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NEWS + POLITICS + ENTERTAINMENT + FOOD / APRIL 3, 2014 / ARKTIMES.COM

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COMMENT

Free, for $127 I was delighted to hear that as a senior citizen I could attend college here in Arkansas for free. I was not so happy to find out that my free class cost me $127 in fees. I explained to the registrar that the law seemed to suggest that seniors would be exempt from all tuition and fees. They backpedaled a little bit, regrouped, and told me that the registration fee was not a fee, the infrastructure free was not a fee, and, of course, the tech fee was also not a fee. I would have pursued the matter further but was afraid that they might end up charging me additional fees for the lesson in Orwellian logic. David Malcolm Rose Hot Springs

see it routed right down the middle of I-40, where the additional impact over what already exists will be minimal, thousands of people will know it is there and witness both the construction and the day to day operation, see things like if it is being maintained or not, and report any leaks within minutes. Current laws or regulations prevent that? Then change them! Oh, and just so one company is not profiting via the dollars it saves by using public property, be sure to charge them a

In response to the March 27 cover story about continuing economic hardship caused by the Pegasus pipeline oil spill in Mayflower a year ago: I remember the oil spill on Palomino Drive in Orcutt, a suburb of Santa Maria, Calif., by a leaky tank in a tank farm built by Union Oil. After

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Vegetarian Noah TV host Glenn Beck and other stalwarts of the Christian right have attacked the recent blockbuster “Noah” as being “pro-animal” and unfaithful to the Bible. Well, yes and no. The film is both pro-animal and faithful to the Bible, at least to the Book of Genesis, our only source for the story of Noah. After all, Genesis 1:29 admonishes “Behold, I have given you every herb yielding seed which is upon the face of all the earth, and every tree that has seed-yielding fruit — to you it shall be for food.” It is only after the flood, with fruits and vegetables no longer abundant, that humans get permission to eat animal flesh. Even then, the Bible stipulates that lives of only select animals may be taken and always with reverence and minimal cruelty. This is certainly a far cry from today’s factory farm and slaughterhouse practices. Regardless of how we may feel about “Noah’s” interpretation of the Bible, each of us can recreate the recommended diet of the Garden of Eden in our home by dropping animal products from our menu. Lewis Mermell Little Rock

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NEWS + POLITICS + ENTERTAINMENT + FOOD / MARCH 27, 2014 / ARKTIMES.COM

LIFE UPENDED The Mayflower oil spill robbed Michelle Ward of her middle-class dream. BY BENJAMIN HARDY

OIL & WATER DON’T MIX.

SAVING LAKE MAUMELLE, ONE DROP AT A TIME.

many cancers in children and elderly persons, some deadly, the whole fairly new suburb street they all lived on, some 16 or so houses, was bought and razed by Unocal, the people settled for fairly large amounts of money, and hardly a peep was heard from the local media: A quarter century ago, Unocal was a major economic presence in the medium-sized farming town of Santa Maria. Hopefully, there will not be the terrible health consequences in Mayflower that we saw in Santa Maria (although the symptoms sure sound similar to what was reported there). Hopefully, Exxon will settle with all residents who want out — I know I would not want to live on a spill site or anywhere near it. And hopefully, state and federal governments will do their part to protect citizens’ rights. Peterjkraus In response to Jay Barth’s March 27 column, “Hobby Lobby case affects more than just contraception”: Perhaps the key issue at stake in the case, Jay, is whether or not government regulations can supersede the fundamental protections afforded U.S. citizens by our Constitution. Last I checked, the right to the free practice of religion IS protected. I’m not aware of any guarantee of free or discounted access to the morning after pill — particularly at the expense of another citizen who conscientiously objects to it. SteveB87

From the web In response to the March 20 article about Valero’s plans to build a crude oil pipeline through Arkansas’s wildlife management areas: I love technology and the lifestyle it provides me. I also love the outdoors. If a new pipeline is needed, I’d like to 4

APRIL 3, 2014

ARKANSAS TIMES

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WORD S

Commandeer the refs too “This hashtag-heavy era of puffery support Pulaski places marketing weight on Anderson’s Tech included this claim to commandeer the fastest team in comment from the the country, but nobody would accuse any school’s president: of his three squads to date of playing with ‘It’s a respectful much composure.” amount.’ Shouldn’t DOUG If Anderson hijacked a bus carrying the phrase be ‘It’s SMITH the Florida Gators, and at gunpoint forced a respectable speedodoug40@gmail.com these student-athletes to play while wear- amount’? Seems to ing Razorback uniforms, then he could say me that ‘respectful’ means ‘full of respect.’ he’d commandeered a team. To comman- An amount can’t have respect ... it’s just a deer something is to seize it, to arbitrarily number. ‘Respectable’ means ‘able to be gain control. Maybe he should do that, but respected’ and this works for a number or he hasn’t yet. He has instead “commanded” any other concept, object or animate being.” three squads at Fayetteville — that is, he has directed them, with specific authorMr. Chapman has earned our respect. ity to do so. “Today’s Democrat-Gazette has Matt DeCample quoting Gov. Beebe: ‘Beebe “Hostilities have flared along the bor- “worries that [deadline] pretty much abdider on several occasions, although the cates the entire future of the private option exchanges of fire have generally been brief to the feds and bases it on whether or not and very limited in scope. Despite protes- those waivers occur ... .” Dr. Douglas E. tations from Syria, there was little indica- Young writes, “I expect he means abrotion either side wanted the confrontation gates instead of abdicates.” to escalate.” Probably so, although this is a closer “Protestation” is just a fancy word for call. To abdicate is “to relinquish formally, “protest.” Simpler is usually better. to leave the position of being a king or queen.” To abrogate is “to abolish by Richard W. Chapman writes: authoritative action, to do away with.” Edward VIII abdicated the throne of “In Sunday’s edition of our statewide paper an article about a proposed tax to England, he didn’t abolish it.

momentum Arkansas

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It was a good week for ...

THE UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS. Robert H. Biggadike of West Covina, Calif., who earned his BA and MA in mechanical engineering from the UA and had a career in the aerospace industry, made a gift of more than $7.8 million to the UA College of Engineering.

It was a bad week for ...

THE LAKE MAUMELLE WATERSHED. Graham Rich, CEO of Central Arkansas Water, the utility that manages the Lake Maumelle watershed and reservoir, which supplies 400,000 Central Arkansans with their drinking water, said based on his conversations with ExxonMobil, he doesn’t believe the oil giant will accede to CAW’s demand that Exxon relocate the Pegasus pipeline outside of the watershed. ANDI DAVIS. The Hot Springs lawyer, whose relationship with Attorney General Dustin McDaniel led him to withdraw from the gubernatorial race, was charged with manslaughter in the 2012 shooting death of Maxwell Ander-

son at Davis’ Hot Springs home as well as burglary and theft for an unrelated alleged crime. PETTY POLITICS. Sen. Jason Rapert objected to the appointment of Linda Tyler to the state Parole Board, leading Gov. Mike Beebe to withdraw the nomination. Rapert and Tyler, a former state representative, faced off in the 2012 election for the Senate District 35 seat, a contentious, no-love-lost race. By tradition, gubernatorial appointments requiring Senate approval can be vetoed by the senator of the nominee’s home district, though such vetoes are exceedingly rare. A senator has objected to a nominee just three times over the duration of Beebe’s term — two of them by Rapert in the last year. THE ARKANSAS TRAVELERS. The North Little Rock-based minor league baseball team introduced a new mascot, a swamp possum in hillbilly garb named Otey, which was nearly universally panned on social media (more on page 11). OUACHITA COUNTY JUDGE MIKE HESTERLY. Hesterly, charged in January 2013 with federal conspiracy and bribery counts in what prosecutors say was a scheme to trade FEMA disaster clean-up funds for a campaign contribution, announced he will resign effective April 3, citing “health problems, current circumstances and other concerns.”

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APRIL 3, 2014

5

EDITORIAL

EYE ON ARKANSAS

Coleman goes boldly

A

On track

s the Times goes to press, it appears that enrollment in the new marketplaces created by Obamacare will have reached at least 7 million Americans as the March 31 open enrollment deadline passed (because of an extension, people have more time to sign up, and that number will grow). That was the original projection from the Congressional Budget Office when enrollment began last October. Then, of course, came the botched rollout of healthcare.gov, the federally run enrollment website used in 36 states, including Arkansas. The law’s critics howled triumphantly that the law was, as they had predicted, a train wreck. That 7 million was an impossible goal. That nobody wanted the products on offer. That the law was doomed to collapse. Many questions remain about how well Obamacare will work. The answers will vary in every state, and the big national enrollment numbers won’t tell us much. But they do tell us that the dire predictions of several months ago will not come true. While the initial performance of healthcare.gov remains an embarrassing unforced error with both political consequences and real harm to folks attempting to enroll, it appears more and more likely that it will end up being a footnote in the history of the law. A detour on the track, not a wreck of the train.  6

APRIL 3, 2014

ARKANSAS TIMES

MATT AMARO

A

rkansas has had many governors who were unfriendly to public education. Proudly ignorant themselves, they thought it presumptuous of others to ask for more. Besides, people who get more education are likely to want more money, and the Curtis Colemans of the state are committed to keeping workers’ wages low, so that bosses’ profits can be kept high. Low wages are among Arkansas’s most enduring traditions. But few Arkansas politicians have shown their disregard for education so boldly as Coleman. Schoolchildren are still valued in some quarters, education still considered fashionable. There may be no other compliment that can be paid Coleman — we know of none — but on this point, at least, he’s an honest man. “Let the little buggers go out and get a job” is his theory. Asa Hutchinson may feel the same way, but he won’t be as frank about it. Coleman is an opponent of Hutchinson’s for the Republican gubernatorial nomination. (Some believe that the Walmart crowd’s hostility to public schools is based on their belief that better education would lead to demands for better pay.) Coleman said at a news conference that he wants to change the state’s top priorities from funding an adequate education for the state’s public school children to granting tax cuts. These cuts would be of more benefit to rich Arkansans than to others. For most non-Walton Arkansans, low pay is a much greater problem than high taxes. Coleman says the tax cuts he seeks would lead to reductions in other government services besides education, but like most tax-cutters he doesn’t say exactly what these would be. Talk about shutting down schools is one thing. Talk about releasing prison inmates is another.

SPRING LOOKS: Local fashion designers showed off their work at the Designers Choice Fashion Preview last Saturday at the Clear Channel Metroplex in Little Rock.

An undeniable threat

T

his winter was a bad one. Ice storm after ice storm. Weeks’ worth of disruption to schools, roads and business. Worst of all, there were those several long stretches of viciously frigid temperatures, the kind that reduce everyone to uselessly and indignantly declaring “IT’S COLD” when stepping out the door. Meanwhile, the planet is still getting warmer and warmer. Last Monday, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change issued its latest report describing the potentially catastrophic impact of rising temperatures on ecosystems and human societies the world over. The IPCC, a global body of scientists tasked with compiling and interpreting climate data into a something like a coherent long-term forecast, said that all signs continue to point to human activity (i.e., burning fossil fuels) as the major driver. There’s no contradiction here. The IPCC measures long-term global trends in temperature; a cold winter in North America doesn’t mean the earth as a whole isn’t still warming. Neither would a mild summer, or another frigid winter after this one. It’s possible that the appendage of Arctic air that repeatedly smacked the U.S. these past few months was edged southward by weather patterns influenced by climate change. Or, maybe not. Weather always lurches around unpredictably, and it does a disservice to the natural world when every meteorological event is seen as a harbinger of doom. By the same token, it’s intellectually dishonest to blame a 12-day run of 100-degree temperatures in August on climate change, tempting though it may be when the inevitable heat wave arrives. That creates a problem, though. Human minds work by generalizing from the particular and tend to put experience before abstractions and data. Without individual examples — the cancer patient helped (or harmed) by Obamacare, the kid’s life ruined by mandatory drug sentencing guidelines — public policy is dry. The climate change issue occupies an odd space: It’s increasingly real and present, but it’s simply impossible to definitively say

that any single weather phenomenon was caused by climate change. All we can do is keep drawing the causal connections. Increased atmospheric levels of CO2 trap more solar heat. Burning oil, BENJAMIN coal and gas release tremendous HARDY amounts of CO2. Therefore, our GUEST COLUMNIST use of fossil fuels is gradually heating up the planet. Environmental threats are often best described with the language of risk. The presence of a hog farm near the Buffalo doesn’t necessarily mean the river is going to be harmed, but for those who love the Buffalo River, its value is so intrinsic and self-evident that any risk rightly sets off alarm bells. Just because ExxonMobil’s Pegasus pipeline runs next to the reservoir supplying drinking water to 400,000 residents of Central Arkansas doesn’t necessarily mean it will contaminate Lake Maumelle. Statistically speaking, it’s highly unlikely another rupture would happen along that specific 13-mile stretch of pipe. But what if did? The consequences of an oil spill in Lake Maumelle would be so disastrous for Little Rock and surrounding towns that even U.S. Rep. Tim Griffin, a friend of the pipeline industry, said the line should not be restarted. (Exxon itself now publically acknowledges the reality of climate change, incidentally, in part for PR purposes but also because it’s a company built on good science.) Meanwhile, the likelihood of catastrophe occurring as a result of increased atmospheric carbon output is high and growing every year. The IPCC predicts increased droughts and floods, rising sea levels, extinctions, falling crop yields, and on and on. Whatever the localized environmental hazards posed by a pipeline or a hog farm, they pale in comparison to the disruption Arkansas faces from a warming planet. If your home is touched by air and water, this problem is in your backyard, too.

OPINION

7 million reasons not to repeal the ACA

O

n the last signup day for first-year insurance coverage, Ross Douthat, the quasi-official Republican intellectual, wrote an obituary for the forces that hoped to repeal Obamacare when Republicans control all three branches of government. Writing in the corner of the New York Times reserved for conservative orthodoxy, Douthat said repeal won’t happen now because it depended on Obamacare tripping over its complexities and failing miserably to achieve its goal of expanding insurance to a significant part of the population. Four and a half months ago, he wrote that the cataclysmic failure of the Internet portals established for the signups and then the cancellation of substandard insurance plans in December in spite of the president’s promise that insurance companies wouldn’t do that meant that it was possible, maybe likely, that the reforms would be so discredited that Obamacare could be repealed when the party got its majorities.

But with the first-year prediction of 7 million new insurance buyers a certainty in spite of all the adminisERNEST trative glitches and DUMAS with many million more poor workers signed up for Medicaid (200,000 Arkansans by the end of this year), that possibility vanished, Douthat said. Repeal or any serious change that canceled coverage for millions of people, he wrote, will not appeal to even many Republicans and will produce only “a ruinous civil war” in the party. Douthat always viewed the reforms as another welfare-state entitlement like Social Security, Medicare and veterans insurance, which if the law worked would become widely accepted and even popular. While polls show Obamacare still unpopular, Douthat saw signs of its growing popularity like Medicare and Social Security before it. Forlorn as he is about the prospect of

killing the law, Douthat does not call on his party to abandon its plan to use Obamacare to win both houses of Congress this year, the last chance to exploit it. The most successful public-relations ruse in history was to make the Affordable Care Act “Obamacare” in the common parlance, thus linking the reforms to a president who was hated in the South and the deep-red mountain and Midwestern states. Polls show people favor the Affordable Care Act and that all its major features except one, the individual mandate, are wildly popular, and the mandate is a trifle below 50 percent. But approval sinks when people are asked about “Obamacare.” Even as it surpasses the first signup threshold, Obamacare political ads proliferate. As of March 1, 66,000 ads had attacked Democrats and more than 30,000 blamed the Democrats for Obamacare. The number of Obamacare ads is 12 times the number at this stage of congressional races four years ago, when they enabled Republicans to take over the House of Representatives. On almost any website you go to, an ad flashes a picture of Pryor and the words he “told the biggest lie of the year.” Then a very sad Wanda Buckley of Marion tells about how grieved she was when Blue Cross canceled her insurance in spite of Obama’s

promise that she could keep it. There was nothing about Pryor lying, but the ad notes that he voted for the act. And the Arkansas insurance commissioner said Blue Cross could continue to cover Mrs. Buckley and others like her with the substandard plans for another two years. Pryor had seen his high approval ratings four years ago plummet because of the Obamacare attacks, but a year ago he counted on implementation at least neutralizing it as a political issue if not turning it into a positive. The bare numbers ought to bear out his hopes: 200,000 voting-age Arkansans with insurance for the first time, thousands more who had lost insurance because they had pre-existing conditions or their illnesses had become too long and expensive insured again, 500,000 Medicare enrollees who are having their out-of-pocket drug costs lowered and have access to free cancer screenings, 35,000 young adults back on their parents’ insurance, 115,000 Arkansans who got rebates last year because insurance companies spent more of their premiums on profits and overhead than Obamacare allows, 1.3 million whose insurance as of Jan. 1 can never be canceled as long as they pay their premiums. But Pryor voted for Obamacare.

Hard to deny Obamacare

S

o it turns out that millions of people dealt with the Affordable Care Act enrollment cutoff pretty much the way they habitually deal with the April 15 income tax filing deadline: procrastinating until the last minute to ensure maximum stress and standing in line. Like mobbing shopping malls on the day after Thanksgiving, it’s the American way of life. One result was predictably negative headlines like this classic in the Washington Post: “HealthCare.gov tumbles on deadline day as consumers race to sign up for insurance.” Because as we all know, temporary computer glitches — which never happen in the flawlessly efficient corporate sector, of course — are the big story here. In the news business, this is called “burying the lede.” It’s the equivalent of a sports story headlined “Third inning errors mar Red Sox World Series win.” Because the real news, sports fans, is that Obamacare has met and even surpassed every enrollment projection. Oddly, millions of last minute shoppers decided they’d be better off with health insurance after all. Who could have guessed? At this writing, it appears that the late buying surge will carry Obamacare beyond the 7 million enrollments projected by the

in American health care some dreamed of, that the number of people without insurbut a creditable start. ance is actually rising.” What’s more, the numbers are dramatiWe await Cruz’s thunderous proof. cally better in states that worked to impleCongressional BudMeanwhile, something else that’s been ment rather than obstruct the Affordable happening right in the face of all those get Office. Too bad, because that quite Care Act. In New York, CNBC reported 59 Koch-financed “Americans for Prosperity” ruins the visual percent of those buying health insurance ads lamenting that the Affordable Care Act effect of a comithrough the state’s marketplace had been “just doesn’t work,” is that the law’s popupreviously uninsured. In Kentucky, it’s 75 larity among the public has been steadily cally misleading Fox GENE News bar graph that percent — immeasurably improving the rising. The latest ABC News/Washington LYONS Post poll released this week shows Obamcontrived to make lives of rural Kentuckians particularly. How long will their neighbors, in, say, acare supported by more Americans than the 6 million citizens enrolled as of last week appear to be a small fraction of the 7 million Tennessee be able to hold out against oppose it, albeit by a scant margin of 49 to 48 percent. CBO projection, rather than 84 percent of it. Obamacare as word gets around? An alert basset hound wouldn’t have been So how are Republicans whose conInterestingly, 36 percent of selffooled. Do they think viewers are morons? gressmen have voted 50 times to repeal the described conservatives now support the But more about what Ed Kilgore calls law handling the unwelcome good news? law, as opposed to 17 percent last Novem“Obamacare denialism” to come. According About the way they dealt with allegedly ber. How that will play into November 2014 to a Rand Corp. study reported in the Los “skewed” poll numbers back in 2012. Who congressional elections remains to be seen. Angeles Times, along with the 7 million can forget the Weekly Standard’s bold elec- However, it’s already become clear to the newly enrolled in private insurance plans, tion eve prediction? “New Projection of saner sorts of conservative thinker that the roughly 4.5 million previously uninsured Election Results: Romney 52, Obama 47.” Affordable Care Act is here to stay. Americans have enrolled in Medicaid since According to pundit Fred Barnes, a 10-point The market has spoken. The political the new law came online last November. Romney landslide was entirely likely. rebellion and/or actuarial collapse dreamed Another 3 million young adults gained The New Republic’s Jonathan Cohn of on the right clearly to happen. coverage through their parents’ insurance summarizes: “[Republicans] are doing Longer term, Obamacare denialism plans, as Obamacare allows. what they almost always do when data appears even more futile. The ever-preRand estimates that another 9 million confounds their previously held beliefs. scient Kevin Drum points out that RepubAmericans have bought directly from insur- They are challenging the statistics — pri- licans can’t dream of repealing the law as ance companies, although many of those marily, by suggesting that most of the peo- long as its namesake lives in the White were previously insured. Overall, the unin- ple getting insurance already had coverage. House. And by 2017 the CBO estimates sured rate has dropped from an estimated Some, like Senator John Barrasso of Wyo- the law’s benefits will extend to 36 mil20.9 percent to 16.6 percent in the law’s ming, say the administration is ‘cooking the lion Americans — a formidable constitufirst year—hardly the sudden revolution books.’ Others, like Senator Ted Cruz, say ency indeed. www.arktimes.com

APRIL 3, 2014

7

PEARLS ABOUT SWINE

Mystified by Dykes selection

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Junior League of Little Rock Saturday, April 12 Jack Stephens Center, UALR 9am – 1pm

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APRIL 3, 2014

ARKANSAS TIMES

or the better part of three years, Pearls About Swine has largely championed Arkansas athletic director Jeff Long for how he’s met various decision points. Prior to the genesis of this column, even, I thought axing John Pelphrey after four seasons as men’s basketball coach was undeniably proper: Recruiting and retention were slipshod, and he didn’t warrant another glance after two losing seasons and ill feelings about the program surfaced. Long had the temerity to make the long-anticipated overtures toward Mike Anderson, and he did so because it was logical, not simply popular. Following that came the first of Long’s hellish trio of calls about the head football coaching position. He implored for veracity behind Bobby Petrino’s halfassed Knievel story and got it, then went at the Gordian knot with both hands. The John L. Smith plug-in shorted out the wiring pretty badly, but Long gritted his teeth and smartly waited out the lost 2012 season to secure Bret Bielema’s name on the contract. Here’s the thing about those decisions: In the proverbial vacuum or with a wide lens flanked by context, Long acted reasonably if not altogether shrewdly. Bielema may be viewed as boorish by some, but he won over 70 percent of his games in a major conference and was, by all rights, a surprising coup just the way Petrino was in late 2007. He’s obviously going to get two or three solid years to calm the presently turbulent seas he sailed in upon. Anderson came “home” and will be here for at least two more seasons in theory because his credentials earned him a longer leash than the one Pelphrey was afforded, and his job performance to date hasn’t been so thoroughly discouraging as to warrant a quick hook. Long was this publication’s 2012 Arkansan of the Year, in fact, not because of ingenuity. He was simply an ever-present lightning rod for many months, and even if you cast him off as some kind of interloper from the other side of Mason-Dixon, you at least had to respect his fearlessness. I guess you could applaud him again for what he did Sunday — a full 48 hours ahead of April Fool’s Day, mind you — when he hired an ESPN analyst to lead the women’s basketball program. Do not interpret any mocking tone herein as a slight toward Jimmy Dykes personally; he lobbied for the job hard and got it, and even if his commentary during games makes you bristle, you can at least appreciate his robust knowledge of the sport. He’s going

to get and apparently embrace a fair opportunity to invigorate a program that has been more or less dorBEAU mant for a while. WILCOX The hiring generated momentary social media buzz on an otherwise sleepy Sabbath morning. Predictably Dykes’ TV colleagues took to Twitter to well-wish, and extol his brilliance. Long had replaced Tom Collen, who has won 348 Division I games, with a guy who has never been a head coach above the small high school level. This isn’t to lambaste the firing of Collen, which was legitimized by yet another poor SEC campaign, but to point out that Long really went off-script with this choice. And why? Was it truly for public relations currency, which is of dubious actual value? Did Long think he could get away with this move simply because women’s basketball isn’t a revenue stream? His duties toward the athletic department are indisputably fiscally motivated, but there’s got to be a cry about gender equity looming beneath the surface here. Had he fired Petrino in 2012 and permanently replaced him with, say, Kirk Herbstreit just because the latter had observed hundreds of games and played the sport, this fan base would be livid. If the hiring standard varies from one sport to the next based on gains and losses alone, we’re facing a rather grim societal problem. Further, Long was visibly shaken in April 2012 when, in detailing Petrino’s various offenses, he emphasized that the departing coach had flagrantly violated university hiring policies by retaining Jessica Dorrell for a recruiting liaison gig that paid just shy of $60,000 per year. Now Long, less than two years later, has given Dykes just shy of a half-mil to be in full control of an entire varsity sport despite his own undeniable dearth of experience. But to skirt the risk of likening Dorrell to Dykes, let’s hearken back to 1997 for something more relevant and comparable. When the late Orville Henry memorably penned that he was “furious” when a selection committee tabbed the rah-rah of Houston Nutt over the seasoning of Tommy Tuberville, it was because that committee bought into a sales pitch and strayed from common sense. Time will tell if that has transpired again, and Pearls can’t share Orville’s rage over this decision, but it’s a perplexing turn of events to say the very least.

THE OBSERVER

Corporate travel?

NOTES ON THE PASSING SCENE

Travelin’ LAST WEEKEND, THE OBSERVER woke up on a hardwood floor in New Orleans, having slept in the unfurnished bedroom of a brick building on Esplanade Avenue with shards of glass glued like makeshift barbed wire to the top of the surrounding wall. “Place looks like a crack-house,” said one passing cyclist as we sat on the stoop drinking coffee a little while later. The cyclist wasn’t wrong. The other houses on the street, narrow shotguns and double-gallery homes painted bright pastel colors, only underlined how bleak and unfinished-seeming the brick building was. One of the tenants, who lived upstairs and claimed exclusive access to the porch, was a house painter and prolific graffiti artist who drank Taaka straight from the bottle. Another made his living by painting his entire body red and dressing up as the devil. Every day he would stalk the Seventh Ward accepting donations for the fact of his costume, and these days, apparently, even in his off-hours he stayed red. I later learned that Degas had once lived across the street. Elbowing our way through the magicians and ghost-tour guides and trombonists and tired tourists in the French Quarter, we paid the two dollars to board the ferry to Algiers Point. We stood on the lower deck, braving windburn and sun shock, and the ride took 10 minutes or maybe less. Once across the river, we walked to a bar called Old Point. Still mostly asleep, we were hardly surprised when we heard, over the music and out of the open side door, what sounded unmistakably like the sound of a velociraptor crying in a yard across the street. We took our beers and wandered toward the yard. Behind a metal grate, we found an enormous turkey squawking and gobbling and eating cat food out of a plastic tray. Its owner, a generous middle-aged woman wearing sunglasses, introduced us to the bird, whose name was Tom Tyson. Tom’s head looked disconcertingly like a brain, changing colors fluidly “like a mood ring,” as his owner put it. While we talked, her husband brought huge, awe-inspiring slabs of meat out to a grill on the porch, and a small, nervous terrier barked in Tom’s face and leapt up to lick our hands. Though we didn’t ask, she began to tell us about her experiences during Katrina. They hadn’t

left, and though their screened-in porch was damaged and Tom was soaked and afraid, his molting process accelerating so that he dropped all of his feathers prematurely, their house remained intact and they were uninjured. Algiers didn’t flood, she told us, and only one of her neighbors had died. She’d tried to leave and suffered a blood clot on the bus out of town. One of the biggest names ever to come out of Algiers was Clarence “Frogman” Henry, and as we rode the ferry back across the river, I looked up Henry’s Wikipedia page. He grew up idolizing Fats Domino and Professor Longhair, and would wear a wig during his early concerts, I learned. His biggest U.S. hit was “I Don’t Know Why (But I Do),” from 1961. Clarence “Frogman” Henry, look him up. Back in on the more populous side of the Mississippi, we again pushed our way through the noise and waves of bodies. It smelled like oysters. A sign caught my eye: “See the Albino Alligators.” It started to rain so we ducked into a bar. We discussed the turkey we had met and agreed that “Tom Tyson” was an appropriate name.

