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NEWS + POLITICS + ENTERTAINMENT / NOVEMBER 7, 2012 / ARKTIMES.COM

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3


COMMENT

From the web In response to an Arkansas Blog post, “Republicans ready to bring DC gridlock to Arkansas,” about Republicans’ willingness to consider Medicaid expansion in Arkansas only if their conditions, including applying co-pays and drug-testing, are met. Using the “equal protection” argument, if drug-testing is to be required for Medicaid patients, ANYONE who receives public money should have to pee into a cup and test negative before they receive a dime. That would include all contractors (including physicians, people bidding for highway contracts, suppliers of goods and services), public employees, and all elected officials. Think about all of the high-tech analysis labs that such a law will bring to Arkansas; we will be awash with peetesting jobs. If the Repug pee brigade were to require drug-testing for Medicaid patients, revealing the results to a state agency would be a violation of federal privacy laws intended to protect patients. In addition, it would be conducting a search without a warrant. Legions of lawyers are salivating on the sidelines waiting to extract financial penalties from the state agencies that might decide that the Constitution can be shredded on a whim. As always, Repug solutions to save money end up costing us more, both financially and spiritually. With the huge range of legal pharmaceutical medications that can produce false positives, expect even more litigation. In order to avoid some false positives, people would have to reveal all of their medications — another violation of patient privacy. It’s just bad policy to assume that all Americans, or even a segment, are automatically guilty and should be forced to prove their innocence before they can receive medical help. What does that say about us? Are we in the process of shredding whatever vestiges of civilization are left? How soon will it be that the only thing protected by law is a fetus? Finally, the major outrage is that those who can least afford the consequence of an error, the poor, will suffer the worst from this worthless publicity stunt, while the Repugnuts strut around cackling that they stuck it to the 47 percent again. YossarianMinderbinder In response to Gene Lyon’s Oct. 31 column, “Romney: Trojan Horse.” Nothing against Mr. Romney but for the life of me I can’t understand why a 4

NOVEMBER 7, 2012

ARKANSAS TIMES

man who has so brilliantly used a corrupt system to put himself in a position to make on average 10 million a year without batting an eye wants to be the president of the United States. A position that if you look at it in its truest sense is almost impotent. The position really should be called the Great Suggestor because literally it’s almost all a president can do. Congress can and does make and pass laws without the president. His signature is just part of the process. Mr. Romney can do more with his money as a private citizen than as president. Saudiwoof

In response to Bob Lancaster’s Oct. 31 column, “Sick list.” Sorry you’re sick, Bob. Must be the same bug that has had me in a fever for, oh, about 30 years — ever since I first heard the phrase “trickle down.” Will we ever be cured? I doubt it. Leastwise, not until them beeves gazing over the fence rail finally have one of them there epiphanies. Lexicat In response to a blog post on the Arkansas Journal of Social Change and Public

Service “Food for Thought” symposium at the Bowen Law School on Oct. 26, particularly the panel, “Food trucks in the Little Rock landscape.” Were minority food truck operators asked to be involved in this talk? Perhaps they were. There are a great number of minority-operated trucks in Little Rock, from the various taco trucks that have been covered here to the ‘Hot Lanta truck I just recently reviewed on Eat Arkansas. There are others. Was Taqueria Samantha, a mainstay of the moribund University Market, asked to participate? Was Big Daddy’s Dogs? The last Main Street Food Truck Festival brought nearly 3,000 people to Main Street on a Saturday, despite horrible weather. Do we have that many people on Saturday walking down Main regularly? No, we don’t. It’s a veritable ghost town. South of I-630, they’ve started doing SOMA Second Thursdays, a food truck event at Bernice Garden that offers an evening meal option to a neighborhood that doesn’t do much business after 5 p.m. Boulevard Bread Co. and The Root don’t serve supper. Why not? As someone who eats in all sorts of places, and as someone who has a limited lunch break, let me break it down to everybody: People who want to stop at a food truck aren’t generally going to sit down at a brick and mortar place. On the flip-side, people who are taking clients to lunch downtown aren’t going to make them line up at the window of a truck. In the end, food trucks have brought some focus to two areas of town — Main Street and South University — that many people avoid. The South University experiment failed due to a hot summer, but the Main Street event still draws crowds. If brick and mortar restaurants want to compete, they might take a lesson from Rocket 21 and Vieux Carre, both of which offer a reasonably priced, perfectly delicious lunch menu apart from their normally pricey fare. And in the case of downtown restaurants like Lulav, maybe they should take time to self-reflect on their bad reputation for food and service and use that opportunity to improve. Little Rock’s food trucks are generally friendlier than its sit-down restaurants. Food trucks are happy you came. Many of our sit-down restaurants act like the customer is privileged to be served by them. That’s the big difference. Michael Roberts

Submit letters to the Editor, Arkansas Times, P.O. Box 34010, Little Rock, AR 72203. We also accept letters via e-mail. The address is arktimes@arktimes.com. Please include name and hometown.


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EDITORIAL

No forced mixing

ome rather horrifying proposals for Arkansas government have been made this election year — restore slavery, execute disobedient children — and one of the scariest is that to merge a public, tax-supported institution, the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, with a church-owned institution, St. Vincent Infirmary. If this plot comes to fruition, the First Amendment guarantee of religious freedom will be placed in the intensive care unit of the new St. Uams, not to come out except feet first. Would there be crucifixes on the walls of St. Uams, as there are at St. Vincent? Most likely. If the bishops can secure a foothold in a public hospital and research center, they’ll be emboldened, and they’ve never believed in separation of church and state anyway. Not allowing them to hang crosses even in the rooms of patients of a different faith, or no faith at all, would be declared an infringement of the bishops’ religious freedom, and their religious freedom, they explain, is very important. Yours, not so much. The Roman Catholic hierarchy is furious over the Obama administration’s effort to allow contraceptive insurance coverage for all Americans, even those who work for Catholic employers. Attacks from the pulpit on President Obama and the Democratic Party are numerous and intense. An Illinois bishop tells his congregation they’ll likely burn in hell if they vote Democratic; an Arkansas bishop says that “right to life” and “religious liberty” are the most important issues in the election, and it’s understood by all that religious liberty in this case means liberty to impose one’s own religious beliefs on others. A level-headed federal judge in Missouri, upholding the contraceptive-coverage mandate in the Affordable Care Act, wrote recently that federal law designed to protect the religious liberty of individuals “is a shield, not a sword. It protects individuals from substantial burdens on religious exercise that occur when the government coerces action one’s religion forbids, or forbids action one’s religion requires; it is not a means to force one’s religious practices upon others.” She went on to say that employers who disagree with the contraceptive-coverage mandate of the Affordable Care Act “remain free to exercise their religion, by not using contraceptives and by discouraging employees from using contraceptives.” The law protects individuals, not sects; discouragement is permitted, denial is not. Not all Catholics take the bishops’ orders, thank goodness. One Catholic layman, more tolerant and more perceptive than his clergy, responded to their electioneering this way: “We don’t want our church to inherit the legacy of Jerry Falwell and Pat Robertson, telling people how to vote.” He knows that if government rolls over for the Pope, Pat Robertson and the Falwellians will demand a cut too — and get it in a state like Arkansas. We might see a merger of Jerry Falwell’s Liberty University and the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville. They’re a ways apart, but distance learning is the latest thing in higher education. No good comes from the mixing of religion and government. Much evil does. See the Middle East for details. 6

NOVEMBER 7, 2012

ARKANSAS TIMES

BRIAN CHILSON

S

EYE ON ARKANSAS

ON LINE: Voters wait in line to vote early Monday. Lines streched long as record numbers of people turned out to vote early.

Election won’t change key issues

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e went to press this week before the polls closed. But I can safely predict that a change in the partisan balance in the Arkansas legislature, if Republicans triumph, won’t have a dramatic effect on some of the most important issues of the day. For example: Republicans in Arkansas have the votes, thanks to the Arkansas Constitution’s requirement of a 75 percent vote on most financial measures, to block the expansion of Medicaid whether they are in the majority or not. They began flexing that rump veto tentatively last year. Expect more of this as their numbers grow. Republicans, expecting to kill Medicaid expansion with or without a majority, have already begun to alibi by suggesting — inaccurately — that the state could choose to take just a little bit of Medicaid expansion, not all of it. The federal government has said it’s an all-or-nothing proposition. Republicans also want poor people to pay tribute for new Medicaid services, they want drug testing and they want rigorous fraud investigations of poor people, though probably not of the doctors, hospitals and drug companies that are responsible for most Medicaid fraud. Also consider so-called education reform. The Billionaire Boys Club, led by Jim Walton, has been slowly purchasing influence in the Arkansas legislature, to the point that it had a bipartisan majority for a loosening of the state charter school law in 2011. The billionaires now want unfettered charter school expansion. They have a receptive audience in the Arkansas Republican Party, which favors private school vouchers, taxpayer-subsidized home schoolers and any plan that further cripples big city school districts with teacher unions. A Republican majority would swell the votes for the Walton plan, but the billionaires’ lobby is probably sufficiently influential without it. Republicans seem to be even more servile, however. Sen. Michael Lamoureux, who’ll lead the Senate if Republicans have a majority and who’ll be part of a

charter school majority vote no matter which party is in power, was quoted in the DemocratGazette over the weekend as saying charter school supporters don’t believe that the curMAX rent process for considering proBRANTLEY maxbrantley@arktimes.com posed charter schools is “very fair,” but he doesn’t know what “the exact solution would be.” I asked him what was unfair about the current system. We have a diverse, diligent state Board of Education. Its membership includes black people, white people, a Latina activist, former legislators and a pillar of the Little Rock charter school movement. It has rigorously reviewed charter school applications and existing charter schools. It has been generally supportive of charters (and tough on failing conventional public schools), but it has rejected some charter expansions and some new applications for cogent reasons. What’s not to like? I wish that the Game and Fish Commission, to name one, had such broad viewpoints and dealt so openly and earnestly with competing philosophies. Lamoureux’s response: “I guess by unfair I mean, we are not getting the desired result.” Wow. That’s an honest answer. Republicans don’t want facts, fairness or due diligence. They want their way. Or the way of the fat cats who bankroll them. I pressed Lamoureux on whether the state Board of Education review was somehow flawed. He responded to my specific question about the required review on finances, track record and the like. “Yes, those issues should be considered,” he wrote. “I think proponents feel the process is not yielding desired results. I do not know all the details.” Who needs details? It’s enough to know the Waltons are unhappy with results. Republicans aim to please them. But so, too, do many Democrats. The election won’t change that.


BRIAN CHILSON

OPINION

GOP suppresses ‘job creators’

T

wo terrible events can befall a cherished economic theory. Someone can actually put it into action to see if it works, or impartial economists can employ regression analyses and other refined academic tools to see how the idea performs in the real world. Now both have happened to the Republican notion that what you must do to get the economy roaring and creating jobs is to turn business and the investor class loose by lowering their taxes. They will run out and hire more workers. That is the heart and soul of the Republican campaign in 2012 for the White House, Congress and state legislatures, at least if other states are like Arkansas, where Republican legislators are talking about lowering the top income tax rates or repealing the tax altogether. The idea has always had a certain seductive charm, as long as you don’t think about it more than a minute. Then you have to ask yourself, does a business hire workers simply because the owner is going to keep more of his profits this year or next year and needs a place (the pockets of new employees) to park his new profits, or does it hire because the company needs more workers to meet a demand for more of its goods and services? Why, the latter of course. If there is no demand for more of your goods, no

amount of tax savings will make you hire a new clerk or start a new production line. Tax savings have absolutely ERNEST nothing to do with DUMAS it, unless taxes are so high that the owner would keep little or none of the extra profits from increased production. And that is not the case — not in the United States, and certainly not in Arkansas. Even in the worst possible case, at current tax rates a businessman will keep two-thirds of his extra profits. As it happens, we have a lot of history of tax cuts and tax increases, both in the United States and in Arkansas. I have pointed out that even a casual look at tax actions since the 1920s shows that income tax increases tended not to slow the economy (see the only Arkansas personal income tax increase in 1971 and the only corporate rate increase in 1991) and tax cuts did not produce economic surges (see Reagan in 1981 and Bush in 2001). But that was just looking at the growth or decline in jobs and gross domestic product in the aftermath of a tax cut or increase, which does not require special know-how. We learned last week from a report in

Smaller can be better

I

rarely buy arguments that a smaller government is a better government. This is particularly the case in the state of Arkansas where a bare-bone government has often lacked the infrastructure necessary to take care of its foster children, assertively regulate polluted waters, or provide the needed mentoring to help troubled schools turn themselves around. The ongoing investigation into questionable investment practices in the office of Martha Shoffner, Arkansas’s Democratic state treasurer, reminds us that there are a few places where some governmental shrinkage would create a smarter way to do government in the early 21st century. In short, the people of Arkansas should pass a constitutional amendment to eliminate four state offices: state treasurer, state auditor, commissioner of state lands, and lieutenant governor. Left standing would be the most consequential statewide offices and, according to law, the three offices that carry out the important work each decade in redrawing state legislative district lines.

To be fair, a number of important tasks are carried out in three of these lesser offices, but they could just JAY as easily be carried BARTH out by administrators in other parts of the executive branch, such as the Department of Finance and Administration. For example, city and county sales tax payments are sent to DFA by the businesses that collect them; they are then passed along to the treasurer’s office for redistribution back to the localities. DFA could complete the entire process and removing the treasurer’s office from the food chain would enhance efficiency. Some savings would occur from the shifting of responsibilities, but other agencies would have to grow to take up the slack. Even more important is the fact that professionalization would result from experienced workers carrying out these important tasks instead of the staffers of the constitutional officers often hired

The New York Times that the Congressional Research Service, a nonpartisan research arm of Congress, did a scholarly study of the theory and concluded, just as armchair economists had, that it was pure bunk. The study was concluded some time ago, but Republicans, who were keenly interested in it, got an advance copy and saw that it was not going to be useful in the fall campaign for Congress and the White House. So Senate Republican leaders talked to the head of the research bureau, who agreed to quietly file it away. The thing leaked anyway, but fortunately for Republicans too late to have any impact. It probably would have had little impact anyway. Politicians will believe what they want to believe, and so will most voters. Mitch McConnell and Orrin Hatch, the Republicans who deep-sixed the study, said the report had partisan phrases, like “Bush tax cuts,” and that the study looked at the effect of tax cuts only in the immediate aftermath rather than in the out years. The study actually examined the long-term effects of reductions in the top marginal rates, not just the first year or so, and, besides, the principal Republican argument has been that a reduction in the top marginal rate for high-income taxpayers would have an immediate jolt by giving businesses the assurances they need to expand and hire. The CRS researchers followed the steady decline in the marginal tax rate on high earners from World War II to the

present and the GDP growth rate and the per-capita GDP growth rate in the years after each reduction. The top tax rate was above 90 percent from 1945 through the ’50s. Then Congress lowered it every few years until it reached the current rate of 35 percent. The rate went up briefly a few times, in the Vietnam War, and ever so slightly under George H.W. Bush and Bill Clinton, but it has gone down pretty steadily. The current 35 percent rate was part of waves of tax cuts under George W. Bush, including special reductions in taxes on investment income. So what happened? There are lots of figures but two groups tell the story. In the ’40s and ’50s, when marginal rates were over 90 percent, GDP growth averaged 4.2 percent a year and per-capita growth averaged 2.4 percent. But in the last decade, when the top rate was 35 percent and the tax on capital gains dropped to 15 percent, real growth averaged only 1.7 percent and less than 1 percent per person. But while all those reductions in top tax rates did not ignite the economy the CRS found that they did have a dramatic effect. They sharply increased the share of the nation’s wealth going to the top onetenth of one percent of taxpayers. The share of the nation’s income that accrued to the top one-tenth of one percent rose from 4.2 percent in 1945 to 12.3 percent, before the big recession in 2007. Republican leaders want to get that trend moving again, and they are not going to let a stinking report get in the way.

more for their loyalty during a campaign than their qualifications for the job. The lieutenant governor’s duties are more purely ceremonial — presiding over the Senate and gaining the powers of the governor (archaically) when he leaves the state or (importantly) when he vacates the office. The Senate duties are easily picked up by the elected president pro tem of that body. While Arkansas needs a clear succession plan when the governor’s office comes open, six other states do not elect a lieutenant governor. Since it is important that anyone serving as governor be a person elected by the entire state’s voters, the secretary of state could move into the office if it were left vacant. The salaries of the four officeholders total just over $200,000 annually. While a chunk of the salary costs could be saved along with the ongoing operational costs of each office, a portion of the salaries should be redistributed to the three remaining offices, especially attorney general and secretary of state. The governor’s office brings with it a variety of perks including a home and food, but those in the other offices are expected to make it on salaries of $72,794 (for the

attorney general) and $54,594 (for the secretary of state) annually. Public servants are supposed to give of themselves through making less than they would in the private sector. When the most skilled attorneys in the state regularly make five times that of the “state’s lawyer,” however, we have reached a point when talented individuals are pushed out of governmental service because of the financial limitations it places on them during the prime of their careers. The fact that the four offices with limited powers are elected and autonomous is a remnant of the post-Reconstruction fear of state government power being centralized. Yet many of the other remnants of that post-Reconstruction mindset have been eliminated from the state Constitution through a series of wise reforms. In 2014, the voters of Arkansas should be offered the ethics proposal that failed to obtain the necessary signatures this year as well as a constitutional amendment to streamline the executive branch through the elimination of these offices. The combination would be a one-two punch for the further modernization of our state government. www.arktimes.com

NOVEMBER 7, 2012

7


PEARLS ABOUT SWINE

Bright spots

N

o sense wasting more valuable column inches this week on the grotesquerie that was Arkansas’s homecoming game against Tulsa, which the Hogs somehow failed to lose. This plodding, 4-5 team isn’t going to play a 13th game this season, and if it does, rejoicing will hardly be warranted anyway. Pearls has been hard enough on John L. Smith and Co. These temps weren’t sticking around, and the Carroll College Castaways will be eagerly awaiting a phone call from Bobby Petrino this winter, as the erstwhile head Hog looks to rebuild a tattered career in parts to be determined. Nobody’s necessarily asking, but my genuine feeling is that if Petrino leads an FBS program this fall, it will not be one of the three likely SEC openings, but rather a stop in Boulder, Colorado. On to the important stuff: Arkansas’s famously poor 2012 season will not be remembered well by most, but even in a ragged four-point win against the Golden Hurricane two of the Hogs’ stalwarts proved again why they deserve not only unfettered adulation, but NFL riches ahead. Cobi Hamilton caught another passel of balls Saturday morning, winning the Crip Hall Award with an 11-catch, 177-yard show. With a full three games remaining, Hamilton already has usurped Jarius Wright’s year-old single-season receptions record, will soon overtake Wright for the one-year yardage crown and still has a sporting chance of passing Wright’s career yardage standard. The prevailing belief at the start of this season was that Hamilton’s professional aspirations hinged on whether he could carry the weight of being Tyler Wilson’s chief target instead of a third or fourth option. The senior from Texarkana, Texas, has met that challenge with gusto even as the younger supporting players have lacked cohesion with Wilson. Hamilton has registered at least seven receptions in each of the last six games, no small feat when you consider the amount of defensive attention he gets. He has been nothing short of dependable, though in a bit of irony, his touchdown output (only four, three of which came in the loss to Rutgers) is a microcosm of the Hogs’ offensive headaches all year: few issues moving the football between the 20s, as they say, and enormous red zone troubles to follow. Against Tulsa, he had consecutive receptions of 41 and 14 yards to put the Hogs near the goal line, where Dennis Johnson punched in the pivotal nail. And that brings us to Johnson, who has had a mercurial but undeniably productive five years on the field. When he arrived in 2008 from the Arkansas side of Texarkana,

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NOVEMBER 7, 2012

ARKANSAS TIMES

it barely moved the needle as far as piquing the excitement of Hogs’ fans. All believed DeAnthony Curtis was BEAU the prize of that WILCOX class, but Johnson just kept his stocky legs churning even when injuries (HE LACERATED HIS BOWEL, PEOPLE! GOOD GOD!) and occasional fumbling troubles threatened to derail him. Because the likes of Ronnie Wingo and Knile Davis have gobbled up carries here and there, Johnson will end his career never truly having the “feature back” identity until his waning days on campus — he’s just nudged past 300 carries over his tenure, which some college players will log in a single campaign. Johnson has averaged about six yards per carry over his career, though, making an enviable highlight film shedding, stiff-arming, dodging and dragging opposing linebackers and defensive backs. He’s saving his premium work for the very end: with 109 yards and two touchdowns against the Golden Hurricane, he cemented his standing as a capable bellcow for what will be a rough final month of the year. Even with the new, inexplicable kickoff rule implemented, Johnson remains the conference’s all-time leading kick returner and he’ll crack the coveted 5,000-yard all-purpose mark with a few touches against the Gamecocks (and realistically, he’s going to get more than a handful). How the Hogs fare against South Carolina on Saturday morning is pure guesswork. The Gamecocks had lofty dreams, took an achingly difficult loss at Baton Rouge, then got pounded at Florida to remove themselves from the East division championship calculus. Injury followed that insult when Marcus Lattimore sustained one of the most garish knee-jobs we’ve had the misfortune of witnessing in a few years. They’ve still got designs on reaching 10 wins and finding a backdoor to the BCS, and after three years of stinging, decisive losses to the Hogs they are primed to take advantage of this newfound disparity between the teams. Steve Spurrier, though, is hell on his own quarterbacks, and Connor Shaw has spent much of this year in physical distress as well, a plight to which Wilson can certainly relate. Hamilton and Johnson have emerged as the torchbearers for this wounded team, and if they produce according to custom, it could reshape the narrative of the Hogs’ lost season and further boost their earnings potential come April.


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EntrY form

It’s the return of the annual Arkansas Times Musicians Showcase with performers competing for an array of prizes. All acts that have at least four songs of original material are encouraged to enter. All styles are welcome.

The Holy Shakes 2012 Winner

search is on! Semifinalists will compete throughout January and February at Stickyz. Weekly winners will then face off in the finals at the Rev Room in March. Check out arktimes.com/showcase for information on how to enter online and upload your files.

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Door prizes will be given away to fans in attendance.

FOR MORE INFO E-MAIL

Arkansas Times Musicians Showcase Entry Form NAME OF BAND HOMETOWN DATE BAND WAS FORMED AGE RANGE OF MEMBERS (ALL AGES WELCOME) CONTACT PERSON ADDRESS CITY, STATE, ZIP PHONE E-MAIL SEND ENTRIES AND DEMO CD TO: Arkansas Times Musicians Showcase, PO BOX 34010, Little Rock, AR 72203

JAN. 7, 2013 robertbell@arktimes.com


W O RDS

Icon, go on In the sweet buying buys: “There are periodic rumors and reports that Mr. Romney’s campaign is dabbling with the idea of buying advertising buys in Minnesota, but he and Republican-aligned groups have spent almost nothing there.” Buying advertising time or buying advertising space or simply buying advertising would be all right. Buying buys is not.

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LesS Fortunate PIRATES A FREE POETRY EVENT AT THE ARKANSAS ARTS CENTER

BOOK LAUNCH AND READING Bryan BorlanD with SPecIAL GUEST THERESA DAVIS POEMS, DANCE, MuSic, Open Mic 6:00 PM Reception / 6:30 PM Performances Tuesday, November 13, 2012 Arkansas Arts Center 501 East 9th Street, Little Rock, AR 72202

Bryan Borland is author of the American Library Association-honored My Life as Adam and editor of the Library Journal-honored Assaracus. He is founder and publisher of Sibling Rivalry Press. Less Fortuate Pirates: Poems from the First Year Without My Father is his latest collection. Theresa Davis is the 2011 Women of the World Poetry Slam Champion and author of After This We Go Dark, forthcoming from Sibling Rivalry Press. She lives in Atlanta, Georgia.

10

NOVEMBER 7, 2012

ARKANSAS TIMES

Aye, conic: I saw a reference to Barbie as an icon, further evidence that one can hardly turn around now without bumping into one. Icon and iconic are gaining on eclectic in the over-use category. “With his eclectic choice of paper towels, Fanshaw is an icon in the world of men’s-room attendants.” The Oxford English Dictionary says that an icon can be “Any thing or person that is the object of excessive or supreme devotion.” The OED goes on to say that in the Eastern Orthodox Church, icon came to mean “a representation of some sacred personage, itself regarded as sacred.” An unbeliever who shattered such images was an iconoclast. Today, an iconoclast is someone who refutes popular beliefs. The on-line Urban Dictionary defines icon as “a legend, role model or superstar,” but let’s get back to that “excessive devotion.” Come to think of it, “excess in all

things” is pretty much the rule today, so maybe icon deserves the workout it’s getting. Still tiresome, DOUG though. SMITH   dougsmith@arktimes.com In re re: “The New York Giants waived former Razorback Mitch Petrus (Carlisle) for the second time this season Tuesday to reactivate tight end Travis Beckum. A third-year pro, Petrus was waived by the Giants on Sept. 1, but was resigned the following day.” Does that mean he was “submissive or acquiescent” the following day? No, the writer wanted to say that the football player signed a new contract the following day. He was re-signed, not resigned. (But give the writer some credit. He didn’t waver on waiver.) The prefix re- is always followed by a hypen when the new word formed by adding re- already has a special meaning of its own. One of the examples given by the Associated Press Stylebook in explaining the rule is “resign (quit)” and “re-sign (sign again).”  Many of us need help in deciding whether or not to use a hypen with re-. Unabridged dictionaries provide this assistance, with long lists of re- words, some hyphenated, some not.

WEEK THAT WAS

It was a good week for… THE ARKANSAS TIMES CRAFT BEER FESTIVAL. Our first celebration of suds attracted some 800 thirsty souls, who got to sample over 150 beers on a gorgeous fall night in downtown North Little Rock. Proceeds benefitted the Argenta Arts District.

It was a bad week for… THE ARKANSAS TIMES. Our weekly deadline fell before polls were closed. Check arktimes. com for election post-mortem. JERRY COX. After the leader of the Family Council made the specious claim that Issue 5, which would legalize the use of medical marijuana, would allow for drug vending machines that distribute medical marijuana and used a cardboard cut-out of a vending machine made by Medicine Dispensing Systems (MDS) to illustrate his point during a press conference, MDS sued Cox in federal court for defamation. The company objected to Cox characterizing its devices as “vending machines that sell marijuana without any prescription to the general public and at convenience stores.” This interferes with the company’s business and damages it, the lawsuit says. The suit claims defamation and also a trademark violation for using the company’s trademark in an

altered fashion at a news conference. THE LITTLE ROCK POLICE DEPARTMENT. Chicago lawyer Michael Laux, who on behalf of the estate of Eugene Ellison previously sued two Little Rock police officers who killed the 67-year-old Ellison in his apartment, has filed two more federal lawsuits challenging Little Rock police actions in shooting deaths. One, filed by the estate of Landris Hawkins, contends that LRPD officers used excessive force and ignored department rules on dealing with mentally disturbed people when officers responded to a call from Hawkins’ grandmother that he was threatening to cut his own throat and, later, was stabbing himself. From the porch of the residence, officers shot and killed Hawkins inside. The other suit contends that officers didn’t follow proper procedure when seeking and later arresting Collin Spradling, who the lawsuit claims was targeted based on a fabricated burglary complaint. Spradling was shot by police because, they claimed, he had a gun, though three non-police witnesses said they never saw him with a gun. The lawsuit also alleges that police fraudulently concealed information. ALSO: Michael Peterson, who was elected to the Little Rock School Board in September, died at his home. He was 63 and worked 38 years in the district, retiring in 2010 as principal of Metropolitan Career Technical Center.


TED BOSWELL

THE OBSERVER NOTES ON THE PASSING SCENE

HAS BEEN NAMED 2013 PLAINTIFF’S PERSONAL INJURY “LAWYER OF THE YEAR” IN BEST LAWYERS IN AMERICA FOR THE LITTLE ROCK METROPOLITAN AREA

Follow the white rabbit THE OBSERVER’S BELATED ODE to Halloween: Like horrors on the tides they came to The Observer’s front door, wave after wave, gory-masked, full-body-suit weird and fake-bloodsplattered. Then, there was the boy in the button-down shirt, tie and slacks. “Businessman?” we yelled after him as he made off with his Reese’s buttercup. “Math teacher,” he said over his shoulder. Scary to some, I guess. Oh, and Pablo Picasso showed up, too. THE OBSERVER IS, of course, a chronicler of all things strange and wonderful, but stuff does slip off our back burner and fall behind the stove from time to time — even the oddest of things. So it is that we forgot to tell you in recent weeks about seeing a large, white rabbit roaming the wilds of Stifft Station. We’d seen him twice on Maple Street, both times on the north side of the big hill above Plateau that we nicknamed Old Misery some years ago when Yours Truly began nightly walks from The Observatory to Markham and back. We first took it to be a white cat, but the way it moved and a pair of unmistakable ears quickly proved it to be a huge, fluffy, perfect bunny like something from a children’s storybook, the creature flashing across the street from left to right before disappearing into the bushes, always at night, always just at the edge of our headlights, no pocket watch in evidence but obviously very, very late for his date with Alice. It took us awhile to believe what we were seeing, even though we regularly catch glimpses of rangy brown city rabbits sitting in our driveway in the spring. No, this one was different: The Ghost Rabbit of Maple Street; somebody’s pet, maybe, either let loose by an owner tired of finding rabbit beans in the hallway courtesy of a grown-too-big Easter present, or absconded through a gap in the wire of a cage somewhere, the Call of the Wild heard and answered. Clearly an Omen, we chuckled to Spouse the first time we saw him, even though we’re both too old and pickled by the rigors of the world to believe in such

nonsense, even when no less than Lewis Carroll is on the other end of the cosmic telephone. Still, Your Correspondent must admit that it took a good bit of willpower to keep from stopping the car, taking our Beloved by the hand, and following our friend down the rabbit hole. We recalled this to tell you about it, sadly, because the Ghost Rabbit is gone. Driving up Maple Street the other night in the rain, we saw the sad, sodden lump of white fur in the road. Though we hoped against hope, our eyes soon made out the ears and the rabbit’s foot, lucky no more. Though we considered getting out and dragging the body into the bushes, the night was dark and cold, and our warm house beckoned. Instead, we motored respectfully into the other lane and left him behind, a meal for whatever dutifully retrieves the dead from Maple Street by moonlight. It occurs to us that there is a truth here, friends — some sad fact, and not a pretty one. Something about fairy tales, maybe, which is too depressing to say out loud. Then again, we’re probably reading too much into it, as we’re prone to do. Besides, if you’re adult enough to have read this far, we don’t have to say it aloud for you to understand it, do we? EAGER TO GET OUT OF TOWN and see the paintbrush of fall, The Observer and family motored out to the pavilion and dock on the Maumelle River at Pinnacle Mountain on Sunday, not a prettier place in all the world by our reckoning. There, walking in the woods just off the parking lot, we happened upon a white chef’s apron, white and fairly clean, but wadded and hurled into the bushes. The Observer is a storyteller, and so we couldn’t help but imagine how it came to be there: A junior chef, fresh from a dressing down by the crabby Frenchman over a collapsed souffle, comes out to smoke, mutter and contemplate by the river. Eventually, having decided To Hell With It, he casts his apron into the weeds, gets in his car, and turns the wheel toward the coast. He knew a girl there once, who taught him how to make a roux.

2013 marks the 30th year that Ted Boswell has been named to the Best Lawyers in America — selected by vote of his peers

The Boswell Law Firm has offices in Bryant, Arkansas, and Memphis, Tennessee Three of its six lawyers are named in the “2013 BEST LAWYERS IN AMERICA” in personal injury law — Ted Boswell, Clark S. Brewster, and Gary K. Morrell

LINKING LAWYERS AND CLIENTS WORLDWIDE

THE BOSWELL LAW FIRM Bryant Center, P. O. Box 798, Bryant, AR 72089 501-847-3031 www.boswellaw.com 45 North Third - Second Floor Memphis, TN 38103 901-522-0050

www.arktimes.com

NOVEMBER 7, 2012

11


Arkansas Reporter

THE

IN S IDE R

Bullying of Latinos addressed

The battle for ethics Remember Regnat Populus, the committee formed to push an ethics reform law onto the 2012 election ballot? On account of a late start — and a huge failure by a private firm hired to canvass for signatures — the group gave up on making the ballot this year. But it soon after filed a new initiative proposal expanded to include state McDaniel constitutional officers as well as the legislature in the ban on gifts to public officials. The measure continues a twoyear waiting period to beSpencer come a lobbyist. It also bans direct corporate and union contributions to campaigns, though not PAC donations. The idea is to get the measure on the 2014 ballot. The early start was intended to provide time to have a good proposal for canvassers to take to polls on Election Day this week. Election Day is a good gathering opportunity but Regnat Populus mostly hoped for a little public exposure to jumpstart a conversation about the expanded measure. No luck. Attorney General Dustin McDaniel stood in the way. He twice has turned down drafts of the proposal as too ambiguous for approval by his office as to form. Paul Spencer, the Catholic High teacher who’s been spearheading the effort, wrote backers: “As you may now be aware, the attorney general’s office did not approve of our ballot title. In spite of a speedy re-submission by our head legal authority, David Couch, it is doubtful that we will be able to canvass on Election Day. However, please stand at the ready — our movement will only be a success with your help.” In the attorney general’s last opinion, he said the revised version of the proposal still appeared ambiguous as to whether it barred all but gifts from relatives to named public officials CONTINUED ON PAGE 13 12

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ARKANSAS TIMES

Study, article in Times prompt gathering. BY DAVID KOON

A

Road test ‘PopUp’ event brings future to South Main. BY LESLIE NEWELL PEACOCK

I

t’s not a festival, Friday and Saturday’s “PopUp Main Street” event, though it will be festive, with music, food and vendors of stuff. Its main purpose, though, is to test an idea: What if South Main Street was altered from a four-lane to a two-lane, divided by a landscaped median and bookended with bike lines? What if the traffic was slowed down a tad to make crossing the street safer and draw attention to the businesses lining the street? The idea: That it will help revitalize a section of Main that businesses and neighbors are trying to make vital again.

You could think of the event, on Main from Interstate 630 to 15th Street, as a life-sized mock-up — or what organizers call a “living street experiment” — happily coinciding with 2nd Friday Art Night and continuing into Saturday. The “PopUp” — a term for a temporary and high-energy event — is a project of the design collective StudioMain and the Chamber of Commerce’s Create Little Rock young professionals group. Inspired by the national Better Block initiative, the Create Little Rock group asked the CONTINUED ON PAGE 29

gathering of around 70 parents, teachers, ministers and Little Rock School District officials met last Saturday at a church near the University of Arkansas at Little Rock to discuss ways to address reports of harassment, bullying and intimidation of Latino students in the Little Rock School District. Headed by Pulaski County Circuit Judge Wendell Griffen, the group said it will meet again in less than a month in Southwest Little Rock, where it hopes to draw more input from Latino parents and students. The gathering was in response to a September cover story in the Arkansas Times, which reported on a study by UALR sociologist Dr. Terry Trevino-Richard. The study — conducted with anonymous focus groups — found widespread reports of sexual harassment and bullying of Latino students by their African-American classmates in the Little Rock School District and reported complaints by Latino parents and students that their attempts to report the incidents to school administrators were sometimes ignored. The meeting was held at New Millennium Church, where Griffen serves as a pastor. Speaking to a standing-room-only crowd, Griffen said he was “pleasantly surprised” by the turnout. He started the meeting by sharing his own story of being bullied as the only black male in his class in Delight High School, a situation made worse by the fact that he skipped two grades, making him younger than his classmates. “I know that bullying hurts,” he said. “If you’ve ever been the only kid on the senior trip who was worried about getting jumped on, you know what it feels like. The perception is that nobody cares.” At times the meeting had the feeling of a tent revival, with Griffen calling on the audience to loudly state their dedication to work together with the LRSD, and to affirm their belief that the district truly wants to solve the problem of bullying. Noting that he’s a product of public education, Griffen CONTINUED ON PAGE 29


LISTEN UP

Tune in to the Times’ “Week In Review” podcast each Friday. Available on iTunes & arktimes.com

THE

BIG

INSIDER, CONT.

PICTURE

DRUG TEST POLICIES IN STATE’S 10 LARGEST SCHOOL DISTRICTS

M

any Arkansas districts randomly drug test middle and high school students who participate in sports or other extracurricular activities. The reasoning behind these tests, according to school handbooks, is twofold — mixing drugs and physical activity endangers the health of students, and students who wear school jerseys are ambassadors, representing the school rather than themselves. A positive test typically means suspension from athletics or other extracurricular activities. In 2002, UALR journalism professor Bruce Plopper and three other families sued the Conway School District for drug testing or threatening to test their middle school students. According to Plopper, both the U.S. and Arkansas Constitutions have clauses that protect against this testing.

Before the case made it to court, Conway suspended its testing program, and in 2007 the district officially dropped the policy. “This was an unwarranted invasion of privacy,” Plopper said. “They were testing students who hadn’t done anything wrong, students with high grades.” According to Rita Sklar, executive director of ACLU of Arkansas, public school students are one of the most susceptible demographics to institutionalized bullying. “What student doesn’t play sports or do something extracurricular? Students shouldn’t have to submit bodily fluids just because they go to a public school,” she said. In a multiyear, national study, the University of Michigan found nearly identical levels of drug use in schools that test and schools that don’t.

SCHOOLS THAT DRUG TEST School District

Groups

Since

Springdale

Enrollment Grades 19,376

7-12

randomly selected student athletes

1996

Bentonville

14,123

8-12

randomly selected or reasonably suspicious student athletes

2002

Rogers

14,145

8-12

randomly selected student athletes

1996

Cabot

10,115

9-12

randomly selected or reasonably suspicious students involved

2012

in extracurricular activities or who park on campus.

