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COMMENT

Against NLR tax increase Why does North Little Rock need a tax increase? A flier that was mailed to me stated that with Little Rock and Newport as well as Garland and Jefferson Counties increasing their tax rates, North Little Rock needs to increase its tax rate to stay competitive. So increasing taxes keeps us moving forward? I have been told by politicians for years that lowering tax rates attracts businesses. Is that not why North Little Rock gave Caterpillar $10-$13 million over ten years to locate here? Perhaps Mayor Hays believes that the tax rate should be shifted from corporations to the working man. I wonder if the citizens of North Little Rock agree. Second, hasn’t the tax base been broadened with the addition of Caterpillar’s newly added 600 jobs, the opening of Dickey-Stephens Park and the many bars, restaurants, retail outlets and galleries that have opened in the now flourishing Argenta district? Usually a government can lower taxes as more pay into the system. Is that not the theory of trickle down or supply side economics?  Is that not why corporate tax rates have been cut in half over the past 30 years? Unlike every other city in Arkansas, North Little Rock runs its own electric company. Every penny of profit generated by North Little Rock Electric goes into the general fund. Twelve million was budgeted in 2011 alone. That’s $12 million that the city takes in before one cent of tax revenue is generated. Oh, and by the way, sales tax is charged on that $12 million. Well, that is if you are not Caterpillar. It should also be noted that electric rates for residents were increased 38% in May of 2008. Yes, we are paying 38% more for our basic utility than we were just three and a half years ago. Now let’s evaluate why North Little Rock may be short of money. First, there is that Inland Maritime Museum. How much revenue does that generate? How much money was spent defending the city in that TIF lawsuit to use school money to build a parking garage for a private hotel firm? If Holiday Inn or Hilton or Marriott or whatever other hotel company thought they could make money off of building a hotel in downtown North Little Rock, then they would build one. The reason that the Wyndham is the only hotel downtown is because that is all that the downtown area can support. I have no problem voting for a tax increase, I voted for the increase to build Dickey-Stephens Park.  But I believe the city should adequately fund the police and fire departments, maintain the roads, parks and school system before spending money on pet projects. I will not support funneling off money for essential 4 NOVEMBER 2, 2011 ARKANSAS TIMES

purposes to fund other pet projects and then be told that the city needs additional revenues for essential projects. Fund what a city is supposed to provide for its citizens and then spend the additional revenues however you wish. But try to properly fund those essentials and then ask for a tax increase for your pet projects and see if the good people of North Little Rock will support it.I doubt it. That is why all voters of North Little Rock should vote against the proposed tax increase on Nov. 8. Garrett Brown North Little Rock

The kids are all right

Tea Party winning the debate

In recent weeks I have heard the young people of the “occupy” movement being compared to the hippies of the 1960s. Often it is said in a derogatory manner. One thing we should remember about those young people who took to the streets back in the ’6os to protest the war in Vietnam, segregation in the South and the state of the environment almost everywhere; those kids were right. I believe these kids today are right as well. David Rose Hot Springs

As Tom Norrell’s head spins (Letters, Oct. 26) while spitting split pea soup, in his attempt to prove what hypocrites Tea Party members are for, gasp, using a tax funded facility, he has warmed my smaller government heart. The fact that all he can do is use a pejorative (where the most common practitioners are liberal Democrats), and then try to claim we are all hypocrites for using what we’ve also helped pay for (yes, we do pay taxes), shows we are winning the war in framing the debate.  I know Norrell won’t be happy until we have a single payer payroll system where the federal government sends us what they think we need, instead of an employer paying us for something we’ve actually earned or produced. I know we are on target when the venom flies towards us.  Norrell would be shocked at how many government employees are Tea Party members because they see the waste on a daily basis. What we are really debating is how much government we need or can afford. The Tea Party isn’t anti tax or anti government. What we do know is that government can’t be all things to all people so let’s set priorities instead of building a government based on politicians purchasing votes (think farm subsidies, loopholes and various tax credits). Maybe I’ll join the Occupy Wall Street crowd next since they’re against bankers giving money to politicians, and the vast majority of the Wall Street money is going to Democrats. Brice Hammerstein Sherwood

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The first GenXer It was very kind of you to acknowledge that I’ve been a columnist here since 1993 (Media column “No New Brummett,” Oct. 26). I’m 46 now and remain a firstyear GenXer. Oh, wait, I’m mistaken. And so are you on multiple points you tried to make, though the point about Gwen was interesting as the only woman. (However, even that isn’t totally correct if you include Brenda Blagg in northwest Arkansas.) And none of the columnists you mentioned — even Brantley or Greenberg — have the following of Brummett. Jeff Hankins President & Publisher Arkansas Business Publishing Group Submit letters to the Editor, Arkansas Times, P.O. Box 34010, Little Rock, AR 72203. We also accept letters via e-mail. The address is arktimes@arktimes.com. Please include name and hometown.


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www.arktimes.com NOVEMBER 2, 2011 5


EDITORIAL

EYE ON ARKANSAS

For roads and jobs

Unbelievable

P

resident Obama’s plan for Medicare would “balance the budget on the backs of seniors,” Rep. Tim Griffin says in a mailing to residents of the Second Congressional District. He lies. The president’s Affordable Care Act, passed over the objections of Griffin and his fellow Republicans, extends the life of Medicare and provides rebates to recipients who are in the dreaded “doughnut hole” for prescription drugs. Griffin and the other Republicans supported a plan to replace Medicare with a voucher system. Their vouchers would have forced low-income Medicare recipients to pay almost $5,000 a year more than they pay now, according to the Congressional Budget Office. Backbreaking. Republicans hate Medicare the way they hate Social Security, because these are government programs that work, directly refuting the Republican philosophy of every man for himself. (Griffin’s mailer was prepared by a national group and distributed to a number of Republican congressmen.) Not long after receiving Griffin’s propaganda, we saw that a poll showed him “in serious jeopardy” of being defeated next year. The poll was conducted by a Democratic-leaning group, true, but it’s still easier to believe than Griffin’s Medicare falsehood. “Overwhelming majority doesn’t think Tim Griffin deserves re-election” was the inspirational headline on the news release. It was soon followed by an announcement that the majority wants to get rid of Rep. Rick Crawford too. There is light at the end of the tunnel.

6 NOVEMBER 2, 2011 ARKANSAS TIMES

BRIAN CHILSON

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etter roads and more jobs is a combination that’s hard to quarrel with, and we won’t. The Arkansas Times supports the proposed $575 million bond program for interstate highway improvements. No additional taxes will be required. Gov. Beebe has called a special election on the bonds for Nov. 8. Early voting has begun. Keeping the interstate system up to par is a neverending job, especially considering the pounding the highways take from trucks heavier than the roads were designed for. If approved by voters, the new highway project will repeat some of the work done in 1999, the year of the last major overhaul of Arkansas interstates. Some of the improvements will be new. The work will provide thousands of jobs, according to the state Highway Department. That means thousands more consumers will have money to spend, in an economy that badly needs stimulus. We have one serious concern, but it can be met. When the 1999 highway project was underway statewide, workers were killed by reckless and impatient motorists. The work crews remained in danger until the Highway Department and the State Police adopted special measures to protect them. This time, we hope the authorities will be adamant from the beginning, and drivers more careful and more considerate of fellow Arkansans, working for a living.