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THIS OBSERVER WAS A ROLLIN’ STONE last weekend, taking the heavensent Saturday morning as a sign that we should light out for Memphis with the family, that handsome city to the Northeast, site of so many of The Observer’s good times and good meals. By the time we got there, convinced yet again that the Arkansas Highway and Transportation Department is in an active conspiracy with the Arkansas Department of Parks and Tourism to stifle the flow of dollars into Tennessee, the sun was high and bright in the blue bowl of the sky. We went to Central Barbecue and had the city’s finest swine, flipped through novels in a bookstore older than Coca Cola (Burke’s Books, open since 1875 and highly recommended), petted kitties at the pungent cat rescue shop across the way, then thumbed stacks of albums at a little hipster record store around the corner, coming kissing close to buying a little number called “Vampire at the Harpsichord” even though we haven’t owned a functioning record player since Ronald Reagan was ascendant. A short trip, then. No lumpy hotel beds or strange toilets, no luggage. Just a lovely trip, and we didn’t once set foot on Beale Street, sakes alive. www.arktimes.com

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Arkansas Reporter

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IN S IDE R

The Huffington Post recently had some fun with David Sterling, the relatively unknown religious right Republican running for Arkansas attorney general. The North Little Rock lawyer represented the Cupids Lingerie company in a lawsuit five years ago; Cupids, in addition to selling risque undies, has a website that hawks some raunchy porn sites. Sterling was an attorney representing a client, which hardly means he endorses Cupids. But you know who won’t cotton to even a whiff of association with panties? Jim Bob Duggar, that’s who. HuffPo poked the hornet’s nest, informing the patriarch of the TLC reality television show “19 Kids & Counting” about the old case. Duggar’s spokesperson responded with this statement: “Due to new revelations and recent developments the Duggar family has decided to withdraw its endorsement of David Sterling in the 2014 race for Arkansas Attorney General. The family wishes both candidates well, but will not be making any endorsement at this time. We will have no further comment on this matter.” New revelations! Recent developments! Duggar’s son Josh Duggar is executive director of the lobbying arm of the Family Research Council. Jim Bob Duggar has previously offered support for Mike Huckabee and Rick Santorum.

Another racist billboard in Harrison

Last October, a billboard with the message “Anti-Racist is a Code Word for Anti-White” went up in Harrison, a town that counts around three dozen black people among its 13,000 residents. Harrison has an ugly racial history as a “sundown town” unwelcome to black people, and happens to be where KKK leader Thom Robb, who lives nearby, keeps his post office box (the KKK continues to make its presence felt in the town — last month, 14 “racial patriots” showed up at the Harrison library to protest a black history event). The “Anti-White” billboard stirred up controversy and exasperation among city leaders who are hoping to change Harrison’s reputation. In November, the sign was painted over in graffiti, with someone changing “Anti-White” to “Love.” Chad Watkins CONTINUED ON PAGE 11 10

APRIL 3, 2014

ARKANSAS TIMES

BRIAN CHILSON

Cupid’s arrow stings Sterling

Lost in translation Worry about fate of Hall’s Newcomer Center simmers. BY DAVID KOON

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ducators at Hall High School and members of the Little Rock Chapter of the League of United Latin American Citizens are worried that Little Rock School District Superintendent Dr. Dexter Suggs wants to end or drastically change the current Newcomer Center at Hall High School. The center, which brings in students from all over the district for whom English is not their native language, currently serves more than 200 students, most of them Latinos. Supporters say the program, which is unique in the district, works to better academic outcomes for students. Suggs, meanwhile, says his intentions have been misconstrued, and he actually wants to expand ESL services — and options for ESL students and their parents — throughout the district, including at Hall. The Newcomer Center at Hall was established after a 1998 visit from federal investigators following a civil rights complaint on behalf of ESL students in the LRSD. Under the Newcomer Center system at Hall, ESL students from 9th through 12th grade are taught their four core subjects in small “sheltered” classes with only 16 students per classroom. Although the

classes are taught in English, as required by state law, teachers of these classes must have an endorsement on their teaching license saying they are specially trained to deal with students who are learning English as a second language. As students become more proficient in English, they are moved into regular or pre-AP classes taught by teachers who have at least 30 hours of training on educating ESL learners. In addition, English classes at Hall are “double blocked” for ESL students, meaning that students spend one hour each day on writing, pronouncing and listening to English, and another hour each day taking the common core English class. Elective classes at Hall such as art, computer keyboarding and PE are taken by both ESL and native speakers. Attendance at Hall High is optional for ESL students; parents may send their children to schools in their neighborhood if they wish. When the program started, it served 60 students. Now there are more than 200 ESL students clustered at Hall, most of them Latinos, who make up 20 percent of the population of the school. A person closely associated with the discussions over the Newcomer Center

who wished to remain unidentified over job concerns — here called M — said that Suggs’ plans for the Newcomer Center and ESL programs in general have been unclear. “He’s saying, ‘We’re going to get rid of it,’ but I can’t pin him down on his plan,” M said. “He won’t say if this is going to be next year, if this means in four years. He won’t commit to anything. But he has flat said in a town meeting that he was going to get rid of the Newcomer Center, and he has said in a public meeting that he will not move the Newcomer Center.” During discussions with Suggs, some had suggested moving the Newcomer Center to McClellan High School on Geyer Springs Road to be closer to the center of the Latino population in Southwest Little Rock. M said the Newcomer Center improves outcomes for ESL students who might otherwise be stuck in the back of a classroom and ignored. M called the percentage of ESL kids who currently go on to take preAP and AP courses at Hall “astronomical compared to the rest of the population,” adding that the school sent ESL students to Governor’s School and Boys and Girls State in recent years, and saw their first ESL Homecoming Queen this year. M said strength in numbers for the Latinos at Hall not only keeps incidents of racially inspired bullying in check, it gives students the confidence to apply to college. Though Suggs has suggested training ESL teachers in schools throughout in the district to increase services to ESL students, M questioned whether this approach is feasible. “You can say you’re going to train teachers,” M said, “but with our agreement with our union, you can’t make a teacher go get trained. You can’t make a teacher go get an endorsement.” The classes for ESL training are particularly rigorous, M said, requiring the completion of 12 graduate hours, and many teachers just don’t want the hassle. The better system, M said, is the one currently in place, which brings ESL students to a centralized location for intensive, specialized instruction, rather than dispersing them into the greater population where teachers may not have the time to spend on their special needs. “[Dr. Suggs’] public motive seems to be that he wants to service the Latino population,” M said, “but he’s not being specific on how he wants to do that. You’re not servicing the Latino population by taking CONTINUED ON PAGE 51

LISTEN UP

PLAYINGhenPOSSUM the Arkansas Travelers

W BIG THE

Tune in to the Times’ “Week In Review” podcast each Friday. Available on iTunes & arktimes.com

announced the first phase of rebranding last fall — which included unveiling a new logo and a “swamp camo” jersey — the team promised to later unveil a new mascot that team officials described as “a legendary creature, an omen known to bringing good luck.” The big reveal came last week. Shelly, the goofy, bucktoothed horse that served as the team’s mascot since 1996 was “upgraded” to Ace, a menacing, 7-foot horse. But Ace didn’t fill the “legendary” good luck charm role. That’s left to a second new mascot, Otey the swamp possum. Has there ever been a more misguided mascot selection? Custom Characters of Glendale, Calif., who has created characters for the likes of Disney and DreamWorks, definitely didn’t take a cue from Pogo. This swamp possum is all sharp claws and rat face. True to form, his backstory includes growing up “watching Travs games ... from underneath the stands” at Ray Winder Field. He’s named “in honor” of former Travs infielder and groundskeeper R.C. Otey, who passed away several years ago. We’re sure his family is touched. The selection drew immediate jeers throughout social media and the web. National sites Deadspin and SBNation lampooned it. Look for Otey to join the Geoduck of Evergreen State (a green, phallicshaped mollusk) and the Banana Slug of the University of CaliforniaSanta Cruz on worst mascot lists on the web. Here’s a sampling of a few of the mostly critical comments from the Times Facebook page:

INSIDER, CONT.

PICTURE

was charged with vandalizing the sign, which was taken down, restored, and put back up. Meanwhile, someone leaked Watkins’ name to the KKK before the charge was made public by the

CAREY VOSS How can there be so many problems with one tiny swamp possum? 1. perputuates hillbilly/ignorant redneck stereotype 2. creepy Clockwork Orange bowler hat (ready for some ultra-violence?) 3. the giant red bat suggests that we should all go out and club a bunch of possums after the game 4. WTF is up with the giant teeth and weird nose? DANIEL GREEN Once, someone’s grandpa brought in a possum he caught to a “science class” at my elementary school. Thing proceeded to hiss, shit everywhere and play dead. Yes. Let’s compare a competitive professional sports team with that. BEAU GOLDEN The marketers in California just have a great feel for what would appeal to people in Arkansas. What do we think of, when we think of Arkansas? Hillbilly Opossums. ROBBIE GILL Run it over and leave it for the vultures. SHARPE DUNAWAY I may be in the minority here but renaming the team to the Arkansas Swamp Possums would be pretty cool! Also an awesome band name. ED CALDWELL Just say no, or consider Gary the Rabid Raccoon. JOHN PETTIE How about the goddamn Arkansas Traveler as a mascot? Would that be so terrible? A man on a horse. There you go. That’s the mascot. Not a stupid Bullwinkle horse with a Shell logo on its back or a disease infested, club-wielding marsupial.

VIA KARK

WILL CHURCHILL Otey looks like a great mascot for a sweeping compound or a line of floor buffers. ISRAEL ROGERS What, was rabid nutria already taken?

police. Now a new sign has gone in below the billboard that reads “Beautiful Town, Beautiful People, No Wrong Exits, No Bad Neighborhoods” and has a picture of a smiling white family. The billboard says it’s sponsored by the Harrison Area Business Owners and has a link to the website HarrisonArkansas.Info. The site eliminates any doubt that the new billboard’s racial coding, if less blatant than the other sign, is ugly business. On its home page, the site has a long description of Harrison, beginning with run-of-the-mill town boosterism, but then quickly displaying a coziness with white supremacy and fascism familiar to anyone who has waded through the muck of racist propaganda. As for the KKK leader Robb? He’s not racist, he’s just “prowhite only.” “Some in the city resent the attention he brings while most are either ambivalent or quiet supporters,” the site says. The strange “No Wrong Exits” bit on the sign is particularly creepy in Harrison, given the horrific history of the violent, forced expulsion of blacks out of the town a century ago.

Still searching for All-Star alumni

A reminder: The 20th class of the Arkansas Times Academic All-Star Team will be named in April. Starting in 1995, teams of judges with years of experience working in education have whittled down hundreds of nominations we’ve been sent from school districts and high schools throughout the state to create each year’s team of 20 of the top students in the state. Now that a good number of past All-Stars are well into their professional careers, and since we’re at a milestone year, we’re hoping to track down as many alumni as possible. If you know a former All-Star, please help put us in touch. Send an email with the subject “ALL-STAR” to lindseymillar@arktimes.com with any information that you have. See a searchable database of all the past winners at arktimes.com/allstaralumni. www.arktimes.com

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Better H health care, lower cost The state’s Payment Improvement Initiative shows it can be done. BY LESLIE NEWELL PEACOCK

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ere was a question a team of public and private insurers and health care specialists put to doctors who perform tonsillectomies: After surgery, do you send the tonsils to pathology for a full stain and thin-slice workup? Or just for a gross inspection? Or do you simply pitch the tonsils in the nearest biohazard bin? Here’s the best answer for slowing medical costs while providing quality care, the goal of the Payment Improvement Initiative’s public and private partners: Pitch them. In virtually every case, doctors suspect before they operate whether the tonsils they are removing are malignant and need to go to pathology; otherwise, the pathology study is deemed unnecessary. That means savings at no cost to a patient’s health. The initiative of the state Department of Health’s Medicaid division and private insurers Blue Cross Blue Shield and QualChoice, launched in 2011, given a trial run in 2012 and now in place, is showing that when doctors know the full costs of treatment of, for example, hip and knee surgery, they may change their practice behavior, creating savings in total health care dollars spent.

BRIAN CHILSON

GOLDEN

It was at Gov. Mike Beebe’s urging, said Dr. William Golden, medical director for Arkansas Medicaid, that Arkansas launched the PII, a unique retrospective payment system. “The governor said, ‘Let’s do this. ... Let’s be ambitious,’ ” Golden said. For a year and a half, DHS and Medicaid staff, the private insurers and consultants McKinsey and Co. held dozens of meetings with doctors and other health care professionals all over Arkansas to create a system tailored to Arkansas’s specific health care landscape, a decentralized system in which people look to many independent providers rather than large, multispecialty organizations along the lines of the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota. The PII collaborators rejected managed care — a “fee for service” system that puts doctors “in a corner” when it comes to how they care for their patients. It rejected “bundling,” in which a single payer divvies up a set dollar amount for a particular course of treatment (or episode of care) to members of the medical team, a system that would not

work in the landscape of fragmented care. (Former Medicaid director Gene Gessow had been a proponent of bundling; he resigned in October 2011.) Instead, the team came up this idea: a retrospective reimbursement system based on comparison of what Arkansas providers charge for a particular “episode” of care — say the treatment of a common cold. Using that continuum of charges, the PII team determines what the acceptable range is and rewards providers whose charges fall in the “commendable” range — below the baseline — and penalizes those whose charges are above the baseline. The curve is based not only on cost, but on quality-of-care indicators that have been factored in. Acceptable levels vary depending on whether Medicaid or private insurance is the payer, since Medicaid reimbursement is lower. The PII team chose five “episodes” to measure initially: upper respiratory tract infections, knee and hip replacement, congestive heart fail-

ure, attention deficit disorder and perinatal care (or pregnancy), first doing three-month trial runs with providers to let them see how they fell along the continuum of charges, and then initiating yearlong pay analyses to determine reimbursement. Since the initial five, 10 more episodes were chosen: colonoscopy, cholecystectomy (gall bladder removal), tonsillectomy, oppositional defiance disorder, coronary artery bypass grafting, percutaneous coronary intervention, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, coupled ADHD/ ODD diagnoses and some neonatal conditions. The private insurers started with three episodes: knee and hip replacement, congestive heart failure, and perinatal care. Those particular episodes were chosen because of wide variation in charges and quality and high numbers of procedures, Steve Spaulding, senior vice president at Blue Cross in charge of payment reform, said. Its next episodes will be tonsillectomy, colonoscopy and gall bladder surgery. The private insurance system differs from Medicaid’s in that the target cost per episode was pre-established by historical data and charges are compared against that. What the Payment Improvement Initiative has done for doctors, Spaulding said, is make transparent the costs of various providers their patients will encounter during the course of an episode, thanks to an electronic data system. For example, surgeons who before might have sent all their hip replacement patients to in-patient rehabilitation post-op can now compare their outcomes with others who used less expensive outpatient alternatives and see if it makes sense for their patients. The electronic records allow doctors to “drill down,” Spaulding said, to examine the average amount spent for their episodes, get details on quality indicators for the episode, compare patients and, if they have questions, call the service line for help with the data. “The intended result,” Spaulding said, is not to cut back on the cost of health care but “to reduce the rate of increase.” Tennessee, Ohio and Delaware are looking at Arkansas’s payment improvement plan as a model they could use, and Spauding and Golden both said they hope Medicare will incorporate some of the retrospective approach to create a standard to which to hold providers accountable. About that common cold: Anyone who has kept up with medical news — not just doctors — knows that antibiotics don’t treat cold viruses. It’s also common knowledge by now that the overuse of antibiotics has made the drugs less effective against fighting bacteria, as the bugs have learned to adapt to their enemies and mutated into resistant strains. That has left us with a smaller arsenal in the fight against infection. So why are doctors still prescribing antibiotics for the sniffles? “It’s easier,” Golden said: They don’t have to spend time explaining why the antibiotic would only be useful to treat a secondary bacterial infection that develops as a result of the virus, thus shortening the visit. CONTINUED ON PAGE 14 www.arktimes.com

APRIL 3, 2014

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BETTER HEALTH CARE, LOWER COST

BRIAN CHILSON

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 13

Taking the PII to heart Cardiologist David Rutlen and UAMS team make changes in the best way to care for their patients. BY LESLIE NEWELL PEACOCK

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r. David Rutlen, 67, has been a cardiovascular researcher at Yale University, chief of cardiology at the Medical College of Georgia, and director of cardiovascular medicine at Froedtert and The Medical College of Wisconsin Cardiovascular Center in Milwaukee. The director of cardiovascular medicine at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences for the past eight years and a clinician, Rutlen and “a cast of thousands” (as he likes to say) took on another challenge in 2012: revamping the way UAMS originates care for congestive heart failure patients as part of the state’s Payment Improvement Initiative to control Medicaid spending. For six months, attending physicians, fellows,

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residents, nursing students, pharmacists — the number was actually 40 — met to examine what UAMS was doing to treat its patients with chronic heart disease who come to UAMS for acute care. It looked at the heart failure order sheet of various procedures and asked, what should be here and what need not be here? Who among us has not had a doctor ask us to get a test another doctor performed in recent months? Shouldn’t that be determined before one is ordered? The medical center’s order sheet — which drives doctors’ decisions in testing — included cardiac ultrasounds, chest X-rays, full blood work. And Rutlen said the team said, “Let’s just rethink CONTINUED ON PAGE 16

But since the PII began to provide doctors with information on their peers’ costs and outcomes in the treatment of upper respiratory infection, the prescribing of antibiotics to treat a common cold has fallen more than 10 percent. The number of doctors that prescribed two courses of antibiotics has fallen by 40 to 50 percent, Golden said. The use of strep tests to diagnose sore throats (pharyngitis) has risen more than 5 percent. Medicaid’s URI data, reported in February, was the first to come in since the PII was launched. Medicaid tracked 654 providers who treated patients for non-specific infections, sore throats and sinusitis from October 2012 to September 2013, and here’s what it found: More than 78 percent of the URI episodes were in acceptable or commendable ranges. More than 40 percent fell in the commendable range and will receive “gain-sharing” incentive payments ranging from less than a dollar to more than $3,000. Only 22 percent charged above the baseline; their “risksharing” (or penalty) ranged from less than a dollar to $7,200. The dollars doctors gained: $69,000. Dollars doctors will pay back to the state: $92,000. Then there are the practices in the middle, the 38 percent of episodes in the acceptable range: They too represent savings, when they have changed the ways they do things to reach that acceptable level. Given what doctors know about the common cold, why would a clinic make an appointment for someone complaining of a cold? That also is a question the Payment Improvement Initiative will address as part of its Medical Home initiative for primary care, a team-based approach in which doctors, nurses and other care providers coordinate all care provided to their patients, with the primary care provider accountable for all costs. That would result in better care, Golden said, and reduce trips to the hospital. It would reduce unnecessary trips to the doctor; that caller with a common cold could be directed to an advanced practice nurse to assess whether a visit is necessary. It would also allow clinics to do what managed care was expected to do so many years ago: prevent acute problems as well as complications, with outreach and more coordinated clinical care. There are financial benefits for primary care providers — who Blue Cross’ Spaulding said take in only 10 percent of the medical dollar but influence care for nearly 100 percent of patients — under the medical home model. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is making grants available to clinics to transfer to the medical home model, helping pay for infrastructure and outreach costs, and savings for reimbursements that fall in the commendable level are significant. Say the PCP is showing savings of $10 per member patient per year, a savings that puts them in the commendable category: Medicaid will reimburse them 50 percent of that $10. CONTINUED ON PAGE 16

BRIAN CHILSON

THOMAS

Caring for offspring and outliers Neonatologist heads Center for Diversity Affairs at UAMS. BY LESLIE NEWELL PEACOCK

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aybe it’s because his parents were sharecroppers. That he grew up Tyronza, one of 12 children. That he was one of the first in his family to go to college. That he knows what it was like to be different from the mainstream student at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, what it’s like to be a minority on staff. Dr. Billy Ray Thomas, neonatologist at UAMS and head of its Center for Diversity Affairs, knows that while access to medical care is increasing, thanks to the Affordable Care Act, and that Arkansas hopes to improve the quality of health care with its medical home initiative, there are other reasons that stand in the way of a healthy populace. Half of his job (the other half in the neonatal intensive care unit) is figuring out how to serve the demographic of the population “moving into the insured realm” whose fears of being discriminated against, or lack of familiarity with the system, mean that accessibility doesn’t translate to actual care. And how can UAMS attract more to the profession of medicine who understand these fears, people who can communicate with minority populations — African American, Hispanic, gay, transgender, the

disabled, people of minority faiths like Muslims, etc. — and can make them comfortable and open about their medical concerns. UAMS open its Office of Minority Affairs in the 1970s, when the focus for equality was on race. Now, as the Center for Diversity Affairs, the office is concerned with all “marginalized populations,” Thomas said. “At the heart of what we do is try to find, recruit and retain disadvantaged and minority students. ... Not just because we need to be diverse. The value is a diverse health care workforce does a better job of taking care of a diverse population.” In the 2013-14 class at UAMS, only 4.7 percent of students were African American, a percentage that has actually decreased in the past five years. The numbers of Hispanic or Latino students has ranged between 1.3 and 3 percent since the 200809 school year. Training faculty and doctors in what Thomas calls cultural competency “is one of the hardest things of any institution,” Thomas said. “There are institutions with bits and pieces of programs, and we have an early beginning of a program.” Where do you start? With faculty? Students? Cul-

tural competence can’t be taught in a lecture hall, the doctor said; “it has to be experiential. ... I think what we’re facing here is people don’t have a real sense of the health disparities that exist.” For the LGBT population, that includes more depression, suicidal thoughts, drinking, smoking and drug abuse. It means reluctance to visit a doctor or share intimate information. As attendees heard at a conference on caring for LGBT patients at UAMS in January, the LGBT population has a higher risk of homelessness, especially among young transgender females. Lesbians have higher rates of obesity and breast cancer and a lower use of preventative health services. Gay and lesbian children are more likely to have been bullied or the victim of violence. Older transgender patients may suffer ill effects from using hormones long term. There is the issue of HIV/AIDs and stigmatization. One of the Center for Diversity Affairs’ top programs now is its summer mentored research programs. “I think that has made the biggest difference in us being able to attract and retain [minority medical] students,” Thomas said. The Center also has science programs that target K-12 students. “I do think we’re making some headway; things will blossom in the next three to five years if we can get past [UAMS budget difficulties].” Thomas’ clinical focus targets another subpopulation: premature and sick full-term babies. During a visit to the neonatal intensive care unit at the UAMS Medical Center, Becky Sartini, head of the NICU, handed Thomas a tiny, beautiful baby born six weeks premature. As Thomas cradled the infant, Sartini made gentle fun of him. He can put a breathing tube in with no problem, she tells a reporter, but he looks a little tentative holding that tiny baby. One of the reasons Thomas, who did his postgrad fellowship at Case Western Reserve, likes his job, he said, is the people in the nursery, “likeminded” people who care for their delicate charges and who, like him, want to get babies past the acute crisis and give them a chance at “another 80 years.” When Thomas, 61, was doing his fellowship, babies under 700 to 750 grams (about a pound and a half) did not survive, he said. Viability is now at 500 grams (a little over a pound). That’s possible thanks to early and good prenatal care for the mother that makes the womb a healthy place for the at-risk fetus, as well as new meds that make up for the lack of secretions in little lungs that keep them from working properly. Babies born prematurely have a high risk of neurological and developmental problems. Babies born at only 25 weeks gestation can develop normally, “but numbers are low,” because of the likelihood of brain bleeds, risk of infection and oxygen deprivation. Given that, how early is too early to save a baby? “I don’t think we’re close to answering that question,” Thomas said. “I think it’s a good thing that we save their lives. We know a large number will have productive, quality lives.” The most important thing for a baby’s development, he said, is getting a team in place — doctors, the family and social workers — to make a plan. www.arktimes.com

APRIL 3, 2014

15

TAKING THE PII TO HEART

BRIAN CHILSON

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 14

SPAULDING

BETTER HEALTH CARE, LOWER COST CONTINUED FROM PAGE 14 If the medical home has 1,000 members, that’s $5,000. It would also provide financial support to primary care physicians, also with incentives that include reimbursements for charges falling under the baseline. Golden said Arkansas was “launching the most ambitious medical home” program in the nation. Doctors learning about the system were “at first like deer in the headlights,” Golden said, but now 600 doctors in 110 practices seeing more

than 250,000 patients are participating. Golden isn’t exaggerating the importance of the medical home. Just a few weeks ago, an MSNBC program on the Payment Improvement Initiative as a whole — one it called one of the nation’s “most creative, ambitious efforts to transform health care” in the nation — focused on SAMA Health Care in El Dorado, one of the state’s first medical homes. Doctors at SAMA got a CMS grant for $400,000 and raised another $100,000 to transform their practice and in nearly two years have produced outcome rankings far higher than the national average and prevented 880 emergency room visits, which would have cost Medicaid $2.6 million.

this.” What if the patient had had an ultrasound recently? Was the chest X-ray really needed? Why order full bloodwork when what you want to know is whether the patient’s kidneys are functioning the way they ought or has their poor heart function loaded their lungs or legs with fluid? Isn’t it critical to get a pharmacist and the nursing staff involved to see what medicines the patient has been taking (heart patients are sometimes on as many as 30 meds, Rutlen said)? Are we providing the best care? What if the patient was put on an intravenous diuretic instead of a bolus, and what if the patient was to be seen a week after his hospital visit to make any needed adjustments in medications? Should that be included in UAMS’protocol? The approach was to see “what exactly do we need to know to take care of the patient?” Rutlen said. The result was a “sea change,” impacting not just its Medicaid patients but all heart patients seen at the medical center. UAMS expected that its average charge for 30-day episodes of congestive heart failure would be in the $4,700 to $6,500

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16

APRIL 3, 2014

ARKANSAS TIMES

range, Rutlen said. But the data came back better: UAMS’ average charges to Medicaid for 20 episodes of congestive heart failure were $3,500. That’s in the “commendable” range established by initiative, which means UAMS will get money back from the state Medicaid system. Will the Payment Improvement Initiative make a real difference in containing Medicaid costs? Rutlen believes it will. The Payment Improvement Initiative is only tangentially related to the Affordable Care Act, which expanded Medicaid eligibility and thus access to health care for hundreds of thousands of Arkansans. But the PII’s creation of the medical home — the coordinated care of patients by cooperating providers — could help with outreach to persons who didn’t have insurance or who simply didn’t feel comfortable going to the doctor. Rutlen’s wondering about his patient with congenital heart failure whom he’s never been able to convince to have the surgery he needs. Maybe he will now. “It’s exciting,” Rutlen said. “Medicine is moving so quickly. ... With the Affordable Care Act, you can look at it as a burden or as an opportunity.” Rutlen added, “My personal perspective would be for universal health care, but only Obama’s plan would have passed” Congress.

BEST DOCTORS IN CENTRAL ARKANSAS Addiction Medicine FORREST B. MILLER St. Vincent Family Clinic 4202 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72204 Phone: 501-562-4838

Allergy And Immunology JENNY CAMPBELL 700 S 52Nd St Rogers, AR 72758 Phone: 479-464-8887

TERRY O. HARVILLE University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Department Of Pathology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-526-7511

CURTIS HEDBERG 700 S 52Nd St Rogers, AR 72758 Phone: 479-464-8887

STACIE M. JONES Arkansas Children’s Hospital Division Of Allergy And Immunology

1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1060

Department Of Anesthesiology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-6114

KEVIN R. KELLER Fayetteville Diagnostic Clinic Division Of Allergy And Immunology 3344 N Futrall Dr Fayetteville, AR 72703 Phone: 479-521-8200

4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-6114

PHILLIP SLOAN JILL M. MHYRE

JOHN L. COFFMAN Mercy Hospital Fort Smith Department Of Anesthesiology 7301 Rogers Ave Fort Smith, AR 72903 Phone: 479-452-1581

ELEANOR A. LIPSMEYER

University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Department Of Anesthesiology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-6114

RYAN B. COLEMAN

AMY M. SCURLOCK

W. BROOKS GENTRY

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Division Of Allergy And Immunology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-4000

University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Department Of Anesthesiology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-6114

Mercy Hospital Fort Smith Department Of Anesthesiology 7301 Rogers Ave Fort Smith, AR 72903 Phone: 479-452-1581

University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Department Of Anesthesiology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-6114

CARMELITA S. PABLO University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Department Of Anesthesiology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-6114

MICHAEL L. SCHMITZ Anesthesiology INDRANIL CHAKRABORTY University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences

ABOUT BEST DOCTORS Best Doctors, Inc. is transforming and improving health care by bringing together the best medical minds in the world to help identify the right diagnosis and treatment. The company’s innovative, peerto-peer consultation service offers a new way for physicians to collaborate with other physicians to ensure patients receive the best care. Headquartered in Boston, MA, the global company seamlessly integrates its services with employers’ other health-related benefits, to serve more than 30 million members in every major region of the world. More than a traditional second opinion, Best Doctors delivers a comprehensive evaluation of a patient’s medical condition – providing value to both patients and treating physicians. By utilizing Best Doctors, members have access to the brightest minds in medicine to ensure the right diagnosis and treatment plan. Best Doctors’ team of researchers conducts a biennial poll using the methodology that mimics the informal peer-to-peer process doctors themselves use to identify the right specialists for their patients. Using a polling method and balloting software, that Gallup® has audited and certified, they gather the insight and experience of tens of thousands of leading specialists all over the country, while confirming their credentials and specific areas of expertise.