Fayetteville

randomly selected or reasonably suspicious students involved

9,017

7-12

SCHOOLS THAT DO NOT DRUG TEST School District

Enrollment

Little Rock

24,049

Pulaski County Special

16,959

Fort Smith

13,896

Conway 9,432 North Little Rock

8,545

1990s

in extracurricular activities. BENTONVILLE ROGERS

SPRINGDALE

All conduct urine tests.

FAYETTEVILLE

According to Medical Laboratories of Arkansas, basic urine tests run $18$24 per student.

FORT SMITH CONWAY

NORTH LITTLE ROCK PULASKI COUNTY SPECIAL

CABOT LITTLE ROCK

“The purpose of drug testing is to give our student athletes another reason to say no to using drugs and alcohol. By drug testing our athletes, they are less likely to give in to peer pressure.” Bentonville School District spokesperson Mary Ley

Last year Rogers tested 189 athletes. This year 83 athletes have been tested so far. There have been no parent complaints about the policy.

or also made some additional limitations on gifts by the public officials. He also cited other unspecified deficiencies in punctuation and wording. The drive has until summer of 2014 to gather the necessary signatures.

Fudge factor In an interview recently with the Raleigh (N.C.) Telegram, former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee, author of a book on how he successfully lost weight, acknowledged that some of that weight had returned. An interviewer asked Huckabee about his efforts at weight loss. “It’s been a battle all my life; I’ve put Huckabee 30 pounds back on,” Huckabee told the Telegram. “I messed up my knee running the New York Marathon and I’ve never quite gotten over it.” He said it’s hard to keep weight off given encouragement to eat, but manned up: “It’s a battle … but ultimately, it’s my responsibility.” Huckabee lost about 110 pounds with a fitness and diet regimen that began in 2003 and wrote the book “Quit Digging Your Grave with a Knife and Fork.” In 2009, he said he’d regained about a quarter of the weight lost, or nearly 30 pounds. He hasn’t gotten smaller since then.

Submit your big idea for Arkansas Do drug test Don’t drug test

“Urine testing is extraordinarily disruptive to the school day. So far this year, we have not drug tested any students, as there has not been any cause to test. However, we can and will test at any time.” Fayetteville School District spokesman Alan Wilbourn

Next school year, Fayetteville plans to rely on hair tests instead of urine tests.

Next month, we’ll unveil the fourth edition of our annual Big Ideas for Arkansas edition and, as usual, we’re taking nominations for ideas that would make Arkansas a better place to live. Every topic is on the table. Commerce. Education. Government. Infrastructure. Tourism. Entertainment. Should we overhaul the state tax code? Build bike trails across the state? End blue laws? Feel free to be as pragmatic or wacky as you want to. Send your nominations to Lindsey Millar at lindseymillar@arktimes.com or to Arkansas Times Big Ideas, P.O. Box 34010, Little Rock, AR 72203. www.arktimes.com

NOVEMBER 7, 2012

13


HHH

THE FIRST TEAM: Coach Wilburn Surface and the original group of Red Heads in 1936.

REDHEADED

REVOLUTION Years before Title IX and the WNBA, the All American Red Heads showed the world that women belong in basketball. BY CHEREE FRANCO

14

NOVEMBER 7, 2012

ARKANSAS TIMES

I

t’s 1966, early winter, on a desolate stretch of Western highway. Ben Overman thinks it’s time for “roadwork.” He pulls the white limousine to the shoulder. Seven doors open in near unison, as seven young women — all willowy redheads — groan at the first blast of icy air. They fall into line, some of them kneeling to tighten the laces of sneakers that seem incongruous with the slacks, blouses and sweaters they wear. The cold is so sharp that each inhalation pierces their lungs. Overman waves out the window and the limousine begins to move, slowly now, as the women jog, puffing tiny clouds of hot breath. The few passing vehicles slow down, both out of courtesy and so the occupants can gawk. It’s not everyday that you see a parade of redheaded women crunching through snow, exercising in street clothes with teased hair and full make-up. Overman accompanies them for a bit, just to make sure everyone’s OK, and then he drives a few miles ahead, parks and waits. Once the women reach him, the day’s training is over. They can relax on the ride to the next high school, YMCA or junior college gym, where they will paint their eyelids blue and their lips cherry-red, toss their henna-dyed hair under florescent lights and play basketball. The women are members of the All American Red Heads. They barnstorm the country, playing up to 220 games a year and performing circus-style halftime shows. Since the team’s beginnings in 1936, the Red Heads have played entirely against men, by men’s rules. Forty-six years from now, they’ll become the first women’s professional basketball team to be inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. But at the moment, they’re just trying to get through this run.


HHH One of the joggers is Judy Cameron — 19, 5’10”, all legs and an auburn bob. She comes from a farming family in Parkers Chapel, a Union County speck too small for any map. The Red Heads are her escape from eleven siblings and an alcoholic father. She was hired midseason last year, sight unseen, on the strength of her high school reputation. When she got the contract in the mail, she immediately dropped out of Southern State College. Her father didn’t think women should go to college anyhow. Another jogger, Pat Overman ’nee Rimer, joined the team four years ago, as an 18-year-old with naturally fiery locks. An expert shooter and soft-spoken diplomat, she’d been a basketball star in her hometown of Edina, Mo. Now Red Head comedienne, she has the toughest position — pulling gags and engaging the crowd, while playing better ball than anyone. It took Pat a few years to make comedienne but only a few months to make the coach her husband. The summer after the team’s first season on the road, Ben Overman showed up at Pat Rimer’s family’s home. He had hidden his feelings, but was under the gun — they had three months off, and if he didn’t move fast, he’d have to pretend that he was only interested in Pat’s basketball skills for all of the following season. That summer, the two courted for a month, married at a Methodist church in Edina, bought a starter home in Ben’s Craighead County hometown of Caraway, and then reported for training.

that first six-month season, the Red Heads went from gimmick to gold, selling out many of their 133 games in 30 states. Olson already owned two men’s teams. He decided to keep his Red Heads on the road and pay each player $100 a month. The Red Heads traveled in DeSotos, station wagons and later, limousines, playing daily or even twice a day. Mostly they played fundraisers, splitting the door with whatever civic club or high school student council hosted them. Their opponents were

percent of the time, they did. At 83, Willa Faye Mason, is one of the oldest living Red Heads. She joined the team in 1949, and in 1956, switched to coaching the Famous Red Heads, a sister team whose players sometimes fed the Red Heads lineup. Once she left the road, she earned a Ph.D. in education and eventually became the women’s athletic director at Northeastern State University in Tahlequah, Okla. When Mason was a senior in high school at Siloam Springs, the

but she got to thinking about it and knew I was seeing the U.S.A., playing a game I loved and getting paid. So she thought it was all right, if that’s what I wanted to do,” Mason said. In 1950, in an attempt to stave off trip boredom, Mason penned the lyrics to the Red Heads theme song. It began, “We are the Red Heads, pretty and trim / we’ve come to your town to play ball and win.” It was sometimes accompanied by a banjo and always accompanied by giggles. On the road, Mason didn’t have



T

he All American Red Heads team was formed in Cassville, Mo., by a Swedish immigrant named C.M. Olson, who combined two basketball trends of the day — the company-sponsored Amateur Athletic Union (AAU) teams, made up of female employees who played other female teams, and the men’s trick teams, such as the Harlem Globetrotters, that were businesses unto themselves, touring and entertaining. Olson wanted to promote his wife’s line of beauty parlors, and he suspected that redheaded women playing ball against men could sell a couple hundred dye jobs. But in

HOOP HOME: The Red Heads original home in Cassville, Mo.

former varsity athletes turned town leaders, and their toughest games were on army bases, against robust young soldiers. Sometimes they played professional athletes, like the Boston Patriots and the Kansas City Chiefs, who had off-season basketball teams, and once, in Long Island, they played a team that included Julius Erving. The Red Heads sprinkled their games with jokes, such as covering their opponents’ eyes, bouncing passes beneath legs and leaving a big lipstick smudge on a referee’s bald head. But the Red Heads played to win, and about 70

Red Heads came through town and her entire basketball team attended the game. Later, team owner Olson returned to Siloam Springs and hired her and the team’s two other forwards. Growing up, Mason was more athletic than her brothers. She describes her parents as “hardworking with normal values,” but they always supported their children’s ventures — even when that meant their 19-year-old daughter wanted to live in motel rooms and faceoff against random men each night. “For my mother, the only thing about it was the traveling. At first she was wary,

much privacy. The Red Heads were lucky if they snagged a moment to do laundry someplace other than the bathroom sink. But there were group outings to state Capitols, museums and university campuses. Mason remembers her favorite places — Catalina Island off California, the redwood forests and Jackson Hole, Wyo. In 1956, the Red Heads became the first women’s basketball team to play in the territory of Alaska. In between their 20-game tour, Mason and her teammates went bobsled riding. CONTINUED ON PAGE 16

www.arktimes.com

NOVEMBER 7, 2012

15


HHH ers for morals, character, neatness, looks and most of all ability,” Walker told the Arkansas Democrat in 1950. “We stress good basketball. You’ve got to if you want to go back next year. … We do pull stunts. We mix one into each quarter, and it takes only a few seconds.” Newton explains this as Hazel “understanding her times. She knew that ultimately, they were an entertainment entity. They were charting new territory. There had never been a professional basketball team owned by a woman, traveling alone, without men.” Walker didn’t want the Travelers to play without her, so in 1965 at age 51, she dissolved the team. She lived in Little Rock until she died in 1990.



I

n 1946, Hazel Walker, 32, an AllAmerican athlete and successful AAU player, joined the Red Heads. During halftime, she challenged anyone in the audience to a free-throw contest. She would start the contest sitting down, then throw a few shots from her knees before ending on her feet. Legend has it, she never missed. Walker was the only daughter of a part-Cherokee couple from outside of Ashdown. She was beautiful, vain, independent and smart. Olson assigned her the role of team captain and road manager. But Walker grew frustrated with the Red Heads. She refused to dye her coal-black hair and instead wore a wig. She hated the comedienne’s flirty antics and wanted to play guileless basketball. In a letter to Elva Bishop, who featured Walker in her documentary “Women’s Basketball,” Walker wrote, “The thing that bothered me about the Red Heads was they wanted a setup. They didn’t want the men to fast break, and they didn’t want the referees to call fouls too closely on us.” Perhaps the final straw, according to Little Rock’s Gary Newton, who authored a screenplay on Walker, was that she wanted to buy the Red Heads. Olson was looking to sell, but he didn’t want to sell to a player. So in 1949, Walker became the first woman to start her own professional basketball team, the Arkansas Travelers. She accepted an initial loan from a boyfriend, but other than that, there were no men involved. (Walker’s husband died when she was 26. She never remarried.) “Hazel didn’t feel like she needed a man,” said Francies Garroutte, 77, of Cabot, who played for the Travelers all 16 years of the team’s existence. Garroutte and Walker took turns driving, booking games and handling business, carting their portable typewriter everywhere. According to Garroutte, the Travelers were too focused on basketball to be bothered with roadside attractions. “We had to get to the games, and we had to be on time,” she said. Walker couldn’t entirely escape her era, and maybe she didn’t want to. Like the Red Heads, the Travelers “did not go out in public unless you were dressed right, hair and make-up fixed,” Garroutte said. “Hazel was a high class lady. She believed you could look like a woman, act like a woman, and play ball like a man.” But the Travelers weren’t hired exactly like men. “I selected my play16

NOVEMBER 7, 2012

ARKANSAS TIMES



I

WALKER: The first woman to start her own professional basketball team, the Arkansas Travelers, in 1949.

THE MOORES: Orwell was the Red Head’s second and final owner. Lorene played 12 seasons for the Red Heads and became the team’s all-time leading scorer.

n 1954 Olson finally sold the team to his favorite Red Heads coach, a ginger-haired man from Caraway. Orwell Moore, the team’s second and final owner, was born in 1917 and had been a teen-age baseball star with aspirations of joining the St. Louis Cardinals. But after two bouts of tuberculosis, he channeled his passion into teaching at a one-room school in Hancock (Craighead County). When he was 26, he ended up falling in love with a sassy 14-year-old student named Lorene. They moved to Cotter, where the high school didn’t allow married students and it certainly didn’t allow them to play ball. But Lorene was an extraordinary athlete, and Moore threatened to resign if she was banned from classes or basketball. After Lorene graduated high school, the couple joined the Red Heads — Moore as a coach and Lorene as a player. Lorene played for 12 years, scoring more than 35,000 points and becoming the team’s greatest all-time scorer. In 1959, they had a daughter. “I was born into the Red Heads,” Tammy Moore Harrison said. “I just thought everybody had a whole bunch of girls hanging around all the time that played ball and stayed at your house.” When she was too young for school, she traveled in the team station wagon. She considered the players her older sisters, only better, because they were celebrities. When they pulled up to the evening’s venue, people would crowd the vehicle to meet them. Much later, in the ’70s, the Red Heads trained at Camp Courage — 350 acres of forest in Holly Springs, Miss., with two lakes, cabins and a mess hall. Moore bought the camp and poured concrete over an area larger than a foot-


HHH ball field, put up goals and created multiple basketball courts. The Red Heads also coached the young campers, girls from 10 to 18 who came from all over the country to spend a few weeks learning basketball. Sometimes college-aged women came as well, in the hopes that they would be hired as Red Heads. But before Camp Courage, the Red Heads’ two-week summer training session was held in the Caraway High School gym, and the players would sleep at the Moores’ house. “Sometimes there were a dozen people around. We put beds everywhere,â€? Harrison remembers. “For me it was a big slumber party. There was a lot of short-sheeting or someone coming around a corner, shrieking like they were grabbed from behind ‌ of course, I thought somebody was really getting them.â€? Moore could be strict and patronizing with his players. “We prefer getting our girls young, fresh out of school. They are easier to coach, easier to fit the Red Head way when they are young,â€? he told Sports Illustrated in 1974. But he was also a playful and optimistic man. He liked to call the Red Heads “the All American Matrimonial Bureau,â€? because he believed that association with the team made women so appealing, they often quit to get married. Moore had a solid, if somewhat ethically dubious, business philosophy. Players were only given their schedule a few weeks in advance, and they were sworn to secrecy. He thought any leak might invite another attraction to set up in town a day or so before the Red Heads, competing for limited disposable income. And the players never knew exactly when their season would end, since Moore kept them on the road

till he turned a profit. He would show up at Red Heads games unannounced, just to check that things were on par. “They always made sure that they had that hair especially dyed if they knew my dad was coming. He was real big on them having red hair and making sure they looked like ladies,â€? Harrison said. “He wanted them to wear dresses or skirts in the car, but I think in the later years, like the ’80s, he even allowed them to wear jeans. I guess he had to change some with the times — not that he liked it.â€? From her Sherwood kitchen, Judy Cameron, 67, recites the rules: “If you smoked when you got on the team, you could still smoke, but you couldn’t smoke in uniform. And you couldn’t take up the habit after you got on the team. There was no drinking. We couldn’t date anybody but the guys we played against, and of course, they couldn’t be married. And it had to be two of us to go out, it couldn’t be just one guy and a girl. We were pretty tough, we could protect ourselves, but those were the rules.â€? They also rotated roommates because Moore didn’t want any cliques, and he never wanted one player to outshine the others. If someone was scoring too much, she was encouraged to pass more and shoot less. To this day, Cameron hates blue eye shadow. ď‚ľď‚ľď‚ľ

P

at and Ben Overman were both with the Red Heads until 1973. Now they live in a sprawling brick house at the end of a shady cul-de-sac in Jonesboro. CONTINUED ON PAGE 18

PAT OVERMAN: Sharp-shooter and comedienne for the Red Heads.

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Last summer they celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary. These days, Pat does something she rarely had to do as a Red Head — dyes her hair red. She still can’t say, exactly, why she agreed to marry the coach. The best she can manage is, “We both loved the same thing. We loved the Red Heads.” She was 18. After their wedding, she thought she had to be the best, so that no one could accuse Ben of favoritism. She spent long hours practicing in summers, when most of the girls took a break from basketball. As comedienne, she had to pull doubleduty on court. “You always had someone on the local team that was a showboat or the people in town loved him. You try to figure those things out going in. He’s the one you’re going to pick on,” Pat said. Her teammate, Cameron, loved the pinch act. “Pat would back up against somebody and scream, ‘he pinched me.’ We were playing the professors at College of William and Mary — most of them

could stand under my arm. We would pat them on the arm, play with their hair,” she said. “And when Pat leaned into that guy and screamed, he ran out of the building and never came back, he was so embarrassed.” Cameron only spent three seasons with the Red Heads before having back surgery for ruptured disks. “Before the Red Heads, I was just a scared little girl. I couldn’t have talked to anybody. Now I’ll get up in front of everybody. I found out one thing — if you don’t think enough of yourself, no one else is going to,” she said. When she left the Red Heads, she became the first female salesperson ever hired by Little Rock’s D.A. Sparks Inc. She traveled the East Coast representing the company. 

I

n the 50 years of the Red Heads’ existence, what it meant to be a woman in America changed more


HHH than what it meant to be an All American Red Head. According to John Molina, a women’s basketball historian, “When the Red Heads first started, they would pull into town and find that church organizations had covered up their legs on the posters.” The ’70s brought changes for ambitious women athletes, and many women found freedom, a college degree and an individual identity more appealing than living by someone else’s rules. But the Red Heads remained mostly in the past. “We’re no part of Women’s Lib, and if any of the girls were to get involved in it — well, they better not let me know about it. I don’t want the All American Red Heads tied to any causes,” Moore was quoted in Sports Illustrated. The Red Heads were antiquated in other ways, too. They played plenty of integrated men’s teams, but in their entire history, no one remembers a black Red Head. According to Ben Overman, no black player ever approached the Red Heads, and the Red Heads never recruited them. “That just wasn’t that time,” he said. Moore told Sports Illustrated that, “We’ve had girls of all persuasions — a Mormon, Indian girls, one Jewish, and I believe there was even one Red Head who did not go along with the existence of the Lord, know what I mean?” For two years in the mid-’70s, Moore had three Red Head teams on the road simultaneously, and one of them was made up entirely of former college players. But by the end of the decade, Camp Courage was sold and the Red Heads were something akin to kitsch — more wholesome than risque, more of a throwback than a phenomenon. When Moore retired the Red Heads in 1986, they had the notoriety of being the first women’s barnstorming basketball team and the last standing. They’d appeared on the “Ed Sullivan Show,” “House Party” with Art Linkletter and the “Tonight Show”

WELL TRAVELED: The Red Heads on a trip to the Phillipines in 1941.

with Johnny Carson. The players were paid about $500 a month. At 40-hour weeks, this would have fallen at least $40 short of minimum wage. In 1997 the WNBA debuted a new era of women’s basketball — one that is lipstick free and champions MVPs, slam-dunks and players measuring nearly 7 feet. The All American Red Heads were a relic, revered as pioneers by scholars and the players they influenced but long-removed from America’s household vernacular. When the Women’s Basketball Hall of Fame opened in Knoxville in 1999, it included a Red Heads exhibit, complete with the team’s trademark white limousine. But the Red Heads didn’t truly rediscover the limelight until historian John Molina found a photo of his grandmother’s 1934 J.B. Williams soap factory team, became fascinated with women’s basketball and took up the Red Heads’ cause. He has amassed the largest collection of Red Heads memorabilia, and shows it all over the country, including the NCAA championships. He first nominated the Red Heads for Naismith in 2006, but it took until 2012 for the team to make it. Molina didn’t mind that he had to apply six times. “Considering how little information there was on the All American Red Heads just 10 years ago, to have gone from

relative obscurity to the pinnacle of the basketball world is amazing,” he said. Shortly after the induction ceremony in Springfield, Mass., the New York Times published an article on the Red Heads. And make-up or not, in the footage that exists, the Red Heads play as a mechanically precise unit. They dart around opponents, pop the ball off hips and forearms, pass behind their back more often than not and shoot with dead accuracy. Their tricks are so clean that by the time the other team realizes what’s happened, the Red Heads are on to the next play. Vivian Stringer, the Rutgers women’s basketball coach, was on the Naismith selection committee. “They were so skilled, and at a time when so many people thought we as women couldn’t handle the ball without passing out. … We all owe them our gratitude for paving the way for us,” she said. Another of Moore’s favorite sayings: “If you can’t play good basketball, you better stay home.” 

S

ept. 7, 2012. About 80 Red Heads and a few coaches crowd the Springfield stage inside the giant silver dome, stacking three deep. Most of them are gray-

headed and modestly dressed in black or royal blue, but several reddishorange Clairol-heads bob among the gray. In the crowd, Coach Stringer snaps dozens of pictures. Right now, she’s not just the coach with the third highest number of wins in women’s basketball history, she’s an excited fan, overcome with the gravity of legacy. A middle-aged blonde woman in a strapless blue gown steps away from the pack. She slides down the reading glasses perched atop her head and speaks into the mic. She’s nervous, thanking the class of 2002 rather than 2012. Her voice wavers and she loses her place a few times, but behind her, award presenter Julius Erving and her extended family of Red Heads stand patiently. Only once does Tammy Harrison Moore’s face nearly crumple. “My father never gave up on the idea that the All American Red Heads would someday reach his goal of being enshrined into the Naismith Hall of Fame. He knew this was the definitive honor in the game of basketball,” she read. She presses her lips together tightly, holding back the rush of emotion — her father had died in 2009, three years before the nomination stuck. Then, as quickly as a Red Head on the court, she regains her composure. “We thank you for recognizing the work of the All American Red Heads and celebrating our part in the great game of basketball,” she finishes. Behind her, there are a lot of fast blinkers. Meanwhile, Willa Faye Mason has penned a new verse for the Red Heads to sing at all their reunions. “Yes, we were the redheads who traveled afar / who showed our country / that girls could play ball / we showed our tricks and fancy routines / but the passing and shooting / was the heart of our schemes / The many miles that we traveled / and any fame that we gained / simply showed our love / for the basketball game.”

Eugene Robinson Pulitzer Prize winning columnist for The Washington Post and MSNBC political commentator

Tue., Nov. 13, 7 p.m.

M. L. Harris Auditorium www.philander.edu Lectures are free and open to the public. For more information call 501-370-5279. No tickets or RSVPs required. www.arktimes.com

NOVEMBER 7, 2012

19


Arts Entertainment AND

BRIAN CHILSON

INNOVATIVE: David Tucker, president, and Portia Cheatham, PR director, of the AAF.

ARKANSAS AIDS WALK TURNS 10

Honoring the fight against the disease has changed dramatically in Arkansas. BY SANDY SARLO

I

n 1991, I attended my first World AIDS Day event here in Little Rock. We attempted to hold hands around the State Capitol dome. On that very cold, early December night, we barely had enough people to stretch across the front of the building. I had come down to honor my friend, Trey. He was supposed to come out that night, but he had just recently taken a turn for the worse and was spending his last few days on earth making arrangements to come home from St. Vincent Infirmary so that he could die at home with his parents and

20

NOVEMBER 7, 2012

ARKANSAS TIMES

his partner. Times were different 20 years ago. Most of us were not out of the closet at home, let alone at work. AIDS was ravaging the male gay community, so that we were losing friends on what seemed like a daily basis. Our mourning was done in private. On a seemingly daily basis, letters to the editor in the Arkansas Democrat called AIDS our deserved punishment from God. On that cold night in 1991, the only church leaders to attend our vigil were one rabbi and a minister of the Unitarian Universalist Church of Little

Rock. Today, many churches and civic groups are openly welcoming to the LGBT community and many more of us are out of the closet to the world. AIDS is no longer considered just the “Gay Disease.” In fact, according to David Tucker, president of the Arkansas AIDS Foundation, some of the most at-risk groups for HIV/AIDS today are youth of all sexual orientations, ages 13-24; heterosexual women of color, and heterosexuals older than 50. The year after my first World AIDS Day event, the Arkansas AIDS Founda-

tion was formed to improve the quality of life for people living with HIV and AIDS in Arkansas. Saturday, Nov. 10, will mark the 10th annual Arkansas AIDS Foundation Walk, which is one of the organization’s primary fundraising and public awareness events. The Arkansas AIDS Foundation has a “proven track record” in serving people no matter their socioeconomic status, race or culture, Tucker said. The money raised at the AIDS Walk will go to assist clients in the foundation’s Medical Assistance Program Services component. This year, the AAF is expanding its services with the Client Assisted Nutritional Services, or CANS, program, providing food vouchers and toiletry and personal hygiene items to clients. Tucker said the AAF is at the forefront in conducting innovative programs for people with AIDS. The foundation provides services to hundreds of clients in Pulaski, Lonoke and Prairie counties, and its district makes up 35 percent of all diagnosed HIV cases and 35 percent of all AIDS cases in Arkansas. The foundation works with all major hospitals, other HIV/AIDS service organizations and all social service organizations involved in HIV/AIDSrelated activities to provide services. This year’s AAF walk is billed as “A Celebration of Life.” The event starts at 10 a.m. Saturday at pavilions 7 and 8 at Murray Park. Registration starts at 10 a.m. and the walk will begin at noon. You can pre-register as an individual walker or as a team by calling (501) 376-6299 or at arktimes.com/ aidswalk. E-mail djtucker61@gmail. com for donation forms, flyers, team instructions or more information. The registration fee ($25 or $15 for students) includes a T-shirt, entertainment and lunch. Awards will be given away to the teams with the most walkers, the most money raised and the best overall banner. This year AAF is also asking participants to donate some toiletry or personal hygiene products to be distributed to their clients through the CANS Program. Kicking off the 2012 AIDS Walk is Wine and Cheese Night, Friday at 7:30 p.m. at the Historic Rogers House (400 W. 18th St. in Little Rock). Admission is $20 and along with an array of wines and cheeses, there will be a silent auction.


THE TO-DO

LIST

BY ROBERT BELL, DAVID KOON & DAVID RAMSEY

THURSDAY 11/8

FRIDAY 11/9

LOST BAYOU RAMBLERS

‘DANCING INTO DREAMLAND’

9 p.m. White Water Tavern. $10.

7 p.m. Dreamland Ballroom. $50.

Cajun music, in addition to being a treasured piece of American folk culture, is a rollicking good time, so it is fitting that the best Cajun band going wastes no time with calcified expressions of authenticity. The Lost Bayou Ramblers, from Pilette, La., are the real deal, but they aren’t afraid to honor their traditions by gleefully shredding them. They dabble in punk and rockabilly and Western swing and psychedelia, without ever losing the unique sound and spirit of the music of their fathers (literally — brothers and bandleaders Louis and André Michon cut their chops playing with their dad’s band, Cajun standard bearers Les Frères Michon). This adventurous spirit gets them labeled Cajun-punk, and fair enough — Louis’s classic bayou wail often veers into a full-on scream, and drummer Paul Etheredge pounds out a waltz like a rhythmic assault. Really, though, I think punk is just getting used as a stand-in for fun here.

The restoration of Ninth Street’s historic Taborian Hall and its Dreamland Ballroom continues with the third annual “Dancing into Dreamland” benefit. The first two “Dancing” fundraisers took place at the Governor’s Mansion, but this year, the event is marking its homecoming. Nine teams of dancers will compete for a $250 cash prize. Previous years’ winners will show off their ballroom chops as well, and there will be refreshments, a cash donation bar, a silent auction and more. It’ll be a good time even for the less-than-coordinated among us who have two left feet on good day. Plus, just going inside the ballroom is always a treat. Imagining the musicians who performed there during Ninth Street’s heyday always gets me lost in thought. That building hosted some of the finest musicians of the 20th century. What must it have been like, to see Ella Fitzgerald, Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, Louis Jordan, B.B. King or any of the other legends who played there? RB

RAMBLIN’ BAND: The Lost Bayou Ramblers give White Water Tavern a shot of Cajun/ punk craziness Thursday night.

This might not be what you’re expecting from accordion and fiddle, but the Ramblers throw a raucous party. They have a way of converting folks to two-

FRIDAY 11/9

stepping, foot-stomping revelry with their boozy Louisiana gusto — a tradition all their own. Kevin Kerby opens. DR

FRIDAY 11/9-SATURDAY 11/10

LEE DEWYZE

9 p.m. Juanita’s. $12 adv., $15 day of.

Not to be too big of a jerk about it, but this writer is very proud to say that he’s never watched a single moment of a single episode of the TV show “American Idol.” No, not even the one where Kris Allen wound up winning, and definitely not the “Steven Tyler Pending Retirement Bankroll Humiliation Tour.” The whole basis of my recent slide toward agnosticism is basically this: On what planet would a merciful God allow the guy who sang “Dream On” to survive years of drug abuse only to let him sink to a job where he’s required to tell somebody his slow-jam cover of Leif Garrett’s “I Was Made for Dancin’ ” was

COMICON-WAY

a little flat? Call me crazy, but I tend to boycott the hell out of any show where it’s clear that Janis Joplin, Tom Waits and Bob Dylan would have been featured in the gag reel, while Donnie Osmond would have been a real contender. But that’s democracy for ya. For those of you who do care about “American Idol,” however, you should know that Lee DeWyze, the winner of “Idol’s” ninth season, is coming to town. He’s got a new album coming out this winter! Sure to be on the set list Friday: his covers of U2’s “Beautiful Day,” Bill Withers’ “Ain’t No Sunshine,” and several other songs I just got off of the Wikipedia page of Leon James “Lee” DeWyze, Jr. (born April 2, 1986, Mt. Prospect, Ill.). Text your non-counting vote now! DK

Yeah, yeah, yeah. Go cry somewhere else about your mom throwing all your priceless comic books and baseball cards in the trash the minute you turned your back on them for that worn copy of Playboy long about the time puberty hit. Everybody’s got that story. The new news is: that stuff about not being able to turn back time isn’t true anymore. Ditto on what your stepbrother said about anybody who wears a Starfleet uniform in public deserving to have their ass kicked. Comic books and other geek fare are big business these days, with comic book conventions in other states drawing tens

of thousands. While Arkansas can’t claim one of the big Cons yet, you can come on out to ComiCon-way 2012, which kicks off this Friday at the Faulkner County Library (it opens at 10 a.m. Saturday). Featuring exhibits and events including a spaceship bridge simulator, items from one of the largest collections of Superman toys in the world, a showing of the Stan Lee documentary “With Great Power,” classic arcade game tournaments, superhero mask decorating for the kiddies and much more, it’s sure to be a good time. Best of all: while justice is never free, citizen, ComiCon-way is. For more information, check out comicon-way.com, then don your tights, shake the cat fur out of your cape and be there. Excelsior! DK

& Blue Jeans” concert, in which symphony lovers may eschew their normal, formal attire for something a little more casual, say, a T-shirt and those perfectly broken-in vintage 501s, from back before Levis cheaped out on us. And hey, what goes better with comfy duds than delicious sausages washed down with frosty,

golden beer? Well boss, the ASO is also reprising the popular Beer & Brats Street Party, in which concert ticketholders may enjoy brats and $2 Diamond Bear beers prior to taking in the music. Speaking of which, here’s what’s in store: Beethoven’s first theatre score, “The Creatures of Prometheus, Op. 43: Overture.” Next up is

Grammy and Oscar winner Tan Dun’s “Concerto for String Orchestra and Pipa,” featuring pipa prodigy Wu Man. The second half of the show boasts a crowd favorite for sure, with Rimsky-Korsakov’s Arabian Nights-inspired “Scheherazade.” The concert (and the Beer & Brats Street Party) is reprised Sunday at 3 p.m. RB

3 p.m. Faulkner County Library. Free.

SATURDAY 11/10

ASO: ‘BEETHOVEN & BLUE JEANS’

8 p.m. Robinson Center Music Hall. $14-$52.

The third installment of the Arkansas Symphony Orchestra’s Masterworks series is the ever-popular “Beethoven 22

NOVEMBER 7, 2012

ARKANSAS TIMES


IN BRIEF

WEDNESDAY 11/7

Legacies & Lunch features political cartoonist John Deering, who’ll discuss the history and influence of his fellow cartoonist, the late George Fisher, Main Library, noon, free.

THURSDAY 11/8

If you dig smart, hooky rock with wooly guitars and catchy melodies, check out acclaimed Cincinnati outfit Wussy, with local rock duo Midwest Caravan, Stickyz, 18-and-older, 9:30 p.m., $6. Fans of rollicking Texas country take note: The Casey Donahew Band rolls into town for an 18-and-older show at Revolution, 9 p.m., $15 adv., $20 day of. Live at Laman continues with Fayetteville folk favorites Still on the Hill, Laman Library, 7 p.m., free.

FRIDAY 11/9

‘TRENCHTOWN ROCK’: The Wailers play at Revolution Sunday night.

SUNDAY 11/11

THE WAILERS

8 p.m. Revolution. $20 adv., $25 day of.

Here’s something that doesn’t happen all that often. One of the living legends of reggae will be playing two shows in Arkansas this week. Obviously, when people think of the Wailers, Bob Marley, Peter Tosh and Bunny Wailer are at the top of mind. But give credit where it’s due: Bassist Aston “Family Man” Barrett is a legend in his own right. He had a big hand in shaping the sound of one of the most vital bands in the history of

pop music. He and his brother, drummer Carlton Barrett, joined the Wailers in 1970, and stayed with Marley after Tosh and Bunny left the group to pursue solo careers. As if that wasn’t sufficient for cementing his legacy, Barrett had also played with dub innovator and bona fide sonic genius/madman Lee “Scratch” Perry’s Upsetters. And in addition to the countless albums he performed on and/or produced, he played on what is, for my money, the greatest roots reggae album ever, Burning Spear’s utterly timeless and essential “Marcus Garvey.”

For decades now, he’s led The Wailers Band with a rotating cast of folks, many of whom also played in the ’70s lineup, including his brother (who died in 1987), Earl Lindo, Tyrone Downey and others. Handling vocal duties for the band now is Koolant Brown, a charismatic singer who recently told the Miami Herald that while he knows he’ll “never be Bob,” it’s nonetheless “a privilege and an honor to sing his songs.” Opening the show is Butterfly and Irie Soul. The Wailers play at Walton Arts Center Saturday (see calendar). RB

TUESDAY 11/13

BLESS THE MIC: EUGENE ROBINSON

7 p.m. Philander Smith College. Free.

Philander Smith College’s Bless the Mic lecture series continues with a visit, one week after the election, from Pulitzer Prize winning journalist and commentator Eugene Robinson. Robinson writes a twice-a-week column for the Washington Post and is, along with his colleague E.J. Dionne and New York Times columnist Paul Krugman, one of the most cogent liberal voices in the country. As such, he’s

a frequent guest on political shows such as The Rachel Maddow Show, Hardball, Meet the Press and more. Robinson’s most recent Post column concerned the entirely sensible idea of building surge barriers to protect the nation’s port cities from the type of destruction wrought by Hurricane Sandy. Of course, that type of reasonable public infrastructure investment would probably never pass muster with the mad hatters in the Tea Party. Still, it’s a good thing that folks like Robinson are there to, at the very least, point out the obvious in the face of insanity. RB

If you prefer getting your fix of The Bard in an extremely condensed form, don’t miss “The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged),” in which three actors attempt to play every role in every Shakespearean play written, Lantern Theatre, Conway, Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday at 2:30 p.m., $12. Travis Ledoyt, billed as “The World’s Best Young Elvis,” makes a welcome return to Murry’s Dinner Playhouse, where he’s wowed audiences for the last couple of years now, Friday-Sunday, 6:30 p.m., $15-$33. The Weekend Theater’s “Raft of the Medusa” continues this weekend, exploring how the AIDS epidemic affects a diverse group of people, 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, $12-$16. North Carolina alt-country specialists American Aquarium play an 18-and-older show at Stickyz, 9 p.m., $8. PopUp Main Street includes food trucks, live music, local vendors and artists and more (see page 12). The UALR Trojans men’s basketball team opens its season against UT Martin, Jack Stephens Center, 7 p.m., $5-$38.

SATURDAY 11/10

Check out some Kansas City hip-hop at Vino’s, which has Grind and Shine 2012, an 18-and-older show with Huey P. Nuisance, iR neKo, The Abnorm, BluntRap, T.Jay, J.G., NorthRock and more, 8 p.m., $7. Pitch-perfect vintage rock ‘n’ roll what you’re looking for? Check out Memphis fave John Paul Keith & The One Four Fives, with Sound of the Mountain, Maxine’s, 8 p.m., $5 adv., $7 door. If you see a bunch of folks running around covered in brightly colored dye, you’ll know it’s The Color Run, a 5k starting at Riverfront Park, 9 a.m., $35.

TUESDAY 11/13

POST COLUMNIST: Eugene Robinson, of the Washington Post, will speak at Philander Smith College Tuesday.

White Water Tavern has the return of eccentric Little Rock trio The Dangerous Idiots, whose new album will be out soon. They play with The P-47s, 10 p.m. Veteran newsman Jim Lehrer will discuss his experience moderating the first 2012 debate between President Barack Obama and Mitt Romney, as well as his new book, “Tension City,” Clinton School of Public Service, 6 p.m., free. www.arktimes.com

NOVEMBER 7, 2012

23


AFTER DARK All events are in the Greater Little Rock area unless otherwise noted. To place an event in the Arkansas Times calendar, please e-mail the listing and all pertinent information, including date, time, location, price and contact information, to calendar@arktimes.com.

Beach Cafe, 9 p.m. 9611 MacArthur Drive, NLR. 771-2994. Rob & Tyndall. Cajun’s Wharf, 5 and 9 p.m., $5 after 8:30 p.m. 2400 Cantrell Road. 501-3755351. www.cajunswharf.com. Ted Ludwig Trio. Capital Bar and Grill, 5 p.m., free. 111 Markham St. 501-374-7474. www.capitalhotel.com/CBG. Wussy, Midwest Caravan. 18-and-older. Stickyz Rock ‘n’ Roll Chicken Shack, 9:30 p.m., $6. 107 Commerce St. 501-372-7707. www.stickyz.com.

