

Feb. 28th

ACT/SAT

Open/ No Fee

None

AP/CLEP

See our website. www.atu.edu

$9,825.00

June 30th

90%

Dec. 10th First Priority

ACT or SAT

1st Day of Classes

Baptist Missionary Association of America

AP/CLEP

Our strength is fostering an excellent education program with a Christian perspective. www.cbc.edu www.crc.edu

$8,500 for boarding students

Open

80%

Aug. 24th

ACT/ASSET

Aug. 24th

Church of Christ

CLEP/AP

$11,267.00

August 1st

96%

August 1st

ACT/SAT

Open/ $50

Church of Christ

AP/CLEP/IB

One of America’s leading character-building colleges with a distinguished academic program. www.harding.edu

with fees approx $5,890

April 15th Priority

89%

Feb. 1st Priority

ACT/SAT

None

None

AP/CLEP

A world-class education in a highly personalized environment. www.hsu.edu

$24,068.00

March 1 Priority

100%

Nov. 15 Early Action for certain scholarships, however scholarships are awarded through all application deadlines

ACT or SAT

Early Action I - Nov. 1, Early Action II - Feb. 1

United Methodist

AP/CLEP/IB

All students engage in “Your Hendrix Odyssey” – a unique array of active, real-life learning experiences that enrich every degree program. www.hendrix.edu

$15,498.00

March 1 Priority

88%

March 1st Priority

ACT/SAT

Rolling/ $25

Interdenominational

AP/CLEP/IB

Strong liberal arts core curriculum. Alpha Chi Honors Chapter top 10% nationally. Nationally ranked “Students in Free Enterprise” (SIFE) team. www.jbu.edu

$15,577.00

Rolling but priority consideration by Feb. 1st

99%

Rolling but priority consideration by March 1st

ACT/SAT

Rolling/ $25

Presbyterian

AP and International Baccalaureate

More than 90% of Lyon applicants are accepted into medical or dental school (national average: 47%). Winner of 14 Arkansas Professors of the Year Awards. Football and wrestling will start in the fall of 2014 www.lyon.edu

$14,505.00

June 1st

97%

Jan. 15th Priority

ACT/SAT

Open/ No Application Fee

Arkansas Baptist State Convention

AP/CLEP

Discover the Ouachita Difference. www.obu.edu

$10,459.00

March 1st

98%

Rolling Deadline

ACT/SAT

Open/$25

United Methodist

CLEP

Think Justice. www.philander.edu

$5,571.00

March 1st Priority

84%

March 1st

ACT or SAT

Open/No Fee

None

AP/CLEP

Affordable, student-centered education and the Complete College Experience. www.saumag.edu

$8,494.95 (est 15 hrs tuition/ fees, rm/brd, books)

March 1 Priority

70%

Dec. 1st Priority, Feb. 1st Final

ACT or SAT

Freshman admission and credential deadline is one week before classes begin.

None

AP/CLEP/PEP/Regents College Exams

Apply and register on-line today! www.ualr.edu.

$8,021.55 including campus room and board

Rolling

83%

March 1st Priority

ACT/ASSET/SAT/COMPASS (for placement)

Rolling/No Fee - Except for international applicants

None

AP/CLEP

UAM consists of the main university campus in Monticello as well as the UAM Colleges of Technology in Crossett and McGehee. www.uamont.edu

$6,610.00

April 15th Priority

90%

March 1st/ April 1st

ACT/SAT

Open

None

CLEP

UAPB is a comprehensive 1890 Land Grant, HBCU institution and the second oldest public university in Arkansas with a diverse student population, competitive degree offerings and stellar faculty that provides liberal and professional education. www.uapb.edu

$8,430.00

March 15th

68%

Feb. 1st (Freshman) April 1st (transfers)

ACT/SAT

Aug. 1

None

AP/CLEP/IB

See our website. www.uark.edu

$6,573.00

Open

77%

Feb. 16th

ACT/SAT

None

None

AP/CLEP/IB

UCA is a comprehensive university offering students excellence in education. www.uca.edu

Varies

June 15th

70%

Varies

ACT/COMPASS/SAT

Open/ No Fee

None

AP/CLEP/Challenge

UAFS - Experience. Expert. Education. www.uafs.edu

$15,325 (not including books or fees)

Feb. 15 Priority

94%

April 1st Priority

ACT/SAT/IB

May 1st Priority

Presbyterian

AP/CLEP

Ozarks Outdoors is one of the premier university-affiliated outdoor education and recreation programs in the state. www.ozarks.edu

$10,025.00

May 1st

97%

None

ACT/SAT

Open/No Fee

Southern Baptist

AP/CLEP

www.williamsbaptistcollege.com

TOTAL SEM COST

AIDDEADLINE

PER ON AID

SCHOLARSHIPDEADLINE

REQUIREDEXAMS

APP DEADLINE FEE

RELIGIOUS AFFILIATION

CREDIT EXAM ACCEPTED

COMMENT AND WEBSITE

$648 plus fees

Open

67%

April 1st Priority

ACT/ASSET/COMPASS/SAT

Open

None

AP/CLEP

www.anc.edu

$1,188 tuition/fees

Priority dates June 1/ Nov 1/Mar 31

57%

June 1st

ACT/ASSET/COMPASS

Open/ No Fee

None

CLEP

Bachelor and graduate degrees are available through Arkansas State University-Jonesboro on the Beebe campus. Call 501-882-8809. www.asub.edu

$1,760 (plus books and fees)

Open

72%

April 1st

ACT/ASSET/COMPASS/SAT

Open/ No Fee

None

AP/CLEP

A great place to start! Campus locations: 7648 Victory Drive in Newport; 5504 Krueger Drive in Jonesboro; and 33500 Hwy 63 East in Marked Tree. www.asun.edu

$1,044 plus books and fees

Priority Consideration Deadline - June 1st

81%

June 1st

ACT/ASSET/COMPASS/SAT

Open/ No Fee

None

AP/CLEP

Bachelor and graduate degrees are available in some areas through ASU-Jonesboro’s Degree Center at ASUMH. Nestled in the heart of Ozark Mountains. www.asumh.edu

Varies

Open

N/A

June 1st

COMPASS

Open/ No Fee

None

N/A

15 Technical Certificate programs are offered on the Searcy campus. www.asub.edu

Varies By Program

May 1 / Oct 1

84%

May 1st

ACT/SAT

Varies By Program / No Fee

Baptist

CLEP

Baptist Health Schools Little Rock provides nine programs of study for students interested in entering the healthcare field. For more information please contact us at bhslr.edu. www.bhslr.edu

Varies

Open

70%

April 15th

ACT/ASSET/SAT/COMPASS

Open/ No Fee

None

Advance Placement

Black River Technical College your window of opportunity! www.blackrivertech.org

$729-$850

Fall-May 1, SpringNov. 1, Sum.-April 15

70%

April 1st

ACT/ASSET/COMPASS/SAT

Open/ No Fee

None

AP/CLEP

CCCUA has 4 on-line associate’s degrees and more than 70 internet courses available. The college also offers many technical programs, a brand new agriculture degree, occupational therapy assisting program, Aviation, Physical Health, Wellness, and Leisure degrees and rodeo team. www.cccua.edu

N/A

July 1st

75%

April 15th

ACT/COMPASS

Open/ No Fee

None

AP/CLEP

EACC is an open-door institution of higher education serving the Arkansas delta since 1974. www.eacc.edu

Varies

N/A

N/A

Open

ACT/SAT/WONDERLIC

Open

None

N/A

ITT Technical Institute offers associate and bachelor degree programs in Electronics, Criminal Justice, Networking, Design and Project Management. www.ITT-Tech.edu

Varies depending on academic/ technical program

Open. Fall 2013 priority, July 19. Spring 2014 priority, Nov. 7.

80%

Nov. 11 (Spring 2014), early July (Fall 2014)

ACT/ASSET/COMPASS or SAT

Open/Free - $25 for international students

None

AP/CLEP

Mid-South Community College is committed to economic development in the Arkansas Delta through the provision of high quality, affordable, and convenient learning opportunities and services. www.midsouthcc.edu

Varies

Open

68%

Open

ACT/COMPASS/SAT

Open/ No Fee

None

AP/CLEP/IB

Learning is our Focus! Student Success is our Goal! Excellent academic 2-year community college in beautiful Hot Springs. www.npcc.edu

N/A

Varies

60%

June 15th

ACT/COMPASS

Open

None

AP/CLEP

Northark offers transfer and technical degree programs, one-year technical certificates, certificates of proficiency, customized business and industry training, adult basic education (GED) classes and non-credit community education courses. In addition, partnerships with area universities provide the opportunity to achieve a bachelor’s degree in Harrison.

$1,550 in-dist, $2,260 out-dist (tuition/fees/books)

5/1/2013

Approx. 60%

Feb. 25

ACT/COMPASS/SAT

Open/ $10

None

AP/CLEP/DANTE

www.nwacc.edu

$1020 plus books and fees

Open

86%

May 1st/ Dec 1st

ACT/ASSET/COMPASS/SAT

Open/ No Fee

None

AP/CLEP

As a Top Ten Community College in the Nation, College of the Ouachitas wants to help you build a future you thought possible only in your dreams. www.coto.edu

Varies

Open

75%

March 1st

ACT/ASSET/COMPASS

Open/ No Fee

None

AP/CLEP

Providing life-changing experiences through education. www.ozarka.edu

$1,530.00

Call 870-338-6474

60%

Call 870-338-6474

ACT/ASSET/COMPASS

Open/ No Fee

None

AP/CLEP

www.pccua.edu

$1,781.50 - If taking 15hrs (fees included)

Fall-May 15, SpringOct. 15, Sum-Mar. 15

76%

Open

ACT/COMPASS

Open/ No Fee

None

AP/CLEP

For more information and a schedule of classes, visit our website at www.pulaskitech.edu.

Contact Campus

Contact Campus

Contact Campus

Contact Campus

Contact Campus

1st day of classes

None

none

www.remngtoncollege.edu

$930 plus fees & books

March 1st

70%

April 1st

ACT/SAT/COMPASS

Open/ No Fee

None

AP/CLEP

A comprehensive college providing a varity of programs, services, and learning opportunities. Transfer, technical degrees and courses: professional workforce, personal development and adult basic education. English as a second language; student support and outreach programs; financial aid assistance www.rmcc.edu

$2500 including books

Open

95%

Open

ACT/SAT/COMPASS

Open

African American Episcopal Church

CLEP

Serves traditional and non-traditional students offering the Associates of Arts Degree in General Studies with concentrations in General Studies, Teacher Education, and Christian Leadership. www.shortercollege.org

Varies

July 1st

60%

March 1st Priority

ACT/ASSET/COMPASS/SAT

Open/ No Fee

None

AP/CLEP

Where students come first. www.southark.edu

Varies

May 1 priority

46%

April 30th

ACT/SAT/COMPASS

Open

None

AP/CLEP

Visit our website at www.seark.edu.

Varies

Varies

60%

1-Mar

ACT/ASSET/COMPASS/SAT

Open/ No Fee

None

CLEP

Southern Arkansas University Tech is a two-year comprehensive college emphasizing technical programs and is commited to providing quality educational programs delivered through various technologies and methodologies to meet the needs of its service areas. It accomplishes this through technical career programs, transfer curricula, continuing education, workforce education, transitional education, and administrative, student, and community services. www.sautech.edu

Varies

Open

Varies

Contact Financial Aid

ACT/ASSET/COMPASS/SAT

Open/ No Fee

None

AP/CLEP

Student Centered. Community Focused. www.uaccb.edu

Varies

April 1st

47%

April 1st for Institution May 15th for Foundation

ACT/COMPASS

Open/ No Fee

None

AP/CLEP

www.uacch.edu

1,365 Plus books

June 30 Priority

68%

Nov. 1st/ April 1st

ACT/ASSET/COMPASS

Open/ No Fee

None

AP/CLEP

UACCM - A Journey with Meaning. www.uaccm.edu

TO COMPILE THIS, FORMS WERE SENT TO EVERY QUALIFIED COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY WITH INSTRUCTIONS TO RETURN BY A SPECIFIED DEADLINE. THOSE SCHOOLS NOT MEETING THE DEADLINETHE WERECOLLEGE REPEATED FROM LAST2013 YEAR. EVERY ATTEMPT IS SUPPLEMENT MADE TO GATHER VERIFY THE INFORMATION. ISSUE • ADVERTISING TOAND ARKANSAS TIMES • AUGUST 22, 2013

39


THE COLLEGE ISSUE 2013

Internships provide hands-on experience Central Arkansas Water can help start your career before you leave school ummer internships offer a chance to experience the

S

day-to-day work in your chosen career field, while

be helpful for your job search after graduation. For engineering and science majors, Central Arkansas Water (CAW) offers two paid summer internships: one in engineering and one in water quality. CAW is the largest drinking water system in Arkansas and an industry leader in regulatory compliance, operational integrity, watershed protection, customer service, financial management, and overall business practices. It is the primary drinking water supplier for more than 400,000 consumers -- that’s one in every seven Arkansans -- at rates that are among the lowest in the country. CAW maintains roughly 2,300 miles of pipe and delivers an average of 68.7 million gallons of water each day (2012). Its laboratory conducts more than 211 water quality tests a day, 365 days a year, to ensure regulatory compliance and the highest quality water service to customers. According to CAW, careers in the water industry are diverse and extremely rewarding, allowing individuals to serve the community in a unique and very important way because no one can live without clean, potable water. Engineering interns at CAW assist with project design, field data collection, job packets, CAD, GIS, GPS work. In order to qualify for the internship, students must have completed two years of study toward a bachelor’s degree in civil, mechanical, agricultural, chemical or environmental engineering and have at least a 3.0 GPA, among other requirements. Water quality interns assist with laboratory collection and analysis; field evaluations of the watershed, land use changes, etc.; analysis of water quality data; and monitoring of water treatment process. To qualify, applicants must have completed two years of study toward bachelor’s degree in chemistry, biology, microbiology, environmental science or a related field and a minimum 3.0 GPA, among other requirements. Preferred applicants will have an interest in water quality/ water resource issues. The internships are 10 weeks long and take place between May or early June and August. Interns will work 40 hours per week, from approximately 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. To apply, send a resume, transcript, completed application and interest statement to CAW human resources. The application period typically begins in May. For more information, contact Margaret Scott, CAW human resources specialist, at margaret.scott@carkw.com. 40 AUGUST 22, 2013 • ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES • THE COLLEGE ISSUE 2013

CENTRAL ARKANSAS WATER OFFERS TWO PAID SUMMER INTERNSHIPS: ONE IN ENGINEERING AND ONE IN WATER QUALITY.

PHOTOS.COM, MICHAL ROZEWSKI©

at the same time making industry contacts that can


THE COLLEGE ISSUE 2013

What’s Happening On Campus ARKANSAS TECH UNIVERSITY The physical presence of Arkansas Tech University continues to evolve. During the 2013-14 academic year, Arkansas Tech will open M Street Residence Hall, a new five-story student housing facility that will be home to 290 students per semester. The construction of M Street Residence Hall is a milestone in what has been a multi-year effort to revitalize the southwest corner of the Arkansas Tech campus. Recent renovations to four housing facilities adjacent to the new M Street Residence Hall -- Critz Hall, Hughes Hall, Tucker Hall and Wilson Hall -- mean that beginning this fall there will be more than 700 Tech students living in that pod of five residence halls. In all, Arkansas Tech now has space to accommodate approximately 3,000 students in university housing. That is more than triple the number of students who lived on campus at Tech just 15 years ago. The growth in the number of students choosing to live in university housing has led Arkansas Tech to embark upon a significant upgrade of its student dining facilities. Baswell Techionery -- a new student union with upscale quick service dining options -- opened in 2011. During fall 2013, a renovated and re-imagined Chambers Cafeteria will debut with seating for 900 students. Diners will enjoy several cooking/serving stations on the dining room floor. The new and renovated spaces that will go into service at Arkansas Tech during the 2013-14 academic year are the latest developments in an investment of more than $210 million in the campus infrastructure since 1995.

sport of college rodeo. An introductory class in rodeo is offered each fall semester for beginning athletes in order to develop a better understanding of the events and rules of the sport. Team members practice weekly on quality stock that is provided by the college. Though coach Valerie Stone is concerned with winning in the arena, she stresses that her athletes are students first, rodeo athletes second, with grade checks done on a regular basis. HERITAGE COLLEGE At the Little Rock campus, Heritage College prides itself on student and community involvement. The following are just examples of the events they have initiated and/or participated in: Red Cross blood drives, Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure, care package drive for U.S. military oversees and in combat, donation collection for homeless veterans, Christmas toy drive for kids with cancer, dona-

UA Cossatot is the only two-year college in Arkansas that has a rodeo COSSATOT COMMUNITY team and only one of three collegiate teams in the state. COLLEGE-UA UA Cossatot is only two-year college tion drive for tornado victims in Oklahoma, food drive in Arkansas that has a rodeo team and only one of three for the food bank at the Church at Rock Creek, Student collegiate teams in the state. The UA Cossatot Rodeo team Angel Tree, student volunteer massage for Assisted Living competes as one of the 14 colleges and universities in in Maumelle, hosted flu clinics, student ride share prothe Ozark Region of the National Intercollegiate Rodeo gram, student job fairs and a student “Clothes Closet”. Association. Member schools of the Ozark Region usually have 10 rodeos each year. UA Cossatot hosts one at the LYON COLLEGE Four States Fair and Rodeo Arena in Texarkana, Ark. The Recently the college decided to re-introduce collegiate first year of the Colts Rodeo, it was voted Best Rodeo in football (playing fall 2015) after a 62-year absence. The the Ozark Region. The mission of the men’s and women’s addition of football, along with men’s and women’s UA Cossatot rodeo teams is to provide the opportunity wrestling (competing fall 2014), will allow the college to for students to earn a college degree while pursuing the

reach even more smart, talented young people desiring to continue their athletic pursuits into college. The campus could hardly be more excited about what’s coming. Popular programs at the college include the Lyon Education and Adventure Program (LEAP), which began in 2010, and involves on-campus recreational facilities, area outdoor trips, leadership opportunities and outdoorthemed for-credit courses. International study is also a focus for Lyon students, and destinations for Lyon’s recent study abroad opportunities include England, France, Germany, Italy, Austria, Hungary, Germany, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Japan, Peru, Belize, Turkey and the Bahamas. MID-SOUTH COMMUNITY COLLEGE Mid-South Community College (MSCC) has seen a flurry of activity recently, with the new Wellness Center as one of the most recent additions to campus. The Wellness Center is expected to open sometime in October, and will include a gymnasium which will be used by the Greyhound sports teams as well as physical education classes and intramural teams, classrooms, a fitness room for students and staff, dressing rooms, and a training room. “The Wellness Center will serve as a vital location for students and members of the community to gather,” said Gheric Bruce, Associate Vice President for Student Life. “It will serve as a multipurpose facility that will allow for unique programming opportunities in the areas of recreation and cultural awareness activities.” With the help of a $784,010 grant from the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the facility will include a large amount of space designed to provide temporary protection to students, employees and local residents in the event of tornadoes and/or severe straightline winds. The safe room will be technologically connected to the area’s weather warning systems so that when an alarm is sounded, whether day or night, the facility lights will come on and the doors will open automatically. MSCC recently acquired a signature and iconic piece of training equipment for its aviation maintenance technology program when it accepted a donated FedEx 727 jet. “Obviously a plane of that caliber will be a great opportunity for our students to have access to technology that we otherwise would not have been able to provide for them,” MSCC president Dr. Glen Fenter said. “It certainly

THE COLLEGE ISSUE 2013 • ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES • AUGUST 22, 2013 41


THE COLLEGE ISSUE 2013

sets our aviation maintenance program apart from a lot of other programs in the country.” “More importantly, I think the plan represents the relationship between FedEx and Mid-South Community College that not only helps to create a unique internship opportunity but certainly bodes well for us in the future in terms of the evolution of our program,” he said. “It’s a fantastic win-win for us and FedEx because it ensures that our students have a chance to see their equipment before they are asked to go to work for FedEx or other companies like them.” The aviation maintenance program is an integrated, FAA-certified training program for airframe and powerplant technicians. Emphasizing internships and on-the-job training, the MSCC program gives students the skills and experience needed to meet the growing demands of the aviation maintenance industry. NATIONAL PARK COMMUNITY COLLEGE As of fall 2013, National Park Community College (NPCC) will be moving from ANGEL to Blackboard Learn 9.1 to deliver content for online and oncampus students. Beginning spring 2014, all courses will be in Blackboard, where students can review the course syllabus, check their class attendance and view their class grades. This system also allows faculty to make content available to students any time, anywhere. Blackboard helps NPCC meet its goals to make learning more accessible and help students be more successful.

begin at 2 p.m. This crosstown showdown is one of the oldest football rivalries in the nation. In the spring, OBU celebrates academic achievement with Scholars Day, where work is featured from every department in the university, from philosophy to the sciences to the arts. PULASKI TECHNICAL COLLEGE About two-thirds of Pulaski Tech’s students are part of the university-transfer program and plan to transfer to a four-year college or university to pursue baccalaureate degrees. Pulaski Tech has been a main source of transfer students to the University of Arkansas at Little Rock for

Chambers Cafeteria at Arkansas Tech University

NORTHWEST ARKANSAS COMMUNITY COLLEGE Northwest Arkansas Community College (NWACC) opened an 83,000-square-foot Center for Health Professions in January 2013. The center houses nursing, respiratory therapy, physical therapist assistant, paramedic, emergency medical technician, fire science, certified nurse assistant and patient care assistant programs. The Nursing Simulation Lab, made possible by a gift from Washington Regional Medical Center, features highfidelity mannequins that can be programmed to engage NWACC nursing students in more than 100 scenarios, allowing students to be exposed to many of the real-world situations they may encounter in their work. OUACHITA BAPTIST UNIVERSITY There’s plenty of activities on the Ouachita Baptist University campus to appeal to students with varied interests. A popular fall event is Tiger Tunes, an all-campus sing that’s completely student led. The event, which is a fund-raiser for the OBU Student Foundation, helps raise money for upperclassmen scholarships. Now in its 35th year, the always sold out festival is scheduled for Oct. 10-12. On Nov. 16, the epic Battle of the Ravine, the annual OBU-Henderson State University football game, will

many years, and articulation agreements with state universities ensure easy transfer of college credits. With fall 2013 tuition priced at $95 per credit hour for in-state residents, Pulaski Tech provides an affordable path to a college education. SOUTHERN ARKANSAS UNIVERSITY TECH Southern Arkansas University Tech is adding a new student center, which will house student life, the college bookstore, the college food service and housing staff. The college is also looking at adding more housing to the campus. The college recently outsourced the bookstore to BBA Solutions, a company which operates several college bookstores in Arkansas. The college is looking forward to the updates and changes the new management will bring to that area of services provided to students and the public. UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS The University of Arkansas has set a goal of becoming a top 50 public research university by 2021. Campaign Arkansas is the vehicle that will take it there. Launched on July 1, 2012, this campaign will conclude in 2020, and will be every bit as ambitious and transformative as the last capital campaign. While the final goal has not yet been determined, the university expects to meet or exceed the billion dollar total of the previous campaign.

42 AUGUST 22, 2013 • ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES • THE COLLEGE ISSUE 2013

Also, several major construction projects have concluded. The renovation and expansion of both Vol Walker Hall and Ozark Hall will be completed for the fall semester. Founders Hall, the newest residence hall, will be completed, as well as the renovation of Hotz Hall, which will again serve a residence hall. The new Fred W. Smith Football Center has also been finished. The conclusion of these projects caps a period of rapid growth and reinvestment in campus facilities that has exceeded $450 million in project costs since July 2011, and impacted more than 40 buildings. UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS AT PINE BLUFF A new era has begun at the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff (UAPB) with the appointment of its first permanent chancellor in more than 20 years. Dr. Laurence B. Alexander took office July 1 after the 21-year tenure of Dr. Lawrence A. Davis, Jr. Formerly the associate dean of the graduate school and director of the Office of Minority Programs at the University of Florida, Alexander has been a Provost Administrative Fellow in the UF Office of Academic Affairs and served as chair of the UF Department of Journalism from 1994-98. Before joining UF, he served on the faculty of Temple University and the University of New Orleans. He also has worked in the journalism profession for The Houma Courier, The Times-Picayune and The Philadelphia Inquirer. As a professor, Alexander has received significant recognition for his research and undergraduate teaching. His research focused on the First Amendment, freedom of expression, media law and policy issues in news gathering, and student free speech issues. He is co-author of Student Free Speech and Public Higher Education, a book published by the Education Law Association. Prior to his appointment, the university broke ground on the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Academy and Conference Center and looks to complete it by 2014. University Drive is also being widened to include a center turning lane and underground electrical lines. UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL ARKANSAS Arkansas Governor Mike Beebe helped the University of Central Arkansas (UCA) break ground on a 42,000 square-foot expansion of the Health Physical Education and Recreation (HPER) Center, which is slated to be finished by the fall 2014. A swimming pool, expanded exercise space, meeting rooms, racquet ball courts and other amenities will make it one of the premier student recreational centers in the state. Also, new recreational fields have been constructed for student use. This academic year, Reynolds Performance Hall will host several outstanding speakers and performances including Bill Cosby, Lisa Ling, The Adams Family Musical, Broadway on Ice and Cirque Eloize “Cirkopolis”.