DRAGGED THROUGH THE MUD: The annual Mud Run 5K took place at Two Rivers Park in Little Rock this past weekend. The event, billed as Little Rock’s Dirtiest 5K, benefits Little Rock Parks and Recreation.

North Little Rock Tea Party

N

orth Little Rock votes on a sales tax increase next week and it seems only fair to give Mayor Pat Hays a little of the attention I gave Little Rock Mayor Mark Stodola on his recent push for a penny increase. Hays is following the Little Rock model. The tax is split in two half-cent proposals — one permanent, one temporary for “capital” expenditures. The increases come with no guarantees, only general promises not backed by law. Hays could take the $15.5 million a year and spend it on retired PT boats for his riverfront fleet if he chose. The tax will increase the sales tax on a pair of socks or a T-shirt at a North Little Rock Walmart to 9 cents on every dollar — 6 cents state, 1 county, 2 city. Buy $10 worth of burgers at McDonald’s and the tax will now be $1.20, counting the 3-cent burger tax. Little Rock, to its credit, provided more information sooner about its tax, both on its website and in a series of public meetings. Hays is getting the job done with far less exposition, in a brief six-week window. The speed and lack of information form some of the objection from the Arkansas Tea Party, which is circulating flyers in opposition to the tax. I’m not sure it matters. North Little Rock is friendly — as most of blue collar Arkansas unaccountably has always been — to the regressive sales tax. Everybody pays the same, right? Few stop to think that the poor spend a disproportionate share of their income on taxes on life’s necessities — food, clothing, utilities, cars. But the Tea Party, which I tend to reflexively oppose, has some valid points. One is that in two years the city will have paid off a bond issue on a hydroelectric plant. That will free more than $14 million a year, permanently, almost what the full penny will raise.

An even stronger point is the slush fund criticism. Hays says he’ll take $20 million — $20 million! — to buy 2,000 acres on the east side of the city. Perhaps it will be the site to relocate the MAX Arkansas State Fair, anxious to BRANTLEY leave a poor neighborhood in maxbrantley@arktimes.com Little Rock. Perhaps it will be a “business park.” Perhaps he won’t buy the land at all. The mayor could just as legally build a parking deck with the tax money for a new downtown hotel or buy another submarine. The State Fair promise is in particular need of greater inspection. Does moving the fair from one side of the Arkansas River to the other guarantee any economic benefit for the area? Perhaps a marginal amount of sales tax revenue for North Little Rock. But a State Fair with a major event venue will also cannibalize Verizon Arena, just as Verizon cannibalized Barton Coliseum at the State Fair. The bigger “if” about the State Fair concerns the total project cost. The land is almost irrelevant. A Jacksonville group has offered to provide free land. A paid consultant has said a State Fair move would cost $190 million for new structures — and might produce an additional $1 million a year in revenue. Where will the millions for new buildings and infrastructure come from? The dream was once that the federal government would provide it. In these times, it’s hard to imagine. Mayor Hays has imitated Stodola in one important respect. He’s wrapped his fanciful wishes inside tangible needs — police, fire and street needs. He understands most voters will respond to these basics and hopes they overlook the slush funds.


OPINION

Big flipper

T

he professionals are consigning the Republican presidential nomination to Mitt Romney more than a month before the first Iowan casts a vote. Ross Douthat, the New York Times’ resident Republican oracle, said there was no point in any further speculation. It’s over. When no one approaches 30 percent among even Republican voters in any poll and Romney’s negatives run high, that seems a little rash, but Douthat is probably right. When opportunists like Tim Griffin jump on board a campaign that is hardly visible in Arkansas, it is a good sign. In Griffin’s case, it merely means that Karl Rove, the modern Rasputin and Griffin’s old mentor, has settled on Romney as the GOP’s likely winner, but Douthat needs no more evidence than that. Romney has been in the wilderness a long time, but the Republican Party is finally safe for a chameleon — and the biggest flip-flopper in history at that. He owes it, ironically, to the rise of extremism and the congressional Republican leadership’s abdication to the bomb throwers who despise Romney. That is not a non sequitur, but more about it in a moment. First, Romney the other day completed a hat trick on climate change, the last of the burning issues of the day

on which he has taken both sides. As recently as five years ago, Al Gore was not a stronger advocate of ERNEST drastic steps to DUMAS lower carbon emissions than Mitt Romney, then the governor of Massachusetts. Romney joined demonstrators outside a coalfired plant in 2003 to show his support for emissions caps. “I will not create jobs or hold jobs that kill people, and that plant, that plant kills people,” he said. He began to change in his 2008 presidential race and this year he reversed direction completely. As late as June, he was still saying that human activity was causing climate change and the country needed to reduce carbon emissions. But last week, at a forum put on, naturally, by one of the largest coal-mining companies, he had no idea whether warming was caused by human activity and he opposed spending money to reduce carbon emissions. Everyone knows his flip-flop on health care. He instituted the first universal health care system by installing in Massachusetts the old Nixon-Ford health plan, based on

Up all night

E

veryone I talk to is tired. You ask anyone how they are and this seems to be the response. Tired from work, tired from kids, tired from one more episode, from one more game the night before. Sleep deprivation supposedly exacts a serious toll, yet I read recently in the New York Times that getting more than seven hours of sleep per night is associated with a shorter lifespan. As a matter of fact, people who got more than 8 hours of sleep per night died 12% earlier than people who got between 6 and 7. If I were a reasonable person, this information might lead me to explore what amount of sleep is best for me. Instead, it led me to one perfectly idiotic question: if less sleep is better for me, what about no sleep? How long could I go? And what would happen to me? The first 18 hours were a slightly longer-than-normal day. What follows is a log of the hours after that. 1 a.m.-3 a.m. (hours 19-20): My

third cup of coffee’s run its course. Yawning. Eyes watering. Work is tougher because I start GRAHAM weird conversaGORDY tions with myself. grahamgordy@gmail.com “Will an itch just go away if I never scratch it?” 3 a.m.-5 a.m. (hour 21-22): You must get a lot hungrier awake than asleep. I eat a banana. Then a bagel. Then a cheese omelette. 5 a.m.-7 a.m. (hour 23-24): No energy. If I were out drinking, I’d notice the time less, but I’m trying to work. Twenty-four hours awake, my blinks become longer. It’s like my eyelids are trying to tempt my brain into just letting them close. Oh, and I think facial hair grows faster waking than sleeping. 7 a.m.-9 a.m. (hour 25-26): The “Backpack! Backpack!” song from “Dora the Explorer” is the only clear and unin-

mandatory insurance purchases. He said it could be a model for the country. Now he promises to try to repeal the national system that was modeled after his own. His most astounding backflip was on abortion. When he ran for the Senate against Edward M. Kennedy in 1994, he declared: “I believe that abortion should be safe and legal in this country. … I believe that Roe v. Wade has been the law for 20 years and we should sustain and support it.” He said he would never waver on abortion. As governor of Massachusetts he supported state funding of abortions for poor women and approved of abortion pills, including RU-486. Pro-choice groups endorsed him. Now he favors amending the U.S. Constitution to outlaw all forms of abortion in all situations. As a candidate for the Senate in 1994 and for governor in 2002 he championed the rights of gays and lesbians, including civil unions and the extension of marital benefits to gay couples. He promised to be a more effective champion of gay rights than Ted Kennedy. He was for gun control before he was against it. As governor he favored a ban on assault weapons and the Brady Bill, which required a waiting period to buy handguns. Now he’s solidly with the National Rifle Association. As governor he raised $500 million in corporate taxes and fees to shore up the budget. Now he wants to cut