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 7

MUSIC

Acoustic Open Mic. The Afterthought, 8 p.m., free. 2721 Kavanaugh Blvd. 501-663-1196. www. afterthoughtbar.com. Audrey Dean Kelley. The Tavern Sports Grill, 7 p.m., free. 17815 Chenal Parkway. 501-830-2100. www.thetavernsportsgrill.com. Brian & Nick. Cajun’s Wharf, through Nov. 28: 5 and 9 p.m., $5 after 8:30 p.m. 2400 Cantrell Road. 501-375-5351. www.cajunswharf.com. Darril Harp Edwards. Stickyz Rock ‘n’ Roll Chicken Shack, 6 p.m. 107 Commerce St. 501372-7707. www.stickyz.com. Gil Franklin & Friends. Holiday Inn, North Little Rock, first Tuesday, Wednesday of every month. 120 W. Pershing Blvd., NLR. Grim Muzik presents Way Back Wednesdays. Cornerstone Pub & Grill, 8:30 p.m. 314 Main St., NLR. 501-374-1782. cstonepub.com. Jim Dickerson. Sonny Williams’ Steak Room, through Nov. 15: 7 p.m. 500 President Clinton Ave. 501-324-2999. www.sonnywilliamssteakroom.com. Michael Carenbauer and Bill Huntington. RJ Tao, 7 p.m.; Nov. 14, 7 p.m.; Nov. 21, 7 p.m.; Dec. 5, 7 p.m.; Dec. 12, 7 p.m.; Dec. 19, 7 p.m.; Dec. 26, 7 p.m. 5501 Kavanaugh Blvd. 501-603-0080. www.rjtaorocks.com/. Ricky David Tripp. Rocket Twenty One, 5:30 p.m. 2601 Kavanaugh Blvd. 501-603-9208. www. ferneaurestaurant.com. Rwake, Dysrhythmia, A Life Once Lost. All ages. Downtown Music Hall, 8 p.m., $8. 211 W. Capitol. 501-376-1819. downtownmusichall. com. Ted Ludwig Trio. Capital Bar and Grill, 5 p.m., free. 111 Markham St. 501-374-7474. www.capitalhotel.com/CBG. Wurly Burds, I Do Declare. Vino’s, 8 p.m., $5. 923 W. 7th St. 501-375-8466. www.vinosbrewpub.com.

COMEDY

John Roy, Brandon Vestal. The Loony Bin, 7:30 p.m., $7-$10. 10301 N. Rodney Parham Road. 501-228-5555. www.loonybincomedy.com. The Joint Venture. Improv comedy group. The Joint, 8 p.m., $5. 301 Main St. No. 102, NLR. 501372-0205. thejointinlittlerock.com. Standup Open Mic Night. Hosted by local come­di­ans of the com­edy col­lec­tive Come­di­ ans of NWA. UARK Bowl, 9 p.m., free. 644 W. Dickson St., Fayetteville. 479-301-2030. uarkbowl.com.

COMEDY

John Roy, Brandon Vestal. The Loony Bin, through Nov. 8, 7:30 p.m.; through Nov. 10, 7:30 and 10 p.m., $7-$10. 10301 N. Rodney Parham Road. 501-228-5555. www.loonybincomedy.com. Robert Kelly, Sam Letchworth. UARK Bowl, 8 p.m., $10-$12. 644 W. Dickson St., Fayetteville. 479-301-2030. www.uarkballroom.com.

DANCE

‘VOICES OF OMENS’: Rwake plays at Downtown Music Hall, with Canadian metal outfit KEN Mode, Dysrhythmia and A Life Once Lost, 8 p.m., $8. Downtown Eureka Springs, Eureka Springs. Heifer Village Speaker Series: India. Heifer Village, 6 p.m., free. 1 World Ave. 501-376-6836. heifer.org/heifervillage. Holiday House 2012. Statehouse Convention Center, 6 p.m., $8-$40. 7 Statehouse Plaza. Meet Make Share. Participants will create a small work of art from the provided materials. Artchurch Studio, ; Dec. 12, $5 donation. 301 Whittington Ave., Hot Springs. 501-318-6779. www.artchurch.org.

LECTURES

Legacies & Lunch: John Deering. The editorial cartoonist will discuss the history and importance of the late George Fisher. Main Library, noon, free. 100 S. Rock St. www.cals.lib.ar.us.

POETRY

Wednesday Night Poetry. 21-and-older show Maxine’s, 7 p.m., free. 700 Central Ave., Hot Springs. 501-321-0909. maxineslive.com/shows.html.

THURSDAY, NOV. 8

MUSIC

Casey Donahew Band. 18-and-older. Revolution,

EVENTS

The husband is planning a business trip for philandering purposes when his wife secretly invites this same girl to spend the weekend. You’ll be surrounded by laughs!

Nov 13 - Dec 31

Season Tickets $160 You Save Up To $170

Food & Wine Festival. Food and wine festival at various locations throughout Eureka Springs. For more information, go to eurekaspringsfoodandwine.com. Downtown Eureka Springs.

NOVEMBER 7, 2012

ARKANSAS TIMES

FILM

The Globe Theatre Presents: “Doctor Faustus.” Market Street Cinema, Nov. 8, 7 p.m.; Nov. 13, 2 p.m. 1521 Merrill Drive. 501-312-8900. www. marketstreetcinema.net.

LECTURES

David Williams. The CEO of the Make-A-Wish Foundation will discuss his work. Clinton School of Public Service, 12 p.m., free. 1200 President Clinton Ave. 501-683-5239. www.clintonschool. uasys.edu.

Campus Food Drive. Bring donations of nonperishable food items. Remington College-Little Rock, 8 a.m. p.m. 19 Remington Drive. 501-3120007. www.remingtoncollege.edu.

BOOKS

Mark Spitzer. The author will read from his newest work, “Monstropocalypse Opus IV,” and sign copies afterward. Faulkner County Library, 7 p.m., free. 1900 Tyler St., Conway. 501-3277482. www.fcl.org.

FRIDAY, NOV. 9

MUSIC

American Aquarium. 18-and-older show. Stickyz

Colonel Glenn & University • murrysdinnerplayhouse.com • 562-3131 24

EVENTS

Arkansas Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty Annual Meeting. Keynote speaker is Scott Bass, executive director of Murder Victims’ Families for Reconciliation. Our Lady of the Holy Souls Catholic Church, 6 p.m., $15-$25. 1003 N. Tyler St. Bicycle Traffic Skills 101. For details or to register, call 501-350-7682. The Joint, 8:30 a.m. 301 Main St. No. 102, NLR. 501-372-0205. thejointinlittlerock.com. Food & Wine Festival. See Nov. 7. Holiday House 2012. Statehouse Convention Center, noon-9 p.m., $8-$40. 7 Statehouse Plaza.

BENEFITS

DANCE

Little Rock Bop Club. Beginning dance lessons for ages 10 and older. Singles welcome. Bess Chisum Stephens Community Center, 7 p.m., $4 for members, $7 for guests. 12th & Cleveland streets. 501-350-4712. www.littlerockbopclub.

9 p.m., $15 adv., $20 day of. 300 President Clinton Ave. 501-823-0090. revroom.com. Disney Live! Mickey’s Music Festival. Verizon Arena, 7 p.m., $21-$56. 1 Alltel Arena Way, NLR. 501-975-9001. verizonarena.com. Helmet, The Toadies. George’s Majestic Lounge, 8 p.m., $24. 519 W. Dickson St., Fayetteville. 479-442-4226. “Inferno.” DJs play pop, electro, house and more, plus drink specials and $1 cover before 11 p.m. Sway, 9 p.m. 412 Louisiana. 501-907-2582. Jason Greenlaw and Trey Johnson. The Joint, 9 p.m. 301 Main St. No. 102, NLR. 501-372-0205. thejointinlittlerock.com. Jim Dickerson. Sonny Williams’ Steak Room, through Nov. 15: 7 p.m. 500 President Clinton Ave. 501-324-2999. www.sonnywilliamssteakroom.com. Krush Thursdays with DJ Kavaleer. Club Climax, free before 11 p.m. 824 W. Capitol. 501-554-3437. Live at Laman: Still on the Hill. Laman Library, 7 p.m. 2801 Orange St., NLR. 501-758-1720. www. lamanlibrary.org. Lost Bayou Ramblers. White Water Tavern, 9 p.m., $10. 2500 W. 7th. 501-375-8400. www. whitewatertavern.com. Open jam with The Port Arthur Band. Parrot

The Arts in Motion: Tango. Arkansas Arts Center, through May 9: second Thursday of every month, 7 p.m., $10, free for members. 501 E. 9th St. 501-372-4000. www.arkarts.com. Soul Spirit Zumba with Ashan. Dunbar Community Center, 6 p.m., $5. 1001 W. 16th St. 501-376-1084.


Rock ‘n’ Roll Chicken Shack, 9 p.m., $8. 107 Commerce St. 501-372-7707. www.stickyz.com. The B-Flats. The Afterthought, 9 p.m., $7. 2721 Kavanaugh Blvd. 501-663-1196. www.afterthoughtbar.com. Canvas. Cornerstone Pub & Grill, 9 p.m. 314 Main St., NLR. 501-374-1782. cstonepub.com. Chris Henry. Flying Saucer, 9 p.m., $3. 323 President Clinton Ave. 501-372-8032. www. beerknurd.com/stores/littlerock. Class of ‘87 Band. Denton’s Trotline, 9 p.m. 2150 Congo Road, Benton. 501-315-1717. Club Nights at 1620 Savoy. Dance night, with DJs, drink specials and bar menu, until 2 a.m. 1620 Savoy, 10 p.m. 1620 Market St. 501-2211620. www.1620savoy.com. Cody Canada & The Departed. George’s Majestic Lounge, 9:30 p.m., $13. 519 W. Dickson St., Fayetteville. 479-442-4226. Ed Burks. Sonny Williams’ Steak Room, Nov. 9-10, 7 p.m. 500 President Clinton Ave. 501324-2999. www.sonnywilliamssteakroom.com. Friday night at Sway. Sway, 9 p.m. 412 Louisiana. 501-907-2582. The Intruders. The Tavern Sports Grill, 7 p.m., free. 17815 Chenal Parkway. 501-830-2100. www. thetavernsportsgrill.com. Jane Bunnet & Hilario Duran with Candido Camero. Walton Arts Center, 7 and 9 p.m. 495 W. Dickson St., Fayetteville. 479-443-5600. LaDonna Gatlin. Arkansas State University at Mountain Home, 7 p.m., $8-$15. 1600 S. College Ave., Mountain Home. The Last Slice, Stiff Necked Fools. Maxine’s, 8 p.m., $5 adv., $7 door. 700 Central Ave., Hot Springs. www.maxinespub.com. Lee DeWyze. Juanita’s, 9 p.m., $12 adv., $15 day of. 614 President Clinton Ave. 501-372-1228. www.juanitas.com. Longreef. West End Smokehouse and Tavern, Nov. 9-10, 10 p.m., $5. 215 N. Shackleford. 501224-7665. www.westendsmokehouse.net. Machina (album release). Downtown Music Hall, 7 p.m. 211 W. Capitol. 501-376-1819. downtownmusichall.com. Ronnie Simmons Band. Thirst n’ Howl, 8:30 p.m., free. 14710 Cantrell Road. 501-379-8189. www. thirst-n-howl.com. Ted Ludwig Trio. Capital Bar and Grill, 9 p.m., free. 111 Markham St. 501-374-7474. www.capitalhotel.com/CBG. Tragikly White. 18-and-older. Revolution, 9:30 p.m., $7. 300 President Clinton Ave. 501-8230090. revroom.com. Travis Linville, The Goodtime Ramblers. White Water Tavern, 9:30 p.m. 2500 W. 7th. 501-3758400. www.whitewatertavern.com. Wes Hart Band (headliner), Richie Johnson (happy hour). Cajun’s Wharf, 5 and 9 p.m., $5 after 8:30 p.m. 2400 Cantrell Road. 501-3755351. www.cajunswharf.com. “YOLO.” Featuring four DJs and beach volleyball, 18-and-older. Flying DD, $5. 4601 S. University. 501-773-9990. flyingdd.com.

COMEDY

John Roy, Brandon Vestal. The Loony Bin, through Nov. 10, 7:30 and 10 p.m., $7-$10. 10301 N. Rodney Parham Road. 501-228-5555. www. loonybincomedy.com. The Main Thing. Two-act comedy play “Electile Dysfunction.” The Joint, 8 p.m., $20. 301 Main St. No. 102, NLR. 501-372-0205. thejointinlittlerock.com. Robert Kelly, Sam Letchworth. UARK Bowl, 8 and 10:30 p.m., $10-$12. 644 W. Dickson

St., Fayetteville. 479-301-2030. www.uarkballroom.com.

EVENTS

The Art of Music. Includes a variety of art, all with a musical theme. Patrick Henry Hays Center, 5:30 p.m., free. 401 W. Pershing, NLR. www. northlr.org/departments/senior-citizens.asp. Big Design in Little Rock. Sneak peek at Korto Momolu’s spring line. River Market Tower, 5:30 p.m., $50. 315 Rock St. 501-539-0913. ComicCon-way. Comic, anime, sci-fi and gaming convention. Faulkner County Library, 10 a.m., free. 1900 Tyler St., Conway. 501-327-7482. comicon-way.com. Community Connections Royal Night Out. Fundraiser with cocktails and hors d’oeuvres. Next Level Events, 6 p.m., $75. 1400 W. Markham St. 501-329-5459. 2012royalnightout.eventbrite.com/. “Dancing into Dreamland.” Fundraiser for restoring Dreamland Ballroom includes refreshments and dancing competition. Dreamland Ballroom, 7 p.m., $50. 800 W. 9th St. 501-2555700. FOCAL used book sale. Main Library, Nov. 9-10, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Nov. 11, 1-4 p.m. 100 S. Rock St. www.cals.lib.ar.us. Food & Wine Festival. See Nov. 7. Holiday House 2012. Statehouse Convention Center, 9 a.m.-9 p.m., $8-$40. 7 Statehouse Plaza. Homeschool Friday Fun — Artful Architecture. Register at crystalbridges.org. Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, 2-3:30 p.m, $45. 600 Museum Way, Bentonville. 479-418-5700. crystalbridges.org. LGBTQ/SGL Youth and Young Adult Group. Diverse Youth for Social Change is a group for LGBTQ/SGL and straight ally youth and young adults age 14 to 23. For more information, call 244-9690 or search “DYSC” on Facebook. 800 Scott St., 6:30 p.m. 800 Scott St. New Member Orientation. Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, 6:30:30 p.m. 600 Museum Way, Bentonville. 479-418-5700. crystalbridges.org. PopUp Main Street. Includes food trucks, live music, local vendors and artists and more. StudioMain, Noon-10 p.m. 1423 S. Main St.

FILM

“The Art of Crystal Bridges.” Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, 6:30 p.m., free. 600 Museum Way, Bentonville. 479-418-5700. crystalbridges.org.

LECTURES

Brian Ingrassia. The history professor and author of “The Rise of the Gridiron University: Higher Education’s Uneasy Alliance with Big-Time Football” will discuss the impact of college football on universities. Clinton School of Public Service, 12 p.m., free. 1200 President Clinton Ave. 501-683-5239. www.clintonschool.uasys. edu.

SPORTS

UALR Men’s Trojans vs. UT Martin. Jack Stephens Center, UALR, 7 p.m., $5-$38. 2801 S. University Ave.

BOOKS

ComiCon-way. Comic convention, featuring music, door prizes, film screenings, costume and cosplay contest, vendors, gaming and

more Faulkner County Library, 3 p.m., free. 1900 Tyler St., Conway. 501-327-7482. www.fcl.org. Kathleen Heil, J. Camp Brown. Pulaski Technical College, 10 a.m., free. 3000 W. Scenic Drive, NLR.

SATURDAY, NOV. 10

MUSIC

“All Red.” Model performances, best-dressed man wins $100. Club Xclusive, 9 p.m., $10. 1400 145th St. 501-551-8372. www.xclusivenight.com. Arkansas Symphony Orchestra: “Beethoven & Blue Jeans.” Featuring Beethoven’s “The Creatures of Prometheus Overture.” Robinson Center, $14-$52. 426 W. Markham St. 501-3764781. www.littlerockmeetings.com/conv-centers/robinson. Brandon Peck, Club Social with DJ Max, JMZ Dean, Rufio, Platinumb, Ewell. Featuring Dominique Sanchez and The Discovery Dolls. Discovery Nightclub, 9 p.m. 1021 Jessie Road. 501-664-4784. www.latenightdisco.com. Club Nights at 1620 Savoy. See Nov. 9. David Bowie Tribute. Featuring Randall Shreve & The Sideshow. Revolution, 9 p.m. 300 President Clinton Ave. 501-823-0090. revroom.com. Ed Burks. Sonny Williams’ Steak Room, 7 p.m. 500 President Clinton Ave. 501-324-2999. www. sonnywilliamssteakroom.com. Gambino Boys. Cornerstone Pub & Grill, 9 p.m. 314 Main St., NLR. 501-374-1782. cstonepub.com. Grind and Shine 2012. 18-and-older show with Huey P. Nuisance, iR neKo, The Abnorm, BluntRap, T.Jay, J.G., NorthRock and more. Vino’s, 8 p.m., $7. 923 W. 7th St. 501-375-8466. www.vinosbrewpub.com. The Hardy Windburn Experience. The Afterthought, 9 p.m., $7. 2721 Kavanaugh Blvd. 501-663-1196. www.afterthoughtbar.com. Huey P. Nuissance, IR Neko, The Abnorm, BluntRap. Vino’s, 8 p.m., $7. 923 W. 7th St. 501375-8466. www.vinosbrewpub.com. John Paul Keith & The One Four Fives, Sound of the Mountain. Maxine’s, 8 p.m., $5 adv., $7 door. 700 Central Ave., Hot Springs. www. maxinespub.com. Karaoke at Khalil’s. Khalil’s Pub, 7 p.m. 110 S. Shackleford Road. 501-224-0224. www.khalilspub.com. K.I.S.S. Saturdays. Featuring DJ Silky Slim. Dress code enforced. Sway, 10 p.m. 412 Louisiana. 501-492-9802. Longreef. West End Smokehouse and Tavern, 10 p.m., $5. 215 N. Shackleford. 501-224-7665. www.westendsmokehouse.net. Pat Anderson. Flying Saucer, 9 p.m., $3. 323 President Clinton Ave. 501-372-8032. www. beerknurd.com/stores/littlerock. Pickin’ Porch. Bring your instrument. All ages welcome. Faulkner County Library, 9:30 a.m. 1900 Tyler St., Conway. 501-327-7482. www.fcl.org. Roger Creager. 18-and-older. Stickyz Rock ‘n’ Roll Chicken Shack, 9 p.m., $10 adv., $12 day of. 107 Commerce St. 501-372-7707. www. stickyz.com. Saturday night at Discovery. Featuring DJs, dancers and more. Discovery Nightclub, 9 p.m., $10. 1021 Jessie Road. 501-664-4784. www.latenightdisco.com. Seeing Red (headliner), Pat Anderson (happy hour). Cajun’s Wharf, 5 and 9 p.m., $5 after 8:30 p.m. 2400 Cantrell Road. 501-375-5351. www. cajunswharf.com. CONTINUED ON PAGE 26

PET PHOTOS with SANTA Supporting CARE for Animals SAT, NOV. 10 & 24 10am to 4pm SUN, NOV. 11 & 25 12pm to 4pm TRINITY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Fellowship Hall Evergreen & Mississippi, Little Rock 501-603-CARE (2273) www.careforanimals.org www.arktimes.com

NOVEMBER 7, 2012

25


MUSIC REVIEW

The Flaming Lips

Barnhill Arena, Nov. 4 BY ZACH HOLLAND

T

he Flaming Lips are a bit mysterious to me. Some people still call them a punk band based on their original sound, but most of their current audience knows them by their recent, less aggressive melodic pop songs like “Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots” and “Do You Realize??” In the early- to mid-’90s, the Lips spent a brief time surfing the pop charts with their left-field hit “She Dont Use Jelly.” But they mostly spend their time wading through experimental psychedelic musical pop art. They are a pillar of Midwestern rock, and every friend of yours in a band that wandered through their home state of Oklahoma has a story about the iconic, idiosyncratic frontman Wayne Coyne. He’s been known for dropping in to do an impromptu guest spot for other bands’ albums. The Lips are one of the few Midwestern bands that seem to embrace their flyover country roots, ready to prove that good art is made by talented and fearless individuals, not by a coastal location. Though Midwestern, The Flaming Lips still have a vaguely international air about them. So, here goes: The band is a midwestanese-punk-alternative-psychedelic-avant-garde-pop-art-space-rock outfit from our neighboring state. I’m a sucker for contradiction when coupled with good music, so I’m sold, and the two records I’m familiar with are near masterpieces of all those elements wrapped in a very listenable package. This is nearly the peak of what a rock band can possibly achieve in my book, so when I heard The Flaming Lips were playing a student show at Barnhill arena in Fayetteville, I knew I was going even though I skip most arena shows these days. The show began with a winking vagina-eye video loop on a massive screen at the front of the stage. After a long wait, the band members surprised us by entering via birth canal in the middle of the video screen, walking through what revealed itself to be a video curtain. Coyne fired a confetti gun over the crowd as confetti cannons simultaneously went off, filling the place to the rafters, and the band coalesced on the opening riff of “Sweet Leaf,” Black Sabbath’s classic ode to Mary Jane. As you would expect, a Lips’ show is heavy on visual effects. Some people will remember when Coyne and Co. came through Fayetteville back in the ’90s on the boombox tour, asking audience members to bring their own boombox so a tape provided by the band could be played at the direction of conductor Coyne. That impressive creativity is still pres26

NOVEMBER 7, 2012

ARKANSAS TIMES

ent, and their homemade props and visual toys are constantly evolving. Wayne still rolls around in the crowd in the plastic bubble. He still has the ultra-close-up camera displaying his nostrils on the large video screen above. He has added oversized laser hands. It was all effective, the most thrilling moment being when the synchronized video screen began looping photos of wild animals gnashing their teeth over some wild keyboard and drum sounds while Coyne fired his laser hands off a massive disco ball. The not-so-young band catered to the student audience with lots of looping, heavily stylized, filtered video of naked young women dancing and flailing. The stage wings were stuffed with uniformed squads of dancing rock ’n’ roll girls. Although the young crowd was excited and generally on board to go wherever the Lips took them, the inevitable requests for “Yoshimi” were heard between less familiar, less melodic, less danceable, more aggressive songs. Coyne teased the crowd playing snippets of “Yoshimi.” He said “we love those songs, we just don’t always play them ... unless you really want to hear it.” It seemed to finally get the enthusiasm from the crowd that he was searching for, so he looked to other band members to make sure all were on board before playing an acoustic, drum-less, sing-along version of the song which the crowd enjoyed immensely, even performing the karate sounds in the verses. It appeared to be off the cuff, as Coyne and the band walked each other slowly through the song, having apparently not practiced it. Coyne seemed to enjoy the moment with the crowd, and the keyboard player looked pleasantly surprised that they made it through without any flubs, although they must’ve played the song thousands of times by now. The band and crowd all seemed in good spirits throughout the night. I found the vocals at times indiscernible and wished for familiar songs in the meat of the set, but the real Lips fans in attendance surely didn’t feel that way, and those who stuck around were treated to a closing version of “Do You Realize??” All in all, the band seems like they still have it, yet I found myself wishing I’d seen them 10 years ago. But you have to respect them for neither ignoring nor pandering to casual fans like me. They are a fantastic band that has deservingly made many “must-see” lists, but if you are considering attending any of their upcoming tour dates, I would recommend getting familiar with their newer material, lest you find yourself with that familiar post-arena concert exhaustion. They promised to return and play a free show in Arkansas if Proposition 5, the medical marijuana act on the ballot this year, passes.

AFTER DARK, CONT. The Sideshow Tragedy. White Water Tavern, 9:30 p.m. 2500 W. 7th. 501-375-8400. www.whitewatertavern.com. Singer/Songwriters Showcase. Parrot Beach Cafe, 2-7 p.m., free. 9611 MacArthur Drive, NLR. 771-2994. The Smittle Band. The Afterthought, 9 p.m., $7. 2721 Kavanaugh Blvd. 501-663-1196. www. afterthoughtbar.com. Swagfest II: Cannibal Corpse pre-sale party. Includes a ticket to see Cannibal Corpse on Nov. 17, and a show with Deshoveled, Decay Awaits, Moment of Fierce Determination and A Darkend Era. Free T shirts to the first 50 people through the door. Juanita’s, 9 p.m., $14. 614 President Clinton Ave. 501-372-1228. www. juanitas.com. Ted Ludwig Trio. Capital Bar and Grill, 9 p.m., free. 111 Markham St. 501-374-7474. www.capitalhotel.com/CBG. Tragikly White Deer Widow Night. Denton’s Trotline, 9 p.m., $10. 2150 Congo Road, Benton. 501-315-1717. The Wailers. Walton Arts Center, 8 p.m., $16-$28. 495 W. Dickson St., Fayetteville. 479-443-5600.

COMEDY

John Roy, Brandon Vestal. The Loony Bin, 7:30 and 10 p.m., $7-$10. 10301 N. Rodney Parham Road. 501-228-5555. www.loonybincomedy. com. The Main Thing. Two-act comedy play “Electile Dysfunction.” The Joint, 8 p.m., $20. 301 Main St. No. 102, NLR. 501-372-0205. thejointinlittlerock.com.

DANCE

Little Rock West Coast Dance Club. Dance lessons. Singles welcome. Ernie Biggs, 7 p.m., $2. 307 Clinton Ave. 501-247-5240. www. arstreetswing.com.

EVENTS

10th Annual AIDS Walk — Celebration of Life. Registration begins at 10 a.m. at pavilions 7 and 8. Murray Park, 12 p.m. Rebsamen Park Road. 237th Marine Corps Birthday. All Marines and Corpsmen and their families will get the military discount all day. Lone Star Steakhouse, 11 a.m. 10901 N. Rodney Parham Rd. 501-227-8898. lonestarsteakhouse.com. Argenta Farmers Market. Argenta, 7 a.m.-noon. Main Street, NLR. Beer & Brats Street Party. Enjoy free bratwursts and $2 Diamond Bear beers with purchase of tickets to the Arkansas Symphony Orchestra’s “Beethoven & Bluejeans” concert. Robinson Center Music Hall, 6 p.m. Markham and Broadway. www.littlerockmeetings.com/ conv-centers/robinson. Falun Gong meditation. Allsopp Park, 9 a.m., free. Cantrell & Cedar Hill Roads. FOCAL used book sale. Main Library, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 100 S. Rock St. www.cals.lib.ar.us. Food & Wine Festival. See Nov. 7. Hillcrest Farmers Market. Pulaski Heights Baptist Church, 7 a.m.-noon. 2200 Kavanaugh Blvd. Holiday House 2012. Statehouse Convention Center, 9 a.m., $8-$40. 7 Statehouse Plaza. Modeling casting call. Club Xclusive, 1 p.m., $25. 1400 145th St. www.xclusivenight.com. Pancake Breakfast Fundraiser to benefit Stewpot. First Presbyterian Church, 8 a.m., $5. 800 Scott St. 501-837-3024. PopUp Main Street. See Nov. 9.

SPORTS

2012 Philander Smith College Social Justice Initiative 5K Run/Walk. Philander Smith College, 8 a.m., $10-$20. 900 W. Daisy L. Gatson Bates Drive.

Brokencyde, Nathan Ryan, The Bunny The Bear. Downtown Music Hall, 6:30 p.m. 211 W. Capitol. 501-376-1819. downtownmusichall. com. The Color Run. Riverfront Park, 9 a.m., $35+. 400 President Clinton Avenue. 801-879-7790. www. thecolorrun.com. Flying Balloon-O Brothers. Thirst n’ Howl, 8:30 p.m., free. 14710 Cantrell Road. 501-379-8189. www.thirst-n-howl.com.

BOOKS

ComiCon-way. See Nov. 9. Jennifer Horne, Linda Scisson. Featuring the authors of “Circling Faith” and “One-of-a-Kind Christmas Quiz.” WordsWorth Books & Co., 1 p.m. 5920 R St. 501-663-9198. www.wordsworthbooks.org.

KIDS

Saturday Story Time. Pyramid Art Books and Custom Framing, 10 a.m., free. 1001 Wright Ave. 501-372-6822. hearnefineart.com.

SUNDAY, NOV. 11

MUSIC

Arkansas Symphony Orchestra: “Beethoven & Blue Jeans.” Featuring Beethoven’s “The Creatures of Prometheus Overture.” Robinson Center, 3 p.m., $14-$52. 426 W. Markham St. 501-376-4781. www.littlerockmeetings.com/ conv-centers/robinson. Fire & Brimstone Duo. Performing on the patio or inside restaurant. Revolution, 6-9 p.m., free. 300 President Clinton Ave. 501-823-0090. revroom.com. Straight No Chaser. Reynolds Performance Hall, UCA, 3 p.m., $30-$40. 350 S. Donaghey, Conway. 501-450-3265. uca.edu.ticketforce.com/eventperformances.asp?evt=114. Sunday Jazz Brunch with Ted Ludwig and Joe Cripps. Vieux Carre, 11 a.m. 2721 Kavanaugh Blvd. 501-663-1196. www.vieuxcarrecafe.com. The Wailers, Butterfly and Irie Soul. Revolution, 8 p.m., $20 adv., $25 day of. 300 President Clinton Ave. 501-823-0090. revroom.com.

EVENTS

Adult Workshop: Get Illuminated with Light Art. Hands-on workshop with various lighting materials, such as LEDs, mini-bulbs and more. Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, 1 p.m., $54-$60. 600 Museum Way, Bentonville. 479-418-5700. crystalbridges.org. Beer & Brats Street Party. See Nov. 10. FOCAL used book sale. Main Library, 1 p.m. 100 S. Rock St. www.cals.lib.ar.us. Food & Wine Festival. See Nov. 7. “Live from the Back Room.” Vino’s, 7 p.m. 923 W. 7th St. 501-375-8466. www.vinosbrewpub.com.

FILM

“The Art of Crystal Bridges.” Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, noon, free. 600 Museum Way, Bentonville. 479-418-5700. crystalbridges.org.

MONDAY, NOV. 12

MUSIC

7th Street Peep Show. Featuring three or four bands per night. Bands sign up at 6:30 p.m. and play 35-minute sets (including setup) on a first-come, first-served basis. House band is The Sinners. Solo artists, DJs and all other performers welcome. Vino’s, 7 p.m., $1. 923 W. 7th St. 501-375-8466. www.vinosbrewpub.com. Irish Traditional Music Session. Hibernia Irish Tavern, Fourth and second Monday of every month, 7 p.m. 9700 N Rodney Parham Road. 501-246-4340. www.hiberniairishtavern.com.


AFTER DARK, CONT. Leonard Johnson. The Afterthought, 8 p.m., free. 2721 Kavanaugh Blvd. 501-663-1196. www. afterthoughtbar.com. The Overseer, This Chaos Inside, Soundcult. Downtown Music Hall, 7 p.m., $8. 211 W. Capitol. 501-376-1819. downtownmusichall.com. Reggae Nites. Featuring DJ Hy-C playing roots, reggae and dancehall. Pleazures Martini and Grill Lounge, 6 p.m., $7-$10. 1318 Main St. 501376-7777. www.facebook.com/pleazures.bargrill.

EVENTS

Food & Wine Festival. See Nov. 7. Preschool Playdate: Teeny Tiny. For children ages 2-5 with a caregiver. Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, 11:30 a.m., free. 600 Museum Way, Bentonville. 479-418-5700. crystalbridges.org.

FILM

International Film Festival. Includes a variety of international films and food. The University of Arkansas at Monticello, Nov. 12-15, 3 p.m., free. 346 University Drive, Monticello. 870-460-1026. www.uamont.edu.

LECTURES

“Laugh in Peace Comedy Tour.” Featuring Rabbi Bob Alper, Muslim comic Azhar Usman and Rev. Susan Sparks, who will discuss promoting interfaith action, multiculturalism and peace through comedy. Clinton School of Public Service, 6 p.m., free. 1200 President Clinton Ave. 501-683-5239. www.clintonschool.uasys.edu. Ron Capps. The director of the Veterans Writing Project will discuss the nonprofit’s mission of providing no-cost writing seminars and workshops for veterans, active and reserve service members and military family members. Clinton School of Public Service, 12 p.m., free. 1200 President Clinton Ave. 501-683-5239. www.clintonschool.uasys.edu.

CLASSES

Finding Family Facts. Rhonda Stewart’s genealogy research class for beginners. Arkansas Studies Institute, second Monday of every month, 3:30 p.m. 401 President Clinton Ave. 501-320-5700. www.butlercenter.org.

TUESDAY, NOV. 13

MUSIC

Acoustic Open Mic Night. The Joint, 8 p.m., free. 301 Main St. No. 102, NLR. 501-372-0205. thejointinlittlerock.com. Arkansas River Blues Society Blues Jam. Thirst n’ Howl, 6 p.m., free. 14710 Cantrell Road. 501379-8189. www.thirst-n-howl.com. Arkansas Symphony Orchestra: “Masterworks.” Featuring Beethoven’s String Quartet, Op. 130 and Op. 133. Clinton Presidential Center, 7 p.m.,

$22. 1200 President Clinton Ave. 370-8000. www. clintonpresidentialcenter.org. Bad Veins, The Skies Revolt, Sick/Sea. Maxine’s, 8 p.m., $5. 700 Central Ave., Hot Springs. www. maxinespub.com. The Dangerous Idiots, The P-47s. White Water Tavern, 10 p.m. 2500 W. 7th. 501-375-8400. www. whitewatertavern.com. Heavy Metal Karaoke. Downtown Music Hall, Nov. 13, 8 p.m.; Nov. 20, 8 p.m.; Nov. 27, 8 p.m.; Dec. 4, 8 p.m.; Dec. 11, 8 p.m.; Dec. 18, 8 p.m., free. 211 W. Capitol. 501-376-1819. downtownmusichall.com. Jeff Long. Khalil’s Pub, 6 p.m. 110 S. Shackleford Road. 501-224-0224. www.khalilspub.com. Jim Dickerson. Sonny Williams’ Steak Room, through Nov. 15: 7 p.m. 500 President Clinton Ave. 501-324-2999. www.sonnywilliamssteakroom.com. Lucious Spiller Band. Copeland’s Restaurant of Little Rock, 6-9 p.m. 2602 S. Shackleford Road. 501-312-1616. www.copelandsrestaurantlittlerock.com. Michael Carenbauer. RJ Tao, Nov. 13, 6:30-9 p.m.; Nov. 20, 6:30-9 p.m.; Nov. 27, 6:30-9 p.m.; Dec. 4, 6:30-9 p.m.; Dec. 11, 6:30-9 p.m.; Dec. 18, 6:30-9 p.m.; Dec. 24, 6:30-9 p.m. 5501 Kavanaugh Blvd. 501-603-0080. www.rjtaorocks. com. Ricky David Tripp. Rocket Twenty One, 5:30 p.m. 2601 Kavanaugh Blvd. 501-603-9208. www. ferneaurestaurant.com. Top of the Rock Chorus rehearsal. Cornerstone Bible Fellowship Church, 7 p.m. 7351 Warden Road, Sherwood. 501-231-1119. www. topoftherockchorus.org. Touch, Grateful Dead Tribute. Ernie Biggs, 8 p.m., $5. 307 Clinton Ave. 501-372-4782. littlerock.erniebiggs.com. Tuesday Jam Session with Carl Mouton. The Afterthought, 8 p.m., free. 2721 Kavanaugh Blvd. 501-663-1196. www.afterthoughtbar.com.

DANCE

“Latin Night.” Revolution, 7 p.m., $5 regular, $7 under 21. 300 President Clinton Ave. 501-8230090. www.revroom.com. Soul Spirit Zumba with Ashan. Dunbar Community Center, 6 p.m., $5. 1001 W. 16th St. 501-376-1084.

EVENTS

Live Trivia by Challenge Entertainment. The Tavern Sports Grill, 7 p.m., free. 17815 Chenal Parkway. 501-830-2100. www.thetavernsportsgrill.com. Political Animals Club: What Just Happened? A Look Back At The 2012 Election. Governor’s Mansion, 11:30 a.m., $20. 1800 Center St. 501377-1121. Tales from the South. Authors tell true stories; schedule available on website. Dinner served

5-6:30 p.m., show at 7 p.m. Call for reservations. Starving Artist Cafe, 5 p.m. 411 N. Main St., NLR. 501-372-7976. www.starvingartistcafe.net. Trivia Bowl. Flying Saucer, 8:30 p.m. 323 President Clinton Ave. 501-372-8032. www.beerknurd. com/stores/littlerock. Wiggle Worms: “Density Detectives.” Museum of Discovery, 10:30 a.m., $8-$10, free for members. 500 Clinton Ave. 396-7050, 1-800-880-6475. www.amod.org.

FILM

The Globe Theatre Presents: “Doctor Faustus.” Market Street Cinema, 2 p.m. 1521 Merrill Drive. 501-312-8900. www.marketstreetcinema.net. International Film Festival. Includes a variety of international films and food. The University of Arkansas at Monticello, through Nov. 15, 3 p.m., free. 346 University Drive, Monticello. 870460-1026. www.uamont.edu. “Rock-A-Bye-Baby.” Market Street Cinema, 7 p.m., $5. 1521 Merrill Drive. 501-312-8900. www. marketstreetcinema.net.