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EXPERIENCE LITTLE ROCK The metropolitan city offers students everything you need to succeed — internships, volunteer opportunities and jobs — not to mention lots of things to do.

DISCOVER TROJAN LIFE Trojan living means joining a community of students who share your academic and social interests. Come tour the campus to get a taste of the UALR experience.

EXPLORE SCHOLARSHIPS UALR awards more than $100 million in financial aid with a wide range of scholarships based on achievements, leadership and service. The priority deadline for most scholarships is Dec. 1.

Little Rock and UALR are full of opportunities. Check us out at ualr.edu/timesadmissions.

UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS AT LITTLE ROCK THE COLLEGE ISSUE 2013 • ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES • AUGUST 22, 2013 43


THE COLLEGE ISSUE 2013

Two Year College Update

Č&#x2C6;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x192;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2039;Â&#x153;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2020; Â?Â&#x2022;Â&#x2013;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2014;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2018;Â? Č&#x2C6;Â&#x2014;Â&#x192;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2039;Ď?Â&#x2039;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2020;Â&#x192;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2030; Â&#x192;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2039;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2013;Â&#x203A; Č&#x2C6;Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x160;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2122;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2014;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x192;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2022;

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44 AUGUST 22, 2013 â&#x20AC;˘ ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES â&#x20AC;˘ THE COLLEGE ISSUE 2013

ARKANSAS TECH UNIVERSITY-OZARK During 2013, Arkansas Tech-Ozark Campus is celebrating its 10th anniversary as a member of the Arkansas Tech University system. Located in the Franklin County community of Ozark, Arkansas Tech-Ozark Campus offers 11 associate degrees and 15 technical certificates. Among the most recent program additions at Arkansas Tech-Ozark Campus is an Associate of Science degree in cardiovascular technology that will prepare graduates for careers in echocardiography labs as cardiovascular technicians. Other health-related programs, including Associate of Science degrees in physical therapy assistant, occupational therapy assistant and nursing, are helping Arkansas Tech-Ozark Campus graduates connect with in-demand careers inside the state. COLLEGE OF THE OUACHITAS Earlier this year, College of the Ouachitas was named as a Top 10 Community College in the Nation by the Aspen Institute. The institute recognizes â&#x20AC;&#x153;high achievement and performance in the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s community collegesâ&#x20AC;?. The 2013 Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence was awarded in March in Washington, D.C., with Second Lady Jill Biden present. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Aspen Prize process evaluated more than 1,000 community colleges. Being one of the top 10 is itself something to celebrate,â&#x20AC;? said Josh Wyner, executive director of the Aspen Instituteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s College Excellence Program. â&#x20AC;&#x153;College of the Ouachitasâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; recognition is well-deserved. In a region with limited economic opportunity, the college works hard to provide students with the tools and support they need to be successful in the classroom and in the workforce.â&#x20AC;? Among the reasons College of the Ouachitas stands out as one of the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top community colleges: Steady increases in the number of credentials awarded â&#x20AC;&#x201C; from 28 for every 100 full-time equivalent students in 2006 to 46 in 2010 47 percent of first-time, full-time students graduate or transfer within three years, compared to the national average of 40 percent Serves low-income student body â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 61 percent of first-time, full-time undergraduates receive Pell grants â&#x20AC;&#x153;Student success and completion are

primary to our mission at College of the Ouachitas,â&#x20AC;? President Stephen Schoonmaker stated. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our selection as one of the Top 10 Community Colleges in the Nation for the 2013 Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence clearly demonstrates that College of the Ouachitas is indeed achieving success with our students in exciting and innovative ways.â&#x20AC;? COSSATOT COMMUNITY COLLEGE UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS UA Cossatot has achieved accreditation for their business programs by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is very important to us as a college, and to the business and agriculture division, that UA Cossatot graduate students who are equipped to be productive members of the workforce,â&#x20AC;? said Barbara Lacefield, division chair for business and agriculture for UA Cossatot. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We value the accreditation we earned from ACBSP because we are required to teach current industry standards and methods. Our accreditation only increases the value of our studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; education.â&#x20AC;? UA Cossatot is also one of four twoyear colleges chosen to participate in the Accelerating Opportunity grant. This grant will allow students without a GED credential or high school diploma to earn a technical certificate in welding. Cossatot staff attended a workshop in Seattle, Washington, to learn more and observe the I-BEST model in action. Adult education instructors team-teach with college instructors to supplement educational gaps that students may have in basic areas of math or reading skills. Adult education instructors may also assist students with soft skills in the areas of employability: creating resumes, job interviewing skills, job searches and getting along with other employees. The program is to begin in the fall 2013. NATIONAL PARK COMMUNITY COLLEGE National Park Community College offers programs for students pursuing two-year associate degrees, students planning to continue their college education at fouryear institutions and students seeking a


Where are you going? variety of short-term certificate programs designed to enhance technical skills. NPCC’s goal is to deliver the education and training to meet the community’s needs and students’ career plans while creating the optimal learning environment necessary to educate and produce a diverse graduate population prepared to meet the demands of today’s work force. NPCC offers the Associate of Arts, Associate of Science, Associate of Arts in Teaching and the Associate of Science in Business for students who plan to transfer to a four-year college or university. The general-education core curriculum is embedded in each of NPCC’s transfer degrees and are fully transferable between Arkansas public higher education institutions. NPCC offers all the general education courses each semester, either online or in a class setting. Multiple sections of each course are offered with varying times and days, including night classes and Saturdays. NORTHWEST ARKANSAS COMMUNITY COLLEGE Northwest Arkansas Community College continues to forge strategic partnerships with businesses throughout the country, including small, locally owned businesses and Fortune 100 companies. The relationships provide world-class training designed to close performance gaps and increase overall worker productivity and efficiency. In addition to more than 12,000 credit stu-

PULASKI TECHNICAL COLLEGE Pulaski Technical College is not only the state’s largest two-year college and the fourth largest of all the state’s colleges and universities, it is also a vital partner in the economic health of central Arkansas. Through university-transfer curriculum, workforce training, and economic development initiatives in business and industry, Pulaski Tech’s influence is greater than initially meets the eye. SHORTER COLLEGE Shorter College, a historically black twoyear college in North Little Rock, is experiencing a resurgence after several years of adversity. Under the direction of president Dr. O. Jerome Green, who took the helm in July 2012, the college is on track to receive accreditation in October. Dr. Jean Bell Manning, a former vice president of academic affairs at Langston University in Oklahoma, has been named interim dean for the college. Shorter College’s physical campus has also transformed with a refurbished and reopened library, a new student center opening this fall and updated technology infrastructure.

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Arkansas Tech University nursing students regularly score among the best in the state on their licensure examinations. dents served annually, the college crafts training opportunities for numerous local employers and provides personal enrichment, professional development and adult education classes, serving almost 7,000 non-credit students each year.

the largest increase in the number of degrees awarded during the past five years. UACCH has experienced a 105.8 percent increase in the number of degrees awarded compared to the 2008 school year. THE COLLEGE ISSUE 2013 • ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES • AUGUST 22, 2013 45


THE COLLEGE ISSUE 2 0 1 3

What’s New Arkansas State University Arkansas State University’s incoming freshmen this fall use iPads to enhance their higher education learning experience as faculty implement a dynamic, multimedia curriculum. Every freshman is enrolled in ASU’s Making Connections firstyear experience course, which is specifically designed to help students transition into higher education and gain skills that will lead to success in the classroom. Last fall, Arkansas State reported more than 1,700 freshmen enrolled in Making Connections. Arkansas State is the first public university in the state and among the first in the country to require every freshman to use iPad technology. ASU is also a national front-runner to implement a required freshman course that is exclusively digital. Students will be able to download and use e-textbooks and apps with iPad, and the ASU Connect initiative focuses on an immersive experience in which technology is embedded in the curriculum. The Connect initiative coincides with Arkansas State becoming the first university in the country to acquire the complete online resource of 14,000 scholarly e-books collected by JSTOR, a nonprofit digital library that supports higher education institutions. The ASU Dean B. Ellis Library will provide full access through its website to the entire collection of titles from 34 major publishers, including highly respected sources such as the Modern Humanities Research Association; the RAND Corporation; and university presses at Princeton, Kentucky, Illinois, North Carolina and Texas. The Making Connections course focuses on transitioning students into college-level learners by introducing critical academic skills and campus resources. Faculty and students will explore study skills, personal organization, and research using iPad apps, and students will also access the course text and other books using digital text. Arkansas State faculty is using iTunes U and iBooks Author to develop interactive curriculum. iTunes U is the world’s largest online catalog of free educational content available to iOS users around the world. iBooks Author is a free authoring tool which anyone with a Mac can use to create stunning iBooks textbooks. Arkansas State is optimizing its new website, www.astate. edu, for mobile device use, and expanding classroom wireless Internet capacity specifically where first-year experience students will have classes in key academic areas and student gathering locations, according to Henry Torres, ASU’s interim chief information officer. “We will be monitoring high-traffic areas and buildings on campus, and we’ll continue to expand coverage in areas of need as they arise,” Torres said. Students can buy iPads at the ASU IT Store on campus, bring their own iPad, or rent an iPad. Purchasing the iPad and “Connect Kit” at the ASU IT Store means incoming freshmen can get everything needed for the Making Connections class in one stop in the center of campus. Arkansas Tech University One feature of Arkansas Tech University that separates it from other four-year institutions around the state is its location in the Arkansas River Valley. Minutes from the Ouachita Mountains, the Ozark Mountains and Lake Dardanelle, the Arkansas Tech

campus is situated at the heart of an outdoorsman’s or outdoorswoman’s dream come true. In order to help students connect with the great outdoors, the Arkansas Tech Office of Campus Recreation offers a variety of free rental equipment, including mountain bikes, kayaks, canoes and tents. In addition, the Office of Campus Recreation hosts guided tours that give Arkansas Tech students the opportunity to experience such activities as fly fishing, hiking, disc golf and rock climbing. College of the Ouachitas In 2012, the College of the Ouachitas (COTO) piloted a 45-minute activity period two days a week where no classes were offered from 12:15-1 p.m. The goals were to increase student involvement in campus activities and to give students, many of whom take back-to-back classes, time to eat lunch and relax a bit. An activities committee, made up of students, faculty and staff, planned events such as Sundaes on Mondays, Tailgate Kickoff, Spirit Day, Laugh-A-Oke, Laser Tag, Walking Tacos and a Halloween costume contest. This time was also used for club and organization meetings, and for more than a few students, a quick trip to the tutor or library. Based on the positive results from these events, the activity period has been expanded to all four days for the 2013 school year. This year, COTO is taking the activity period a step further by starting College Learning in Community (CLICs) to help connect students with faculty, staff and other students who have common interests. Based on surveys from last year, they’ll be developing CLICs in areas like basketball, health and fitness, crafts (eventually splitting into separate crafts such as knitting, scrapbooking, etc.), computers, gaming, book clubs — basically anything that students might want to hang out with other people and do or discuss. There won’t be any club sponsors or reports required; CLICs will be individually led and loosely organized. National studies have shown that students who are engaged on campus and have a relationship with faculty and staff are more likely to finish their degree, and COTO is looking for ways to help students get engaged. Henderson State University The university has undergone $7.8M in renovations to campus, including a new dining facility, renovations to Garrison Center, the addition of Chik-Fil-A and Starbucks to the student center and a revamped Reddie Bookstore. National Park Community College Service members, veterans and their dependents can use their military benefits and educational assistance programs at National Park Community College (NPCC) to pay for their educational expenses. With the recent addition of NPCC’s Veteran Center, veterans now receive a wide range of services that aim to promote inclusiveness while minimizing entrance anxiety. These are a few of the services that NPCC Veteran’s Center is proud to offer to our veterans: •Fresh coffee and snacks •Computer and Internet lounge •Referral to State Rehabilitation Assistance Representative •Communication, email updates and letter communications

46 AUGUST 22, 2013 • advertising supplement to arkansas times • the college issue 2013

•Scholarship application/essay assistance •VA benefit support •FAFSA (Pell Application) support •Mental health referrals •Degree planning NPCC is proud to offer services that reflect genuine gratitude toward our nation’s service men and women. Ouachita Baptist University Ouachita Baptist University has gone mobile. The university’s new mobile application features essential information for visitors to campus as well as residents and includes guides for hallmark campus events such as Welcome to Ouachita’s World new student orientation and homecoming. “The app is simply a way to connect with our students,” said Tim Harrell, director of campus activities. “They are all connected to their phones and tablets. Now, they get to carry an interactive schedule for our events with them. “We’ve also loaded a freshman to-do list for all the students,” Harrell added. “When the guide is updated, it notifies everyone that they have something new waiting on them. It has been one the best ways to communicate with the entire class – even better than email.” The app was developed in partnership with Guidebook, an app development firm based in California, and it is available for Apple, Android, Blackberry and Windows mobile devices such as the iPhone, Kindle Fire, iPad, Blackberry Playbook and Windows Phone. Ouachita is one of the first universities to partner with Guidebook on this level. The company primarily offers organizations the ability to publish event guides through the umbrella Guidebook app, and Ouachita’s custom, stand-alone app is one of the first of its kind. The app can be downloaded from the Apple App Store, Google Play Store, Kindle App Store and more. Another new aspect of the OBU campus is the renovation of the Grant Center for international education. The new space is much larger, and is updated with new technology to help the program accomplish what it needs to get done. “We’ll have a classroom, a conference room and a seminar room, one of which will be equipped with distance learning equipment,” Ian Cosh, vice president for community and international engagement, said. Overall, the renovations will provide a more modern and useful space to a program that the people involved with the renovations feel are well deserving of the effort. Southern Arkansas University Southern Arkansas University’s (SAU) newest residence hall is University Hall, a unique concept that groups residents – primarily sophomores – into three learning communities. The Think Green community promotes a lifestyle of sustainability, energy conservation and giving back to the environment with the goal of provoking thought and awareness in students to spark a change in their everyday usage of the environment and its resources. Activities and programs include recycling, proper waste management, monitoring wasted energy and planting trees, as well as visiting a LEED building and researching ways SAU could conserve and protect the environment.


The Wellness community will focus on being active, eating well, managing stress, enjoying healthy relationships and more. Programs and activities include learning to create wellbalanced meals on a budget, setting realistic goals and working toward them, speakers on healthy lifestyle topics and hosting Housing’s annual 5K race. The Pay It Forward community focuses on volunteer work and civility to create positive change in the SAU community and helps students become active citizens through education, service-learning, volunteerism and promoting civility among one another. Activities and programs include participation in national Make a Difference Day, volunteering in the community and leading campus activities to promote paying it forward. Interested students must meet eligibility requirements and complete the application process.

internship opportunities provided through one-of-a-kind connections to the state’s thriving capital city. With more than 100 undergraduate programs of study and 60-plus graduate programs, UALR suits many academic interests – and an equal number of social and service organizations as well. Some of the newer offerings at UALR include: A Bachelor of Science degree in architectural and construction engineering and a new Master of Science degree in construction management. The Coleman Sports and Recreation Complex for soccer, track and field teams in intramurals. The Student Services Center, where all the services a student needs are in one convenient location in the heart of campus. The UALR George W. Donaghey Emerging Analytics Center™ (EAC), which features data visualization systems that are among the first of their

kind in the world. University of Central Arkansas The biggest change on campus stands 10 feet and weighs approximately 2,250 pounds. This is a life-sized black bear carved from a tree outside Wingo Hall, the University of Central Arkansas’s (UCA) administration building. An Iowa chainsaw carver spent four days carving the tree into a bear sculpture that serves as a campus focal point. Students, faculty, staff and community members visit the bear almost daily to take pictures or just marvel at its beauty. The tree that was carved is one of 46 trees planted as a living memorial to fallen UCA alumni who fought in World War II, but this tree was dying. Now, it will continue to serve as a memorial. Students will name the bear through a contest this fall.

Southern Arkansas University Tech Students at Southern Arkansas University Tech this fall will walk into a fresh new administration building. The college’s physical plant has spent most of the summer painting and installing new flooring in the building where the school administrators, student services (admissions, financial aid, registrar, advising, business office and more), and classrooms are located. New lighting and bright white paint has turned a once dark and dim building into a bright, uplifting atmosphere. University of Arkansas The University of Arkansas is expected to reach a new enrollment record of 25,400 students this fall. One area that has been positively affected by this growth is Greek Life. In addition to welcoming the first Latina sorority last year, Sigma Iota Alpha, several more sororities and fraternities will be on campus this fall, including Alpha Chi Omega, Phi Mu, Kappa Alpha Order, and Beta Theta Pi. To serve the growing Greek community, the Charlie and Cappy Whiteside Greek Life Leadership Center was recently dedicated. This center will provide renovated office space for Greek Life staff, as well as meeting space and temporary housing for new organizations. Following the spring 2013 commencement, the U of A also held its first intercession, which provided a condensed, 10-day class session between the spring semester and the first summer session. Intercession courses will be held regularly in January, May and August. University of Arkansas at Little Rock The University of Arkansas at Little Rock (UALR) is situated in the heart of Little Rock, a city recognized by Kiplinger.com and Forbes magazine as a great place for business and also by Outside Magazine for its great quality of life. A metropolitan university on the move, UALR is always looking to provide unique learning and

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THE COLLEGE ISSUE 2013

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48 AUGUST 22, 2013 • ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES • THE COLLEGE ISSUE 2013

Concert photo by Nicole Kibert; Others courtesy of LuceroMusic.com

Financial Aid ne of the largest obstacles a student can face is affording a college education, and it can seem like an impossible task to figure out in the ins and outs of scholarships and financial aid. Colleges and universities around the state offer many options for students who need assistance.

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ARKANSAS TECH UNIVERSITY All freshman academic scholarships at Arkansas Tech University are awarded on a competitive basis. The deadline for incoming freshmen to apply for Distinguished Scholars, Second Century Scholars or Collegiate Scholars scholarships is Feb. 28 of the current award year. June 1 is the deadline to apply for transfer scholarships for the fall term, and Dec. 15 is the deadline to apply for transfer scholarships for the spring term. Incoming freshmen who wish to apply for the University Honors program must do so by Dec. 1 of their senior year in high school. EAST ARKANSAS COMMUNITY COLLEGE The East Arkansas Community College Foundation offers students the opportunity to apply for a host of academic scholarships available through the EACC financial aid offices: General Education Scholarship: For full-time sophomores who plan to transfer to a four-year institution after graduation. Technical Education Scholarship: Awarded to a full-time sophomore in an Associate of Applied Science degree program. Non-Traditional Student Scholarship: Presented to a full-time sophomore who is 25 years of age or older. Eleanor B. and Harry E. Beasley Scholarship: Established in honor of Eleanor B. Beasley, longtime board of trustees member at EACC and her husband Harry E. Beasley. Recipients of the scholarship must be graduates of a high school in St. Francis County and must be a sophomore with a grade point average of 3.0 or higher. George P. andAlice H.Walker Scholarship: This scholarship was established in 2004 through the estate of Mildred Sikes, daughter of George and Alice Walker, and dedi-

cated to the support of students at EACC pursuing an Associate of Applied Science degree in an allied health field. It is expected these students will become practicing health care professionals and provide care for many others over their lifetime. Th e C o m m u n i t y L e a d e r Scholarship: This scholarship assists EACC students who have demonstrated leadership skills in their community. The scholarship requires a GPA of 3.0 and involvement in projects or groups that focus on community service and volunteerism. Jessie E. Smith Swindle Nursing Scholarship: This scholarship is dedicated to assisting an EACC nursing student from Cross County who plans to attend EACC as a full-time nursing student. Two new scholarships at EACC are the Giny Blankenship Memorial Nursing Scholarship and the Burt-Davis Nursing Scholarship. The Blankenship scholarship is for assisting students seeking an Associate of Applied Science Degree in the EACC Nursing Program. The Burt-Davis Nursing Scholarship will assist students in the EACC nursing program. The Burt-Davis scholarship was established by Ms. Marguerite L. Burt of Wynne in memory of her mother, Mrs. Bertha Davis Burt, and grandmother, Mrs. Sally Stephens Davis. There are many additional scholarship opportunities available at EACC. For application information and complete details of each, please contact the financial aid office on campus. LYON COLLEGE Many students think a Lyon College education is financially out of reach. However, financial aid staff award more than $4 million in institutional aid to students to allow them to attend the school. US News and World Report consistently names as Lyon College “One of America’s Best Liberal Arts Colleges.” More than 99 percent of last year’s incoming Lyon College students received scholarships and other types of financial aid to help

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COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES AROUND THE STATE OFFER MANY OPTIONS FOR STUDENTS WHO NEED FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE. finance their education. Most aid is awarded based on need (determined by the FAFSA) or on merit relating to academics, athletics or fine art performance. On-campus workouts, try outs or auditions are used to determine athletic and fine art scholarships. Academic aid is usually determined by performance at Honors Day scholarship competitions. Lyon hosts Honors Day scholarship competitions every fall and winter, providing competitive students (24 ACT or a 3.25 high school GPA and accepted to the college) the opportunity to earn scholarship money based on performance. During each competition, students will provide writing samples and interviews while their high school GPAs and standardized test results are scored. At the conclusion of each Honors Day, every student competing will receive scholarship money ranging from at least $26,000 over four years, up to greater than $105,000 over four years. MID-SOUTH COMMUNITY COLLEGE The Thomas B. Goldsby Jr. Scholarship program at Mid-South Community College (MSCC) allows Crittenden County high school students who meet the academic and testing criteria to earn college credits concurrently with their work in high

NATIONAL PARK COMMUNITY COLLEGE NPCC is committed to providing access to higher education programs to all students who qualify. The cost of attending NPCC depends on studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; residency, program of study and other factors. Financial assistance may help students with tuition, books, fees and in some cases, uniforms. There is also a wide variety of scholarship assistance through the National Park Community College Foundation, which exists to provide additional financial support to NPCC students. For a list of scholarships endowed through the generous donations of NPCC Foundation partners, and for scholarship availability, visit www.npcc.edu, click on the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Community and Friendsâ&#x20AC;? menu and scroll down to â&#x20AC;&#x153;NPCC Foundation.â&#x20AC;? OUACHITA BAPTIST UNIVERSITY For outstanding high school students, Ouachita Baptist University offers a variety of merit-based scholarships: Trustee Scholarship: Scholarships up to full cost of tuition, fees, room and board are available to National Merit finalists and Arkansas students who qualify to receive Arkansasâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Governorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Distinguished Scholarship. National Merit semi-finalists receive scholarships up to $15,000 per year. Presidential Scholarship: Full-tuition scholarships are awarded to seven incoming freshmen each year. Ouachita Scholars Scholarships: University Scholarship â&#x20AC;&#x201D; $40,800 ($10,200/year), Deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Scholarship â&#x20AC;&#x201D; $32,800 ($8,200/ year), Founderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Scholarship â&#x20AC;&#x201D; $24,800 ($6,200/year) Ouachita Collegiate Awards: Achievement Award â&#x20AC;&#x201D; $16,800 ($4,200/year), Opportunity Award â&#x20AC;&#x201D; $8,800 ($2,200/year) UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS COMMUNITY COLLEGE AT HOPE The University of Arkansas Community College at Hope Foundation has worked with a supportive community to raise raise more than $500,000 for scholarships. For more information, visit www.uacch.edu.