corporate taxes and promises never to raise them. He once was a little soft on immigrants, grieving about making it hard for the children of illegal aliens to go to college by denying them in-state tuition. Now he’s tougher than all the others. So in a season when the party seems to demand total purity the most transparent weathervane in history is going to be the nominee and perhaps the president. How does that happen? To the leaders of the party, to the men who bankroll it and to a large extent the rank-and-file Republican voters, character is not the decisive factor but who can get elected. The extremists can’t. There are, in fact, certain advantages to having weak character. Old-line Republicans, who are still the majority in the party, and independents may not admire Romney — few could — but they don’t fear him. As president they know he would govern by accommodation as he always did. No one believes that he would stick to any of the stands he has taken the past year. People may have loathed and distrusted Richard Nixon, but they didn’t fear him. He talked as conservative as they come but left a record as progressive as Jimmy Carter’s, Bill Clinton’s or Barack Obama’s. As for the Tea Party, they can’t bolt for a third party next summer. Romney, after all, is with them on everything.

terrupted thought I’ve had in hours. I want to stick my finger in my eye until I touch my brain. 9 a.m.-11 a.m. (hour 27-28): This was a terrible damn idea. The feeling it most resembles is of being drunk and heartbroken. What was I hoping to accomplish? That I could discover some wormhole I could pass through and I would never have to sleep again? Why not experiment with hitting myself in the crotch with a hammer in the hope that I would eventually cross some threshold into pleasure? This is my last guinea pig column. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. (hour 29-30): I forgot to take out the recycling and I hear the truck. Six steps into the yard, I realize I’m only wearing boxers. Back inside. Pants. Slap myself in the face. Back outside. Missed the truck. I go for a run, but the thoughts only get louder. 1 p.m.-3 p.m. (hour 31-32) I have to go to a lunch I forgot about. This isn’t helped by the fact that I just had a vision of an imaginary cockroach. Driving to the restaurant, a couple of nonexistent animals run by in my peripheral vision. My lunch date doesn’t seem to realize

that I’m a total basketcase. 3 p.m.-7 p.m. (hour 33-36) A second wind of sorts, my body giving in to the fact that I must press on till bedtime. I’m totally delirious, though. 7 p.m-11 p.m. (hour 37-40) Girlfriend gets home. I try to hide my derangement, but during dinner I make a joke about Oprah, a joke about selling sex for back pills, and a joke about Oprah selling sex for back pills. I think I’m hilarious. She suspects nothing. We watch a movie. I fall asleep at 11 p.m., 40 hours after the last time I’d woken up. I sleep nine hours. I sleep the sleep of the just. If there’s a lesson to be gained, it’s a reminder of what true fatigue feels like. There’s always something mundane but seductive via television, Internet or elsewhere to distract us. Also, who among us works hard enough to truly be tired at the end of a day? When I re-read the study with a clear head, I realize it wasn’t accounting for happiness, only longevity. Quantity as opposed to quality. So, oversleeping becomes a choice for each of us, another instance of a long life or a happy one. www.arktimes.com NOVEMBER 2, 2011 7


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rkansas fans are renowned fatalists.  You know all the lowlights by heart. Street to Peschel. The phantom pass interference against SMU. Atwater’s missed pick in Miami. Stumble and Fumble. The Southern-Fried Misadventures of Reggie Fish. In 2011, the worm seems to have turned. For a minute at least. What’s happened the first two months is pretty special stuff, if you can cease bitching long enough to appreciate it. We are winning contests that should have a surgeon general’s warning emblazoned on the game program. These Razorbacks are besotted with self-destructive, maddening traits. They play lethargically early, recklessly at the end, and only sporadically well in between. And yet they are, as of this writing, a 7-1 team nestled snugly in the No. 7 spot of the BCS standings.  The Hogs’ first trip to Nashville in five years ended the same way the last one did: triumphant, but only by virtue of the Commodores’ own sad history catching up to them. In 2006, Vandy’s kicker, Bryant Hahnfeldt, kicked a 48-yard field goal attempt about 46 yards in the final minute — Houston Nutt famously credited the late Paul Eells’ otherworldly breath for blowing the try short — and that allowed the Razorbacks to escape with a two-point win.  This time, Carey Spear’s 27-yard kick to send the game into overtime went dead right in the waning seconds and the Hogs tiptoed out of Vandy’s crypt-masquerading-as-stadium as 31-28 winners. Vanderbilt rolled up 462 total yards, built a 14-point first-half lead and had the Hogs squarely against the ropes in the fourth quarter, driving for a score that would have given the Commodores a 15-point lead with about 12 minutes left. That’s when fate interceded again. A completely unforced fumble by Vandy’s outstanding tailback, Zac Stacy, was snatched off the turf by Jerry Franklin, and the senior linebacker coasted to a 94-yard touchdown return that flipped the momentum permanently. Zach Hocker’s third field goal of the game later gave the Hogs the lead, then Vandy’s brilliant last-ditch effort at victory stalled at the Arkansas 10 before Spear’s fateful shank. It’s been a charmed run through October: first-half deficits in all four games, all casually brushed aside by a team that seems to be far more adept at finishing. In this space before the season, I noted that the one nagging shortcoming of the Petrino era was an inability to close. We

are presently, in ways that sometimes defy explanation, sloughing that albatross. And while punBEAU dits might observe WILCOX that we aren’t knocking down titans, we’re doing nothing differently from what champions do, year in and year out. Auburn narrowly dispatched Kentucky and Mississippi State a year ago. The year before, Alabama’s national championship run was salvaged by Terrence Cody’s meaty fingers in a twopoint win over a sub par Tennessee team. The best teams are those that win across the spectrum, blowout to squeaker and all in between.  One of the benefits of all these prenoon kickoffs is that by the time Saturday evening rolls around, the pollsters are getting their digs in at other top-flight programs that have lost or struggled mightily. The Hogs aren’t winning pretty, but once the flurry of upsets materializes (Oklahoma, Wisconsin, Clemson, etc.) the news about Arkansas having another dogfight becomes stale and largely irrelevant. We aren’t losing ground, but we are content to let others do it for us. Lost in the furor over another sketchy performance is an indisputable fact: winning on the road in the SEC is an onerous task, especially when it’s Andre Ware’s Early Bird Special. From this point forward, it’s likely to be post meridiem start times in far friendlier confines (until LSU of course). It starts Saturday with a home date against a South Carolina team that sits just behind us in the BCS pecking order, a lone loss to Auburn blemishing its record.  In many ways, the Gamecocks are a mirror of the Hogs, their loftiest hopes being thwarted by an early-season loss and a critical injury to their bellcow. They also appear to fancy a close game, with three of their seven wins by a field goal or less. For once, that predilection toward high tension may not work against us, as we have three recent wins by a combined 12 points. Two full months in, nobody knows what to make of this team. It’s reasonable to anticipate slippage in November, a final prelude to some nondescript December bowl sponsored by toiletries or industrial sanders. But it would also be none too surprising to see them march to Baton Rouge with a 10-1 record, brimming with swagger, and these next three weeks would seem to lay an ideal foundation for that sort of finale.