LECTURES

Bless the Mic: Eugene Robinson. Philander Smith College, 7 p.m., free. 900 W. Daisy L. Gatson Bates Drive. Heather Parton. The political blogger known as “Digby” will read from her award-winning writings at the College of Business building. University of Central Arkansas, 7:30 p.m., free. 201 Donaghey Ave., Conway. 501-450-3293. www.uca.edu. Jim Lehrer. The veteran newsman will discuss his experience moderating the first 2012 debate between President Barack Obama and Governor Mitt Romney, as well as his new book, “Tension City.” Clinton School of Public Service, 6 p.m., free. 1200 President Clinton Ave. 501-683-5239. www.clintonschool.uasys.edu.

BOOKS

Mark Richard. The award-winning author presents “Writing as Remedy.” Hendrix College, 7:30 p.m. 1600 Washington Ave., Conway. www. hendrix.edu. Tim Ernst. The photographer will show slides of his photos of Arkansas. Faulkner County Library, 7 p.m., free. 1900 Tyler St., Conway. 501-3277482. www.fcl.org.

THIS WEEK IN THEATER

Auditions for “Company.” Auditions for the production of Stephen Sondheim’s musical, scheduled for Feb. 9-March 7. The Weekend Theater, Sat., Nov. 10, 10 a.m.; Sun., Nov. 11, 6:30 p.m. 1001 W. 7th St. 501-374-3761. www. weekendtheater.org. “The Beaux’ Stratagem.” Comedy by George Farquhar, adapted by Thornton Wilder and Ken Ludwig. University of Central Arkansas,

Snow Fine Arts Center Recital Hall, through Nov. 9, 7:30 p.m., $10, free for UCA students. 201 Donaghey Ave., Conway. “Bunnicula.” Based on the classic children’s book. Arkansas Arts Center, through Nov. 11: Fri., 7 p.m.; Sat., 3 p.m.; Sun., 2 p.m., $12. 501 E. 9th St. 501-372-4000. www.arkarts.com. “The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged).” Three actors attempt to play every role in every Shakespearean play written. Lantern Theatre, Nov. 9-10, 7:30 p.m.; Sun., Nov. 11, 2:30 p.m.; Nov. 16-17, 7:30 p.m.; Sun., Nov. 18, 2:30 p.m., $12. 1021 Van Ronkle, Conway. 501-733-6220. www.conwayarts.org/index.html. Hank and My Honky Tonk Heroes. Musical revue celebrating the songs of Hank Williams, featuring 20 of his classic country numbers. Murry’s Dinner Playhouse, through Nov. 8, 6 p.m., $15-$33. 6323 Col. Glenn Road. 501-5623131. murrysdinnerplayhouse.com. “Letters Home.” Stage play based on real letters written to home from U.S. soldiers stationed in Iraq and Afghanistan. Walton Arts Center, Sun., Nov. 11, 2 p.m., $16-$26. 495 W. Dickson St., Fayetteville. 479-443-5600. “Pajama Tops.” Farce in which a would-be philandering husband gets a surprise when his wife secretly invites the girl he’s been seeing on the side to spend the weekend with them. Murry’s Dinner Playhouse, through Dec. 30: Tue.-Sat., 6 p.m.; Wed., 11 a.m., 3 and 7 p.m.; Sun., 11 a.m. and 5:30 p.m., $15-$33. 6323 Col. Glenn Road. 501-562-3131. murrysdinnerplayhouse.com. “Raft Of The Medusa.” Joe Pintauro’s play examines the ways the AIDS epidemic affects a diverse group of people. The Weekend Theater, through Nov. 10, 7:30 p.m.; through Nov. 17, 7:30 p.m., $12-$16. 1001 W. 7th St. 501-374-3761. www.weekendtheater.org. Travis Ledoyt — “The World’s Best Young Elvis.” Murry’s Dinner Playhouse, Nov. 9-11, 6:30 p.m., $15-$33. 6323 Col. Glenn Road. 501-5623131. murrysdinnerplayhouse.com. “The Woman in Black.” Stephen Mallatratt’s thriller based on Susan Hill’s book of the same name stars El Dorado native and stage and screen actor William Ragsdale. Rialto Theater, through Nov. 9, 7:30 p.m.; through Nov. 11, 2:30 and 7:30 p.m., $16-$34. 113 E. Cedar St., El Dorado. 877-725-8849. www.eldofest.com.

GALLERIES, MUSEUMS

NEW EXHIBITIONS, EVENTS

ARKANSAS STATE LIBRARY, 900 W. Capitol Ave.: “Fought in Earnest: Civil War Arkansas,” Arkansas History Commission traveling exhibit, Nov. 7-16, 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Mon.-Fri. BUTLER CENTER GALLERIES, Arkansas Studies Institute, 401 President Clinton Ave.: “From the Vault: Works from the Central CONTINUED ON PAGE 28

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NOVEMBER 7, 2012

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AFTER DARK, CONT. Arkansas Library System’s Permanent Collection,” including historical paintings by Donald Draper, works on paper by visionary artist Arthur Grain, sculpture by Mary Cockrill and more, Nov. 9-March 23, 2013, reception 5-8 p.m. Nov. 9, 2nd Friday Art Night, with live music by Dave Williams and Friends; Arkansas League of Artists exhibition, through Jan. 26; “Solastalgia,” work by Susan Chambers and Louise Halsey, through Jan. 26. 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Mon.-Sat. 320-5700. COURTYARD MARRIOTT, 521 President Clinton Ave.: “Art to Remember in Nov.,” work by members of the ArtGroupMaumelle, painting demonstrations, 5-8 p.m. Nov. 9, 2nd Friday Art Night. 975-9800. GALLERY 221, 2nd and Center Sts.: “Works on Paper,” reception 5-8 p.m. Nov. 9, 2nd Friday Art Night, with preservation specialist Pat Collins. 801-0211. GALLERY 26, 2601 Kavanaugh Blvd.: 18th annual “Holiday Art Show,” work by 60-plus artists, opens with reception 7-10 p.m. Nov. 10, runs through Jan. 12. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tue.-Sat. 6648996. HEARNE FINE ART, 1001 Wright Ave.: “American Spring: A Cause For Justice,” quilts dealing with societal issues such as racism, civil rights, violence, discrimination, social justice and intolerance, in partnership with Fiber Artists for Hope and Sabrina Zarco, through Nov. (more at the Central High School Museum Visitors Center); “And the Band Played On,” mixed media paintings and sculpture by Kevin Cole, open 5-8 p.m. Nov. 9, 2nd Friday Art Night. 372-6822. HISTORIC ARKANSAS MUSEUM, 200 E. Third St.: “Beyond the Expected: Norwood Creech, Paulette Palmer and Edward Wade Jr.,” Nov. 9-Feb. 3, 2013, and “Jared Hogue: Mini Faces,” Nov. 9-Jan. 6, 2013, opening reception 5-8 p.m. Nov. 9, 2nd Friday Art Night, with music by John Cook and barbecue from Jones Bar-B-Q Diner, also booksignings with Edmond Davis, author of “Pioneering African-American Aviators: Featuring the Tuskegee Airmen of Arkansas,” and Kat Robinson, author of “Arkansas Pie”; “Barbie Doll: The 11 ½-inch American Icon,” through Jan. 6, 2013; “A Collective Vision,” recent acquisitions, through March 2013. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Sat., 1-5 p.m. Sun. 324-9351. MOSAIC TEMPLARS CULTURAL CENTER, Ninth and Broadway: Talk on African American soldiers in the Civil War by historian Hari Jones, 6 p.m. Nov. 8; “A Voice through the Viewfinder: Images of Arkansas’ Black Community by Ralph Armstrong,” through Jan. 5, 2013; permanent exhibits on African-American entrepreneurial history in Arkansas. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Tue.-Sat. 683–3593. OLD STATE HOUSE MUSEUM, 300 W. Markham: Open 5-8 p.m. Nov. 9, 2nd Friday Art Night, with s’mores, kettle corn, hot cider, ginger-apple pie drinks from Brandon’s Rocktown Distillery and music by the Good Time Ramblers; “Battle Colors of Arkansas,” 18 Civil War flags; “Things You Need to Hear: Memories of Growing up in Arkansas from 1890 to 1980,” oral histories about community, family, work, school and leisure. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Sat., 1-5 p.m. Sun. 324-9685. STUDIOMAIN, 1423 Main St.: 2012 AIA Design Awards, open 5-8 p.m. Nov. 9, 2nd Friday Art Night. www.studio-main.org. THEA FOUNDATION, 401 Main St., NLR: “Arkansas Champion Trees: An Artist’s Journey,” large colored-pencil drawings by Linda Palmer, Nov. 12-30; “Hunsicker Memorial Show,” Nov. 12-16, honoring the memory of Lucas Hunsicker, proceeds from sales benefit

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NOVEMBER 7, 2012

ARKANSAS TIMES

Contest rules and entry forms can be picked up at Mosaic Templars Cultural Center or downloaded from www.mosaictemplarscenter.com. Call 683-3593 for more information. The Fine Arts Center of Hot Springs has issued a call to artists for its “Wintertide Exhibit” in December. There is no entry fee, but a $10 hanging fee for the juried show. For more information, call Donna Dunnahoe at 501-624-0489 or e-mail donna@hsfac.org. Artworks should be submitted in jpeg form to info @hsfac.org.

CONTINUING EXHIBITS

DOLLED UP FOR 2ND FRIDAY ART NIGHT: Mountain View artist Paulette Palmer’s mixed media sculptures (such as “Gracie and Gomez,” above) at the Historic Arkansas Museum and more art will be on view after hours for 2nd Friday Art Night, 5-8 p.m. Nov. 9. Also Friday: CALS collection works at the Butler Center Galleries, ArtGroup Maumelle at the Courtyard Marriott, works on paper at Gallery 221, Kevin Cole mixed media and quilts at Hearne Fine Art, work by Norwood Creech, Edward Wade Jr. and Jared Hogue at the HAM, and the 2012 AIA Honor Awards at StudioMain. The Old State House Museum will have music, s’mores and ginger-apple pie drinks from Brandon’s Rocktown Distillery. the Hunsicker Scholarship Fund. 379-9512. EL DORADO SOUTH ARKANSAS ARTS CENTER, 110 E. 5th St.: 2012 Membership Show and Competition,” through Nov. 21. 870-862-5474. MOUNTAIN HOME A R K A N S A S S TAT E U N I V E R S I T YM O U N TA I N HOME, 1600 South College St.: Artists-in-education exhibition by Cheryl Blasdel, Noel Cole, Steve Hargett, Anieta England, Clint Pevril, Dana Johnson, Jo Rowell and others, through Nov. 26, The Sheid, Dale Bumpers Great Hall. 870508-6162. SPRINGDALE SHILOH MUSEUM, 118 W. Johnson: “Other Voices: Civil War in the Ozarks,” sympo-

sium on the home front experiences of women, African Americans, Native Americans and members of the Peace Society, 9:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Nov. 10. 479-750-8165.

CALL TO ARTISTS

Mosaic Templars Cultural Center, 501 W. 9th St., is accepting entries for its first annual “Say it Ain’t Say’s” sweet potato pie contest, open to both amateur and professional bakers. (The contest’s name refers to retired restaurateur Say McIntosh, famed for his sweet potato pies.) Deadline is Nov. 17; pies will be displayed and judged at the museum’s Holiday Open House 2-5 p.m. Dec. 2. The first eight amateur and first five professionals will be accepted. Prizes will be awarded for 1st and 2nd choice in each category and there will be a People’s Choice Award presented to the crowd favorite.

ARKANSAS ARTS CENTER, MacArthur Park: “50 for Arkansas,” work donated by Dorothy and Herbert Vogel, through Jan. 6; “Multiplicity,” exhibition on printmaking from the Smithsonian American Art Museum, through Jan. 6. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Tue.-Fri., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat., 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sun. 372-4000. GALLERY 360, 900 S. Rodney Parham: “Dia de los Muertos,” through Nov. 11, portion of sales benefit Arkansas Food Bank. 663-2222. GREG THOMPSON FINE ART, 429 Main St., NLR: “Southern Landscape,” work by Al Allen, Thomas Hart Benton, Darrell Berry, Gary Bolding, Adrian Brewer, J.O. Buckley, Roger Carlisle, Carroll Cloar, Shelia Cotton, William Dunlap, Louis Freund, Charles Harrington, Colette Pope Heldner, Dolores Justus, Matt McLeod, Laura Raborn, Ed Rice, Kendall Stallings, Barry Thomas and Rebecca Thompson. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tue.-Fri., 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Sat. 664-2787. J.W. WIGGINS GALLERY, Sequoyah National Research Center, 500 University Plaza: “Indian Ink: Native Printmakers in the J.S. Wiggins Collection of Native American Art,” curated by Bobby Martin, art professor at John Brown University, through Dec. 14. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.Fri. 569-8336. LAMAN LIBRARY, 2801 Orange St.: “Norman Rockwell’s Home for the Holidays,” exhibition from the Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge, Mass., through Dec. 9. 758-1720. M2GALLERY, 11525 Cantrell: “Lifelines,” photographs by Brian Fender, paintings by Kathy Bay, portion of proceeds from Fender sales go to ALS research. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tue.-Sat. 225-6257. PULASKI TECHNICAL COLLEGE, 3000 W. Scenic Drive: “It’s About Time,” work by Warren Criswell,” through Dec. 15, Bank of the Ozarks exhibition space, Ottenheimer Library. 812-2200. UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS AT LITTLE ROCK: “Faces of the Delta,” drawings by Aj Smith, through Nov. 16; “Photographing the Landscape,” work by Jay Gould, Frank Hamrick, Chad Smith and Luther Smith, through Nov. 29, lecture by Smith 6:30 p.m. Nov. 29; “BA and BFA Senior Exhibitions,” Gallery III, through midDecember. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri. 569-3182.

ONGOING MUSEUM EXHIBITS

CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL MUSEUM VISITOR CENTER, Bates and Park: “American Spring: A Cause For Justice,” quilts dealing with societal issues such as racism, civil rights, violence, discrimination, social justice and intolerance, in partnership with Fiber Artists for Hope and Sabrina Zarco, through Nov. (more at Hearne Fine Art); exhibits on the 1957 desegregation of Central and the civil rights movement. 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. daily. 374-1957. CLINTON PRESIDENTIAL CENTER, 1200 President Clinton Ave.: “Dorothy Howell Rodham and Virginia Clinton Kelley,” through Nov. 25; permanent exhibits about policies and White House life during the Clinton administration. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Sat., 1-5 p.m. Sun. $7 adults; $5 college students, seniors, retired military; $3 ages 6-17. 370-8000. More art listings can be found in the calendar at www.arktimes.com


BULLYING ADDRESSED, CONT.

said he said he didn’t want to be part of anything that’s an effort to tear down the LRSD. District Superintendent Morris Holmes was in attendance along with several members of his senior staff. Holmes told the crowd that the district has been developing a strategic response to the reports since the story appeared, and said he would “go to hell and back” to keep students from being abused. He said he has talked to teachers and administrators over the past month, asking them one by one “what did you know?” “You need to know that we have not taken this lightly,” Holmes said. “It hasn’t been a game of, ‘We didn’t like what they had in the paper.’ ” After speaking about his seven years as superintendent of the Fort Worth Independent School District, which has a large Latino population, Holmes said that the issue of bullying is an “issue of power.” “Do you not know that the majority almost always abuses the minority? It’s a social fact. It’s a political fact. It’s an economic fact. It is a sexual fact. It is a pervasive fact in our society, and I know it well.” Later in the meeting, there were a few tense moments when Holmes turned to Griffen and spoke of people “questioning his character” in their response to the reports, including an Oct. 18 letter Griffen and the congregation of New Millennium Church sent to Holmes and members of the Little Rock School Board. In the letter, the congregation wrote that they did not “view the responses of Dr. Holmes or the Little Rock School Board as an acceptable acknowledgement that serious problems surrounding the issues of bullying and sexual harassment exist. In fact, we are dismayed by the reaction this far which amounts, in our view, to quibbling about whether Dr. Trevino-Richard’s work for

BRIAN CHILSON

Continued from page 12

KNOWS THE FEELING: Griffen recalled his own experience with bullies.

the District constitutes a ‘study.’ ” Associate Superintendent Dr. Sadie Mitchell spoke about the district’s response so far, saying that she was “hurt to the core” after reading the story in the Times. “Hispanic parents have called us, angry, because something that happened in 2007 is now a priority,” she said. Mitchell said that the district has polled every school for information on their antibullying efforts and is evaluating their responses. The district has also formed an ad hoc committee to research the issues raised by Trevino-Richard’s study, and will soon launch a public awareness campaign on the issue of bullying. Mitchell said one of the problems the district has identified is that the LRSD doesn’t have a “refined curriculum” on dealing with reports of bullying. LRSD officials later volunteered the use of Chicot Elementary — one of the schools mentioned in Trevino-Richard’s research — as a site for the group’s next meeting, which Griffen said should happen in less than a month. Jorge Luna, who identified himself as

the owner of a Spanish-language radio station, rose to say that the group needed to do more to get the opinions of blue-collar Latinos with children in the district. “We see the doctors, teachers, principals [here today],” Luna said. “But what happened with the construction workers? What happened with the farm workers? What happened with the people working in the hotels? What happened to the people in the restaurants?” Local Latina attorney Cristina Monterrey told the group that in the Latino community, there is “a fear of coming forward,” which might be a reason bullying isn’t often reported to administrators by Latino students. “Everything starts when it’s reported,” Monterrey said. “A lot of these children, they come from a culture and they come from a background where there is this overwhelming fear of letting anyone know that something is being done to you.” Monterrey said that many Latino parents come from political systems where people are sometimes physically harmed for reporting wrongdoing. She asked the

LRSD to take that fear into account when coming up with a bullying curriculum. “There is a cultural barrier there,” she said. “There is a language barrier. And we have to reach out into that community to break down that perception.” Katherine Snyder, the principal of Booker T. Washington Elementary Magnet in Little Rock, told the group that she believes adult harassment and bullying are common today, and said children learn what they see from their parents. She said she’d been subjected to what she would consider bullying by a parent at her school within the past week. “I watch parents bully my teachers,” she said. “I watch parents bully their children, and I get bullied by parents. Many of my parents don’t know another way to communicate. I don’t necessarily think they’re bullies, but they do resort to harassment and intimidation because that’s the strategy they’ve found might work for them. I’m saying this because our children who bully are a symptom of a much larger problem.”

ROAD TEST, CONT. Continued from page 12 architects of StudioMain to plot out, with the help of neighborhood, business and city interests, a future vision for South Main. Several architectural balloons have been floated for the revitalization of the South Main neighborhood — or SOMA. The “PopUP” will “test the principles,” event organizer James Meyer said, of the Project Main Street design by Polk Stanley Wilcox architect Ed Sergeant that has gotten a good reception at City Hall. The plan calls for lane revisions from I-630 to 17th Street. To help set the life-size scene, “PopUp” organizers are temporarily detouring 40 trees en route to a landscaping project to

the three-block median. After a brief closure for set up, Main Street will reopen at noon Friday and 2nd Friday Art Night will be the PopUp kick-off, to coin a vigorous phrase, with the Cons of Formant providing music from 7-9 p.m. at the Bernice Garden at 14th and Main. There will also be food at the Oxford American at 13th and Main (a small sample of the menu at its future restaurant, South on Main, from Chef Matthew Bell; read more about Bell on page 56) and Midtown Billiards between 13th and 14th. Southern Gourmasian, Taqueria Alicia, Wishbone’s, Bryant’s BBQ and Catering and Philly’s to Go food trucks will fill the lot opposite the OA (formerly parking for Juanita’s). Goodwill will operate a store in a

vacant building on the east side of the intersection of 14th Street and Main and Etsy Little Rock will have vendors on the street. At deadline, the Dunbar Community Garden was considering joining the vendors. StudioMain, at 1423 Main St., will be the “home base” for the event, said Meyer, who is an associate at Witsell, Evans, Rasco architectural firm. On exhibit there will be the Arkansas chapter of the American Institute of Architects’ 2012 Arkansas Honors awards as well as information on the PopUp planning. North on Main, an installation of painted doors by University of Arkansas at Little Rock art students will be placed around the vacant United Systems build-

ing across from Community Bakery. The Oxford American and UALR students were planning an exhibit at the magazine’s office at press time. Saturday’s “PopUp” runs 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. with DJ King Julian providing music from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. The Central High Jazz Band is tentatively scheduled for Saturday afternoon. There will be canine as well as people traffic at a dog park on the grassy lot in back of the EZ Mart at 14th and Main (across Scott from the Villa Marre). The “PopUp” event runs 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday. Main will return to its regular four-lane configuration on Sunday; it will be closed at 10 a.m. for crews to restore the street. www.arktimes.com

NOVEMBER 7, 2012

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MOVIE LISTINGS SPECIAL

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Thursday, November 8 THE LOST BAYOU RAMBLERS! (South Louisiana)

Friday, November 9 Travis Linville (Norman, OK) w/ The Goodtime Ramblers

saTurday, November 10

The Sideshow Tragedy (Austin, TX)

Tuesday, November 13 The Dangerous Idiots w/ The P-47s

Check Out Additional Shows At

whitewatertavern.com 30

NOVEMBER 7, 2012

ARKANSAS TIMES

NOV. 9-10

Market Street Cinema times at or after 9 p.m. are for Friday and Saturday only. Rave showtimes are valid for Friday only. Chenal 9, Lakewood 8, Regal McCain Mall and Riverdale showtimes were not available by press deadline. Find up-to-date listings at arktimes.com. NEW MOVIES Easy Money (R) — Scandinavian crime thriller about the tangled connections between various underworld elements. Market Street: 1:45, 4:15, 6:45, 9:15. Skyfall (PG-13) — Latest Bond film is sure to be a blockbuster. Breckenridge: 12:30, 1:00, 3:30, 4:00, 7:00, 7:30, 10:00, 10:30. Chenal 9: 10:00 a.m., 1:10, 4:20, 7:30, 10:40 (IMAX), 10:30 a.m., 1:40, 4:50, 8:00. Rave: 10:15 a.m., 1:30, 4:45, 8:00, 11:15 (XTreme), 10:45 a.m., noon, 12:45, 3:15, 4:00, 6:30, 7:15, 8:30, 9:45, 10:30, 11:30. Stolen (R) — Nicolas Cage is a “master thief� whose daughter is kidnapped and something or other and blah blah. Market Street: 2:15, 4:30, 7:15, 9:00. RETURNING THIS WEEK Alex Cross (PG-13) — Pretty much “Tyler Perry’s ‘Death Wish’ meets ‘Seven.’ � Breckenridge: 1:30, 4:30, 7:25, 9:50. Rave: 11:25 a.m., 2:10, 4:55, 7:45, 10:25. Arbitrage (R) — Finance thriller in which Richard Gere must juggle his crumbling hedge fund, his mistress and a bloody crime. Market Street: 2:00, 7:15. Argo (R) — A group of Americans in revolutionary Iran make an improbable escape, based on actual events, from director Ben Affleck. Breckenridge: 1:15, 4:20, 7:20, 9:55. Chenal 9: 10:10 a.m., 1:10, 4:10, 7:10, 10:10. Rave: 10:25 a.m., 1:15, 4:25, 7:25, 10:20. Brave (PG) – Animated fantasy tale of a Celtic-type girl who must save her kingdom from something or other. Movies 10: 12:20, 2:40, 5:05, 7:25, 9:50. The Campaign (R) – In which Ricky Bobby goes to Washington with the weird-beard from the “Hangover� films. Movies 10: 12:35, 2:45, 4:55, 7:00, 9:55. Cloud Atlas (R) — Based on the sci-fi novel, with Tom Hanks and Halle Berry. Breckenridge: 12:40, 4:15, 7:50. Chenal 9: noon, 3:30, 7:00, 10:30. Rave: 11:35 a.m., 3:25, 7:10, 10:55. The Dark Knight Rises (PG-13) – Third gloomy Batman flick from director Christopher Nolan. Movies 10: 12:30, 4:00, 7:45. The Expendables 2 (R) — Sequel to the film in which a bunch of current and former action movie stars get together for tea and cake and explosions and cheekily self-referential jokes. Movies 10: 1:00, 4:15, 7:15, 10:15. Flight (R) — Denzel Washington is a pilot with a substance abuse problem, from director Robert Zemeckis. Breckenridge: 12:45, 3:45, 7:10, 10:10. Chenal 9: 10:15 a.m., 1:25, 4:25, 7:25, 10:25. Rave: 10:15 a.m., noon, 12:30, 1:20, 3:40, 4:35, 7:00, 7:55, 10:10, 11:10. Here Comes the Boom (PG) — “The Zookeeper� star Kevin James is a teacher in this one. Breckenridge: 4:10, 9:45. Rave: 12:10, 2:50, 5:55, 11:40. Hotel Transylvania 3D (PG) — Animated kids movie in which Dracula is an overprotective

BLOND BOND IS BACK: Daniel Craig is back as Agent 007 in “Skyfall,â€? the latest flick in the long-running James Bond franchise. father who hosts a big monster mash, starring the voice of Adam Sandler, of course. Breckenridge: 1:05, 3:40. Ice Age: Continental Drift (PG) – Latest iteration in the series about a crew of wacky animated animals. Movies 10: 12:05, 2:35, 4:50, 7:20, 9:40. The Man with The Iron Fists (R) — Martial arts action flick, directed by and starring RZA, from producer Quentin Tarantino. Breckenridge: 1:35 (open-captioned), 4:05, 7:35, 10:20. Rave: 10:20 a.m., 2:35, 5:05, 7:35, 8:35, 10:05, 11:05. The Master (R) — Paul Thomas Anderson’s latest masterwork about a Scientologytype cult, with Philip Seymour Hoffman, Amy Adams and Joaquin Phoenix. Market Street: 4:30, 9:15. The Odd Life of Timothy Green (PG) — Basically it’s Cabbage Patch Kids the Movie, but with just one Cabbage Patch Kid. Movies 10: 12:25, 2:50, 5:15, 7:40, 10:10. The Paperboy (R) — OK, so, Matthew McConaughey is an investigative reporter and John Cusack is a psychotic swampdweller and Nicole Kidman is a hot-butscary nympho? Huh. Market Street: 2:00, 4:15, 7:00, 9:00. Paranormal Activity 4 (R) — Part four of the “Paranormal Activityâ€? franchise finds this asdffzzzz ‌ Oops, fell asleep at the keyboard on account of powerful boredom. Breckenridge: 7:05, 9:25. Rave: 10:50 a.m., 1:35, 4:05, 6:35, 9:00. ParaNorman (PG) — Stop-motion animated film about a kid who talks to ghosts, from the studio that made “Coraline.â€? Movies 10: 12:15, 2:25, 4:35, 6:45, 8:55 (2D), 1:20, 3:30, 5:40, 7:50, 10:00 (3D). Pitch Perfect (PG-13) — Competitive groups of singers have singing competitions and so forth. Breckenridge: 1:20, 4:05, 7:35, 10:15. Chenal 9: 10:25 a.m., 1:25, 4:25, 7:25, 10:25. Rave: 11:50 a.m., 2:45. The Possession (PG-13) — A family must confront a terrifying something or other but more importantly, this stars Matisyahu. Yes, really. Movies 10: 12:10, 2:20, 4:45, 7:10, 9:35.

Restless Heart: St. Augustine (NR) — Religious movie. Market Street: 1:30, 4:05, 7:00, 9:20. Silent Hill: Revelation (R) — Just what in the Sam Hill are Ned Stark and Jon Snow doing in this cheesy-looking horror flick about Hell or something? Rave: 12:35, 3:20, 5:50, 8:20, 10:45 (3D). Sinister (R) — Bunch of terror happens to Ethan Hawke and his family. Breckenridge: 1:10, 7:15. Rave: 5:25, 8:05, 10:50. Taken 2 (PG-13) — Sequel to the kidnapping-based action film, with Liam Neeson. Breckenridge: 1:10, 3:50, 7:05, 9:40. Chenal 9: 10:20 a.m., 1:20, 4:20, 7:20, 10:20. Rave: 11:20 a.m., 1:50, 7:50, 10:15. Trouble with the Curve (PG-13) — Latest Clint Eastwood flick is probably OK, but not as good as the one where he yells at the chair. Movies 10: noon, 2:30, 5:00, 7:30, 10:05. Wreck-It Ralph 3D (PG) — Animated movie about a video game character. Breckenridge: 1:25, 7:40 (2D), 4:35, 10:05 (3D). Chenal 9:10:00 a.m., 10:30 a.m., 1:00, 1:30, 4:30, 6:55, 7:30, 10:30 (2D), 4:00, 10:00 (3D). Rave: 10:20 a.m., 11:00 a.m., 1:00, 1:45, 3:45, 4:30, 6:45, 7:30, 9:30, 10:15 (2D), 11:40 a.m., 12:20, 2:30, 3:00, 5:15, 5:45, 8:15, 11:00 (3D). Chenal 9 IMAX Theatre: 17825 Chenal Parkway, 821-2616, www.dtmovies.com. Cinemark Movies 10: 4188 E. McCain Blvd., 945-7400, www.cinemark.com. Cinematown Riverdale 10: Riverdale Shopping Center, 296-9955, www.riverdale10.com. Lakewood 8: 2939 Lakewood Village Drive, 758-5354, www.fandango.com. Market Street Cinema: 1521 Merrill Drive, 312-8900, www.marketstreetcinema.net. Rave Colonel Glenn 18: 18 Colonel Glenn Plaza, 687-0499, www.ravemotionpictures.com. Regal Breckenridge Village 12: 1-430 and Rodney Parham, 224-0990, www.fandango. com. Regal McCain Mall 12: 3929 McCain Blvd., 753-1380, www.regmovies.com.


MOVIE REVIEW

‘IRON FISTS’: RZA directs and stars.

RZA brings da ruckus But not much else in ‘Man with the Iron Fists.’ BY SAM EIFLING

F

ans of Quentin Tarantino may be crestfallen to learn that the “presented by” credit he receives in “The Man with the Iron Fists” isn’t backed up by any other real credit (say, director or producer or key grip). The hip-hop impresario and performer RZA (pronounced RIZZ-uh) stars, directing a screenplay he also wrote. You may remember RZA from such immortal New York supergroups as the horrorcore pioneers Gravediggaz and the inimitable Wu-Tang Clan, who routinely sampled old martial-arts flicks and honed a gangsta-fied kung-fu aesthetic into something approaching a true mystique. (Tiger style!) Even if Tarantino didn’t do much on “Fists,” you can see why he’d want to sign this throwback. In true Wu-Tang fashion, the more names the merrier. Perhaps the best thing about “Fists,” then, is that it exists at all, and that it appears as a fully realized vision of RZA’s ideal campy martial-arts flick. Is it a good movie? Nah. Will it make you laugh, cringe, gape and cheer? Yeah, probably. Inspired, you’ll run home and dust off “Wu-Tang: Shaolin Style” on oldschool PlayStation while cranking up your scratched-up “Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers)” CD. Along the way to this sublimity, you’ll have to overlook a couple of traditional sticking points for film snobs, namely, “quality acting” and “coherent story.” Russell Crowe naturally holds his own as an English dude named Jack Knife (note: he kills people with an awesome knife), but the second-best performer in the movie might just be Lucy Liu as the madam of a massive brothel called the Pink Blossom. Typically when Lucy Liu

is the second-best actor in a given movie, it’s time to worry. At least RZA is decent as a blacksmith who, due to some disarmingly unfortunate circumstances, reluctantly joins the fight to save his dumpy Chinese hamlet, Jungle Village. The main bad guy is played by Byron Mann channeling an evil Ziggy Stardust. Another hero is played by Rick Yune, looking exactly like the animated prince from “Mulan” in a crazy mechanical knife suit that lets him kill thugs by the bushel but which fails spectacularly against a metallic titan played by pro wrestling superstar Dave Bautista. Virtually every woman in the cast is a prostitute except for Liu, who of course is in charge of all the prostitutes. Here’s the storyline: A shipment of government gold is coming through the village. Rival gangs all want it. Some stuff happens. RZA’s girlfriend (Jamie Chung) is forget-your-name gorgeous. Orphan kids get into trouble. Mostly, people fight. For the R-rating, it doesn’t indulge in nudity. Seriously, it’s just fighting, with some dialogue to move us toward more fighting. But it looks and sounds fantastic. If there is high art contained in “Fists,” it’s in indulgent gore and magical combat scenes. You will see people killed in fashions most ridiculous, all crushings and stabbings and beheadings and poison dartings and dismemberments and whatnot, often set to tunes from the likes of Kanye West, the Black Keys and, yes, re-orchestrated versions of Wu-Tang classics. RZA has said the final result represented 85 percent of his vision. God help anyone who runs into that remaining 15 percent in a dark alley.

5815 KAVANAUGH BLVD LITTLE ROCK, AR 72207 (501) 664.0030 WWW.BOSWELLMOUROT.COM FINE ART FOR THE ESTABLISHED AND EMERGING COLLECTOR

ARKANSAS TIMES READERS ARE GIVERS.

OUR READERS CONTRIBUTED MORE THAN

TO CHARITIES AND NON-PROFIT ORGINIZATIONS LAST YEAR. SOURCE: THE MEDIA AUDIT, JAN. 2012

UALR Grads @ Work • Wright, Lindsey & Jennings • Aristotle • Nabholz Construction • Northwestern Mutual • LM Windpower • KARK • Baptist Health • Entergy • American Chemistry • FIS • Arkansas Department of Health • Molex • Stephens Inc. • Acxiom • UAMS • AT&T • Monterrey & Tellez Law Firm, P.L.L.C. • KTHV • Jones Productions • Clinton Presidential Library • eStem High School • Searcy Daily Citizen • BKD • Welspun • Arkansas Supreme Court • Caterpillar • VCC • Windstream • Lockheed-Martin • Delta Trust & Bank • Historic Arkansas Museum • St. Vincent Infirmary • Verizon • ESPN • Mitchell Williams • U.S. Marshals Museum • Arkansas Attorney General’s Office • Hewlett-Packard • U.S. Army • Arkansas Democrat-Gazette • Southwest Power Pool • Mosaic Templars Educational and Cultural Center • Little Rock School District • Raytheon • U.S. Bank • Walmart • The Communications Group • Arkansas Blue Cross and Blue Shield • Frazier, Hudson & Cisne • Arkansas Governor’s Office • Arkansas History Commission • Central Arkansas Library System • William Jefferson Clinton Birthplace National Historic Site • KATV • BAE Systems • Heifer International • Arkansas Department of Information Systems • Arvest Bank • Pulaski County Special School District • Schueck Steel • Friday, Eldredge and Clark • Clinton School of Public Service • North Little Rock Police Department • Arkansas Children’s Hospital • Arkansas Business • Arvest Mortgage • North Little Rock School District • Arkansas Department of Human Services • MacArthur Museum of Arkansas Military History • Arkansas State Police • Central High School • Arkansas Department of Workforce Services • Williams and Anderson • Little Rock Central High National Historic Site • Arkansas Times • KLRT • Arkansas Historic Preservation Program • State of Arkansas • Mainstream Technologies • Old State House Museum

Make a difference in your career. Apply Now! ualr.edu/success

UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS AT LITTLE ROCK

Crissy Monterrey, Attorney www.arktimes.com

NOVEMBER 7, 2012

31


We have 46 of the Best! 11 Lawyers of the Year & 35 Best Lawyers

Kevin A. Crass Litigation-Securities - Little Rock Michael S. Moore Labor Law-Management - Little Rock Elizabeth Robben Murray Employment Law-Individuals - Little Rock A. Wyckliff Nisbet, Jr. Employee Benefits (ERISA) Law - Little Rock

Top Row:  Elizabeth R. Murray, Kevin A. Crass, Robert S. Shafer, Michael S. Moore Bottom Row:  Frederick S. Ursery, J. Shepherd Russell III, A. Wyckliff Nisbet, Jr., Bruce B. Tidwell (Not Pictured:  Clifford W. Plunkett, James M. Simpson, William A. Waddell, Jr.)

Clifford W. Plunkett Bet-the-Company Litigation - Fayetteville J. Shepherd Russell III Project Finance Law - Little Rock Robert S. Shafer Appellate Practice - Little Rock James M. Simpson First Amendment Law - Little Rock Bruce B. Tidwell Health Care Law - Little Rock

Little Rock

Rogers

400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 (501) 376-2011

600 S. 52nd St., Suite 200 (479) 695-2011

Frederick S. Ursery Employment Law-Management - Little Rock

Fayetteville

William A. Waddell, Jr. Litigation-Banking & Finance - Little Rock

3425 North Futrall Dr., Suite 103 (479) 695-2011

FridayFirm.com


BEST LAWYERS 2013 IN ARKANSAS ©PHOTOS.COM, DANIEL WIEDEMANN

ARKANSAS TIMES is proud to publish the BEST LAWYERS® IN ARKANSAS list for 2013. Produced by the Best Lawyers® in America, the oldest lawyer-rating publication in the U.S., this list is the gold standard for accuracy and integrity. Listings are organized by specialty and broken down by city and are in alphabetical order.

2013 LAWYERS OF THE YEAR This designation reflects the high level of respect a lawyer has earned among other leading lawyers in the same communities and the same practice areas for their abilities, their professionalism and their integrity.