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THE COLLEGE ISSUE 2013 UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS AT LITTLE ROCK No matter what type of student you are – whether a traditional full-time student, a non-traditional online student or a hybrid – there are several opportunities to help finance your education at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock (UALR). That was the case for Wendy Lyons, a triple major in small business management, accounting and professional and technical writing at UALR. Lyons applied for received more than $6,500–enough to cover the cost of full-time tuition and fees at the university this fall. She spent several months sifting through a variety of scholarship applications after she attended an on-campus workshop offered by the UALR Office of Campus Life specifically geared toward non-traditional students. Lyons and other students are realizing how many private scholarships UALR offers through the generosity of individual and corporations deeply committed to UALR’s mission and the promise of its students. A small but select group of incoming students each year earn the distinction of being named a Donaghey Scholar, among the most coveted designations given

by UALR. Those selected as Donaghey Scholars earn up to $80,000 over a fouryear period. The award includes tuition and a stipend, as well as a funded study abroad experience, a laptop, and assistance toward student housing. The university offers a wide range of many other types of scholarships based on academics, achievements, leadership, and service. The priority deadline for most scholarships is Dec. 1, and the final deadline is Feb. 1. UALR also awards more than $100 million in financial aid each year to assist with the cost of education. Visit ualr.edu/ scholarships for a list with requirements and online application. SOUTHERN ARKANSAS UNIVERSITY TECH Scholarship deadlines are March 1 for most scholarships. Southern Arkansas University Tech offers a $1,000 bonus to students who enter the college with an Arkansas Challenge Scholarship Award (lottery scholarship). The college also offers numerous other scholarships based on merit and need. More info can be found http://www.sautech.edu/studentResources/ scholarships.aspx

You are ready. Earn a quality education with the University of Arkansas stamp of approval from Cossatot Community College. You have access to educational opportunities in the classroom and online. The landscape of education is always changing but the since its inception, the University of Arkansas System has developed a tradition of excellence. You. Are. Ready.

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or many students, college represents freedom. They have the opportunity to choose new classes, meet new friends and live on their own. But college is also the perfect time to start taking on more personal responsibility – and a budget is a great place to start. College students need to make a lot of purchases. Aside from books and course supplies, there’s also gas, toiletries, clothes and pizza on the list. For students, just like everyone else, a bank account is a link to purchasing power, and it’s important to manage those finances responsibly. Here are a few helpful guidelines for doing that successfully: ESTABLISH A BUDGET: know how much you have, how much you need and how you should spend it. TRACK AND MAINTAIN YOUR BUDGET: monitoring your expenses lets you make adjustments as needed and helps you stay on track.

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USE AVAILABLE TOOLS WISELY: check cards are convenient, but you must learn to record your purchases promptly to avoid losing track of those late-night burger runs! TAKE ADVANTAGE OF ONLINE BANKING: having detailed account information available on your computer makes budgeting easier to manage. TRY MOBILE BANKING: college students are often on the go, so text services and downloadable bank apps are easy ways to stay on top of important alerts and account balances. FIRST SECURITY has banking centers and ATMs in many college locations (and hometowns) across Arkansas, with almost 70 locations statewide. Having convenient access to your account can be a huge benefit to parents and/or relatives who want to help out with school expenses. After all, when it comes to college expenses, you’ll want all the help you can get!

©PHOTOS.COM, JUPITERIMAGES

College: The Perfect Time to Hit the (Check) Books

It’s about UFirst at Simmons immons First Bank’s UFirst student checking account is a great way to manage your money while keeping fees low. Some of the account benefits/features include:

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ONLINE STATEMENTS MOBILE BANKING MOBILE DEPOSITS TEXT BANKING ONLINE BILL PAY DEBIT CARD WITH NO FEE charged by Simmons First for using other banks’ ATMs (fees charged by other banks will apply)

FREE NOTARY SERVICE 24-HOUR TELEPHONE BANKING And as a thank you, Simmons First will add $10 to your balance. For more information, visit www. simmonsfirst.com.

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FIRST ORDER of Simmons First logo checks are free

THE COLLEGE ISSUE 2013 • ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES • AUGUST 22, 2013 51


THE COLLEGE ISSUE 2013

Alternative Options for Your College Fund hile banks no longer offer federally backed student loans, private loans are still available, such those offered by Arkansas Federal Credit Union (AFCU). For undergraduate students, Arkansas Federal’s Student Choice Loan covers the cost of an education without charging high interest rates, says Cory Liebhardt, AFCU Jacksonville Service Center manager. “We designed our student loans to be friendly to parents and students, without the high fees normally associated with student loans,” he says. As a bonus, there are no application or origination fees. Business students can now apply for an AFCU loan to cover their graduate studies in business. For those who already have student loans, AFCU recently added a private loan refinance option for students who have private loans at higher rates with banks. This can be advantageous as banks usually have fees and higher interest rates associated with their private student loans, Liebhardt says. “Go ahead and apply even if you’re not a member,” Liebhardt says. Those who aren’t members often find they have a connection through a family member, organization or institution. Currently, there are as many as 600+ groups that belong to AFCU,

©PHOTOS.COM, THINKSTOCK

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along with the military and a number of educational institutions such as the University of Arkansas at Little Rock, University of Central Arkansas and Harding University. Liebhardt says AFCU encourages students to apply for all the “free” aid they qualify for, but if federal student loans, which are generally a smaller amount than needed to completely cover the cost of an education, aren’t enough, he recommends considering an AFCU Student Choice Loan. Instead of a set amount, Liebhardt says, “We contact the school and ask, ‘What is the cost of a four-year education at your institution?’ ” That information is used to determine the amount of the loan, which is capped at $75,000 and requires a co-signer unless the student has a two-year positive credit history. “Basically, the student applies once and is granted a line of credit,” he says. Instead of handing the student a check, the money goes directly to the school, and when the student has needs, such as a laptop or books, the school issues a check. “We work hard to take care of the student,” and loans are often offered at lower rates than those offered by the federal program, he says.

LOTS OF GREAT SCHOOLS.

ONE GREAT BANK. From hometow hometowns to college towns, we make banking better for students and their parents. Security has 70 locations throughout Arkansas – including banks and ATMs on or First Secur several college campuses – so convenient service is never far away. You’ll also near se mobile and online banking that lets parents transfer funds to student accounts love our mo anytime, anywhere, with just a click. If only registering for classes were this easy. anytim

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52 AUGUST 22, 2013 • ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES • THE COLLEGE ISSUE 2013

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ATTENTION JUNIORS AND SENIORS CHECK OUT THE WEB VERSION OF ARKANSAS TIMES 2013 COLLEGE GUIDE AT WWW.ARKTIMES.COM simmonsfirst.com

Military Money ant to go to college? The Arkansas Army National Guard can help. They offer several education benefits, with two programs that help pay college tuition:

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Federal Tuition Assistance (FTA) that pays $4,500.00 a year Guard Tuition Incentive Program (GTIP) that pays an additional $2,500.00 per semester The Arkansas Army National Guard is the only part-time military service that offers of these benefits -- almost $20,000 more in education benefits towards a bachelor’s degree than any other part-time military branch. With the cost of a college education increasing every year, that’s a huge step in reducing a student’s debt load. In addition, the Montgomery G.I. Bill pays an additional $356 each month a student attends school, and these funds are just to help toward cost of living while in college. When added to the monthly two-day National Guard pay received for attending drill (which is at least $200), the average student may have enough money to cover living expenses and be able to focus on just their studies. The Arkansas Army National Guard can offer almost $50,000 in education benefits toward college -- all for just serving one weekend a month and two weeks in the summer. Gain full-time benefits for a part-time commitment of 38 days a year without worrying about how to pay for school. Locate a local Army National Guard recruiter today so they can help you get to college and start realizing your dreams.

Going away to school or staying close to home? No matter where you choose to continue your education, we’re not far away. With 92 financial centers and over 100 ATMs throughout Arkansas, Kansas and Missouri, Simmons First is practically around the corner. Open a UFirst Student Checking Account and we’ll deposit the first $10, then... bank anywhere, anytime! Use your computer or mobile phone to access your account information, receive account alerts, and pay bills. Even make deposits with your mobile phone. Plus, your parents can make immediate transfers into your account 24 hours a day!

MEMBER FDIC / SINCE 1903

Valid on new Ufirst Student Checking Accounts only. Limit one $10 deposit per account, per person. Limited to high school and college students only.

THE COLLEGE ISSUE 2013 • ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES • AUGUST 22, 2013 53


ARKANSAS ACADEMIC CHALLENGE SCHOLARSHIP T he Arkansas Academic Challenge Program provides educational assistance to Arkansas residents in pursuit of a higher education. Additional funding made possible by the Arkansas Scholarship Lottery has allowed the expansion of the Arkansas Academic Challenge Scholarship to provide higher education opportunities to previously underserved Arkansans (traditional, currently enrolled & nontraditional college students). Eligibility requirements for the Academic Challenge Scholarship are based on two student categories: Traditional (Current year high school graduates) and Nontraditional Students.

HOW TO APPLY Take advantage of the online universal application. It’s your one-stop shop for state and lottery funded financial aid. With the new online application you can: • Search and apply for scholarships and grants • Create your account • Check your status • Receive alerts and notices through email • Manage your account 24/7

AWARD AMOUNTS: The Arkansas General Assembly sets award amounts annually. Once determined, the amounts will be posted on the ADHE website - www.adhe.edu.

Advertising Supplement to Arkansas Times

BASIC ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA: An applicant must: • Be an Arkansas resident and U.S. citizen or a lawful permanent resident • Be accepted for admission at an approved Arkansas institution of higher education in a program of study that leads to a baccalaureate degree, associate degree, qualified certificate or a nursing school diploma • Not have earned a baccalaureate degree • Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) (although there will be no income cap)

ADDITIONAL ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA FOR THE TRADITIONAL STUDENT: • Enroll in fall semester immediately after high school • Enroll full-time each semester • Graduate from high school in current school year • Meet one of the following criteria: 1. Graduate from an Arkansas public high school and complete the Smart Core curriculum; and either


DEADLINE DATES

RESOURCES

Must apply no later than June 1 immediately following graduation as a traditional student. All other students must also apply by June 1.

Arkansas Department of Higher Education: www.adhe.edu Free Application for Federal Student Aid: www.fafsa.ed.gov Arkansas Student Loan Authority: www.fundmyfuture.info College Goal Sunday Arkansas: www.arcollegegoalsunday.org Say Go College Week: www.saygocollege.com College 101: www.arkcollege101.com Come Back: www.ComeBack2GoForward.com

For complete program details please visit

www.adhe.edu

or contact the Arkansas Department of Higher Education’s Financial Aid department at the following: Email: finaid@adhe.edu (800) 54-STUDY (501) 371-2050 – Greater Little Rock

Financial Aid Division 423 Main St., STE 400, Little Rock, AR 72201 (Entrance on Capitol Avenue) Email: finaid@adhe.edu (800) 54-STUDY (501) 371-2050 – Greater Little Rock facebook.com/ArkDeptHigherEd twitter.com/ArkDeptHigherEd

i. Achieve at least a 2.5 high school GPA; or ii. Achieve a 19 on the ACT or the equivalent score on an ACT equivalent test. 2. Graduate from an Arkansas public high school before the 2013-2014 school year, but did not complete the Smart Core curriculum, achieve a 2.5 high school GPA; and either i. Achieve a 19 on the ACT or the equivalent score; or ii. Score proficient or higher on all statemandated end-of-course assessments 3. Graduate from a private, out-of-state or home school high school and achieve a minimum composite score of nineteen (19) on the ACT or the equivalent score on an ACT equivalent test.

ADDITIONAL ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA FOR THE NONTRADITIONAL STUDENT: • Enroll full-time or part-time each semester • Meet one of the following criteria: 1. Graduated from an Arkansas public high school and achieved a 2.5 high school GPA or had a 19 on the ACT or the equivalent score on an ACT equivalent test ; or 2. Has earned at least 12 hours towards a degree with a cumulative GPA of at least 2.5.

RENEWAL REQUIREMENTS: Traditional students must enroll in at least 12 hours the first fall semester following high school graduation and at least 15 hours each semester thereafter to receive funding. Traditional students must complete at least 27 hours first year and at least 30 hours each year thereafter with a 2.5 cumulative GPA. Nontraditional students may enroll in as few as 6 hours and receive a pro-rated scholarship amount. Nontraditional students must maintain a 2.5 cumulative GPA with continuing eligibility based on enrollment.

Advertising Supplement to Arkansas Times


There’s never been a better time to go to college or an easier way to apply for financial aid

The Arkansas Department of Higher Education reviews and approves academic programs for the state’s 11 public universities and 22 public two-year colleges. In addition, the agency is responsible for distributing approximately $170 million annually from state revenues and lottery funds in the form of financial aid. For complete information about our programs, visit www.adhe.edu to review program rules and regulations. The eligibility requirements and rules governing the programs administered by ADHE are subject to legislative and regulatory amendments. Please e-mail the Financial Aid Division at finaid@adhe.edu for additional information.

• Application period is from January 1 to June 1 for upcoming academic year • Must complete FAFSA as well as YOUniversal scholarship application • Download free YOUniversal app for any smart phone


Arkansas Academic Challenge

SCHOLARSHIP

LIVING YOUR DREAM THROUGH EDUCATION! With funding made possible by the

ARKANSAS SCHOLARSHIP LOTTERY, the Arkansas Academic Challenge Scholarship provides opportunities for higher education to Arkansans.

If you’re planning to attend college in the fall, complete the YOUniversal financial aid application by June 1 at www.adhe.edu or download the free YOUniversal app for your smart phone.

ADHE | Financial Aid Division | 423 Main St STE 400 | Little Rock, AR 72201 Email: finaid@adhe.edu | (800) 54-STUDY | (501) 371-2050 – Greater Little Rock | www.adhe.edu


THE COLLEGE ISSUE 2013

Campus Safety olleges and universities across the state work hard to create communities on their respective campuses that foster learning and life-long relationships among students, faculty and staff. And while campus life may seem idyllic, administrators must identify and mitigate potential threats, whether it is petty property crimes or major incidents such as a mass shooting. Ensuring the safety of everyone on campus is a responsibility that’s taken seriously, and each school has policies and plans in place to prevent crime and notify students and faculty of a serious incident.

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ARKANSAS TECH UNIVERSITY The installation of emergency call stations, pedestrian safety gates and more lighting are visible examples of the security enhancements that Arkansas Tech University (ATU) has put into place in recent years, but perhaps even more important are the trained professionals who help ATU students stay safe. The Arkansas Tech Department of Public Safety (DPS) is on duty around the clock. Tech Safety Transport is an outreach program that provides students and faculty with peace of mind by, upon request, dispatching a public safety

CAMPUS ALERT!

employee to walk with them to their destination on campus after dark. In addition, students, faculty and staff are encouraged to register with the Arkansas Tech Campus Emergency and Outreach Notification (CEON) system. CEON is available to communicate with members of the campus community should a life-threatening situation arise. COLLEGE OF THE OUACHITAS The primary mission of the College of the Ouachitas’ (COTO) campus safety and security department is to ensure a safe and healthy environment that complements the educational mission of the college. COTO’s vice president of information technology is the chief security officer, who oversees all campus safety programs and the department’s one full-time and several part-time employees. In addition, local and state law enforcement personnel are, by invitation, responsible for enforcement of local and state laws on campus. NATIONAL PARK COMMUNITY COLLEGE The safety and security of students, faculty and staff at National Park Community College (NPCC) is of high importance, and administrators monitor the campus on several fronts. NPCC has a conscientious maintenance department that keeps the college looking its best as well as safe from potential hazards, while well-trained personnel from the security office constantly patrol the campus. NPCC also recently added a permanent security person from the Garland County Sheriff’s Office who is always on campus as an extension of the Sheriff’s Department with the authority to act on threats to the campus, keeping it safe and secure. SHORTER COLLEGE Shorter College is the only private college in the state to have a certified police force on campus. The four officers on staff patrol the campus 24 hours a day, seven days a week. SOUTHERN ARKANSAS UNIVERSITY TECH The Southern Arkansas University Tech campus is a safe place where campus police are on duty 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Campus police officers are also trained law enforcement officers, and the college is fortunate to be next door to the Arkansas Law Enforcement Training Academy. UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS The University of Arkansas Police Department provides security on campus at all times with a fully accredited professional staff that includes 24 patrol officers as well as criminal investigators and crime prevention officers. A student-staffed escort service, emergency call stations around campus, safety and self-defense classes, and a Safe Ride service are also offered.

©PHOTOS.COM, NATALIA SIVERINA TIMES • THE COLLEGE ISSUE 2013 58 AUGUST 22, 2013 • ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS

In the event of a campus-wide emergency UAPD has comprehensive response plan in place, that includes sending an emergency message to everyone on campus in a matter of minutes through text messaging, email and phone messages. Residence halls and many Greek houses are equipped with voice announcement systems to provide immediate safety instructions. University Police also work with campus communicators to get emergency information out through social media. UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS AT LITTLE ROCK UALR Campus Chief of Police Ed Smith has many goals with the start of the school year, one of which is to personally know each resident assistant on a first-name basis. “This is a team, and we all have a role to play,” he told a room filled with resident assistants during their recent safety training session. “But more than that, this is the UALR family… we’re here to help. That’s our commitment to you.” Smith and his staff of 26 police officers are well prepared for keeping the campus safe. The RA safety training is only one of numerous resources that help students make their time at UALR a positive and safe experience. Public safety programs range from emergency alert notifications; safety seminars; free safety escorts; emergency telephones around campus; ample outdoor lighting on pathways, parking, and streets; and free shuttle trolley services. New this fall will be “bicycle cops” who will be out and about throughout the campus, as well as satellite dispatch stations in high traffic areas across the campus. UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS AT PINE BLUFF The University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff campus is equipped with 24-hour video surveillance, emergency stations and card key access to dormitories. The college also uses the RAVE Alert system to broadcast emergency notifications to students and employees in the event of emergency. UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS COMMUNITY COLLEGE AT HOPE The University of Arkansas Community College at Hope (UACCH) has partnered with campus, city, county and state law enforcement to provide a safe learning environment for its students. This partnership includes a satellite police station on campus. UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL ARKANSAS Safety is a top priority at the University of Central Arkansas (UCA). The UCA Police Department includes 28 full-time, sworn police officers, nine full-time support staff and several part-time staff who provide law enforcement, public safety, emergency management and 911 services to the UCA community 24 hours a day, seven days a week. The UCA Alert System provides text, voice and email messages in the event of incidents or emergencies that pose a continuing threat to the safety of the UCA community.

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THIS MOMENT IS WORTH THE PRICE OF TUITION

The best Soldier is an educated Soldier. That’s why the Army National Guard will help you pay for college. Check it out: • Montgomery GI Bill • Army National Guard Kicker • Student Loan Repayment Program • Free Academic Testing (SAT, ACT, GRE and more) That’s in addition to valuable career training, leadership skills, and part-time service to the community. Go to NATIONALGUARD.com for more details. 3URJUDPVDQG%HQHÀWV6XEMHFWWR&KDQJH

THE COLLEGE ISSUE 2013 • ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES • AUGUST 22, 2013 59

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You want a higher education, not higher education costs.

As one of the top universities in our state, Arkansas Tech University belongs high on your list of possibilities. And with the lowest cost among the WXEXI´W&MK*MZI ½ZIPEVKIWXFEWIHSRIRVSPPQIRX MXWLSYPH FI EX XLI XST SJ XLEX PMWX ;I EVI SRI SJ SRP] X[S TYFPMG YRMZIVWMXMIWMR%VOERWEWXLEXSJJIVEPP½ZISJXLIQSWXWSYKLX EJXIVHIKVIIWERH[I´ZIEHHIHQSVIXLERRI[TVSKVEQW SJWXYH]MRXLITEWXX[SHIGEHIW2SXXSQIRXMSR[ILEZI XLIWIGSRHLMKLIWXKVEHYEXMSRVEXIEQSRKXLIWXEXI´W&MK*MZI ERH WSQI SJ XLI LMKLIWX IRVSPPQIRX WXERHEVHW 1EOI ]SYV HVIEQWSJLMKLIVIHYGEXMSRGSQIXVYI[MXLSYXELMKLIVGSWX 60 AUGUST 22, 2013 • ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES • THE COLLEGE ISSUE 2013

www.atu.edu


It’s back!

1620 SAVOY 1620 Market St 501-221-1620 1620savoy.com Free Soufflé (Chocolate Jamaican Rum or Grand Marnier) with purchase of entrée.  

American Pie Pizza 10912 Colonel Glenn Rd #7000 501-225-1900 americanpiepizza.net $5 off any purchase over $20 (not including alcohol) – Colonel Glenn location only.

4square Cafe and Gifts 405 President Clinton Ave 501-244-2622 4squaregifts.com Buy any sandwich or wrap and get a free cookie.

B-Side 11121 N. Rodney Parham 501-716-2700 lillysdimsum.com 1/2 Order Beignets with house made fruit coulis $3.

A.W. Lin’s Asian Cuisine 17717 Chenal Pkwy 501-821-5398 awlins.com Happy Hour Sunday - Thursday 3-7pm $2 draft beer, $2 special drinks, $3 house Sake. Half price selected appetizers and sushi. Monday - Thursday: Sushi special: buy one get one half off 3-7pm Sunday and Monday: Kid’s eat free (12 and under) Thursday is Ladies Night: Sangria $4 glass & $18 pitcher (ladies only) Half price appetizer

Baseline Pit Stop Bar & Grill 5506 Baseline Rd 501-562-9635 pitstopbarandgrill.com Two eggs any style and your choice of meat with hash browns, toast and a cup of coffee or soda for $6 from 8am to 10am. Ask about our daily lunch specials.

Acadia Restaurant 3000 Kavanaugh Blvd 501-603-9630 acadiahillcrest.com 20 oz Blackened Porter House steak, served with a Crawfish Risotto and Roasted Garlic Compound Butter. $39.75 for Prix Fixe Entrée only or $43.75 for three courses. Afterthought Bistro & Bar (formerly Vieux Carré) 2721 Kavanaugh Blvd 501-663-1196 afterthoughtbar.com Three Course Prix Fixe Menu $25 – Select from a range of options. Not valid with any other discount or coupon. Alcohol and gratuity not included. All Aboard Restaurant & Grill 6813 Cantrell Road 501-975-7401 all-aboardrestaurant.com Buy a meal, get a “Lil” engineers meal for half off.

Big Whiskey’s American Bar & Grill 225 E Markham St 501-324-2449 bigwhiskeys.com $2 off any burger. Black Angus 10907 N Rodney Parham Rd 501-228-7800 blackanguscafe.com $1 off two catfish dinners (two or three piece dinner with fries and hush puppies and choice of cole slaw or salad).

Boston’s Restaurant & Sports Bar 3201 Bankhead Dr. 501-235-2000 bostons.com ½ price appetizer with purchase of two entrées. Dine-in only.

Brave New Restaurant 2300 Cottondale Ln #105 501-663-2677 bravenewrestaurant.com Mahi Mahi Soft Tacos – two soft flour tortillas with grilled mahi mahi, topped with fresh mango-avocado relish and pico de gallo for $12. Bray Gourmet 323 Center St. 501-353-1045 braygourmet.com Bray’s Smoked Turkey Spread: Your choice of original, Cajun, jalapeno, or dill spread. Served with lettuce and tomato on choice of sourdough, marble rye, white, or wheat for $5.29. Bravo! Cucina Italiana 17815 Chenal Pkwy 501-821-2485 bravoitalian.com $7.95 lunch features Monday-Friday until 3pm. Browning’s Mexican Grill 5805 Kavanaugh Blvd 501-663-9956 browningsmexicangrill.com Back to School Special – Kid’s meal for $2.99.

Bobbie Jean’s Soul Food 3201 W. 56th St 501-570-8585 BLT sandwiches for $2.50.

Buffalo Grill 1611 Rebsamen Park Rd • 501-296-9535 buffalogrilllr.com Mahi Mahi Salad $8.99.

Bookends Café 120 River Market Ave 501-918-3091 cals.org Turkey, Cheese, and Avocado Sandwich with Potato Salad $5.

Butcher Shop 10825 Hermitage Road 501-312-2748 thebutchershoplittlerock.com Half price drinks and appetizers from 5-7pm Mon thru Fri. Bar area only.

Boscos Restaurant & Brewing Co. 500 President Clinton Ave 501-907-1881 boscosbeer.com $20 off dinner. Dine-in only, no carry out and customer must ask for the restaurant month special.

Café @ Heifer 1 World Ave. 501-907-8801 heifer.org ½ sandwich, side and a drink for $6.99.

Cafe Bossa Nova 2701 Kavanaugh Blvd 501-614-668 cafebossanova.com Moqueca (regularly priced at $24) for $21.19 during the month of August. $1 off Fejoida on Saturdays.

Cafe Prego 5510 Kavanaugh Blvd 501-663-5355 10% off your entire tab or 20% off bottles of wine. Cajun’s Wharf 2400 Cantrell Rd 501-375-5351 cajunswharf.com $35 Prix Fixe 3-course restaurant month dinner menu. (Choose two out of three courses) Camp David Interstate 30 & 6th St. Inside Holiday Inn Presidential Conference Center 501-975-CAMP(2267) $2 Miller Lt Draft, $3 house wines, $4 house liquors from 4:30 to 6:30 daily. Canon Grill 2811 Kavanaugh Blvd 501-664-2068 canongrill.com Free Cheese Dip with purchase of two Entrées, one per table. Cantina Cinco de Mayo 23 Rahling Road, Suite A1 501-821-2740 Sun-Thurs: $3.49 Margaritas, 99¢ Draft Beer - Dos Equis & Blue Moon Fri & Sat: $2.99 Margaritas, Small Draft Beer 99¢ . Cantina Laredo 207 N University Ave #300 501-280-0407 facebook.com/ cantinalaredolittlerock Wednesday Special – Half price any wine by the glass, 4pm-close Thursday Special – Half price house Margarita for Ladies night, 4pm-close.