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Small Town

W O RDS

Not Barney Cissy Feehan writes: “I see that google is now in the dictionary as a verb meaning ‘to use the Google search engine to obtain information about (as a person) on the World Wide Web.’ But where did the search engine get the name? Does it have anything to do with the old comic strip character Barney Google, he of the goo-goo-googley eyes?” Cissy is no chicken, clearly. Not many people can remember Barney Google, who was, as she says, the hero of a longago comic strip. And of a song inspired by the strip; that’s where the line about the “goo-goo-googley eyes” comes from. Barney was a banjo-eyed little fellow who owned a less-than-successful race horse named Sparkplug. Sometime in the 1930s, a hillbilly associate of Barney’s named Snuffy Smith was introduced into the strip, and in a few years’ time, Snuffy had taken over. The Snuffy Smith comic is still around. But we’ve drifted away from the subject, perhaps because I find comic strips more interesting than search engines. No, Barney Google had nothing to do with the high-tech Google. According to Wikipedia, “The name ‘Google’ origi-

nated from a misspelling of ‘googol,’ which refers to the number represented by a 1 followed by oneDOUG hundred zeros.” SMITH Techies tend not dougsmith@arktimes.com to be good spellers, and vice versa. Now here is an example of comics and technology working together to enlighten mankind, or at least me. In the “Get Fuzzy” strip, I read “Satchel, there’s no reason to fear mothmen, even if they do exist. … Being part moth nerfs an otherwise potentially scary mutant.” Unfamiliar with this usage, I turned to the on-line Urban Dictionary and found the verb nerf: “To weaken or make less dangerous. Taken from the ‘Nerf’ brand name, which makes sports equipment toys out of a soft foam (e.g., the Nerf football is soft foam rather than the hard leather of a real football). Used frequently in the context of computer game balance changes. “ ‘The chaingun was awesome til they nerfed it, now you can’t hit s*** with it.’ ”

WEEK THAT WAS

It was a good week for… MIKE BEEBE. Governing magazine named the governor one of its 2011 public officials of the year and the University of Arkansas’s Arkansas Poll reported that he enjoys a stratospheric 72 percent favorable rating in the state.

RICK CRAWFORD AND TIM GRIFFIN. A poll by Public Policy Polling showed voters favor replacing the First District’s Rep. Rick Crawford 48-43 and the Second District’s Rep. Tim Griffin 49-44 with “someone new.”

PROTECTING THE OZARKS. The Ozark Society has sued to stop gas drillling in the Ozark National Forest until an adequate environmental impact statement has been completed. Federal agencies haven’t adequately considered impact on endangered species, roadless areas and wild and scenic rivers, the suit said. It also said they particularly have failed to consider the fallout from hydraulic fracturing wells. The suit asked for a preliminary injunction against further exploration until the suit can be tried.

FORT SMITH. Whirlpool announced that in 2012 it will close a plant in Fort Smith that currently employs some 1,000 workers. Several hundred jobs in related industries will also be lost.

WALTER KIMBROUGH. The highlyregarded, self-styled “hip-hop president” of Philander Smith College is leaving Little Rock to become the president of Dillard University in New Orleans. It’s a move up for Kimbrough, 44. Dillard has long been considered one of the country’s top historically black colleges and universities and recently won a $25 million National Institutes of Health grant to research disparities in health care.

10 NOVEMBER 2, 2011 ARKANSAS TIMES

It was a bad week for…

SCOTT FORD. In a speech to the Fort Smith Chamber of Commerce, the former Alltel CEO drew a comparison between the 99 percenters of the Occupy movement demonstrations with those responsible for genocide in Rwanda. SHERIFF KENNEY CASSELL. Prosecutor Cody Hiland of Conway will seek to remove Cassell from office as Searcy County sheriff for a misdemeanor federal conviction in 1979 for possession of stolen Cornish hens. Cassell, like Hiland, a Republican, admits his past and notes that he disclosed it to voters when he ran. Hiland said the Arkansas Supreme Court case law is clear; that a conviction of this nature requires removal from office.


THE OBSERVER NOTES ON THE PASSING SCENE

FRIED

Braving haunted houses IT’S THAT TIME OF THE YEAR, WHEN THE OBSERVER seeks out manufactured

scares to get in the mood for Halloween. Like every American holiday, the night of Oct. 31 is surrounded by a certain amount of capitalistic tackiness; we wonder what it must have been like to live back when people were actually afraid of the dead returning to life. In the hopes of getting into the spirit of the season we took a trip down to the Scimitar Shrine Center (home of the Shriners, best known for their philanthropy and wearing red fezzes), and their annual Temple of Terror. We hadn’t been to a haunted house since we were a kid, the memories of which we had successfully repressed, so we weren’t sure what to expect. Step one: get in line. From the outside, the Shrine Center looked empty, but, after we’d been escorted through the dimly lit lobby with cliche Halloween merchandise in every corner (skeletons, spiders, cottony cobwebs), we took a seat with about 40 others who were waiting for entrance. On one end of the room concessions were being sold; at the other a big TV played the last thirty minutes of “Poltergeist.” Hanging from the ceiling were zombie-ghost-grim reaper hybrids that occasionally lit up and vibrated and emitted compressed shrieks. A few people were in costume. The initial shivers that had followed us in from the chilly night outside were gone very quickly, once we realized that we were in for a long wait. Over an hour’s wait, in fact, but we had company and there was, after all, the promise of a good scare once the time came. Occasionally the exit would pop open and visitors would scamper out, chased by the sound of a chainsaw. The Observer and our companion laughed with each other, but of course there lingered in our conversation the vague concern for what, exactly, was behind the door that every 10 minutes or so would admit a few giggling teenage girls and their parents. At last it was our turn. Volunteers tore our tickets and ushered us into the Temple. We’ll admit, it was unnerving — everybody’s a little bit afraid of the dark. Here’s how it went: the haunted

house was essentially a series of rooms, each one playing off a particular horror movie trope. In one there was a family sobbing around an open coffin; as we strolled past it the person inside jumped out with a screech. Another was a psych ward with white-clad patients chained to their metal cots, beseeching us to help them escape. A few were empty except for Halloween paraphernalia — ghoulish mannequins, TVs playing nothing but static, giant bugs. Most of it was in total darkness. Between each room we had to squeeze through very thin partitions, which, for the claustrophobic, was probably the most terrifying part of the experience. The Observer was most creeped out by a room painted all in white with a fog machine going somewhere — it was impossible to see, and there were people with gas masks who appeared out of the smoke to get up in our face. Yes, we jumped more than once as we trudged through the Temple, and there were even a few times that we had to laugh. All in all it was an amusing evening, despite the wait. We can admire anyone who waits around in a small, dark room, surrounded by skeletons, waiting for an (somewhat) unsuspecting victim to walk through. That, we think, would be pretty freaky.