N. M. NORTON

THOMAS S. STREETMAN

WALTER E. MAY

J. BLAKE HENDRIX

STEPHEN N. JOINER

BRUCE B. TIDWELL

Administrative / Regulatory Law Wright, Lindsey & Jennings LLP 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR

Bankruptcy and Creditor Debtor Rights / Insolvency and Reorganization Law Streetman, Meeks & Gibson 302 Main Street P.O. Drawer A, Crossett, AR

Corporate Law Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard, P.L.L.C. 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR

Criminal Defense: White-Collar Fuqua Campbell, P.A. 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 400 Little Rock, AR

Energy Law Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, AR

Health Care Law Friday, Eldredge & Clark, LLP 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR

CLIFFORD W. PLUNKETT

JOHN C. EVERETT

Bet-the-Company Litigation Friday, Eldredge & Clark, LLP 3425 North Futrall Drive, Suite 103 Fayetteville, AR

Criminal Defense: Non-White-Collar Everett Wales & Comstock 1944 East Joyce Boulevard P.O. Box 8370 Fayetteville, AR

CONSTANCE G. CLARK Appellate Practice Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor, PLC 19 East Mountain Street P.O. Box 1688 Fayetteville, AR

ROBERT S. SHAFER Appellate Practice Friday, Eldredge & Clark, LLP 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR

STEVEN W. QUATTLEBAUM

JEFF ROSENZWEIG

Bet-the-Company Litigation Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow PLLC 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, AR

Criminal Defense: Non-White-Collar Jeff Rosenzweig 300 South Spring Street, Suite 310 Little Rock, AR

A. WYCKLIFF NISBET, JR.

JOHN F. PEISERICH

Employee Benefits (ERISA) Law Friday, Eldredge & Clark, LLP 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR

Environmental Law Perkins & Trotter PLLC 101 Morgan Keegan Drive, Suite A Little Rock, AR

ELIZABETH ROBBEN MURRAY

CARROL ANN HICKS

Employment Law - Individuals Friday, Eldredge & Clark, LLP 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR

Family Law Hicks & Associates 5321 John F. Kennedy Boulevard, Suite A North Little Rock, AR

WILLIAM H. L. WOODYARD III Insurance Law Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard, P.L.L.C. 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR

MICHAEL S. MOORE Labor Law - Management Friday, Eldredge & Clark, LLP 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR

GARLAND J. GARRETT

JACK EAST III

EDDIE N. CHRISTIAN, SR.

FREDERICK S. URSERY

JAMES M. SIMPSON

JOHN L. BURNETT

Banking and Finance Law Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, AR

Construction Law Jack East III 2725 Cantrell Road, Suite 202 Little Rock, AR

Criminal Defense: White-Collar Christian, Byars and Hickey 502 Garrison Ave. P.O. Box 1725 Fort Smith, AR

Employment Law - Management Friday, Eldredge & Clark, LLP 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR

First Amendment Law Friday, Eldredge & Clark, LLP 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR

Labor Law - Union Lavey and Burnett 904 West Second Street Little Rock, AR

ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES

NOVEMBER 7, 2012

33


BEST LAWYERS OF THE YEAR CRAIG S. LAIR

SPENCER F. ROBINSON

MARIAM T. HOPKINS

ROBERT L. HENRY III

ROBERT M. CEARLEY, JR.

DANIEL L. HEARD

Litigation & Controversy - Tax Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, AR

Litigation - Labor & Employment Ramsay, Bridgforth, Robinson and Raley, LLP Simmons Banking Building, 11th Floor 501 Main Street P.O. Box 8509 Pine Bluff, AR

Medical Malpractice Law - Defendants Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins, L.L.P. 400 West Capital Ave., Suite 2400 Little Rock, AR

Personal Injury Litigation - Defendants Barber, McCaskill, Jones & Hale, P.A. 400 West Capitol 2700 Regions Center Little Rock, AR

Product Liability Litigation - Plaintiffs Cearley Law Firm, P.A. Centre Place, Second Floor 212 Center Street Little Rock, AR

Securities Regulation Kutak Rock LLP 124 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR

WILLIAM A. WADDELL, JR. Litigation - Banking & Finance Friday, Eldredge & Clark, LLP 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR

JOHN KEELING BAKER Litigation - Real Estate Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard, P.L.L.C. 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR

JAMES F. DOWDEN Litigation - Bankruptcy James F. Dowden, P.A. 212 Center Street, 10th Floor Little Rock, AR

KEVIN A. CRASS

JOHN DEWEY WATSON Litigation - Construction ADR, Inc. 1501 North University Ave., Suite 420 Little Rock, AR

Litigation - Securities Friday, Eldredge & Clark, LLP 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR

RICHARD F. HATFIELD Litigation - Trusts & Estates Hatfield & Sayre PA 401 West Capitol Ave., Suite 502 Little Rock, AR

SAMUEL E. LEDBETTER Litigation - Environmental McMath Woods, P.A. 711 West Third Street Little Rock, AR

LYN P. PRUITT

PHILIP E. KAPLAN Litigation - First Amendment Williams & Anderson PLC Stephens Bldg, 22nd Floor 111 Center St. Little Rock, AR

MARSHALL S. NEY Litigation - Labor & Employment Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard, P.L.L.C. 5414 Pinnacle Point Drive, Suite 500 Rogers, AR

C. DOUGLAS BUFORD, JR.

G. ALAN WOOTEN

Mergers & Acquisitions Law Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard, P.L.L.C. 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR

Personal Injury Litigation - Defendants Conner & Winters, LLP 4375 North Vantage Drive Suite 405 Fayetteville, AR

JOHN WILLIAM SPIVEY III

Personal Injury Litigation - Plaintiffs The Boswell Law Firm 408 North Reynolds Road P.O. Box 798 Bryant, AR

Municipal Law Wright, Lindsey & Jennings LLP 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR

W. WILSON JONES Non-Profit / Charities Law Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, AR

BILL W. BRISTOW Personal Injury Litigation - Defendants Bristow & Richardson 216 East Washington Ave. Jonesboro, AR

TED BOSWELL

BOBBY R. MCDANIEL Personal Injury Litigation - Plaintiffs McDaniel & Wells, P.A. 400 South Main Street Jonesboro, AR

RICHARD N. WATTS Product Liability Litigation - Defendants Watts, Donovan & Tilley, P.A. Arkansas Capital Commerce Center, Suite 200 200 River Market Ave. Little Rock, AR

Mass Tort Litigation / Class Actions Defendants Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard, P.L.L.C. 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR

DAVID M. POWELL Professional Malpractice Law Defendants Williams & Anderson PLC Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, AR

J. SHEPHERD RUSSELL III Project Finance Law Friday, Eldredge & Clark, LLP 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR

JAMES A. BUTTRY Public Finance Law Friday, Eldredge & Clark, LLP 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR

HAROLD W. HAMLIN Real Estate Law Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard, P.L.L.C. 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR

H. WATT GREGORY III

WALKER DALE GARRETT

Securities / Capital Markets Law Kutak Rock LLP 124 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR

Medical Malpractice Law - Defendants ts Bassett Law Firm LLP 221 North College Ave. P.O. Box 3618 Fayetteville, AR

JOSEPH HICKEY Tax Law Thomas, Hickey & Shepherd, L.L.P. 423 North Washington Ave. El Dorado, AR

KATHRYN BENNETT PERKINS Trademark Law Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, AR

WILLIAM JACKSON BUTT II Trusts and Estates Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor, PLC 19 East Mountain Street P.O. Box 1688 Fayetteville, AR

WILLIAM DIXON HAUGHT Trusts and Estates Haught & Wade, LLP 111 Center Street, Suite 1320 Little Rock, AR

JOHN D. DAVIS Workers’ Compensation Law Employers Wright, Lindsey & Jennings LLP 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR

BEST LAWYERS IN ARKANSAS These Arkansas lawyers have been excerpted from The Best Lawyers in America 2013 which includes listings for more than 50,000 lawyers in 129 specialties, in all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

ADMINISTRATIVE / REGULATORY LAW

WILLIAM H. L. WOODYARD III Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

ALLAN W. HORNE Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor 425 West Capitol Ave. Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-375-9151

CHARLES L. SCHLUMBERGER

FRANK B. NEWELL Laser Law Firm 101 South Spring Street, Suite 300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-2488 501-376-2981

FREDERICK K. CAMPBELL Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

DOAK FOSTER Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

T. ARK MONROE III Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

JEFFREY THOMAS Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800 34

NOVEMBER 7, 2012

Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, AR, 72201-4420 501-379-1700

JOHN D. DAVIS Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3699 501-371-0808

LEE J. MULDROW Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3699 501-371-0808

N. M. NORTON Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3699 501-371-0808

ADMIRALTY & MARITIME LAW

ANTITRUST LAW ROBERT SHULTS Shults, Brown & Perkins 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1600 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3637 501-375-2301

PHILIP S. ANDERSON Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-0800

PETER G. KUMPE Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-0800

APPELLATE PRACTICE CONSTANCE G. CLARK Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor 19 East Mountain Street P.O. Box 1688 Fayetteville, AR, 72702-1688 479-521-7600

R. CHRISTOPHER LAWSON Friday, Eldredge & Clark 3425 North Futrall Drive, Suite 103 Fayetteville, AR, 72703-6252 479-695-2011

REX M. TERRY

G. SPENCE FRICKE

Hardin, Jesson & Terry 5000 Rogers Ave., Suite 500 P.O. Box 10127 Fort Smith, AR, 72917-0127 479-452-2200

Barber, McCaskill, Jones & Hale 400 West Capitol 2700 Regions Center Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-6175

ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES

ROBERT S. SHAFER

STACI CARSON

BRETT D. WATSON

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Watts, Donovan & Tilley Arkansas Capital Commerce Center, Suite 200 200 River Market Ave. Little Rock, AR, 72201-1769 501-372-1406

Brett D. Watson, Attorney at Law PO Box 707 Searcy, AR,72145 501-388-0864

FRANK B. NEWELL Laser Law Firm 101 South Spring Street, Suite 300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-2488 501-376-2981

ROGER D. ROWE Lax, Vaughan, Fortson, McKenzie & Rowe Cantrell West Building, Suite 201 11300 Cantrell Road Little Rock, AR, 72212 501-376-6565

JULIE GREATHOUSE Perkins & Trotter 101 Morgan Keegan Drive, Suite A Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-603-9000

E. B. CHILES IV Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, AR, 72201-4420 501-379-1700

PATRICK J. GOSS Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, AR, 72201-2893 501-375-9131

PHILIP S. ANDERSON Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-0800

JESS L. ASKEW III Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-0800

PHILIP E. KAPLAN Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-0800

TROY A. PRICE Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3699 501-371-0808

ARBITRATION ROBERT E. HORNBERGER ADR, Inc. 404 North Seventh Street P.O. Box 8064 Fort Smith, AR, 72902 479-783-1776

SIDNEY H. MCCOLLUM ADR, Inc. 1501 North University Ave., Suite 420 Little Rock, AR, 72207 501-376-2121

BANKING AND FINANCE LAW TODD P. LEWIS Conner & Winters 4375 North Vantage Drive Suite 405 Fayetteville, AR, 72703 479-582-5711

LEIGH ANNE YEARGAN

RALPH W. WADDELL

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 5414 Pinnacle Point Drive, Suite 500 Rogers, AR, 72758-8131 479-464-5650

Barrett & Deacon 300 South Church Street, Third Floor P.O. Box 1700 Jonesboro, AR, 72403 870-931-1700


GARLAND W. BINNS, JR.

STAN D. SMITH

DAVID SOLOMON

Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor 425 West Capitol Ave. Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-375-9151

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

David Solomon 427 Cherry Street P.O. Box 490 Helena, AR, 72342-3301 870-338-7427

RANDAL B. FRAZIER

GEOFFREY B. TREECE

H. WILLIAM ALLEN

Kutak Rock 124 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3706 501-975-3000

Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, AR, 72201-4420 501-379-1700

Allen Law Firm 212 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201-2416 501-374-7100

PATRICK A. BURROW

CHARLES W. BAKER

JIM L. JULIAN

Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, AR, 72201-4420 501-379-1700

Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, AR, 72201-2893 501-375-9131

Chisenhall, Nestrud & Julian 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2840 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-5800

JEB H. JOYCE

CHARLES T. COLEMAN

KEVIN A. CRASS

Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, AR, 72201-4420 501-379-1700

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

DAVID B. VANDERGRIFF

JUDY SIMMONS HENRY

WILLIAM MELL GRIFFIN III

Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, AR, 72201-4420 501-379-1700

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

GARLAND J. GARRETT

DAVID A. GRACE

CHRISTOPHER J. HELLER

Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, AR, 72201-2893 501-375-9131

Hardin & Grace 500 Main Street, Suite A P.O. Box 5851 North Little Rock, AR, 72119 501-378-7900

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

KEVIN P. KEECH

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

JOHN KOOISTRA III Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-0800

DAVID F. MENZ Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-0800

BANKRUPTCY AND CREDITOR DEBTOR RIGHTS / INSOLVENCY AND REORGANIZATION LAW THOMAS S. STREETMAN Streetman, Meeks & Gibson 302 Main Street P.O. Drawer A Crossett, AR, 71635 870-364-2213

JASON N. BRAMLETT Friday, Eldredge & Clark 3425 North Futrall Drive, Suite 103 Fayetteville, AR, 72703-6252 479-695-2011

JILL R. JACOWAY Jacoway Law Firm 223 Southeast Ave. Fayetteville, AR, 72701 479-521-2621

RICHARD L. RAMSAY Eichenbaum, Liles & Heister 124 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1900 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3717 501-376-4531

Keech Law Firm 4800 West Commercial Drive North Little Rock, AR, 72116 501-221-3200

JOHN TERRY LEE John Terry Lee 106 South Broadway Street Siloam Springs, AR, 72761 479-524-3693

BETďšşTHEďšşCOMPANY LITIGATION H. DAVID BLAIR Blair & Stroud 500 East Main Street, Suite 201 P.O. Box 2135 Batesville, AR, 72501 870-793-8350

DENNIS L. SHACKLEFORD Shackleford, Phillips & Ratcliff 100 East Church Street P.O. Box 1718 El Dorado, AR, 71731-1718 870-862-5523

FLOYD M. THOMAS, JR. Thomas, Hickey & Shepherd 423 North Washington Ave. El Dorado, AR, 71730-5615 870-862-3478

ROBERT L. JONES III Conner & Winters 4375 North Vantage Drive Suite 405 Fayetteville, AR, 72703 479-582-5711

SIDNEY P. DAVIS, JR. HARRY A. LIGHT Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor 19 East Mountain Street P.O. Box 1688 Fayetteville, AR, 72702-1688 479-521-7600

JAMES F. DOWDEN

JOHN C. EVERETT

James F. Dowden 212 Center Street, 10th Floor Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-324-4700

Everett Wales & Comstock 1944 East Joyce Boulevard P.O. Box 8370 Fayetteville, AR, 72703-8370 479-443-0292

Bud Whetstone is Being Recognized as One of the Best Lawyers in Arkansas

ELIZABETH ROBBEN MURRAY

WILLIAM A. WADDELL, JR. Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

D. MICHAEL HUCKABAY, SR. Huckabay Law Firm Metropolitan Tower, Suite 1575 425 West Capitol Ave. Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-375-5600

ROGER D. ROWE Lax, Vaughan, Fortson, McKenzie & Rowe Cantrell West Building, Suite 201 11300 Cantrell Road Little Rock, AR, 72212 501-376-6565

M. SAMUEL JONES III Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

BEVERLY A. ROWLETT Munson, Rowlett, Moore & Boone 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1900 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-374-6535

E. B. CHILES IV Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, AR, 72201-4420 501-379-1700

STEVEN W. QUATTLEBAUM

In an instant their world has been torn apart‌ we help them put it back together.

AWARDS WON INCLUDE: t5JNFTi#FTU-BXZFSTwoArkansas Times t%JTUJOHVJTIFE$JUJ[FO"XBSEoCommunity Service Awards t'#*$PNNVOJUZ-FBEFSTIJQ"XBSE ti0OF0G"NFSJDBT1SFNJFS-BXZFSTwoFortune Magazine t-JTUFE*O#FTU-BXZFST*O"NFSJDB1FSTPOBM*OKVSZ-JUJHBUJPO 1MBJOUJòT1SPEVDU-JBCJMJUZ-JUJHBUJPO1MBJOUJòT t.JE4PVUI4VQFS-BXZFS ti0OF0G5IF#FTU5SJBM-BXZFST*O"SLBOTBTwoArkansas Democrat-Gazette

Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, AR, 72201-4420 501-379-1700

ti0VUTUBOEJOH-BXZFS"OE)VNBOJUBSJBOwoArkansas Bar Association

CHARLES L. SCHLUMBERGER

ti0VUTUBOEJOH5SJBM-BXZFSwoTrial Lawyers Association

Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, AR, 72201-4420 501-379-1700

LANCE R. MILLER Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

CLIFFORD W. PLUNKETT

MICHAEL N. SHANNON

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 3425 North Futrall Drive, Suite 103 Fayetteville, AR, 72703-6252 479-695-2011

Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, AR, 72201-4420 501-379-1700

t-JUUMF3PDLtXIFUTUPOFBOEPEVNDPN ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES

NOVEMBER 7, 2012

35


JOHN E. TULL III Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, AR, 72201-4420 501-379-1700

RICHARD T. DONOVAN

ARKANSAS ASSOCIATION OF WOMEN LAWYERS hosts its

Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, AR, 72201-2893 501-375-9131

PATRICK J. GOSS

ANNUAL HOLIDAY BRUNCH & AUCTION

Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, AR, 72201-2893 501-375-9131

Saturday, December 8, 2012 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Trapnall Hall 423 E. Capitol ʀ Downtown Little Rock ʀ $25

STEVEN T. SHULTS Shults, Brown & Perkins 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1600 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3637 501-375-2301

THANK YOU TO OUR SHINING STAR SPONSORS

TIMOTHY O. DUDLEY Timothy O. Dudley 114 South Pulaski Street Little Rock, AR, 72201-1924 501-372-0080

PHILIP S. ANDERSON

QUATTLEBAUM, GROOMS, TULL & BURROW PLLC

All proceeds benefit the AAWL Scholarship Fund For more information about auction items or to make a reservation visit www.arwomenlawyers.org

Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-0800

JESS L. ASKEW III Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-0800

Special thanks to our Media Sponsor

PHILIP E. KAPLAN

ARKANSAS’S SOURCE FOR NEWS, POLITICS AND ENTERTAINMENT

Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-0800

The All New 2013 Honda Accords

CIVIL RIGHTS LAW DAVID M. FUQUA Fuqua Campbell 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 400 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-374-0200

AUSTIN PORTER, JR. Porter Law Firm Tower Building, Suite 1300 323 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-244-8200

PHILIP E. KAPLAN Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-0800

COMMERCIAL LITIGATION H. DAVID BLAIR Blair & Stroud 500 East Main Street, Suite 201 P.O. Box 2135 Batesville, AR, 72501 870-793-8350

BRIAN H. RATCLIFF Shackleford, Phillips & Ratcliff 100 East Church Street P.O. Box 1718 El Dorado, AR, 71731-1718 870-862-5523

DENNIS L. SHACKLEFORD Shackleford, Phillips & Ratcliff 100 East Church Street P.O. Box 1718 El Dorado, AR, 71731-1718 870-862-5523

FLOYD M. THOMAS, JR. Thomas, Hickey & Shepherd 423 North Washington Ave. El Dorado, AR, 71730-5615 870-862-3478

WOODSON BASSETT PETER G. KUMPE Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-0800

Bassett Law Firm 221 North College Ave. P.O. Box 3618 Fayetteville, AR, 72702-3618 479-521-9996

JOHN R. ELROD DAVID M. POWELL Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-0800

Conner & Winters 4375 North Vantage Drive Suite 405 Fayetteville, AR, 72703 479-582-5711

ROBERT L. JONES III TERESA M. WINELAND Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-0800

D. NATHAN COULTER Wilson, Engstrom, Corum & Coulter 200 South Commerce, Suite 600 P.O. Box 71 Little Rock, AR, 72203 501-375-6453

JOHN G. LILE Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3699 501-371-0808

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Visit our New Location 10 Colonel Glenn Court · Little Rock Across from Rave Theatre

ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Conner & Winters 4375 North Vantage Drive Suite 405 Fayetteville, AR, 72703 479-582-5711

TODD P. LEWIS Conner & Winters 4375 North Vantage Drive Suite 405 Fayetteville, AR, 72703 479-582-5711

JASON WALES Everett Wales & Comstock 1944 East Joyce Boulevard P.O. Box 8370 Fayetteville, AR, 72703-8370 479-443-0292

CLIFFORD W. PLUNKETT Friday, Eldredge & Clark 3425 North Futrall Drive, Suite 103 Fayetteville, AR, 72703-6252 479-695-2011

DON A. SMITH Smith Cohen Horan 1206 Garrison Ave., Suite 200 P.O. Box 10205 Fort Smith, AR, 72917 479-782-1001

DAVID SOLOMON David Solomon 427 Cherry Street P.O. Box 490 Helena, AR, 72342-3301 870-338-7427

JOSEPH BARRETT DEACON Barrett & Deacon 300 South Church Street, Third Floor P.O. Box 1700 Jonesboro, AR, 72403 870-931-1700

H. WILLIAM ALLEN Allen Law Firm 212 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201-2416 501-374-7100

JASON J. CAMPBELL Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins 400 West Capital Ave., Suite 2400 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-1887

JIM L. JULIAN Chisenhall, Nestrud & Julian 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2840 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-5800

KEVIN A. CRASS Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

WILLIAM MELL GRIFFIN III Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

CHRISTOPHER J. HELLER Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

JEFFREY H. MOORE Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

ELIZABETH ROBBEN MURRAY Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

CONSTANCE G. CLARK Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor 19 East Mountain Street P.O. Box 1688 Fayetteville, AR, 72702-1688 479-521-7600

SIDNEY P. DAVIS, JR. Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor 19 East Mountain Street P.O. Box 1688 Fayetteville, AR, 72702-1688 479-521-7600

WILLIAM A. WADDELL, JR. Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

DAVID D. WILSON Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

STEPHEN A. MATTHEWS

JOHN C. EVERETT

D. MICHAEL HUCKABAY, SR.

Bridges Law Firm 315 East Eighth Ave. P.O. Box 7808 Pine Bluff, AR, 71611 870-534-5532

Everett Wales & Comstock 1944 East Joyce Boulevard P.O. Box 8370 Fayetteville, AR, 72703-8370 479-443-0292

Huckabay Law Firm Metropolitan Tower, Suite 1575 425 West Capitol Ave. Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-375-5600


Congratulations to

JOHN COULTER For Being Selected By His Peers As One Of The Best Lawyers In Arkansas Employment Law – Individuals Employment Law – Management Litigation – Labor & Employment

JAMES CARTER COULTER

Justice for our clients. Awards from our peers. We like what we do. At Cearley Law Firm, we seek justice for our clients. And because we have been successful, we have been named one of the best lawyers in Arkansas every year since 1998. We enjoy being part of the legal system, and we’ve got the plaques on our walls and the smiles of our clients to prove it.

P.L.C.

Attorneys at Law

Cearley Law Firm

tXXXKBNFTDBSUFSDPVMUFSMBXDPN #SPBEXBZt4VJUFt"SWFTU#BOL#VJMEJOHt-JUUMF3PDL

Bob Cearley, Attorney 212 Center Street • Little Rock • 372-5600 (Toll Free) 1-877-934-5600 • www.CearleyLawFirm.com

We congratulate our partners LARRY CHISENHALL CHUCK NESTRUD* JIM JULIAN** DENISE HOGGARD

on their recognition by their peers as Best Lawyers’ in Arkansas

REGIONS CENTER, 400 WEST CAPITOL AVENUE, SUITE 2840 LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS 72201   s777#.*,!7#/*Fellow of the American College of Environmental Lawyers **Fellow of the American College of Trial Lawyers ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES

NOVEMBER 7, 2012

37


ROGER D. ROWE

TOM HARDIN

JOHN G. LILE

Lax, Vaughan, Fortson, McKenzie & Rowe Cantrell West Building, Suite 201 11300 Cantrell Road Little Rock, AR, 72212 501-376-6565

Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, AR, 72201-2893 501-375-9131

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3699 501-371-0808

JOHN KEELING BAKER Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

R. T. BEARD III Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

M. SAMUEL JONES III Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Congratulations to our partner

BRUCE E. MUNSON Munson, Rowlett, Moore & Boone 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1900 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-374-6535

,ÂœLiĂ€ĂŒĂŠ°Ê/Â…ÂœÂ“ÂŤĂƒÂœÂ˜ĂŠÂœÂ˜ĂŠÂ…ÂˆĂƒĂŠĂ€iVÂœ}Â˜ÂˆĂŒÂˆÂœÂ˜ĂŠ>ĂƒĂŠÂœÂ˜iĂŠÂœvĂŠ ĂŒÂ…iĂŠ iĂƒĂŒĂŠ>ĂœĂžiĂ€��ƒĂŠÂˆÂ˜ĂŠÀŽ>Â˜Ăƒ>ĂƒĂŠvÂœĂ€ĂŠ œ““iĂ€Vˆ>Â?ĂŠÂˆĂŒÂˆ}>ĂŒÂˆÂœÂ˜

BEVERLY A. ROWLETT Munson, Rowlett, Moore & Boone 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1900 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-374-6535

­nÇäŽÊÓΙ‡™xnÂŁĂŠUĂŠĂŠĂœĂœĂœÂ°ÂŤ>Ă€>}ÂœĂ•Â?`Â?>ĂœĂžiÀ°Vœ“

LINKING LAWYERS AND CLIENTS WORLDWIDE

BASSETT LAW FIRM

Proudly Congratulates Our Friends and Partners

B E S T L AW Y ER S I N A R K A N S A S

LINKING LAWYERS AND CLIENTS WORLDWIDE

221 N. College Avenue Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702 (479) 521-9996 www.bassettlawďŹ rm.com

i am honored to be recognized. thank you.

NOVEMBER 7, 2012

ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES

DAVID M. DONOVAN Watts, Donovan & Tilley Arkansas Capital Commerce Center, Suite 200 200 River Market Ave. Little Rock, AR, 72201-1769 501-372-1406

RICHARD N. WATTS Watts, Donovan & Tilley Arkansas Capital Commerce Center, Suite 200 200 River Market Ave. Little Rock, AR, 72201-1769 501-372-1406

STEPHEN A. MATTHEWS Bridges Law Firm 315 East Eighth Ave. P.O. Box 7808 Pine Bluff, AR, 71611 870-534-5532

JAMES G. LINGLE Lingle Law Firm 110 South Dixieland Road Rogers, AR, 72758 479-636-7899

MARSHALL S. NEY Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 5414 Pinnacle Point Drive, Suite 500 Rogers, AR, 72758-8131 479-464-5650

Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, AR, 72201-4420 501-379-1700

JOSEPH R. FALASCO

JESS L. ASKEW III

Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, AR, 72201-4420 501-379-1700

Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-0800

Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, AR, 72201-4420 501-379-1700

Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, AR, 72201-4420 501-379-1700

CHARLES L. SCHLUMBERGER Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, AR, 72201-4420 501-379-1700

MICHAEL N. SHANNON Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, AR, 72201-4420 501-379-1700

JOHN E. TULL III Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, AR, 72201-4420 501-379-1700

RICHARD T. DONOVAN

GARLAND J. GARRETT

38

TIMOTHY O. DUDLEY Timothy O. Dudley 114 South Pulaski Street Little Rock, AR, 72201-1924 501-372-0080

BRETT D. WATSON

Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, AR, 72201-2893 501-375-9131

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ROBERT F. THOMPSON Branch, Thompson, Warmath, & Dale 414 West Court Street Paragould, AR, 72450 870-239-9581

Brett D. Watson, Attorney at Law PO Box 707 Searcy, AR, 72145 501-388-0864

STEVEN W. QUATTLEBAUM

WOODY BASSETT, DALE GARRETT & CURT NEBBEN

STEVEN T. SHULTS Shults, Brown & Perkins 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1600 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3637 501-375-2301

PHILIP S. ANDERSON

CHAD PEKRON LLP

GORDON S. RATHER, JR. Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-0800

E. B. CHILES IV

414 West Court Street, Paragould, Arkansas 72450

DEBRA BROWN Shults, Brown & Perkins 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1600 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3637 501-375-2301

PHILIP E. KAPLAN Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-0800

PETER G. KUMPE Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-0800

DAVID M. POWELL Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-0800

TERESA M. WINELAND Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-0800

GARY D. CORUM Wilson, Engstrom, Corum & Coulter 200 South Commerce, Suite 600 P.O. Box 71 Little Rock, AR, 72203 501-375-6453

BRANDON B. CATE Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 4100 Corporate Center Drive, Suite 310 Springdale, AR, 72762 479-444-5200

DOUGLAS O. SMITH, JR. Douglas O. Smith 13 Berry Hill Fort Smith, AR, 72903 479-783-3135

CONSTRUCTION LAW JOHN M. SCOTT Conner & Winters 4375 North Vantage Drive Suite 405 Fayetteville, AR, 72703 479-582-5711

CYRIL HOLLINGSWORTH Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor 425 West Capitol Ave. Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-375-9151

JEFFREY H. MOORE Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

JACK EAST III Jack East III 2725 Cantrell Road, Suite 202 Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-372-3278

DAVID M. POWELL D. NATHAN COULTER

Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, AR, 72201-2893 501-375-9131

Wilson, Engstrom, Corum & Coulter 200 South Commerce, Suite 600 P.O. Box 71 Little Rock, AR, 72203 501-375-6453

PATRICK J. GOSS

STEPHEN R. LANCASTER

Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, AR, 72201-2893 501-375-9131

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-0800

DAVID A. GRACE Hardin & Grace 500 Main Street, Suite A P.O. Box 5851 North Little Rock, AR, 72119 501-378-7900


COPYRIGHT LAW HERMANN IVESTER Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

HAROLD J. EVANS Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-0800

J. CHARLES DOUGHERTY Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3699 501-371-0808

CORPORATE GOVERNANCE LAW H. WATT GREGORY III Kutak Rock 124 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3706 501-975-3000

CORPORATE LAW GREG SCHARLAU Conner & Winters 4375 North Vantage Drive Suite 405 Fayetteville, AR, 72703 479-582-5711

RALPH W. WADDELL Barrett & Deacon 300 South Church Street, Third Floor P.O. Box 1700 Jonesboro, AR,72403 870-931-1700

GARLAND W. BINNS, JR. Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor 425 West Capitol Ave. Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-375-9151

DONALD T. JACK, JR.

WARNER H. TAYLOR

JOHN C. EVERETT

Jack, Nelson & Jones One Cantrell Center, Suite 500 2800 Cantrell Road Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-375-1122

Taylor Law Partners 303 East Millsap Road P.O. Box 8310 Fayetteville, AR, 72703 479-443-5222

Everett Wales & Comstock 1944 East Joyce Boulevard P.O. Box 8370 Fayetteville, AR, 72703-8370 479-443-0292

H. WATT GREGORY III

EDDIE N. CHRISTIAN, SR.

Kutak Rock 124 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3706 501-975-3000

Christian, Byars and Hickey 502 Garrison Ave. P.O. Box 1725 Fort Smith, AR, 72902-1725 479-782-9147

C. DOUGLAS BUFORD, JR. Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

BILL W. BRISTOW

BOBBY R. MCDANIEL McDaniel & Wells 400 South Main Street Jonesboro, AR, 72401 870-932-5950

T. ARK MONROE III

JOHN S. SELIG

JEFF ROSENZWEIG

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Jeff Rosenzweig Law Firm 300 South Spring Street, Suite 310 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-859-0328

ROBERT SHULTS

JOHN WESLEY HALL, JR.

Shults, Brown & Perkins 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1600 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3637 501-375-2301

John Wesley Hall Law Firm 1202 Main Street, Suite 210 Little Rock, AR, 72202-5057 501-859-0013

PHILIP S. ANDERSON Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-0800

JACK T. LASSITER Lassiter & Couch 813 West Third Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-370-9300

D. NICOLE LOVELL

TIMOTHY M. BUCKLEY Buckley, McLemore & Hudson 123 North Block Ave. Fayetteville, AR, 72701 866-722-7694

JOHN C. EVERETT Everett Wales & Comstock 1944 East Joyce Boulevard P.O. Box 8370 Fayetteville, AR, 72703-8370 479-443-0292

RALPH BLAGG The Blagg Law Firm 286 Court Street P.O. Box 1169 Clinton, AR, 72031 501-745-4302

CHRISTINA D. COMSTOCK Everett Wales & Comstock 1944 East Joyce Boulevard P.O. Box 8370 Fayetteville, AR, 72703-8370 479-443-0292

DAVID H. WILLIAMS The Law Office of David H. Williams 212 Center Street Suite 200 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-0038

EDUCATION LAW CHRISTOPHER J. HELLER Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

DAN F. BUFFORD Laser Law Firm 101 South Spring Street, Suite 300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-2488 501-376-2981

CLAYTON R. BLACKSTOCK

JEFF ROSENZWEIG

Mitchell, Blackstock, Barnes, Ivers & Sneddon 1010 West Third Street P.O. Box 1510 Little Rock, AR, 72203-1510 501-378-7870

Jeff Rosenzweig Law Firm 300 South Spring Street, Suite 310 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-859-0328

EMPLOYEE BENEFITS ERISA LAW

JACK T. LASSITER

FLOYD M. THOMAS, JR.

Buckley, McLemore & Hudson 123 North Block Ave. Fayetteville, AR, 72701 866-722-7694

J. BLAKE HENDRIX Fuqua Campbell 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 400 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-374-0200

Lassiter & Couch 813 West Third Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-370-9300

CRIMINAL DEFENSE: WHITECOLLAR

TIMOTHY M. BUCKLEY

McDaniel & Wells 400 South Main Street Jonesboro, AR, 72401 870-932-5950

John Wesley Hall Law Firm 1202 Main Street, Suite 210 Little Rock, AR, 72202-5057 501-859-0013

Timothy O. Dudley 114 South Pulaski Street Little Rock, AR, 72201-1924 501-372-0080

Thomas, Hickey & Shepherd 423 North Washington Ave. El Dorado, AR, 71730-5615 870-862-3478

BOBBY R. MCDANIEL

JOHN WESLEY HALL, JR.

TIMOTHY O. DUDLEY

CRIMINAL DEFENSE: NON WHITECOLLAR

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Bristow & Richardson 216 East Washington Ave. Jonesboro, AR, 72401-3102 870-935-9000

Fuqua Campbell 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 400 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-374-0200

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

PRICE C. GARDNER

BILL W. BRISTOW

J. BLAKE HENDRIX

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

PAUL B. BENHAM III

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Christian, Byars and Hickey 502 Garrison Ave. P.O. Box 1725 Fort Smith, AR, 72902-1725 479-782-9147

WALTER E. MAY

Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-0800

WALTER M. EBEL III

EDDIE N. CHRISTIAN, SR.

Bristow & Richardson 216 East Washington Ave. Jonesboro, AR , 72401-3102 870-935-9000

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

WARNER H. TAYLOR Taylor Law Partners 303 East Millsap Road P.O. Box 8310 Fayetteville, AR, 72703 479-443-5222

DUI/DWI DEFENSE

TIMOTHY O. DUDLEY Timothy O. Dudley 114 South Pulaski Street Little Rock, AR, 72201-1924 501-372-0080

GARY D. CORUM Wilson, Engstrom, Corum & Coulter 200 South Commerce, Suite 600 P.O. Box 71 Little Rock, AR, 72203 501-375-6453

DAVID M. GRAF Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

JOSEPH B. HURST, JR. Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

ALEXANDRA A. IFRAH Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

A. WYCKLIFF NISBET, JR. Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

THOMAS L. OVERBEY Overbey, Strigel, Boyd & Westbrook 10809 Executive Center Drive, Suite 310 Little Rock, AR, 72211-6022 501-664-8105

CRAIG H. WESTBROOK Overbey, Strigel, Boyd & Westbrook 10809 Executive Center Drive, Suite 310 Little Rock, AR, 72211-6022 501-664-8105

BRYANT CRANFORD Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, AR, 72201-2893 501-375-9131

EMPLOYMENT LAW  INDIVIDUALS PAUL D. WADDELL Barrett & Deacon 300 South Church Street, Third Floor P.O. Box 1700 Jonesboro, AR, 72403 870-931-1700

ELIZABETH ROBBEN MURRAY Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

JOHN D. COULTER James, Carter & Coulter 500 Broadway Little Rock, AR, 72203 866-716-3242

JOHN L. BURNETT Lavey and Burnett 904 West Second Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-376-2269

JOHN T. LAVEY Lavey and Burnett 904 West Second Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-376-2269

JANET L. PULLIAM Watts, Donovan & Tilley Arkansas Capital Commerce Center, Suite 200 200 River Market Ave. Little Rock, AR, 72201-1769 501-372-1406

EMPLOYMENT LAW  MANAGEMENT PAUL D. WADDELL Barrett & Deacon 300 South Church Street, Third Floor P.O. Box 1700 Jonesboro, AR, 72403 870-931-1700

DENISE REID HOGGARD Chisenhall, Nestrud & Julian 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2840 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-5800

J. BRUCE CROSS Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon, & Galchus 500 President Clinton Ave., Suite 200 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-371-9999

RECOGNIZED AGAIN

DAVID H. WILLIAMS

BEST LAWYERS IN AMERICA SINCE 2001

Every now and then ĞǀĞŶĂŐŽŽĚůĂǁLJĞƌŶĞĞĚƐƚŚĞŶĂŵĞŽĨĂŶŽƚŚĞƌŐŽŽĚůĂǁLJĞƌ͘dŚĂƚ͛ƐǁŚLJĂƩŽƌŶĞLJƐƉĂƌƚŶĞƌǁŝƚŚƵƐ͘ When your clients need help with ƉŚĂƌŵĂĐĞƵƟĐĂů͕ŵĞĚŝĐĂůĚĞǀŝĐĞ͕ĂŶĚƉƌŽĚƵĐƚůŝĂďŝůŝƚLJĐĂƐĞƐ͕ adding us to your legal team is a strong idea. We bring more than 30 years of experience in challenging legal areas. For ŵŽƌĞŝŶĨŽƌŵĂƟŽŶŽŶŚŽǁǁĞĐĂŶŚĞůƉLJŽƵŽďƚĂŝŶƚŚĞďĞƐƚƌĞƐƵůƚƐĨŽƌLJŽƵƌĐůŝĞŶƚ͕ĐŽŶƚĂĐƚƵƐƚŽĚĂLJ͘ THE LAW OFFICE OF DAVID H. WILLIAMS OFFERS OVER 30 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE WINNING ON BEHALF OF CLIENTS. PRESERVE THE AMERICAN JURY ϮϭϮĞŶƚĞƌ^ƚƌĞĞƚ͕ĞŶƚĞƌWůĂĐĞůĚŐ͕ϮŶĚ&ůŽŽƌͻ>ŝƩůĞZŽĐŬ͕ZϳϮϮϬϭ ϱϬϭͲϯϳϮͲϬϬϯϴͻƚŽůůĨƌĞĞϴϳϳͲϰϵϮͲϯϬϯϬͻǁǁǁ͘ĚŚǁŝůůŝĂŵƐůĂǁĮƌŵ͘ĐŽŵ ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES

NOVEMBER 7, 2012

39


ALLEN C. DOBSON

BYRON L. FREELAND

Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon, & Galchus 500 President Clinton Ave., Suite 200 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-371-9999

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

RUSSELL A. GUNTER Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon, & Galchus 500 President Clinton Ave, Suite 200 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-371-9999

RICHARD A. RODERICK Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon, & Galchus 500 President Clinton Ave., Suite 200 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-371-9999

SCOTTY M. SHIVELY Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon, & Galchus 500 President Clinton Ave., Suite 200 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-371-9999

CAROLYN B. WITHERSPOON Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon, & Galchus 500 President Clinton Ave., Suite 200 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-371-9999

CHARLES W. REYNOLDS Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor 425 West Capitol Ave. Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-375-9151

DAVID P. MARTIN Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, AR, 72201-2893 501-375-9131

JOHN D. DAVIS

DANIEL L. HERRINGTON

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

MICHAEL R. JONES

MICHAEL S. MOORE

Gilker and Jones 9222 North Highway 71 Mountainburg, AR, 72946 479-369-4294

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

ELIZABETH ROBBEN MURRAY

JOHN D. COULTER

TIM BOE Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, AR, 72201-2893 501-375-9131

PHILIP E. KAPLAN

CHRISTOPHER J. HELLER

James, Carter & Coulter 500 Broadway Little Rock, AR, 72203 866-716-3242

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-0800

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

FREDERICK S. URSERY

BRIAN A. VANDIVER

Watts, Donovan & Tilley Arkansas Capital Commerce Center, Suite 200 200 River Market Ave. Little Rock, AR, 72201-1769 501-372-1406

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

JANET L. PULLIAM

OSCAR E. DAVIS, JR.