VICTOR MANDOFF University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Department Of Anesthesiology

Mercy Hospital Fort Smith Department Of Anesthesiology 7301 Rogers Ave Fort Smith, AR 72903 Phone: 479-452-1581

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University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Rheumatology Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 2Nd Fl 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-8000

Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1100

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department Of Anesthesiology 1 Children’s Way

The result is the Best Doctors in America® List, which includes the nation’s most respected specialists and outstanding primary care physicians in the nation. These are the doctors that other doctors recognize as the best in their fields. They cannot pay a fee and are not paid to be listed and cannot nominate or vote for themselves. It is a list which is truly unbiased and respected by the medical profession and patients alike as the source of top quality medical information. Gallup® has audited and certified Best Doctors, Inc.’s database of physicians, and its companion The Best Doctors in America® List, as using the highest industry standards survey methodology and processes. These lists are excerpted from The Best Doctors in America® 2014 database, which includes more than 45,000 U.S. doctors in over 40 medical specialties and 400 subspecialties. The Best Doctors in America® database is compiled and maintained by Best Doctors, Inc. For more information, visit www.bestdoctors.com or contact Best Doctors by telephone at 800-675-1199 or by e-mail at research@bestdoctors.com. Please note that lists of doctors are not available on the Best Doctors Web site. Best Doctors, Inc., has used its best efforts in assembling material for this list, but does not warrant that the information contained herein is complete or accurate, and does not assume, and hereby disclaims, any liability to any person or other party for any loss or damage caused by errors or omissions herein,

Mercy Outpatient Surgery Center - River Valley 3601 W E Knight Dr Fort Smith, AR 72903 Phone: 479-785-2555

ABID UL GHAFOOR Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department Of Anesthesiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1100

DANNY L. WILKERSON University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Department Of Anesthesiology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-6119

Cardiovascular Disease JOSEPH K. BISSETT Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System John L. Mcclellan Memorial Veterans Hospital Department Of Cardiology 4300 W 7Th St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-257-5795

J. LYNN DAVIS St. Vincent Heart Clinic Arkansas 415 N University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-664-6841

BEN D. JOHNSON 500 S University Ave, Ste 415 Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-664-9535

JAMES D. MARSH University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Department Of Internal Medicine Outpatient Center Bldg, 2Nd Fl 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-7000

whether such errors or omissions result from negligence, accident, or any other cause. © Copyright 2014, Best Doctors, Inc. Used under license, all rights reserved. This list, or any parts thereof, must not be reproduced in any form without written permission from Best Doctors, Inc. No commercial use of the information in this list may be made without the permission of Best Doctors, Inc. No fees may be charged, directly or indirectly, for the use of the information in this list without permission. BEST DOCTORS, THE BEST DOCTORS IN AMERICA, and the Star-in-Cross Logo are trademarks of Best Doctors, Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries, and are used under license.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE VISIT WWW.BESTDOCTORS.COM.

SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES

APRIL 3, 2014

17

DAVID L. RUTLEN University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Division Of Cardiovasular Medicine Outpatient Center Bldg, 2Nd Fl 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-5311

EUGENE S. SMITHIII University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Cardiology Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 2Nd Fl 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-5311

BARRY F. URETSKY University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences

Division Of Cardiovascular Medicine 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-8000

Clinical Pharmacology LAURA P. JAMES Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Pharmacology And Toxicology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1418

Colon And Rectal Surgery J. RALPH BROADWATER, JR. University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute Department Of Surgical Oncology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-8211

Critical Care Medicine PAULA JEAN ANDERSON University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Pulmonary And Critical Care Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 2Nd Fl 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-603-1400

JOHN B. CONE University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Department Of Surgery 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-8000

F. CHARLES HILLERII University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences

Pulmonary And Critical Care Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 2Nd Fl 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-603-1400

MUHAMMAD JAFFAR University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Department Of Anesthesiology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-6114

LARRY G. JOHNSON University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Pulmonary And Critical Care Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 2Nd Fl 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-603-1400

VICTOR MANDOFF

MISSY CLIFTON

University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Department Of Anesthesiology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-6114

Premier Dermatology & Skin Renewal Center 901 Se Plaza Dr, Ste 5 Bentonville, AR 72712 Phone: 479-273-3376

GARY L. TEMPLETON Fayetteville Diagnostic Clinic 3344 N Futrall Dr Fayetteville, AR 72703 Phone: 479-521-8200

SCOTT M. DINEHART Arkansas Skin Cancer Center Medical Towers Bldg, Ste 860 9601 Baptist Health Dr Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-975-7455

GUNNAR H. GIBSON Dermatology RENIÉ EDWARD BRESSINCK Dermatology Group Of Arkansas Baptist Medical Towers 1, Ste 690 9601 Baptist Health Dr Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-227-8422

4200 N Rodney Parham Rd, Ste 202 Little Rock, AR 72212 Phone: 501-227-4323

CHRISTOPHER SCHACH Ozark Dermatology Clinic 4375 N Vantage Dr, Ste 305 Fayetteville, AR 72703 Phone: 479-443-5100

KEVIN ST. CLAIR Ozark Dermatology Clinic 4375 N Vantage Dr, Ste 305 Fayetteville, AR 72703 Phone: 479-443-5100

Eating Disorders MARIA G. PORTILLA Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Adolescent Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1849

Endocrinology And Metabolism DONALD L. BODENNER University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute Thyroid Center 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-526-2292

STAVROS C. MANOLAGAS University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Diabetic And Endocrinology Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 2Nd Fl 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-296-1220

GANESH K. NAIR Little Rock Diagnostic Clinic 10001 Lile Dr Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-227-8000

ROBERT S. WEINSTEIN University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Diabetic And Endocrinology Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 2Nd Fl 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-296-1220

Family Medicine JIMMY ACKLIN Veterans Health Care System Of The Ozarks Department Of Family Medicine Sparks Medical Plaza 1500 Dodson Ave Fort Smith, AR 72917 Phone: 479-441-2600

DAN BEAU BELL Washington Regional Family Clinic Eureka Springs 146 S Passion Play Rd, Ste A Eureka Springs, AR 72632 Phone: 479-253-9746

RONALD BRIMBERRY Uams Family Medical Center Springdale 601 W Maple Ave, Ste 102 Springdale, AR 72764 Phone: 479-750-6585 18

APRIL 3, 2014

SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES

KATHERINE ANN IRISH-CLARDY University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Ahec Family Medical Center 612 S 12Th St Fort Smith, AR 72901 Phone: 479-785-2431

RALPH FARRIS JOSEPH St. Vincent Family Clinic 4202 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72204 Phone: 501-562-4838

RUSSELL EUGENE MAYO University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Ahec Family Clinic 300 E 6Th St, 2Nd Fl Texarkana, AR 71854 Phone: 870-779-6000

FORREST B. MILLER

120 Dellmere Dr Hot Springs, AR 71913 Phone: 501-520-1489

Fort Smith, AR 72901 Phone: 479-573-7960

ANN T. RIGGS DAVID A. LIPSCHITZ 415 N Mckinley St, Ste 130 Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-660-4500

PRIYA MENDIRATTA University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Donald W. Reynolds Senior Health Center Geriatrics And Longevity Clinic 629 Jack Stephens Dr Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-6219

GRETCHEN M. OROSZ Sparks Senior Health Center 1500 Dobson Ave, Ste 125

University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Donald W. Reynolds Senior Health Center Geriatrics And Longevity Clinic 629 Jack Stephens Dr Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-6219

T. SCOTT SIMMONS University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Institute On Aging 629 Jack Stephens Dr Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-8000

A. REED THOMPSON University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute Lymphedema Clinic 4301 W Markham St, 6Th Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-296-1200

LARRY D. WRIGHT Schmieding Center For Senior Health And Education 2422 N Thompson St, Ste A Springdale, AR 72764 Phone: 479-757-3333

Geriatric Medicine/Hospice And Palliative Medicine A. REED THOMPSON University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences

Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute Lymphedema Clinic 4301 W Markham St, 6Th Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-296-1200

MICHAEL M. MOORE

Hand Surgery ROGER N. BISE

Infectious Disease ROBERT W. BRADSHERJR.

2713 S 74Th St, Ste 302 Fort Smith, AR 72903 Phone: 479-478-8555

University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Infectious Diseases Clinic 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-603-1616

G. THOMAS FRAZIER, JR. Arkansas Specialty Orthopaedics Arkansas Specialty Hand And Upper Extremity Center 600 S Mckinley St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-663-3647

Arkansas Specialty Orthopaedics 600 S Mckinley St, Ste 200 Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-663-3647

JOHN E. DIETRICH Infectious Disease Resource Group 9600 Baptist Health Dr, Ste 280 Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-661-0037

St. Vincent Family Clinic 4202 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72204 Phone: 501-562-4838

GORDON R. PARHAM Washington Regional Medical Center Department Of Internal Medicine 3215 N North Hills Blvd Fayetteville, AR 72703 Phone: 479-463-1000

WILLIAM H. RILEY, JR. St. Vincent Family Clinic 4202 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72204 Phone: 501-562-4838

CHARLES H. RODGERS St. Vincent Family Clinic 4202 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72204 Phone: 501-562-4838

STEVE L. SIMPSON St. Vincent Family Clinic 10000 N Rodney Parham Rd Little Rock, AR 72227 Phone: 501-221-0888

STEVEN W. STRODE Arkansas Disability Determination 701 Pulaski St Little Rock, AR 72201 Phone: 501-683-1703

MARK S. THOMAS Washington Regional Palliative Care 3215 North Hills Blvd Fayetteville, AR 72703 Phone: 479-463-7363

DANIEL W. WATSON Autumn Road Family Practice 904 Autumn Rd, Ste 200 Little Rock, AR 72211 Phone: 501-227-6363

Gastroenterology HELEN B. CASTEEL Pediatric Gastroenterology Associates 1515 S Bowman Rd, Ste B Little Rock, AR 72211 Phone: 501-228-7171

D. DEAN KUMPURIS 417 N University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-666-0249

GERALD R. SILVOSO Little Rock Diagnostic Clinic 10001 Lile Dr Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-227-8000

Geriatric Medicine HOSAM K. KAMEL Geriatrics Consulting Services SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES

APRIL 3, 2014

19

DWIGHT A. LINDLEYJR. Infectious Disease Resource Group 9600 Baptist Health Dr, Ste 280 Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-661-0037

Internal Medicine LEE CURTIS ABEL Little Rock Diagnostic Clinic 10001 Lile Dr Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-227-8000

MICHAEL SACCENTE University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Infectious Diseases Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 2Nd Fl 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-603-1616

STEVEN A. EDMONDSON

MARK LEE STILLWELL

AMY J. FITZGERALD

Northwest Center For Infectious Diseases 2900 Medical Center Pkwy, Ste 240B Bentonville, AR 72712 Phone: 479-273-9173

Mercy Clinic Family Medicine - 70 West 1707 Airport Rd Hot Springs, AR 71913 Phone: 501-767-6200

Washington Regional Medical Center Department Of Internal Medicine 3215 N North Hills Blvd Fayetteville, AR 72703 Phone: 479-463-1000

LANCE L. HAMILTON Northwest Internal Medicine 2900 Medical Center Pkwy, Ste 240B Bentonville, AR 72712 Phone: 479-273-9173

ROBERT HOWARD HOPKINS, JR. University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Internal Medicine South Clinic 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-5311

ROBERT CHARLES LAVENDER University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Internal Medicine South Clinic 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-5545

SARA GHORI TARIQ University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Internal Medicine South Clinic 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-5545

SUE A. ULMER Little Rock Diagnostic Clinic 10001 Lile Dr Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-227-8000

PAUL WILLIAM ZELNICK

Healing is in Our Nature.® Congratulations to all the Arkansas Children’s Hospital physicians named to the Best Docs, Inc. list!

Physicians Group Doctors Bldg, Ste 615 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-666-3666

Medical Genetics G. BRADLEY SCHAEFER Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Genetics And Metabolism 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-4000

Medical Oncology And Hematology BART BARLOGIE

Access to our experts is at your fingertips with the FREE MyACH mobile app! MyACH can help you find a doctor, find your way around the hospital and keeps your families’ health information where you can always find it - in the palm of your hand. fi Download it from the App Store D

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University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute Myeloma Institute For Research And Therapy 324 Jack Stephens Dr, 8Th Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-8230

JOSEPH M. BECK II Doctor’s Bldg, Ste 512 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-666-7007

PETER D. EMANUEL

Meet our doctors at archildrens.org 20

APRIL 3, 2014

SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES

University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute Medical Oncology Clinic 4301 W Markham St, 7Th Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-8530

TONY A. FLIPPIN Mercy Medical Center Department Of Medical Oncology And Hematology 7001 Rogers Ave, Ste 200 Fort Smith, AR 72903 Phone: 479-314-7490

Neurological Surgery STEVEN L. CATHEY Central Arkansas Neurosurgery Clinic 3500 Springhill Dr, Ste 201 North Little Rock, AR 72117 Phone: 501-771-2000

MARIANN HARRINGTON

JOHN DIAZ DAY

Little Rock Hematology Oncology Associates 9500 Baptist Health Dr, Ste 330 Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-537-9009

University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Department Of Neurosurgery 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-8757

LAURA FULPER HUTCHINS University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute Women’s Oncology Clinic 4301 W Markham St, 2Nd Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-296-1200

ALI F. KRISHT Arkansas Neuroscience Institute Department Of Neurosurgery 5 Saint Vincent Cir, Ste 220 Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-552-6412

T. GLENN PAIT University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Jackson T. Stephens Spine And Neurosciences Institute 501 Jack Stephens Dr Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-8757

MICHAEL STANDEFER Northwest Arkansas Neurosurgery Clinic 5501 Willow Creek Dr, Ste 203 Springdale, AR 72762 Phone: 479-521-0900

Neurology ROBERT LEROY (LEE) ARCHER University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Jackson T. Stephens Spine And Neurosciences Institute

The Neurology Clinic 501 Jack Stephens Dr, 2Nd Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-5838

BRADLEY S. BOOP Little Rock Diagnostic Clinic 10001 Lile Dr Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-227-8000

M. BETUL GUNDOGDU University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Jackson T. Stephens Spine And Neurosciences Institute The Neurology Clinic 501 Jack Stephens Dr, 2Nd Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-5838

JOHN L. KAREUS

BASHIR S. SHIHABUDDIN

Cooper Clinic, P.A. 6801 Rogers Ave Fort Smith, AR 72903 Phone: 479 274 3300

University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Jackson T. Stephens Spine And Neurosciences Institute The Neurology Clinic 501 Jack Stephens Dr, 2Nd Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-5838

WALTER STEVEN METZER University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Department Of Neurology 501 Jackson Stephens Dr, 8Th Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-1735

STACY A. RUDNICKI University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Jackson T. Stephens Spine And Neurosciences Institute 501 Jack Stephens Dr, 2Nd Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-5838

MARGARET F. TREMWEL Vascular Neurology And Memory Disorders Clinic 1500 Dodson Ave, Ste 175 Fort Smith, AR 72901 Phone: 479-709-7125

Nuclear Medicine JAMES E. MCDONALD University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Division Of Nuclear Medicine

ISAAM MAKHOUL University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute Medical Oncology Clinic 4301 W Markham St, 10Th Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-8530

Best and Future Best

LAWRENCE A. MENDELSOHN Little Rock Hematology Oncology Associates 9500 Baptist Health Dr Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-219-8777

DIANE D. WILDER

Congratulations to Ken Martin, M.D., for again being recognized as Best Doctor in the orthopedic surgery category. Dr. Martin is also pleased to announce a future Best Doctor through the association of Clay Riley, M.D., with Martin Knee and Sports.

Little Rock Hematology Oncology Associates 9500 Baptist Health Dr, Ste 200 Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-537-9009

Nephrology SAMEH R. ABUL-EZZ University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Kidney Transplant Clinic 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-5535

BOBBIE DEAN FINE, JR.

Dr. Riley’s orthopedic expertise focuses on shoulder and elbow repair and rehabilitation enhanced through his Fellowship at the Foundation for Athletic and Reconstructive Research, Texas Orthopedic Hospital, Houston. In addition, Dr. Riley is active in research and has authored numerous orthopedic book chapters and scientific papers.

Arkansas Renal Group Hot Springs Diagnostic Associates 115 Wrights St Hot Springs, AR 71913 Phone: 501-321-9803

JAMES T. HENRY Sparks Medical Foundation Renal Care Associates 1500 Dodson Ave, Ste 280 Fort Smith, AR 72901 Phone: 479-709-7480

MICHELLE W. KRAUSE University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Renal Clinic 5800 W 10Th St, Ste 510 Little Rock, AR 72204 Phone: 501-661-7910

Choose Martin Knee and Sports for the best in orthopedic surgery, outcomes and rehabilitation.

ROBERT F. MCCRARY, JR. Arkansas Renal Group Hot Springs Diagnostic Associates 115 Wrights St Hot Springs, AR 71913 Phone: 501-321-9803

DANA P. RABIDEAU Sparks Medical Foundation Renal Care Associates 1500 Dodson Ave, Ste 280 Fort Smith, AR 72901 Phone: 479-709-7480

Ken Martin, M.D. (left), with Clay Riley, M.D.

JOHN WAYNE SMITH Arkansas Renal Group Hot Springs Diagnostic Associates 115 Wrights St Hot Springs, AR 71913 Phone: 501-321-9803

8907 Kanis Road Little Rock, Arkansas 72205 501.227.9994 SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES

APRIL 3, 2014

21

4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-6901

KATHY LYNN THOMAS Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System John L. Mcclellan Memorial Veterans Hospital Department Of Nuclear Medicine 4300 W 7Th St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-257-6100

DAVID W. WEISS Radiology Consultants Of Little Rock Baptist Medical Towers 1, Ste 1100 9601 Baptist Health Dr Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-227-5240

Obstetrics And Gynecology ALEXANDER F. BURNETT University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute Women’s Oncology Clinic 4301 W Markham St, 2Nd Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-8522

KAY H. CHANDLER Cornerstone Clinic For Women 1 Lile Ct, Ste 200 Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-224-5500

STEPHEN M. CHATELAIN

Pleasant Valley Ophthalmology Congratulates Their New Associate,

Arkansas Perinatal Services Medical Towers Bldg 2, Ste 810 9501 Baptist Health Dr Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-217-8467

KAREN JEAN KOZLOWSKI

Laurie Barber, MD For Being One Of The Best Doctors Dr. Laurie Barber has special interest in comprehensive eye care, dry eye, refractions, cataract evaluations, and other medical eye diseases.

11825 Hinson Rd, Ste 103 Little Rock For appointments call 501-223-3937

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Young Women’s Center 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-6601

CURTIS L. LOWERY, JR. University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences University Women’s Health Center Freeway Medical Tower, Ste 7-400 5800 W 10Th St Little Rock, AR 72204 Phone: 501-296-1800

Ophthalmology LAURIE D. G. BARBER Pleasant Valley Ophthalmology 11825 Hinson Rd, Ste 103 Little Rock, AR 72212 Phone: 501-223-3937

/(3"/5ʤ#"'3".&34)08300.ʼ ʤʼʰt45&1)"/0456%*04$0.

APRIL 3, 2014

RICHARD W. NICHOLAS, JR.

Arkansas Oculoplastic Surgery 9800 Baptist Health Dr, Ste 500 Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-223-2244

University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Department Of Orthopaedic Surgery 4301 W Markham St, Ste 531 Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-296-1200

CAROL W. CHAPPELL 5 Saint Vincent Cir, Ste 200 Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-661-1123

RICHARD A. HARPER University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Jones Eye Institute 4301 W Markham St, 7Th Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-5822

SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES

RICHARD A. NIX Orthoarkansas 10301 Kanis Rd Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-604-6900

RICHARD D. PEEK Arkansas Specialty Orthopaedics 600 S Mckinley St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-663-3647

MIKE S. MCFARLAND 3805 W 28Th Ave Pine Bluff, AR 71603 Phone: 870-536-4100

RICKEY D. MEDLOCK Retina Associates 9800 Baptist Health Dr, Ste 200 Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-219-0900

A. HENRY THOMAS University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Jones Eye Institute 4301 W Markham St, 7Th Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-5822

CHRISTOPHER T. WESTFALL University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Jones Eye Institute 4301 W Markham St, 7Th Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-5822

Orthopaedic Surgery JAMES D. ALLEN Medical Park Orthopaedics And Sports Medicine 501 Virginia Dr, Ste C Batesville, AR 72501 Phone: 870-793-2371

Arkansas Specialty Orthopaedics 600 S Mckinley St, 1St Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-666-2824

University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences University Women’s Health Center Freeway Medical Tower, Ste 7-400 5800 W 10Th St Little Rock, AR 72204 Phone: 501-296-1800

22

WADE BROCK

University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Division Of Maternal And Fetal Medicine Freeway Medical Tower, 7Th Fl 5800 W 10Th St Little Rock, AR 72204 Phone: 501-526-7425

PAUL J. WENDEL

STEPHANO’S FINE ART GALLERY

Arkansas Specialty Orthopaedics 600 S Mckinley St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-663-3647

C. LOWRY BARNES

3343 Springhill Dr, Ste 1005 North Little Rock, AR 72117 Phone: 501-758-9251

WITH WORKS AVAILABLE AT

DAVID GORDON NEWBERN

Retina Specialists Of Arkansas 5 Saint Vincent Cir, Ste 201 Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-978-5500

EVERETT F. MAGANN

STEPHEN RAY MARKS

wmichaelabstract.com

J. DAVID BRADFORD

WAYNE BRUFFETT Arkansas Specialty Orthopaedics 600 S Mckinley St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-663-3647

GREG T. JONES Mercy Clinic River Valley Musculoskeletal Center 3501 W E Knight Dr Fort Smith, AR 72903 Phone: 479-709-6750

DAVID W. SUDBRINK Mercy Clinic River Valley Musculoskeletal Center 3501 W E Knight Dr Fort Smith, AR 72903 Phone: 479-709-6750

RUTH L. THOMAS University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Department Of Orthopaedic Surgery 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-6067

JOHN L. VANDER SCHILDEN University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Department Of Orthopaedic Surgery 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-7823

Otolaryngology JEFFREY L. BARBER Arkansas Otolaryngology Center 10201 Kanis Rd Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-227-5050

JOE B. COLCLASURE Arkansas Otolaryngology Center 10201 Kanis Rd Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-227-5050

JOHN RODDEY EDWARDS DICKINS Arkansas Otolaryngology Center 10201 Kanis Rd Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-227-5050

JOHN L. DORNHOFFER University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Jackson T. Stephens Spine And Neurosciences Institute Ear, Nose And Throat Clinic 501 Jack Stephens Dr, 3Rd Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-5878

JAMES WALTER LONG Mercy Clinic River Valley Musculoskeletal Center 3501 W E Knight Dr Fort Smith, AR 72903 Phone: 479-709-6750

KENNETH A. MARTIN Martin Knee And Sports Medicine Center 8907 Kanis Rd, Ste 330 Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-975-5633

GRESHAM RICHTER Arkansas Children’s Hospital Pediatric Otolaryngology Clinic Vascular Anomalies Center 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1225

BRENDAN C. STACK, JR. University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Department Of Otolaryngology, Head

And Neck Surgery 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-8224

SCOTT J. STERN Little Rock Hematology Oncology Associates 9500 Baptist Health Dr Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-219-8777

Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-5170

Pediatric Allergy And Immunology D. MELISSA GRAHAM Advanced Allergy & Asthma 500 S. University Ave., Suite 215 Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-420-1085

STACIE M. JONES JAMES Y. SUEN University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Department Of Otolaryngology, Head And Neck Surgery 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-296-1200

EMRE VURAL University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Department Of Otolaryngology, Head And Neck Surgery 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-5140

Pathology MURAT GOKDEN University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Division Of Neuropathology Shorey Bldg, 4Th Fl, Rm 4S-09 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-603-1508

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Division Of Allergy And Immunology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1060

TAMARA T. PERRY Arkansas Children’s Hospital Division Of Allergy And Immunology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-4000

AMY M. SCURLOCK Arkansas Children’s Hospital Division Of Allergy And Immunology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-4000

Pediatric And Adolescent Gynecology KAREN JEAN KOZLOWSKI Arkansas Children’s Hospital Young Women’s Center 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-6601

AUBREY HOUGH, JR. University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Department Of Pathology And Laboratory Services 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-526-6990

Pediatric Anesthesiology JESUS (JOJO) APUYA

JENNIFER HUNT

JAMES GRADY CROSLAND

University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Department Of Pathology And Laboratory Services 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-5170

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department Of Anesthesiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1100

LAURA W. LAMPS University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Department Of Pathology And Laboratory Services Shorey Bldg, 4Th Fl, Rm 4S-09 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-7966

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department Of Anesthesiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1100

AYANT K. DESHPANDE Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department Of Anesthesiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-8006

TIMOTHY W. MARTIN Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department Of Anesthesiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1100

ROBERT B. LORSBACH University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Department Of Pathology And Laboratory Services Shorey Bldg, 4Th Fl, Rm 4S-29 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-5170

FRED G. SILVAII Nephropath 10810 Executive Center Dr, Ste 100 Little Rock, AR 72211 Phone: 501-604-2695

ANNA-MARIA ONISEI Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department Of Anesthesiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1100

MICHAEL L. SCHMITZ Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department Of Anesthesiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1100

M. SAIF SIDDIQUI BRUCE ROBERT SMOLLER University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Department Of Pathology And Laboratory Services Shorey Bldg, 4Th Fl, Rm 4S-09 4301 W Markham St

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department Of Anesthesiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1100

ABID UL GHAFOOR Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department Of Anesthesiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1100

J. MICHAEL VOLLERS Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department Of Anesthesiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1100

Pediatric Cardiac Surgery MICHIAKI IMAMURA Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department Of Cardiothoracic Surgery 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-5858

Pediatric Cardiology THOMAS H. BEST Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department Of Cardiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1479

RENEE ADAMS BORNEMEIER Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department Of Cardiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1479

BRIAN K. EBLE Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Pediatric Cardiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1479

EUDICE E. FONTENOT Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department Of Cardiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1479

ELIZABETH A. FRAZIER Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department Of Cardiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1479

M. MICHELE MOSS Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department Of Cardiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1479

Section Of Critical Care Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1845

XIOMARA GARCIA-CASAL Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department Of Cardiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1479

JERRIL W. GREEN Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Critical Care Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1845

MARK J. HEULITT Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Critical Care Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1845

M. MICHELE MOSS Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department Of Cardiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1479

PARTHAK PRODHAN Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department Of Cardiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1479

RONALD C. SANDERS, JR. Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Critical Care Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1845

STEPHEN M. SCHEXNAYDER Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Critical Care Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1845

Pediatric Dermatology JAY M. KINCANNON University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Dermatology Clinic 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-686-5960

Pediatric Emergency Medicine RHONDA M. DICK Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Emergency Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1050

MARY HUCKABEE Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Emergency Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1050

LAURA P. JAMES Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Pharmacology And Toxicology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1418

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Emergency Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1050

REBECCA A. SCHEXNAYDER Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Emergency Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1050

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Emergency Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1050

KENDALL LANE STANFORD

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Emergency Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1050

TONYA MARIE THOMPSON Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Emergency Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1050

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Endocrinology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1430

Pediatric Clinical Genetics STEPHEN G. KAHLER

JILL FUSSELL

STEPHEN FRANK KEMP

University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences James L. Dennis Developmental Center Department Of Pediatrics 1301 Wolfe St Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1830

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Endocrinology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1430

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department Of Cardiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1479

RICHARD THOMAS FISER Arkansas Children’s Hospital

ARKANSAS OCULOPLASTIC SURGERY, PLLC  r#BQUJTU)FBMUI%S -JUUMF3PDL "3

ELIZABETH ANNE STORM

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department Of Pediatrics 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-3300

University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences James L. Dennis Developmental Center Department Of Pediatrics 1301 Wolfe St Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1830

Cosmetic and Reconstructive Oculoplastic Surgery

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Emergency Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1050

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department Of Cardiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1479

ELDON GERALD SCHULZ

For Being Voted One Of Arkansas’s Best Doctors By His Peers

STEVEN W. SHIRM

PAUL MICHAEL SEIB

Pediatric Critical Care ADNAN TARIQ BHUTTA

Congratulates Dr. Wade Brock

REBECCA LATCH

Pediatric Developmental And Behavioral Problems PATRICK H. CASEY

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Genetics And Metabolism 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-4000

ARKANSAS OCULOPLASTIC SURGERY, PLLC

Pediatric Endocrinology JOHN L. FOWLKES

CAROL W. C,WW>>Í•M.D. /^W>^dKEEKhEd,/d/KEK&

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ALBA E. MORALES Arkansas Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital Section Of Endocrinology 1 Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1430

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KATHRYN M. THRAILKILL

Arkansas Ophthalmology Associates, P.A.