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SPEAKING OF HALLOWEEN TRADITIONS,

Junior had outgrown trick-or-treating this year, so instead of organized begging, The Observer and family drove up to Conway, and hit another haunted house. The building was a dark, close maze in a large building. Junior held onto his mother’s shirt tail, and The Observer onto his. At times, he almost ran. In the middle of things — the dark, the noise, the folks jumping out of shadows — The Observer found himself thinking about the mannish boy who has replaced the warm bundle who once slept on our shoulder. This moment, The Observer thought, is as good a metaphor for his onrushing teenage years as we’re likely to get: Trailing him through darkness. Struggling to hold on but not hold him back. Both full of apprehension. Both dreading the inevitable moment when it will all be over and we will emerge in the Real World. www.arktimes.com NOVEMBER 2, 2011 11


Arkansas Reporter

THE

IN S IDE R

Dillard a-Twitter Dr. Walter Kimbrough, president of Philander Smith College, Tuesday was named new president of Dillard University in New Orleans. This being the modern age, Dillard students were on Twitter about the selection even before it was announced and then even more so afterward. Lots of students were impressed that Kimbrough, 44, is a Twitter user himself. His handle: @hiphopprez. Kimbrough has styled himself as a new-style college leader, with a social justice outreach that saw him lead student trips in support of civil rights and his hiphop lecture series that featured provocative speakers. But the Twitter handle really caught Dillard students’ attention. Example of many, from Twitter user RoxxStarr: “The fact that DU’s new President’s twitter name is @HipHopPrez makes me like him instantly.”

Hot check artist unchallenged Roby Brock’s Talk Business website reported this week that Rep. Josh Johnston had announced for re-election in District 65 and that the Rose Bud Republican had no Democratic opposition. The Blue Hog Report blog reported in April that Johnston had been arrested in 1995 on a felony hot check charge and eventually pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor and paid more than $700 in fines and costs. He’s refused to respond to the Times’ questions about his eligibility in light of the record. A court removed another Republican candidate last year for a federal misdemeanor conviction involving misuse of Medicaid money. A Republican prosecutor in Conway announced this week that he’d seek to remove a Republican sheriff in Searcy County because of a 30-year-old misdemeanor related to possession of some stolen Cornish hens from a truck shipment. Another candidate was ruled ineligible because of theft of campaign signs. The Arkansas Republican Party has so far declined to answer questions from the Times about Johnston’s eligibility. We can report that sources say Johnston is expected to have a Democratic opponent with experience in elective office and that Johnston’s record isn’t likely to be swept under the rug.

Donation for Occupy Little Rock Occupy Little Rock, the local offshoot of the worldwide protest CONTINUED ON PAGE 13 12 NOVEMBER 2, 2011 ARKANSAS TIMES

WANTS MURAL RESTORED: Brad Cushman says the artwork could be a UALR centerpiece.

The story of a mural

First an artwork, then building material, now the goal of UALR restoration project. BY LESLIE NEWELL PEACOCK

F

or the past 27 years, the University of Arkansas at Little Rock has stored a fragile mural by social realist painter Joe Jones, after then-UALR archivist (and now Central Arkansas Library Director) Bobby Roberts rescued it from oblivion in 1984. Painted for Commonwealth College in Mena in 1935, “The Struggle of the South” portrays the miseries of sharecropping, a lynching and the plight of coal miners. Jones was a Missourian who said “I’m not interested in painting pretty pictures to match pink and blue walls. I want to paint things that knock holes in walls.” Ironically, Jones’ mural was turned into walls, with holes knocked in them, for a house in Fort Smith. Now, the gallery director of the UALR art department wants to restore them. Jones, who’d shown his work in New York and who as a Works Progress Administration artist had painted a mural at a Magnolia post office the previous year, was commissioned by Commonwealth College in 1935 to paint the mural. The college scraped together $50 for the project, and according to some reports, Jones had to make his own charcoal to draw the mural. Commonwealth, despite being the

alma mater of future Gov. Orval Faubus, was created in the 1920s to train organizers for the workers movement and make other social reforms. In the Aug. 1, 1935, issue of its twice-monthly newsletter, the Fortnightly, the college announced Jones would lecture on “proletarian art and culture” during the two weeks he would be at the college. “It was his students who painted the murals on the walls of old St. Louis courthouse and fought the efforts of the indignant property owners to demolish them,” the paper reported. Jones worked at the museum from Aug. 5-19 completing the mural, approximately 44 feet long and 100 inches high and placed on three walls of what appears in photographs to be a bay window in the dining room. Commonwealth closed in 1940 and was dismantled. Forty-four years later, Fadjo Cravens of Fort Smith contacted Roberts, told him a house in which the mural had been used as building material was about to be torn down and asked him if the archives would like to buy it. Roberts paid $500 for it sight unseen. The mural languished in storage until 2009, when Andrew Walker, thendirector of the St. Louis Art Museum,

in Jones’ home town, got in touch with Cushman to see if UALR indeed had the mural and if it could be used in the museum’s upcoming exhibition, “Joe Jones, Painter of the American Scene,” which was hung last year. But the mural wasn’t in any condition to be exhibited. It had been divided into sections and used to wall a closet. Part of it was covered with wallpaper. Other sections had been hung with the image facing the studs, and large bits of the paint had flaked off. Some parts were missing entirely. Its condition was so delicate that students who wanted to see it were only provided photographs. But Cushman agreed to take the mural out of storage for Walker and other museum personnel. “They were blown away,” Cushman said. So blown away that they offered to restore the central section of the mural — the lynching scene — at their own cost. Cushman agreed. That exhibition, UALR’s decision to create an Institute on Race and Ethnicity and interest outside UALR on the work has prompted a determined restoration effort. After the exhibition, Jones’ grandson, Jonathan Jones, a D.C. lobbyist and friend of Sen. Mark Pryor, contacted Cushman to learn more about the mural. Jones, Mark Pryor, and Sen. David and Barbara Pryor attended an event at UALR last week to see a documentary that the university has begun to make to record the mural, its history and the restoration project. Jones saw the rest of the mural for the first time and was moved, Cushman said, calling restoration efforts a great tribute to his grandfather. He expressed the hope that the work could be placed in a common room so students would “have to look at it and think about it for the next 100 years,” Cushman said. Cushman plans to seek federal, state and private grants to pay for the restoration. Helen Houp and the St. Louis conservator Paul Hanner inspected the mural a couple of weeks ago and compared notes; Houp should have a report to UALR within a couple of weeks on what it will take to bring it back to life. Cushman would like to see it exhibited in the manner it was hung at Commonwealth — against three walls — where it would embody lessons in art and social history and serve as a centerpiece for the university.


LISTEN UP

ARKANSAS POLITICAL TRENDS

THE

BIG

On Oct. 26, the University of Arkansas’s Diane D. Blair Center of Southern Politics and Society released its 13th annual Arkansas Poll. Conducted between Oct. 14 and 19 via 800 telephone surveys, the poll’s authors claim it has a margin of error plus or minus 3.5 percentage points. For a link to more results from the poll, go to arktimes.com/arkpoll.

PICTURE

Percentage who approve of the way these politicians have handled their jobs in 2011.

Gov. Mike Beebe: 72%

2011: 74%

2009: 72%

Percentage who feel that Arkansas is generally headed in right direction.

2011: 67%

2010: 67%

2010: 52%

Percentage who said global warming/climate change is an urgent problem. Percentage who said most important problem facing people in Arkansas is the economy. Percentage who self-identify as Democrat. Percentage who self-identify as Independent.