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

KATHLYN GRAVES

SPENCER F. ROBINSON Ramsay, Bridgforth, Robinson and Raley Simmons Banking Building, 11th Floor 501 Main Street P.O. Box 8509 Pine Bluff, AR, 71611 870-535-9000

ENERGY LAW LAWRENCE E. CHISENHALL, JR. Chisenhall, Nestrud & Julian 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2840 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-5800

SCOTT C. TROTTER Perkins & Trotter 101 Morgan Keegan Drive, Suite A Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-603-9000

STEPHEN N. JOINER Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, AR, 72201-2893 501-375-9131

WALTER G. WRIGHT, JR.

HENRY HODGES

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Hodges Law Firm 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1722 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3402 501-375-0400

JULIE GREATHOUSE Perkins & Trotter 101 Morgan Keegan Drive, Suite A Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-603-9000

JOHN F. PEISERICH Perkins & Trotter 101 Morgan Keegan Drive, Suite A Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-603-9000

G. ALAN PERKINS

N. M. NORTON Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3699 501-371-0808

DAVID R. MATTHEWS Matthews, Campbell, Rhoads, McClure, Thompson & Fryauf 119 South Second Street Rogers, AR, 72756 479-636-0875

ENVIRONMENTAL LAW JOHN R. ELROD Conner & Winters 4375 North Vantage Drive Suite 405 Fayetteville, AR, 72703 479-582-5711

Perkins & Trotter 101 Morgan Keegan Drive, Suite A Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-603-9000

BRIAN ROSENTHAL Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, AR, 72201-2893 501-375-9131

EQUIPMENT FINANCE LAW GARLAND J. GARRETT Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, AR, 72201-2893 501-375-9131

FAMILY LAW BRYAN J. REIS

CHARLES R. NESTRUD Chisenhall, Nestrud & Julian 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2840 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-5800

The Farrar Firm 135 Section Line Road, Suite Five Hot Springs, AR, 71913 501-525-3130

BARRY E. COPLIN

MARK H. ALLISON

Coplin, Hardy, & Stotts One Union Plaza, Suite 1650 124 West Capitol Ave. Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-707-0300

Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor 425 West Capitol Ave. Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-375-9151

JUDSON C. KIDD

SAMUEL E. LEDBETTER McMath Woods 711 West Third Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-396-5400

Dodds, Kidd & Ryan 313 West Second Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-375-9901

SHERRY P. BARTLEY

W. MICHAEL REIF

JAMES M. SIMPSON

MARCIA BARNES

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Mitchell, Blackstock, Barnes, Ivers & Sneddon 1010 West Third Street P.O. Box 1510 Little Rock, AR, 72203-1510 501-378-7870

Lavey and Burnett 904 West Second Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-376-2269

JACK WAGONER III Wagoner Law Firm 1320 Brookwood, Suites D & E Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-663-5225

STEPHEN C. ENGSTROM Wilson, Engstrom, Corum & Coulter 200 South Commerce, Suite 600 P.O. Box 71 Little Rock, AR, 72203 501-375-6453

CARROL ANN HICKS Hicks & Associates 5321 John F. Kennedy Boulevard, Suite A North Little Rock, AR, 72116 501-771-1817

SAM HILBURN Hilburn, Calhoon, Harper, Pruniski & Calhoun US Banking Building, Eighth Floor One Riverfront Place P.O. Box 5551 North Little Rock, AR, 72119 501-372-0110

HARRY TRUMAN MOORE Goodwin Moore 200 South Pruett Street P.O. Box 726 Paragould, AR, 72450 870-239-2225

DAVID R. MATTHEWS Matthews, Campbell, Rhoads, McClure, Thompson & Fryauf 119 South Second Street Rogers, AR, 72756 479-636-0875

FINANCIAL SERVICES REGULATION LAW H. WATT GREGORY III

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor 425 West Capitol Ave. Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-375-9151

Kutak Rock 124 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3706 501-975-3000

LEIGH ANNE YEARGAN

MARCELLA J. TAYLOR

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 5414 Pinnacle Point Drive, Suite 500 Rogers, AR, 72758-8131 479-464-5650

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

GARY B. ROGERS

DONALD H. HENRY

Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor 425 West Capitol Ave. Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-375-9151

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800



LINKING LAWYERS AND CLIENTS WORLDWIDE

FIRST AMENDMENT LAW

JOHN T. LAVEY

PHILIP S. ANDERSON Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-0800

JESS L. ASKEW III Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-0800

MORGAN E. WELCH, JR. Welch, Brewer and Hudson US Bank Building, Suite 413 One Riverfront Place North Little Rock, AR, 72114 501-978-3030

FRANCHISE LAW WILLIAM A. WADDELL, JR. Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

ROGER D. ROWE Lax, Vaughan, Fortson, McKenzie & Rowe Cantrell West Building, Suite 201 11300 Cantrell Road Little Rock, AR, 72212 501-376-6565

DAVID M. POWELL Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-0800

GOVERNMENT RELATIONS PRACTICE T. ARK MONROE III Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

HEALTH CARE LAW BRYAN G. LOONEY Kutak Rock 234 East Millsap Road, Suite 400 Fayetteville, AR, 72703-4099 479-973-4200

HONORED TO BE NAMED AMONG THE BEST LAWYERS IN AMERICAÂŽ Focusing on Family Law

COPLIN, HARDY & STOTTS, PLLC :HVW&DSLWRO$YHQXH6XLWH‡/LWWOH5RFN$UNDQVDV PHONE‡ZZZFRSOLQODZFRP 40

NOVEMBER 7, 2012

ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES


DEBBY THETFORD NYE

MICHAEL P. VANDERFORD

BYRON L. FREELAND

Kutak Rock 234 East Millsap Road, Suite 400 Fayetteville, AR, 72703-4099 479-973-4200

Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins 400 West Capital Ave., Suite 2400 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-1887

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

SCOTTY M. SHIVELY Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon, & Galchus 500 President Clinton Ave., Suite 200 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-371-9999

BRUCE B. TIDWELL Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

ELIZABETH ANDREOLI Hardin, Jesson & Terry 1401 West Capitol Ave., Suite 190 Little Rock, AR, 72201-2939 501-850-0015

DONALD T. JACK, JR. Jack, Nelson & Jones One Cantrell Center, Suite 500 2800 Cantrell Road Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-375-1122

DAVID L. IVERS Mitchell, Blackstock, Barnes, Ivers & Sneddon 1010 West Third Street P.O. Box 1510 Little Rock, AR, 72203-1510 501-378-7870

MICHAEL W. MITCHELL Mitchell, Blackstock, Barnes, Ivers & Sneddon 1010 West Third Street P.O. Box 1510 Little Rock, AR, 72203-1510 501-378-7870

CHARLES B. CLIETT, JR. Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

HAROLD H. SIMPSON The Health Law Firm One Cantrell Center, Suite 200 2800 Cantrell Road Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-221-7100

LEE J. MULDROW Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3699 501-371-0808

IMMIGRATION LAW MELISSA MCJUNKINS DUKE Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon, & Galchus 500 President Clinton Ave., Suite 200 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-371-9999

DONNA SMITH GALCHUS Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon, & Galchus 500 President Clinton Ave., Suite 200 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-371-9999

KATHY W. GOSS Kathy Woodward Goss 604 South Center Street P.O. Box 448 Lonoke, AR, 72086-0000 501-676-6522

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY LAW N. M. NORTON Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3699 501-371-0808

INSURANCE LAW SCOTT D. PROVENCHER Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins 400 West Capital Ave., Suite 2400 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-1887

ALLAN W. HORNE Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor 425 West Capitol Ave. Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-375-9151

JAMES C. BAKER, JR. Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

FREDERICK K. CAMPBELL Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

DOAK FOSTER Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

T. ARK MONROE III Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

JEFFREY THOMAS Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

WILLIAM H. L. WOODYARD III Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

JERRY LOVELACE Roy, Lambert, Lovelace & Bingaman 2706 South Dividend Drive P.O. Drawer 7030 Springdale, AR, 72766-7030 479-756-8510

LABOR LAW ďšş MANAGEMENT J. BRUCE CROSS Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon, & Galchus 500 President Clinton Ave., Suite 200 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-371-9999

RUSSELL A. GUNTER Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon, & Galchus 500 President Clinton Ave., Suite 200 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-371-9999

RICHARD A. RODERICK Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon, & Galchus 500 President Clinton Ave., Suite 200 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-371-9999

CAROLYN B. WITHERSPOON Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon, & Galchus 500 President Clinton Ave., Suite 200 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-371-9999

CHARLES W. REYNOLDS Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor 425 West Capitol Ave. Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-375-9151

DANIEL L. HERRINGTON Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

KATHLYN GRAVES Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

TIM BOE Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, AR, 72201-2893 501-375-9131

DAVID P. MARTIN Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, AR, 72201-2893 501-375-9131

Congratulations to

BOBBY McDANIEL LAWYER OF THE YEAR Personal Injury Litigation-Plaintiffs Criminal Defense: Non-White-Collar Criminal Defense: White-Collar Medical Malpractice Law-Plantiffs Personal Injury Litigation-Plaintiffs

and

PHILLIP WELLS Personal Injury Litigation-Plaintiffs Workers’ Compensation Law-Claimants

JOHN D. DAVIS Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3699 501-371-0808

MICHAEL R. JONES Gilker and Jones 9222 North Highway 71 Mountainburg, AR, 72946 479-369-4294

SPENCER F. ROBINSON Ramsay, Bridgforth, Robinson and Raley Simmons Banking Building, 11th Floor 501 Main Street P.O. Box 8509 Pine Bluff, AR, 71611 870-535-9000

LABOR LAW ďšş UNION JOHN L. BURNETT

Recognized as two of the best lawyers in the state of Arkansas, we applaud them on this honor. We would also like to thank our peers in the legal community and the Arkansas Times readers for their continued support.

McDANIEL & WELLS, P.A Attorneys at Law 400 South Main, Jonesboro, AR 72401  r   www.mcdanielandwells.com

Lavey and Burnett 904 West Second Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-376-2269

JOHN T. LAVEY Lavey and Burnett 904 West Second Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-376-2269

MELVA HARMON Melva Harmon 111 Center Street, Suite 1200 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-1133

LAND USE & ZONING LAW RANDAL B. FRAZIER Kutak Rock 124 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3706 501-975-3000

W. CHRISTOPHER BARRIER Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

LEGAL MALPRACTICE LAW ďšş DEFENDANTS G. SPENCE FRICKE Barber, McCaskill, Jones & Hale 400 West Capitol 2700 Regions Center Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-6175

DONALD H. BACON Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

MICHAEL S. MOORE

EDWIN L. LOWTHER, JR.

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Congratulations to our members named among the Best LawyersŽ in Arkansas: Allan W. Horne — Administrative/Regulatory Law; Insurance Law Garland W. Binns, Jr. — Banking & Finance Law; Corporate Law; Securities/Capital Markets Law Cyril Hollingsworth — Construction Law; Litigation - Construction Charles W. Reynolds — Employment Law - Management; Labor Law - Management; Litigation - Labor & Employment Mark H. Allison — Environmental Law W. Michael Reif — Family Law Gary B. Rogers — Family Law Michael O. Parker — Litigation & Controversy - Tax; Tax Law; Trusts & Estates James Paul Beachboard — Real Estate Law John B. Peace — Tax Law; Trusts & Estates Joseph H. Purvis — Workers’ Compensation Law - Employers

(501) 375-9151 425 W. Capitol, Suite 3700 Little Rock, AR 72201 ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES

NOVEMBER 7, 2012

41


LEVERAGED BUYOUTS AND PRIVATE EQUITY LAW H. WATT GREGORY III Kutak Rock 124 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3706 501-975-3000

LITIGATION ďšş ANTITRUST JAMES M. SIMPSON Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

CHARLES L. SCHLUMBERGER Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, AR, 72201-4420 501-379-1700

PHILIP S. ANDERSON Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-0800

RICHARD T. DONOVAN

GEOFFREY B. TREECE

ALLEN C. DOBSON

SAMUEL E. LEDBETTER

Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, AR, 72201-2893 501-375-9131

Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, AR, 72201-4420 501-379-1700

Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon, & Galchus 500 President Clinton Ave., Suite 200 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-371-9999

McMath Woods 711 West Third Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-396-5400

PHILIP S. ANDERSON

CHARLES T. COLEMAN

CYRIL HOLLINGSWORTH

SHERRY P. BARTLEY

Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-0800

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor 425 West Capitol Ave. Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-375-9151

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

PHILIP E. KAPLAN

Hardin & Grace 500 Main Street, Suite A P.O. Box 5851 North Little Rock, AR, 72119 501-378-7900

Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-0800

KIMBERLY WOOD TUCKER Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3699 501-371-0808

MARSHALL S. NEY

LITIGATION ďšş BANKING & FINANCE H. WILLIAM ALLEN Allen Law Firm 212 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201-2416 501-374-7100

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 5414 Pinnacle Point Drive, Suite 500 Rogers, AR, 72758-8131 479-464-5650

LITIGATION ďšş BANKRUPTCY CONSTANCE G. CLARK

WILLIAM A. WADDELL, JR. Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor 19 East Mountain Street P.O. Box 1688 Fayetteville, AR, 72702-1688 479-521-7600

HARRY A. LIGHT Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

RANDAL B. FRAZIER Kutak Rock 124 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3706 501-975-3000

JAMES F. DOWDEN James F. Dowden 212 Center Street, 10th Floor Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-324-4700

DONALD H. HENRY Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

LANCE R. MILLER

JOHN E. TULL III Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, AR, 72201-4420 501-379-1700

DAVID B. VANDERGRIFF Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, AR, 72201-4420 501-379-1700

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

STAN D. SMITH Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

DAVID A. GRACE

JACK EAST III

ALLAN GATES

Jack East III 2725 Cantrell Road, Suite 202 Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-372-3278

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

KEVIN P. KEECH

JUNIUS BRACY CROSS, JR.

Keech Law Firm 4800 West Commercial Drive North Little Rock, AR, 72116 501-221-3200

Junius Bracy Cross, Jr. 308 East Eighth Street Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-374-2512

MARSHALL S. NEY

RICHARD N. WATTS

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 5414 Pinnacle Point Drive, Suite 500 Rogers, AR, 72758-8131 479-464-5650

Watts, Donovan & Tilley Arkansas Capital Commerce Center, Suite 200 200 River Market Ave. Little Rock, AR, 72201-1769 501-372-1406

Perkins & Trotter 101 Morgan Keegan Drive, Suite A Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-603-9000

WILLIAM M. CLARK, JR. Cypert, Crouch, Clark & Harwell 111 Holcomb Street P.O. Box 1400 Springdale, AR, 72765-1400 479-751-5222

LITIGATION ďšş CONSTRUCTION H. DAVID BLAIR Blair & Stroud 500 East Main Street, Suite 201 P.O. Box 2135 Batesville, AR, 72501 870-793-8350

JASON WALES Everett Wales & Comstock 1944 East Joyce Boulevard P.O. Box 8370 Fayetteville, AR, 72703-8370 479-443-0292

JOHN DEWEY WATSON ADR, Inc. 1501 North University Ave., Suite 420 Little Rock, AR, 72207 501-376-2121

JASON J. CAMPBELL Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins 400 West Capital Ave., Suite 2400 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-1887

MARCELLA J. TAYLOR

JULIE GREATHOUSE

STEPHEN R. LANCASTER

JOHN F. PEISERICH

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Perkins & Trotter 101 Morgan Keegan Drive, Suite A Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-603-9000

DAVID A. GRACE

G. ALAN PERKINS

Hardin & Grace 500 Main Street, Suite A P.O. Box 5851 North Little Rock, AR, 72119 501-378-7900

Perkins & Trotter 101 Morgan Keegan Drive, Suite A Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-603-9000

JAMES G. LINGLE

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Lingle Law Firm 110 South Dixieland Road Rogers, AR, 72758 479-636-7899

LITIGATION ďšş ENVIRONMENTAL JOHN R. ELROD Conner & Winters 4375 North Vantage Drive Suite 405 Fayetteville, AR, 72703 479-582-5711

JOSEPH HENRY BATES III Carney Williams Bates Bozeman & Pulliam 11311 Arcade Drive, Suite 200 Little Rock, AR, 72212 501-312-8500

RAY F. COX, JR.

LITIGATION ďšş FIRST AMENDMENT JOHN E. TULL III Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, AR, 72201-4420 501-379-1700

PHILIP S. ANDERSON Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-0800

PHILIP E. KAPLAN Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-0800

TROY A. PRICE Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3699 501-371-0808

MORGAN E. WELCH, JR. Welch, Brewer and Hudson US Bank Building, Suite 413 One Riverfront Place North Little Rock, AR, 72114 501-978-3030

JAMES G. LINGLE Lingle Law Firm 110 South Dixieland Road Rogers, AR, 72758 479-636-7899

LITIGATION ďšş INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY H. WILLIAM ALLEN Allen Law Firm 212 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201-2416 501-374-7100

JAMES G. LINGLE

HERMANN IVESTER

Lingle Law Firm 110 South Dixieland Road Rogers, AR, 72758 479-636-7899

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

LITIGATION ďšş ERISA E. B. CHILES IV Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, AR, 72201-4420 501-379-1700

N. M. NORTON Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3699 501-371-0808

MARSHALL S. NEY Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 5414 Pinnacle Point Drive, Suite 500 Rogers, AR, 72758-8131 479-464-5650

recognized again JOHN WESLEY HALL BEST LAWYERS IN AMERICA, CRIMINAL DEFENSE AND WHITE COLLAR CRIMINAL DEFENSE s4RIALLAWYER !UTHOR ,ECTURER AND)NTERNATIONALLY RECOGNIZEDEXPERTON CRIMINALLAWANDPROCEDUREANDLEGALETHICS sTH0RESIDENT  OFTHE.ATIONAL!SSOCIATIONOF#RIMINAL$EFENSE ,AWYERSWWWNACDLORG THELARGESTBARASSOCIATIONOFCRIMINALDEFENSE LAWYERS REPRESENTING LAWYERSANDTHE"ILLOF2IGHTS

1202 Main St., Suite 210 Little Rock, Arkansas 72202 501-371-9131 42

NOVEMBER 7, 2012

ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES

“From street crimes to war crimes, he has tried them all.�


Our expanding Northwest Arkansas office now includes more than 10 attorneys — attorneys with significant experience in a wide variety of areas, including civil, commercial and complex litigation; banking, construction, health care and employment law; business organization and transaction law; corporate and securities matters; transportation and logistics; foreclosures and real estate. The attorneys in our Northwest Arkansas office are well known in the business and legal communities. They have more than 200 years of combined experience and have guided clients through more than 600 trials to jury verdict. They are recognized and honored by organizations such as Best Lawyers in America, Super Lawyers, Chambers USA, American College of Trial Lawyers and International Academy of Trial Lawyers. Through our Northwest Arkansas office, we offer local experience and expertise along with the resources of our other offices to be of full service to our clients.

Our Attorneys Vicki Bronson

Kerri E. Kobbeman

John M. Scott

Terri Dill Chadick

Todd P. Lewis

Joshua P. Wisley

John R. Elrod

Amber Prince

G. Alan Wooten

Robert L. Jones, III

Greg S. Scharlau

NW Arkansas | Dallas | Houston | Oklahoma City | Santa Fe | Tulsa | Washington, D.C. www.cwlaw.com ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES

NOVEMBER 7, 2012

43


LITIGATION  LABOR & EMPLOYMENT ALFRED F. ANGULO, JR. Barrett & Deacon 100 West Center Street, Suite 200 P.O. Box 1506 Fayetteville, AR, 72702 479-582-5353

CHRISTOPHER J. HELLER

PHILIP E. KAPLAN

GLENN E. BORKOWSKI

KEVIN A. CRASS

STEPHEN R. LANCASTER

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-0800

Kutak Rock 124 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3706 501-975-3000

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3699 501-371-0808

M. SAMUEL JONES III

LITIGATION & CONTROVERSY  TAX

DANIEL L. HERRINGTON Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

SIDNEY P. DAVIS, JR. Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor 19 East Mountain Street P.O. Box 1688 Fayetteville, AR, 72702-1688 479-521-7600

EVA C. MADISON

MICHAEL S. MOORE Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

ELIZABETH ROBBEN MURRAY

Littler Mendelson One Steele Plaza, Suite 300 3739 Steele Boulevard Fayetteville, AR, 72703 479-582-6100

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

FREDERICK S. URSERY

BENJAMIN H. SHIPLEY III Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon, & Galchus 5401 Rogers Ave., Suite 200 Fort Smith, AR, 72903 479-783-8200

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

JOHN D. COULTER

PAUL D. WADDELL Barrett & Deacon 300 South Church Street, Third Floor P.O. Box 1700 Jonesboro, AR, 72403 870-931-1700

Chisenhall, Nestrud & Julian 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2840 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-5800

JOHN L. BURNETT

J. BRUCE CROSS

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, AR, 72201-4420 501-379-1700

Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon, & Galchus 500 President Clinton Ave., Suite 200 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-371-9999

Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, AR, 72201-2893 501-375-9131

JANET L. PULLIAM

CHARLES W. REYNOLDS

Watts, Donovan & Tilley Arkansas Capital Commerce Center, Suite 200 200 River Market Ave. Little Rock, AR, 72201-1769 501-372-1406

Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor 425 West Capitol Ave. Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-375-9151

MARSHALL S. NEY

LITIGATION  PATENT

JOHN KEELING BAKER Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3699 501-371-0808

LITIGATION  REAL ESTATE Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor 19 East Mountain Street P.O. Box 1688 Fayetteville, AR, 72702-1688 479-521-7600

THOMAS A. DAILY Daily & Woods 58 South Sixth Street P.O. Box 1446 Fort Smith, AR, 72902 479-782-0361

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

JOSEPH R. FALASCO Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, AR, 72201-4420 501-379-1700

TIMOTHY W. GROOMS Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, AR, 72201-4420 501-379-1700

CHARLES L. SCHLUMBERGER Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, AR, 72201-4420 501-379-1700

GARLAND J. GARRETT Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, AR, 72201-2893 501-375-9131

STEPHEN R. LANCASTER

L. KYLE HEFFLEY Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 5414 Pinnacle Point Drive, Suite 500 Rogers, AR, 72758-8131 479-464-5650

LITIGATION  SECURITIES H. WILLIAM ALLEN

Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, AR, 72201-2893 501-375-9131

LITIGATION  TRUSTS & ESTATES WILLIAM JACKSON BUTT II Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor 19 East Mountain Street P.O. Box 1688 Fayetteville, AR, 72702-1688 479-521-7600

ROBERT S. JONES Barrett & Deacon 300 South Church Street, Third Floor P.O. Box 1700 Jonesboro, AR, 72403 870-931-1700

ALLISON J. CORNWELL Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

SARAH COTTON PATTERSON

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Allen Law Firm 212 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201-2416 501-374-7100

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

RICHARD T. DONOVAN

M. SAMUEL JONES III

RAY F. COX, JR.

CONSTANCE G. CLARK

DAVID P. MARTIN

SCOTTY M. SHIVELY

SPENCER F. ROBINSON Ramsay, Bridgforth, Robinson and Raley Simmons Banking Building, 11th Floor 501 Main Street P.O. Box 8509 Pine Bluff, AR, 71611 870-535-9000

LEIGH ANNE YEARGAN

E. B. CHILES IV

ALLEN C. DOBSON Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon, & Galchus 500 President Clinton Ave., Suite 200 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-371-9999

JOHN G. LILE Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 5414 Pinnacle Point Drive, Suite 500 Rogers, AR, 72758-8131 479-464-5650

KATHLYN GRAVES

Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon, & Galchus 500 President Clinton Ave., Suite 200 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-371-9999

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 5414 Pinnacle Point Drive, Suite 500 Rogers, AR, 72758-8131 479-464-5650

James, Carter & Coulter 500 Broadway Little Rock, AR, 72203 866-716-3242

Lavey and Burnett 904 West Second Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-376-2269

DENISE REID HOGGARD

JOHN D. DAVIS

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

RICHARD F. HATFIELD Hatfield & Sayre 401 West Capitol Ave., Suite 502 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3437 501-374-9010

GEORGE N. PLASTIRAS Plastiras Law Firm 101 South Spring Street, Suite 300 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-859-0986

CRAIG S. LAIR Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, AR, 72201-2893 501-375-9131

DENNIS L. SHACKLEFORD Shackleford, Phillips & Ratcliff 100 East Church Street P.O. Box 1718 El Dorado, AR, 71731-1718 870-862-5523

MICHAEL O. PARKER Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor 425 West Capitol Ave. Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-375-9151

PRICE C. GARDNER Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

JOHN KEELING BAKER Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

CRAIG S. LAIR Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, AR, 72201-2893 501-375-9131

MASS TORT LITIGATION / CLASS ACTIONS  DEFENDANTS JOHN R. ELROD Conner & Winters 4375 North Vantage Drive Suite 405 Fayetteville, AR, 72703 479-582-5711

SHERRY P. BARTLEY Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

LYN P. PRUITT Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

November Non-Surprise We congratulate Sam Ledbetter and Bruce McMath on their awards in Environmental and Personal Injury Law, but we’re not surprised. They’ve earned Best Lawyer honors year after year — as have other McMath Woods attorneys. If your case calls for the best, call the Best.

Carter C. Stein

Sam Ledbetter

Ross Noland

James Bruce McMath

Phillip H. McMath

Neil Chamberlin

Charles Harrison

Will Bond

Injury, wrongful death and environmental litigation www.McMathLaw.com | 711 West 3rd, Little Rock, AR 72201 | 501.396.5400 www.facebook.com/McMathWoods www.twitter.com/McMathWoods www.linkedin.com/company/mcmath-woods-p-a44

NOVEMBER 7, 2012

ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES


STEVEN W. QUATTLEBAUM

WALTER B. COX

LAURA HENSLEY SMITH

BOBBY R. MCDANIEL

Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, AR, 72201-4420 501-379-1700

Cox, Cox & Estes 75 North East Street, Suite 400 P.O. Box 878 Fayetteville, AR, 72702 479-251-790

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

McDaniel & Wells 400 South Main Street Jonesboro, AR, 72401 870-932-5950

GORDON S. RATHER, JR. Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3699 501-371-0808

MEDIA LAW JOHN E. TULL III Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, AR, 72201-4420 501-379-1700

JESS L. ASKEW III Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-0800

MEDIATION ROBERT E. HORNBERGER ADR, Inc. 404 North Seventh Street P.O. Box 8064 Fort Smith, AR, 72902 479-783-1776

JOHN A. DAVIS III ADR, Inc. 1501 North University Ave., Suite 420 Little Rock, AR, 72207 501-376-2121

JOHN DEWEY WATSON ADR, Inc. 1501 North University Ave., Suite 420 Little Rock, AR, 72207 501-376-2121

FRANK S. HAMLIN Hamlin Dispute Resolution 823 West Markham Street, Suite 100 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-850-8888

MEDICAL MALPRACTICE LAW  DEFENDANTS H. DAVID BLAIR Blair & Stroud 500 East Main Street, Suite 201 P.O. Box 2135 Batesville, AR, 72501 870-793-8350

WALKER DALE GARRETT Bassett Law Firm 221 North College Ave. P.O. Box 3618 Fayetteville, AR, 72702-3618 479-521-9996

JAMES R. ESTES Cox, Cox & Estes 75 North East Street, Suite 400 P.O. Box 878 Fayetteville, AR, 72702 479-251-7900

KELLY CARITHERS Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor 19 East Mountain Street P.O. Box 1688 Fayetteville, AR, 72702-1688 479-521-7600

SIDNEY P. DAVIS, JR. Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor 19 East Mountain Street P.O. Box 1688 Fayetteville, AR, 72702-1688 479-521-7600

PAUL D. WADDELL

Barrett & Deacon 300 South Church Street, Third Floor P.O. Box 1700 Jonesboro, AR, 72403 870-931-1700

D. MICHAEL HUCKABAY, SR.

DONALD H. BACON

Huckabay Law Firm Metropolitan Tower, Suite 1575 425 West Capitol Ave. Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-375-5600

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

KEN COOK

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 5414 Pinnacle Point Drive, Suite 500 Rogers, AR, 72758-8131 479-464-5650

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

JEFFREY HATFIELD Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

M. SAMUEL JONES III

PAUL D. MCNEILL

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Womack, Landis, Phelps & McNeill Century Center 301 West Washington Ave. P.O. Box 3077 Jonesboro, AR, 72403 870-932-0900

Munson, Rowlett, Moore & Boone 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1900 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-374-6535

JASON J. CAMPBELL Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins 400 West Capital Ave., Suite 2400 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-1887

MARIAM T. HOPKINS Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins 400 West Capital Ave., Suite 2400 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-1887

TIMOTHY L. BOONE

BRUCE E. MUNSON Munson, Rowlett, Moore & Boone 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1900 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-374-6535

L. KYLE HEFFLEY Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 5414 Pinnacle Point Drive, Suite 500 Rogers, AR, 72758-8131 479-464-5650

SCOTT D. PROVENCHER

ROBERT J. LAMBERT, JR.

Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins 400 West Capital Ave., Suite 2400 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-1887

Roy, Lambert, Lovelace & Bingaman 2706 South Dividend Drive P.O. Drawer 7030 Springdale, AR, 72766-7030 479-756-8510

MICHELLE ATOR Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

DONALD H. BACON Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

MEDICAL MALPRACTICE LAW  PLAINTIFFS H. DAVID BLAIR Blair & Stroud 500 East Main Street, Suite 201 P.O. Box 2135 Batesville, AR, 72501 870-793-8350

MORTGAGE BANKING FORECLOSURE LAW ROBERT M. WILSON, JR. Associates Closing & Title 1521 Merrill Drive, Suite A-150 Little Rock, AR, 72211 501-223-0949

JENNIFER WILSON-HARVEY Wilson & Associates 1521 Merrill Drive, Suite A-150 Little Rock, AR, 72211 501-223-0949

L. KYLE HEFFLEY

MUNICIPAL LAW

MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS LAW JAMES W. SMITH Smith Hurst 226 West Dickson Street, Suite 201 Fayetteville, AR, 72701 479-301-2444

PAUL B. BENHAM III Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

WALTER M. EBEL III Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

H. WATT GREGORY III Kutak Rock 124 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3706 501-975-3000

THOMAS C. VAUGHAN, JR. Lax, Vaughan, Fortson, McKenzie & Rowe Cantrell West Building, Suite 201 11300 Cantrell Road Little Rock, AR, 72212 501-376-6565

C. DOUGLAS BUFORD, JR. Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

KEVIN R. BURNS Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, AR, 72201-2893 501-375-9131

J. SHEPHERD RUSSELL III Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

HAL JOSEPH KEMP Hal Joseph Kemp 111 Center Street, Suite 1300 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-7243

GORDON M. WILBOURN Kutak Rock 124 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3706 501-975-3000

W. CHRISTOPHER BARRIER Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

M. JANE DICKEY Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, AR, 72201-2893 501-375-9131

DAVID F. MENZ Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-0800

C. TAD BOHANNON Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3699 501-371-0808

JOHN WILLIAM SPIVEY III Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3699 501-371-0808

NONPROFIT / CHARITIES LAW BYRON M. EISEMAN, JR. Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

SARAH COTTON PATTERSON Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

K. COLEMAN WESTBROOK, JR. Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

W. WILSON JONES Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, AR, 72201-2893 501-375-9131

OIL & GAS LAW THOMAS A. DAILY Daily & Woods 58 South Sixth Street P.O. Box 1446 Fort Smith, AR, 72902 479-782-0361

ROBERT M. HONEA Hardin, Jesson & Terry 5000 Rogers Ave., Suite 500 P.O. Box 10127 Fort Smith, AR, 72917-0127 479-452-2200

G. ALAN PERKINS Perkins & Trotter 101 Morgan Keegan Drive, Suite A Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-603-9000

JAMES D. RANKIN III Perkins & Trotter 101 Morgan Keegan Drive, Suite A Little Rock, AR, 72202 501-603-9000

CAROLYN J. CLEGG Keith & Clegg McAlester Building, Suite 205 124 South Jackson P.O. Box 1029 Magnolia, AR, 71754-1029 870-234-3550

PATENT LAW STEPHEN D. CARVER Carver Patent Law Pleasant Valley Corporate Center, Suite 800 2024 Arkansas Valley Drive Little Rock, AR, 72212 501-224-1500

MARIAN MAJOR MCMULLAN THANK YOU TO MY PEERS FOR SELECTING ME AS ONE OF THE BEST LAWYERS IN ARKANSAS 815 W. MARKHAM ST. LITTLE ROCK

501.376.9119 PFPXOODQODZȽUPFRP

LINKING LAWYERS AND CLIENTS WORLDWIDE

ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES

NOVEMBER 7, 2012

45


RAY F. COX, JR.

ROBERT L. JONES III

BILL W. BRISTOW

JIM L. JULIAN

D. MICHAEL HUCKABAY, JR.

TIMOTHY L. BOONE

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Conner & Winters 4375 North Vantage Drive Suite 405 Fayetteville, AR, 72703 479-582-5711

Bristow & Richardson 216 East Washington Ave. Jonesboro, AR, 72401-3102 870-935-9000

Chisenhall, Nestrud & Julian 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2840 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-5800

Huckabay Law Firm Metropolitan Tower, Suite 1575 425 West Capitol Ave. Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-375-5600

Munson, Rowlett, Moore & Boone 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1900 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-374-6535

D. MICHAEL HUCKABAY, SR.

Munson, Rowlett, Moore & Boone 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1900 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-374-6535

J. CHARLES DOUGHERTY Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3699 501-371-0808

PAUL D. MCNEILL

MICHELLE ATOR

Conner & Winters 4375 North Vantage Drive Suite 405 Fayetteville, AR, 72703 479-582-5711

Womack, Landis, Phelps & McNeill Century Center 301 West Washington Ave. P.O. Box 3077 Jonesboro, AR, 72403 870-932-0900

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

WALTER B. COX

JOHN V. PHELPS

Cox, Cox & Estes 75 North East Street, Suite 400 P.O. Box 878 Fayetteville, AR, 72702 479-251-7900

Womack, Landis, Phelps & McNeill Century Center 301 West Washington Ave. P.O. Box 3077 Jonesboro, AR, 72403 870-932-0900

G. ALAN WOOTEN

PERSONAL INJURY LITIGATION ďšş DEFENDANTS RODNEY P. MOORE Wright, Berry, Moore & White 303 Professional Park Drive P.O. Box 947 Arkadelphia, AR, 71923 870-246-6796

JAMES R. ESTES

CLARK S. BREWSTER

Cox, Cox & Estes 75 North East Street, Suite 400 P.O. Box 878 Fayetteville, AR, 72702 479-251-7900

The Boswell Law Firm 408 North Reynolds Road P.O. Box 798 Bryant, AR, 72089-0798 501-847-3031

BRIAN H. RATCLIFF

KELLY CARITHERS

Shackleford, Phillips & Ratcliff 100 East Church Street P.O. Box 1718 El Dorado, AR, 71731-1718 870-862-5523

Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor 19 East Mountain Street P.O. Box 1688 Fayetteville, AR, 72702-1688 479-521-7600

DENNIS L. SHACKLEFORD Shackleford, Phillips & Ratcliff 100 East Church Street P.O. Box 1718 El Dorado, AR, 71731-1718 870-862-5523

FLOYD M. THOMAS, JR. Thomas, Hickey & Shepherd 423 North Washington Ave. El Dorado, AR, 71730-5615 870-862-3478

ALFRED F. ANGULO, JR. Barrett & Deacon 100 West Center Street, Suite 200 P.O. Box 1506 Fayetteville, AR, 72702 479-582-5353

WALKER DALE GARRETT Bassett Law Firm 221 North College Ave. P.O. Box 3618 Fayetteville, AR, 72702-3618 479-521-9996

CURTIS L. NEBBEN Bassett Law Firm 221 North College Ave. P.O. Box 3618 Fayetteville, AR, 72702-3618 479-521-9996

SIDNEY P. DAVIS, JR.