Arkansas Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital Section Of Endocrinology 1 Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Way

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ARKANSAS OPHTHALMOLOGY ASSOCIATES

SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES

APRIL 3, 2014

23

1 OUT OF 3 DIAGNOSES IN THE U.S. IS WRONG.

AND THAT’S JUST NOT

The U.S. healthcare system places an enormous burden on doctors and their patients. As a result, approximately 34% of patients in America are misdiagnosed. And 68% of treatment plans require correction.* Best Doctors is helping lower these numbers. How? By providing patients with access to the best minds in medicine for virtual second opinions, answers to personal healthcare questions and more. 2XUVHUYLFHVDUHRIIHUHGDVDQHPSOR\HHEHQH¿WE\RXVWDQGLQJ companies like The Home Depot and other leaders nationwide. Ask your Human Resources representative if your company offers Best Doctors. It would be a mistake not to.

* Based on Best data. 24 APRIL 3, 2014Doctors SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES

www.bestdoctors.com

STEPS YOU CAN TAKE TO AVOID MISDIAGNOSIS

1

Ask questions, even â&#x20AC;&#x153;unimportantâ&#x20AC;? ones. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be a spectator in your own care. Ask questions about your disease, diagnosis, treatment, drugs and overall care. Prepare questions in advance for every doctorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s visit. Bring along a friend or family member to remind you what you want to ask. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t hold back â&#x20AC;&#x201C; no question is too â&#x20AC;&#x153;sillyâ&#x20AC;? or â&#x20AC;&#x153;uncomfortableâ&#x20AC;? when itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your health.

2

Tell a 10-second story. Studies show that doctors interrupt patients after about 10 seconds to assist as quickly as possible. Hold your doctorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s attention by telling a brief, compelling story up front. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just focus on symptoms (â&#x20AC;&#x153;my knee hurtâ&#x20AC;?), but also on situations (â&#x20AC;&#x153;My knee hurt so badly I couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t walk from my bed to the kitchen.â&#x20AC;?) The more your doctor knows, the stronger the foundation for your diagnosis.

3

Always get a second opinion. Or a third. Second opinions are becoming increasingly routine in modern medicine. Be your own advocate and seek out second, third â&#x20AC;&#x201C; or even fourth â&#x20AC;&#x201C; opinions from medical experts. Understand what youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re facing and get the information you need to make GHFLVLRQVZLWKFRQÂżGHQFH

4

Give your tissue samples a second look. If your diagnosis is based on a biopsy, have a second specialist re-review your tissue samples. An inaccurate pathology report can lead to an incorrect diagnosis, which leads to the wrong treatment.

5

Tell your doctor you want to be a partner â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and be one. Establish an active partnership with your doctor. That doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mean self-diagnosis on the Internet. It means working together to ensure the best possible care. Share your family history using tools like My Family Health Portrait from the U.S. Surgeon General. Understand your tests and their risks. Ask your doctor to explain his or her thought process. And partner in the decision-making.

Most important of all, know \RXUGLDJQRVLVÂąDQGGRQÂśWOHDYH\RXUGRFWRUÂśVRIÂżFHXQWLO\RXGR,I\RXU GRFWRULVXQFHUWDLQDVNZKDWVWHSVDUHQHFHVVDU\IRUFRQÂżUPDWLRQ.QRZZKDW\RXKDYHZKDWWRH[SHFW and what to do about it. The greater your knowledge, the better your decisions and your health. About Best Doctors Founded in 1989 by Harvard Medical School physicians, Best Doctors is an expert medical consultation service that works with employers and healthplans to help improve healthcare quality. With 30 million members worldwide, Best Doctors provides people facing medical uncertainty with access to world-class medical expertise to ensure they have the right diagnosis and treatment.

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SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES

APRIL 3, 2014

25

Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1430

Pediatric Gastroenterology JULIANA C. FREM

Section Of Hematology And Oncology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-4000

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Gastroenterology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1004

ROBERT L. SAYLORSIII

GEORGE J. FUCHSIII

KIMO C. STINE

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Gastroenterology, Hepatology And Nutrition 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-4400

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Hematology And Oncology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-4000

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Hematology And Oncology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-4000

Pediatric Infectious Disease NADA S. HARIK

TROY E. GIBBONS Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Gastroenterology, Hepatology And Nutrition 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-4000

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Division Of Infectious Diseases 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1416

RICHARD F. JACOBS Pediatric Hematology-Oncology DAVID L. BECTON Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Hematology And Oncology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1494

AMIR R. MIAN Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Hematology And Oncology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1494

CAROLYN SUZANNE SACCENTE Arkansas Children’s Hospital

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Division Of Infectious Diseases 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1416

JOSE R. ROMERO Arkansas Children’s Hospital Division Of Infectious Diseases 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1416

Pediatric Infectious Disease J. GARY WHEELER Arkansas Children’s Hospital Division Of Infectious Diseases

1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1416

Pediatric Interventional Radiology CHARLES ALBERT JAMES Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department Of Radiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1175

Pediatric Medical Genetics STEPHEN G. KAHLER

EILEEN N. ELLIS

RICHARD E. MCCARTHY

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Nephrology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-4000

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department Of Orthopaedics 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-4000

KAREN M. REDWINE

Pediatric Otolaryngology CHARLES MICHAEL BOWER

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Nephrology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1847

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department Of Otolaryngology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-4000

THOMAS G. WELLS

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Genetics And Metabolism 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-4000

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Nephrology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-4000

G. BRADLEY SCHAEFER

Pediatric Neurological Surgery GEORGE T. (TIM) BURSON

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Genetics And Metabolism 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-4000

Pediatric Medical Toxicology LAURA P. JAMES

Neurosurgery Arkansas Baptist Medical Towers 1, Ste 310 9601 Baptist Health Dr Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-224-0200

JAMES ARONSON

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Pharmacology And Toxicology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1418

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department Of Orthopaedics 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-4000

Pediatric Nephrology RICHARD T. BLASZAK

ROBERT DALE BLASIER

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Nephrology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-4000

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department Of Orthopaedics 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-4000

GRESHAM RICHTER Arkansas Children’s Hospital Pediatric Otolaryngology Clinic Vascular Anomalies Center 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1225

Pediatric Pain Management MICHAEL L. SCHMITZ Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department Of Anesthesiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1100

Pediatric Physical Medicine And Rehab VIKKI A. STEFANS Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Developmental, Behavioral And Rehabilitation 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-3728

Pediatric Pulmonology ARIEL BERLINSKI Arkansas Children’s Hospital

Section Of Pulmonary Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-4000

JOHN LEE CARROLL Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Pulmonary Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1006

GULNUR COM Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Pulmonary Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-4000

SUPRIYA K. JAMBHEKAR Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Pulmonary Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-4000

LOUAY K. NASSRI Sparks Pediatrics 1501 S Waldron Rd, Ste 100 Fort Smith, AR 72903 Phone: 479-709-7337

ROBERT H. WARREN Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Pulmonary Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-4000

Pediatric Radiology CHARLES ALBERT JAMES Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department Of Radiology 1 Children’s Way

AT ARKANSAS UROLOGY, YOU’LL ALWAYS GET OUR BEST Arkansas Urology is proud to announce that our own Dr. Keith Mooney and Dr. Gail Reede Jones have been named among this year’s “Best Doctors in America.” Along with all our physicians, they share an unmatched commitment to improving the health of all the patients we serve. And with the addition of Epoch Health, we’re providing more comprehensive care for Arkansas men than ever before.

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A r k a n s a s U r o l o g y. c o m

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APRIL 3, 2014

SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES

Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1175

Pediatric Rheumatology JASON A. DARE Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department Of Rheumatology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-4000

TERRY O. HARVILLE University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Department Of Pathology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-526-7511

PAULA K. MORRIS Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department Of Rheumatology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-4000

Pediatric Sleep Medicine JOHN LEE CARROLL Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Pulmonary Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1006

Pediatric Specialist/Abused Children JERRY G. JONES Arkansas Children’s House 1600 Maryland Ave Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-2680

Pediatric Specialist/Adolescent And Young Adult Medicine ELTON R. CLEVELAND Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Adolescent Medicine

1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-4000

4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-603-1255

BRIAN H. HARDIN

ROBERT E. LYLE

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Adolescent Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-4000

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Neonatology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1028

J. DARRELL NESMITH

ASHLEY S. ROSSIII

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Adolescent Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-4000

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Neonatology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-4000

MARIA G. PORTILLA

JOANNE S. SZABO

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Adolescent Medicine 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1849

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Neonatology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1028

Pediatric Specialist/NeonatalPerinatal Medicine ROBERT W. ARRINGTON

BONNIE J. TAYLOR

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Neonatology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1028

BRYAN L. BURKE, JR. Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Neonatology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-526-1548

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Neonatology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-4000

BILLY RAY THOMAS University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Section Of Neonatology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-296-1397

DONNAL C. WALTER R. WHIT HALL University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Section Of Neonatology

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Neonatology 1 Children’s Way

Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-4000

Pediatric Surgery RICHARD J. JACKSON

Pediatric Specialist/Neurology, General BERNADETTE M. LANGE

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department Of Surgery 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-4000

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Neurology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1850

GREGORY B. SHARP Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Neurology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-4000

ROLLA M. SHBAROU Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Neurology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1850

Pediatric Specialist/Pediatric Metabolic Diseases STEPHEN G. KAHLER Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Genetics And Metabolism 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-4000

Pediatric Surgery M. SIDNEY DASSINGER Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department Of Surgery 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1446

Pediatric Surgery R. TODD MAXSON Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department Of Surgery 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-4000

Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1202

RONALD L. BALDWIN Arkansas Children’s Hospital General Pediatrics Clinic 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1202

SHELLY L. BALDWIN Arkansas Children’s Hospital General Pediatrics Clinic 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1202

Pediatric Surgery SAMUEL D. SMITH

CHARLES S. BALL

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department Of Surgery 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-4000

Medical Associates Of Northwest Arkansas (Mana) Northwest Arkansas Pediatric Clinic 3380 N Futrall Dr, Ste 1 Fayetteville, AR 72703 Phone: 479-442-7322

Pediatric Urology STEPHEN J. CANON

LANESSA D. BASS

Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Urology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-4000

Arkansas Children’s Hospital General Pediatrics Clinic 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-4000

Pediatrics/General RICHARD R. ACLIN

DEBRA D. BECTON

University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Ahec Family Medical Center 612 S 12Th St Fort Smith, AR 72901 Phone: 479-785-2431

MARY E. AITKEN Arkansas Children’s Hospital General Pediatrics Clinic 1 Children’s Way

Arkansas Children’s Hospital General Pediatrics Clinic 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1202

HANNAH BEENE-LOWDER University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Arkansas Children’s Hospital Centers For Children

SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES

APRIL 3, 2014

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519 Latham Dr Lowell, AR 72745 Phone: 479-756-4157

LAUREEN BENAFIELD Medical Associates Of Northwest Arkansas (Mana) Northwest Arkansas Pediatric Clinic 3380 N Futrall Dr, Ste 1 Fayetteville, AR 72703 Phone: 479-442-7322

CARRIE M. BROWN Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Neonatology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-4000

BRYAN L. BURKE, JR. Arkansas Children’s Hospital Section Of Neonatology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-526-1548

VINCENT CALDERON, JR.

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St. Vincent Family Clinic 4202 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72204 Phone: 501-562-4838

ORRIN J. DAVIS Medical Associates Of Northwest Arkansas (Mana) Northwest Arkansas Pediatric Clinic 3380 N Futrall Dr, Ste 1 Fayetteville, AR 72703 Phone: 479-442-7322

FEDERICO C. DE MIRANDA Mercy Pediatrics Fort Smith 7303 Rogers Ave, Ste 200 Fort Smith, AR 72903 Phone: 479-314-4810

MEREDITH A. DENTON Medical Associates Of Northwest Arkansas (Mana) Northwest Arkansas Pediatric Clinic 3380 N Futrall Dr, Ste 1 Fayetteville, AR 72703 Phone: 479-442-7322

DALE W. DILDY, JR. Arkansas Children’s Hospital General Pediatrics Clinic 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1202

ROSANA DIOKNO

HORACE L. GREEN The Children’s Clinic 1420 W 43Rd Ave Pine Bluff, AR 71603 Phone: 870-534-6210

APRIL 3, 2014

SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES

JOE T. ROBINSON

Pediatric Partners 7303 Rogers Ave, Ste 201 Fort Smith, AR 72903 Phone: 479-478-7200

Medical Associates Of Northwest Arkansas (Mana) Northwest Arkansas Pediatric Clinic 3380 N Futrall Dr, Ste 1 Fayetteville, AR 72703 Phone: 479-442-7322

CHARLOTTE A. HOBBS

BRENT (BRENTLY) SILVEY

Arkansas Center For Birth Defects Research And Prevention 13 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-5001

Medical Associates Of Northwest Arkansas (Mana) Northwest Arkansas Pediatric Clinic 3380 N Futrall Dr, Ste 1 Fayetteville, AR 72703 Phone: 479-442-7322

JON R. HENDRICKSON

CHARLES DAVID JACKSON Medical Associates Of Northwest Arkansas (Mana) Northwest Arkansas Pediatric Clinic 3380 N Futrall Dr, Ste 1 Fayetteville, AR 72703 Phone: 479-442-7322

A. LARRY SIMMONS

ANTHONY DALE JOHNSON

JOHN SIMMONS

Arkansas Pediatric Clinic Doctors Bldg, Ste 200 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-664-4117

Medical Associates Of Northwest Arkansas (Mana) Northwest Arkansas Pediatric Clinic 3380 N Futrall Dr, Ste 1 Fayetteville, AR 72703 Phone: 479-442-7322

CARL WESLEY KLUCK, JR. Arkadelphia Clinic For Children 2850 Twin Rivers Dr Arkadelphia, AR 71923 Phone: 870-245-5244

SEAN M. LIVINGSTON Medical Associates Of Northwest Arkansas (Mana) Northwest Arkansas Pediatric Clinic 3380 N Futrall Dr, Ste 1 Fayetteville, AR 72703 Phone: 479-442-7322

R. ALAN LUCAS Arkansas Pediatrics Of Conway 2710 College Ave Conway, AR 72034 Phone: 501-329-1800

JAMES S. MAGEE Arkansas Children’s Hospital General Pediatrics Clinic 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1202

Arkansas Children’s Hospital General Pediatrics Clinic 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1202

WARREN A. SKAUG The Children’s Clinic 800 S Church St, Ste 400 Jonesboro, AR 72401 Phone: 870-935-6012

CHRISTOPHER E. SMITH University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Arkansas Children’s Hospital Centers For Children 519 Latham Dr Lowell, AR 72745 Phone: 479-756-4157

JAMES S. SWINDLE Medical Associates Of Northwest Arkansas (Mana) Northwest Arkansas Pediatric Clinic 3380 N Futrall Dr, Ste 1 Fayetteville, AR 72703 Phone: 479-442-7322

Physical Medicine And Rehabilitation KEVIN J. COLLINS

Arkansas Children’s Hospital General Pediatrics Clinic 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-4000

MERLE E. MCCLAIN Mercy Pediatrics Fort Smith 7303 Rogers Ave, Ste 200 Fort Smith, AR 72903 Phone: 479-314-4810

Rehabilitation Medicine Consultants Of Arkansas Springhill Medical Plaza 3401 Springhill Dr, Ste 460 North Little Rock, AR 72117 Phone: 501-945-1888

JOSEPH M. ELSER

LAURA R. MCLEANE

KEVIN M. MEANS

Arkansas Children’s Hospital General Pediatrics Clinic 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-4000

Arkansas Children’s Hospital General Pediatrics Clinic 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1202

University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Department Of Physical Medicine And Rehabilitation 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-221-1311

CHARLES ROBERT FEILD

EDUARDO R. OCHOA, JR.

University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences James L. Dennis Developmental Center Department Of Pediatrics 1301 Wolfe St Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1830

Arkansas Children’s Hospital General Pediatrics Clinic 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1202

Plastic Surgery THOMAS R. MOFFETTJR.

DIANE FREEMAN Arkansas Pediatric Clinic Doctors Bldg, Ste 200 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-664-4117

WILLIAM C. PATTON East Arkansas Children’s Clinic 901 Holiday Dr Forrest City, AR 72335 Phone: 870-633-0880

TERRY S. PAYTON Medical Associates Of Northwest Arkansas (Mana) Northwest Arkansas Pediatric Clinic

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3380 N Futrall Dr, Ste 1 Fayetteville, AR 72703 Phone: 479-442-7322

Plastic And Reconstructive Surgery Associates 11300 N Rodney Parham Rd, Ste 210 Little Rock, AR 72212 Phone: 501-663-4100

KRIS B. SHEWMAKE 10801 Executive Center Dr, Ste 101 Little Rock, AR 72211 Phone: 501-492-8970

JAMES C. YUEN University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Division Of Plastic And Reconstructive Surgery

4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-8711

Psychiatry JAMES A. CLARDY University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Psychiatric Research Institute 3916 W Capitol Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-526-8286

JEFFREY L. CLOTHIER University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Department Of Psychiatry 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-526-8100

TIM A. KIMBRELL Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System Department Of Psychiatry 2200 Fort Roots Dr North Little Rock, AR 72114 Phone: 501-257-3468

IRVING KUO Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System Eugene J. Towbin Healthcare Center Mental Health Clinic 2200 Fort Roots Dr North Little Rock, AR 72114 Phone: 501-257-3131

LAWRENCE A. LABBATE

JODI M. BARBOZA Radiology Associates (Rapa) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-664-3914

BENJAMIN JOSEPH BARTNICKE Radiology Associates (Rapa) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-664-3914

F. KEITH BELL Radiology Associates (Rapa) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-664-3914

NEIL E. CROW, JR. Sparks Regional Medical Center Department Of Radiology 1001 Towson Ave Fort Smith, AR 72901 Phone: 479-441-4181

C. WILLIAM DEATON Radiology Associates (Rapa) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-664-3914

Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System Eugene J. Towbin Healthcare Center Mental Health Clinic 2200 Fort Roots Dr North Little Rock, AR 72114 Phone: 501-257-3131

LEO F. DROLSHAGENIII

JOHN SPOLLEN

STEVE A. DUNNAGAN

Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System Eugene J. Towbin Healthcare Center Mental Health Clinic 2200 Fort Roots Dr North Little Rock, AR 72114 Phone: 501-257-3131

Radiology Associates (Rapa) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-664-3914

Pulmonary Medicine F. CHARLES HILLERII

EREN ERDEM

University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Pulmonary And Critical Care Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 2Nd Fl 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-603-1400

Radiation Oncology MICHAEL L. TALBERT Carti Baptist Division Of Radiation Oncology 9500 Kanis Rd, Ste 150 Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-312-1733

Radiology ALBERT S. ALEXANDER Radiology Associates (Rapa) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-664-3914

EDGARDO J. CHUA ANGTUACO University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Division Of Neuroradiology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-5750

TERESITA L. ANGTUACO University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Division Of Ultrasound 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-5762

Mercy Medical Center Department Of Radiology 7301 Rogers Ave Fort Smith, AR 72903 Phone: 479-314-6200

University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Division Of Neuroradiology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-5750

JONATHAN F. FRAVEL Radiology Associates (Rapa) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-664-3914

JEROME J. GEHL Radiology Associates (Rapa) St. Vincent Breast Center, Ste 114 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-661-9766

DANNA F. GREAR Medical Associates Of Northwest Arkansas (Mana) The Breast Center 55 W Sunbridge Dr Fayetteville, AR 72703 Phone: 479-442-6266

STEVEN E. HARMS Medical Associates Of Northwest Arkansas (Mana) The Breast Center 55 W Sunbridge Dr Fayetteville, AR 72703 Phone: 479-442-6266

MURRAY T. HARRIS Medical Associates Of Northwest Arkansas (Mana) 3344 N Futrall Dr

Fayetteville, AR 72703 Phone: 479-582-7383

KEDAR JAMBHEKAR University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Department Of Radiology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-5750

CHARLES ALBERT JAMES Arkansas Children’s Hospital Department Of Radiology 1 Children’s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1175

AARON L. JANOS Radiology Associates (Rapa) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-664-3914

DON L. KUSENBERGER Radiology Associates (Rapa) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-664-3914

ROBERT W. LAAKMAN Radiology Associates (Rapa) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-664-3914

W. JEAN MATCHETT Radiology Associates (Rapa) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-664-3914

JOHN N. MEADORS Radiology Associates (Rapa) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-664-3914

LAURA G. MOORE-FARRELL Mercy Medical Center Department Of Radiology 7301 Rogers Ave Fort Smith, AR 72903 Phone: 479-314-6200

CONGRATULATIONS Dr. Rob McCrary For Being Voted One of Arkansas’s Best Doctors (Nephrology) - Your Co-Workers at Medevco

GEORGE A. NORTON Radiology Associates (Rapa) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-664-3914

MEDEVCO

ROGERICH T. PAYLOR Radiology Associates (Rapa) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-2614

CHRISTIE B. PHELAN Radiology Associates (Rapa) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-664-3914

KEVIN L. POPE Medical Associates Of Northwest Arkansas (Mana) The Breast Center 55 W Sunbridge Dr Fayetteville, AR 72703 Phone: 479-442-6266

JOHN P. SCURLOCK

SHOP LOCAL

Radiology Associates (Rapa) SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES

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CARING FOR AN OLDER FAMILY MEMBER IN YOUR HOME? Our Schmieding Home Caregiver Training for family caregivers offers basic skills for communication, understanding behaviors and hands on care for bathing, incontinence, nutrition and mobility. Classes now forming. For more information, call 501-526-6500 or email: RAHoward@uams.edu

Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-664-3914

RICHARD W. HOUK

WAYNE A. HUDEC

Little Rock Diagnostic Clinic 10001 Lile Dr Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-227-8000

Ozark Surgical Associates 3017 Bob Younkin Dr, Ste 101 Fayetteville, AR 72703 Phone: 479-521-1484

Radiology Associates (Rapa) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-664-3914

S. MICHAEL JONES

DAVID W. HUNTON

Little Rock Diagnostic Clinic 10001 Lile Dr Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-227-8000

Mercy Clinic General Surgery - 74Th Street 2717 S 74Th St Fort Smith, AR 72903 Phone: 479-573-3101

HEMENDRA R. SHAH

THOMAS M. KOVALESKI

JOHN C. JONES

University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Department Of Radiology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-5750

Little Rock Diagnostic Clinic 10001 Lile Dr Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-227-8000

The Surgical Clinic Of Central Arkansas Hickingbotham Outpatient Center, Ste 501 9500 Kanis Rd Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-227-9080

RAJESH SETHI

KATHLEEN M. SITARIK

University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Rheumatology Clinic Outpatient Center Bldg, 2Nd Fl 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-8000

STACY SMITH-FOLEY

CUMMINS LUE

STEPHEN J. SEFFENSE

Medical Associates Of Northwest Arkansas (Mana) The Breast Center 55 W Sunbridge Dr Fayetteville, AR 72703 Phone: 479-442-6266

Little Rock Diagnostic Clinic 10001 Lile Dr Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-227-8000

Cooper Clinic, P.A. 7001 Rogers Ave Fort Smith, AR 72903 Phone: 479 274 5100

LAURA B. TRIGG

T. MICHAEL STANTON

Little Rock Diagnostic Clinic 10001 Lile Dr Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-227-8000

Surgical Associates Of Conway 525 Western Ave, Ste 203 Conway, AR 72034 Phone: 501-327-4828

Sleep Medicine JOHN LEE CARROLL

EMILIO TIRADO

Radiology Associates (Rapa) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-664-3914

DAVID E. TAMAS Radiology Associates (Rapa) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-664-3914

Arkansas Community Health Centers Â&#x2021;3DWLHQW&HQWHUHG0HGLFDO+RPHV Â&#x2021;/RFDO+HDOWKFDUH3URYLGHUVLQ&RPPXQLWLHV Â&#x2021;(QUROOPHQWAssisters3ULYDWH2SWLRQ ,QVXUDQFH0DUNHWSODFH

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JENNIFER TURNER Medical Associates Of Northwest Arkansas (Mana) The Breast Center 55 W Sunbridge Dr Fayetteville, AR 72703 Phone: 479-442-6266

SHANNON R. TURNER Radiology Associates (Rapa) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-664-3914

Rheumatology JAMES HOWARD ABRAHAMIII Little Rock Diagnostic Clinic 10001 Lile Dr Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-227-8000

ROBERT M. BREWERJR.

To locate a Community Health Center near you, call 1-877-666-CHCA or visit our website at www.chc-ar.org facebook.com/CommunityHealthCentersofAR twitter.com/chc_ar 30

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Arkansas Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital Section Of Pulmonary Medicine 1 Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Way Little Rock, AR 72202 Phone: 501-364-1006

Sleep Medicine DAVID GEORGE DAVILA Baptist Health Sleep Clinic Hickingbotham Outpatient Bldg, 1St Fl 9500 Kanis Rd Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-202-1902

Sleep Medicine GREGORY S. KRULIN University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Sleep Lab 11300 Financial Pkwy, Ste 1200 Little Rock, AR 72211 Phone: 501-526-6090

Surgery HUGH F. BURNETT The Surgical Clinic Of Central Arkansas Hickingbotham Outpatient Center, Ste 501 9500 Kanis Rd Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-227-9080

CHRIS M. CATE

Little Rock Diagnostic Clinic 10001 Lile Dr Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-227-8000

The Surgical Clinic Of Central Arkansas Hickingbotham Outpatient Center, Ste 501 9500 Kanis Rd Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-227-9080

JAMES S. DENEKE

JOHN B. CONE

Cooper Clinic, P.A. 6801 Rogers Ave Fort Smith, AR 72903 Phone: 479 274 3650

University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Department Of Surgery 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-8000

THOMAS R. DYKMAN

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RONALD ROBERTSON

Radiology Associates (Rapa) Doctors Bldg, Ste 101 500 S University Ave Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-664-3914

AARON M. SPANN

Suppor t ed by a grant f rom t he Donald W. Reynolds Foundat ion.

ELEANOR A. LIPSMEYER

Fayetteville Diagnostic Clinic 3344 N Futrall Dr Fayetteville, AR 72703 Phone: 479-521-8200

University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Division Of Trauma And Surgical Critical Care 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-526-6262

500 S University Ave, Ste 808 Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-664-2174

WILLIAM EVERETT TUCKER The Surgical Clinic Of Central Arkansas Hickingbotham Outpatient Center, Ste 501 9500 Kanis Rd Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-227-9080

JOHN W. WEBB St. Josephâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mercy Surgical Clinic Medical Office Bldg, Ste 201 1 Mercy Ln Hot Springs, AR 71913 Phone: 501-609-2229

Surgical Oncology J. RALPH BROADWATER, JR. University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute Department Of Surgical Oncology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-8211

RONDA S. HENRY-TILLMAN University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute Oncology Clinics, 2Nd Fl 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-296-1200

JOHN C. JONES The Surgical Clinic Of Central Arkansas Hickingbotham Outpatient Center, Ste 501 9500 Kanis Rd Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-227-9080

V. SUZANNE KLIMBERG DARRYL W. ECKES Cooper Clinic, P.A. 7001 Rogers Ave Fort Smith, AR 72903 Phone: 479 274 5100

University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Oncology Clinic 4301 W Markham St, 2Nd Fl Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-296-1200

KENT C. WESTBROOK University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute Department Of Surgical Oncology 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-8211

MONICA VERMA, MD The only private practice ophthalmologist in Arkansas specializing in the eye care needs of children.