Sen. Mark Pryor: 47%

2007: 44% 2010: 42%

2009: 39% 2008: 35%

2008: 33%

Sen. John Boozman: 40% 2009: 34% 2009: 34%

2011: 34% 2011: 33% 2011: 31%

2009: 33%

Tune in to the Times’ “Week In Review” podcast each Friday. Available on iTunes & arktimes.com

INSIDER, CONT. movement that started in New York City with Occupy Wall Street, is getting a $1,000 donation last week from the Arkansas AFL-CIO. Though OLR’s “General Assembly” — the group of protestors who are on hand during their planning meetings — still has to vote on how the donation will be allocated, some organizers we spoke to note that Occupy’s camp at Fourth and Ferry Streets near downtown has some winterization needs as the colder months set in, as well as ongoing concerns like food, propane for cooking, securing a larger tent to serve as a central meeting place, and acquiring wooden pallets to use as risers to keep tents from flooding in the rain. Caleb Baumgardner, a law student who has been with Occupy Little Rock since the first organizational meetings, said that though far-right conservatives have been spreading rumors that the Occupy movement is a front for organized labor since the beginning of the Occupy Wall Street protests, the support from the AFL-CIO, both nationally and at the local level, is simply an acknowledgement that Occupy and union workers share some of the same goals. “We understand that organized labor is supposed to be a countervailing force to the power of big business in this country so big business can’t just run roughshod over everyone and do whatever they want with no accountability and no responsibility,” he said. “They understand that we get that, so they understand we have a common cause.”   Occupy Little Rock will hold its next large-scale protest march this Saturday, Nov. 5, beginning at 10 a.m. at the Occupy Little Rock camp at Fourth and Ferry Streets.

2010: 28% Percentage who self-identify as Republican.

2011: 26%

2008: 24%

CORRECTIONS

2010: 21%

President Barack Obama: 32%

SEND US YOUR BIG IDEA At the end of the month, we’ll unveil the third edition of our annual Big Ideas for Arkansas edition and, as usual, we’re taking nominations for ideas that would make Arkansas a better place to live. Every topic is on the table. Commerce. Education. Government. Infrastructure. Tourism. Entertainment. Should we overhaul the state tax code? Build bike trails across the state? End blue laws? Feel free to be as pragmatic or wacky as you want to. Send your nominations to lindseymillar@arktimes.com or to Arkansas Times Big Ideas, P.O. Box 34010, Little Rock, AR 72203. Below are some of the more provocative ideas from previous editions: ≥ Make elected officials do community service ≥ Tear down I-630 and replace it with a boulevard. ≥ Build a permanent home for the Little Rock Film Festival downtown. ≥ Solve the energy crisis with wastewater and chicken feathers. ≥ Put a state moratorium on prison construction. MATT FOX ILLUSTRATION

In transcribing the Best Doctors® Inc. list that ran in last week’s issue of the Arkansas Times, two names were omitted: oncologist/ hematologist Dr. Lawrence A. Mendelsohn and ophthalmologist Dr. Wade Brock. The Times regrets the errors. Max Brantley’s column last week said incorrectly that the top state income tax bracket began at $25,000. That was the top bracket when the income tax was adopted in 1971, but it has been indexed since 1997 and the top bracket now kicks in at $32,700. www.arktimes.com NOVEMBER 2, 2011 13


judicial elections and how to avoid them BRIAN CHILSON

Nationwide, judicial races are getting nastier. COURTHOUSES FOR SALE?: It’s starting to look that way.

BY DOUG SMITH

COVER ILLUSTRATION BY BRYAN MOATS 14 NOVEMBER 2, 2011 ARKANSAS TIMES

T

he prospect of big, greedy corporations and bigoted, right-wing religionists seizing control of the state courts is plenty scary, like finding Karl Rove and Donald Wildmon on your doorstep. (Does anybody sell Rove and Wildmon masks for Halloween? People would hand over their daughters to avoid tricks from those two.) Add the U.S. Chamber of Commerce to the cause, and you have a true Axis of Evil. It could happen in Arkansas, the way it’s happened elsewhere. Rove, the Republican Party strategist and lead handler of George Bush, helped business interests unseat a Democratic chief justice of the Alabama Supreme Court who was believed soft on plaintiffs.

He’s done similar work in his home state of Texas. Over the last decade, the Chamber of Commerce has poured millions of dollars into state Supreme Court races around the country, seeking — usually successfully — to get rid of justices who’ve displeased corporations by ruling against them in lawsuits. Right-wing religionists got everybody’s attention last year, when they removed three Iowa Supreme Court justices who’d voted to legalize same-sex marriage. The vote by the seven court justices was unanimous, but only three of them were on the ballot in 2010. Presumably, the fundamentalist faction will go after others in 2012, like sharks coming back for another bite.


Justice Robert L. Brown, Little Rock, chair Elizabeth Andreoli, Little Rock Nate Coulter, Little Rock Judge David F. Guthrie, El Dorado Stephanie Harris, Little Rock Henry Hodges, Little Rock Karen Hutchins, Little Rock Jim Julian, Little Rock Judge Alice Lightle, Little Rock Harry Truman Moore, Paragould Mark W. Nichols, Little Rock John F. Stroud Jr., Texarkana Annabelle Imber Tuck, Little Rock Judge Larry Vaught, Little Rock Judge Joyce Williams Warren, Little Rock Judge Ralph E. Wilson, Osceola

In Arkansas, a “tort reform” law, making it more difficult for people to win lawsuits against corporations, was approved by the legislature a few years back. Since then, some of the law has been struck down by the Arkansas Supreme Court as unconstitutional. Similar rulings in other states have resulted in business interests backing “tort reform” candidates against sitting justices in bitter and expensive elections. The Arkansas Supreme Court last year invalidated an initiated act that prohibited unmarried, cohabiting couples from adopting or fostering children. Act 1 was aimed primarily at same-sex couples, who cannot legally marry in Arkansas. It was backed by the Arkansas Family Council, a fundamentalist group, and approved by voters in 2008. After the Supreme Court knocked the law down, Family Council President Jerry Cox said the decision was the worst the Court had ever made. The decision by the seven-member court was unanimous. None will be removed for that vote in 2012, though. Only one Supreme Court seat will be on the ballot next year, and the incumbent, Associate Justice Jim Gunter, is not seeking re-election. Associate Justice Robert Brown wrote the Act 1 decision, saying the act violated fundamental privacy rights implicit in the Arkansas Constitution. Angry voters won’t get another shot at him. His term doesn’t expire until 2014, but he’s announced he’ll retire at the end of 2012 (after the elections). He couldn’t run again even if he wanted to, because of age limits on judicial candidates. Nonetheless, Brown is concerned about what he’s called “toxic judicial elections,” of the sort that have occurred elsewhere and could occur here. He’s the chairman of a state task force looking for ways to prevent their occurrence. The Task Force is a creation of the Arkansas Bar Association and the Judicial Council, which is an organization of the state’s judges. In a law-review article, Brown has noted that “judicial campaigns for the supreme court in Alabama in 2008 cost a total of $5.3 million. They cost $9.3 million in Illinois in 2004. A 2008 election for the high court in Wisconsin cost approximately $6 million, with $4.8 million contributed by special interest groups and $1.2 million raised on behalf of the candidates them-

BRIAN CHILSON

BRIAN CHILSON

Arkansas Task Force on Judicial Elections

JUSTICE BROWN: Leads reform group.