MARIAM T. HOPKINS Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins 400 West Capital Ave., Suite 2400 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-1887

DAVID A. LITTLETON Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins 400 West Capital Ave., Suite 2400 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-1887

RANDY P. MURPHY

Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor 19 East Mountain Street P.O. Box 1688 Fayetteville, AR, 72702-1688 479-521-7600

Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins 400 West Capital Ave., Suite 2400 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-1887

DON A. TAYLOR

SCOTT D. PROVENCHER

Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor 19 East Mountain Street P.O. Box 1688 Fayetteville, AR, 72702-1688 479-521-7600

Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins 400 West Capital Ave., Suite 2400 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-1887

MICHAEL P. VANDERFORD

JASON WALES Everett Wales & Comstock 1944 East Joyce Boulevard P.O. Box 8370 Fayetteville, AR, 72703-8370 479-443-0292

CLIFFORD W. PLUNKETT Friday, Eldredge & Clark 3425 North Futrall Drive, Suite 103 Fayetteville, AR, 72703-6252 479-695-2011

DOUGLAS O. SMITH, JR. Douglas O. Smith 13 Berry Hill Fort Smith, AR, 72903 479-783-3135

Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins 400 West Capital Ave., Suite 2400 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-1887

G. SPENCE FRICKE Barber, McCaskill, Jones & Hale 400 West Capitol 2700 Regions Center Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-6175

ROBERT L. HENRY III Barber, McCaskill, Jones & Hale 400 West Capitol 2700 Regions Center Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-6175

DONALD H. BACON Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

JAMES C. BAKER, JR. Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

KEVIN A. CRASS Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

WILLIAM MELL GRIFFIN III Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

JAMES M. SIMPSON Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

LAURA HENSLEY SMITH Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

FREDERICK S. URSERY Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

GUY ALTON WADE Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

DAVID D. WILSON Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Huckabay Law Firm Metropolitan Tower, Suite 1575 425 West Capitol Ave. Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-375-5600

TODD WOOTEN Kutak Rock 124 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3706 501-975-3000

DAN F. BUFFORD Laser Law Firm 101 South Spring Street, Suite 300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-2488 501-376-2981

SHERRY P. BARTLEY Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

R. T. BEARD III Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

MICHELLE H. CAULEY Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

JEFFREY HATFIELD Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

STUART P. MILLER Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

JOHN E. MOORE

BRUCE E. MUNSON Munson, Rowlett, Moore & Boone 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1900 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-374-6535

BEVERLY A. ROWLETT Munson, Rowlett, Moore & Boone 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1900 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-374-6535

MICHAEL N. SHANNON Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, AR, 72201-4420 501-379-1700

THOMAS G. WILLIAMS Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, AR, 72201-4420 501-379-1700

DAVID M. DONOVAN Watts, Donovan & Tilley Arkansas Capital Commerce Center, Suite 200 200 River Market Ave. Little Rock, AR, 72201-1769 501-372-1406

JAMES W. TILLEY Watts, Donovan & Tilley Arkansas Capital Commerce Center, Suite 200 200 River Market Ave. Little Rock, AR, 72201-1769 501-372-1406

RICHARD N. WATTS Watts, Donovan & Tilley Arkansas Capital Commerce Center, Suite 200 200 River Market Ave. Little Rock, AR, 72201-1769 501-372-1406

LYN P. PRUITT

TERESA M. WINELAND

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-0800

Selected: Best Lawyer 2013 Eva Madison FNBEJTPO!MJUUMFSDPNt

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NOVEMBER 7, 2012

ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES


The lawyers and staff at Watts, Donovan & Tilley congratulate

RICHARD WATTS, DAVID DONOVAN & JIM TILLEY for their selection in The Best Lawyers in America for personal injury and product liability litigation. Watts, Donovan & Tilley provides a tradition of legal excellence, serving the citizens of Arkansas.

WATTS, DONOVAN & TILLEY, P.A.

5924 5 924 R S STREET TREE EET T LITTLE ROCK 501.664.3062 WWW.MRWICKS.COM

Arkansas Capital Commerce Center 200 River Market Avenue, Suite 200 Little Rock, AR 72201 (501) 372-1406

www.wdt-law.com

WE SALUTE OUR PARTNERS ON BEING NAMED BEST LAWYERS IN AMERICA® 9(5+@74<97/@Â&#x2039;4(90(4;/67205: 40*/(,37=(5+,9-69+Â&#x2039;+(=0+(30;;3,;65 :*6;;+796=,5*/,9Â&#x2039;1<30(4/(5*6*2 1(:651*(47),33 AND 4(90(4;/67205: LAWYER OF THE YEAR MEDICAL MALPRACTICE DEFENSE

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>,:;*(70;63(=,5<,:<0;,c30;;3,96*2(9c;,3,7/65,!c-(*:0403,! >,):0;,!>>>(5+,9:654<97/@/67205:*64 ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES

NOVEMBER 7, 2012

47


PETIT JEAN HAM FUNDRAISER

BOBBY R. MCDANIEL

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3699 501-371-0808

McDaniel & Wells 400 South Main Street Jonesboro, AR, 72401 870-932-5950

EDWIN L. LOWTHER, JR.

PHILLIP J. WELLS

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3699 501-371-0808

McDaniel & Wells 400 South Main Street Jonesboro, AR, 72401 870-932-5950





JERRY J. SALLINGS Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3699 501-371-0808

MAIL ORDER PRICE

SMOKED HAM ď&#x161;Ž14ď&#x161;ş16LBď&#x161;Ż - Traditional Hickory Smoked, bone-in ham. Petit Jeanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most popular ham!

$47

$79

EZ CARVE SMOKED HAM ď&#x161;Ž8ď&#x161;ş10LBď&#x161;Ż - The bone has been removed for smooth and easy slicing!

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$65

GIFT BOX - Includes Arkansas Style Smoked Sausage (14 oz), Hickory Smoked Bacon (1 lb), Peppered Bacon (1.5 lb), and Summer Sausage (8 oz).

$27

$40

DELUXE GIFT BOX - Includes a 3.5 lb Hickory Smoked Ham, Arkansas Style Smoked Sausage (14 oz), Hickory Smoked Bacon (1 lb), and Summer Sausage (8 oz). **BEST SELLER**

$37

$48



people. Includes a Whole Oven-Roasted Turkey (10-12lb), Cornbread Dressing, Sweet Potato Casserole and Pecan Cobbler.

ROGER A. GLASGOW

GORDON S. RATHER, JR.

PICK UP PRICE

COMPLETE TURKEY DINNER â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Feeds 4-6

BILL W. BRISTOW Bristow & Richardson 216 East Washington Ave. Jonesboro, AR, 72401-3102 870-935-9000

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Camp Aldersgate has formed a partnership with Petit Jean Meats in Morrilton, Arkansas for this wonderful fundraiser. We are very excited about this opportunity! Camp Aldersgate receives a portion of the profits from every smoked ham or gift box we sell. Petit Jean smoked hams or gift boxes make great holiday gifts for friends or family members. They would also make wonderful customer gifts! The items can even be â&#x20AC;&#x153;drop shippedâ&#x20AC;? directly to the recipients on your list anywhere in the United States. Complete your holiday shopping or buy items to compliment a holiday meal.

ORDER DEADLINE: DECEMBER 5 PICK UP DATES ď&#x161;ŽAT CAMP ALDERSGATEď&#x161;Ż DECEMBER 11 & 12 9AM TO 5PM

MICHAEL D. BARNES Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3699 501-371-0808

$52

QUANTITY

ELTON A. RIEVES III Elton A. Rieves III & Associates 213 East Washington, Suite Two P.O. Box 450 Mountain View, AR, 72560 870-269-5757

JEFF SINGLETON

TOTAL

Hankins Law Firm 800 West Fourth Street P.O. Box 5151 North Little Rock, AR, 72119 501-371-9226

JERRY LOVELACE Roy, Lambert, Lovelace & Bingaman 2706 South Dividend Drive P.O. Drawer 7030 Springdale, AR, 72766-7030 479-756-8510

I AM UNABLE TO PARTICIPATE BUT PLEASE ACCEPT MY DONATION FOR CAMP ALDERSGATE



PERSONAL INJURY LITIGATION ď&#x161;ş PLAINTIFFS

GRAND TOTAL

RODNEY P. MOORE

Purchaserâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Name: ____________________________________________________________________ Address: ____________________________________________________________________________



ORDER FORM

Blair & Stroud 500 East Main Street, Suite 201 P.O. Box 2135 Batesville, AR, 72501 870-793-8350

Contact Number: _____________________________________________________________________ Email:_____________________________________________________________ _________________ *Mail Orders Only* (attach additional mail order addresses & enclosures to this form!) IF GIFT PLEASE COMPLETE

TED BOSWELL The Boswell Law Firm 408 North Reynolds Road P.O. Box 798 Bryant, AR, 72089-0798 501-847-3031

Name: ______________________________________________________________________________ Address: ____________________________________________________________________________ City: ___________________________________________ State: _________ Zip: _________________ Gift Enclosure Message: ________________________________________________________________

Thomas, Hickey & Shepherd 423 North Washington Ave. El Dorado, AR, 71730-5615 870-862-3478

R MC/Visa R Discover R AMEX R CASH R CHECK (payable to Camp Aldersgate)



Card # _________________________________ Security Code*: _____________ Exp. _____________ Signature (required for credit card): ______________________________________________________ *On back of card (last 3 digits after credit card number), nn front of AMEX (4 digits after credit card number)

NOVEMBER 7, 2012

ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES



FOR OFFICE USE: ORDER FILLED BY: ________________ORDER LOGGED BY: _________________

48

JAMES F. SWINDOLL Law Offices of James F. Swindoll 212 Center Street, Suite 300 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-374-1290

ROBERT M. MCHENRY McHenry, McHenry and Taylor 8210 Henderson Road Little Rock, AR, 72210 501-372-3425

JAMES BRUCE MCMATH McMath Woods 711 West Third Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-396-5400

MICHAEL N. SHANNON Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, AR, 72201-4420 501-379-1700

MICHAEL R. RAINWATER Rainwater, Holt & Sexton 6315 Ranch Drive Little Rock, AR, 72223 800-434-4800

TIMOTHY O. DUDLEY Timothy O. Dudley 114 South Pulaski Street Little Rock, AR, 72201-1924 501-372-0080

BUD B. WHETSTONE Whetstone & Odum The Centre at Ten Building, Suite 204 12921 Cantrell Road Little Rock, AR, 72223-1799 501-376-3564

FRANK H. BAILEY Bailey & Oliver 506 Hospital Drive Mountain Home, AR, 72653 870-425-6041

FLOYD M. THOMAS, JR.

____________________________________________________________________________________

For additional information or questions contact us at Camp Aldersgate 501.225.1444, www.facebook.com/campaldersgateAR

Wright, Berry, Moore & White 303 Professional Park Drive P.O. Box 947 Arkadelphia, AR, 71923 870-246-6796

H. DAVID BLAIR

City: ___________________________________________ State: _________ Zip: _________________

EASY ORDERING OPTIONS

FREDERICK S. URSERY Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

STEPHEN A. MATTHEWS Bridges Law Firm 315 East Eighth Ave. P.O. Box 7808 Pine Bluff, AR, 71611 870-534-5532

$67

t.BJM0SEFS'PSN"MEFSTHBUF3E -JUUMF3PDL "3 t'BY0SEFS'PSNt0SEFS0OMJOFXXXDBNQBMEFSTHBUFOFU

ROBERT M. CEARLEY, JR. Cearley Law Firm Centre Place, Second Floor 212 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-5600

CLYDE TALBOT TURNER Turner & Associates 4705 Somers Ave., Suite 1000 North Little Rock, AR, 72116 501-791-2277

JASON WALES Everett Wales & Comstock 1944 East Joyce Boulevard P.O. Box 8370 Fayetteville, AR, 72703-8370 479-443-0292

B. MICHAEL EASLEY Easley & Houseal 510 East Cross Street Forrest City, AR, 72335 870-633-1447

JERRY LOVELACE Roy, Lambert, Lovelace & Bingaman 2706 South Dividend Drive P.O. Drawer 7030 Springdale, AR, 72766-7030 479-756-8510

PRODUCT LIABILITY LITIGATION ď&#x161;ş DEFENDANTS JOSEPH BARRETT DEACON Barrett & Deacon 300 South Church Street, Third Floor P.O. Box 1700 Jonesboro, AR, 72403 870-931-1700

JULIA M. HANCOCK Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins 400 West Capital Ave., Suite 2400 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-1887

SCOTT D. PROVENCHER Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins 400 West Capital Ave., Suite 2400 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-1887

MICHAEL P. VANDERFORD Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins 400 West Capital Ave., Suite 2400 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-1887

G. SPENCE FRICKE Barber, McCaskill, Jones & Hale 400 West Capitol 2700 Regions Center Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-6175

LYN P. PRUITT Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

BRUCE E. MUNSON Munson, Rowlett, Moore & Boone 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1900 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-374-6535

THOMAS G. WILLIAMS Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, AR, 72201-4420 501-379-1700

RICHARD N. WATTS Watts, Donovan & Tilley Arkansas Capital Commerce Center, Suite 200 200 River Market Ave. Little Rock, AR, 72201-1769 501-372-1406

MICHAEL D. BARNES Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3699 501-371-0808

EDWIN L. LOWTHER, JR. Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3699 501-371-0808

GORDON S. RATHER, JR. Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3699 501-371-0808

CLYDE TALBOT TURNER Turner & Associates 4705 Somers Ave., Suite 1000 North Little Rock, AR, 72116 501-791-2277

JERRY LOVELACE Roy, Lambert, Lovelace & Bingaman 2706 South Dividend Drive P.O. Drawer 7030 Springdale, AR, 72766-7030 479-756-8510

PRODUCT LIABILITY LITIGATION ď&#x161;ş PLAINTIFFS H. DAVID BLAIR Blair & Stroud 500 East Main Street, Suite 201 P.O. Box 2135 Batesville, AR, 72501 870-793-8350


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ROBERT M. CEARLEY, JR.

BUD B. WHETSTONE

Cearley Law Firm Centre Place, Second Floor 212 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-5600

Whetstone & Odum The Centre at Ten Building, Suite 204 12921 Cantrell Road Little Rock, AR, 72223-1799 501-376-3564

STEVEN W. QUATTLEBAUM

CLYDE TALBOT TURNER

Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, AR, 72201-4420 501-379-1700

Turner & Associates 4705 Somers Ave., Suite 1000 North Little Rock, AR, 72116 501-791-2277

MICHAEL N. SHANNON

JERRY LOVELACE

Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, AR, 72201-4420 501-379-1700

JOHN E. TULL III Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, AR, 72201-4420 501-379-1700

Roy, Lambert, Lovelace & Bingaman 2706 South Dividend Drive P.O. Drawer 7030 Springdale, AR, 72766-7030 479-756-8510

PROFESSIONAL MALPRACTICE LAW ď&#x161;ş DEFENDANTS H. DAVID BLAIR Blair & Stroud 500 East Main Street, Suite 201 P.O. Box 2135 Batesville, AR, 72501 870-793-8350

DAVID A. LITTLETON Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins 400 West Capital Ave., Suite 2400 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-1887

SCOTT D. PROVENCHER Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins 400 West Capital Ave., Suite 2400 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-1887

MICHAEL P. VANDERFORD

TIMOTHY O. DUDLEY

W. JACKSON WILLIAMS

Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins 400 West Capital Ave., Suite 2400 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-1887

Timothy O. Dudley 114 South Pulaski Street Little Rock, AR, 72201-1924 501-372-0080

Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-0800

DAVID M. POWELL Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-0800

PROFESSIONAL MALPRACTICE LAW ď&#x161;ş PLAINTIFFS H. DAVID BLAIR Blair & Stroud 500 East Main Street, Suite 201 P.O. Box 2135 Batesville, AR, 72501 870-793-8350

PROJECT FINANCE LAW J. SHEPHERD RUSSELL III Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

HAROLD W. HAMLIN Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

DAVID F. MENZ Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-0800

JOHN ALAN LEWIS Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 5414 Pinnacle Point Drive, Suite 500 Rogers, AR, 72758-8131 479-464-5650

PUBLIC FINANCE LAW ROBERT B. BEACH, JR. Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

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W. JACKSON WILLIAMS Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-0800

JOHN WILLIAM SPIVEY III Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3699 501-371-0808

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RAILROAD LAW JOSEPH BARRETT DEACON Barrett & Deacon 300 South Church Street, Third Floor P.O. Box 1700 Jonesboro, AR, 72403 870-931-1700

SCOTT H. TUCKER Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

FREDERICK S. URSERY Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

REAL ESTATE LAW CARL J. CIRCO University of Arkansas School of Law Waterman Hall, 1045 West Maple Street Fayetteville, AR, 72701 479-575-5601

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PRICE C. GARDNER Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

JAMES M. SAXTON Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

JAY T. TAYLOR Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

HAL JOSEPH KEMP Hal Joseph Kemp 111 Center Street, Suite 1300 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-7243

J. MARK SPRADLEY J. Mark Spradley 8114 Cantrell, Suite 240 Little Rock, AR, 72227 501-537-4290

GLENN E. BORKOWSKI Kutak Rock 124 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3706 501-975-3000

RANDAL B. FRAZIER Kutak Rock 124 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3706 501-975-3000

MARIAN M. MCMULLAN McMullan Law Firm 815 West Markham P.O. Box 2839 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-376-9119

W. CHRISTOPHER BARRIER Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

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SECURITIES / CAPITAL MARKETS LAW GARLAND W. BINNS, JR. Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor 425 West Capitol Ave. Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-375-9151

PAUL B. BENHAM III Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

WALTER M. EBEL III Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

H. WATT GREGORY III Kutak Rock 124 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3706 501-975-3000

C. DOUGLAS BUFORD, JR. Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

JOHN S. SELIG Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

PATRICK A. BURROW Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, AR, 72201-4420 501-379-1700

D. NICOLE LOVELL Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-0800

M. SEAN HATCH Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3699 501-371-0808

SECURITIES REGULATION

JAMES LEE MOORE III Reece, Moore, Pendergraft 75 North East Ave., Suite 500 P.O. Box 1788 Fayetteville, AR, 72702 479-443-2705

JAMES W. SMITH Smith Hurst 226 West Dickson Street, Suite 201 Fayetteville, AR, 72701 479-301-2444

ROBERT S. JONES Barrett & Deacon 300 South Church Street, Third Floor P.O. Box 1700 Jonesboro, AR, 72403 870-931-1700

TOM D. WOMACK Womack, Landis, Phelps & McNeill Century Center 301 West Washington Ave. P.O. Box 3077 Jonesboro, AR, 72403 870-932-0900

JEB H. JOYCE

Kutak Rock 124 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3706 501-975-3000

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3699 501-371-0808

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C. DOUGLAS BUFORD, JR. JOHN WILLIAM SPIVEY III Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3699 501-371-0808

STUART W. HANKINS Hankins Law Firm 800 West Fourth Street P.O. Box 5151 North Little Rock, AR, 72119 501-371-9226

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W. JACKSON WILLIAMS Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-0800

PAUL B. BENHAM III

Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, AR, 72201-4420 501-379-1700

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H. WATT GREGORY III

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J. SHEPHERD RUSSELL III Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

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SECURITIZATION AND STRUCTURED FINANCE LAW

JOHN ALAN LEWIS Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 5414 Pinnacle Point Drive, Suite 500 Rogers, AR, 72758-8131 479-464-5650

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

JOHN S. SELIG Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

MICHAEL O. PARKER Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor 425 West Capitol Ave. Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-375-9151

JOHN B. PEACE Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor 425 West Capitol Ave. Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-375-9151

J. LEE BROWN Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

BRYAN DUKE Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

WALTER M. EBEL III Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011


BYRON M. EISEMAN, JR.

RAY F. COX, JR.

MICHAEL O. PARKER

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor 425 West Capitol Ave. Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-375-9151

PRICE C. GARDNER

J. CHARLES DOUGHERTY

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3699 501-371-0808

ROBERT T. SMITH

TRADEMARK LAW

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

JOHN C. LESSEL John C. Lessel 11601 Pleasant Ridge Road, Suite 301 Little Rock, AR, 72212 501-954-9000

DAVID A. SMITH Kutak Rock 124 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3706 501-975-3000

THOMAS C. VAUGHAN, JR. Lax, Vaughan, Fortson, McKenzie & Rowe Cantrell West Building, Suite 201 11300 Cantrell Road Little Rock, AR, 72212 501-376-6565

THOMAS L. OVERBEY Overbey, Strigel, Boyd & Westbrook 10809 Executive Center Drive, Suite 310 Little Rock, AR, 72211-6022 501-664-8105

CRAIG H. WESTBROOK Overbey, Strigel, Boyd & Westbrook 10809 Executive Center Drive, Suite 310 Little Rock, AR, 72211-6022 501-664-8105

C. BRANTLY BUCK Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, AR, 72201-2893 501-375-9131

BRYANT CRANFORD Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, AR, 72201-2893 501-375-9131

W. WILSON JONES Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, AR, 72201-2893 501-375-9131

CRAIG S. LAIR Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, AR, 72201-2893 501-375-9131

JOHN R. TISDALE Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3699 501-371-0808

STEPHEN D. CARVER Carver Patent Law Pleasant Valley Corporate Center, Suite 800 2024 Arkansas Valley Drive Little Rock, AR, 72212 501-224-1500

HERMANN IVESTER Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

KATHRYN BENNETT PERKINS Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, AR, 72201-2893 501-375-9131

HAROLD J. EVANS Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-0800

J. CHARLES DOUGHERTY Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3699 501-371-0808

TRANSPORTATION LAW SUSAN KELLER KENDALL

ANTHONY A. HILLIARD Ramsay, Bridgforth, Robinson and Raley Simmons Banking Building, 11th Floor 501 Main Street P.O. Box 8509 Pine Bluff, AR, 71611 870-535-9000

TECHNOLOGY LAW HAROLD J. EVANS Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-0800

JEFFREY H. DIXON Eichenbaum, Liles & Heister 124 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1900 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3717 501-376-4531

W. THOMAS BAXTER Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

J. LEE BROWN Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

ALLISON J. CORNWELL Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

SARAH COTTON PATTERSON Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

TRUSTS AND ESTATES

WILLIAM DIXON HAUGHT

Thomas, Hickey & Shepherd 423 North Washington Ave. El Dorado, AR, 71730-5615 870-862-3478

WILLIAM JACKSON BUTT II Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor 19 East Mountain Street P.O. Box 1688 Fayetteville, AR, 72702-1688 479-521-7600

JAMES LEE MOORE III Reece, Moore, Pendergraft 75 North East Ave., Suite 500 P.O. Box 1788 Fayetteville, AR, 72702 479-443-2705

JAMES W. SMITH Smith Hurst 226 West Dickson Street, Suite 201 Fayetteville, AR, 72701 479-301-2444

ROBERT S. JONES Barrett & Deacon 300 South Church Street, Third Floor P.O. Box 1700 Jonesboro, AR, 72403 870-931-1700

TOM D. WOMACK Womack, Landis, Phelps & McNeill Century Center 301 West Washington Ave. P.O. Box 3077 Jonesboro, AR, 72403 870-932-0900

BRUCE E. MUNSON Commercial Litigation Medical Malpractice Law - Defendants Personal Injury Litigation – Defendants Product Liability Litigation – Defendants

BEVERLY A. ROWLETT Bet-the-Company Litigation Commercial Litigation Personal Injury Litigation – Defendants

K. COLEMAN WESTBROOK, JR. Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

JOSEPH HICKEY

CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR MEMBERS NAMED AS BEST LAWYERS IN AMERICA

BYRON M. EISEMAN, JR. Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Kendall Drewyor Law Firm Bank of Rogers, Suite 201 3706 Pinnacle Hills Parkway Rogers, AR, 72758-8897 479-464-9828

TED N. DRAKE Bridges Law Firm 315 East Eighth Ave. P.O. Box 7808 Pine Bluff, AR, 71611 870-534-5532

JOHN B. PEACE

Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor 425 West Capitol Ave. Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-375-9151

Haught & Wade 111 Center Street, Suite 1320 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-375-5257

JOHN COGAN WADE Haught & Wade 111 Center Street, Suite 1320 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-375-5257

JOHN E. MOORE Personal Injury Litigation – Defendants

TIMOTHY L. BOONE Medical Malpractice Law – Defendants Personal Injury Litigation – Defendants

JOHN C. LESSEL John C. Lessel 11601 Pleasant Ridge Road, Suite 301 Little Rock, AR, 72212 501-954-9000

STEVE BAUMAN Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

JENNIFER R. PIERCE Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

THOMAS L. OVERBEY Overbey, Strigel, Boyd & Westbrook 10809 Executive Center Drive, Suite 310 Little Rock, AR, 72211-6022 501-664-8105

R i Regions Center C t {ääÊ7iÃÌÊ >«ˆÌœ]Ê-ՈÌiÊ£™ääÊUʈÌ̏iÊ,œVŽ]Ê,ÊÇÓÓä£ ­x䣮ÊÎÇ{‡ÈxÎxÊUÊ>ÝÊ­x䣮ÊÎÇ{‡x™äÈ www.mrmblaw.com

A civil litigation firm serving all of Arkansas

GEORGE N. PLASTIRAS Plastiras Law Firm 101 South Spring Street, Suite 300 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-859-0986 ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES

NOVEMBER 7, 2012

53


C. BRANTLY BUCK

CHRISTOPHER T. ROGERS

PHILLIP J. WELLS

R. SCOTT ZUERKER

L. ERIC NEWKIRK

Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, AR, 72201-2893 501-375-9131

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 5414 Pinnacle Point Drive, Suite 500 Rogers, AR, 72758-8131 479-464-5650

McDaniel & Wells 400 South Main Street Jonesboro, AR, 72401 870-932-5950

Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon, & Galchus 5401 Rogers Ave., Suite 200 Fort Smith, AR, 72903 479-783-8200

Mayton, Newkirk & Jones The Lyon Building, Suite 200 401 West Capitol Ave. Little Rock, AR, 72201-4823 501-376-0504

PHILIP M. WILSON

Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins 400 West Capital Ave., Suite 2400 Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-372-1887

WILLIAM B. ROBERTS William B. Roberts 3903 Water Oak Drive Texarkana, AR, 71854 903-293-1211

CRAIG S. LAIR

VENTURE CAPITAL LAW

Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, AR, 72201-2893 501-375-9131

H. WATT GREGORY III Kutak Rock 124 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3706 501-975-3000

DAN C. YOUNG Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, AR, 72201-2893 501-375-9131

WATER LAW WALTER G. WRIGHT, JR.

TED N. DRAKE

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 1800 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Bridges Law Firm 315 East Eighth Ave. P.O. Box 7808 Pine Bluff, AR, 71611 870-534-5532

JAMES C. MOSER, JR. Bridges Law Firm 315 East Eighth Ave. P.O. Box 7808 Pine Bluff, AR, 71611 870-534-5532 Ramsay, Bridgforth, Robinson and Raley Simmons Banking Building, 11th Floor 501 Main Street P.O. Box 8509 Pine Bluff, AR, 71611 870-535-9000

Philip M. Wilson Law 1501 North University Ave., Suite 255 Little Rock, AR, 72207 501-374-4000

GREGORY GILES Moore & Giles 1206 North State Line Ave. Texarkana, AR, 71854 870-774-5191

JOSEPH H. PURVIS

BRIAN H. RATCLIFF Shackleford, Phillips & Ratcliff 100 East Church Street P.O. Box 1718 El Dorado, AR, 71731-1718 870-862-5523

BRIAN ROSENTHAL

CURTIS L. NEBBEN Bassett Law Firm 221 North College Ave. P.O. Box 3618 Fayetteville, AR, 72702-3618 479-521-9996

EDDIE H. WALKER, JR. Walker, Shock & Harp 400 North Sixth Street P.O. Box 998 Fort Smith, AR, 72902-0998 479-783-7600

CONSTANCE G. CLARK Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor 19 East Mountain Street P.O. Box 1688 Fayetteville, AR, 72702-1688 479-521-7600

BEST LAWYERS 2013 IN ARKANSAS

CONTACT INFO:

These lists are excerpted from The Best Lawyers in America® 2013, which includes listings for more than 50,000 lawyers in 129 specialties, in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. The Best Lawyers in America® is published by Woodward/White, Inc., Aiken, South Carolina and can be ordered directly from the publisher. For information call 803-648-0300; write 237 Park Ave., SW, Aiken, SC 29801; email info@bestlawyers. com; or visit www.bestlawyers.com. Online subscriptions to Best Lawyers® databases are available at www.bestlawyers.com

DISCLAIMER:

Woodward/White Inc., has used its best efforts in assembling material for this list but does not warrant that the information contained herein is complete or accurate, and does not assume, and hereby disclaims, any liability to any person for any loss or damage caused by errors or omissions herein whether such errors or omissions result from negligence, accident, or any other cause. All listed attorneys have been verified as being members in good standing with their respective state bar associations as of August 1, 2012, where that information is publicly available. Consumers should contact their state bar for verification and additional information prior to securing legal services of any attorney.

COPYRIGHT:

Copyright 2012 by Woodward/White, Inc., Aiken, SC. All rights reserved. This list, or parts thereof, must not be reproduced in any form without permission. No commercial use of this list may be made without permission of Woodward/White, Inc. No fees may be charged, directly or indirectly, for the use of this list without permission. “The Best Lawyers in America” and “Best Lawyers” are registered trademarks of Woodward/White, Inc.

METHODOLOGY:

Inclusion in Best Lawyers® is based entirely on peer review. The methodology is designed to capture, as accurately as possible, the consensus opinion of leading lawyers about the professional abilities of their colleagues within the same geographical area and legal practice area. Best Lawyers employs a sophisticated, conscientious, rational, and transparent survey process designed to elicit meaningful and substantive evaluations of the quality of legal services. Our belief has always been that the quality of a peer-review survey is directly related to the quality of its voting pool. Lawyers are not allowed to or required to pay a fee to be listed, nor is any purchase required. For additional information that may not appear in this section, please see our Frequently Asked Questions page.

NOMINATION PROCESS

To be included in the Best Lawyers peer review process, an attorney must first be nominated. Clients, other lawyers, and marketing teams are the primary sources of nominations for Best Lawyers, but anyone can submit a nomination; we only ask that a lawyer not nominate himself or herself. All lawyers in the previous edition of Best Lawyers are automatically nominated into their listed practice area(s) for the next

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NOVEMBER 7, 2012

ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES

BETTY J. HARDY Coplin, Hardy, & Stotts One Union Plaza, Suite 1650 124 West Capitol Ave. Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-707-0300

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WORKERS’ COMPENSATION LAW  CLAIMANTS

ANTHONY A. HILLIARD

RANDY P. MURPHY

Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor 425 West Capitol Ave. Little Rock, AR, 72201 501-375-9151

GUY ALTON WADE Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2000 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3522 501-376-2011

FRANK B. NEWELL Laser Law Firm 101 South Spring Street, Suite 300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-2488 501-376-2981

MICHAEL E. RYBURN Ryburn Law Firm 10825 Financial Center Parkway, Suite 136 Little Rock, AR, 72211-3555 501-228-8100

CAROL L. WORLEY Worley Wood & Parrish One Financial Centre Parkway, Suite 411 650 South Shackleford Road Little Rock, AR, 72211 501-225-3535

JOHN D. DAVIS Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3699 501-371-0808

LEE J. MULDROW Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Ave., Suite 2300 Little Rock, AR, 72201-3699 501-371-0808

MICHAEL R. MAYTON

MICHAEL J. DENNIS

Mayton, Newkirk & Jones The Lyon Building, Suite 200 401 West Capitol Ave. Little Rock, AR, 72201-4823 501-376-0504

Bridges Law Firm 315 East Eighth Ave. P.O. Box 7808 Pine Bluff, AR, 71611 870-534-5532

©PHOTOS.COM, DANIEL WIEDEMANN

W. WILSON JONES Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, AR, 72201-2893 501-375-9131

peer review process and must garner enough positive votes to be included in the next edition. Nominators must choose a practice area from our list to ensure that the nomination is properly submitted. You can access the practice area list for each country by clicking here. Click here (here for UK and AU) to access/download a Best Lawyers nomination form.

VOTING

Voting attorneys for Best Lawyers are those currently listed in the publication, creating an unparalleled level of transparency in our polling process. Customized ballots are generated for each voter and are populated with nominees in the voter’s corresponding geographic area and practice area(s). Because Best Lawyers’ voters provide peer review within their own geographic area and practice area, lists are not subject to the distortions of “open” voting. A large and open voting pool introduces a host of potential distortions to the selection process, including encouraging collusion between lawyers to secure votes. Whether by telephone, e-mail, or fax, we ask voting lawyers the same question, “If you were unable to take a case yourself, how likely would you be to refer it to this nominee?” Lawyers are asked to give nominees 5-1 numerical grades – 5 for a lawyer the voter would certainly refer a case to, 4 for a lawyer the voter would probably refer a case to, 3 for a lawyer the voter might hesitate to refer a case to, 2 for a lawyer they would likely not refer a case to, and 1 for an attorney they would definitely not refer a case to. Voting lawyers are allowed to provide decimal points in order to make their votes more precise. The option to choose “I Don’t Know” is also available, which signifies that the voter is not familiar with a particular attorney’s work. Best Lawyers does not set artificial quotas or target percentages for the size of its lists.

INCLUSION

Once all of the peer review evaluations have been compiled, the votes are averaged. Votes from partners within a nominee’s own firm are weighed appropriately, and eccentric votes – far better or far worse than the others – are tagged for further review. As soon as the decisions are finalized, the selected lawyers are checked against state bar association sanction lists to make sure that he or she is in good standing with the ethics committee of his or her state bar. Notifications of congratulation are sent to all the listed lawyers to inform them of their inclusion. Firms who have designated contacts with us will also receive comprehensive summaries of the survey results for their firm(s). It is important to note that the practice area of a lawyer listed in Best Lawyers is based on the nomination and corresponding votes received from their peers. Listed lawyers are not permitted to add practice areas they want to be included in, as they must be nominated for and voted into each practice area. Subspecialties may be added to existing practice area listings to assist clients in locating an attorney that has expertise in very particular legal matters. Lawyers do not automatically remain on the list, but must be voted onto the list during each voting cycle to be included in subsequent editions. Ultimately, a lawyer’s inclusion on these lists is based on the subjective judgments of his or her fellow attorneys. While it is true that the lists may at times disproportionately reward visibility or popularity, we remain as confident today as we were three decades ago that the breadth of our survey, the candor of our respondents, and the sophistication of our polling methodology largely correct for any biases and that these lists continue to represent the most reliable, accurate, and useful as well as the most transparent guide to the best lawyers available anywhere.


Dining WHAT’S COOKIN’ MATTHEW BELL, sous chef at Ashley’s at the Capital Hotel, will open the restaurant and bar South on Main in the Oxford American magazine’s venue of the same name at 1300 Main St. Bell will own the restaurant and bar and pay rent to the Oxford American, which will program the venue with an array of arts and culture. Barring construction delays, Bell and Oxford American publisher Warwick Sabin point to February as a target for opening. Bell said he plans to follow the magazine’s lead in exploring the South with his menu. “You don’t have to put a ton of research into knowing what food you’re going to do when you have something like the Oxford American that’s laid the groundwork. Not just its food issue, but also with the idea of looking at the whole South and realizing that it’s not all fried chicken and banjos. I want to take a look at the entire Southern experience and Southern culture.” A native of Missoula, Mont., Bell, 33, trained at Le Cordon Bleu in Austin, Texas, before moving to North Little Rock, his wife’s hometown, to intern at Ristorante Capeo. After spending time at Capeo and Argenta Seafood Co., Bell moved to the Capital Hotel, where he’s remained for the last four years. Since chef Lee Richardson left the hotel in June, Bell has run the kitchen in Ashley’s, setting lunch and dinner menus. Bell and Sabin have long been friends. After the Oxford American announced that it had leased the South Main space, Bell invited Sabin to dinner to pitch him on his vision for the restaurant component. “After about five minutes of talking, we knew we were exactly on the same page.” “Refined Southern” is how Bell describes his vision for the South on Main menu. “We named our LLC Home to Table because we want to take that vision of what people do at home and refine it and offer it in a casual setting with great service and really showcase that the South has always done so much with so little, whether it be whole animal butchery or whole vegetables.” He expects the price points to be around $8 to $15 for lunch and $15 to $25 for dinner. Lunch will be served every weekday, and dinner will be offered Tuesday through Saturday. Bell said he and Sabin agree that programming on the stage will follow dinner service, CONTINUED ON PAGE 59 56

NOVEMBER 7, 2012

ARKANSAS TIMES

Newk’s Express Cafe

4317 Warden Road, NLR 753-8826 newks.com

QUICK BITE Though pizzas are always hit-and-miss at any restaurant without the word “pizza” featured prominently on the sign out front, give Newk’s a shot. They’ve got a solid, somewhat-chewy crust, and a big slate of interesting pies. We’ll definitely be trying the Debra (grilled chicken, parmesan, Roma tomatoes and pesto) and the spicy shrimp (shrimp, bell peppers, chili oil, cilantro, crushed red chilies, and parmesan cheese) on an upcoming visit. HOURS 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. daily OTHER INFO Beer and wine, credit cards accepted.