Thoracic Surgery FRANK MICHAEL BAUER III

PROVIDING CLINICAL SERVICES FOR: >SRWOb`WQ=^VbVOZ[]Z]UgÂ&#x2019;Ab`OPWa[caÂ&#x2019;AQV]]ZdWaW]\SfO[a @SbW\]^ObVg]T>`S[Obc`WbgÂ&#x2019;2OQ`g]abS\]aWaÂ&#x2019;/[PZg]^WO ;]bWZWbg2Wa]`RS`aÂ&#x2019;1VOZOhW]\abgSaSgSZWRRWa]`RS`aÂ&#x2019;5S\SbWQag\R`][Sa @SRO\R^OW\TcZSgSaÂ&#x2019;;SRWQOZQ]`\SOÂ&#x2019;1][^`SVS\aWdS]^VbVOZ[]Z]Ug

St. Vincentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cardiovascular Surgeons 5 Saint Vincentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cir, Ste 501 Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-666-2894

HUGH F. BURNETT The Surgical Clinic Of Central Arkansas Hickingbotham Outpatient Center, Ste 501 9500 Kanis Rd Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-227-9080

In downtown Little Rock two blocks from the State Capitol. e eďŹ&#x201A;or o a. We send ďŹ&#x201A;owers worldwide through TeleďŹ&#x201A;ora. 1222 WEST CAPITOL -*55-&30$,t '3"/$&4'-08&34)01$0.

EYE CARE ARKANSAS

501.225.4488 Baptist Health Eye Center 9800 Baptist Health Drive, Suite 301 Little Rock, AR 72205

JAMES S. COUNCE Cardiovascular Surgery Clinic 3276 N North Hills Blvd Fayetteville, AR 72703 Phone: 479-587-1114

ROBERT C. JAGGERS

Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a reason CARTI ranks in the top ďŹ ve percent nationally for patient satisfaction amongst cancer centers.

Cardiovascular Surgery Clinic 3276 N North Hills Blvd Fayetteville, AR 72703 Phone: 479-587-1114

H. GARETH TOBLER University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Department Of Cardiothoracic Surgery 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-7884

Urology MARK A. HEWETT Urology Associates Of Northwest Arkansas 2100 S 54Th St Rogers, AR 72758 Phone: 479-271-7077

Dr. Larry Mendelsohn Hematologist/Oncologist

Dr. Mariann Harrington Hematologist/Oncologist

Dr. Diane Wilder Hematologist/Oncologist

GAIL REEDE JONES Arkansas Urology 1300 Centerview Dr Little Rock, AR 72211 Phone: 501-219-8900

D. KEITH MOONEY Arkansas Urology 1300 Centerview Dr Little Rock, AR 72211 Phone: 501-664-4364

Vascular Surgery GARY W. BARONE University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences Division Of Renal Surgery 4301 W Markham St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-686-6086

MOHAMMED M. MOURSI Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System John L. Mcclellan Memorial Veterans Hospital Department Of Vascular Surgery 4300 W 7Th St Little Rock, AR 72205 Phone: 501-257-6917

Dr. Scott Stern Head & Neck Surgery

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Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking at ďŹ ve of them. Thank you to our patients for recognizing Dr. Larry Mendelsohn, Dr. Mariann Harrington, Dr. Diane Wilder, Dr. Scott Stern and Dr. Michael Talbert of CARTI as ďŹ ve of the Best Doctors in the state. Because of these physicians, along with our medical staďŹ&#x20AC; and 400 colleagues throughout the state, CARTI brings the ďŹ ght to cancer to more than 20,000 patients each year. Congratulations on this well-deserved honor.

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SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES

APRIL 3, 2014

31

April 28, 2014 • 6:30pm - 9:00pm • The Capital Hotel Don’t miss an evening of delicious food from some of Little Rock’s most talented chefs, rub elbows with local celebrities, and be an integral part of funding the Thea Foundation’s life-changing scholarship program.

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8 Chefs • 2 Mixologists 10 Local Celebrities

XI

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ARKANSAS TIMES

W Kara Bibb, Kita Marshall and other great writers from the 2014 Arkansas Literary Festival.

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Pub or Perish will present a celebration of the double-X chromosome, with readings by some of the best female poets, essayists and fiction writers on the local scene.

For more information, contact David Koon at (501) 375-2985 ext. 389, or david@arktimes.com.

arktimes.com

A SPECIAL SECTION FROM

THE CITY OF NORTH LITTLE ROCK NORTH LITTLE ROCK ADVERTISING & PROMOTIONS COMMISSION C.B.M. CONSTRUCION CO., INC. WILLIAM F. LAMAN PUBLIC LIBRARY SYSTEM

LOOKING BACK, LOOKING FORWARD

MATT AMARO

I

n 1942, the city of North Little Rock began working toward passing a tax to support local libraries. The tax was placed on the ballot in 1945 and passed. Myrtle Deason was hired to operate the library and worked for a full year with the Board of Trustees before the library opened in 1947. The original library was housed in a turn-of-the-century building at 211 Maple St. It was two stories, with books on the first level and living quarters on the second. A library for the African-American community was established near the Missouri Pacific railroad grounds at 808 E. 13th St. In 1959, a group of determined citizens and the library director, Elsie Wisenberger, sparked a drive for a Civic Improvement Bond issue that would include a new library building. On Dec. 30, 1962, the Maple Street Library and 13th Street Library moved into the new facility and formally dedicated it as the William F. Laman Public Library of North Little Rock. It was named in honor of Mayor William F. “Casey” Laman who held office from

Library director Jeffrey Baskin

dedicated on April 22, 2003, it was nearly doubled in size, from about 25,000 square feet to almost 50,000 square feet. This expansion added a second floor, included new space for books and public programs, and created two large public reading rooms.

massive deficits, Baskin saw opportunity. The old Argenta Post Office in downtown North Little Rock officially closed June 15, 2012, leaving this historic building vacant and without purpose. According to the National Trust for Historic Preserva-

economic growth and creating sustainable and safe neighborhoods for its residents and visitors. Community integration has always been Baskin’s core motive behind directing the library into its future. His vision to move the library’s

Community integration has always been Baskin’s core motive behind directing the library into its future. His vision to move the library’s Argenta Branch into the Post Office has finally come true. 1958 to 1972 and then again from 1979 to 1980. Helen Elrod was the first director. Wilma Ankrum followed as director, and then in 1970 the library expanded under the direction of Patricia O’Bannon. Nancy Pack served as director from 1981 to 1987. Since that time, Jeffrey L. Baskin has served as library director. His dedication to revitalizing the library in big ways has given other libraries a prime example to model. In February 2002, work began to expand and renovate the library. When the expansion was formally

In May 2006, the library opened its first branch on Main Street in downtown North Little Rock. The Argenta Branch moved into what was once the City Hall and downtown fire station. The 2,550-square-foot branch held a collection of approximately 10,000 adult and children books and DVDs, and six computer stations with public internet access. The library shared the historic building with the North Little Rock History Commission. In 2011, as the United States Postal Service announced the closure of 3,700 post offices nationwide due to

tion, “Local post office buildings have traditionally played an essential role in the lives of millions of Americans. Many are architecturally distinctive, prominently located, and cherished as civic icons in communities across the country.” The William F. Laman Public Library System believes in the Historic Argenta District. Its history and effort to preserve, restore and revitalize Main Street and historic buildings and homes is important to the downtown area of North Little Rock. It brings community back to the city, boosting

Argenta Branch into the Post Office has finally come true. With a loan from the City of North little Rock, the William F. Laman Public Library System purchased the former Post Office building for $775,000 on Sept. 30, 2012. Baskin says, “We are very excited for this opportunity to improve and expand our services to the people of Central Arkansas.” Renovations began March 5, 2013 at a cost of $2.8 million, with the plan to convert and renovate the old Post Office for use as the Argenta Branch Library.

A SPECIAL ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT FROM THE CITY OF NORTH LITTLE ROCK, NORTH LITTLE ROCK ADVERTISING & PROMOTIONS COMMISSION, C.B.M. CONSTRUCTION CO., INC. AND WILLIAM F. LAMAN PUBLIC LIBRARY SYSTEM

NORTH LITTLE ROCK HISTORY COMMISSION (2)

The renovated building features 15,300 square feet of public space, including a large children’s department, computer lab, exhibit hall/gallery, 140-seat auditorium, meeting room, vending area with seating and more than 12,000 books for children, teen and adult readers. “The new library will be a great asset to everyone in the community. It is one more piece to the puzzle that makes Argenta a place we want to live and raise a family. The remodeling of the Post Office was a great way to use a beautiful historic building and provide a style inside that will make everyone feel welcome. I’m looking forward to it opening and providing a centrally located space for the whole city to enjoy,” said Terry Hartwick, North Little Rock Chamber of Commerce President & CEO. The grand opening of the new Argenta Branch is Saturday, April 5 with all-day activities and fun, but it won’t stop there. Branch manager Brooke Hadder says, “The Argenta Branch Library will be a great community space with regular programming to both satisfy community interest and address community needs.” The full programming schedule includes weekly children’s story times, as well as a twice monthly baby lapsit called “Twinkle, Twinkle,” developed to address the early literacy needs of infants. Tail Waggin’ Tutors will be a regular presence in the library with sessions on Tuesdays at 3:30 p.m. and Saturdays at 10:30 a.m. Additionally, adults will enjoy Good Gardens on the second Saturday of each month, with hands-on gardening techniques and guest lecturers from the field. Furthermore, the library’s LINC Center will feature 18 public access computers and offer a weekly Jobseekers Clinic, in which library staff will offer one-on-one assistance to those building a resumé, applying for a job or needing help setting up an email account. “And that’s just the beginning,” Hadder says. “Everyday we’re brainstorming new programs to engage the community here in Argenta.”

First library in North Little Rock opens in 1947 at 211 Maple St. Post office construction begins Dec. 21, 1931 in downtown North Little Rock.

HISTORY OF THE POST OFFICE 1931 Construction of $125,000 red-brick two-story Post Office began

Dec. 21. Designed by architect Charles L. Thompson, an example of 1930s Georgian Revival style.

1932 Post Office opens Dec. 17. 1933 Ross Lawhon appointed first NLR postmaster June 27. 1937 Lawhon resigned. Jonathon A. Horton appointed acting

postmaster Jan. 1. Arkansas District of Civilian Conservation Corps locates on the second floor in the ’30s.

1938 Horton appointed postmaster in March. 1939 R.M.S. Butner appointed acting postmaster after Horton’s

death, May 30.

1940 Butner appointed postmaster July 1 and served until

December 1946. Major repairs made to the Post Office during the summer, including plumbing and fixtures improvements, painting, sidewalk and curb work, and installation of Venetian blinds.

1942 U.S. Coast Guard recruiting office locates in the building

during the 1940s.

1944 Department of Labor office operated in the building

during the 1940s.

1947 Otis W. Neely appointed postmaster Jan. 1 and served until

his death, April 26, 1959.

1956 Internal Revenue Service had a field office on second floor

for almost 20 years until 1976.

1959 David P. Wood appointed acting postmaster in November.

1960 Clyde Byars installed as acting postmaster, Feb. 20. 1961 Gene Burks named acting postmaster in March. 1962 Downtown merchants protest plan to move Main Post Office

to Pershing Avenue in Military Heights.

1963 Arnold B. Sikes appointed postmaster, April 26. 1964 U.S. Treasury Department opens an office. 1965 Main Post Office moves to Pershing Avenue in July. 1968 Renovations totaling $252,000 were made, including

adding air-conditioning to the building.

1983 Post Office building listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

1988 Saturday window service eliminated in February. 1993 Jack H. Williams accountants had offices in the building

until 2002.

1996 Americans with Disabilities Act ramp built in April in the front of the building. Broken windows and masonry are repaired.

2007 Window service hours cut back and office weekday hours

changed to close at 1 p.m.

2012 Post Office closes June 15. The William F. Laman Public

Library, with a loan from the City of North Little Rock, purchases building for $775,000 on Sept. 30.

2013 Renovations to the building begin March 5. 2014 Laman Library Argenta Branch opens April 5.

A SPECIAL ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT FROM THE CITY OF NORTH LITTLE ROCK, NORTH LITTLE ROCK ADVERTISING & PROMOTIONS COMMISSION, C.B.M. CONSTRUCTION CO., INC. AND WILLIAM F. LAMAN PUBLIC LIBRARY SYSTEM

“Argenta is the front door to our city and the curb appeal just went way up with the new Argenta branch of the Laman Library. What an outstanding institution and addition to our city. Congratulations to our library commission and employer on their new building, where fostering education, community service and the arts happens every day.” — Joe Smith, mayor of North Little Rock

Argenta Branch 420 Main St. at the Old Post Office North Little Rock 501-687-1061 lamanlibrary.org

Main Branch 2801 Orange St. North Little Rock 501-758-1720

GRAND OPENING CELEBRATION

SATURDAY, APRIL 5

10 a.m. | Grand Opening Ceremony Library LINC Center

Meeting room

Music Provided by Rodney Block and the Real Music Lovers.

11 a.m. | The Arkansaw Toothpick Theater Presents: “The Front Porch Jubilee”

Family-friendly, Vaudeville-style musical variety stage show with musicians, performers and magic! Providing wholesome entertainment before everyone’s bedtime.

12:30 p.m. | Tail Waggin’ Tutors

This program provides a relaxed and “dog friendly” atmosphere, which allows children to practice their reading skills. It helps build self-esteem as children get to sit with and read to dogs. BRIAN CHILSON (4)

2 p.m. | Gallery Talk

Sandra Taylor Smith, director of North Little Rock History Commission, and Otto Seay, a postal employee from 1958-1990, discuss the history of the downtown North Little Rock Post Office.

Children’s area

Library lobby and gallery space

All Day | Arts & Crafts Activities Held in the Children’s Department

One event coming soon is the Summer Reading Program, which will feature performers and crafts for children and author discussions for adults, as well as great prizes! Summer Reading kicks off June 1. The library will host the Arkansas Shakespeare Theatre (AST) in its production and presentation of William Shakespeare’s comedy, “Two Gentlemen of Verona,” on June 19, 21 and 22 at 7:30 p.m. The outdoor production will take place from the old postal loading dock, making “taking in the theatre” a more casual and accessible feat. “We are really excited about working with the new location this summer,” says

Rebekah Scallet of AST. The library’s continued participation in Argenta Art Walk, the third Friday of each month, will resume in May. Visitors will be invited into the historic lobby to watch live demonstrations from local artists and view the library’s current exhibit in the gallery. The gallery opens with a photography exhibit that showcases historical images of old Main Street in Argenta, and the construction and building of the Post Office. Lastly Hadder states, “We view this library as a blank canvas and we are excited for the people of Central Arkansas to fill it with programs, activities, and memories.”

Free Giveaways!

“The renovation of the Historic U.S. Post Office to the Argenta Laman Library is by far the most important commercial project in the Argenta Arts and Innovation District in decades. The Innovative programming Laman Library is well known for will activate Main Street in ways not seen since the pre-Urban Renewal days of the 1970s. Urban libraries have become a cornerstone for residential and commercial development across the country. I am very confident Laman will be a model for what a community library can mean to the economic revival of cities and towns all over the USA.” — John Gaudin, New Argenta Fund

A SPECIAL ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT FROM THE CITY OF NORTH LITTLE ROCK, NORTH LITTLE ROCK ADVERTISING & PROMOTIONS COMMISSION, C.B.M. CONSTRUCTION CO., INC. AND WILLIAM F. LAMAN PUBLIC LIBRARY SYSTEM

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Lawrence Finney, “Cityboy, Longsuffering Saint” (2013) oil on canvas, 24 h x 12 w

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april 3, 2014

37

Arts Entertainment

‘THIS HAPPENED TO ME, THIS IS HOW I REMEMBER IT’ A Q&A with Kevin Brockmeier on his new book, ‘A Few Seconds of Radiant Filmstrip: A Memoir of Seventh Grade.’ BY WILL STEPHENSON

L

ittle Rock’s Kevin Brockmeier is the award-winning author of two story collections, two children’s books and three novels, including “The Brief History of the Dead” and “The Illumination.” His stories have appeared in the New Yorker, McSweeney’s, the Oxford American and the Georgia Review. His new book (published on Tuesday), “A Few Seconds of Radiant Filmstrip: A Memoir of Seventh Grade,” is his first work of nonfiction, a beautifully written and often unsettling account of his experiences as a seventh-grader in Little Rock in 1985-86 (a period, he says at one point, bookended roughly by the 38

APRIL 3, 2014

ARKANSAS TIMES

releases of “Gotcha!” and “Top Gun”). Far from an exercise in nostalgia, the book is a glimpse into the peculiar and particular terrible-ness of that stage in a young person’s life, full of nebulous friendships, minor humiliations and melancholy boredom. The books rings awfully true, in other words, and Brockmeier’s potent, honest prose makes for a vivid, funny and achingly familiar read. You’re known as a fiction writer. Why a memoir and why now? The book had been gestating for quite a while, actually. In fact, I tried to start it several years ago, but couldn’t figure out how to approach the material, so I set it

aside to work on “The Illumination.” I remember reading something that Charles Baxter wrote about William Maxwell’s short novel “So Long, See You Tomorrow”: “You feel that you have been given considerably more of what is precious to its author than is often the case in novels of many hundreds of pages.” I was thinking of that as a sort of challenge: to give away what was most intimate to me. Even the strangest and most unlikely of my books have had hard undercurrents of personal feeling, but very rarely have they depicted what literally happened to me. There are writers I love — Italo Calvino, for instance, and Octavia Butler — who wrote almost nothing about their own lives,

BENJAMIN KRAIN

AND

and I love them no less for that, but I can’t help wondering what such books would have been like and wishing they existed. Did you find that autobiographical writing presented a different set of challenges from your previous work? I always work roughly the same way. My shorthand description is that I broach my sentences one tiny piece at a time, termiting away at them until I’m satisfied that they present the right effect, doing my best to complete each one before I move on to the next. My approach was the same here, except that the character whose world I was exploring was a younger version of myself. One of the challenges for me was figuring out whether I would reflect on that time in my life or immerse myself in it. How much distance, I wondered, should I permit myself? None, was my decision, or at least as little as possible. I selected the third-person, presenttense voice — Kevin does this, Kevin thinks that — mostly as a matter of instinct, but on reflection I think that it gave me a very particular way of approaching the story, one that allowed me to investigate my life the same way I investigate the lives of my fictional characters, with both honesty and compassion. My fiction-writing muscles are trained toward sympathy, whereas if you’re reflecting on your own life, you train yourself away from sympathy, or at least I do. I hope I found a way to be simultaneously transparent and generous with myself. CONTINUED ON PAGE 48

ROCK CANDY Check out the Times’ A&E blog arktimes.com

A&E NEWS SPLICE MICROCINEMA is a new film screening series to be held in the backroom at Vino’s every Wednesday night (beginning April 9) at 7:30 p.m., and will kick off with a set of four early black and white films by Jean-Luc Godard, presented on 16mm prints. Here is an excerpt of our interview with the mysterious (and anonymous) team behind the series (the full Q&A can be found online at our Rock Candy blog). Who are you? We’re a non-profit run by a small collective of folks — an award-winning filmmaker, a film columnist for a beloved magazine, a film studies Ph.D., an un-pedigreed but dedicated film autodidact, and a local artist/musician — who are thrilled to see our town’s moviegoing culture grow and want to add a little yeast to the mix by starting a place to project small, (sometimes) obscure, alternative movies in small, alternative spaces. Where did the idea of Splice come from? The two co-founders started planning this in late 2011. Other projects and straight-up life made us put it on the backburner for a couple years, but it’s been sous-viding in our heads ever since. What kinds of programming can we expect? We’re thinking of big ways to be small. Little Rock is well outfitted with big places to see big movies. ... But we’re staying true to our size, curating around our size limitations, and using it as a chance to bring worldclass “deep cuts” of movies to Little Rock. We’re focusing on underground classics, alternative American cinema, cool and quintessential foreign movies, some experimental things, some offthe-radar cult things. What kind of atmosphere are you going for here? Cinematheques are a pretty inherently snobby thing, right? We want to crush that ASAP. This is open to everyone — art types, church folk, senior citizens, teenagers. If cinema is a church, we’re solidly of the “open hearts, open minds, open doors” persuasion. Our programming is “no snobbery,” too. We ride for Alexandr Sokurov, and would love to watch “Russian Ark” on a big screen, but that’s way too highbrow. For now, we want to keep the atmosphere and the movies fun and lively. And we’re going to be equally jacked to have drinks with old friends, new friends, and watch everything from Godard classics to pieces of ’80s regional cult trash.

CULT FICTION

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39

THE TO-DO

LIST

BY WILL STEPHENSON

THURSDAY 4/3

DAX RIGGS

9 p.m. Stickyz. $10.

Dax Riggs fronted the influential sludge metal band Acid Bath, who formed in South Louisiana (deep in “True Detective” country) in 1991, played spooky, experimental “death rock” that sampled “Blue Velvet” and Jim Jones, and then disbanded in the late ’90s. Riggs went on to start a handful of other bands, including the equally scary and rage-filled (but quieter and more accessible) Fat Possum indie rock band Deadboy and the Elephantmen. These days he records and tours under his own name, settling into his role as, in Fat Possum’s words, “Louisiana’s own dark star and Orpheus of the underground.” If his aesthetic has moved away from discordance towards dark, Nick Cavelike folk-rock, his sensibility is the same as it ever was: His most recent album was called “Say Goodnight to the World,” and featured song titles like “I Hear Satan” and “Let Me Be Your Cigarette.”

DEATH ROCK: Dax Riggs will be at Stickyz Thursday.

THURSDAY 4/3-SATURDAY 4/5

DELTA SYMPOSIUM XX

Arkansas State University. Free.

Arkansas State University will host its 20th Delta Symposium this weekend, titled “Diversities in the Delta,” and featuring a variety of free lectures, readings and performances on the theme. Talks on Levon Helm, swamp rabbits and 19th century cookbooks will be followed by panel discussions focusing on topics like blues and Delta memoir writing. Two highlights of this year’s event

are a reading, Q&A and book signing by the Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Yusef Komunyakaa (5 p.m. Friday, April 4) at the Wilson Hall Auditorium, and a concert by blues musician John Hammond, the man who introduced Bob Dylan to The Band (his father was the famous talent scout who got Dylan a record deal in 1961, the same year he also spearheaded the reissue of Robert Johnson’s “King of the Delta Blues Singers”), at 5 p.m. Saturday, April 5, at City Water and Light Park.

8 p.m. Robinson Center Music Hall. $50.15-$58.85.

“I know ya’ll seen me in the movies, but the money’s gone goddamnit, that’s why I’m here tonight.” That’s how Mike Epps opened his “Inappropriate Behavior” special in 2006, and I can only assume the money is gone once again, because Epps will be in town Friday night on his “After Dark” 40

APRIL 3, 2014

ARKANSAS TIMES

SHINYRIBS

10 p.m. White Water Tavern.

Beloved alt-country band The Gourds, an important presence in the Austin music scene since the mid’90s, went on hiatus last October, giving singer Kevin Russell time to focus all his resources on his newer project, Shinyribs, which also features Gourds drummer (and Russell’s brother-in-law) Keith Langford. Here, Russell dances

and plays occasional ukulele and writes songs about his “favorite root vegetable” (sweet potato) and conspiracy theories involving the moon. As always, he also plays engaging, skewed country music filled with falsetto and upbeat, Southern-funk, bar-band stomp. The group’s strongest trait is its unpredictability: Its second and most recent album, “Gulf Coast Museum,” ended with a wounded Harold Melvin and the Blue Notes cover.

SATURDAY 4/5

FRIDAY 4/4

MIKE EPPS

FRIDAY 4/4

ZAJAL LIVE

tour. One of the emergent stars of the Def Jam Comedy boom of the early ’90s, Epps quickly found a home outside of the stand-up circuit, in Hollywood. Famous for his roles as a stoner in “Next Friday,” a pimp in “How High,” a thief in “All About the Benjamins” and a Kodiak bear in “Dr. Doolittle 2,” he’s also appeared in music videos by Kendrick Lamar (playing a priest), Ice Cube and T.I. (twice).

6 p.m. Reynolds Center, Fayetteville. Free.

The King Fahd Center at the University of Arkansas will present “Zajal Live: A Poetic Duel in Lebanese Arabic,” featuring Antoine Saadeh and Bassam Harb, two celebrated experts in the art of zajal, an Arabic oral poetry tradition dating back to the 13th century. Zajal is semi-improvised, semi-sung and presented in the form of a duel, a kind of

proto-rap battle in which both participants riff on a common theme (“riff” in this case implying a much higher level of complexity than is typically intended by the word). Professor Adnan Haydar will be on hand to explain and summarize the proceedings. Middle East Studies instructor Paula Haydar will give a lecture on the history of the folk tradition earlier that day, at 1:30 p.m. in room 408 of the Science and Engineering building.

IN BRIEF

THURSDAY 4/3

TUESDAY 4/8

THE GODFATHER: PART II

7 p.m. Market Street Cinema. $8.

The “Godfather” movies never really fit the New Hollywood narrative very comfortably — they’re stuffy, white-elephant, prestige dramas, classically constructed and a little humorless. They are beautiful though, especially the second

one, which pays tribute (to put it charitably) to the visual breakthroughs of Bertolucci’s “The Conformist,” and brings to life the grimy old New York that Luc Sante wrote about in “Low Life.” There are more interesting movies on the same subject and milieu (e.g. “Once Upon a Time in America”) and even better Fran-

cis Ford Coppola movies (“The Conversation”), but there’s a lot to enjoy about this thing, even in the margins (note the rare and awesome Lee Strasberg performance as the cold-hearted and shirtless Miami kingpin Hyman Roth). Also, I’ve never seen it on a big screen, and that’s what Market Street is offering.

The Porter Fund will host a gala at the Governor’s Mansion to honor Charles Portis with its Lifetime Achievement Award, featuring readings by authors Roy Blount Jr., Roy Reed and Jay Jennings, 6 p.m., $200. Pianist Jura Margulis will give a free lecture and concert at the University of Arkansas’s Ozark Hall, 5 p.m., and the Natural State Brass Band will play at Maumelle High School at 7:30, $5, a benefit for the Maumelle High School Band program. Little Rock’s Collin vs. Adam and Whale Fire will play at the Afterthought at 9 p.m., $5, and The Frontier Circus will be at White Water Tavern with Riverbottom Debutante at 9:30 p.m., $5.

FRIDAY 4/4 The Arkansas Men and Women’s College Basketball All-Star Game will be held at Summit Arena, at 3:30 p.m. (also 3:30 p.m. Saturday), $8-$18. The Ron Robinson Theater will present “Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom,” the 2013 biopic starring Idris Elba as Nelson Mendela, 7 p.m. April 4-6, $5. The Old State House Museum will open its free production of “The Bridgegroom of Blowing Rock,” a play by Catherine Trieschmann performed by Torn Kite Theatre Company, at 7:30 p.m. (other performances will be 7:30 p.m. Saturday, April 5, and 2 p.m. Sunday, April 6). The Weekend Theater’s production of “Tuesdays With Morrie” will also open at 7:30 p.m., with other performances at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, April 5, and 2:30 p.m., Sunday, April 6, $12-$16. L.A. NOISE: John Wiese will be at White Water Tavern with Bonnie Montgomery and The Bloodless Cooties Tuesday.

SATURDAY 4/5 TUESDAY 4/8

JOHN WIESE

9:30 p.m. White Water Tavern.