selves. In Michigan, the price tag for chief justice in 2008 exceeded $7.5 million.” Last year in Arkansas, the two Supreme Court races on the ballot cost a total of $1.8 million, big money by Arkansas standards, but not reflective of the huge contributions from specialinterest groups that have been made in other states. In that 2008 Michigan race, a Republican chief justice, Cliff Taylor, was defeated by a Democratic challenger, Diane Hathaway, in an election that has been described as “an orgy of negativity.” Brown says: “A number of attack ads were run on television by both candidates, the majority of which were paid for by special interest groups, including the Michigan Democratic and Republican Parties and the Michigan Chamber of Commerce, at a cost in excess of $3.8 million.” A Democratic ad accused Taylor of nodding off during a case involving the deaths of six children. A

Republican ad, citing a decision by Hathaway to give probation to an Arab-American defendant, suggested that she was sympathetic to terrorists. In Arkansas, judicial races are nonpartisan; presumably, the political parties will not make large contributions. But there’s nothing to keep the big-business groups out. The right-wing religious groups don’t generally have a huge amount of money, but they have voters, and they can turn them out. Forbes magazine reported that the U.S. Chamber of Commerce raised $8 million to contest judicial races in 2000, $20 million in 2001, and $40 million in 2002. The Chamber won 21 of the 24 judicial races it attempted to influence from 2001 to 2003. In 2004, the Chamber won 12 of the 13 state supreme court races in which it was involved. Chamber President Tom CONTINUED ON PAGE 16

www.arktimes.com NOVEMBER 2, 2011 15


“Demagoguery and outrageously high campaign contributions are emerging as the twin ingredients for success in supreme court elections.” Donohue said in a 2002 speech that “On the political front, we’re going to get involved in key state supreme court and attorney general races as part of our effort to elect pro-legal reform [pro-business] judicial candidates.” The National Association of Manufacturers, a corporate cousin of the Chamber, also invests in judicial races, through a subsidiary called the American Justice Partnership that strives to withhold justice from plaintiffs. Viveca Novak wrote in The American Prospect that “The true extent of spending by the Chamber and the AJP is impossible to know. They and many of the conduit groups through which they funnel money are orga-

nized under sections of the tax code that don’t require disclosure of donors or outlays. Also, in some cases, groups can mask their donors when they run only ‘issue ads’ that don’t explicitly call for someone’s election or defeat, even if their intent is clear.” A Wisconsin race involving Louis Butler, the state’s first black Supreme Court justice, produced what Brown says are perhaps the most offensive ads in recent memory. Butler’s challenger, Michael Gableman, ran a Willie Horton-type ad that showed a black offender and had this voiceover: “Louis Butler worked to put criminals back on the street. Like Ruben Mitchell, who raped an 11-year-old girl with

a learning disability. Butler found a loophole. Mitchell went on to molest another child. Can Wisconsin families feel safe with Louis Butler on the Supreme Court?” The Butler camp responded with an ad accusing Gableman of being soft on sex offenders. It didn’t save Butler from becoming the first incumbent judge to lose a race in Wisconsin in 40 years. “Demagoguery and outrageously high campaign contributions are emerging as the twin ingredients for success in supreme court elections,” Brown says. In Arkansas, judges are elected. (A system of which Brown approves, incidentally.) In Iowa, they’re appointed, a procedure that some believe produces

better judges. A 15-member panel — seven members appointed by the governor, seven by the state bar association, one a sitting state supreme Court justice — interviews potential judges. The panel is forbidden from asking about political affiliation. The panel recommends three finalists for each vacancy. The governor selects from those three. Periodically, voters decide whether a particular judge should be retained or dismissed. Incumbent supreme court justices usually win these retention votes easily. Not in 2010. In 2009, the seven-member Iowa Supreme Court ruled unanimously that Iowa’s ban on same-sex marriage violated the equal-protection clause of

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10/31/11 3:57 PM


BAKER: Removed in Iowa.

BUTLER: Out in Wisconsin.

the state constitution. Iowa became the third state to legalize same-sex marriage, behind Massachusetts and Connecticut. Five of the justices had been appointed by Democrats, two by Republicans. Social conservatives were outraged by the decision, and three of the offending judges were up for retention in 2010 — Chief Justice Marsha Ternus and Associate Justices David Baker and Michael Streit. Some Iowa Republican politicians were active in a movement to remove the three, but the anti-retention campaign got its money from a religious-right group, the American Family Association (AFA), headquartered in Tupelo, Miss. Originally called the National Federation for Decency, the organization was founded in 1977 by Rev. Donald Wildmon, and is often in the forefront of Religious Right causes. Its efforts bore fruit in Iowa. All three of the offending justices lost their retention votes. The decision allowing samesex marriage still stands. The Arkansas Task Force on Judicial Elections has been meeting for months and is expected to have some recommendations by the end of the year. Some of the proposals it is considering to keep judicial elections clean would require legislative action, possibly even constitutional revision. Some could be achieved more informally. The reform that might be the most effective might also be the hardest to achieve. Public financing of judicial campaigns would effectively prevent big campaign contributions from special interests, but as a practical matter, the chances of achieving public

financing in Arkansas are slight. Many Arkansans would be hostile to the idea of spending the people’s money to elect lawyers, figuring the lawyers get enough of their money already. But North Carolina has public financing, and other states are considering it. Another proposal would require judges to recuse in cases involving their big campaign contributors. Some judges do this now, voluntarily. Some don’t. A “rapid response team” of lawyers and laymen would respond to misleading ads by judicial candidates, possibly asking for a retraction from the candidate, and issuing its own statement if he or she didn’t retract. The use of an official “voter’s guide” providing information about judicial candidates and sent at no cost to all voters would perhaps lessen the use and influence of deceptive advertising. Most voters are unfamiliar with the judicial candidates, which makes them easier to mislead. The movement to keep specialinterest money from dominating judicial elections became even more urgent with the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision last year in the Citizens United case. Reformers like Brown may want to lessen the influence of corporate contributors, but a majority of the Supreme Court does not. In a 5 to 4 decision, the Court removed the legal limits on corporate contributions in political races. Reformers feel that decision looming over them. “What we’re doing is prophylactic,” Brown said. “We’re getting ready for what we think is coming.”

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Arts Entertainment AND

ELVIS IS IN THE MUSEUM And so are Van Halen and Heart, at Barton.

F

or decades, music fans in Central Arkansas knew Barton Coliseum as THE place for big name concerts. It certainly wasn’t the most ideal venue, thanks to its poor acoustics. But it was pretty much the only choice in the region for shows too big for Robinson Auditorium but not big enough for War Memorial Stadium. Fairgoers at this year’s Arkansas State Fair who lived through those years got a flashback with the unveiling of the Barton Rock ’n’ Roll Museum. It looks at a few especially noteworthy performances, as well as one show that didn’t end up taking place. It also features artists like Heart, Styx, Journey, Boston and Foghat, who played there repeatedly over the years.  The collection, featuring 31 performers, is mostly housed in a small area just off the coliseum’s main hallway. Included are photos from shows, concert posters, ticket stubs and framed record albums. There are also legal contracts for a few of the performances, which are among the more interesting items featured. “Last year we started going through [the Arkansas State Fair] archives and seeing what we had and getting them preserved because they were in one of our buildings here on the grounds that was not a good place for them,” said Deb Crow, organizer of the museum. The efforts were initially for an exhibit that opened last year looking at the century-old history of the State Fair. Crow says she started coming across items related to the many huge rock shows featured at Barton and decided a look at that was warranted. One of the museum’s prime exhibits: a sold-out show by Elvis Presley on April 17, 1972. “We were able to have someone donate posters from the concert, had pictures donated, even a copy of the ticket,” said Crow. The photos feature Elvis in a red, glittering rhinestone jumpsuit with cape, while the marquee along Roosevelt 18 NOVEMBER 2, 2011 ARKANSAS TIMES