SOLID SANDWICH: Newk’s Italian sandwich and a Caesar salad.

Yes, Newk’s NLR chain does sandwiches, salads right.

A

week ago, this writer would have been one of the first to tell you that Central Arkansas needs another sandwich-and-soup shop the way we need an extra month called Sweatsumore shoehorned in between July and August. There’s something of a glut in the salad-n-sammich market, and most of the ones that are here, in our experience, just aren’t all that overwhelming. Then we tried out the new joint called Newk’s Express Cafe on the freeway near McCain Mall. Though we weren’t expecting much — we’ve been let down too often by the genre — Newk’s turned out to be something of a treat on every front we sampled, with big, carefully-made portions, a nice menu featuring good food, quick service, and prices that won’t leave you wishing you’d hit the McDonald’s just up the freeway. Part of a chain with locations in 12 states, Newk’s isn’t doing anything all that revolutionary. It’s just that their

selections are a bit more upscale than a place like, for example, Jason’s Deli, at a comparable price. Their big menu features 10 kinds of salads, 11 styles of 10-inch, thin crust pizzas, 14 sandwiches, and a rotating selection of soups. On our first trip to Newk’s, we tried the toasted Italian sandwich ($7.99) and our companion gave one of the veggie pizzas ($8.29) a twirl. The sandwich turned out to be excellent and nicely sized, featuring loads of capicola, mortadella, pepperoni, salami, provolone, fresh veggies, and a spicy red-pepper sauce to give it a little kick. The pasta salad we ordered as a side was a bit of a letdown, but the sandwich hit the spot. Ditto for our companion and her veggie pizza, with grilled portobello mushrooms, bell peppers, basil pesto artichoke hearts, goat cheese, red onion and more. Though the goat cheese wasn’t doing it for her, she said everything else about the pizza was great, and there’s probably a good chance Newk’s could

substitute some other cheese for you on request. On a later visit, companion decided to sample the soup menu, selecting their tortilla soup and half a pesto chicken sandwich ($7.79). We, meanwhile, tried one of their Ultimate Salads ($8.99), with mixed greens, grilled chicken breast, ham, turkey bacon, cheddar and honey mustard dressing. Again, both our orders turned out to be really fine, particularly our friend’s spicy, complicated bowl of tortilla soup, which paired perfectly with the chicken, roasted peppers and goat cheese of her sandwich (she liked the goat cheese that time ... go figure). Our salad, too, was very good, served in a bowl that could have easily doubled as a helmet in event of an air raid, with very fresh ingredients and just enough of their spicy-sweet dressing. Though we were worried about the amount of meat in the salad — we’re prone to think that getting too complicated with anything other than the veggies sorta defeats the whole purpose of having a salad — it turned out to be a good pairing once we tossed it a bit. Overall, we found Newk’s to be a comfortable, quick, affordable, tasty dining spot, one sure to be hopping between now and Christmas as the traffic at nearby McCain Mall fills with holiday shoppers. The ultimate measure for this reviewer is whether or not we’d return to a place on our own dime (as opposed to the Arkansas Times’). We’ll be back soon.


Information in our restaurant capsules reflects the opinions of the newspaper staff and its reviewers. The newspaper accepts no advertising or other considerations in exchange for reviews, which are conducted anonymously. We invite the opinions of readers who think we are in error.

AMERICAN

1620 SAVOY Revamped West Little Rock landmark restaurant. The food is still highquality and painstakingly prepared — a wideranging dinner menu that’s sure to please almost everyone. 1620 Market St. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-221-1620. D Mon.-Sat., BR Sun. ALLEY OOPS Plate lunches, burgers and homemade desserts. Remarkable chess pie. 11900 Kanis Road. Full bar, All CC. $-$$. 501-221-9400. LD Mon.-Sat. BR Sun. B-SIDE The little breakfast place turns tradition on its ear, offering French toast wrapped in bacon on a stick, a must-have dish called “biscuit mountain” and beignets with lemon curd. 11121 Rodney Parham Road. Full bar, All CC. $$. 501-716-2700. BL Wed.-Sun. BAR LOUIE A something-for-everybody menu so broad and varied to be almost schizophrenic. 11525 Cantrell Road, Suite 924. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-228-0444. LD daily. 11525 Cantrell Road. 501-228-0444. BIG WHISKEY’S AMERICAN BAR AND GRILL A modern grill pub with all the bells and whistles: 30 flat screen TVs, boneless wings, whiskey on tap. Plus, the usual burgers, steaks, soups and salads. 225 E. Markham St. Full bar, All CC. $$. 501-324-2449. LD daily. BOBBY’S COUNTRY COOKIN’ One of the better plate lunch spots in the area, with some of the best fried chicken and pot roast around, a changing daily casserole and wonderful homemade pies. 301 N. Shackleford Road, Suite E1. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-2249500. L Mon.-Fri. BOGIE’S BAR AND GRILL A menu filled with burgers, salads and giant desserts, plus a few steak, fish and chicken main courses. 120 W. Pershing Blvd. NLR. Full bar, All CC. $$. 501-812-0019. D daily. THE BOX Cheeseburgers and French fries are greasy and wonderful and not like their fastfood cousins. 1023 W. Seventh St. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-372-8735. L Mon.-Fri. BUFFALO GRILL A great crispy-off-the-griddle cheeseburger and hand-cut fries star. 1611 Rebsamen Park Road. Full bar, CC. $$. 501-2969535. LD daily. 400 N. Bowman Road. Full bar, Beer, All CC. $$. 501-224-0012. LD daily. CATFISH CITY AND BBQ GRILL Basic fried fish and sides, including green tomato pickles, and tasty ribs and sandwiches in beef, pork and sausage. 1817 S. University Ave. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-663-7224. LD Tue.-Sat. CHEERS Good burgers and sandwiches, vegetarian offerings and salads at lunch and fish specials, and good steaks in the evening. 2010 N. Van Buren. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-6635937. LD Mon.-Sat. 1901 Club Manor Drive. Maumelle. Full bar, All CC. 501-851-6200. LD daily, BR Sun. CORNERSTONE PUB & GRILL A sandwich, pizza and beer joint in the heart of North Little Rock’s Argenta district. 314 Main St. NLR. Full bar, All CC. $-$$. 501-374-1782. LD Mon.-Sat. DAVE AND RAY’S DOWNTOWN DINER Breakfast buffet daily featuring biscuits and gravy, home fries, sausage and made-to-order omelets. 824 W. Capitol Ave. No alcohol. $. 501-372-8816. BL Mon.-Fri. DAVID’S BUTCHER BOY BURGERS Serious hamburgers, steak salads, homemade custard.

BELLY UP

B Breakfast L Lunch D Dinner $ Inexpensive (under $8/person) $$ Moderate ($8-$20/person) $$$ Expensive (over $20/person) CC Accepts credit cards

101 S. Bowman Road. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-227-8333. LD Mon.-Sat. DOGTOWN COFFEE AND COOKERY An up-to-date sandwich, salad and fancy coffee kind of place, well worth a visit. 6725 John F. Kennedy Blvd. NLR. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-833-3850. BL Mon.-Sun., BLD Fri.-Sat.,. E’S BISTRO Try the heaping grilled salmon BLT on a buttery croissant. 3812 JFK Boulevard. NLR. No alcohol, All CC. $$. 501-771-6900. FLIGHT DECK A not-your-typical daily lunch special highlights this spot, which also features inventive sandwiches, salads and a popular burger. Central Flying Service at Adams Field. Beer, Wine, All CC. $-$$. 501-975-9315. BL Mon.-Sat.

Check out the Times’ food blog, Eat Arkansas arktimes.com

HILLCREST ARTISAN MEATS A fancy charcuterie and butcher shop with excellent daily soup and sandwich specials. 2807 Kavanaugh Blvd. Suite B. No alcohol, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-671-6328. L Mon.-Sat. THE HOP DINER The downtown incarnation of the old dairy bar, with excellent burgers, onion rings, shakes and daily specials. 201 E. Markham. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-2440975. KITCHEN EXPRESS Delicious “meat and three” restaurant offering big servings of homemade soul food. Maybe Little Rock’s best fried chicken. 4600 Asher Ave. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-666-3500. BLD Mon.-Sat., LD Sun.

GOOD FRIENDS • FINE SPIRITS • GREAT TASTE Martini / Wine Bar • Piano Bar 35 wines by the glass 335 Wine SeLeCtionS Fine SPiritS FroM around the WorLd (SCotCh LiSt FroM every region oF SCotLand) 6 SingLe-BarreL BourBonS Private CorPorate LunCheS

best steAk 2005-2012

Now BookiNg Holiday ReseRvatioNs 500 Pres. Clinton Avenue (river MArket DistriCt) reservAtions (501) 324-2999

FREE VALET PARKING

sonnywilliamssteakroom.com

A FUSION OF FLAVORS FOR LITTLE ROCK wine

/ dine / energize

5501 KAVANAUGH BLVD. STE. G / IN THE HEIGHTS / 501.603.0080 STEAK SPECIALS EVERY NIGHT! / JAZZZZY JAZZ NIGHT TUESDAYS & WEDNESDAYS HAPPY HOUR MON-SUN / OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK / LATE NIGHT SPECIALS THUR-SAT LADIES PARTY ALL NIGHT EVERY MONDAY & THURSDAY RJ TAO LIVE ENTERTAINMENT THUR-SAT 10-CLOSE / KIDS EAT FREE SUNDAY-WEDNESDAY

LETTI’S CAKES Soups, sandwiches and salads available at this cake, pie and cupcake bakery. 3700 JFK Blvd. NLR. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-708-7203. LD (closes at 6 p.m.) Mon.-Fri. L Sat. LYNN’S CHICAGO FOODS Outpost for Chicago specialties like Vienna hot dogs and Italian beef sandwiches. 6501 Geyer Springs. No alcohol, All CC. $. 501-568-2646. LD Mon.-Sat. MADDIE’S PLACE If you like your catfish breaded Cajun-style, your grits rich with garlic and cream and your oysters fried up in perfect puffs, this is the place for you. 1615 Rebsamen Park Road. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-6604040. LD Tue.-Sat. MASON’S DELI AND GRILL Heaven for those who believe everything is better with sauerkraut on top. 400 Clinton Ave. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-376-3354. LD Mon.-Sat. MIMI’S CAFE Breakfast is our meal of choice here. Portions are plenty to last you through the afternoon, especially if you get a muffin on the side. Middle-America comfort-style entrees make-up other meals, from pot roast to pasta dishes. 11725 Chenal Parkway. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-221-3883. BLD daily, BR Sun. PACKET HOUSE GRILL An up-to-date take on sophisticated Southern cuisine served up in a stunning environment that dresses up the historic house with a modern, comfortable feel. 1406 Cantrell Road. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-372-1578. D Tue.-Sat. PHIL’S HAM AND TURKEY PLACE Fine hams, turkeys and other specialty meats served whole, by the pound or in sandwich form. 11121 N. Rodney Parham Road. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-225-2136. LD Mon.-Fri. L Sat. SIMPLY NAJIYYAH’S FISHBOAT & MORE Good catfish and corn fritters. 1717 Wright Ave. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-562-3474. LD Tue.-Sat. SLICK’S SANDWICH SHOP & DELI Meatand-two plate lunches in state office building. 101 E. Capitol Ave. No alcohol. 501-375-3420. BL Mon.-Fri. SPECTATORS GRILL AND PUB Burgers, soups, salads and other beer food. 1012 W. 34th St. NLR. Full bar, All CC. $-$$. 501-791-0990. LD Mon.-Sat. SPORTS PAGE One of the largest, juiciest, most flavorful burgers in town. Grilled turkey and hot cheese on sourdough gets praise, too. 414 Louisiana St. Beer, Wine, All CC. $-$$. 501-3729316. LD Mon.-Fri. STARVING ARTIST CAFE All kinds of crepes, served as entrees or as dessert. The Black Forest ham sandwich is a perennial favorite with the lunch crowd. Dinner menu changes daily, good wine list. 411 N. Main St. NLR. Full bar, All CC. $$. 501-372-7976. L Tue.-Sat., D Tue., Fri.-Sat. THE TAVERN SPORTS GRILL Burgers, barbecue and more. 17815 Chenal Parkway. Full bar, All CC. $-$$. 501-830-2100. LD daily. TROPICAL SMOOTHIE CAFE Smoothies, sandwiches and salads. 10221 N. Rodney Parham Road. No alcohol, All CC. $$. 501-2242233. BLD daily; 400 President Clinton Ave. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-786-6555. L Mon.-Sat.; 524 Broadway St. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 246-3145. BLD Mon.-Fri. (closes at 6 CONTINUED ON PAGE 58

BIG BODACIOUS STEAKS | EXOTIC MEATS | FONDUES | PACIFIC RIM CUISINES | ULTRA LOUNGE www.arktimes.com

NOVEMBER 7, 2012

57


CROSSWORD

DINING CAPSULES, CONT.

EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ Across 1 Harness horse’s gait 5 Light bluish green 9 Reading chair accompaniers 14 Tennis’s Mandlikova 15 It’s just under 8: Abbr. 16 Intensely passionate 17 Athlete’s booster 19 One of many on a monitor 20 Ving of Hollywood 21 Subject of a Car and Driver report 23 It was transferred to China in 1999 24 Sleek, briefly 25 Detergent with a glass in every box, long ago 26 Where to paint a model 28 Pea or peanut

31 Mormon church, for short 32 D.C. team since ’05 34 Kind of colony in “Papillon” 35 & 37 Leave quickly … or what both words in 17-, 21-, 26-, 49-, 56and 61-Across could be? 39 Not live 42 “Uh-huh” 44 N.Y.C. commuters’ inits. 47 “Yippee!” 49 Catholic remembrance 52 Tokyo, formerly 53 Word after e or G 55 Mitchum rival 56 Tipoff 59 See the light of day 60 Virus that arose in the Congo 61 ×

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE M A F I A

A N N O U N E N C F I E T A R

A P P L Y

E P I C S

N O L I E

D R A M A

L S E A A L N O T H O E N I N O L D P P A S S I T I N O T A E S R

P A W N E D

F I V E K

C G R L S L I A O A S R A D E I C K I S N A S A X E D T H E X T G O A A X C O R S T S L A S H S G O O D M D O L T P A I T I T E R R A D U R K T B S G U S

A M E N U

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Down Kind of blanket Mounted a fierce campaign Works without a break? Landing strip Life’s pleasures The 9-Down might put one out, briefly Salutation in an old-fashioned love letter Foul-up

9 “Colors” org.

S 10 Throw ___ Y 11 Screwy in the S head O 12 Suppose P 13 Fizzy water

A I L S E T O N S E T

63 Bags with handles 64 Indigo plant 65 Ready to be driven, in golf 66 ___ attack 67 ___ Pop, 2010 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee 68 Lat. and Lith., formerly

P E E L S

18 Hydrologist’s field: Abbr. 22 IM pioneer

24 Japanese brew

27 “Taking Woodstock” director Lee

29 Inventor Whitney

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Puzzle by Gary Cee

30 Bath ___

40 Birders’ magazine 50 ___ Club 51 Peaks 41 Plug 54 ___ Mountains 43 Come up ___ The Doors’ “Love (Asian range) ___ Madly” 44 Puts one and one 57 Heartfelt request together? Mrs. Morgenstern 58 Soak up some on “Rhoda” 45 Set off rays D.D.E. opponent 46 The 1 and 2 in 59 Snakelike 1+2=3 Meadowlands 62 Korean War 48 Soprano Sumac team fighter

33 Fantastic bargain 35 36 38 39

For answers, call 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 a minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800-814-5554. Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. AT&T users: Text NYTX to 386 to download puzzles, or visit nytimes.com/mobilexword for more information. Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/wordplay. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords.

THIS MODERN WORLD

p.m.) 10221 N. Rodney Parham Road. No alcohol, All CC. $$. 501-2242233. BLD daily 12911 Cantrell Road. No alcohol, All CC. $$. 501-376-2233. BLD daily 400 President Clinton Ave. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-7866555. L Mon.-Sat. UNIVERSITY MARKET @ 4CORNERS A food truck court where local vendors park daily. Check facebook.com/4cornersmarket to see what carts are scheduled to be parked. 6221 Colonel Glenn Road. CC. $-$$. 501-515-1661. LD daily. VICTORIAN GARDEN We’ve found the fare quite tasty and somewhat daring and different with its healthy, balanced entrees and crepes. 4801 North Hills Blvd. NLR. $-$$. 501-758-4299. L Tue.-Sat.

BENIHANA JAPANESE STEAKHOUSE Enjoy the cooking show, make sure you get a little filet with your meal, and do plenty of dunking in that fabulous ginger sauce. 2 Riverfront Place. NLR. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-374-8081. BLD Sun.-Sat. CHI DIMSUM & BISTRO A huge menu spans the Chinese provinces and offers a few twists on the usual local offerings. 6 Shackleford Drive. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-221-7737. LD daily. 17200 Chenal Parkway. No alcohol, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-821-8000. LD Mon.-Sat., D Sun. FAR EAST ASIAN CUISINE Old favorites such as orange beef or chicken and Hunan green beans are prepared with care. 11610 Pleasant Ridge Road. Full bar, All CC. $$. 501-219-9399. LD daily. FORBIDDEN GARDEN Classic, American-ized Chinese food in a modern setting. 14810 Cantrell Road. Beer, Wine, All CC. $-$$. 501-868-8149. LD daily. FU LIN Quality in the made-to-order entrees is high, as is the quantity. 200 N. Bowman Road. Full bar, All CC. $$. 501-225-8989. LD daily, BR Sun. IGIBON JAPANESE RESTAURANT It’s a complex place, where the food is almost always good and the ambiance and service never fail to please. 11121 N. Rodney Parham Road. Beer, Wine, All CC. $$. 501-217-8888. LD Mon.-Sat. KIYEN’S SEAFOOD STEAK AND SUSHI Sushi, steak and other Japanese fare. 17200 Chenal Pkwy. Suite 100. Full bar. $$-$$$. 501-821-7272. LD daily. KOBE JAPANESE STEAKHOUSE & SUSHI Stands taller in its sushi offerings than at the grill. 11401 Financial Centre Parkway. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-225-5999. L Mon.-Sat. D daily. VAN LANG CUISINE Terrific Vietnamese cuisine, particularly the way the pork dishes and the assortment of rolls are presented. Great prices, too. Massive menu, but it’s user-friendly for locals with full English descriptions and numbers for easy ordering. 3600 S. University Ave. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-570-7700. LD daily.

BARBECUE

CAPITOL SMOKEHOUSE AND GRILL Beef, pork and chicken, all smoked to melting tenderness and doused with a choice of sauces. The crusty but tender backribs star. Side dishes are top quality. A plate lunch special is now available. 915 W. Capitol Ave. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-372-4227. L Mon.-Fri. CROSS EYED PIG BBQ COMPANY Traditional barbecue favorites smoked well such as pork ribs, beef brisket and smoked chicken. Miss Mary’s famous potato salad is full of bacon and other goodness. Smoked items such as ham and turkeys available seasonally. 1701 Rebsamen Park Road. Full bar, All CC. $-$$. 501-265-0000. L Mon.-Sat., D Tue.-Fri. 1701 Rebsamen Park Road. Beer, Wine, All CC. $-$$. 501-227-7427. LD daily. FATBOY’S KILLER BAR-B-Q This Landmark neighborhood strip center restaurant in the far southern reaches of Pulaski County features tender ribs and pork by a contest pitmaster. Skip the regular sauce and risk the hot variety, it’s far better. 14611 Arch Street. No alcohol, All CC. $$. 501-888-4998. L Mon.-Wed. and Fri.; L Thu. HB’S BBQ Great slabs of meat with fiery barbecue sauce, but ribs are served on Tuesday only. Other days, try the tasty pork sandwich on an onion roll. 6010 Lancaster. No alcohol, No CC. $-$$. 501-565-1930. LD Mon.-Fri. MICK’S BBQ, CATFISH AND GRILL Good burgers, picnic-worthy deviled eggs and heaping barbecue sandwiches topped with sweet sauce. 3609 MacArthur Dr. NLR. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-791-2773. LD Mon.-Sun. SIMS BAR-B-QUE Great spare ribs, sandwiches, beef, half and whole chicken and an addictive vinegar-mustard-brown sugar sauce unique for this part of the country. 2415 Broadway. Beer, CC. $-$$. 501-372-6868. LD Mon.-Sat. 1307 John Barrow Road. Beer, All CC. $-$$. 501-224-2057. LD Mon.-Sat. 7601 Geyer Springs Road. Beer, All CC. $$. 501-562-8844. LD Mon.-Sat.

EUROPEAN / ETHNIC

KHALIL’S PUB Widely varied menu with European, Mexican and American influences. Go for the Bierocks, rolls filled with onions and beef. 110 S. Shackleford Road. Full bar, All CC. $$. 501-224-0224. LD daily. BR Sun. THE PANTRY The menu stays relatively true to the owner’s Czechoslovakian roots, but there’s plenty of choices to suit all tastes. 11401 Rodney Parham Road. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-353-1875. LD Mon.-Fri., D Sat.

58

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ARKANSAS TIMES


DINING CAPSULES, CONT. STAR OF INDIA The best Indian restaurant in the region, with a unique buffet at lunch and some fabulous dishes at night. 301 N. Shackleford. Beer, Wine, All CC. $$. 501-2279900. LD daily. TASTE OF ASIA Delicious Indian food in a pleasant atmosphere. Perhaps the best samosas in town. Buffet at lunch. 2629 Lakewood Village Dr. NLR. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-812-4665. LD daily. TAZIKIâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S The first Arkansas location of the chain offers gyros, grilled meats and veggies, hummus and pimento cheese. 8200 Cantrell Road. Beer, Wine, All CC. $$. 501-227-8291. LD daily 12800 Chenal Parkway. Beer, Wine, All CC. 501-225-1829. LD daily.

ITALIAN

DAMGOODE PIES A somewhat different Italian/pizza place, largely because of a spicy garlic white sauce thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s offered as an alternative to the traditional red sauce. Good bread, too. 2701 Kavanaugh Blvd. Beer, Wine, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-664-2239. LD daily. 6706 Cantrell Road. Beer, Wine, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-6642239. LD daily. 10720 Rodney Parham Road. Beer, Wine, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-664-2239. LD daily. 37 East Center St. Fayetteville. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 479-444-7437. LD daily. GUSANOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S They make the tomatoey Chicagostyle deep-dish pizza the way itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s done in the Windy City. It takes a little longer to come out of the oven, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s worth the wait. 313 President Clinton Ave. Full bar, All CC. $-$$. 501-374-1441. LD daily. 2915 Dave Ward Drive. Conway. Full bar, All CC. $$. 501-329-1100. LD daily. LARRYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PIZZA The buffet is the way to go â&#x20AC;&#x201D; fresh, hot pizza, fully loaded with ingredients, brought hot to your table, all for a low price. 1122 S. Center. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-224-8804. LD daily. 12911 Cantrell Road. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-224-8804. LD daily.

NYPD PIZZA Even the personal pizzas come in impressive combinations, and baked ziti, salads are more also are available. Cheap slice specials at lunch. 6015 Chenonceau Blvd., Suite 1. Beer, Wine, All CC. $-$$. 501-868-3911. LD Mon.-Sat., D Sun. VESUVIO Arguably Little Rockâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best Italian restaurant is in one of the most unlikely places â&#x20AC;&#x201C; tucked inside the Best Western Governorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Inn within a nondescript section of west Little Rock. 1501 Merrill Drive. Full bar, All CC. $$$. 501-225-0500. D daily. VILLA ITALIAN RESTAURANT Hearty, inexpensive, classic southern Italian dishes. 12111 W. Markham St. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-219-2244. LD Mon.-Sat.

IF YOU WERE ONE of the 3,000 folks who packed the Bernice Sculpture Garden and South Main Street on Saturday for the 2nd Annual Cornbread Festival, or even if you werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll want to know the winners of the cornbread contests, chosen by a panel of celebrity judges and festival attendees. Best Professional Traditional â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Fresh Ideas at Philander Smith. Best Professional Non-Traditional â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Loblolly Creamery. Best Professional Sweet â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Brown Sugar Bake Shop. Best Professional Overall â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Fresh Ideas at Philander Smith. Best Side Item â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Root. Best Amateur Sweet â&#x20AC;&#x201D; No entries, no winner. Best Amateur Non-Traditional â&#x20AC;&#x201D; William Fisher. Best Amateur Traditional â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Terry Wright. Best Amateur Overall â&#x20AC;&#x201D; William Fisher. Best in Show â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Fresh Ideas at Philander Smith, taking home $500.

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Amateurs and professionals in the three categories (traditional, non-traditional and sweet) won $100, a T-shirt and a gift basket. Overall winners also won a trophy, and a cast-iron Dutch oven went to The Root for Best Side Item. Best in show also won $500. THE MOSAIC TEMPLARS CULTURAL CENTER, the museum of black Arkansas entrepreneurship at 501 W. 9th St., is accepting entries for its first annual â&#x20AC;&#x153;Say it Ainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Sayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;sâ&#x20AC;? Sweet Potato Pie contest, open to both amateur and professional bakers. (The contestâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s name refers to retired restaurateur Say McIntosh, famed for his sweet potato pies.) Entries must be from scratch and not store-bought. Deadline to enter is Nov. 17; pies will be displayed and judged at the museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Holiday Open House 2-5 p.m. Dec. 2. The first eight amateur entries and first five professional entries will be accepted. Prizes will be awarded for 1st and 2nd choice in each category and there will be a Peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Choice Award presented to the crowd favorite. Contest rules and entry forms can be picked up at Mosaic Templars Cultural Center or downloaded from the museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website. Call 683-3593 for more information.

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LATINO

CASA MANANA Great guacamole and garlic beans, superlative chips and salsa (red and green) and a broad selection of fresh seafood, plus a deck out back. 6820 Cantrell Road. Full bar, All CC. $-$$. 501-280-9888. LD daily 18321 Cantrell Road. Full bar, All CC. $-$$. 501-8688822. LD daily 400 President Clinton Ave. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. BL Mon.-Sat. CASA MEXICANA Familiar Tex-Mex style items all shine, in ample portions, and the steak-centered dishes are uniformly excellent. 6929 JFK Blvd. NLR. Full bar, All CC. $$. 501-835-7876. LD daily. LA HACIENDA Creative, fresh-tasting entrees and traditional favorites, all painstakingly prepared in a festive atmosphere. 3024 Cantrell Road. Full bar, All CC. $-$$. 501-6610600. LD daily. 200 Highway 65 N. Conway. All CC. $$. 501-327-6077. LD daily. LAS DELICIAS Levy-area mercado with a taqueria and a handful of booths in the back of the store. 3401 Pike Ave. NLR. Beer, All CC. $. 501-812-4876. LAS PALMAS Mexican chain with a massive menu of choices. 10402 Stagecoach Road. Full bar, All CC. $-$$. 501-455-8500. LD daily.

WHATâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S COOKINâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, CONT. though he said he could imagine some exceptions. Read more about Bellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plans for South on Main at arktimes.com/southonmain.

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allsopp park promenade Tree Lighting Friday, november 30, 5:30 pM www.arktimes.com

NOVEMBER 7, 2012

59


A garage door from Cloplay’s Avante Collection with frosted glass available at ROYAL OVERHEAD DOOR.

NOVEMBER 7, 2012

other front door The

G

BY JANIE GINOCCHIO

arage doors — functional and utilitarian, right? Wrong. Ever seen a house with a ratty, dirty or just plain ugly garage door? Maybe the color is from 1978 or it’s taken a beating from one too many kids learning to drive? It doesn’t do anything for the look of the entire house, does it? It’s sort of like an otherwise beautiful smile that has a missing tooth. Nowadays, garage doors function as the main door for most homes, and people are starting to take more notice of this heavily used entryway. With the many different styles and materials available for garage doors, it’s easy to make sure this substantial part of your home’s exterior reflects your personality and style.

hearsay ➥ GALLERY 26 is proud to present its 17th annual holiday art show, featuring works by more than 60 Arkansas artists, including paintings, drawings, pottery, photographs, glass, sculpture, ornaments, scarves and jewelry. The opening reception is scheduled from 7-10 p.m. Nov. 10 and will feature live music. The reception is free and open to the public. The show runs through Jan. 12. ➥ The ARKANSAS ARTS CENTER MUSEUM SCHOOL will present a sale Nov. 16-17 at the Clear Channel Metroplex. Museum School instructors and students will have works on sale for as low as $5, and items include pottery, jewelry, paintings, woodwork and fused glass. The member preview party is from 6-9 p.m. Nov. 16, with the public sale scheduled from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Nov. 17. 60

NOVEMBER 7, 2012

ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES

➥ There’s a new weekly party Friday nights at Sway. It’s the same great atmosphere, plus signature drinks and high-energy dance music. ➥ POTTERY BARN has a sale on holiday bedding starting at $89. See store for details. ➥ Santa Claus is coming to town, and will be at PARK PLAZA MALL beginning Nov. 10 and will be there until Christmas Eve. Hours are 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. ➥ There will be a Paige Hamilton Design trunk show at B. BARNETT from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Nov. 13 and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Nov. 14. The holiday handbag line will be available for purchase.


Windsor Door’s SteelWood collection combines the low-cost and durability of steel with a custom wood appearance. WIndsor doors are available at ROYAL OVERHEAD DOOR.

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Holiday Open House Saturday Nov. 10th, 10-5 & Sunday Nov. 11th, 1-5

For some suggestions on what’s hot right now, we turned to Jared Smith of Royal Overhead Door. Royal has been in business for 40 years and has five offices across the state. Smith said two of the most popular residential garage door manufacturers are Clopay (which has the Good Housekeeping seal of approval) and Windsor Door. Both companies offer a variety of finishes, glass inserts and insulation offerings that will satisfy the most demanding of customers. Windsor Door is considered the leader in the garage door industry. While Windsor doors are pretty straight forward in their construction — a steel skin embossed with a wood grain with a tough tongue-in-groove joint system — you can choose from a variety of panel styles and a mindboggling array of glass inserts. If you want the look of leaded glass, Windsor offers several styles of beveled

acrylic inserts that are striking. Clopay has three lines to choose from: Portfolio, Wood and Classic, and within these lines are multiple collections. The Portfolio line is for those who like a sleek, modern look. The most striking in this series is from the Avante Collection, which features an aluminum frame with large glass panels that make up the majority of the door. You can choose the opacity of the glass to meet your privacy needs, and insulated glass is available for greater energy efficiency. Doors from the Wood line are hand-crafted from sustainable wood and come in a variety of finishes. Like the historic feel of a carriage housestyle door but want the convenience of an automatic door? Then the Clopay Wood line is for you. I’ve only scratched the surface of what’s available out there in the

world of residential garage doors. Trying to choose the right look can be overwhelming for the uninitiated, which is where Royal Overhead Door can help. Their professional staff offers specification and design services to help you find what you need. Once you’ve selected your perfect door, they’ll install it. They also offer maintenance and repair services. Talk about a one-stop shop. So if you want to update the look of your home without a complete exterior overhaul, consider changing out those garage doors. You can give that 1980s ranch style a modern kick with a glass-panel door or give your run-of-the-mill cottage a historic feel with a cedar carriage style door. Be the house on the block with the coolest garage door. It’s guaranteed to get you noticed. For more information about Royal Overhead Door, call 1-800-242-4512.

2616 Kavanaugh | 501.661.1167

Cloplay also offers a woodlook door available at ROYAL OVERHEAD DOOR. ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES

NOVEMBER 7, 2012

61


To hell with you

Y

ou’ll recall him as the ex-Bro. exGov. CheezWhizaholic, always with his hand out grasping for additional earthly treasures to lay up, now hired Murdoch throat and bass guitar in a Xian rock band that, if it isn’t named the Fox Dicks, ought to be. His latest gig has been helping mainstream Republican rape apologists get elected to high public office. He was in the news last week warning us that we’d be going to Hell when we die if we didn’t vote Republican in this week’s election. He said later that his remarks on this matter had been misinterpreted or misconstrued or taken out of context or some damned thing, that he wasn’t even talking about Hell fire or the Last Judgment. But he was. You know he was, I know he was, and the American people know he was. And the Catholic bishops, who were saying pretty much the same thing. Vote GOP or burn in Hell. Read his exact words. “Your vote will affect the future and be recorded in eternity. Will you vote the values that will stand the test of fire? This is Mike Huckabee asking you to join me November the 6th and vote based on values that will stand the test of fire.” Vote Republican-platform “values” and it’ll be recorded in eternity and you pass the test of fire. Is there any other

way to interpret this petulant idiot foolishness except as a threat of eternal damnation? The only other BOB “test of fire” that LANCASTER I know of is the inquisitorial one that authorized the collared Fox Dicks of olden times to burn you at the stake for holding or expressing opinions they didn’t approve of. Survive, you passed the test. Perish, you flunked. But surely Fox Dick Huck wasn’t pining for a test of fire so cruel and unfair. He’d want a fair and balanced test of fire, and you’d need some good old-fashioned Bible-approved Hell fire to bring that off. Two thoughts on this: 1. Voting GOP in 2012 is actually more likely to get you sent to Hell than to keep you out. When the panel of fate judges meets to render a verdict on your particular case, one of them is bound to say, “Well, the Lord said when you do it unto the least of these, you do it unto me, and a 2012 Republican vote was doing it to a whole slew of leasts.” 2. The suggestion that there’ll be fewer Republicans in Hell than voters of a different bent or stripe is just plain wrong. I know this for a fact because I was in Hell

not long ago and kept a sort of running tally of the political affiliations of the suffering souls there who voted in American elections back when they were alive and kicking. I found Hell was just covered up with Republicans. Or with the charred shadows of those who had been Republicans back when they still had the option of being something else. Something better. Something salvageable. It’s very rare that a still-living person gets a free round-trip guided tour of Hell. Mine came about by accident — I was out in the deer woods, just down the road from here, and shooting at some food like Jed Clampitt, and my musket ball perforated a camouflaged portal guarding the sharp descent into the underworld. The shade of a poet dead nigh 700 years misted up through the bullet hole and invited me to come on in, take my shoes off, have a look around. Nothing on my calendar so I bit. Turned out to be quite a trek. Today’s Hell is geographically unchanged, the concentric circles wending down to a central pit where, according to “South Park,” Satan dens up to hookah hash and watch DVD porn with his longtime buttboy Sadaam Hussein. The landscapes that were once ruined wilderness now feature tattoo parlors, car lots with Corvairs and Edsels predominating, tobacco superstores (everybody in Hell still smokes), and boot shops where everything comes only in rattlesnake. The

place is as cheerless as Rumania, as agoraphobic as Nebraska. Zombies wander the streets of Pandemonium and Dis, Nixon being one of them. The residents or detainees are much different characters from those in the old epics, ensconced here for a much different variety of crimes and sins. The reigning aboriginal devils and demons are much less gothic and canine and, while still lizard-eyed and forked-tongued, resemble Hermann Goring and Jim Bruton more than gargoyle doorknockers out of bad dreams. The up-to-date damned are grimvisaged pasty-faced ex-people who live lives of quiet desperation, the difference being that they know the desperation will last forever. They’d spend much of their time masturbating if there was anything there to do it with. They watch the same TV shows as upper-worlders, and in the background there’s piped-in country music that they can’t ever get away from or turn off. Despite being colonless, they are required to get a colonoscopy every day. When they go out to eat, it has to be at Chick-fil-A. And even then the chicken has no substantiality. Nothing to sink their teeth into. If they had teeth. Such scenes of desolation! Such torment everlasting! And all of it contingent to how you voted in one stupid election. Which hellacious names you X’ed. Which damnable levers you pulled.

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Loan Assistant II needed in the Little Rock area. Three years experience as a Loan Assistant is required. Hours are Monday thru Friday 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Arvest offers excellent benefits and rewarding incentive programs. To apply for this position visit our website www.arvest.com under careers. EOE/AA

Legal Notices

Automotive

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”THE ARkANSAS DEpARTMENT of Finance and Administration, Office of Intergovernmental Services is seeking proposals for funding under the FY 2012 Residential Substance Abuse Treatment (RSAT) for State Prisoners Program. The RSAT Program assists state and local governments to develop and implement substance abuse treatment programs in state and local correctional and detention facilities and to create and maintain community-based aftercare services for offenders. The full federal solicitation may be viewed at https://www.bja. gov/Funding/12RSATsol.pdf. Eligible Applicants: Applicants may be state agencies or units of local government. Application must be made by the chief administrative officer of the entity (mayor, director, county judge, city manager, etc). Although non profits are not eligible applicants, state agencies and units of local government are encouraged to develop collaborative relationships in order to increase aftercare and post release treatment for incarcerated individuals Deadline: Completed applications must be received no later than 4:30 p.m., Monday November 26, 2012. The state RSAT solicitation along with necessary forms is located at http:// www.dfa.arkans as.gov/offices/intergovernmentalServices/grants/Pages/ rsat.aspx. Contact: You may also contact James Lawson at the Office of Intergovernmental Services by phone at (501) 682-1074 or by email, james. lawson@dfa.arkansas.gov.

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ARKANSAS NUMISMATIC SOCIETY, INC. presents its annual

Coin Show

JACKSONVILLE COMMUNITY CENTER Municipal Drive & W. Main St.

Dealers from all over the US on hand, buying and selling US and foreign coins, medals, tokens, currency, gold, silver, jewelry, & supplies

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It’s happening right now on Arkansas Blog www.arktimes.com www.arktimes.com NOVEMBER 7, 2012 63


from Here

Retirement looks good

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fun people, gourmet food and activities!

WOODLAND H E IG H TS Call Wendy Hudgeons to schedule your tour today!

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