Capers 14502 Cantrell Rd 501-868-7600 capersrestaurant.com $13 Prix Fixe 3-course restaurant month lunch menu. $30 Prix Fixe 3-course restaurant month dinner menu. (Choose two out of three courses)

Casa Mañana 6820 Cantrell Rd • 501-280-9888 18321 Cantrell Rd. • 501-868-8822 400 President Clinton Ave, D • 501372-6637 casamananamexicanfood.com 15% off your order. Excluding alcohol. China Wok 10402 Stagecoach Road, Ste. G 501-407-0833 Monday-Saturday 10:30-3pm Lunch Special includes choice of entrée, pork fried rice and soup or can of soda for $5.25. Excludes egg foo young, special lo mein and Mongolian beef. Cheers in the Heights 2010 N Van Buren St 501-663-5937 cheersith.com A complimentary piece of carrot cake with the purchase of two entrées (Cheers in the Heights location only). Chi’s Too 5110 W. Markham 501-604-7777 Buy one complete dinner, get one free kids’ meal. Limit: Kids 12 and under. Two free kids’ meals per table. Dine-in only. Ciao Baci 605 Beechwood 501-603-0238 ciaobaci.org Free tapas with any two full entrée orders. Cojita’s Mexican Grill 625 W Capitol Ave (in the Legacy Hotel) 501-244-0733 $4 off any $15 purchase. Two tacos, rice and beans for $4, dine-in only. $3 Margaritas now available during Happy Hour, 4-7pm.


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Your favorite Little Rock chefs have put together a variety of specials for the month of August that are great values on the city’s most delicious dining. Attention - You Must Ask Your Server about these specials throughout August DineLR.com Community Bakery • SOMA 1200 Main St 501-375-7105 communitybakery.com $1 off Iced coffee, iced Latte, Espresso Frappe, Espresso milkshake, fruit smoothie. Community Bakery • WLR 270 S Shackleford Rd 501-224-1656 Free cookie of your choice with any purchase. Copper Grill 300 E 3rd St # 101 501-375-3333 coppergrilllr.com $13 Prix Fixe 3-course restaurant month lunch menu. $30 Prix Fixe 3-course restaurant month dinner menu. Corky’s Ribs & BBQ 12005 Westhaven Dr 501-954-7427 corkysbbq.com $1 off all Phil’s sandwiches. Curry in a Hurry 11121 N Rodney Parham Rd 501-224-4567 facebook.com/curryhurry Free soda with purchase of two entrées. Damgoode Pies 6706 Cantrell Rd • 501-664-2239 2701 Kavanaugh Blvd • 501-6642274 10720 N Rodney Parham Rd • 501664-2239 damgoodepies.com Free delivery. No delivery charge for any order. Dempsey Bakery 323 S Cross St 501-375-2257 dempseybakery.com Free Sugar Cookie with lunch purchase. Doe’s Eat Place 1023 W Markham St 501-376-1195 doeseatplace.net Salmon for two for $40. Served with potatoes, toast and salad.

El Porton Mexican Restaurant 12111 W Markham St #450 501-223-8588 5507 Ranch Dr 501-868-7333 elportonmexicanrestaurants.com Happy Hour Mon-Fri 2-5 – Regular Margarita $2.95, 25 oz. Draft Beer $2.95 Lunch Special $5.99 Mon-Fri Entrée with Soft Drink Famous Dave’s 225 N Shackleford Rd 501-221-3283 famousdaves.com $5 off purchase of $20.

Green Corner Store & Soda Fountain 1423 Main St 501-374-1111 thegreencornerstore.com Beat the August heat with $1 off anything at the Soda Fountain. Gus’s World Famous Fried Chicken 300 President Clinton Ave., Ste. D 501-372-2211 gusfriedschicken.com/little-rock-ar Gus’s World Famous Fried Chicken! Now serving fried catfish Monday and Tuesday all day! Gusano’s Chicago Style Pizzeria 313 President Clinton Ave 501-374-1441 gusanospizza.com $7.49 Lunch Special – 8” One Topping Pizza, Side Salad and Soft Drink. Happy Hour 3-6pm - $2 domestic drafts 12oz. $3 well drinks.

Far East Asian Cuisine & Bar 11610 Pleasant Ridge Rd #100 Pleasant Ridge West Shopping Center 501-219-9399 fareastasiancuisine.com Hillcrest Artisan Meats House wine and beer 50% off. 2807 Kavanaugh Blvd. Appetizers 30% off from 4:00 to 6:00, 501-671-6328 dine in only. hillcrestartisanmeats.com “Olli-Day” Every Friday! 20% off Forbidden Garden Virginia’s Olli Salami. Also featuring 14810 Cantrell Rd daily sandwich and soup specials. 501-868-8149 facebook.com/ForbiddenGardenAR The Hop Diner $1 off a glass of wine. 201 E. Markham 501-224-0975 The Fold Botanas & Bar $1 Off A Combo Meal (comes with 3501 Old Cantrell Road fries & drink). 501-916-9706 thefoldlr.com Iriana’s Pizza $6 Signature cocktails for the 201 E. Markham remainder of August. 501-374-3656 irianaspizza.com Genghis Grill 15% off any whole pizza. 12318 Chenal Pkwy 501-223-2695 J. Gumbo’s genghisgrill.com Buy one bowl at regular price and get 12911 Cantrell Rd, Ste 18 501-916-9635 one for half price. jgumbos.com Seafood Gumbo $6.75 + tax. Graffiti’s Italian Restaurant 7811 Cantrell Rd Jimmy’s Serious Sandwiches 501-224-9079 5116 West Markham littlerockgraffitis.net 501-666-3354 One free appetizer with the jimmysserioussandwiches.com purchase of two full entrées (only From 4-8pm Only, dine in or carry out. one per table). Purchase a sandwich or salad and get one of the following for free: House Made Dessert, Serious Size A Sandwich, Extra Side Order, Soft Drink Or Iced Tea.

Jordan’s BarBQ 8912 Stagecoach Road 501-455-2800 2 piece fish dinner with fries, slaw, hushpuppies & a drink for $6.50. Regular size BBQ sandwich, pork or beef, with 2 select sides (beans, slaw, potato salad, corn or chips) & a drink for $6.50. La Casa Real 11121 Rodney Parham #9-10A 501-219-4689 Fajitas for two, small cheese dip, and two soft drinks for $22.95. La Hacienda 3024 Cantrell Road 501-661-0600 $2.99 Margaritas on Wednesday and Thursday Larry’s Pizza Downtown 1122 S. Center St. 501-372-6004 larryspizzaofarkansas.com $2 off any large pizza or $3 off any large specialty pizza. Take-out only. Las Palmas III 10402 Stagecoach Road 501-455-8500 laspalmasarkansas.com $5 Inferno Hot Wings. Free fountain drink with purchase of lunch plate, 11am-3pm Monday-Wednesday. 15% off any specialty entrée. Layla’s Gyros And Pizzeria 9501 N. Rodney Parham Rd. 501-227-7272 laylasgyro.com Lunch only: Gyro Sandwich, fries & drink $6.65. Leo’s Greek Castle facebook.com/leosgreekcastle 2925 Kavanaugh Blvd. 501-666-7414 Free baklava with purchase of a Gyro Platter after 5pm. Lilly’s Dim Sum Then Some 11121 N. Rodney Parham, Ste. 35B 501-716-2700 lillysdimsum.com Sunday: 50% off all wine bottles.

Loca Luna 3519 Old Cantrell Road 501-663-4666 localuna.com Mon: Wine Night- ½ off all wine under $28 Tues: $9 large pizza, $2 draft. Wed: Lady’s Special happy hour- $2. Domestic Beer, $4 Margaritas, Wine, Martinis, Cozmo. Thurs: Men’s special happy hour- $2 Domestic Beer, $4 Margaritas, Wine, Martinis, Cozmo. Mellow Mushroom 16103 Chenal Parkway, Ste. 900 501-379-9157 mellowmushroom.com/ westlittlerock 1/2 priced appetizers during late night happy hour 9-close. Mexico Chiquito 13924 Cantrell Road 501-217-0700 mexicochiquito.net All you can eat taco dinners $9.99. Montego Café 315 Main St. 501-372-1555 montegocafe.com Monday-Friday 4-7pm: 1/2 off any appetizer & all specialty drinks $5. The Oyster Bar 3003 W. Markham 501.666.7100 LRoysterbar.com $2 Off a Lb Of Shrimp $1 Off Half a Lb Of Shrimp Packet House Grill 1406 Cantrell Road 501-372-1578 packethousegrill.com Chile glazed salmon and rice pilaf. 10% off.


Your favorite Little Rock chefs have put together a variety of specials for the month of August that are great values on the city’s most delicious dining. Attention - You Must Ask Your Server about these specials throughout August DineLR.com Pancetta Regional Kitchen

& Wine Bar

3 Statehouse Plaza • In the Marriott 501-399-8000 marriott.com/litpb Lunch: Pappardelle Pasta with spring peas, spinach, asparagus + parmesan $12.50 per person(includes soft beverage but not tax & tip) Dinner: Grilled hanger steak + cucumber tomato salad $25 per person (includes dinner & dessert, but not tax & tip) Complimentary valet parking up to 2-1/2 hrs. The Pantry Restaurant 11401 N. Rodney Parham 501-353-1875 littlerockpantry.com Enjoy Arkansas honey crème brûlée, one per table, dinner only. Pho Thanh My Restaurant 302 N Shackleford 501-312-7498 ½ OFF An order of eggrolls with a purchase of $20 or more. Pizza Café 1517 Rebsamen Park 501-664-6133 pizzacafelr.com $2 Domestics all day Monday and Tuesday. The Pizza Joint 6100 Stone Road 501-868-9108 thepizzajoint.org $5 Off any purchase over $20 (not including alcohol). Planet Smoothie 102A Markham Park Dr. 501-227-6399 facebook.com/ PlanetSmoothieMarkham Snack Deal: 16 oz. smoothie and any snack item for $4. Plaza Grille (Doubletree Hotel) 424 West Markham St 501-372-4371 DoubletreeLR.com Tequila marinated chicken breast with black bean salsa and rice for $12.50.

Prose Garden Café 100 Rock St. Main Library, 5th Floor 501-918-3023 cals.org Turkey, cheese & avocado sandwich with potato salad $5. Prost 120 Ottenheimer (River Market) 501-244-9550 willydspianobar.com Half-Priced appetizers 4-7pm when you mention restaurant month. The Purple Cow 8026 Cantrell Road 501-221-3555 11602 Chenal Parkway 501-224-4433 purplecowlr.com Free scoop of ice cream with purchase of entrée (Limit one per table). RJ Tao 5501 Kavanaugh Blvd. #G 501-603-0080/0082 Two can dine for $60. One sharing appetizer, 2 entrées (seafood or steak) and bottle of wine. Red Door Restaurant 3701 Cantrell Road 501-666-8482 reddoorrestaurant.net Mon: Apps ½ Price With Entrée Tues: Wine Night - ½ off all wine under $28 a bottle. Wed: Filet Night- 7oz. Angus Tenderloin Filet $16.95 . Thurs: Ladies Special Happy Hour$2 domestic beer, $4 margaritas, martinis, wine & cozmo. Revolution Restaurant 300 President Clinton Ave. 501-823-0091 rumbarevolution.com Lunch Special: choice of seasoned beef, shredded chicken or fish tacos (grilled, blackened or fried), chips & salsa and soft drink $7.99.

The Root Café 1500 S. Main St. 501-414-0423 therootcafe.com Weekday Breakfast Special: Try our award-winning weekday breakfast and take 20% off of your breakfast entrée (available Tues-Fri 7-11am). Also featuring Saturday and Sunday brunch and full lunch menu TuesdaySaturday. Rosalia’s Family Bakery 2701 Kavanaugh Blvd 501-319-7035 facebook.com/ RosaliasFamilyBakery Free small brewed coffee with purchase of specialty coffee drink. Salut Bistro 1501 N. University (In The Prospect Bldg.) 501-660-4200 salut-bistro.com Free dessert with purchase of 2 entrées. Santo Coyote 11610 Pleasant Ridge Dr., Ste. 110 501-658-0140 santo-coyote.com $1.99 Margaritas on Wednesday. Free flan with purchase of $15 or more. Sky Modern Japanese 11525 Cantrell Road 501-224-4300 skylittlerock.com Sunday-Thursday 5-7pm: $4 house wine, $4.50 house rolls, $4 Drafts, $2 Domestics, $3 Imports. SO Restaurant-Bar 3610 Kavanaugh Blvd. 501-663-1464 sorestaurantbar.com Three-course prix fixe menu - $65 Star Of India 301 N. Shackleford #C4 501-227-9900 lrstarofindia.com 15% Off dinner entrée.

Stickyz Rock ‘N’ Roll Chicken Shack 107 River Market Ave. 501-372-7707 stickyz.com Lunch Special: 4 of our famous hand-cut chicken fingers in 12 different varieties, choice of baked potato soup or chicken & sausage gumbo, 2 dipping sauces and soft drink $7.99. Sushi Cafe 5823 Kavanaugh Boulevard 501-663-9888 sushicaferocks.com Sunday-Thursday: Chef’s special, 2 adults for $50 (Sushi Only). The Tavern Sports Grill 17815 Chenal Pkwy, Ste. F101 501-830-2100 thetavernsportsgrill.com Come try our new menu by Donnie Ferneau, plus $1 off drinks and $2.50 domestic pints from 3-7pm. On Thursday night: $10 buckets, $8 PBR buckets, $2.50 domestic pints all night. Thirst N’ Howl Bar & Grill 14710 Cantrell Road 501-379-8189 thirst-n-howl.com 10% off catfish plate on Friday lunch 11am-2pm. Tracy Cakes 10301 N. Rodney Parham 501-227-4243 tracycakesar.com Buy 3 cupcakes get 1 free. Trio’s Restaurant 8201 Cantrell Road #100 501-221-3330 triosrestaurant.com Half off any appetizer with purchase of an entrée. Offer good at lunch, dinner and brunch. Dine in only. Dog Days of Summer – Trio’s partners with Hollywood Feed across the street on Cantrell. All month, doggies dining on our patio receive free Doggy Goodie Bag.

Tropical Smoothie 12911 Cantrell Rd. #19 • 501-224-1113 11900 Kanis Rd. • 501-221-6773 10221 N. Rodney Parham • 501-224-2233 524 S. Broadway St. • 501-246-3145 410 S. University Ave. Ste. 140 501-240-1021 tropicalsmoothie.com Start your day off right! ½ priced smoothies from 7-9am, MondayFriday. Vesuvio Bistro 1315 Breckenridge Dr. 501-225-0500 vesuviobistro.com Costato Di Maiale Alla Milanese: Bonein pork chop butterflied and pan fried, served with sautéed vegetables and potatoes for $28. Now open 4-10pm. Other nightly specials also available. West End Smokehouse 215 N. Shackleford 501-224-7665 westendsmokehouse.net Every Friday: All sandwiches $5.99 from 11am-3pm. Free pool with purchase of $8.99 Or more. Willy D’s Piano Bar 322 President Clinton Ave. 501-244-9550 willydspianobar.com Half priced appetizers 7-9 pm when you mention restaurant month. WT Bubba’s 500 President Clinton Ave. #40 501-244-2528 wtbubbas.com Free dessert with any meal purchase. Ya Ya’s Euro Bistro 17711 Chenal Parkway 501-821-1144 yayasar.com Select appetizers: Two for one from 3-5:30pm Blue Summer Signature Cocktail $5 All Day for August Restaurant Month Zin Urban Wine & Beer Bar 300 River Market Ave. #1 501-246-4876 zinlr.com Mention the Savor the City promo and receive 15% off all bottles of wine


Arts Entertainment AND

Fayetteville Roots Festival Highlights THURSDAY 8/22 “Everything You Need to Know About Making a Living with your Songs” — Fayetteville Public Library, 3:30 p.m. St. Paul & The Broken Bones, Isayah’s Allstars, American Aquarium — George’s, 10 p.m.

ROOTSY AFFAIR: Arkansasborn folk singer Iris DeMent performs at the Walton Arts Center Friday as part of the Fayetteville Roots Festival. She also performs Saturday at South on Main in Little Rock.

MORE THAN JUST MUSIC FAYETTEVILLE ROOTS FESTIVAL GROWS IN ITS FOURTH YEAR. BY ROBERT BELL

I

t’s an impressive feat, the way the Fayetteville Roots Festival has grown from its origins in 2010 as a one-day music event hosted at Greenhouse Grille into what it is in 2013: a four-day, multivenue celebration of art, folk music, local food and, really, Fayetteville itself. The marquee names have proliferated along with the festival’s increasing profile — Guy Clark was top-of-bill in 2011, last year’s headliners were John Prine and The David Grisman Trio and this year sees performances from Iris DeMent, The Del McCoury Band and Jerry Douglas. Of course, along with all the more familiar names are scores of other noteworthy acts, including veterans, up-and-comers and underground heroes of the sort that’ll get the devoted folk, blues, bluegrass and country fans excited. It’s also pretty much a given that attendees will discover some 64

AUGUST 22, 2013

ARKANSAS TIMES

new performer they’ve never heard of who’ll knock their socks off. But in addition to the performers, the festival showcases the city of Fayetteville, said organizer Bryan Hembree, who also performs in 3 Penny Acre, a trio that includes Bernice Hembree and Bayard Blain and that serves as host band for the festival. Hembree and Jerrmy Gawthrop of Greenhouse Grille are partners in organizing the event, an arrangement that stretches back to that first year and one that has undoubtedly influenced the festival’s focus on showcasing local food and the folks who grow, distribute and prepare it. Seeing as 3 Penny Acre got its start busking at the Fayetteville Farmer’s Market, that seems appropriate. Greenhouse Grille, Brick House Kitchen, Ella’s Restaurant and Pure Joy Ice Cream col-

laborate with a host of farmers to cater the festival for attendees and artists. Two of the festival pass packages include dinner on Friday and Saturday, and there will be a food court at the Walton Arts Center on those days. Last year, 16 states were represented between artists and ticket holders, “and this year there are 27, so we really feel like Fayetteville is on stage,” Hembree said. And that’s not just a figurative expression: the way the festival is structured — there are 11 stages scattered around the core of downtown — will create a sort of flow of people, most of whom will walk from one venue to another, from the Walton Arts Center and George’s on Dickson Street up to the Fayetteville Public Library, from the Farmer’s Market on the Square to bars and restaurants on Block and School Streets. The festival is also geared toward creating a good time for everyone from families and children to the most party-hearty, late-night warriors. Many of the events are free, including a host of musicians, dances and programming at the library (including songwriting workshops, a screening of the Levon Helm documentary “Ain’t In It for My Health” and live broadcasts of KUAF’s “Ozarks at Large”). There are free shows at Maxine’s, Greenhouse Grille, Arsaga’s Depot, May Bell Music and the Fayetteville Town Center. Then there are the art exhibits connected with the festival, including “True Faith, True Light: The Folk Instruments of

FRIDAY 8/23 Crooked Crow Songwriting Workshop — FPL, 9-11 a.m. Local Food Festival Fare — Walton Arts Center, 3-10:30 p.m. 3 Penny Acre, Joe Pug, Iris DeMent and Del McCoury Band — Walton Arts Center, 6-10:30 p.m. David Kimbrough Duo, Reverend Payton’s Big Damn Band with Jimbo Mathus and Alvin Youngblood Hart — George’s, 10 p.m.-2 a.m. SATURDAY 8/24 Shannon Wurst — FPL, 10 a.m. “Ain’t In It for my Health: A Film About Levon Helm” — FPL, 11 a.m. Local Food Festival Fare — WAC, Noon-10:30 p.m. Luella & The Sun — George’s, 4 p.m. Field Report — WAC’s Starr Theatre, 4 p.m. Mary Gauthier, Elephant Revival, John Fullbright, The Jerry Douglas Band — WAC, 6-10:30 p.m. Paul Benjamin Band, Hayes Carll — George’s, 10:30 p.m.-1 a.m. SUNDAY 8/24 “Tales from the South” live radio broadcast, with Mary Gauthier and Michael Fracasso — FPL, 1:30-3:30 p.m. Roots Festival Closing Party, with 3 Penny Acre, Luella & The Sun and Field Report — George’s, 6-10 p.m.

Ed Stilley” at the Walton Arts Center and “This Land: Picturing a Changing America in the 1930s and 1940s” at Crystal Bridges in Bentonville. Visual art is another way the festival has grown since its debut, and the exhibits will remain up for several weeks so even folks who couldn’t make the main event can still get an idea of what it’s all about. As of now, multi-day passes for the Fayetteville Roots Festival are sold out. There are still single-day tickets available for the Friday and Saturday concerts at the Walton Arts Center. They’re $53 or $33 for University of Arkansas Students. Tickets for the Late Night Stage shows at George’s are $10 for Thursday and $15 for Friday or Saturday.


Check out the Times’ A&E blog

N

arktimes.com

A&E NEWS DELIGHTFULLY WEIRD PSYCHO-BILLY HERO TAV FALCO (from Gurdon), genre-defier Dan Hicks and the Hot Licks (Little Rock) and ‘90s country star Collin Raye (De Queen) are among the big names at this year’s Arkansas Sounds Musical Festival, a production of the Butler Center for Arkansas Studies, a department of the Central Arkansas Library System. Think of it as a music version of the Arkansas Literary Festival, which the Central Arkansas Library also puts on. The free festival runs Sept. 27-28 at the First Security Amphitheatre, the River Market Pavilions and the main branch of the Central Arkansas Library. Other featured acts: Arkansas Times Musicians Showcase winners The Sound of the Mountain, The Smittle Band, The 1 oz. Jig, Messy Sparkles, Epiphany, War Chief, Mountain Sprout, Bonnie Montgomery and a tribute to Glen Campbell. Festival organizer John Miller said the Campbell tribute is likely to resemble last year’s tributes to Levon Helm and Michael Burks, where members of some of the featured acts join together to do cover songs. Raye’s likely to perform a number of Campbell songs during his shot at the festival, too, Miller said. Raye has a Campbell tribute album scheduled for release later this year. Fans of Falco should circle Thursday, Sept. 26 on their calendar, too. He’ll be reading from “Ghosts Behind the Sun: Splendor, Enigma & Death: Mondo Memphis Vol. 1,” his underground history of Memphis, at 6 p.m. at the Main Library’s Darragh Center. Miller said it’s a hugely engrossing book, and that Falco will incorporate video and stories that didn’t make the book in his presentation. TICKETS ARE NOW ON SALE for the “Willie Nelson & Family” performance that’s been added to the Walton Arts Center’s 2013-14 season on Nov. 26. The show starts at 7 p.m. Tickets will run $49 to $79 and can be purchased by calling the box office at 479-443-5600 or going to the arts center’s website. KIRSTEN DUNST WILL PLAY the female lead in “Midnight Special,” the next project for Little Rock native Jeff Nichols, whose last film “Mud” was a sleeper hit. Nichols’ muse Michael Shannon and Joel Edgerton — who was stellar as the non-”Parks and Rec” Navy Seal in “Zero Dark Thirty” — co-star. The film has been described as a “contemporary science fiction chase film.” Nichols wrote the script.

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8 pm, $7 cover Join us for LIVE MUSIC in the bar Monday thru Saturday nights

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AUGUST 22, 2013

65


THE TO-DO

LIST

BY ROBERT BELL

THURSDAY 8/22

LILLY LEDBETTER

6:30 p.m. CALS Main Library. Free.

The idea that a woman wouldn’t be paid the same as a man for doing the same job is offensive to the basic sense of fairness most people would agree that society should aspire to. So it’s logical then that a woman who was paid substantially less than her male colleagues for doing the same job as them for nearly two decades would seek relief from the courts. That’s what Alabaman Lilly Ledbetter did, and she was awarded $3.3 million (though according to an article in Time, that amount was later reduced to $300,000). The case made its way to the Supreme Court, where the conservative wing struck down the ruling in a 5-4 vote, stating that because Ledbetter did not complain about the discriminatory nature of her pay within 180 days of receiving her first paycheck, that she was not entitled to any judgment against her former employer, Goodyear. Of course, compensation details are confidential at most corporations, and

FAIR PAY FIGURE: Lilly Ledbetter will speak at CALS Main Library Thursday.

Ledbetter only learned of the pay disparity as she was preparing to retire, after a colleague slipped her a note anonymously. The Supreme Court’s decision seems to ignore this important detail. Ledbetter was a guest on Stephen Colbert’s show last fall.