“I deal in actual sounds,” John Wiese once told the L.A. Times. “Often, these will have a lot of trajectory of their own and define their own path.” A composer and noise musician, Weise has dealt in his own

chaotic brand of “actual sounds” since the late ’90s, touring and recording with his projects LHD and Sissy Spacek, and with a diverse orbit of often better-known groups looking to borrow his distinctive sonic tool-kit, like Wolf Eyes, Yellow Swans, No Age and Sun O))), who I once saw nearly

shatter a collection of stained glass windows in an Athens, Ga., chapel by force of volume alone (the fire alarm went off and no one even noticed). Wiese is a little brilliant and maybe dangerous, and he’ll share a bill with Bonnie Montgomery and The Bloodless Cooties.

“The 400 Blows” officially announced the arrival of the French New Wave, “Breathless” gave it personality. With its sloppy, barely explored manhunt plot, makeshift tracking shots and seemingly arbitrary edits (within single takes, giving it that idiosyncratic, jittery feel), the film was something new in a way that

divided audiences and thrilled aspiring filmmakers. It’s hardly representative of Godard’s approach, as he never really made another film like it, but it’s taken on a cultural-historical life of its own as a cinematic landmark, admired for its radical direction, D.I.Y. ethos and fashion, among other reasons.

WEDNESDAY 4/9

“BREATHLESS”

7:30 p.m. Vino’s. Donations.

Splice Microcinema, the new underground film series to be held in Vino’s back room, is starting out strong with its opening night pick, the first in a set of four early Jean-Luc Godard films (screened in 16mm). If Truffaut’s

The Arkansas Orchid Society and SWROGA Show and Sale, a free event featuring a raffle, silent auction and orchid sale, will be at the Benton Event Center beginning at noon and at 11 a.m. Sunday, April 6. Gallery 360 will present “Burning Bright,” a reading by poet Jessica Otto at 7 p.m. Local garage punk band Bombay Harambee will play White Water Tavern with Teenagers and Pagiins, 9 p.m. Buttery and Irie Soul will be at the Afterthought at 9 p.m., $10, and Consumers will be at Juanita’s with Becoming Elephants and Burning the Past, 10 p.m., $10.

WEDNESDAY 4/9 Arkansas Times Musicians Showcase finalist John Willis will perform at South on Main as part of its free Local Live series, 7:30 p.m. The Slackers will play at Juanita’s at 9 p.m. with Chinese Dub Embassy and Brown Soul Shoes, $15. www.arktimes.com

APRIL 3, 2014

41

AFTER DARK All events are in the Greater Little Rock area unless otherwise noted. To place an event in the Arkansas Times calendar, please email the listing and all pertinent information, including date, time, location, price and contact information, to calendar@arktimes.com.

SPORTS

THURSDAY, APRIL 3

MUSIC

Collin vs. Adam, Whale Fire. Afterthought Bistro & Bar, 9 p.m., $5. 2721 Kavanaugh Blvd. 501-6631196. www.afterthoughtbar.com. Dax Riggs. Stickyz Rock ‘n’ Roll Chicken Shack, 9 NEXT FRIDAY: Mike Epps will be at the Robinson Center Music Hall Friday, 8 p.m., p.m., $10. 107 Commerce St. 501-372-7707. www. $50.15-$58.85. stickyz.com. The Frontier Circus, Riverbottom Debutante. animation, the festival will host visiting filmmakHall, 8 p.m., $50.15-$58.85. Markham and White Water Tavern, 9:30 p.m., $5. 2500 W. 7th ers and offer a screenwriting workshop. through Broadway. www.littlerockmeetings.com/convSt. 501-375-8400. www.whitewatertavern.com. April 6, $25. centers/robinson. “Inferno.” DJs play pop, electro, house and more, “Winter Sucks.” Original sketch comedy by The plus drink specials and $1 cover before 11 p.m. Main Thing. Call to make reservations. The Joint, Sway, 9 p.m. 412 Louisiana. 501-907-2582. Horse racing. Oaklawn, 1:30 p.m., $2.50-$4.50. 8 p.m., $20. 301 Main St. No. 102, NLR. 501-372Jura Margulis. A free lecture and concert by the 2705 Central Ave., Hot Springs. 501-623-4411. 0205. thejointinlittlerock.com. internationally renowned pianist, to be held www.oaklawn.com. in Ozark Hall. University of Arkansas, 5 p.m., Fayetteville. honorscollege.uark.edu/invites. Ballroom Dancing. Free lessons begin at 7 p.m. Krush Thursdays with DJ Kavaleer. Club Climax, “From the Heart: A Night of Spoken Word.” Bess Chisum Stephens Community Center, 8-11 free before 11 p.m. 824 W. Capitol. 501-554-3437. Hosted by the Oxford American, the Social Justice p.m., $7-$13. 12th and Cleveland streets. 501-221Laura Aikin. Walton Arts Center, 8:15 p.m., $75. 495 League Poetry Club, and Foreign Tongues. Oxford 7568. www.blsdance.org. W. Dickson St., Fayetteville. 479-443-5600. American, 7 p.m. 1300 Main St. “Salsa Night.” Begins with a one-hour salsa lesson. Live music. No cover charge Sun.-Tue. and Thu. Juanita’s, 9 p.m., $8. 614 President Clinton Ave. Ernie Biggs. 307 Clinton Ave. 501-372-4782. lit- FRIDAY, APRIL 4 501-372-1228. www.littlerocksalsa.com. tlerock.erniebiggs.com. Michael Eubanks. Newk’s Express Cafe, 6:30 p.m. 4317 Warden Road, NLR. 501-753-8559. newks.com. Club Nights at 1620 Savoy. Dance night, with Fantastic Friday. Literary and music event, Natural State Brass Band. Proceeds benefit the DJs, drink specials and bar menu, 10 p.m. until refreshments included. For reservations, call Maumelle High School Band program. Maumelle 2 a.m. 1620 Savoy. 1620 Market St. 501-221-1620. 479-968-2452 or email artscenter@centuryHigh School, 7:30 p.m., $5. 100 Victory Drive. 501www.1620savoy.com. tel.net. River Valley Arts Center, Every third 851-5350. Live music. No cover charge Sun.-Tue. and Thu. Friday, 7 p.m., $10 suggested donation. 1001 Open jam with The Port Arthur Band. Parrot Ernie Biggs. 307 Clinton Ave. 501-372-4782. litE. B St., Russellville. 479-968-2452. www.arvarBeach Cafe, 9 p.m. 9611 MacArthur Drive, NLR. tlerock.erniebiggs.com. tscenter.org. 771-2994. Royal Southern Brotherhood, Samantha Fish. LGBTQ/SGL weekly meeting. Diverse Youth Project 86, At War’s End, Siversa. Juanita’s, 9 p.m., George’s Majestic Lounge, 9 p.m., $20. 519 W. for Social Change is a group for LGBTQ/SGL $10 adv., $12 day of. 614 President Clinton Ave. Dickson St., Fayetteville. 479-442-4226. and straight ally youth and young adults age 501-372-1228. www.juanitas.com. Shinyribs. White Water Tavern, 10 p.m. 2500 W. 14 to 23. For more information, call 244-9690 RockUsaurus. Senor Tequila, 7-9 p.m. 10300 N. 7th St. 501-375-8400. www.whitewatertavern.com. or search “DYSC” on Facebook. LGBTQ/SGL Rodney Parham Road. 501-224-5505. www.senor- Ted Ludwig Trio. Capital Bar and Grill, 9 p.m., free. Youth and Young Adult Group, 6:30 p.m. 800 tequila.com. 111 Markham St. 501-374-7474. www.capitalhotel. Scott St. Stoney LaRue. George’s Majestic Lounge, 9 p.m., com/CBG. $17. 519 W. Dickson St., Fayetteville. 479-442-4226. University of Central Arkansas Opera Theatre. Ted Ludwig Trio. Capital Bar and Grill, 7:30 p.m., See April 3. “Mandela.” Ron Robinson Theater, April 4-6, 7 p.m., free. 111 Markham St. 501-374-7474. www.capit$5. 1 Pulaski Way. 501-320-5703. www.cals.lib.ar.us/ alhotel.com/CBG. ron-robinson-theater.aspx. University of Central Arkansas Opera Theatre. Mike Epps and friends. Robinson Center Music Ozark Foothills FilmFest. See April 3. Students will perform Samuel Barber’s “A Hand of Bridge,” Gian Carlo Menotti’s “The Telephone” and Seymour Barab’s “La Pizza con Funghi.” Reynolds Performance Hall, University of Central Arkansas, 7:30 p.m. 201 Donaghey Ave., Conway.

SPORTS BOOKS

MUSIC

DANCE

EVENTS

FILM

COMEDY

EVENTS

2014 Arkansas Youth Summit. Gina Cox Center, 1 p.m. 501 W. Academy St., Lonoke. Charles Portis Lifetime Achievement Porter Fund Gala. Featuring readings by authors Roy Blount Jr., Roy Reed and Jay Jennings. Governor’s Mansion, 6 p.m., $200. 1800 Center St. 501-868-7172. Hillcrest Shop & Sip. Shops and restaurants offer discounts, later hours and live music. Hillcrest, first Thursday of every month, 5 p.m. P.O.Box 251522. 501-666-3600. www.hillcrestmerchants.com.

FILM

Ozark Foothills FilmFest. In addition to screenings of narrative and documentary features, shorts and 42

APRIL 3, 2014

ARKANSAS TIMES

Arkansas Men and Women’s College Basketball All-Star Game. This two-day event will feature the top 20 male and female basketball players from throughout Arkansas. Summit Arena, April 4, 3:30 p.m.; April 5, 3:30 p.m., $8-$18. 134 Convention Blvd., Hot Springs. 501-620-5001. www.summitarena.org. Horse racing. Oaklawn, 1:30 p.m., $2.50-$4.50. 2705 Central Ave., Hot Springs. 501-623-4411. www.oaklawn.com. St. Vincent Tour de Paul 2014. Men’s professional tennis tournament. Pleasant Valley Country Club, April 4-13. 1 Pleasant Valley Drive. 501-225-5622. www.pleasantvalleycountryclub.net.

BENEFITS

ALS Arkansas Wine Tasting. Crush Wine Bar, 5:30 p.m., $30 adv., $35 day of. 318 Main St., NLR. 501374-9463. www.bikehikeforals.com.

SATURDAY, APRIL 5

MUSIC

Bombay Harambee, Teenagers, Pagiins. White Water Tavern, 9 p.m. 2500 W. 7th St. 501-375-8400. www.whitewatertavern.com. Butterfly and Irie Soul. Afterthought Bistro & Bar, 9 p.m., $10. 2721 Kavanaugh Blvd. 501-663-1196. www.afterthoughtbar.com. Club Nights at 1620 Savoy. See April 4. Consumers, Becoming Elephants, Burning the Past. Juanita’s, 10 p.m., $8 adv., $10 day of. 614 President Clinton Ave. 501-372-1228. www.juanitas.com. FRASS, The Pneumatic Girls, Herding Kittens. The Locals coffee shop, 7 p.m. 1024 Van Ronkle Street, Conway. thelocals.be. Jam Rock Saturday. Twelve Modern Lounge, first Saturday of every month, 9 p.m. 1900 W. Third St. 501-301-1200. K.I.S.S. Saturdays. Featuring DJ Silky Slim. Dress code enforced. Sway, 10 p.m. 412 Louisiana. 501492-9802. Lil Rock Obama, J Purley, Suavio Da Don, Yung 2, Joker B, Country Boyz. Regina Intus Centre, 10 p.m., $7-$10. 6221 Colonel Glenn Rd. Live music. No cover charge Sun.-Tue. and Thu. Ernie Biggs. 307 Clinton Ave. 501-372-4782. littlerock.erniebiggs.com. New Era Saturdays. 21-and-older. Twelve Modern Lounge, first Saturday of every month, 9 p.m., $5 cover until 11 p.m. 1900 W. Third St. 501-301-1200. Pickin’ Porch. Bring your instrument. All ages welcome. Faulkner County Library, 9:30 a.m. 1900 Tyler St., Conway. 501-327-7482. www.fcl.org. Singer/Songwriters Showcase. Parrot Beach Cafe, 2-7 p.m., free. 9611 MacArthur Drive, NLR. 771-2994. Tab Beniot, The Cate Brothers. George’s Majestic Lounge, 9 p.m., $20. 519 W. Dickson St., Fayetteville. 479-442-4226. Ted Ludwig Trio. Capital Bar and Grill, 9 p.m., free. 111 Markham St. 501-374-7474. www.capitalhotel. com/CBG. Tyler Bryant and The Shakedown. Stickyz Rock ‘n’ Roll Chicken Shack, 8:30 p.m., $8 adv., $10 day of. 107 Commerce St. 501-372-7707. www.stickyz.com. University of Central Arkansas Opera Theatre. See April 3.

COMEDY

“Winter Sucks.” See April 4.

FILM

SPORTS

FILM

POETRY

Jessica Otto, “Burning Bright.” Gallery 360, 7 p.m. 900 S. Rodney Parham Road. 501-663-2222. “Zajal Live: A Poetic Duel in Lebanese Arabic”. A free performance by two of Lebanon’s masters of the art of oral poetry — zajal — Antoine Saadeh and Bassam Harb, at the Reynolds Center. University of Arkansas, 6 p.m. Fayetteville.

SPORTS

Arkansas Men and Women’s College Basketball All-Star Game. See April 4. Children’s Advocacy Alliance: Tandem Skydiving Jump. A fundraising event to benefit for abused community children. Bill and Hillary Clinton National Airport, $100. One Airport Road. 501372-3439. clintonairport.com. Horse racing. Oaklawn, 1 p.m., $2.50-$4.50. 2705 Central Ave., Hot Springs. 501-623-4411. www. oaklawn.com. St. Vincent Tour de Paul 2014. Men’s professional tennis tournament. Pleasant Valley Country Club, through April 13. 1 Pleasant Valley Drive. 501225-5622. www.pleasantvalleycountryclub.net.

SUNDAY, APRIL 6

MUSIC

Cypress Creek Park Spring Bluegrass Jam. Cypress Creek Park, April 6-12. Cypress Creek

it BIGG! Open 7 Days A Week • 8pm-2am Shows Start at 8:30pm

Located in the Heart of the River Market District 307 President Clinton Avenue 501.372.4782 www.erniebiggs.com

SPORTS

St. Vincent Tour de Paul 2014. Men’s professional tennis tournament. Pleasant Valley Country Club, through April 13. 1 Pleasant Valley Drive. 501225-5622. www.pleasantvalleycountryclub.net. CONTINUED ON PAGE 45

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FILM

UCA Graduate Film Screening. Free screening of graduate thesis projects by UCA Digital Filmmaking MFA students: “Collection Day,” by Scott Eggleston, “In Borrowed Time,” by Dustin Barnes and “Spectre-O-Scope,” by Mark Clifford. Reynolds Performance Hall, UCA, 7 p.m. 350 S. Donaghey, Conway.

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MUSIC

Cypress Creek Park Spring Bluegrass Jam. Cypress Creek Park, through April 12. Cypress Creek Avenue, Adona. 501-662-4918. www. cypresscreekpark.com/. Live music. No cover charge Sun.-Tue. and Thu. Ernie Biggs. 307 Clinton Ave. 501-372-4782. littlerock.erniebiggs.com. Monday Night Jazz. Afterthought Bistro & Bar, 8 p.m., $5. 2721 Kavanaugh Blvd. 501-663-1196. www.afterthoughtbar.com. Nelo, Rodge. Juanita’s, 8 p.m., $8 adv., $10 day of. 614 President Clinton Ave. 501-372-1228. www.juanitas.com.

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EVENTS

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EVENTS

Annual Railroadiana Show and Sale. Arkansas Railroad Museum, 9 a.m., $5. 1700 Port Road, Pine Bluff. 870-535-8819. www.arkansasrailroadmuseum.org. Arkansas Orchid Society and SWROGA Show and Sale. Free event featuring raffle drawing, silent auction and orchid sale. Benton Event Center, April 5, 12 p.m.; April 6, 11 a.m. 17324 I-30 North, Benton. Arkansas State University Delta Symposium. A free music festival and symposium featuring special guest John Hammond. City, Water and Light Arkansas Orchid Society and SWROGA Show Park, 12 p.m. 1123 S. Culberhouse St., Jonesboro. and Sale. Free event featuring raffle drawing, Falun Gong meditation. Allsopp Park, 9 a.m., silent auction and orchid sale. Benton Event free. Cantrell and Cedar Hill Roads. Center, 11 a.m. 17324 I-30 North, Benton. Grand Opening of Laman Library’s Argenta “Live from the Back Room.” Spoken word event. Branch. Music provided by Rodney Block and Vino’s, 7 p.m. 923 W. 7th St. 501-375-8466. www. The Real Music Lovers. Laman Library, Argenta vinosbrewpub.com. Branch, 10 a.m. 506 Main St., NLR. 501-687-1061. www.lamanlibrary.org. Hillcrest Farmers Market. Pulaski Heights Baptist “Mandela.” Ron Robinson Theater, 7 p.m., $5. 1 Church, 7 a.m.-2 p.m. 2200 Kavanaugh Blvd. Pulaski Way. 501-320-5703. www.cals.lib.ar.us/ Historic Neighborhoods Tour. Bike tour of historic ron-robinson-theater.aspx. neighborhoods includes bike, guide, helmets Ozark Foothills FilmFest. See April 3. and maps. Bobby’s Bike Hike, 9 a.m., $8-$28. 400 President Clinton Ave. 501-613-7001. Pork & Bourbon Tour. Bike tour includes bicycle, Horse racing. Oaklawn, 1:30 p.m., $2.50-$4.50. guide, helmets and maps. Bobby’s Bike Hike, 2705 Central Ave., Hot Springs. 501-623-4411. 11:30 a.m., $35-$45. 400 President Clinton Ave. www.oaklawn.com. 501-613-7001. St. Vincent Tour de Paul 2014. Men’s professional tennis tournament. Pleasant Valley Country Club, through April 13. 1 Pleasant Valley Drive. 501“Mandela.” Ron Robinson Theater, through April 225-5622. www.pleasantvalleycountryclub.net. 6, 7 p.m., $5. 1 Pulaski Way. 501-320-5703. www. cals.lib.ar.us/ron-robinson-theater.aspx. MONDAY, APRIL 7 Ozark Foothills FilmFest. See April 3.

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Little Rock West Coast Dance Club. Dance lessons. Singles welcome. Ernie Biggs, 7 p.m., $2. 307 Clinton Ave. 501-247-5240. www. arstreetswing.com.

Avenue, Adona. 501-662-4918. www.cypresscreekpark.com. Elephant Revival. George’s Majestic Lounge, 8:30 p.m., $15. 519 W. Dickson St., Fayetteville. 479-442-4226. Irish Traditional Music Session. Hibernia Irish Tavern, first and third Sunday of every month, 2:30 p.m. 9700 N. Rodney Parham Road. 501246-4340. www.hiberniairishtavern.com. Iron Reagan, Occultist, Snakedriver, Lifer. Vino’s, 8 p.m., $7. 923 W. 7th St. 501-375-8466. www. vinosbrewpub.com. Live music. No cover charge Sun.-Tue. and Thu. Ernie Biggs. 307 Clinton Ave. 501-372-4782. littlerock.erniebiggs.com. University of Central Arkansas Opera Theatre. See April 3.

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MUSIC REVIEW

Cher

March 28, Verizon Arena BY JIM HARRIS

T

44

APRIL 3, 2014

BRIAN CHILSON

he only other time we saw Cher perform live, she was on the first of a couple of supposed “final” tour stops at what’s now called Verizon Arena, and we had the pleasure of keeping company with Little Rock entrepreneur Jennings Osborne in his crowded suite. Jennings is gone, but Cher, who turns 68 in May, is still out on the road on yet another promised final concert along for the arena on such familiar Benatar swing. hits as “Hit Me With Your Best Shot,” “We This time we were only six rows away, Are Young,” and an encore blend of “Heartdead center, from the front of the stage breaker” with the Johnny Cash staple “Ring (amazing comped concert seats, to be sure) of Fire.” and we’re pretty sure we saw a wink when While Cher’s a testament to what plasshe was assuring the crowd of 12,119 rau- tic surgeons can accomplish, she also still cous concertgoers that this was indeed her possesses the legs of a 25-year-old — not a last series of shows. mark on them, though she was hiding recent Another sexagenarian who doesn’t sound ankle surgery that she said was keeping her ready to stop touring, the rocking, 61-year- from doing some really serious moves with old Pat Benatar, was a hot, cheery warm-up her five male and five female dancers, two for the main act in an hour-long set with her acrobats and a solid seven-piece backing husband, guitarist/keyboardist Neil Giraldo. band with a female bass player donning the Benatar, who stole the show appearing in Cher hair of the ’60s. a hit-filled tour with Journey that stopped Totally Las Vegas in production, with by Verizon Arena last fall, sounded no dif- everything but actual pyrotechnics, the perferent from the way she did 35 years ago formance may have been more show than when she and Giraldo first started their run. Cher, as she required several breaks for a Eventually, the show became a happy sing- dozen costume changes that helped her con-

ARKANSAS TIMES

vey a career in singing and movies that began in the mid-1960s. She spent a lot of time providing insight we’ve somehow missed all these years, such as the fact that her mother was from Searcy before she moved to Hollywood for an acting and modeling career. (A simple Googling of Cher’s mom reveals a still-vivacious woman who has written a book and appears in fabulous shape for 88, hints that we may still have not seen the last of the genetically blessed Cher). The concertgoer’s age might have determined which part of the show stood out most. For us, Cher’s mashup of video from the 1960s and her live sing-along with a video of Sonny Bono on “The Beat Goes On,” followed by “I’ve Got You, Babe,” was beautiful nostalgia. Cher expressed how difficult it had been in past shows to recreate “I’ve Got You, Babe,” and her ode to her late and ex-husband was heartfelt. She began the show, though, bringing the power of woman to the fore and ended it the same. For the opening “Women’s World,” she arose atop a pillar wearing an audacious feathered headdress for a Cleopatra look. To end it, Cher climbed aboard a contraption shaped like a church window, and this time her headpiece was a halo of the madonna — not Madonna, but rather the Virgin Mary (we’re not kidding) — as she floated mere feet above the floor crowd to

the back of the arena. Some fans screamed and reached almost as if the Holy Mother herself was in the house. In between, Cher hit on all the major points in her vocal career, from her “Gypsies, Tramps and Thieves” solo breakout, as she swirled in a multileveled gypsy skirt, to the more recent “Believe,” where she wore what appeared to be next to nothing. Her fabulous dancers worked their rears off with her, particularly on the bawdy “Welcome to Burlesque,” and in killing time while she went backstage. Her two acrobats, wearing nothing but the lower half of a Greek war ensemble, scurried up and down ropes before a Trojan horse appeared from backstage, and Cher slipped out of it dressed as Helen of Troy (we guess) in a short gold outfit with blond wig, singing “Take It Like a Man.” One other highlight was the powerful and fitting ballad “You Haven’t Seen the Last of Me,” a rangy song that she managed to handle without much difficulty. She reminded us, with a video of her Oscar acceptance speech for her role in “Moonstruck,” that critics never thought much of her as a “real” singer or actor. Her career says otherwise. And, approaching 68, it truly appears that, to paraphrase the song title, she has turned back time. No ifs about it.

AFTER DARK, CONT.

TUESDAY, APRIL 8

MUSIC

Bonnie Montgomery, John Wiese, The Bloodless Cooties. White Water Tavern, 9:30 p.m. 2500 W. 7th St. 501-375-8400. www.whitewatertavern.com. Cypress Creek Park Spring Bluegrass Jam. Cypress Creek Park, through April 12. Cypress Creek Avenue, Adona. 501-662-4918. www. cypresscreekpark.com. The Goddamn Gallows. Stickyz Rock ‘n’ Roll Chicken Shack, 9 p.m., $7 adv., $10 day of. 107 Commerce St. 501-372-7707. www.stickyz.com. Irish Traditional Music Sessions. Hibernia Irish Tavern, second and Fourth Tuesday of every month, 7-9 p.m. 9700 N. Rodney Parham Road. 501-246-4340. www.hiberniairishtavern.com. Joe Nichols, Backroad Anthem. Washington Regional Gala Walton Arts Center, 7 p.m. 495 W. Dickson St., Fayetteville. 479-443-5600. Lacuna Coil, Kyng, Eve to Adam, Cilver. Presented by 100.3 the Edge. Juanita’s, 8 p.m., $17 adv., $20 day of. 614 President Clinton Ave. 501-372-1228. www.juanitas.com. Live music. No cover charge Sun.-Tue. and Thu. Ernie Biggs. 307 Clinton Ave. 501-372-4782. littlerock.erniebiggs.com. Lucious Spiller Band. Copeland’s Restaurant of Little Rock, 6-9 p.m. 2602 S. Shackleford Road. 501-312-1616. www.copelandsrestaurantlittlerock.com. Music Jam. Hosted by Elliott Griffen and Joseph Fuller. The Joint, 8-11 p.m., free. 301 Main St. No. 102, NLR. 501-372-0205. thejointinlittlerock.com. Tuesday Jam Session with Carl Mouton. Afterthought Bistro & Bar, 8 p.m., free. 2721 Kavanaugh Blvd. 501-663-1196. www.afterthoughtbar.com.

SPORTS

St. Vincent Tour de Paul 2014. Men’s professional tennis tournament. Pleasant Valley Country Club, through April 13. 1 Pleasant Valley Drive. 501-225-5622. www.pleasantvalleycountryclub.net.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 9

MUSIC

Acoustic Open Mic. Afterthought Bistro & Bar, 8 p.m., free. 2721 Kavanaugh Blvd. 501-663-1196. www.afterthoughtbar.com. Casper Allen, Thistle, Elliott S. Cotton. The Locals coffee shop, 7 p.m. 1024 Van Ronkle Street, Conway. thelocals.be. Cypress Creek Park Spring Bluegrass Jam.

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DANCE

“Latin Night.” Revolution, 7:30 p.m., $5 regular, $7 under 21. 300 President Clinton Ave. 501-8230090. www.littlerocksalsa.com.

EVENTS

Co-op(t): An evening of visual art and music. Featuring artwork by UALR Artist in Residen Taimur Cleary and music by the UALR Percussion Ensemble led by Charles Law. South on Main, 5 p.m. 1304 Main St. 501-244-9660. www.facebook. com/SouthonMainLR. Little Rock Green Drinks. Informal networking session for people who work in the environmental field. Ciao Baci, 5:30-7 p.m. 605 N. Beechwood St. 501-603-0238. www.greendrinks. org. Tales from the South. Authors tell true stories; schedule available on website. Dinner served 5-6:30 p.m., show at 7 p.m. Call for reservations. Starving Artist Cafe, 5 p.m. 411 N. Main St., NLR. 501-372-7976. www.starvingartistcafe.net. Trivia Bowl. Flying Saucer, 8:30 p.m. 323 President Clinton Ave. 501-372-8032. www.beerknurd.com/ stores/littlerock.

FILM

“Field of Dreams.” Vino’s, 8 p.m. 923 W. 7th St. 501-375-8466. www.vinosbrewpub.com. “The Godfather: Part II.” Market Street Cinema, 7 p.m., $8. 1521 Merrill Drive. 501-312-8900. www. marketstreetcinema.net.

LECTURES

V.J. Smith. A free lecture by the author of “The Richest Man in Town.” Arkansas State University at Mountain Home, 7 p.m. 1600 S. College Ave., Mountain Home.

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45

AFTER DARK, CONT. Cypress Creek Park, through April 12. Cypress Creek Avenue, Adona. 501-662-4918. www. cypresscreekpark.com. The Lacs, Moonshine Bandits. George’s Majestic Lounge, 9 p.m., $20. 519 W. Dickson St., Fayetteville. 479-442-4226. Live music. No cover charge Sun.-Tue. and Thu. Ernie Biggs. 307 Clinton Ave. 501-372-4782. littlerock.erniebiggs.com. Local Live: John Willis. South on Main, 7:30 p.m., free. 1304 Main St. 501-244-9660. www.facebook. com/SouthonMainLR. Open Mic Nite with Deuce. Thirst n’ Howl, 7:30 p.m., free. 14710 Cantrell Road. 501-379-8189. www.thirst-n-howl.com. Seryn, John and Jacob. Stickyz Rock ‘n’ Roll Chicken Shack, 9 p.m., $8. 107 Commerce St. 501-372-7707. www.stickyz.com.