He summed up the decision thusly: “Their logic was, you should have known before you knew.” While Ledbetter undoubtedly received unjust treatment at the hands of her employer and, arguably, the nation’s highest court, she did get some satisfac-

tion when President Obama signed the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act in 2009, the first piece of legislation he signed into law. She’ll be signing copies of her new book, “Grace & Grit: My Fight for Equal Pay and Fairness at Goodyear and Beyond.”

THURSDAY 8/22SUNDAY 8/24

THURSDAY 8/22

JOHN WILLIS EP RELEASE SHOW

9:30 p.m. The Joint. $7.

RED OCTOPUS THEATER: ‘#OCTOPILITTLEROCK’

If you’ve been following original local music the last few years, the odds are good that Little Rock native John Willis’ name will be a familiar one. The UCA graduate is an arranger and an ace piano player who has accompanied many of the state’s finest singer/songwriters. And it turns out that Willis is a fine singer/ songwriter himself, as evidenced by the sophisticated, lush-sounding pop contained on his six-song EP, “King of the Cocktail Party,” which will be available at this show. Willis’s Facebook bio states that he grew up “listening to equal parts MoTown, 60’s-70’s singer/songwriters, and Gospel,” as well as classical, jazz and world music. All those influences certainly shine through on his new EP, especially on the title track, with its range of sounds: a gentle Brazilian lilt here, a jaunty chorus of background singers, what sounds like a harmonium in the distance, and wry observations throughout. Opener “The Ladder” is a jaunty, piano-

If you’re looking at that title and thinking to yourself (or perhaps to someone else, if you’ve got ESP), “Now, just what in the Sam Hill are those Red Octopi up to this go around?” well pardner, I’ll tell you what: They’re lampooning protesters and political dissidents, shut-ins, organic food snobs, moshing, “Downton Abbey” and the Good Lord only knows what else. How about some of these sketch titles: “It’s the ’90s — It’s Not All About Flannel,” “Def Jill’s Comedy Showcase,” “Hillcrest Now Sells Coyote Meat” — and those were just the ones we could print! Just kidding, but seriously, as is usually the case with Red Octopus productions, you should leave your kiddos at home, as this shiz is for grownups only now. Take note: The first 10 people who show up each night at 7:30 p.m. who are so inclined can enter for half price, so long as they agree to protest the show (signs will be provided).

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ARKANSAS TIMES

8 p.m. The Public Theatre. $8-$10.

‘KING OF THE COCKTAIL PARTY’: John Willis will perform at an EP release show Thursday at The Joint.

led number with rich, gorgeous vocal harmonies and an ending that recalls Harry Nilsson in his prime. Also on the

bill: Sammy Williams, of Midwest Caravan, and headliner Isaac Alexander, performing with a full band.


IN BRIEF

FRIDAY 8/23

FRIDAY 8/23

KEVIN SECONDS, KEPI GHOULIE

9 p.m. Low Key Arts. $5.

With his band 7 Seconds, Sacramento native Kevin Seconds was one of the pioneers of melodic hardcore back in the early ’80s. If you’re an old punker, you might’ve owned a copy of “The Crew” or

the “Skins, Brains & Guts” EP. You might even have a faded old “Walk Together, Rock Together” T-shirt tucked away in a drawer somewhere. In addition to adding melody to the short-loud-fast formula for hardcore, Seconds was also one of the first punks to go the solo-acoustic route. While his long-running band is still going, Seconds is primarily focused on the solo

gigs. On tour with Seconds is fellow Sactown native Kepi Ghoulie, frontman of the Ramones-and-B-horror-flick-inspired Groovie Ghoulies. That band broke up unfortunately, but Ghoulie has continued to pump out ridiculously catchy pop punk with a band and, yes, in a solo-acoustic setup. Also on this bill at this all-ages show: Rad Posture and Maxine Meyers.

ing (not to be confused with the folks who publish “Car & Driver”) and determining one’s own PSI potential (“that is to say your personal ability for remote viewing and extrasensory perception or ESP,” according to a statement from organizer Keith Sales). Plus there’ll be panel discussions and lectures on many other things. At first I thought maybe this conference was about the hypothesis of the multiverse in metaphysics, particularly the idea that there could be an infinite number of universes that were nearly identical, and how like, maybe in one particular parallel universe, the idea

of parallel universes is widely accepted, but there’s a group of folks who don’t believe in it and they have conferences about how there’s really actually only one universe and how it’s all just a conspiracy to cover up for that fact and also because the idea of an infinite number of parallel universes is just like, too freakin’ weird to consider and kind of makes you feel queasy if you think about it, you know? But that’s not what this is about. At least in this universe. There are deals available for hotel packages. Check out AmericasMostHauntedHotel.com for more info and a schedule of events.

FRIDAY 8/23-SUNDAY 8/25

PARALLEL UNIVERSES CONFERENCE

Various times. Crescent Hotel. $75-$125.

This weekend is the second annual Parallel Universes Conference at The Crescent Hotel in Eureka Springs. The theme this year is “Things Unknown.” Topics include Spontaneous Human Combustion (that’s when folks burst into flames suddenly), dowsing (that’s when a water witch uses a divining rod to locate groundwater or unmarked graves or gold and so forth), auto-writ-

WEDNESDAY 8/28

JOHN HIATT & THE COMBO

John Hiatt’s career has spanned so many decades and he’s penned songs for so many big-name artists and he’s recorded so many great albums that it’s dang-near impossible to pigeonhole him. But if you absolutely had to attempt to sum up his work in a pithy one-liner, you might be tempted to say something along the lines of, “He’s the father of tasteful, soulful, country- and blues-tinged, folksy, singer/ songwriter-y Americana/roots-rock.” But no, that doesn’t really do him justice. I’d say pick out one of his many career highlights and dig in. Although 1987’s “Bring the Family” is probably one of the most obvious, it’s also one of the best — “Lipstick Sunset” is a heartbreaker with some incredibly evocative guitar playing from Ry Cooder. Another really good one is 2008’s “Same Old Man,” a bluesy effort that

JACK SPENCER

9 p.m. Juanita’s. $40 adv., $45 day of.

STAYING POWER: John Hiatt & The Combo play Juanita’s Wednesday.

was recorded at Hiatt’s home studio, with guitar and mandolin provided by Luther Dickinson, the redoubtable guit-slinger of The North Mississippi Allstars. Hiatt’s most recent LP was last year’s “Mystic Pinball,”

another very well-received collection of tunes. If you’re on the fence about this show for any reason, give it a listen and it’ll knock you over onto the right side. Opening the show will be Native Run.

Salsa dancers of all levels are welcome at Juanita’s, where Salsa Little Rock brings in renowned Fayetteville ensemble Calle Soul. There’s a lesson from 9-10 p.m., and after that, things kick into high gear, $10 cover. Chris DeClerk handles the happy hour tunes at Cajun’s Wharf starting at 5:30 p.m., but hey, it’s Friday, so stick around for the headliner, The Karla Case Band, at 9 p.m., $5 after 8:30 p.m. The Big Dam Horns bring their big, brassy sounds to Stickyz, 9 p.m., $5. If your Friday evening needs an injection of misanthropic southern metal, don’t miss Rwake at White Water Tavern, with Seahag and Enchiridion, 10 p.m. If you need some laughs, check out “Arkansanity,” the current sketch comedy show at The Joint, starring the in-house funny experts, The Main Thing, 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, $20. Volks folks, take note: The 21st annual VW Weekend will be under way in Eureka Springs, headquartered at the Best Western Inn of the Ozarks. Check NwaVwa.com for more information and schedule.

SATURDAY 8/24 Native Arkansan Iris DeMent is the first high profile act to come to South on Main, Oxford American’s new restaurant/performance space. Tickets are sold out to the 8 p.m. concert. Fayetteville’s Randall Shreve & The Sideshow will bring the dramatic rock ’n’ roll fireworks to Stickyz, 9:30 p.m., $6. Over at Revolution, School of Dub Presents: “Back 2 School Vol. 4,” featuring DTF, 9 p.m., $7-$10. Discovery hosts Sno White, with Ewell, JMZ Dean and DJ Haze, plus Dominique and the Disco Dolls, DJ Johnny Mambo and more, 9 p.m.-5 a.m., $10-$15. Singer/songwriter and Glen Rose native Michael Prysock returns to White Water Tavern, 9:30 p.m., $5. The University of Arkansas Community College at Hope hosts a Jazz Workshop and Evening Concert in celebration of President Bill Clinton’s birthday. The workshop begins at 10 a.m. and the concert at 6 p.m. Red Devil Lies, Enchiridion and Attack of the Mind bring the heaviness to Juanita’s, 10 p.m., $8 adv., $10 day of.

TUESDAY 8/27 Nu metal outfit Alien Ant Farm plays at Juanita’s, with Hank and the Cupcakes, Eddie and the Defiantz and Attack the Mind, 9 p.m., $12 adv., $15 day of. Revolution hosts hard rock legends Great White, 8:30 p.m., $15. Over at Stickyz, you can catch Austin-based indie craftsmen The Eastern Sea, with openers Grandchildren, 9 p.m., $8 adv., $10 day of.

www.arktimes.com

AUGUST 22, 2013

67


AFTER DARK All events are in the Greater Little Rock area unless otherwise noted. To place an event in the Arkansas Times calendar, please e-mail the listing and all pertinent information, including date, time, location, price and contact information, to calendar@arktimes.com.

tegocafe.com. Ted Ludwig Trio. Capital Bar and Grill, 9 p.m., free. 111 Markham St. 501-374-7474. www.capitalhotel.com/CBG. Word Play TJay, Kenyon the Dawn, Bloka Black Rambo. Vino’s. 923 W. 7th St. 501-3758466. www.vinosbrewpub.com. “YOLO.” Featuring four DJs and beach volleyball, 18-and-older. Flying DD, $5. 4601 S. University. 501-773-9990. flyingdd.com.

THURSDAY, AUG. 22

MUSIC

Dee Dee Jones. Ladies night, $5 after 9 p.m., free before. Montego Cafe, 8 p.m. 315 Main St. 501-372-1555. www.montegocafe.com. Fayetteville Roots Festival. Four-day folk festival, hosted at venues all over downtown Fayetteville. Dickson Street, $10-$53. Dickson and West streets, Fayetteville. www.fayettevilleroots.com. “Inferno.” DJs play pop, electro, house and more, plus drink specials and $1 cover before 11 p.m. Sway, 9 p.m. 412 Louisiana. 501-907-2582. Jocko Deal. Denton’s Trotline, 8 p.m.; Aug. 29, 8 p.m., free. 2150 Congo Road, Benton. 501315-1717. Jodi James (happy hour), Adrenaline (headliner). Cajun’s Wharf, 5:30 and 9 p.m., $5 after 8:30 p.m. 2400 Cantrell Road. 501-375-5351. www.cajunswharf.com. John Willis. “King of the Cocktail Party” EP release show, with Sammy Williams and Isaac Alexander. The Joint, 8 p.m., $7. 301 Main St. No. 102, NLR. 501-372-0205. thejointinlittlerock.com. Josh Harty, Cencellieri. Maxine’s. 700 Central Ave., Hot Springs. www.maxinespub.com. Karaoke. The Afterthought, 8 p.m., free. 2721 Kavanaugh Blvd. 501-663-1196. www.afterthoughtbar.com. Karaoke with Kevin & Cara. MacDaddy’s Bar and Grill, 9 p.m., free. 314 N. Maple St., NLR. Krush Thursdays with DJ Kavaleer. Club Climax, free before 11 p.m. 824 W. Capitol. 501-554-3437. Michael Eubanks. Newk’s Express Cafe, 6:30 p.m. 4317 Warden Road, NLR. 501-753-8826. newks.com. Open jam with The Port Arthur Band. Parrot Beach Cafe, 9 p.m. 9611 MacArthur Drive, NLR. 771-2994. RockUsaurus. Senor Tequila, 7-9 p.m. 10300 N. Rodney Parham Road. 501-224-5505. www. senor-tequila.com. Smokey. The Tavern Sports Grill, 7 p.m., free. 17815 Chenal Parkway. 501-830-2100. www.thetavernsportsgrill.com. Ted Ludwig Trio. Capital Bar and Grill, 5 p.m., free. 111 Markham St. 501-374-7474. www.capitalhotel.com/CBG.

EVENTS

Lilly Ledbetter. Lecture on her ten-year fight for equal pay. Main Library, 6:30 p.m. 100 S. Rock St. www.cals.lib.ar.us. Professor Sally J. Kenney. A political science professor at Tulane University will speak on women as judges and gender issues in the courts system. UALR William H. Bowen School of Law, noon. 1201 McMath Ave. 501-324-9434. www.law.ualr.edu. Woodlawn Farmer’s Market. Shoppes on Woodlawn, 4:30 p.m. 4523 Woodlawn. 501666-3600. woodlawnshoppes.blogspot.com.

BENEFITS

Save the Children benefit event. Governor’s Mansion, 6:30 p.m., $100. 1800 Center St. 501377-1121.

68

AUGUST 22, 2013

ARKANSAS TIMES

COMEDY

The Main Thing presents “Arkansanity.” Original two-act comedy play lampooning life in Arkansas. The Joint, 8 p.m., $20. 301 Main St. No. 102, NLR. 501-372-0205. thejointinlittlerock.com.

DANCE

Ballroom Dancing. Free lessons begin at 7 p.m. Bess Chisum Stephens Community Center, 8-11 p.m., $7-$13. 12th & Cleveland streets. 501-2217568. www.blsdance.org. Salsa Night. Begins with a one-hour salsa lesson. Juanita’s, 9 p.m., $8. 614 President Clinton Ave. 501-372-1228. www.littlerocksalsa.com. ROAD WARRIORS: The ceaselessly touring troubadours in American Aquarium return to Little Rock Friday for a show at Revolution, with Conway rabble-rousers Swampbird opening up, 9:30 p.m., $10.

FRIDAY, AUG. 23

MUSIC

American Aquarium, Swampbird. Revolution, 9:30 p.m., $10. 300 President Clinton Ave. 501823-0090. revroom.com. The Big Dam Horns. Stickyz Rock ‘n’ Roll Chicken Shack, 9 p.m., $5. 107 Commerce St. 501-3727707. www.stickyz.com. Calle Soul. Salsa lessons before the show. Juanita’s, 9 p.m., $10. 614 President Clinton Ave. 501-372-1228. www.juanitas.com. Canvas. The Tavern Sports Grill, 7 p.m., free. 17815 Chenal Parkway. 501-830-2100. www.thetavernsportsgrill.com. Chris DeClerk (happy hour), Karla Case Band (headliner). Cajun’s Wharf, 5:30 and 9 p.m., $5 after 8:30 p.m. 2400 Cantrell Road. 501-375-5351. www.cajunswharf.com. Club Nights at 1620 Savoy. Dance night, with DJs, drink specials and bar menu, until 2 a.m. 1620 Savoy, 10 p.m. 1620 Market St. 501-2211620. www.1620savoy.com.

Erik Deacon and Clayton Nichols. Cornerstone Pub & Grill, 8 p.m. 314 Main St., NLR. 501-3741782. cstonepub.com. Fayetteville Roots Festival. Four-day folk festival, hosted at venues all over downtown Fayetteville. Dickson Street, through Aug. 25, $10-$53. Dickson and West streets, Fayetteville. www.fayettevilleroots.com. Friday night at Sway. Sway, 9 p.m. 412 Louisiana. 501-907-2582. Indie Music Night “Back 2 School Edition.” Local hip hop showcase. Downtown Music Hall, 9 p.m., $10. 211 W. Capitol. 501-376-1819. downtownmusichall.com. Kevin Seconds, Kepi Ghoulie, Rad Posture, Maxine Meyers. Low Key Arts, 9 p.m., $5. 118 Arbor St., Hot Springs. Modoc, SX Rex. Maxine’s. 700 Central Ave., Hot Springs. www.maxinespub.com. Rwake. With Seahag and Enchiridion. White Water Tavern, 10 p.m. 2500 W. 7th St. 501-3758400. www.whitewatertavern.com. Synergy, DJ Sleepy Genius. Montego Cafe, 8:30 p.m. 315 Main St. 501-372-1555. www.mon-

EVENTS

21st Annual VW Weekend. Various events and times; NwaVwa.com for more details. Best Western Inn of the Ozarks, Aug. 23-25. 207 W. Van Buren, Eureka Springs. 479-253-9768. www. innoftheozarks.com. Fourth Annual Mark Pennebaker Memorial Golf Tournament. Call 501-372-5959 for more information. Burns Park Championship Course, 1 p.m. 30 Championship Drive, NLR. 758-5800. LGBTQ/SGL Youth and Young Adult Group. Diverse Youth for Social Change is a group for LGBTQ/SGL and straight ally youth and young adults age 14 to 23. For more information, call 244-9690 or search “DYSC” on Facebook. 800 Scott St., 6:30 p.m. 800 Scott St. Second Annual Parallel Universes Conference. Conference is titled “Things Unknown.” AmericasMostHauntedHotel.com for more information. Crescent Hotel and Spa, Aug. 23-25. 75 Prospect Ave., Eureka Springs. 877-342-9766. www.crescent-hotel.com. Swap Meet and Car Show. Cypress Creek Park, Aug. 23-24. Cypress Creek Avenue, Adona.

SATURDAY, AUG. 24

MUSIC

Brigade Clothing Launch Party. Featuring VILE PACK, Fresco Grey, Goom des Garcons, C-Port Vino’s. 923 W. 7th St. 501-375-8466. www.vinosbrewpub.com. Christine DeMeo. The Tavern Sports Grill, 7 p.m., free. 17815 Chenal Parkway. 501-830-2100. www. thetavernsportsgrill.com. Club Nights at 1620 Savoy. See Aug. 23. Fayetteville Roots Festival. Four-day folk festival, hosted at venues all over downtown Fayetteville. Dickson Street, through Aug. 25, $10-$53. Dickson and West streets, Fayetteville. www.fayettevilleroots.com. Iris DeMent. Oxford American, 8 p.m., $52. 1300 Main St. Jazz Workshop and Evening Concert. A celebration of President Bill Clinton’s Birthday. Workshop begins at 10 a.m. and concert begins at 6 p.m. University of Arkansas Community College at Hope, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. 2500 S. Main


PARTY AT OUR PLACE!

EVENTS

21st Annual VW Weekend. Various events

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK | 11AM - LATE 225 E MARKHAM • LITTLE ROCK, AR

(501) 324-2449 bigwhiskeys.com

If you’re not HERE, we’re having more fun than you are! There’s still time, GET HERE!

BOOKS

Michael Prysock

tuesday, august 27

Hooten Hallers (Columbia, MO)

CLASSES

MUSIC

Friday, august 23 saturday, august 24

saturday, august 31

KABF 88.3 Birthday Bash!

Acting Workshop. 501-454-3301 for more information. Doubletree Hotel, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 424 W. Markham. 501-372-4371.

Fayetteville Roots Festival. Four-day folk festival, hosted at venues all over downtown Fayetteville. Dickson Street, $10-$53. Dickson and West streets, Fayetteville. www.fayettevilleroots.com. Karaoke with DJ Sara. Hardrider Bar & Grill, 7 p.m., free. 6613 John Harden Drive, Cabot. 501-982-1939 . KSSN 96 Presents: “Blacktop Boogie.” With Joe Nichols, Kellie Pickler, Dustin Lynch, Jana Kramer and James Wesley. Juanita’s, 2 p.m., $10 adv., $15 day of. 614 President Clinton Ave. 501-372-1228. www.juanitas.com. Reggae Sundays with First Impressions. Stickyz Rock ’n’ Roll Chicken Shack, 7:30 p.m., $5. 107 Commerce St. 501-372-7707. www.stickyz.com. Successful Sunday. Featuring live music and DJs. CONTINUED ON PAGE 70

7th & Thayer · Little Rock · (501) 375-8400

RWAKE

D.K. Caldwell. The author of “Days of the Dragon” will sign books. Hastings of Russellville, 4-7 p.m. 3051 E. Main St., Russellville. 479-968-7279.

SUNDAY, AUG. 25

IT’S ONLY WEIRD IF IT DOESN’T WORK

Trim: 2.125x5.875 Bleed: none Live: 1.875x5.625

Little Rock West Coast Dance Club. Dance lessons. Singles welcome. Ernie Biggs, 7 p.m., $2. 307 Clinton Ave. 501-247-5240. www. arstreetswing.com.

All American Food & Great Place to Watch Your Favorite Event

Closing Date: 8/2/13 QC: CS

DANCE

Book Our Party Room Today!

Publication: Arkansas Times

COMEDY

The Main Thing presents “Arkansanity.” Original two-act comedy play lampooning life in Arkansas. The Joint, 8 p.m., $20. 301 Main St. No. 102, NLR. 501-372-0205. thejointinlittlerock.com.

and times; NwaVwa.com for more details. Best Western Inn of the Ozarks, through Aug. 25. 207 W. Van Buren, Eureka Springs. 479-253-9768. www.innoftheozarks.com. Argenta Farmers Market. Argenta, 7 a.m.-noon. Main Street, NLR. CALS Job Skills Workshop: Dressing for an Interview or Job. Call 501-918-3003 to register. Main Library, 1:30 p.m. 100 S. Rock St. www. cals.lib.ar.us. Falun Gong meditation. Allsopp Park, 9 a.m., free. Cantrell & Cedar Hill Roads. Hillcrest Farmers Market. Pulaski Heights Baptist Church, 7 a.m.-2 p.m. 2200 Kavanaugh Blvd. Komen of Arkansas Kick-off Party & 20th Anniversary Celebration. Free food, music, games and more. The Promenade at Chenal, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., $20. 17711 Chenal Parkway. 501821-5552. chenalshopping.com. Leester M. Vahsholtz Bike and Hike for ALS. Bike from River Trail Station to Pinnacle Mountain. River Trail Station, 7 a.m. 140 Riverfront Drive, NLR. Little Rock Farmers Market. River Market Pavilions, through Oct. 26: 7 a.m. 400 President Clinton Ave. 375-2552. www.rivermarket.info. “Researching Military Records.” Free workshop on researching military records by Arkansas History Commission. MacArthur Museum of Arkansas Military History, 10 a.m.-noon. 503 E. 9th St. 376-4602. www.arkmilitaryheritage.com. Rollin’ on the River 5K Race and 2K Family Fun Walk. A benefit for Easter Seals. Clinton Presidential Center, 7:15 a.m., $10 - $25. 1200 President Clinton Ave. 370-8000. www.clintonpresidentialcenter.org. Second Annual Parallel Universes Conference. Conference is titled “Things Unknown.” AmericasMostHauntedHotel.com for more information. Crescent Hotel and Spa, through Aug. 25. 75 Prospect Ave., Eureka Springs. 877342-9766. www.crescent-hotel.com. Swap Meet and Car Show. Cypress Creek Park. Cypress Creek Avenue, Adona.

Brand: Bud Light Generic Item #:PBP201310480 Job/Order #: 253475

St., Hope. Karaoke at Khalil’s. Khalil’s Pub, 7 p.m. 110 S. Shackleford Road. 501-224-0224. www.khalilspub.com. Karaoke. Casa Mexicana, 7 p.m. 6929 JFK Blvd., NLR. 501-835-7876. Karaoke with Kevin & Cara. All-ages, on the restaurant side. Revolution, 9 p.m.-12:45 a.m., free. 300 President Clinton Ave. 501-823-0090. revroom.com. Kindersongs Concert. Arkansas Arts Center, 11 a.m., $5. 501 E. 9th St. 501-372-4000. www. arkarts.com. K.I.S.S. Saturdays. Featuring DJ Silky Slim. Dress code enforced. Sway, 10 p.m. 412 Louisiana. 501-492-9802. Michael Prysock. White Water Tavern, 9:30 p.m., $5. 2500 W. 7th St. 501-375-8400. www.whitewatertavern.com. Mike McDonald. Cornerstone Pub & Grill, 9 p.m. 314 Main St., NLR. 501-374-1782. cstonepub.com. Pickin’ Porch. Bring your instrument. All ages welcome. Faulkner County Library, 9:30 a.m. 1900 Tyler St., Conway. 501-327-7482. www.fcl.org. Randall Shreve and the Sideshow. Stickyz Rock ‘n’ Roll Chicken Shack, 9:30 p.m., $6. 107 Commerce St. 501-372-7707. www.stickyz.com. Red Devil Lies, Enchiridion, Attack of the Mind. Juanita’s, 10 p.m., $8 adv., $10 day of. 614 President Clinton Ave. 501-372-1228. www. juanitas.com. Richie Johnson (happy hour), Grand Theft Audio (headliner). Cajun’s Wharf, 5:30 and 9 p.m., $5 after 8:30 p.m. 2400 Cantrell Road. 501375-5351. www.cajunswharf.com. School of Dub Presents: “Back 2 School Vol. 4.” Featuring DTF. Revolution, 9 p.m., $7-$10. 300 President Clinton Ave. 501-823-0090. revroom.com. Singer/Songwriters Showcase. Parrot Beach Cafe, 2-7 p.m., free. 9611 MacArthur Drive, NLR. 771-2994. Sno White. Also with Ewell, JMZ Dean, DJ Haze, Dominque and the Disco Dolls and Latin dance starting at 1:30 a.m. with DJ Johnny Mambo. Discovery Nightclub, 12:00 a.m.-4 a.m., $10. 1021 Jessie Road. 501-664-4784. www.latenightdisco.com. Ted Ludwig Trio. Capital Bar and Grill, 9 p.m., free. 111 Markham St. 501-374-7474. www.capitalhotel.com/CBG. A Traitor’s Funeral, Eddie and the Defiantz, A Darkend Era, Buried in Rome. Downtown Music Hall, 8 p.m., $7. 211 W. Capitol. 501-3761819. downtownmusichall.com. Walker Lukens and the Sidearms, Ben Franks and the Bible Belt Boys. Maxine’s. 700 Central Ave., Hot Springs. www.maxinespub.com.

check out additional shows at

whitewatertavern.com

A Chicago style Speakeasy & Dueling Piano Bar. This is THE premier place to party in Little Rock. “Dueling Pianos” runs Monday through Saturday. Dance & Club music upstairs on Wed, Fri & Sat. Drink specials and more! Do it BIGG! Open 7 Days A Week • 8pm-2am Shows Start at 8:30pm

Located in the Heart of the River Market District 307 President Clinton Avenue

Find Us On Facebook www.facebook.com/arkansastimes

501.372.4782 www.erniebiggs.com www.arktimes.com

AUGUST 22, 2013

69


AFTER DARK, CONT. Montego Cafe, 7 p.m. 315 Main St. 501-372-1555. www.montegocafe.com. Sunday Jazz Brunch with Ted Ludwig. The Afterthought Cafe, 11 a.m. 2721 Kavanaugh Blvd. 501-663-1196. www.vieuxcarrecafe.com. Wretched, Abiotic. Downtown Music Hall, 7 p.m., $10 adv., $15 day of. 211 W. Capitol. 501376-1819. downtownmusichall.com.

Ricky David Tripp. Rocket Twenty One, 5:30 p.m. 2601 Kavanaugh Blvd. 501-603-9208. www.ferneaurestaurant.com. Tuesday Jam Session with Carl Mouton. The Afterthought, 8 p.m., free. 2721 Kavanaugh Blvd. 501-663-1196. www.afterthoughtbar.com.

EVENTS

“Latin Night.” Revolution, 7 p.m., $5 regular, $7 under 21. 300 President Clinton Ave. 501-8230090. www.littlerocksalsa.com.

21st Annual VW Weekend. Various events and times; NwaVwa.com for more details. Best Western Inn of the Ozarks. 207 W. Van Buren, Eureka Springs. 479-253-9768. www.innoftheozarks.com. Bernice Garden Farmers Market. The Bernice Garden, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. 1401 S. Main St. www. thebernicegarden.org. “Live from the Back Room.” Spoken word event. Vino’s, 7 p.m. 923 W. 7th St. 501-375-8466. www. vinosbrewpub.com. Second Annual Parallel Universes Conference. Conference is titled “Things Unknown.” AmericasMostHauntedHotel.com for more information. Crescent Hotel and Spa. 75 Prospect Ave., Eureka Springs. 877-342-9766. www.crescent-hotel.com.

MONDAY, AUG. 26

MUSIC

Brian and Nick, Richie Johnson. Cajun’s Wharf, 5:30 p.m. 2400 Cantrell Road. 501-375-5351. www.cajunswharf.com. The Goddamn Gallows, Calamity Cubes. Downtown Music Hall, 7 p.m., $10 adv., $12 day of. 211 W. Capitol. 501-376-1819. downtownmusichall.com. Irish Traditional Music Session. “SloPlay” begins at 6 p.m. Public session begins at 7 p.m. Hibernia Irish Tavern, second and Fourth Monday of every month. 9700 N. Rodney Parham Road. 501-2464340. www.hiberniairishtavern.com.

TUESDAY, AUG. 27

MUSIC

Alien Ant Farm. With Hank and the Cupcakes, Eddie and the Defiantz and Attack the Mind. Juanita’s, 9 p.m., $12 adv., $15 day of. 614 President Clinton Ave. 501-372-1228. www. juanitas.com. Arkansas River Blues Society Blues Jam. Thirst n’ Howl, 7:30 p.m., free. 14710 Cantrell Road. 501-379-8189. www.thirst-n-howl.com. The Eastern Sea, Grandchildren. Stickyz Rock ‘n’ Roll Chicken Shack, $8 adv., $10 day of. 107 Commerce St. 501-372-7707. www.stickyz.com. Great White featuring Jack Russell. Revolution, 8:30 p.m., $15. 300 President Clinton Ave. 501823-0090. revroom.com. Hooten Hallers. White Water Tavern, 10 p.m. 2500 W. 7th St. 501-375-8400. www.whitewatertavern.com. Jodi James. Vada Sheid Community Development Center, 6 p.m., free. 1600 South College St., Mountain Home. 1-800-514-3849. thesheid.com. Karaoke Night. Cornerstone Pub & Grill, 8 p.m. 314 Main St., NLR. 501-374-1782. cstonepub. com. Karaoke Tuesday. Prost, 8 p.m., free. 322 President Clinton Blvd. 501-244-9550. Lucious Spiller Band. Copeland’s Restaurant of Little Rock, 6-9 p.m. 2602 S. Shackleford Road. 501-312-1616. www.copelandsrestaurantlittlerock.com. Open Music Jam. The Joint, 8 p.m., free. 301 Main St. No. 102, NLR. 501-372-0205. thejointinlittlerock.com. 70

AUGUST 22, 2013

ARKANSAS TIMES

DANCE

EVENTS

Little Rock Farmers Market. River Market Pavilions, through Oct. 26: 7 a.m. 400 President Clinton Ave. 375-2552. www.rivermarket.info. Tales from the South. Authors tell true stories; schedule available on website. Dinner served 5-6:30 p.m., show at 7 p.m. Call for reservations. Starving Artist Cafe, 5 p.m. 411 N. Main St., NLR. 501-372-7976. www.starvingartistcafe.net. Trivia Bowl. Flying Saucer, 8:30 p.m. 323 President Clinton Ave. 501-372-8032. www.beerknurd. com/stores/littlerock.

SPORTS

Arkansas Travelers vs. Springfield Cardinals. Dickey-Stephens Park, Aug. 27-30, 7:10 p.m., $4-$12. 400 W. Broadway St., NLR. 501-6641555. www.travs.com.

WEDNESDAY, AUG. 28

MUSIC

Aaron Sarlo. The Tavern Sports Grill, 7 p.m., free. 17815 Chenal Parkway. 501-830-2100. www.thetavernsportsgrill.com. Acoustic Open Mic. The Afterthought, 8 p.m., free. 2721 Kavanaugh Blvd. 501-663-1196. www. afterthoughtbar.com. Ben and Doug. Cajun’s Wharf, 5:30 p.m. 2400 Cantrell Road. 501-375-5351. www.cajunswharf. com. Fight or Flight, Mindset Evolution, At Wars End. Revolution, 8 p.m., $12 adv., $15 day of. 300 President Clinton Ave. 501-823-0090. revroom.com. John Hiatt and the Combo. Juanita’s, 9 p.m., $40 adv., $45 day of. 614 President Clinton Ave. 501-372-1228. www.juanitas.com. Karaoke at Khalil’s. Khalil’s Pub, 7 p.m. 110 S. Shackleford Road. 501-224-0224. www.khalilspub.com. Karaoke Extravaganza. Includes drink and food specials and cash prizes. Montego Cafe, 9 p.m., $5. 315 Main St. 501-372-1555. www.montegocafe.com. Live Karaoke and Dueling Pianos. Featuring Dell Smith and William Staggers. Montego Cafe, 9 p.m. 315 Main St. 501-372-1555. www. montegocafe.com. Paula Nelson Band. Stickyz Rock ‘n’ Roll Chicken Shack, 9 p.m., $7. 107 Commerce St. 501-3727707. www.stickyz.com. Ricky David Tripp. Rocket Twenty One, 5:30 p.m. 2601 Kavanaugh Blvd. 501-603-9208. www.ferneaurestaurant.com. Ted Ludwig Trio. Capital Bar and Grill, 5 p.m., free. 111 Markham St. 501-374-7474. www.capitalhotel.com/CBG.

COMEDY

The Joint Venture. Improv comedy group. The Joint, 8 p.m., $5. 301 Main St. No. 102, NLR. 501372-0205. thejointinlittlerock.com. Standup Open Mic Night. Hosted by local come­di­ans of the com­edy col­lec­tive Come­di­ ans of NWA. UARK Bowl, 9 p.m., free. 644 W. Dickson St., Fayetteville. 479-301-2030. uarkbowl.com.

DANCE

Little Rock Bop Club. Beginning dance lessons for ages 10 and older. Singles welcome. Bess Chisum Stephens Community Center, 7 p.m., $4 for members, $7 for guests. 12th & Cleveland streets. 501-350-4712. www.littlerockbopclub.

EVENTS

Reenactment of the March on Washington. Arkansas State Capitol, 1 p.m. 5th and Woodlane.

LECTURES

“Civil War Archeology in Arkansas: What Careful Excavations Can Tell Us About the Conflict.” A presentation of The Toltec Chapter of the Arkansas Archeological Society. Dr. Jamie C. Brandon will deliver the lecture. The Witt Stephens Jr. Central Arkansas Nature Center, 7 p.m. 602 President Clinton Ave. 501-907-0636. www.centralarkansasnaturecenter.com.

POETRY

Wednesday Night Poetry. 21-and-older show. Maxine’s, 7 p.m., free. 700 Central Ave., Hot Springs. 501-321-0909. maxineslive.com/shows. html.

SPORTS

Arkansas Travelers vs. Springfield Cardinals. Dickey-Stephens Park, 7:10 p.m., $4-$12. 400 W. Broadway St., NLR. 501-664-1555. www.travs. com.

THIS WEEK IN THEATER

“#OctopiLittleRock.” New sketch comedy show from Red Octopus Theater. The Public Theatre, Aug. 22-24, 8 p.m., $8-$10. 616 Center St. 501374-7529. www.thepublictheatre.com. Auditions for Royal Players’ “Frankenstein.” Auditions to include a short monologue of the actor’s choice. Royal Theatre, Aug. 23-24, 7 p.m.; Mon., Aug. 26, 7 p.m. 111 S. Market St., Benton. “The River Niger.” An Air Force soldier returns to his Harlem family, though not as the hero they anticipated. The Weekend Theater, through Aug. 24: Fri., Sat., 7:30 p.m., $12-$16. 1001 W. 7th St. 501-374-3761. www.weekendtheater.org. “South Pacific.” Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Pulitzer Prize-winning classic. Murry’s Dinner Playhouse, through Aug. 31: Tue.-Sat., 6 p.m., $15-$35. 6323 Col. Glenn Road. 501-562-3131. murrysdinnerplayhouse.com.

GALLERIES, MUSEUMS

NEW EXHIBITIONS, EVENTS

CANTRELL GALLERY, 8206 Cantrell Road: 4th annual Arkansas League of Artists juried exhibition, opens with reception 6-8 p.m. Aug. 23, show through Oct. 29. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.Sat. 224-1335. M2 GALLERY, 11525 Cantrell Road: 4th annual “Clothing Optional” online art auction, with work by Kathy Lindsey, Dan Holland and Jeaneen Barnhart for September, website goes up Aug. 23. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tue.-Sat. 225-6257. MACARTHUR MUSEUM OF MILITARY HISTORY, 503 E. 9th St. (MacArthur Park): Workshop on researching military records, 10 a.m.-noon. Aug. 24. 376-4602. UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS AT LITTLE ROCK, 2801 S. University: “Transformation 8: Contemporary Works in Small Metals,” wearable objects and sculptural objects, Gallery I, through Oct. 2; “Figurative Forms: Work from the UALR Permanent Collection,” Gallery II, through Sept. 25; “David O’Brien, Senior Exhibition,” sculpture and puppet animation video, Aug. 26-Sept. 5, meet the artist 5-8 p.m.

Aug. 26. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri., also, after Labor Day, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Sat., 2-5 p.m. Sun. 569-3182. BENTONVILLE CRYSTAL BRIDGES MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART: Art Talk with Manuela Well-Off-Man and Aaron Jones on “People and Places” exhibit, south corridor, 1 p.m. Aug. 22. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Mon., Thu., Sat.-Sun.; 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Wed.-Fri. 479-418-5700. JONESBORO ARKANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY: “Odyssey of Dreams: A Decade of Paintings, 20032012,” 34 works by Basil Alkazzi; “Drawings by Carroll Cloar,” Bradbury Gallery, Aug. 29-Sept. 29. Noon-5 p.m. Tue.-Sat., 2-5 p.m. Sun. 870972-2567. NEWPORT NEWPORT COUNTRY CLUB: “Evening with the Arts” auction and fundraiser for the 6th annual Delta Visual Arts Show next year, 6 p.m. Aug. 24, tickets $20. Reserve at 870-523-1009.

CALL FOR ENTRIES

The Arkansas Pastel Society is accepting entries to its national exhibition, “Reflections in Pastel,” set for Nov. 8-Feb 23 at the Butler Center for Arkansas Studies. Deadline is Sept. 5. More than $5,000 in cash and prizes will be awarded, including a $1500 grand prize. The show will be juried by pastel artist Richard McKinley.  For more information email apsreflections@gmail. com. The Fort Smith Regional Art Museum is accepting entries for its “Portraits of Hope” exhibition Oct. 24-Nov. 30. All proceeds from sales will benefit the Ozark Affiliate of the Susan G. Komen Foundation. Entries will be accepted through Oct. 13. Call 479-784-2787 for more information.

CONTINUING EXHIBITS

ARKANSAS ARTS CENTER, MacArthur Park: “Rembrandt, Van Dyck, Gainsborough: The Treasures of Kenwood House, London,” through Sept. 8, $12 adults, $10 seniors, $8 military, $6 students, free to members; “Bauhaus Twenty-21: An Ongoing Legacy,” photographs by Gordon Watkinson, through Sept. 22; “50 Works / 50 Weeks / 50 Years,” Alice Pratt Brown Atrium, through 2013; “Ryan Sniegocki: Museum School Ceramic Artist in Residence,” pottery; “Interwoven: Craft Exhibition,” from the permanent collection, through Nov. 17. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Tue.-Fri., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat., 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sun. 372-4000. BOSWELL-MOUROT, 5816 Kavanaugh Blvd.: New works by Hye-Young go. 664-0030. BUTLER CENTER GALLERIES, Arkansas Studies Institute, 401 President Clinton Ave.: “MidSouthern Watercolorists 43rd Annual Juried Exhibition,” through Oct. 27; “Get a Simple Landscape,” drawings by Jerry Phillips, through Sept. 29; “Creative Expressions,” work by individuals with mental illness at the Arkansas State Hospital, through Aug. 25. 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Mon.Sat. 320-5700. CHRIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH, 509 Scott St.: Paintings from the Arkansas League of Artists and Local Colour. CHROMA GALLERY, 5707 Kavanaugh Blvd.: Work by Robert Reep and other Arkansas artists. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri., 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sat. 664-0880. COX CREATIVE CENTER, 120 River Market Ave.: Arkansas League of Artists Signature Member Show, through August. 918-3095. THE EDGE, 301B President Clinton Ave.: Paintings by Avila (Fernando Gomez), Eric


AFTER DARK, CONT. Freeman, James Hayes, Jerry Colburn, St. Joseph Thomason and Stephen Drive. 992-1099. ELLEN GOLDEN ANTIQUES, 5701 Kavanaugh Blvd.: Paintings by Barry Thomas and Arden Boyce. 664-7746. GALLERY 221 & ART STUDIOS 221, Pyramid Place: “A Variety of Impressions,” with work by Jennifer Cox Coleman. 801-0211. GALLERY 26, 2601 Kavanaugh Blvd.: Recent work by John Kushmaul, Erin Lang and Brittany McDonald, through Sept. 7. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tue.Sat. 664-8996. GALLERY 360, 900 S. Rodney Parham Road: “7,” seventh exhibition featuring creations by artists and non-artists from found materials. 663-2222. GINO HOLLANDER GALLERY, 2nd and Center: Paintings and works on paper by Gino Hollander. 801-0211. GREG THOMPSON FINE ART, 429 Main St., NLR: “Best of the South.” 664-2787. HEARNE FINE ART, 1001 Wright Ave.: 372-6822. LAMAN LIBRARY, 2801 Orange St., NLR: “Discover Greatness: An Illustrated History of Negro Baseball Leagues,” photographs tracing black baseball from the 19th century through 1947, through Aug. 24. 758-1720. L&L BECK, 5705 Kavanaugh Blvd.: “Impersonating the Impressionists,” paintings by Louis Beck. 660-4006. PAINT BOX GALLERY, 705 Main St., NLR: Jewelry by P.J. Bryant, through Sept. 15. 3742848. STATE CAPITOL: “Spanning the Century (and more),” photographs of historic bridges by Maxine Payne, drawings, in celebration of the 100th anniversary of the Highway and Transportation Department, through August. THEA FOUNDATION, 401 Main St., NLR: Paintings by Eric Forstmann, through Aug. 30, origami cranes by Akeen McDaniel, through Aug. 30. 379-9512. BENTON DIANNE ROBERTS ART STUDIO AND GALLERY, 110 N. Market St.: Work by Chad Oppenhuizen, Dan McRaven, Gretchen Hendricks, Rachel Carroccio, Kenny Roberts, Taylor Bellott, Jim Cooper and Sue Moore. 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Wed.-Fri., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat. 8607467. BENTONVILLE CRYSTAL BRIDGES MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART, One Museum Way: “Angels & Tomboys: Girlhood in 19th-Century American Art,” work by John Singer Sargent, Winslow Homer, Thomas Eakins, Mary Cassatt and others, through Sept. 30; “Surveying George Washington,” historical documents, through Sept. 30; permanent col-

lection of American masterworks spanning four centuries. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Mon., Thu., Sat.-Sun.; 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Wed.-Fri. 479-418-5700. CALICO ROCK CALICO ROCK ARTISTS COOPERATIVE, Hwy. 5 at White River Bridge: Paintings, photographs, jewelry, fiber art, wood, ceramics and other crafts. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Tue.-Thu., 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Fri.-Sat., noon-4 p.m. Sun. calicorocket.org/artists. EL DORADO SOUTHEAST ARKANSAS ARTS CENTER, 110 E. 5th St.: “2013 Annual Juried Competition,” work by 28 artists chosen by David Houston, juror, through Aug. 23; “Ebb and Flow,” acrylics, oil pastel and chalk by Melanie Pyron, through Aug. 30. 870-862-5474. FAYETTEVILLE UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS: “Low Magic,” mixed media by Luke Knox, through August, Fine Arts Center Gallery, closing reception Aug. 29. HARRISON ARTISTS OF THE OZARKS, 124 ½ N. Willow St.: Work by Amelia Renkel, Ann Graffy, Christy Dillard, Helen McAllister, Sandy Williams and D. Savannah George. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Thu.-Sat., noon-4 p.m. Sun. 870-429-1683. HOT SPRINGS ARTISTS’ WORKSHOP GALLERY, 810 Central Ave.: Jim Reimer, paintings, and Bonnie Ricci, watercolors, through August. 501-623-6401. FINE ARTS CENTER, 626 Central Ave.: “Hot Springs National Photography Competition,” through August, 10:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Tue.-Sat. 501-624-0489. GARVAN GARDENS, 550 Akridge Road: “Three Artists,” work by Millie Steveken, Cynthia Schanink and Pat Langwise, through August in the Magnolia Room; “Splash of Glass: A James Hayes Art Glass Installation,” 225 pieces of art glass in 13 areas of the garden, through September. $10 adults, $9 seniors, $5 children, $5 dogs on leash. 9 a.m.-6 p.m. daily. 501-262-9300. JUSTUS FINE ART, 827 Central Ave.: Work by Steve Griffith, Robyn Horn, Dolores Justus, Rebecca Thompson, Dan Thornhill, Emily Wood, Kari Albright, Michael Ashley and others. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Wed.-Sat. 501-321-2335. LAKE VILLAGE GUAYACHOYA CULTURAL CENTER, 1652 U.S. 65: 2013 “Small Works on Paper,” through Sept. 24. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Tue.-Thu., 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Fri. 870-265-6077.

PERRYVILLE SUDS GALLERY, Courthouse Square: Paintings by Dottie Morrissey, Alma Gipson, Al Garrett Jr., Phyllis Loftin, Alene Otts, Mauretta Frantz, Raylene Finkbeiner, Kathy Williams and Evelyn Garrett. Noon-6 p.m. Wed.-Fri, noon-4 p.m. Sat. 501-766-7584.

ONGOING MUSEUM EXHIBITS

ARKANSAS INLAND MARITIME MUSEUM, North Little Rock: “Captain’s Cabin Exhibit,” photographs, biographies, sea stories from the crew, and personal artifacts, through August. 371-8320. ARKANSAS SPORTS HALL OF FAME MUSEUM, Verizon Arena, NLR: 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Mon.-Sat. 663-4328. CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL MUSEUM VISITOR CENTER, Bates and Park: Exhibits on the 1957 desegregation of Central and the civil rights movement. 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. daily. 374-1957. CLINTON PRESIDENTIAL CENTER, 1200 President Clinton Ave.: “And Freedom for All: the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom,” photographs by Stanley Tretick of the 1963 march, through Nov. 17; “Oscar de la Renta: American Icon,” designs worn by Laura Bush, Jessica Chastain, Hillary Clinton, Chelsea Clinton and others, and other couture pieces, through Dec. 1. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Sat., 1-5 p.m. Sun. $7 adults; $5 college students, seniors, retired military; $3 ages 6-17. 370-8000. ESSE, 1510 S. Main St.: “What’s Inside: A Century of Women and Handbags (1900-1999),” purses from the collection of Anita Davis, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Tue.-Sun., $10-$8. 916-9022. HISTORIC ARKANSAS MUSEUM, 200 E. Third St.: “Heeding the Call: The Firefighter Collection of Johnny Reep,” through Jan. 5; “The Sense of Nature: David Mudrinich, John Van Horn and Judy Wright Walter,” through Oct. 6; “Jason A. Smith: Stills”; “Arkansas Made,” ongoing; “The Curious World of Patent Models,” through Sept. 29. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Sat., 1-5 p.m. Sun. 324-9351. MacARTHUR MUSEUM OF ARKANSAS MILITARY HISTORY, MacArthur Park: “Undaunted Courage, Proven Loyalty: JapaneseAmerican Soldiers in World War II,” through August. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Mon.-Sat., 1-4 p.m. Sun. 376-4602. MOSAIC TEMPLARS CULTURAL CENTER, 9th and Broadway: “Shades of Greatness,” collaborative art exhibition inspired by the history of the Negro Leagues; permanent exhibits on African-American entrepreneurship in Arkansas. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Tue.-Sat. 683-3593. MUSEUM OF DISCOVERY, 500 President Clinton Ave.: “Wiggle Worms,” science pro-

gram for pre-K children 10 a.m.-10:30 a.m. every Tue., 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Tue.-Sat., 1-5 p.m. Sun., $10 ages 13 and older, $8 ages 1-12, free to members and children under 1. 396-7050. OLD STATE HOUSE MUSEUM, 300 W. Markham: “Lights! Camera! Arkansas!”, the state’s ties to Hollywood, including costumes, scripts, film footage, photographs and more, through March 1, 2015; “Things You Need to Hear: Memories of Growing up in Arkansas from 1890 to 1980,” oral histories about community, family, work, school and leisure, through March 2014. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Sat., 1-5 p.m. Sun. 324-9685. WITT STEPHENS JR. CENTRAL ARKANSAS NATURE CENTER, Riverfront Park: Exhibits on wildlife and the state Game and Fish Commission. ENGLAND TOLTEC MOUNDS STATE PARK, State Hwy. 165: Major prehistoric Indian site with visitors’ center and museum. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Sat., noon-5 p.m. Sun., closed Mon. $3 for adults, $2 for ages 6-12. 961-9442. FORT SMITH REGIONAL ART MUSEUM, 1601 Rogers Ave.: “65th River Valley Invitational,” through Sept. 1. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Thu.-Sat., 1-5 p.m. Sun. $8, free to members. 479-784-2787. HOT SPRINGS MID-AMERICA SCIENCE MUSEUM, 500 Mid-America Blvd.: “Dinosaurs,” robotic Tyrannosaurus Rex and others, through Sept. 2; “SkyCycle,” counterweighted bicycle illustrates the law of “center of gravity,” through Sept. 2; “Tinkering,” new permanent experimental space. 501-767-3461, 800-632-0583. MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART, 425 Central Ave.: “Arkansas Champion Trees: An Artist’s Journey,” colored pencil drawings by Linda Palmer, through Aug. 24. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Tue.-Sat., noon-3 p.m. Sun. $5. 501-609-9966. JACKSONVILLE JACKSONVILLE MUSEUM OF MILITARY HISTORY, 100 Veterans Circle: Exhibits on D-Day; F-105, Vietnam era plane (“The Thud”); the Civil War Battle of Reed’s Bridge, Arkansas Ordnance Plant (AOP) and other military history. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon-Sat., 1-5 p.m. Sun. $3 adults; $2 seniors, military; $1 students. 501-241-1943. MORRILTON MUSEUM OF AUTOMOBILES, Petit Jean Mountain: Permanent exhibit of more than 50 cars from 1904-1967 depicting the evolution of the automobile. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 7 days. 501-727-5427.