The Slackers, Chinese Dub Embassy, Brown Soul Shoes. Juanita’s, 9 p.m., $12 adv., $15 day of. 614 President Clinton Ave. 501-372-1228. www. juanitas.com. Ted Ludwig Trio. Capital Bar and Grill, 7:30 p.m., free. 111 Markham St. 501-374-7474. www.capitalhotel.com/CBG.

COMEDY

The Joint Venture. Improv comedy group. The Joint, 8 p.m., $7. 301 Main St. No. 102, NLR. 501372-0205. thejointinlittlerock.com. The Sandman. The Loony Bin, 7:30 p.m. $8-$12. 10301 N. Rodney Parham Road. 501-228-5555. www.loonybincomedy.com.

DANCE

Little Rock Bop Club. Beginning dance lessons

for ages 10 and older. Singles welcome. Bess Chisum Stephens Community Center, 7 p.m., $4 for members, $7 for guests. 12th & Cleveland streets. 501-350-4712. www.littlerockbopclub.

POETRY

Rocktown Slam. Sign up at the door to perform in the competition. Arkansas Arts Center, 7 p.m.-9 p.m., $5-$10. 501 E. 9th St. 501-372-4000. www. arkarts.com. Wednesday Night Poetry. 21-and-older show. Maxine’s, 7 p.m., free. 700 Central Ave., Hot Springs. 501-321-0909. maxineslive.com/shows. html.

SPORTS

Horse racing. Oaklawn, 1:30 p.m., $2.50-$4.50. 2705 Central Ave., Hot Springs. 501-623-4411.

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APRIL 3, 2014

ARKANSAS TIMES

www.oaklawn.com. St. Vincent Tour de Paul 2014. Men’s professional tennis tournament. Pleasant Valley Country Club, through April 13. 1 Pleasant Valley Drive. 501225-5622. www.pleasantvalleycountryclub.net.

THIS WEEK IN THEATER

Andrew Lloyd Webber’s “The Wizard of Oz.” Walton Arts Center, through April 3, 7 p.m.; Fri., April 4, 8 p.m.; through April 6, 2 p.m., $26-$83. 495 W. Dickson St., Fayetteville. 479-443-5600. “The Bridegroom of Blowing Rock.” A play by Catherine Trieschmann, performed by Torn Kite Theatre Company. Free and open to the public. Old State House Museum, April 4-5, 7:30 p.m.; Sun., April 6, 2 p.m. 500 Clinton Ave. 501-3249685. www.oldstatehouse.com. “The Fox on the Fairway.” Dinner and a new comedy by Ken Ludwig. Murry’s Dinner Playhouse, through April 19: Sun., 5:30 and 11 a.m.; Tue.-Sat., 6 p.m., $25-$35. 6323 Col. Glenn Road. 501-5623131. murrysdinnerplayhouse.com. “Les Miserables.” The Rep presents an allnew production of Alain Boublil and ClaudeMichel Schonberg’s “Les Miserables.” Arkansas Repertory Theatre, through April 6: Wed., Thu., Sun., 7 p.m.; Fri., Sat., 8 p.m.; Sun., 2 p.m., $30$55. 601 Main St. 501-378-0405. www.therep.org. “Over the River and Through the Woods.” Pocket Community Theater, through April 13: Fri., Sat., 7:30 p.m.; Sun., 2:30 p.m., $10. 170 Ravine St., Hot Springs. “Ripped and Wrinkled.” An original rock musical about a world famous band from North Little Rock called The Dogs. The Joint, through May 31: Fri., Sat., 8 p.m., $20. 301 Main St. No. 102, NLR. 501-372-0205. thejointinlittlerock.com. “Tuesdays With Morrie.” The Weekend Theater, through April 13: Fri., Sat., 7:30 p.m.; Sun., 2:30 p.m., $12-$16. 1001 W. 7th St. 501-374-3761. www. weekendtheater.org.

GALLERIES, MUSEUMS

NEW EXHIBITS, EVENTS

ARKANSAS ARTS CENTER, MacArthur Park: “InCiteful Clay,” 35 ceramic sculptures that offer social commentary by Toby Buonagurio, Nuala Creed, Michelle Erickson, Richard Notkin, Anne Potter, Richard Shaw, Akio Takamori, Ehren Tool, Patti Warashina and Paula Winokur, April 4-June 29, Winthrop Rockefeller Gallery; “Feed Your Mind Friday” tour of exhibit “InCiteful Clay” by Chief Curator and Curator of Contemporary Craft Brian Lang, noon April 4; “Art of Wine,” with Princess Giorgianna Corsini, 5:30 p.m. April 8, lower lobby, $50 members, $60 nonmembers; “The Crossroads of Memory: Carroll Cloar and the American South,” 70 paintings by the late Arkansas native, curated by Memphis’ Brooks Museum, through June 1; “Ties that Bind: Southern Art from the Collection,” atrium, through April 27; “Earthly Delights: Modern and Contemporary Highlights from the Collection,” through April 20, Strauss and Smith galleries. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Tue.-Fri., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat., 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sun. 372-4000. ART GROUP GALLERY, 11525 Cantrell Road (Pleasant Ridge Town Center): “First Friday Art Night,” 4-8 p.m. April 4. 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Mon.Thu., 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Fri.-Sat., 1-6 p.m. Sun. STEPHANO’S FINE ART, 1813 N. Grant St.: “Tail Waggin’ and Tailgaitin’ ” party to benefit Out of the Woods Animal Rescue, with raffle baskets, live music, drinks, food, 2-5 p.m. April 6. 563-4218. UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS AT LITTLE ROCK, 2801 S. University Ave.: “Revision, Missing, Listen, Light, Fly: Drawings by David Bailin,” charcoal and mixed media drawings, Gallery II, April 5-May 30, artist’s lecture 6 p.m. April 17,

AFTER DARK, CONT. reception 6:30-8 p.m. May 15; “Annual Student Competition,” Gallery I, through May 5; “BA Group Exhibit,” work by Daniel Ramsey, Mandy Schrader, Ashley Barker, Lisa Kent, Megan Roberts and Charles Cameron Tedder, Gallery III, through April 9. 569-3182. BENTONVILLE CRYSTAL BRIDGES MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART, One Museum Way: “Picasso and His Times,” lecture by Duke University art history professor Patricia Leighten, 4-5 p.m. April 6; “The William S. Paley Collection: A Taste for Modernism,” works by Paul Gaugin, Andre Derain, Henri Matisse, Paul Cezanne, Edgar Degas, Pablo Picasso and others, through July 7; “At First Sight,” watercolors from the personal collection of museum founder Alice Walton, through April 21; “Edward Hopper: Journey to Blackwell’s Island,” preliminary sketches on loan from the Whitney Museum of American Art, the finished painting and other watercolors by Hopper, through April 21; permanent collection of American masterworks spanning four centuries. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Mon., Thu.; 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Wed., Fri.; 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Sat.-Sun., closed Tue. 479-418-5700.

Center at Mountain Home and to compete in the Quick Draw competition at the “Art, Music and Barbecue” in Cotter May 2. Landscape artist Bruce Peil will be judge. Artists’ registration will be April 30-May 2; entry fee is $50. Cash prizes to be awarded. Preregistration is encouraged. For more information go to White River Artists on Facebook, email whiteriverartists@gmail.com or call 870-424-1051.

CONTINUING EXHIBITS

BOSWELL-MOUROT, 5815 Kavanaugh Blvd.: “New Works by Eric Maurus,” through April 22. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Mon.-Fri., 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Sat. 6640030. BUTLER CENTER GALLERIES, Arkansas Studies Institute, 401 President Clinton Ave.: “2nd annual Arkansas Printmakers Membership Exhibition,” CONTINUED ON PAGE 48

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CONWAY UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL ARKANSAS: “BA/ BFA Senior Exhibit,” works by 11 graduating students, April 3-24, Baum Gallery of Fine Art. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri., 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Thu., 1-5 p.m. Sun. 501-450-5793. HOT SPRINGS ARTISTS WORKSHOP GALLERY, 610 A Central Ave.: Pastels by Sheliah Halderman, watercolors by Daryl Wedwick, through April. Gallery Walk reception 5-9 p.m. April 4. 623-6401. BLUE MOON GALLERY, 718 Central Ave.: “sUZI mADE,” collaged paintings by Suzi Dennis, through April. Artist’s reception at Gallery Walk, 5-9 p.m. April 4. 318-2787. GALLERY CENTRAL, 800 Central Ave.: Paintings by Bob Snider. Gallery Walk reception 5-9 p.m. April 4. 318-4278. JUSTUS FINE ART, 827 Central Ave.: Annual “Tree Show,” work by Steve Griffith, Matthew Hasty, Dolores Justus, Rebecca Thompson, and Dan Thornhill, through April. Gallery Walk reception 5-9 p.m. April 4. 501-321-2335. RUSSELLVILLE RIVER VALLEY ARTS CENTER, 1001 E. B St.: “PALS,” paintings by Marion Hotz, Karen Driver, Patricia Aures, Irene Roberts and Bonnie Peyton, opens with reception 1-3 p.m. April 6, show through April. 479-968-2452.

CALL FOR ENTRIES

The Arkansas Arts Council is taking applications for $4,000 artist fellowships in short story writing, theater directing and artworks on paper. Deadline to apply is April 18. Fellowships are awarded based on artistic ability and to encourage development of the fellows. For more information, call the Arts Council at 324-9766 or email robinm@arkansasheritage.org. The Arkansas Arts Center is taking entries now through April 17 for its 56th annual Delta Exhibition, open to artists in Arkansas and contiguous states. Show dates are June 27-Sept. 28. Juror will be Brian Rutenberg. Prizes include the $2,500 Grand Award, two $750 Delta Awards and a $250 Contemporaries Delta Award. Artists may register and upload images at www.arkansasartscenter.org. Plein Air on the White River 2014, to be held April 30-May 3, is accepting entries from artists to show work at the Vada Sheid Community www.arktimes.com

APRIL 3, 2014

47

AFTER DARK, CONT. work by Warren Criswell, Samantha Kosakowski, Robert Bean, Diane Harper, Dominique Simmons, David Warren, Shannon Rogers, Win Bruhl, Debi Fendley, Jorey May Greene, Melissa Gill, Neal Harrington, Tammy Harrington, Evan Lindquist, Houston Fyer, Thomas Sullivan and Sherry O’Rorke, through June 28; “Southern Voices,” contemporary quilts by the Studio Art Quilts Associates, through May 24. 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Mon.Sat. 320-5790. CANTRELL GALLERY, 8206 Cantrell Road: “Arkansas Weather Report,” new paintings by Daniel Coston, through April 27. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Sat. 224-1335. GREG THOMPSON FINE ART, 429 Main St., NLR: “Carroll Cloar: A Road Less Traveled,” 23 paintings and drawings, through April 12. 664-2787. HEARNE FINE ART, 1001 Wright Ave.: “From a Whisper ... to a Conversation ... to a Shout,” work

BROCKMEIER, CONT.

by Lawrence Finney, through April 22, receptions 1:30 p.m. and 5:30 p.m. April 11, gallery talk by the artist 2 p.m. April 12. 372-6822. L&L BECK ART GALLERY, 5705 Kavanaugh Blvd.: “Spring Flowers,” paintings by Louis Beck, through April; free giclee drawing 7 p.m. April 17. 660-4006. MUGS CAFE, 515 Main St., NLR: “Breaking Eggs,” group exhibit of paintings, drawings, wall sculpture, art jewelry and metalwork by the Art Bunch: Christie Young, Emily Wood, Michael Warrick, Denise White, Dan Thornhill, Dominique Simmons, MJ Robbins, Ruth Pasquine, Bonnie Nickol, Marty Justice, Jeannie Hursely, Marianne Hennigar, Diane Harper, Judith Faust, V.L. Cox, Robert Bean and Fran Austin, through April 15.

ONGOING MUSEUM EXHIBITS

CLINTON PRESIDENTIAL CENTER, 1200

President Clinton Ave.: “Spies, Traitors and Saboteurs: Fear and Freedom in America,” from the International Spy Museum in Washington, D.C., through April 27; permanent exhibits on the Clinton administration. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Sat., 1-5 p.m. Sun. $7 adults; $5 college students, seniors, retired military; $3 ages 6-17. 370-8000. ESSE, 1510 S. Main St.: “What’s Inside: A Century of Women and Handbags (1900-1999),” purses from the collection of Anita Davis, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Tue.-Sun., $10-$8. 916-9022. HISTORIC ARKANSAS MUSEUM, 200 E. 3rd St.: “Ciara Long: A Different Perspective,” sketches, through May 4; Mid-Southern Watercolorists “44th Annual Juried Exhibition,” through April 6; “A Sure Defense: The Bowie Knife in America,” through June 22; “Arkansas Made,” ongoing. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Sat., 1-5 p.m. Sun. 324-9351.

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Continued from page 38 Why seventh grade? There’s this idea that only big lives, momentous lives, are worthy of memoir, and I remember thinking, well, maybe, but isn’t every life momentous — or at least wouldn’t it be if you approached it with enough care, enough perceptiveness? Take any one year of any one life, recount it with clarity and sympathy, and shouldn’t it matter? Seventh grade was far and away the most difficult year of my childhood, but it’s also the year I’ve spent the most time trying to understand, as well as the source of a lot of the stories I’ve continued to tell, and I thought it would make for fruitful narrative soil. I tried to avoid treating the incidents I recall as anecdotes, packaged together with whatever meanings or punchlines I’ve derived from them over the years, since I don’t think our lives actually unfold with morals attached to them, or meanings that are easily extracted, or jokes designed to generate sympathy. I wanted to do the opposite — to offer up a life whose meanings can only be perceived through a tangle of desires, confusions and textural details. But the wealth of stories I remember from seventh grade certainly gave me a way of organizing the book: Oh yes, this happened, and then this happened, and then this. The book can be painful to read. Was it painful to write? It might seem odd, but the most painful experiences to undergo ended up being the easiest to write about, simply because I recollected them so clearly. Those voices — I don’t think they’ve ever fully left my mind. What was hard for me was cleaving to the facts of my life as they actually transpired, and also to my sensibility as I recall it working back then — to that vocabulary, that perspective, that specific 13-year-old boy’s set of worries and preoccupations — resisting the urge to let my own sensibility, the retrospection of a middle-aged man, take up the instrument and change the key. Not painful work, then, but painstaking. Did you have any reservations about the book’s kind of stark honesty, or was this necessary to the whole project? I didn’t have those hesitations while I was writing the book, or at least I wouldn’t allow myself to indulge them, because the question at its heart was so intriguing to me: How did it actually feel to be this particular human being immersed in this particular life during this particular year? That’s what I wanted to know, and it seemed to me that my answer would only have any value if I was as honest as I knew how to be. CONTINUED ON PAGE 50

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ARKANSAS TIMES

MOVIE REVIEW

God stars as destroyer In Darren Aronofsky’s ‘Noah.’ BY SAM EIFLING

T

he epic “Noah,” a watchable if relentlessly weird adaptation of the book of Genesis’ grisliest passage, carries a rating of PG-13, for all the things that make the Bible such a favorite around the holidays: “violence, disturbing images and brief suggestive content.” For anyone who spent Sunday school sleeping in, this is the episode in which the Creator, as Noah and his family call God, notices what a bunch of irredeemable scoundrels humans have become and decides to push the reset button. Violent and disturbing only begins to sketch it. To our everlasting luck, there was one fellow — Russell Crowe, as a proto-steampunk vegetarian — whom the Creator tipped off. Noah builds a triple-decker brick-shaped boat the size of a small mall, and when the rains come, he and a menagerie of birds, beasts and bugs ride out the tempest while everyone and everything else, including the dinosaurs, we can only presume, are duly and permanently smote. This is a story so short and simple that you could read the King James version fully during the end credits of “Noah.” And yet what a tale! It has been nightmare fuel for millennia, but the Bible tells us little about Noah, other than that he could build a boat like a boss. The Noah of “Noah” has a nice thing going — married to Jennifer Connelly,

‘NOAH’: Russell Crowe stars.

got three kids, grandson to Methuselah (Anthony Hopkins) — in a bleak Icelandic dirtscape, until he starts getting pretty explicit signs from God, in the form of creepy dreams full of undersea corpses, that He’s about to take a mulligan and it’s going to get ugly. Also, in a twist that you didn’t see coming, there are some pious stone giants handy to help Noah and his family slap the ol’ ark together on deadline. Not kidding. Some of director/writer Darren Aronofsky’s past work, not least “Requiem for a Dream,” has suffered because of his apparent malice toward his characters. In this, he’s not a bad fit to adapt Genesis. His Noah is a hero touched by God who cannot help but overthink the Creator’s aims. When his three sons look around and find that only

the eldest is bringing a wife (Emma Watson), Noah quells a family insurrection and surmises, not unreasonably, that their job is not to perpetuate this benighted species, but merely to shepherd the rest of the animal kingdom through the flood and then to die off slowly and in loneliness afterward. If Noah like Aronofsky seems like a misanthrope, well, remember that they like all of us were created in God’s image. For all of the clunkiness of “Noah,” it does pick the right aspect of this fable to dote upon. Once the family escapes an army of would-be ark pirates (led by a Mad Maxish Ray Winstone) they’re left to their own existential dread, huddled in a dark box as the screams of the dying leak in through the timber-and-pitch walls. Any bright child has picked apart this story with such questions as “How do the animals eat?” (turns out, they hibernate) and “Where does everyone go to the bathroom?” (unanswered, still). The slightly more advanced question is, “During months at sea, carrying the fate of every species including our own, in the dark and atop genocidal waves, how does everyone not go crazy?” Madness may be inevitable on such a mission from God, as the Blues Brothers would likewise tell you, especially when the Creator becomes the Destroyer. Here’s where “Noah” veers into the subversive, even as it takes a respectful route to smelting scripture into a big-budget spectacle. At some level, it’s about how wrong we can be when we feel certain we understand God. This in a film about the guy who saved all life on the planet (except, like, all the plants, right? How did any plants survive? (etc., etc.) and yet not even he gets close enough to God to really understand what He wants, nor to play God, as it were. A Biblical epic Artist: that celebrates a dose of healthy skepticism Heather is a “Noah” for modern times. Emmett

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ART AE CLIENT

BROCKMEIER, CONT. Continued from page 48 My impulse was to take all the circumstances of my life — the person I used to be, the friends I used to know, the girls I used to like, the dreams I used to have, the movies I used to watch, the secrets I used to keep, the doubts I used to hide, the adulthood I used to anticipate — everything, whether good, bad or embarrassing — and gather it back together. The problems of trying to resurrect that long-gone consciousness and that long-gone time were difficult for me, and being anything other than truthful would only have com-

pounded the difficulty. I’ll admit, though, that as the publication date has approached I’ve been considerably more nervous than I usually am, because the material of the book is so intimate and I did so little to soften it. Was there a book or set of books that served as guideposts for your approach here, or that at least allowed you to think that this book was something you could pull off? I’m never sure I can pull my books off. If I were, I doubt I would feel compelled to attempt them. That said, writing this

one, I think I was under the imaginative magnetic sway of “Stop-Time” by Frank Conroy, “I Will Not Leave You Comfortless” by Jeremy Jackson, “So Long, See You Tomorrow” by William Maxwell and “The Dangerous Lives of Altar Boys” by Chris Fuhrman, though the last two are autobiographical novels rather than memoirs, and none of them are written in either the third person or the present tense, nor do any of them make a brief foray into science fiction, as “A Few Seconds of Radiant Filmstrip” does. I hope it’s not graceless to say that while I was writing the book I also read a pair of

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memoirs that I found dissatisfyingly sterile or lazy in very specific (and fundamentally opposite) ways: negative examples. One of them was carefully and deliberately composed and seemed wholly faithful to the facts of the writer’s life, but failed to offer anything like the lived experience of those facts, and the other was brimming with the lived experience of its writer’s life, and was probably faithful to the facts, but was very poorly crafted — passionate, but at the expense of some vibrancy or precision in the phrasing. I did my best to avoid those shortcomings. The city of Little Rock is a sort of enigmatic minor character in the book. How has your own relationship to the city changed over the years? Well, for starters, there’s a big difference between knowing a city by car and knowing it by foot. It’s tempting to think that the portion of a city that’s available for you to discover shrinks as you grow older, but the truth, I suspect, is that the shadows and the light simply switch places: you know more of the terrain, but you know it less intimately. I’m certainly more familiar with the highways of this place than I used to be, and the restaurants, and the arrangement of the neighborhoods, but I doubt I’ll ever again know a patch of woods as completely as I did the one behind Sturbridge Apartments when I was 10 years old. A city is something like a net, I think, and for me the net of Little Rock is a lot bigger now, but the knots are much farther apart. I’m sure there are things that slip through the gaps. I’ve written about Little Rock before, specifically in a couple of stories that I think of as precursors to this book, “Apples” and “Andrea Is Changing Her Name.” But “A Few Seconds of Radiant Filmstrip” marks my hardest effort to capture Little Rock as it actually exists, or at least as it did back in 1985. It was a smaller place for me then, but no less mine. In the book, you take the opportunity to visit your seventh-grade self (a very strange and powerful scene). What practical advice would you give a younger you if this were possible, assuming this entire book isn’t already an answer to this question? There’s the kind of late-night timetravel conversation you might fantasize about having with your younger self — love this person; avoid that one; hold on tight when you meet this one; hold on tight and don’t let go — and then there’s what I actually wanted to do with the book, which was simply to say, This is what happened to me, this is how I remember it. Maybe that would be enough — just that — to look myself in the eye and say, “I remember you.”

LOST IN TRANSLATION, CONT.

away the one stronghold that they have.” Andre Guerrero is a member of LULAC’s state education committee and the director of programs for language minority students with the Arkansas Department of Education — though he made it clear he was not speaking on behalf of the Department of Education. Guerrero and other members of LULAC have met with Suggs several times to discuss the issue of how to serve Latino students in the LRSD and the Newcomer Center at Hall. “He told us that the program was good and he was supporting it. And now, bang, he sort of announces that, no, he’s going to dismantle it,” Guerrero said. Guerrero said the Newcomer Center is efficient and makes financial sense. “Staffing, scheduling, funding, so that it is costeffective to give these kids the extra help they need,” he said, “and it’s been very, very effective. This is one of the few things that hasn’t cost the district a disproportionate amount of money for results.” The program was approved by the U.S. Department of Education when it was started in the 1990s, Guerrero said, and isn’t “segregation” — only clustering students together for efficiency. Most of the parents with ESL students at Hall are happy with the system as it is, Guerrero said, and that Hall has proven successful at reaching a vulnerable population. “Nationally, we have a major problem with Hispanic dropouts,” he said. “We’re doing a good job addressing that through the Newcomer Center. It’s helping these kids, they like it, they’re moving ahead, they’ve got a bond with their teachers, they feel wanted and secure and well-taught. That makes sense to me.” In an interview this week, Suggs told the Times he does not want to close the Newcomer Center, and it was “not accurate” that he shot down the idea moving the center to McClellan High. “We’re not closing the Newcomer Center,” he said. “We’re actually going to expand the services for our English as New Language students.” Suggs said he didn’t know why those who attended meetings with him got the impression that he would close the center. “We did speak about the Newcomer Center, but we didn’t go into specifics about it,” he said. “I think whenever you talk about change, people become nervous and think it’s going to end.” Suggs did say he will “rearrange” the Newcomer Center, adding: “Hall High School will change. We will expand the services to [ESL] kids, but that option will always be there [for parents] to send their kids to Hall.” Asked if he would prefer to send ESL

students to schools in their own neighborhoods, Suggs said he wanted to give parents and students the option to attend any school they desire, which an expanded ESL system would allow. He said the current mindset regarding ESL students in the district has “a segregation component,” which is unacceptable given that Hispanics are the fastest-growing segment of the LRSD student population. “I wouldn’t say [students are] denied [enrollment at other schools], because they’re given the opportunity,” he said. “But I would say [there is] that concept of: ‘OK, well, we have to send them here.’

Well, what if I don’t want to go there? If I want to go somewhere else, why not give them the option? I think it’s more important that we provide services, because a lot of our families have smaller kids who aren’t in high school. We need to make sure we’re providing those services at that lower level, which we’re not doing a very good job of right now.” Suggs said the discussions about ESL programs and how to fund ESL teacher training are in their infancy and that changes are “not going to happen any time in the near future.” He said that paying for those changes will be a matter of shifting

resources. He also said he’s sure he’ll be able to find volunteers or work with the teachers’ union to find teachers willing to go through ESL training so programs can be expanded across the district. “In coming years,” he said, “you’re going to see a lot of relentless determination to recruit Hispanic, bilingual teachers and paraprofessionals, because we have to provide those services for those students,” Suggs said. “You want those students to feel at ease, and the parents to feel at ease, that when they come into the school, they’ll have someone who can communicate with them effectively.”

TIM HURSLEY

Continued from page 10

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Travel with the Arkansas Times to see paintings by great French masters and others in the “The William S. Paley Collection: A Taste for Modernism” at Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville. The exhibit of 60 works from the CBS mogul’s collection features work by Pablo Picasso, Paul Gaugin, Andre Derain, Henri Matisse, Paul Cezanne, Edgar Degas, Henri Toulouse-Lautrec and more contemporary artists, including Francis Bacon. The exhibition was organized by the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York.

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51

Dining WHAT’S COOKIN’

JONATHAN WILKINS, the man behind the most delicious bar food Little Rock has ever seen, is cooking again. After leaving White Water Tavern last summer, Wilkins has resurfaced with Arkansas Fresh Bakery in Benton, which largely supplies directly to restaurants but has expansion plans on the horizon. Wilkins will begin selling Arkansas Fresh bread and grilled sandwiches and snacks at the Argenta Farmers Market on Saturday. From Wilkins on Facebook: “I’m happy to announce a new collaboration between myself and the folks at Arkansas Fresh Bakery. Starting this weekend every Saturday you can find me at the Argenta Farmer’s Market from 7 a.m. to noon. I’ll be running the bakery’s market stand as well as manning the grill to serve up a revolving menu of sandwiches and grilled snacks. I’ve got a bunch of new recipes, but some of your favorites that you haven’t been able to get in a while will also be making appearances. In short, ‘The Doublewide’ will once again be available. Go ahead and ‘like’ the Arkansas Fresh Bakery page. I’ll be posting the weekly menu up there. Hope to see you this season at the farmer’s market.” 52

APRIL 3, 2014

ARKANSAS TIMES

the edge off. The chanterelle mushrooms, charred corn and truffle corn puree were outstanding complements, much more than just afterthoughts or plate decorations. The truffle polenta ($12), billed as “crispy,” wasn’t, and its blandness got more intense after we had consumed the excellent mushrooms and bits of goat cheese that accompanied. But it was filling for sure. Our pasta choice is what we’ll be going back for. The crab tagliolini ($16) is a gem: thin pasta with considerably more shards of SLEEK: Cache features swank, modern decor. lump crab than we deserved. It’s not heavily sauced, but the Pernod (a French anisette liqueur) gives it a great, sharp edge. On our return trip we weren’t so budget conscious. The sea bass and scallops ($39) featured two large, pan-sauteed scallops But there’s much to love about that sat atop cipollini onion that had been swanky River Market restaurant. sauteed to sweetness. The 4- to 5-ounce portion of perfectly prepared, succulent sea our gut reaction the first time you’re bass was accented by cauliflower cream that Cache Restaurant  at Cache Restaurant will likely be, was rich and not too cauliflowery. Slightly 425 President Clinton Ave. “This doesn’t feel like I’m in Little charred broccoli, carrots and asparagus Little Rock, AR 72201 Rock.” That’s really not fair to our city, which accompanied. The dish was excellent, but 501-850-0265 www.cachelittlerock.com is growing in sophistication and worldliit wasn’t $39 excellent, particularly given ness, but gut reactions aren’t necessarily the portions. QUICK BITE logical or fair. Our dining companion’s Tasmanian If you just want to nosh or are looking for a lower-cost dinner option, ask Cache is super swanky, modern, cosmosalmon ($30) featured a larger slab of wellfor the pizza menu at the bar. You’ll politan and well-appointed in every way. prepared salmon, served skin-side up. It was find seven creative options, priced It’s a huge, two-story restaurant/lounge moist, tender and not the least bit fishy. It between $10 and $12. (They’re also that wraps around the northeast corner sat atop a bed of amazing creamed leeks on the main lunch menu.) And it’s fun watching the hustle and bustle in the of the new Arcade Building in the heart of (we could eat a bowl of them), and the kitchen and the bartenders slinging the River Market District. But it’s divided beet ribbons offered a nice counterpoint fancy drinks. into distinct smaller sections that give it of sweetness. HOURS an unexpectedly intimate feel — from the Speaking of sweetness, we tried three 11 a.m.-close Monday through Friday, comfortable bar area, perfect for happy hour desserts over the course of our two visits 5 p.m.-close Saturday. Last seating at chats, to the counter seats where diners can (all $9.95): a classic but not inspired vanilla 9:45 each evening. creme brulee; a more distinctive, light-yetwatch the dozen or so kitchen staff scurryOTHER INFO ing around the huge, upscale open kitchen rich cheesecake served with whipped cream Full bar, credit cards accepted. to the downstairs main dining room. and a bit of caramel sauce; and nougatine, a Upstairs is the lounge, and it’s presented very rich flourless chocolate cake with bits just as compellingly — thanks this time of of praline and nuts and a scoop of homeyear to the sliding glass windows, which get a load of the prices. We’re not a town made vanilla ice cream. open up the place to the beautiful spring known for $74 ribeyes, $26 foie gras appeTo see the variety of steak, chicken, pasta weather; and at the central corner of the tizers or $21 meat and cheese plates. And and other entrees — plus to get a sense of lounge is a small outdoor patio where you at lunch, a sandwich with chips will set you the look and feel of the place — take time can soak up even more of the River Market back $11-$13 before beverage, tip and tax. So, to visit www.cachelittlerock.com. hustle and bustle below. yes, you can bruise your credit card pretty Given its prices, it would be logical to catCache (pronounced “cash,” not “cach- severely at Cache, especially if you shoot egorize Cache as a special occasion restauay”) is owned by Linda and Rush Hard- the moon. But there are ways to minimize rant. But unless folks are celebrating even ing, and anyone who has followed Rush the financial commitment and still leave the most minor of holidays or occasions, Harding’s professional career as CEO of satisfied. that’s not the way Cache is playing out. We At our first dinner we each just got an booked well in advance for our Friday night Crews and Associates, his high-profile support of UCA and his many philanthropic appetizer, split a pasta and split a dessert. dinner, but when we called one Monday kindnesses knows he does nothing halfway. The braised pork belly ($14) features a afternoon for reservations that night we Cache is living proof. decent-sized hunk of flavorful, salty, some- were told it was a complete sellout — but Another “I don’t feel like I’m in Little what fatty piece of delectable pork, not a that we were welcome to dine at the bar, a Rock” moment is likely to come when you meal-sized portion but plenty to knock lively and enjoyable experience. BRIAN CHILSON

OUR ANNUAL ARKANSAS TIMES HERITAGE HOG ROAST is on the horizon. The cook-off at the Argenta Farmers Market in North Little Rock is scheduled for 5 p.m. Saturday, May 3. Tickets are $25 in advance, or $30 at the door and include pig meat and sides from the roasters and live music from Memphis’ Ghost Town Blues Band, Runaway Planet and The Salty Dogs. Proceeds benefit the Argenta Arts District. So far we’ve got 19 restaurants participating. They’ll all smoke a hog from Scott Heritage Farm. Here they are: 1620 Savoy, Arthur’s Prime Steakhouse & Oceans, Cafe 42, Cafe Bossa Nova, Cheers, Cregeen’s Irish pub, Crush Wine Bar, The Fold, Maddie’s Place, Midtown Billards, Natchez, Reno’s Argenta Cafe, Ristorante Capeo, The Root, The Schlafly Tap Room, Southern Gourmasian, South on Main, Taco Mama and Whole Hog. If your favorite restaurant isn’t among that group, holler at ’em. There’s still time for teams to register.

Cache takes cash

Y

Information in our restaurant capsules reflects the opinions of the newspaper staff and its reviewers. The newspaper accepts no advertising or other considerations in exchange for reviews, which are conducted anonymously. We invite the opinions of readers who think we are in error.

B Breakfast L Lunch D Dinner $ Inexpensive (under $8/person) $$ Moderate ($8-$20/person) $$$ Expensive (over $20/person) CC Accepts credit cards

BELLY UP Check out the Times’ food blog, Eat Arkansas arktimes.com

DINING CAPSULES

LITTLE ROCK/ N. LITTLE ROCK

AMERICAN

4 SQUARE CAFE AND GIFTS Vegetarian salads, soups, wraps and paninis and a broad selection of smoothies in an Arkansas products gift shop. 405 President Clinton Ave. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-244-2622. BLD daily. ARKANSAS BURGER CO. Good burgers, fries and shakes, plus salads and other entrees. Try the cheese dip. 7410 Cantrell Road. Beer, Wine, All CC. $-$$. 501-663-0600. LD Tue.-Sat. ASHLEY’S The premier fine dining restaurant in Little Rock. The menu is often daring and always delicious. 111 W. Markham St. Full bar, All CC. $$$. 501-374-7474. BLD Mon.-Sat. BR Sun. BELLWOOD DINER Traditional breakfasts and plate lunch specials are the norm at this lostin-time hole in the wall. 3815 MacArthur Drive. NLR. No alcohol, No CC. $. 501-753-1012. BL Mon.-Fri. THE BLIND PIG Tasty bar food, including Zweigle’s brand hot dogs. 6015 Chenonceau Blvd. Full bar, CC. $-$$. 501-868-8194. D: Tue.-Sun., L Sat.-Sun. BRAVE NEW RESTAURANT Chef/owner Peter Brave was doing “farm to table” before most of us knew the term. His focus is on fresh, highquality ingredients prepared elegantly but simply. Ordering the fish special is never a bad choice. His chocolate crème brulee sets the pace. 2300 Cottondale Lane. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-663-2677. LD Mon.-Fri. D Sat. BRAY GOURMET DELI AND CATERING Turkey spreads in four flavors — original, jalapeno, cajun and dill — and the homemade pimiento cheese are the signature items at Chris Bray’s delicatessen, which serves sandwiches, wraps, soups, stuffed potatoes and salads and sells the turkey spreads to go. 323 Center St. Suite 150. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-353-1045. BL Mon.-Fri. CAPITAL BAR AND GRILL Big hearty sandwiches, daily lunch specials and fine evening dining all rolled up into one at this landing spot downtown. Surprisingly inexpensive with a great bar staff and a good selection of unique desserts. 111 Markham St. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-374-7474. LD daily. CAPITOL BISTRO Serving breakfast and lunch items, including quiche, sandwiches, coffees and the like. 1401 W. Capitol Ave. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-371-9575. BL Mon.-Fri. CATERING TO YOU Painstakingly prepared entrees and great appetizers in this gourmetto-go location, attached to a gift shop. Caters everything from family dinners to weddings and large corporate events. 8121 Cantrell Road. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-614-9030. Serving meals to go: LD Mon.-Sat. CATFISH HOLE Downhome place for wellcooked catfish and tasty hushpuppies. 603 E. Spriggs. NLR. Beer, All CC. $-$$. 501-758-3516. D Tue.-Sat. CELLAR 220 Ecclectic menu and strong wine list. 220 W. 6th St. Full bar, CC. $$$. 501-374-5100. LD Mon.-Fri., D Sat. CIAO BACI The focus is on fine dining in this casually elegant Hillcrest bungalow, though excellent tapas are out of this world. The tree-

shaded, light-strung deck is a popular destination. 605 N. Beechwood St. Full bar, All CC. $$$. 501-603-0238. D Mon.-Sat. CRAZEE’S COOL CAFE Good burgers, daily plate specials and bar food amid pool tables and TVs. 7626 Cantrell Road. Full bar, All CC. $-$$. 501-221-9696. LD Mon.-Sat. CUPCAKES ON KAVANAUGH Gourmet cupcakes and coffee, indoor seating. 5625 Kavanaugh Blvd. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-664-2253. LD Mon.-Sat. DEMPSEY BAKERY Bakery with sit-down area, serving coffee and specializing in gluten-, nutand soy-free baked goods. 323 Cross St. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-375-2257. Serving BL Tue.-Sat. DIXON ROAD BLUES CAFE Sandwiches, burgers and salads. 1505 W. Dixon Road. Full bar, All CC. $-$$. 501-888-2233. D Fri.-Sat. DOE’S EAT PLACE A skid-row dive turned power brokers’ watering hole with huge steaks, great tamales and broiled shrimp, and killer burgers at lunch. 1023 W. Markham St. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-376-1195. LD Mon.-Fri., D Sat. FILIBUSTER’S BISTRO & LOUNGE Sandwiches, salads in the Legacy Hotel. 625 W. Capitol Ave. Full bar, All CC. $$. 501-374-0100. D Mon.-Fri. FLYING FISH The fried seafood is fresh and crunchy and there are plenty of raw, boiled and grilled offerings, too. The hamburgers are a hit, too. It’s counter service; wander on through the screen door and you’ll find a slick team of cooks and servers doing a creditable job of serving big crowds. 511 President Clinton Ave. Beer, Wine, All CC. $$. 501-375-3474. LD daily. GRUMPY’S TOO Music venue and sports bar with lots of TVs, pub grub and regular drink specials. 1801 Green Mountain Drive. Full bar, All CC. $-$$. 501-225-3768. LD Mon.-Sat. GUS’S WORLD FAMOUS FRIED CHICKEN The best fried chicken in town. Go for chicken and waffles on Sundays. 300 President Clinton Ave. Beer, CC. $-$$. 501-372-2211. LD daily.

HOMER’S Great vegetables, huge yeast rolls and killer cobblers. Follow the mobs. 2001 E. Roosevelt Road. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-374-1400. BL Mon.-Fri. 9700 N Rodney Parham. Full bar, All CC. $$. 501-224-6637. LD Mon.-Sat. IRONHORSE SALOON Bar and grill offering juicy hamburgers and cheeseburgers. 9125 Mann Road. Full bar, All CC. $. 501-562-4464. LD daily. JIMMY’S SERIOUS SANDWICHES Consistently fine sandwiches, side orders and desserts for 30 years. Chicken salad’s among the best in town, and there are fun specialty sandwiches such as Thai One On and The Garden. Get there early for lunch. 5116 W. Markham St. No alcohol, CC. $-$$. 501-666-3354. L Mon.-Sat., D Mon.-Sat. (drive-through only). KRAZY MIKE’S Po’boys, catfish and shrimp and other fishes, fried chicken wings and all the expected sides served up fresh and hot to order on demand. 200 N. Bowman Road. Beer, All CC. $$. 501-907-6453. LD Mon.-Sat. LOCA LUNA Grilled meats, seafood and pasta dishes that never stray far from country roots, whether Italian, Spanish or Arkie. “Gourmet plate lunches” are good, as is Sunday brunch. 3519 Old Cantrell Road. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-663-4666. BR Sun., LD Mon.-Fri., D Sat. THE MAIN CHEESE A restaurant devoted to grilled cheese. 14524 Cantrell Road. Beer, Wine. $-$$. 501-367-8082. LD Mon.-Sat. MILFORD TRACK Healthy and tasty are the key words at this deli/grill that serves breakfast and lunch. Hot entrees change daily and there are soups, sandwiches, salads and killer desserts. Bread is baked in-house, and there are several veggie options. 10809 Executive Center Dr., Searcy Building. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-223-2257. BL Mon.-Fri., L Sat. NATCHEZ RESTAURANT Smart, elegant takes on Southern classics. 323 Center St. Beer, Wine, CC. $$-$$$. L Tue.-Fri., D Wed.-Sat. OYSTER BAR Gumbo, red beans and rice (all

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A by Acacia 2013 Unoaked Chardonnay Reg $14.39 ............................. Sale $10.99 Haras de Pirque Character 2007 Cabernet/Carmenere Reg $24.99 ............................. Sale $18.99

*in Store only • While Supplies last.

We Will MatCh any loCal, advertiSed priCe! Bring in the ad to Save.

11200 W. Markham Street · 501-223-3120 · colonialwineshop.com · facebook.com/ColonialWines C E L E B R AT E R E S P O N S I B LY.

you can eat on Mondays), peel-and-eat shrimp, oysters on the half shell, addictive po’ boys. Killer jukebox. 3003 W. Markham St. Beer, Wine, All CC. $-$$. 501-666-7100. LD Mon.-Sat. THE RELAY STATION This grill offers a short menu, which includes chicken strips, French fries, hamburgers, jalapeno poppers and cheese sticks. 12225 Stagecoach Road. Full bar, All CC. $-$$. 501-455-9919. LD daily. SALUT BISTRO This bistro/late-night hangout does upscale tapas. 1501 N. University. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-660-4200. L Mon.-Fri., D Tue.-Sat. SCALLIONS Reliably good food, great desserts, pleasant atmosphere, able servers — a solid lunch spot. 5110 Kavanaugh Blvd. Beer, Wine, All CC. $-$$. 501-666-6468. L Mon.-Sat. SHORTY SMALL’S Land of big, juicy burgers, massive cheese logs, smoky barbecue platters and the signature onion loaf. 1100 N. Rodney Parham Road. Full bar, All CC. $$. 501-224-3344. LD daily. SONNY WILLIAMS’ STEAK ROOM Steaks, chicken and seafood in a wonderful setting in the River Market. Steak gets pricey, though. Menu is seasonal, changes every few months. 500 President Clinton Ave. Full bar, All CC. $$$. 501-324-2999. D Mon.-Sat. SOUTH ON MAIN Fine, innovative takes on Southern fare in a casual, but well-appointed setting. 1304 Main St. Full bar, CC. $-$$. 501-244-9660. L Mon.-Fri., D Tue.-Sat. TABLE 28 Excellent fine dining with lots of creative flourishes. Branch out and try the Crispy Squid Filet and Quail Bird Lollipops. 1501 Merrill Drive. Full bar, CC. $$$-$$$$. 224-2828. D Mon.-Sat. WEST END SMOKEHOUSE AND TAVERN Its primary focus is a sports bar with 50-plus TVs, but the dinner entrees (grilled chicken, steaks and such) are plentiful and the bar food is upper quality. 215 N. Shackleford. Full bar, All CC. $$. 501-224-7665. L Fri.-Sun., D daily.

ASIAN

A.W. LIN’S ASIAN CUISINE Excellent panAsian with wonderful service. 17717 Chenal Parkway. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-821-5398. LD daily. CHINESE KITCHEN Good Chinese takeout. Try the Cantonese press duck. 11401 N. Rodney Parham Road. No alcohol, CC. $-$$. 501-2242100. LD Tue.-Sun. LEMONGRASS ASIA BISTRO Fairly solid Thai bistro. Try the Tom Kha Kai and white wine alligator. They don’t have a full bar, but you can order beer, wine and sake. 4629 E. McCain Blvd. NLR. Beer, Wine, All CC. 501-945-4638. LD daily. MR. CHEN’S ASIAN SUPERMARKET AND RESTAURANT A combination Asian restaurant and grocery with cheap, tasty and exotic offerings. 3901 S. University Ave. $. 501-562-7900. LD daily. PHO THANH MY It says “Vietnamese noodle soup” on the sign out front, and that’s what you should order. The pho comes in outrageously large portions with bean sprouts and fresh herbs. Traditional pork dishes, spring rolls and bubble tea also available. 302 N. Shackleford Road. No alcohol, All CC. $$. 501-312-7498. LD Mon., Wed.-Sun. CONTINUED ON PAGE 54 www.arktimes.com

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DINING CAPSULES, CONT.

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SEKISUI Fresh-tasting sushi chain with fun hibachi grill and an overwhelming assortment of traditional entrees. Nice wine selection, also serves sake and specialty drinks. 219 N. Shackleford Road. Full bar, All CC. $-$$. 501-221-7070. LD daily. TOKYO HOUSE Defying stereotypes, this Japanese buffet serves up a broad range of fresh, slightly exotic fare — grilled calamari, octopus salad, dozens of varieties of fresh sushi — as well as more standard shrimp and steak options. 11 Shackleford Dr. Beer, Wine, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-219-4286. LD daily.

➥ The next big event at CANTRELL GALLERY is the spring trunk show for Regalia Handmade Clothing. Come to Cantrell Gallery to see the latest one-of-a-kind creations. A wine and cheese preview party will be from 6-8 p.m. April 11 or you can stop by from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. April 12. Bring your friends, see the new line, try on some clothes and visit with Mark Hughes, owner/designer of Regalia Handmade Clothing. If CHIP’S BARBECUE Tasty, if a little pricey, you’re not familiar with this line barbecue piled high on sandwiches generand you want a sneak-peek at what ously doused with the original tangy sauce or they look like, check out the Regaone of five other sauces. Better known for the incredible family recipe pies and cheesecakes, lia website: www.regaliahandmade. which come tall and wide. 9801 W. Markham com. For more information, call 501St. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-225-4346. LD 224-1335. Mon.-Sat. ➥ PARK PLAZA MALL recently PIT STOP BAR AND GRILL A working-man’s announced the expected summer bar and grill, with barbecue, burgers, breakfast opening of ZUMIEZ, a store that and bologna sandwiches, plus live music on specializes in young men’s and Friday and Saturday nights. 5506 Baseline Road. juniors’ casual, active and beachFull bar, No CC. $$. 501-562-9635. BLD daily. related sportswear and accessories. The store will be located on the top CREGEEN’S IRISH PUB Irish-themed pub with level, west end, near Build-A-Bear a large selection of on-tap and bottled British Workshop. beers and ales, an Irish inspired menu and lots ➥ THE PROMENADE AT CHEof nooks and crannies to meet in. Specialties NAL will host a Family Health and include fish ‘n’ chips and Guinness beef stew. Wellness Fest from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. 301 Main St. NLR. Full bar, All CC. $$. 501-3767468. LD daily. April 5. The event will feature free ISTANBUL MEDITERRANEAN RESTAURANT fitness demos, the chance to speak with health experts from St. Vincent West, health and wellness vendors, a Red Cross blood drive, and kids’ activities. soon to Lakewood Villa g n i ge! ➥ STUDIO ONE DANCE in North Com Little Rock is offering a belly dancing for beginners workshop on Thursday nights in April for ages 13 to adult. The class is from 7-8 p.m. April 3, 10, 17 and 24. The total cost for all four classes is $65. If the workWhere Modern Meets shop garners enough interest, Studio Fresh Mexican Cuisine One hopes to make it a permanent offering. Call 501-833-6000 for more 2629 Lakewood Village Pl · North Little Rock information. Next to Shoe Carnival ➥ Don’t forget that April 3 is FIRST (see attached) THURSDAY SHOP ’N SIP in Hillcrest. Enjoy a leisurely stroll down (AT) the neighborhood’s business disJust In Time For Easter! We have a very, very, sweet, male lab mix puppy that has shown up at our farm. He is healthy, playful and very, very hungry. We wormed him trict until 8 p.m., and be sure to stop this morning and he is ready to be adopted by a good home. Cost is $10 which takes by BOX TURTLE for the BELLA care of the wormer. This puppy would make a great child’s gift, just in time for Easter. Theole’ARKANSAS ORCHID SOCIETY and Or maybe just a good family dog. Call Kaytee at 501-607-3100. VITA jewelry trunk show and also SWORGA 2014 SHOW and SALE a book signing with Tracy Nicholas (ELLA) of thenewbully.com. April 5 • 12-4pm (Vender Sales Open 10am) Aprilla 6 •semana 11am-3pmSanta. ➥ OUT OF THE WOODS ANIA tiempo para Adopte este perrito! Tenemos un cachorro macho. Esta sano y juega mucho. FreeLabrador Admission MAL RESCUE of Arkansas will Esta listo para ser adoptado ya esta desparasitado. El costo es de $10 que cubre la desparasitada. Este cachorro ara feliz a cualquier niño. Para mayor información llama host a fun-filled afternoon to honor a Kaytee en Ingles al 501-607-3100. Meet and speak with award winning founder Kathy Woods. The event, orchid growers. Tail Waggin’ and Tailgaitin’ for View beautiful blooming orchids. Kathy’s Cause, will include live Purchase and grow your own orchid plants. Raffle drawing. music, a silent auction, a raffle, a Bid on silent auction items. wine pull and BBQ from Cross Eyed Pig. Hosted at Stephano’s Fine Art Benton Event Center Gallery from 2-5 p.m. April 6, folks 17324 I-30 N • Benton will also be able to browse and meet Info: reison@SBCGlobal.net the artist.

BARBECUE

EUROPEAN / ETHNIC

54

APRIL 3, 2014

ARKANSAS TIMES

This Turkish eatery offers decent kebabs and great starters. The red pepper hummus is a winner. Possibly the best Turkish coffee in Central Arkansas. 11525 Cantrell Road. No alcohol, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-223-9332. LD daily. LAYLA’S GYROS AND PIZZERIA Delicious Mediterranean fare — gyros, falafel, shawarma, kabobs, hummus and babaganush — that has a devoted following. All meat is slaughtered according to Islamic dietary law. 9501 N Rodney Parham Road. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-227-7272. LD daily (close 5 p.m. on Sun.). LITTLE GREEK Fast casual chain with excellent Greek food. 11525 Cantrell Road. Beer, All CC. $$. LD daily.

ITALIAN

CIAO ITALIAN RESTAURANT Don’t forget about this casual yet elegant bistro tucked into a downtown storefront. The fine pasta and seafood dishes, ambiance and overall charm combine to make it a relaxing, enjoyable, affordable choice. 405 W. Seventh St. Full bar, All CC. $$. 501-372-0238. L Mon.-Fri., D Thu.-Sat. IRIANA’S PIZZA Unbelievably generous handtossed New York style pizza with unmatched zest. Good salads, too; grinders are great. 201 E. Markham St. Beer, Wine, All CC. $-$$. 501-3743656. LD Mon.-Sat. MELLOW MUSHROOM Popular high-end pizza chain. 16103 Chenal Pkwy. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-379-9157. LD daily. ROMANO’S MACARONI GRILL A chain restaurant with a large menu of pasta, chicken, beef, fish, unusual dishes like Italian nachos, and special dishes with a corporate bent. 11100 W Markham St. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-2213150. LD daily.

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ZAFFINO’S BY NORI A high-quality Italian dining experience. Pastas, entrees (don’t miss the veal marsala) and salads are all outstanding. 2001 E. Kiehl Ave. NLR. Beer, Wine, All CC. 501-834-7530. D Tue.-Sat.

LATINO

CANON GRILL Tex-Mex, pasta, sandwiches and salads. Creative appetizers come in huge quantities, and the varied main-course menu rarely disappoints. 2811 Kavanaugh Blvd. Full bar, All CC. $$. 501-664-2068. LD daily. COTIJA’S A branch off the famed La Hacienda family tree downtown, with a massive menu of tasty lunch and dinner specials, the familiar white cheese dip and sweet red and fieryhot green salsas, and friendly service. 406 S. Louisiana St. Full bar, All CC. $$. 501-244-0733. L Mon.-Fri. FONDA MEXICAN CUISINE Authentic Mex. The guisado (Mexican stew) is excellent. 400 N. Bowman Road. Full bar, CC. $$-$$$. 501-3134120. LD Tue.-Sun. LAS MARGARITAS Sparse offerings at this taco truck. No chicken, for instance. Try the veggie quesadilla. 7308 Baseline Road. No alcohol, No CC. $. LD Tue.-Thu. LAS AMERICAS Guatemalan and Mexican fare. Try the hearty tamales wrapped in banana leaves. 8622 Chicot Road. $-$$. 501-565-0266. LD daily. TAQUERIA KARINA AND CAFE A real Mexican neighborhood cantina. Freshly baked pan dulce, Mexican-bottled Cokes, first-rate guacamole, inexpensive tacos, burritos, quesadillas and a broad selection of Mexican-style seafood. 5309 W. 65th St. Beer, No CC. $. 501-562-3951. BLD daily.

ARKANSAS TIMES

MARKETPLACE TO ADVERTISE IN THIS SECTION, CALL LUIS AT 501.375.2985

Systems Analyst

Just In Time For Easter!

We have a very, very, sweet, male lab mix puppy that has shown up at our farm. He is healthy, playful and very, very hungry. We wormed him this morning and he is ready to be adopted by a good home. Cost is $10 which takes care of the wormer. This puppy would make a great child’s gift, just in time for Easter. Or maybe just a good ole’ family dog. Call Kaytee at 501-607-3100.

(Little Rock, AR & client sites) Design & develop warehousing system using & cloud methodologies without compromising security with multi-tenant architecture. Setup tier-one applications, data warehouses, databases & SQL & liaison between IT & Business Team. Bachelor Degree or equivalent in Business Administration & 5 years of experience required. Must be highly proficient in Datawarehousing & Business Intelligence. Mail resume to: Tecsource, Attn: HR, 3 Chenay Drive, Little Rock, AR 72223.

Can ihelp you? Learn to get more from your Mac at home or office.

• Help choose the perfect Apple for you and your budget

ARKANSAS TIMES MARKETPLACE

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AssistAnt Professor of fAmily And PreventAtive medicine

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Mitch Albom’s

tuesdays with Morrie A young man, an old man, and life’s greatest lesson Directed by Andy Hall April 4-5, 11-13, 18-19 Fridays & Saturdays 7:30pm Sunday 2:30pm $16 Adults $12 Students & Seniors Corner of 7th & Chester 1001 W 7th St • Little Rock For More Information & Tickets

501.374.3761 www.weekendtheater.org

Notice of filliNg applicatioNs for restauraNt wiNe & Native beer/malt beverages permit

Notice is hereby given that the undersigned has filed an application with the Alcoholic Beverage Control Division of the State of Arkansas for a permit to sell and serve wine food and Arkansas native beer and malt beverages at retail on the premises described as: 524 S. Main St. Little Rock, Pulaski County. Said application was on March 24, 2014. the undersigned states that he/she is a resident of Arkansas, of good moral character; that he/she has never been convicted of a felony or other crime involving moral turpitude; that no license to sell alcoholic beverages by the undersigned has been revoked within five (5) years last past; and, that the undersigned has never been convicted of violating the laws of this State, or any other State, relative to the sale of controlled beverages. Name of Applicant: Kent Walker. Name of Business: Kent Walker Artisan Cheese. Sworn to before me this 25th day of March, 2014. Linda L. Phillips, Notary Public. My commission Expires: September 28, 2016. #12350768.

Senior Web Developer

Transamerica Life Insurance Company seeks Senior Web Developer in Little Rock, AR, to code, test, identify, implement and document technical solutions.  Requires Bachelor’s in Information Systems, Computer Science or technically related field and 5 years work experience. Experience must include 3 years of web development using Microsoft .NET framework 2.0/3.0/4.0 (ASP.NET Webforms/ MVC and C#2.0/4.0), Web services and XML technologies (ASMX, WCF), Databases (SQL Server 2008 /Oracle); and 2 years of development in HTML, CSS/CSS3, XML, XSD, XSLT, JavaScript, jQuery, SSIS, SSRS.  Experience can be concurrent. Will also accept Master’s degree with 3 years of experience. Apply online at www.transamerica.com, Job ID 140000U6. All Transamerica companies are equal opportunity employers.  

IT’S HAPPENING RIGHT NOW ON THE ARKANSAS BLOG. WWW.ARKTIMES.COM

UAMS is seeking to fill two (2) positions for Assistant Professor of Family and Preventative Medicine in the Little Rock, Arkansas metro area. Clinical Position. The clinical physician will include directing residents, nurses and medical assistant. Duties include, prescribing or administering treatment, therapy, medication, vaccinations and other specialized medical care to treat or prevent illness, disease or injury. Monitor patients’ conditions and progress and reevaluate treatments as necessary. Coordinate work with nurses, social workers, rehabilitation therapists, pharmacists, psychologists, and other health care provides. Must have an MD, or foreign equivalent, Arkansas State Medical License, and must be board certified or board eligible in family medicine upon hire and if board eligible. Must complete board certification within one (1) year of hire. Send résumé to Jamie Rankins, jlrankins@uams.edu, 501-6866606, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Dept of Family & Preventative Medicine, 4301 W. Markham, Slot 530, Little Rock, AR 72205. EOE.

ARKANSAS TIMES www.arktimes.com

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