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AUGUST 22, 2013

71


MOVIE REVIEW ADVERTISEMENT

hearsay ➥ Word on the street is that two new clothing stores are scheduled to open in the Heights: BRITS & TURKS of Fayetteville has secured space at 5909 R St., and Jonesboro’s STEAMROLLER BLUES’ Facebook page says it will open in the Heights in Fall 2013, but with no location announced. We’ll keep you posted. ➥ Mark your calendars for RESTORE & AFTER, a fundraising event benefitting Habitat for Humanity of Pulaski County, scheduled for 6-9 p.m. Sept. 19 at Next Level Events. The event features furniture and home décor items from Habitat’s ReStore shops that have been transformed by local artists that will be sold during a silent auction. Tickets are $35 in advance or $40 at the door. Visit habitatpulaski.org to purchase tickets. If you can’t make it to Restore & After, then be sure to head over to Habitat’s two ReStore shops in Pulaski County — there’s one at 6700 S. University Ave. in Little Rock and at2657 Pike Ave. in North Little Rock. You can find furniture, lighting fixtures, construction materials and even clothes and books — the stores are a treasure trove of donated items just waiting to be redone or upcycled. ➥ Clothing store E. LEIGH’S — with locations in the Heights and Fayetteville — is preaching the gospel that game day doesn’t have to be just about T-shirts and jeans. They have a great collection of cute outfits that can reflect your sense of style and your team spirit — and some of them are even on sale. ➥ New River Market-area store

PAPER, SCISSORS, LITTLE ROCK recently announced the retail debut of a new line of baby and children’s wear called Cate & Riley. Featured are bandanas and bibs for $12 each. Be sure to check them out. ➥ CYNTHIA EAST FABRICS is celebrating its anniversary with a 20 percent off sale Aug. 22-24. Store hours are 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. 72

AUGUST 22, 2013

ARKANSAS TIMES

‘BLUE JASMINE’: Cate Blanchett stars.

Single rich female seeking happiness Woody Allen fills ‘Blue Jasmine’ with types, not fleshed-out characters. BY MIKE POWELL

Y

ou know who’s really easy to pick on? Rich people. In a post-Bernie Madoff, post-financial crisis culture more clearly stratified into the 99 and 1 percent than ever, extreme wealth isn’t just a symbol of detachment from the struggle of your fellow human beings but of borderline evil. Being reminded that money can’t buy happiness isn’t enough anymore — we want stories of the way money corrodes, collapses and precipitates the True and Final downfall of the people who seek it. Why? Far be it from me to psychologize most of the human race, but my hunch is simple: A base need for retribution. So here is a new Woody Allen movie about a woman named Jasmine (Cate Blanchett) who ships off in her smart, cream-colored Chanel jacket from “New York… Park Avenue,” as she puts it, to live with her sister Ginger (Sally Hawkins) in a humble walk-up in San Francisco after her squillionaire husband (Alec Baldwin) is revealed to be a crook. Ginger bags groceries at the supermarket while her two children bounce from room to room clubbing each other with toys. Playful, sweet, and realistic without seeming downtrodden, Ginger drinks beer with lunch and dresses like an 18-year-old, in lightly bedazzled shorts and funky print T-shirts. Her boyfriend, a mechanic named Chili (Bobby Cannavale) is the archetypical big dumb lug, watchin’ the

fight with a PBR in hand, gettin’ angry and then telling Ging how much he loves her as he struggles to keep this single, gel-soaked forelock out of his eyes. Stripped of her money, property, jewelry, way of life, and what little dignity she had, Jasmine unravels. With the exception of Louis C.K. — whose own show once featured a B plot about how he can’t act in other peoples’ projects — the performances are great, and carry the movie. Blanchett snaps back and forth between prim confidence and total mania, telling Ginger she really ought to find a more respectable man as she trembles over her Xanax and Stolichnaya, which early on in the movie she takes in a chilled martini glass with vermouth and a twist and moves steadily into having it warm, straight and in whatever vessel will hold liquid. Hawkins — who played a not totally dissimilar role in Mike Leigh’s “Happy-Go-Lucky” — has a way of seeming quietly grateful in the face of circumstances that aren’t much to sing about. As compelling as Jasmine’s unraveling is, it’s also a foregone conclusion, and the movie’s most surprising — and in a way, saddest — drama is when Ginger starts thinking that maybe her sister is right. But as engaging as the actors are — and not just Blanchette and Hawkins, but Andrew Dice Clay, Cannavale, Baldwin, and Peter Saarsgard — the characters they play and story they inhabit can

feel like shorthand. Chili and Ginger are classically romanticized workingclass folks — they don’t have much, but they got love, and other comforting truisms you’ve heard before. The women in the movie all revolve around men, and the men are rigidly either Good or Bad. In the end, there’s something cruel and a little tiring about how the plot marches toward Jasmine’s dissolution. Her only sympathetic quality is frailty, which of course she’s too proud to admit to. Instead, she clings bitterly to lies, ignores all warnings, refuses to learn lessons and withdraws to a world even farther removed than the polo fields and infinity pools she used to know. Is this movie funny? Many people in the theater I watched it in seemed to think so, laughing when Jasmine frantically hems and haws to Ginger that nobody would ever want to buy her Vuitton luggage because it’s monogrammed, or when she wanders into the living room looking confused and, apropos of nothing, asks Chili and his pals who you have to sleep with in order to get a decent martini around here. These are intense, upsetting exchanges, softened only by the vague sense that she deserves it. She doesn’t. She is a tiny dictator in charge of nothing. Even the basics of her own life elude her. I found myself wanting her to have the one thing the movie so rigidly refuses to give her: Happiness.


What this program can do for you:  

Free Public Workshops: These presentations take place at various locations in  Pulaski County to inform residents of ways to avoid peak day and time demand watering; maintain a healthy landscape; and be more efficient with automatic sprinkler  systems by using new technologies to ultimately save money on your water bill!

Site and Home Consultations: Receive a FREE evaluation of your home or business      sprinkler system. See how to properly use all of the components and find out just how much  water your sprinkler system is using. You can also get helpful advice on landscape options           that are more water efficient. Call 501.340.6650 for more information.  

Presentations for Civic Groups & P.O.A.s: These short presentations are  for groups that want to learn about being more water efficient. Call 501.340.6650  to schedule.

3 simple steps that can help reduce your water bill: 1. Avoid afternoon watering, as well as watering during the peak water usage time  of day from 5:30 – 7:30 am. Divide the watering session into half before the peak  time of day and half after to get the most out of your watering and avoid run­off. 

2. Keep an efficient sprinkler system. Make sure heads are working properly  and not leaking. Keep spray off of streets, sidewalks, and other hardscapes.

3. Install a rain shut off device. Consult an experienced irrigation contractor to install  a new rain sensor to keep your system from running during or after a rain shower.

Learn more at carkw.com or uaex.edu   

501.340.6650

Scan this QR code to  learn more about  this important program.

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AUGUST 22, 2013

73


Dining WHAT’S COOKIN’ GET READY FOR SOME great comida in September, when the Arkansas Times hosts the North Point Ford Latino Food and Music Festival, the first of what we hope will be an annual event. Where else but Argenta for the festival, set for 6-10 p.m. Sept. 14 in the Farmers Market Plaza. We’ll announce a vendor list soon; but we’ll tell you right now that you’ll be greeted by Mariachi Americas and Cuban group CruzWay will add a little salsa to your salsa. Tickets — $15 in advance, $20 at the door — will benefit the Argenta Arts District. Chow and beer will be extra. Get tickets at arktimes.com/latinofood. Sponsors are El Latino, Arkansas Times, Budweiser, Pulaski Tech and the Argenta Arts Foundation. THE ITALIAN KITCHEN, known as Lulav until earlier this year, will soon see another name change. Businessman Burch Wilson recently bought the restaurant from Matt Lile and plans to call it Cellar 220, according to Donnie Ferneau, who’s working for the restaurant as a business and kitchen consultant (repeated calls to Wilson went unreturned). The restaurant remains open, serving Italian food. A “restaurant re-launch” is coming in a few weeks, Ferneau said. Initially, Cellar 220 will only serve dinner, though Ferneau said lunch was a possibility. The interior will remain the same and the service staff is going to go through extensive training, said Ferneau, who described the cuisine as “affordable and wine friendly.” “We’re looking at mid-week diners that really don’t want to break the bank when they go out, but they still want a great meal. Too many fine dining restaurants are slow during the week and busy on the weekends.” Ferneau opened an eponymous restaurant in Hillcrest in 2005. He sold it to businessman Frank Fletcher in 2011 and stuck around as chef until January. Since then he’s hosted cooking classes and done more consulting. In addition to Cellar 220, he recently revamped the menu at The Tavern. Next up, he’s opening a new restaurant. He said he has the concept, the name and a location, but isn’t ready to divulge anything yet. Stay tuned. SOUTH ON MAIN, the Oxford Americantied restaurant, began dinner service on Tuesday, Aug. 20. It’ll continue 5 p.m. until 10 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. The dinner menu includes the likes of pickled shrimp ($12), trotters ($8), beet carpaccio ($8) and soft shell crab ($10) as starters and rabbit boudin ($15), grilled ribeye ($22) and spaghetti squash ($15) as entrees. Reservations are encouraged. Make them at 244-9660 or by visiting opentable. com/south-on-main. South on Main is co-owned by Chef Matthew Bell; his wife, Amy Kelley Bell; her aunt, Mary Steenburgen, and Ted Danson. 74

AUGUST 22, 2013

ARKANSAS TIMES

FLAVORFUL: Beale Street BBQ tacos from Revolution.

Recharged Revolution Tasty tacos of all variety at River Market restaurant/club.

W

hen your restaurant is connected to a live music venue that features acts of all genres, attracting concert-goers from all walks of life —rockers, hipsters, cowboys and punks — you’d like to have a menu with a little flair to it, a bit edgier than what they’re serving across the street. This is, no doubt, the thought behind the latest menu changes at downtown Little Rock’s Revolution restaurant. It boldly promotes the motto, “Eat, Drink, Rock” above the entrance doors, and diners enter expecting a meal that, perhaps, marches to the beat of a different drum. What better way to spice things up than with tacos? Fancy tacos, that is. Everyone loves tacos. They always appeal to the grumbling-gut late night crowd, and they’re perfect for a little culinary improv — a chance to step out of bounds a bit and put a new spin on a familiar favorite. So it was that Revolution remixed its entire menu, opting to churn out an assortment of original taco plates with influences from the

Deep South to New England to Hawaii. The restaurant’s interior is spacious and comfortable. Many tables are neatly tucked away into dimly lit booths, making for a cozy, intimate evening. There are also larger tables for groups and a spacious, colorful bar is available for folks wanting to sit there. We chose to take advantage of the spacious outdoor patio. We were pleased to find the service every bit as good outdoors as one might find indoors — our waiter was prompt, helpful and always attentive. We hunkered down with our menus and soon got to eatin’. The menu begins with an “opening acts” list. Here you’ll find a handful of appetizers you might expect from a traditional Mexican joint — green and red salsas, queso, tortilla soup, and guacamole. But it manages to venture a bit off the beaten path with items such as “smothered fries” with melted cheese, bacon, and cracker crumbles, or the “kicked up” crab cakes with roasted red pepper aioli. We opted for the “queso

Revolution

300 President Clinton Ave. 823-0900 QUICK BITE The Rev Room’s eclectic taste in music is mirrored here by a menu that touches upon regional cuisine from nearly every corner of the nation. They’ve even got a nod to Little Rock with a fried green tomato, bacon, and ranch taco. Beyond just tacos, you’ll also find more traditional Mexican fare — enchiladas, quesadillas and fajitas. HOURS 4 p.m. until 10 p.m. Monday through Wednesday, 11 a.m. until 10 p.m. Thursday and Friday, 11 a.m. until 11 p.m. Saturday, 11 a.m. until 10 p.m. Sunday. OTHER INFO Full bar, credit cards accepted.

deluxe” ($7), a basket of chips with a sizable bowl of golden melted cheese, pico de gallo and chorizo. The chips were long, curling strips of white corn that came dusted with a spicy cayenne pepper mixture. The queso was hot and remained creamy throughout the duration of its consumption instead of turning into the disgusting, elastic cheese film that can plague cheese dips. The chorizo was a nice touch with notes of smoky cumin and paprika. We felt it could have used a bit more spice, but it was a nice start to the meal. The “Rockin’ Taco” plates are the


Information in our restaurant capsules reflects the opinions of the newspaper staff and its reviewers. The newspaper accepts no advertising or other considerations in exchange for reviews, which are conducted anonymously. We invite the opinions of readers who think we are in error.

B Breakfast L Lunch D Dinner $ Inexpensive (under $8/person) $$ Moderate ($8-$20/person) $$$ Expensive (over $20/person) CC Accepts credit cards

DINING CAPSULES focus of the menu. Each plate delivers two hefty tacos (on your choice of corn or flour tortillas) and comes paired with two sides. We were enticed by nearly every taco option on the menu. It was clear that these were no ordinary meatand-onion street tacos being dished up here. Revolution is borrowing bits from regional cuisine across the country — the “Big in Baltimore” with crab cakes, lettuce, tomato, and chipotle; the “Big Tex” with steak, onions and peppers; the “Honolulu Luau” with sweet pulled pork and mango salsa. We first sampled the “Beale Street BBQ,” which featured shredded barbecue pork, jack cheese, white onion and crunchy slaw. The pork was tender and flavorful. Its juices slowly seeped from the edges from the tacos. The slaw had a nice crunch, a welcome counterpoint to the soft pork. They were finished with a salty cheese and slightly sweet barbecue sauce and we had no problem devouring the set. For our accompanying sides, we chose sweet potato chips and a green chile hash brown casserole. The chips came out thin and crisp, but maybe a titch over-fried. They played well, however, with the creamy aioli alongside for dipping. The hash brown casserole was a success as well. While we were a little surprised to find the dish topped with (what appeared to be) crumbled Doritos, the potatoes were soft and cheesy, the chilies adding a nice spice to the mixture. Next, we sampled the “Caribbean Crunch” tacos — a duo featuring coconut shrimp, lettuce, mango salsa, and queso fresco. The meaty shrimp were fried crisp. The dish was a bit sweeter than we expected — not something we usually go for in tacos. We chose freshly cut fries as one of our sides this go-round. These were served hot and crisp, with the “natural cut,” skin-on approach. They benefited from a pinch of salt, but we were not sorry for ordering them. Revolution appears to have captured a bit of the rock-and-roll spirit in its latest menu. It’s comfortable, but also a little out of the ordinary. The plates are filling and affordable, plenty to get you through a long, hard night of headbanging or whatever it is you chose to do while enjoying the sweet sounds issuing from the nearby stage.

AMERICAN

1620 SAVOY The revamping of this enduring West Little Rock landmark restaurant has breathed considerable new life into 1620 Savoy. It’s a very different look and feel than the original, and the food is still high-quality and painstakingly prepared — a wide-ranging dinner menu that’s sure to please almost everyone. 1620 Market St. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-2211620. D Mon.-Sat., BR Sun. ADAMS CATFISH & CATERING Catering company with carry-out restaurant in Little Rock and carry-out trailers in Russellville and Perryville. 215 N. Cross St. All CC. $-$$. 501-3744265. L Tue.-Sat. ALL ABOARD RESTAURANT & GRILL Burgers, catfish, chicken tenders and such in this trainthemed restaurant, where an elaborately engineered mini-locomotive delivers patrons meals. 6813 Cantrell Road. No alcohol. 501-975-7401. LD daily. ALLEY OOPS The restaurant at Creekwood Plaza (near the Kanis-Bowman intersection) is a neighborhood feedbag for major medical institutions with the likes of plate lunches, burgers and homemade desserts. Remarkable Chess Pie. 11900 Kanis Road. Full bar, All CC. $-$$. 501-221-9400. LD Mon.-Sat. BR Sun. B-SIDE The little breakfast place in the former party room of Lilly’s DimSum Then Some turns tradition on its ear, offering French toast wrapped in bacon on a stick, a must-have dish called “biscuit mountain” and beignets with lemon curd. Top notch cheese grits, too. 11121 Rodney Parham Road. Full bar, All CC. $$. 501-716-2700. BL Wed.-Sun. BAR LOUIE This chain’s first Arkansas outlet features a something-for-everybody menu so broad and varied to be almost schizophrenic. 11525 Cantrell Road, Suite 924. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-228-0444. LD daily. 11525 Cantrell Road. 501-228-0444. BIG WHISKEY’S AMERICAN BAR AND GRILL A modern grill pub in the River Market with all the bells and whistles - 30 flat screen TVs, whiskey on tap, plus boneless wings, burgers, steaks, soups and salads. 225 E Markham St. Full bar, All CC. $$. 501-324-2449. LD daily. BOBBY’S COUNTRY COOKIN’ One of the better plate lunch spots in the area, with some of the best fried chicken and pot roast around, a changing daily casserole and wonderful homemade pies. 301 N. Shackleford Road, Suite E1. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-2249500. L Mon.-Fri. BOGIE’S BAR AND GRILL The former Bennigan’s retains a similar theme: a menu filled with burgers, salads and giant desserts, plus a few steak, fish and chicken main courses. There are big screen TVs for sports fans and lots to drink, more reason to return than the food. 120 W. Pershing Blvd. NLR. Full bar, All CC. $$. 501-812-0019. D daily. BOOKENDS CAFE A great spot to enjoy lunch with friends or a casual cup of coffee and a favorite book. Serving coffee and pastries early and sandwiches, soups and salads available after 11 a.m. Cox Creative Center. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501- 918-3091. BL Mon.-Sat. CONTINUED ON PAGE 77

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LITTLE ROCK’S MOST AWARD WINNING RESTAURANT 1619 Rebsamen Road 501-663-9734

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5 0 0 P r e s i d e n t c l i n t o n aV e n u e ( in t h e r i V e r m a r k e t d i s t r i c t ) c a l l F o r r e s e rVat i o n s 5 0 1 . 3 2 4 . 2 9 9 9 W W W. s o n n y W i l l i a m s s t e a k r o o m . c o m

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Little Rock Restaurant Month COUNTDOWN O

nly 10 days remain to take advantage of over 100 restaurants offering a variety of specials. Your best plan would be to figure out where to dine for lunch and dinner over the next 10 days and explore Little Rock’s excellent dining scene. There are several new places that have opened recently and probably a few longtime spots you’ve forgotten about. Remember, you have to ask your server what their restaurant month special is or tell them you want to have their restaurant month special. Check out some latest specials below. You’ll want more details so checkout DineLR.com to get complete details or go to pages 61-63 in this issue.

drink Salut Bistro — Free dessert with purchase of 2 entrees WT Bubba’s — Free appetizer with any food purchase

OUT TO LUNCH

Bobbie Jean’s Soul Food — $2.50 BLT sandwich Bookends Café — Loaded Turkey sandwich with potato salad $5 Black Angus — $1 off two hamburger steak dinners Bray Gourmet — Loaded Smoked Turkey spread sandwich $5.29 Brave New Restaurant — Duck Sausage Hot Dog — loaded for $10.75 EARLY BIRD SPECIALS Browning’s Mexican Grill — B-Side — ½ order beignets with fruit Browning’s Duo for $6.99 Buffalo Grill — Mahi Mahi salad $8.99 coulis $3 Café @ Heifer — half a sandwich, side Baseline Pit Stop Bar & Grill — two and drink $6.99 eggs, meat, hash browns, toast, drink $6 Community Bakery — $1 off iced coffee, China Wok — lunch special with entrée, latte, espresso frappe, espresso milkshake or pork fried rice, soup and soda $5.25 smoothie Cojita’s Mexican Grill — $4 off any Tropical Smoothie — half off smoothies $15 purchase — $4 lunch with 2 tacos, rice, beans, chips and salsa. from 7-9 a.m. Mon.-Fri. Copper Grill — $13 prix fixe 3 course FAMILY & KID FRIENDLY lunch, choice of two (separate dinner special) A.W. Lin’s Asian Cuisine — Sunday and Corky’s Ribs & BBQ — $1 off all Phil’s Monday kids eat free (one of several specials) sandwiches All Aboard Restaurant & Grill — half Famous Dave’s — $5 off purchase of $20 off “Lil” engineers meal with meal purchase Gus’s World Famous Fried Chicken American Pie Pizza — $5 off purchase — Fried Catfish Monday & Tuesday only over $20 (not including alcohol) Gusano’s Chicago Style Pizzeria — Chi’s Too — Free kids meal with dinner $7.49 pizza lunch special with salad and purchase (limit two per table) soda plus 8”one topping pizza The Hop Diner — $1 off combo meal Mexico Chiquito — all you can eat taco with fries and drink dinners $9.99 J. Gumbo’s — any one entrée, chips and FREE OFFERS a drink $8 + tax. Good at dinner too. 4square Café and Gifts — free cake Layla’s Gyros and Pizzeria — Gyro truffle with sandwich or wrap purchase sandwich, fries and drink $6.65 (lunch only) Canon Grill — free cheese dip with 2 The Oyster Bar — $2 off pound of entrée purchase shrimp, $1 off half pound Cheers in the Heights — free piece of The Pizza Joint — $5 off any purchase carrot cake with two entrees purchased over $20 (alcohol not included) Curry in a Hurry — Free Butter Naan Planet Smoothie — 22oz Smoothie of with two entrée purchase the Month” $2.99 Dempsey Bakery — Free Sugar Cookie Plaza Grille (Doubletree Hotel) — Cilantro crusted Atlantic salmon with with lunch purchase Jimmy’s Serious Sandwiches — fingerling potatoes and fresh veggies $14 Prose Garden Café — Turkey, cheese purchase a sandwich or salad and choose free house made dessert, Serious Size A sandwich, & avocado sandwich with potato salad $5 extra side order, soft drink or iced tea Revolution Restaurant — Beef, chicken Larry’s Pizza Downtown — free 20oz or fish tacos with chips, salsa, soft drink $7.99 tea or fountain drink with small or large salad Stickyz Rock ’N’ Roll Shack — Four — take out only hand cut chicken fingers, choice of baked Las Palmas III — Free small cheese potato soup or chicken & sausage gumbo. dip with two entrees purchased, plus more Soft drink $7.99 Leo’s Greek Castle — Free baklava with West End Smokehouse — All purchase of a Gyro Platter after 5pm sandwiches $5.99 Friday 11-3pm. The Purple Cow — Free scoop of ice cream with entrée purchase (one per table) DINNER & A DATE Rosalia’s Family Bakery — Free small 1620 Savoy — free Soufflé with entrée brewed coffee with purchase of specialty Acadia Restaurant — discounted special

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AUGUST 22, 2013

ARKANSAS TIMES

entrée or 3 course prix fixe. Butcher Shop — half price drinks and Afterthought Bistro & Bar — three appetizers from 5-7 pm course prix fixe menu $25 Camp David — $2 Miller Light draft, $3 Café Bossa Nova — Moqueca for $21.19 house wins $4 house liquors from 4:30-5:30 Cajun’s Wharf — $35 prix fixe 2 course Cantina Cinco De Mayo — Sun-Thurs dinner $3.49 margaritas, $.99 draft beer Fri-Sat Capers — $30 prix fixe 3 course dinner $2.99 margaritas, small draft beer $.99 Cantina Laredo — Wed — half price Ciao Baci — Chef’s 4 course tasting $30 Doe’s Eat Place — 8 oz filet, toast, glass wine Thursday — ladies half price potatoes and soaked salad $35 house margarita Graffiti’s Italian Restaurant — free El Porton Mexican Restaurant — appetizer with purchase of two full entrees, Happy Hour — regular Margarita $2.95, one per table 25oz draft beer $2.95. Lunch special $5.99 Jordan’s BarBQ — 2 piece fish dinner, entrée and soft drink fries, slaw, hushpuppies and drink or regular Far East Asian Cuisine & Bar — house BBQ sandwich with 2 sides. $6.50 wine and beer 50% off from 4-6 pm Forbidden Garden — $1 off glass of RJ Tao — two can dine for $60 (appetizer, wine 2 entrees and bottle of wine) The Fold Botanas & Bar — $1 off all Sushi Café — Chef’s special, 2 adults Mexican beers for $50 (sushi only Sun-Thur) SO Restaurant-Bar — three course prix Green Corner Store & Soda Fountain fixe menu $65 — $1 off anything at the Soda Fountain Vesuvio Bistro — Bone-in pork chop La Hacienda — $2.99 margaritas on butterflied, pan fried, with vegetables and Wednesday and Thursday Montego Café — ½ off appetizer and potatoes $28 all specialty drinks $5 — Monday-Friday 4-7pm STRAIGHT UP % OFF Big Whiskey’s — 50% off appetizer The Pantry Restaurant — Happy Hour with entrée white and red wine for $15 a bottle Boscos Restaurant & Brewing Co. — Pizza Café — $2 Domestics all day 20% off lunch (dine in only) Monday and Tuesday Boston’s Restaurant & Sports Bar — Prost — 50% off appetizers from 4-7 pm 25% off large or medium pizza (dine in only) Santo Coyote — $1.99 Margaritas on 10% off entire tab or 20% off bottle of wine Wednesday — free flan with purchase of Café Prego — 10% off your entire tab, $15 or more or 20% bottles of wine Sky Modern Japanese — $4 house Casa Manana — 15% off meal order, wine, $4.50 house rolls, $4 drafts, $2 excludes alcohol domestic, $3 imports, Sun-Thur 5-7 pm Damgoode Pies — Purchase any large The Tavern Sports Grill — $1 off pizza $50 off appetizer. drinks, $2.50 domestic pints from 3-7. Genghis Grill — buy one bowl at regular Thursday night $10 buckets, $8 PBR, $2.50 price and get one 50% off pints Hillcrest Artisian Meats — 20% off Willy D’s Piano Bar — 50% off Virginia’s “Olli Salami” every Friday appetizers 7-9 pm Iriana’s Pizza — 15% off any whole Ya Ya’s Euro Bistro — Select apps pizza to for one 3-5:30. Blue Summer Signature La Casa Real — 20% off a whole meal Cocktail $5 Zin Urban Wine & Beer Bar — 15% with purchase of two entrees (alcohol not of all bottles of wine included) Lilly’s Dim Sum Then Some — Sunday 50% off all wines by the bottle MULTIPLE SPECIALS EACH DAY Mellow Mushroom — 50% off AT LUNCH & DINNER appetizers during late night happy hour 9 till close A.W. Lin’s Asian Cuisine, Loca Luna, Packet House — 10% off all weekend Pancetta Regional Kitchen & Wine Bar specials in the Marriott, The Root Café, Red Door Pho Thanh My Restaurant — 50% and Trio’s all have too many specials to off order of eggrolls with a purchase of list — to get complete breakdown go to $20 or more DineLR.com. Trio’s is even offering The Star of India — 15% off dinner entrée Dogs Days of Summer, dogs dine on the Thirst N’ Howl Bar & Grill — 10% patio, free bowl of water and take home a goody bag from Hollywood Feeds. off any burger Tue-Thur.

BELLY UP TO THE BAR

Bravo! Cucina Italiana — $5 drink specials and $3.95 appetizers

This is a great time to take advantage of all these specials and try a new restaurant — we suspect you’ll find a new favorite.


DINING CAPSULES, CONT. THE BOX Cheeseburgers and French fries are greasy and wonderful and not like their fast-food cousins. 1023 W. Seventh St. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-372-8735. L Mon.-Fri. BUFFALO GRILL A great crispy-off-the-griddle cheeseburger and hand-cut fries star at this family-friendly stop. 1611 Rebsamen Park Road. Full bar, CC. $$. 501-296-9535. LD daily. CAFE 201 The hotel restaurant in the Crowne Plaza serves up a nice lunch buffet. 201 S. Shackleford Road. Full bar, All CC. $$. 501-2233000. BLD Mon.-Sat., BR Sun. CATFISH CITY AND BBQ GRILL Basic fried fish and sides, including green tomato pickles, and now with tasty ribs and sandwiches in beef, pork and sausage. 1817 S. University Ave. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-663-7224. LD Tue.-Sat. CHEERS Good burgers and sandwiches, vegetarian offerings and salads at lunch and fish specials, and good steaks in the evening. 2010 N. Van Buren. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-6635937. LD Mon.-Sat. 1901 Club Manor Drive. Maumelle. Full bar, All CC. 501-851-6200. LD daily, BR Sun. CHICKEN WANG’S CAFE Regular, barbecue, spicy, lemon, garlic pepper, honey mustard and Buffalo wings. Open late. 8320 Colonel Glenn Road. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-562-1303. LD Mon.-Sat. CORNERSTONE PUB & GRILL A sandwich, pizza and beer joint in the heart of North Little Rock’s Argenta district. 314 Main St. NLR. Full bar, All CC. $-$$. 501-374-1782. LD Mon.-Sat. DAVE AND RAY’S DOWNTOWN DINER Breakfast buffet daily featuring biscuits and gravy, home fries, sausage and made-to-order omelets. Lunch buffet with four choices of meats and eight veggies. 824 W. Capitol Ave. No alcohol. $. 501-372-8816. BL Mon.-Fri. DAVID’S BUTCHER BOY BURGERS Serious hamburgers, steak salads, homemade custard. 101 S. Bowman Road. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-227-8333. LD Mon.-Sat. 4000 McCain Blvd. NLR. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-353-0387. LD Mon.-Sat. E’S BISTRO Despite the name, think tearoom rather than bistro — there’s no wine, for one thing, and there is tea. But there’s nothing tearoomy about the portions here. Try the heaping grilled salmon BLT on a buttery croissant. 3812 JFK Boulevard. NLR. No alcohol, All CC. $$. 501-771-6900. FLIGHT DECK A not-your-typical daily lunch special highlights this spot, which also features inventive sandwiches, salads and a popular burger. Central Flying Service at Adams Field. Beer, Wine, All CC. $-$$. 501-975-9315. BL Mon.-Sat. HILLCREST ARTISAN MEATS A fancy charcuterie and butcher shop with excellent daily soup and sandwich specials. Limited seating is available. 2807 Kavanaugh Blvd. Suite B. No alcohol, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-671-6328. L Mon.-Sat. THE HOP DINER The downtown incarnation of the old dairy bar, with excellent burgers, onion rings, shakes, daily specials and breakfast. 201 E. Markham. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-2440975. KITCHEN EXPRESS Delicious “meat and three” restaurant offering big servings of homemade soul food. Maybe Little Rock’s best fried chicken. 4600 Asher Ave. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-666-3500. BLD Mon.-Sat., LD Sun. LASSIS INN One of the state’s oldest restaurants still in the same location and one of the best for catfish and buffalo fish. 518 E 27th St. Beer, Wine, All CC. $$. 501-372-8714. LD Tue.-Sat. LETTI’S CAKES Soups, sandwiches and salads available at this cake, pie and cupcake bakery.

3700 JFK Blvd. NLR. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-708-7203. LD (closes at 6 p.m.) Mon.-Fri. L Sat. LYNN’S CHICAGO FOODS Outpost for Chicago specialties like Vienna hot dogs and Italian beef sandwiches. Plus, other familiar fare — burgers and fried catfish, chicken nuggets and wings. 6501 Geyer Springs. No alcohol, All CC. $. 501-568-2646. LD Mon.-Sat. MADDIE’S PLACE If you like your catfish breaded Cajun-style, your grits rich with garlic and cream and your oysters fried up in perfect puffs, this Cajun eatery on Rebsamen Park Road is the place for you. 1615 Rebsamen Park Road. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-660-4040. LD Tue.-Sat. MARIE’S MILFORD TRACK II Healthy and tasty are the key words at this deli/grill, featuring hot entrees, soups, sandwiches, salads and killer desserts. 9813 W Markham St. No alcohol, CC. $-$$. 501-225-4500. BL Mon.-Sat. MASON’S DELI AND GRILL Heaven for those who believe everything is better with sauerkraut on top. The Bavarian Reuben, a traditional Reuben made with Boar’s Head corned beef, spicy mustard, sauerkraut, Muenster cheese and marble rye, is among the best we’ve had in town. 400 Clinton Ave. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-376-3354. LD Mon.-Sat. NEWK’S EXPRESS CAFE Gourmet sandwiches, salads and pizzas. 4317 Warden Road. NLR. Beer, All CC. $-$$. 501-753-8826. LD daily. PACKET HOUSE GRILL Owner/chef Wes Ellis delivers the goods with an up-to-date take on sophisticated Southern cuisine served up in a stunning environment that dresses up the historic house with a modern, comfortable feel. 1406 Cantrell Road. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-372-1578. L Mon.-Fri., D Tues.-Sat. PHIL’S HAM AND TURKEY PLACE Fine hams, turkeys and other specialty meats served whole, by the pound or in sandwich form. 11121 N. Rodney Parham Road. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-225-2136. LD Mon.-Fri. L Sat. SADDLE CREEK WOODFIRED GRILL Upscale chain dining in Lakewood, with a menu full of appetizers, burgers, chicken, fish and other fare. It’s the smoke-kissed steaks, however, that make it a winner — even in Little Rock’s beef-heavy restaurant market. 2703 Lakewood Village. NLR. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-812-0883. SIMPLY NAJIYYAH’S FISHBOAT & MORE Good catfish and corn fritters. 1717 Wright Ave. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-562-3474. LD Tue.-Sat. SLICK’S SANDWICH SHOP & DELI Meatand-two plate lunches in state office building. 101 E. Capitol Ave. No alcohol. 501-375-3420. BL Mon.-Fri. SPECTATORS GRILL AND PUB Burgers, soups, salads and other beer food, plus live music on weekends. 1012 W. 34th St. NLR. Full bar, All CC. $-$$. 501-791-0990. LD Mon.-Sat. SPORTS PAGE One of the largest, juiciest, most flavorful burgers in town. Grilled turkey and hot cheese on sourdough gets praise, too. Now with lunch specials. 414 Louisiana St. Beer, Wine, All CC. $-$$. 501-372-9316. LD Mon.-Fri. STARVING ARTIST CAFE All kinds of crepes, served as entrees or as dessert, in this cozy multidimensional eatery with art-packed walls and live demonstrations by artists during meals. The Black Forest ham sandwich is a perennial favorite with the lunch crowd. Dinner menu changes daily, good wine list. “Tales from the South” dinner and readings at on Tuesdays; live music precedes the show. 411 N. Main St. NLR. Full bar, All CC. $$. 501-372-7976. L Tue.-Sat., D Tue., Fri.-Sat. CONTINUED ON PAGE 78

Family Owned & Operated Since 1997

15% OFF ANY FOOD PURCHASE. VALID AT ALL 4 LOCATIONS Not valid with any other offer.

Happy Hour Everyday 3-7pm 4154 E. McCain • NLR • 501-945-8010 laspalmasarkansas.com www.facebook.com/laspalmasmexican

Lunch SpeciaL

Monday - Friday Gyro Sandwich, FrieS & drink $6.90 oFFer expireS 9/19/13

gyros • hummus • tabbouleh • baba ghannouj pizza • calzone • mediterranean salad

fresh, delicious Mediterranean cuisine

LR • Rodney Parham • 227-7272 LR • Ranch Blvd. • 868-8226 Conway • Oak Street • 205-8224

EXPERIENCE BLENDING FAMILIAR TASTES, UNEXPECTED DELIGHTS, AND NEW TWISTS

Celebrate Sundays with 35% off Brunch menu FOR A LIMITED TIME — AUG. 25 AND SEPT. 1

Enjoy our new Brunch menu with more drink and entrée specials, featuring dinner items at lunch prices.

In appreciation to our loyal customers and an invitation to our new friends,

ALL menu items will be $4.99 or less (excluding A.W. Lin’s combo, Sushi or Sashimi Combo and Love Boat)

Last day to join our customer appreciation event - August 22 We have crafted a new menu with Chinese, exotic Thai influences and South Asian fusion we can’t wait to share. New Lunch options include multiple course dishes, tantalizing mini-appetizers and classic rice and noodle dishes you expect.

501-821-5398 • www.awlins.com 17717 CHENAL PKWY, H101 • LITTLE ROCK

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AUGUST 22, 2013

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DINING CAPSULES, CONT. SUFFICIENT GROUNDS Great coffee, good bagels and pastries, and a limited lunch menu. 124 W. Capitol. No alcohol, CC. $. 501-372-1009. BL Mon.-Fri. SUGIE’S Catfish and all the trimmings. 4729 Baseline Road. No alcohol, All CC. $. 501-5700414. LD daily. THE TAVERN SPORTS GRILL Burgers, barbecue and more. 17815 Chenal Parkway. Full bar, All CC. $-$$. 501-830-2100. LD daily. VICTORIAN GARDEN We’ve found the fare quite tasty and somewhat daring and different with its healthy, balanced entrees and crepes. 4801 North Hills Blvd. NLR. $-$$. 501-758-4299. L Tue.-Sat. WAYNE’S FISH & BURGERS TO GO Offers generously-portioned soulfood plate lunches and dinners - meat, two sides, corn bread - for $6. 2221 South Cedar St. 501-663-9901. WHITE WATER TAVERN Excellent, locallysourced bar food. 2500 W. 7th St. Full bar, All CC. $-$$. 501-375-8400. D Tue.-Fri., L Fri.

ASIAN

BENIHANA JAPANESE STEAKHOUSE Enjoy the cooking show, make sure you get a little filet with your meal, and do plenty of dunking in that fabulous ginger sauce. 2 Riverfront Place. NLR. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-374-8081. BLD Sun.-Sat. CHI DIMSUM & BISTRO A huge menu spans the Chinese provinces and offers a few twists on the usual local offerings, plus there’s authentic Hong Kong dim sum available. 6 Shackleford Drive. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-221-7737. LD daily. 17200 Chenal Parkway. No alcohol, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-821-8000. LD Mon.-Sat., D Sun. FAR EAST ASIAN CUISINE Old favorites such as orange beef or chicken and Hunan green beans

are still prepared with care at what used to be Hunan out west. 11610 Pleasant Ridge Road. Full bar, All CC. $$. 501-219-9399. LD daily. FORBIDDEN GARDEN Classic, American-ized Chinese food in a modern setting. Try the Basil Chicken. 14810 Cantrell Road. Beer, Wine, All CC. $-$$. 501-868-8149. LD daily. FU LIN Quality in the made-to-order entrees is high, as is the quantity. 200 N. Bowman Road. Full bar, All CC. $$. 501-225-8989. LD daily, BR Sun. IGIBON JAPANESE RESTAURANT It’s a complex place, where the food is almost always good and the ambiance and service never fail to please. The Bento box with tempura shrimp and California rolls and other delights stand out. 11121 N. Rodney Parham Road. Beer, Wine, All CC. $$. 501-217-8888. LD Mon.-Sat. KIYEN’S SEAFOOD STEAK AND SUSHI Sushi, steak and other Japanese fare. 17200 Chenal Pkwy, Suite 100. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-8217272. LD daily. KOBE JAPANESE STEAKHOUSE & SUSHI Though answering the need for more hibachis in Little Rock, Kobe stands taller in its sushi offerings than at the grill. 11401 Financial Centre Parkway. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-225-5999. L Mon.-Sat. D daily. NEW FUN REE Reliable staples, plenty of hot and spicy options and dependable delivery. 418 W 7th St. No alcohol, All CC. $. 501-664-6657. LD Mon.-Sat. STAR OF INDIA The best Indian restaurant in the region, with a unique buffet at lunch and some fabulous dishes at night (spicy curried dishes, tandoori chicken, lamb and veal, vegetarian). 301 N. Shackleford. Beer, Wine, All CC. $$. 501-2279900. LD daily. TASTE OF ASIA Delicious Indian food in a pleasant

atmosphere. Perhaps the best samosas in town. Buffet at lunch. 2629 Lakewood Village Dr. NLR. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-812-4665. LD daily. VAN LANG CUISINE Terrific Vietnamese cuisine, particularly the way the pork dishes and the assortment of rolls are presented. Great prices, too. Massive menu, but it’s user-friendly for locals with full English descriptions and numbers for easy ordering. 3600 S. University Ave. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-570-7700. LD daily.

BARBECUE

CAPITOL SMOKEHOUSE AND GRILL Beef, pork and chicken, all smoked to melting tenderness and doused with a choice of sauces. The crusty but tender backribs star. Side dishes are top quality. A plate lunch special is now available. 915 W. Capitol Ave. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-372-4227. L Mon.-Fri. CROSS EYED PIG BBQ COMPANY Traditional barbecue favorites smoked well such as pork ribs, beef brisket and smoked chicken. Miss Mary’s famous potato salad is full of bacon and other goodness. Smoked items such as ham and turkeys available seasonally. 1701 Rebsamen Park Road. Full bar, All CC. $-$$. 501-265-0000. L Mon.-Sat., D Tue.-Fri. 1701 Rebsamen Park Road. Beer, Wine, All CC. $-$$. 501-227-7427. LD daily. FATBOY’S KILLER BAR-B-Q This Landmark neighborhood strip center restaurant in the far southern reaches of Pulaski County features tender ribs and pork by a contest pitmaster. Skip the regular sauce and risk the hot variety, it’s far better. 14611 Arch Street. No alcohol, All CC. $$. 501-888-4998. L Mon.-Wed. and Fri.; L Thu. HB’S BBQ Great slabs of meat with fiery barbecue sauce, but ribs are served on Tuesday only. Other days, try the tasty pork sandwich on an onion roll. 6010 Lancaster. No alcohol, No CC. $-$$.

501-565-1930. LD Mon.-Fri. SIMS BAR-B-QUE Great spare ribs, sandwiches, beef, half and whole chicken and an addictive vinegar-mustard-brown sugar sauce unique for this part of the country. 2415 Broadway. Beer, CC. $-$$. 501-372-6868. LD Mon.-Sat. 1307 John Barrow Road. Beer, All CC. $-$$. 501-224-2057. LD Mon.-Sat. 7601 Geyer Springs Road. Beer, All CC. $$. 501-562-8844. LD Mon.-Sat.

EUROPEAN / ETHNIC

KHALIL’S PUB Widely varied menu with European, Mexican and American influences. Go for the Bierocks, rolls filled with onions and beef. 110 S. Shackleford Road. Full bar, All CC. $$. 501-224-0224. LD daily. BR Sun. THE PANTRY Owner and self-proclaimed “food evangelist” Tomas Bohm does things the right way — buying local, making almost everything from scratch and focusing on simple preparations of classic dishes. The menu stays relatively true to his Czechoslovakian roots, but there’s plenty of choices to suit all tastes. There’s also a nice happy-hour vibe. 11401 Rodney Parham Road. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-353-1875. LD Mon.-Fri., D Sat.

ITALIAN

DAMGOODE PIES A somewhat different Italian/ pizza place, largely because of a spicy garlic white sauce that’s offered as an alternative to the traditional red sauce. Good bread, too. 2701 Kavanaugh Blvd. Beer, Wine, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-664-2239. LD daily. 6706 Cantrell Road. Beer, Wine, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-664-2239. LD daily. 10720 Rodney Parham Road. Beer, Wine, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-664-2239. LD daily. 37 East Center St. Fayetteville. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 479-444-7437. LD daily.

ARKANSAS TIMES CLASSIFIEDS Find US On FACEBOOK

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ARKANSAS EDUCATION ASSOCIATION The Arkansas Education Association is seeking applicants for a Secretary in its Field and Legal Division. The position is based in Little Rock. Minimum starting salary is $30,593, negotiable based on skills and experience. Fringe benefit package is outstanding, including Health, Dental and Long Term Disability Insurances and a defined benefit Retirement Plan; generous vacation and holiday schedules. Minimum qualifications: high school diploma (or GED) and at least two years of experience in secretarial or clerical work; proficiency with Microsoft Office products. Interested applicants send by September 6 resume and references to AEA Office Manager, 1500 West 4th Street, Little Rock, AR 72201 or by email to ar-atjones@nea.org. 22, 2013 ARKANSAS TIMES 78 78 August AUGUST 22, 2013 ARKANSAS TIMES

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DINING CAPSULES, CONT. GUSANO’S They make the tomatoey Chicagostyle deep-dish pizza the way it’s done in the Windy City. It takes a little longer to come out of the oven, but it’s worth the wait. 313 President Clinton Ave. Full bar, All CC. $-$$. 501-374-1441. LD daily. 2915 Dave Ward Drive. Conway. Full bar, All CC. $$. 501-329-1100. LD daily. NYPD PIZZA Plenty of tasty choices in the obvious New York police-like setting, but it’s fun. Only the pizza is cheesy. Even the personal pizzas come in impressive combinations, and baked ziti, salads are more also are available. Cheap slice specials at lunch. 6015 Chenonceau Blvd., Suite 1. Beer, Wine, All CC. $-$$. 501-8683911. LD Mon.-Sat., D Sun. VESUVIO Arguably Little Rock’s best Italian restaurant is in one of the most unlikely places – tucked inside the Best Western Governor’s Inn within a nondescript section of west Little Rock. 1501 Merrill Drive. Full bar, All CC. $$$. 501-2250500. D daily.

LATINO

CASA MANANA Great guacamole and garlic beans, superlative chips and salsa (red and green) and a broad selection of fresh seafood, plus a deck out back. 6820 Cantrell Road. Full bar, All CC. $-$$. 501-280-9888. LD daily 18321 Cantrell Road. Full bar, All CC. $-$$. 501-8688822. LD daily 400 President Clinton Ave. No

alcohol, All CC. $-$$. BL Mon.-Sat. CASA MEXICANA Familiar Tex-Mex style items all shine, in ample portions, and the steakcentered dishes are uniformly excellent. 6929 JFK Blvd. NLR. Full bar, All CC. $$. 501-835-7876. LD daily. EL PORTON Good Mex for the price and a wide-ranging menu of dinner plates, some tasty cheese dip, and great service as well. 12111 W. Markham St. Full bar, All CC. $$. 501-223-8588. LD daily. 5201 Warden Road. NLR. Full bar, All CC. $$. 501-753-4630. LD daily. ELIELLA You’ll find perhaps the widest variety of street style tacos in Central Arkansas here — everything from cabeza (steamed beef head) to lengua (beef tongue) to suadero (thin-sliced beef brisket). The Torta Cubano is a belly-buster. It’s a sandwich made with chorizo, pastor, grilled hot dogs and a fried egg. The menu is in Spanish, but the waitstaff is accomodating to gringos. 7700 Baseline Road. Beer, All CC. $. 501-5395355. L Mon.-Sat. LA HACIENDA Creative, fresh-tasting entrees and traditional favorites, all painstakingly prepared in a festive atmosphere. Great taco salad, nachos, and maybe the best fajitas around. 3024 Cantrell Road. Full bar, All CC. $-$$. 501-661-0600. LD daily. 200 Highway 65 N. Conway. All CC. $$. 501-327-6077. LD daily. LA VAQUERA The tacos at this truck are more

expensive than most, but they’re still cheap eats. One of the few trucks where you can order a combination plate that comes with rice, beans and lettuce. 4731 Baseline Road. No alcohol, No CC. $. 501-565-3108. LD Mon.-Sat. LAS DELICIAS Levy-area mercado with a taqueria and a handful of booths in the back of the store. 3401 Pike Ave. NLR. Beer, All CC. $. 501-812-4876. LAS PALMAS Mexican chain with a massive menu of choices. 10402 Stagecoach Road. Full bar, All CC. $-$$. 501-455-8500. LD daily 4154 E. McCain Blvd. NLR. Full bar, All CC. $-$$. LD daily. LONCHERIA MEXICANA ALICIA The best taco truck in West Little Rock. Located in the Walmart parking lot on Bowman. 620 S. Bowman. No alcohol, No CC. $. 501-612-1883. L Mon.-Sat. MARISCOS EL JAROCHO Try the Camarones a la Diabla (grilled shrimp in a smoky pepper sauce) or the Cocktail de Campechana (shrimp, octopus and oyster in a cilantro and onion-laced tomato sauce). 7319 Baseline Road. Beer, All CC. $-$$. 501-565-3535. Serving BLD Wed.-Mon. MERCADO SAN JOSE From the outside, it appears to just be another Mexican grocery store. Inside, you’ll find one of Little Rock’s best Mexican bakeries and a restaurant in back serving tortas and tacos for lunch. 7411 Geyer Springs Road. Beer, CC. $. 501-565-4246. BLD daily. www.arktimes.com august 22, 2013 79 79 www.arktimes.com AUGUST 22, 2013


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AUGUST 22, 2013

ARKANSAS TIMES

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Arkansas Times - Aug. 22, 2013