said “Welcome Elvis and thousands of out of state visitors. Sold out.” A CD of the performance was eventually released and is also on display. Another exhibit features a copy of a contract for a concert Lynyrd Skynyrd was to play at Barton Coliseum on Oct. 22, 1977. But two days before that, just a few shows into a new tour, a chartered plane crashed, killing several members of the band, including front man Ronnie Van Zant. The contract details how the group was guaranteed $12,500, plus 71.1 percent of the gross box office receipts over $36,887. But a handwritten notation says simply: “cancelled Van Zant killed in plane crash.” Other acts noted in the museum include Van Halen, the Jackson Five, Black Oak Arkansas, Jefferson Starship, the Allman Brothers and Grand Funk Railroad, which immortalized Little Rock and groupie “Sweet” Connie Hamzy in its 1973 anthem “We’re an American Band.” There’s also an extensive display on Stevie Ray Vaughan, who played there in 1984, including a contract signed by him and photos from a special VIP show. Like so many who grew up in Central Arkansas, my first concert was at Barton Coliseum. Looking at a display on the many performances there over the years by Rush, I was happy to see a ticket stub from the April 1, 1982, concert. It was a bewildering, mind-altering experience for a 10-year-old in fourth grade. My older brother had talked my parents into taking us. In the following years I’d see one concert after another there, including countless heavy metal bands, which for the most part aren’t included in the museum. Going to concerts at Barton was practically a right of passage for young people in the area. Walking into a show felt like walking into a rock ’n’ roll fantasy. The place would be swarming with teens and young adults, all enjoying a massive

BRIAN CHILSON

BY MICHAEL HIBBLEN

party away from parental eyes. There was always a smoky haze inside, sometimes so thick it was hard to see through to the stage.  It was a different era for concerts, when general admission was typical, prompting people to line up outside Barton beginning early on the day of a concert. When the doors would finally open up, once getting past the tickettaker, people would often break into a hard sprint to secure a place near the front of the stage. In addition to the rock shows, many long gone legends of country and R&B also played at Barton. Tickets to James Brown concerts cost only 99 cents at one time. The museum feels a little hollow only noting the rock acts, but much of Barton’s records were lost when a secondary storage location was destroyed. Much of

what’s in the museum was preserved by a local music fan. Today Barton Coliseum is no longer used for concerts, with most large shows held at Verizon Arena in North Little Rock. With consideration underway of new possible locations for the Arkansas State Fair, the clock could be ticking for Barton Coliseum. One possible site could be in North Little Rock, if voters there approve a sales tax increase on Tuesday, Nov. 8. While I haven’t heard any specific talk of Barton being torn down, it’s hard to imagine the coliseum, which was built in 1949, remaining if the fairgrounds are moved. This museum at least acknowledges some of its history. The Barton Rock ’n’ Roll Museum is open 8 a.m. until 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and during occasional special events.


BRIAN CHILSON

ROCK CANDY Check out the Times’ A&E blog arktimes.com

A&E NEWS HUMORIST AND PUBLIC RADIO FAVORITE DAVID SEDARIS will be

stopping by WordsWorth Books Dec. 5 for a book signing. In the past, Sedaris has had no problem selling out large-ish venues such as the Walton Arts Center. So to keep a lid on things, WordsWorth will be issuing tickets. The store will give out one ticket per customer for each Sedaris book purchased at the store from now until Dec. 4, while supplies last. The store owners stressed that while there might be a short reading, the event is primarily a book signing. Also, leave your cameras at home, because Sedaris doesn’t really want to have his picture made with you.

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bum. It’s called “Yik3S!” and it’s streaming on Bandcamp at www.iam607. bandcamp.com. Big K.R.I.T.’s “Return of 4eva” has been best album of the year by far, 607 said. With “Yik3S!”, he aimed to top it. And he’s confident he’s succeeded. One track is called “607 is the Best Lyricist ... PERIOD.” THANKSGIVING IS NEARLY UPON US,

which means Christmas is nigh, which means before you can say “two-day hangover” you’ll be tying one on and toasting the new year and wondering just how in the hell 2011 managed to sneak past you so quickly. And of course, with another new year comes another Arkansas Times Musicians Showcase. This marks the contest’s 20th year. Here’s how it’ll go down: your trusty Times staff and the folks from Stickyz and Revolution pare down the field to a gaggle of semi-finalists; starting Jan. 26, four of those acts will square off each week at Stickyz and five judges will select a winner. Each week’s winner moves on to the finals at Revolution. The winner of the final round will receive a bevy of excellent prizes and a drink named in his, her or their honor. So if you are an Arkansas-based musical act (solo or band) performing original material in any genre, you should go ahead and enter at www.arktimes.com/ showcase12.

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www.arktimes.com NOVEMBER 2, 2011 19


THE TO-DO

LIST

BY ROBERT BELL AND BERNARD REED

WEDNESDAY 11/2

OZARK FOLK FESTIVAL

Various times. Eureka Springs. Free-$15.

Back for its 64th year, the original Ozark folk festival is taking hold of Arkansas’s quirkiest, coolest small town with up-and-coming and wellestablished musical acts from around the region playing in various venues around town. The headliners are, per usual, a who’s who of bluegrass — Big Smith (Friday) and Still on the Hill, Split Lip Rayfield and 3 Penny Acre (Saturday) — with their unique folk and country sounds that keep them swimming against the mainstream. On Friday night is the festival’s oldest tradition, the Barefoot Ball, which is as unpretentious as it sounds (although, hillbillies be warned, shoes are required for entrance). The Folk Festival Parade, with a “Eureka through the Years” theme, rolls through Saturday for the grand finale. BR.

THURSDAY 11/3

WEDNESDAY 11/2

‘BLAZE FOLEY: DUCT TAPE MESSIAH’

‘DRUNKEN ANGEL’: Stickyz screens a documentary about legendary singer/songwriter Blaze Foley and follows it with a concert.

RVIVR

8:30 p.m., Stickyz Rock N’ Roll Chicken Shack. $10 adv., $12 d.o.s.

From out of the damp, green environs of Olympia, Wash., comes the upbeat sound of RVIVR, playing punk-rock ’n’ roll a la Dillinger Four or maybe Against Me! The band crafts driving pop-punk anthems with lots of palm-muting, boygirl shout-singing and soaring, dramatic choruses rife with “whoa-ohs” and on a couple of tracks — I kid you not — horns. And it’s awesome. It’s been a ton of years since I kept up with DIY punk, but RVIVR (pronounced “reviver”) is the kind of band that makes you remember what it’s like to be excited about living for the moment, drinking too much cheap beer with your best friends, kissing this town goodbye and flipping a fat middle finger to the square community. This is music that’s earnest but not naive, skeptical but not cynical, bursting with poppy hooks but still capable of leaving a bruise. You know that cute girl with the green hair and the nose ring and the Molotov cocktail tattoo, the one who works at the grimy punk-rock pizza joint in every mid-sized city in the country? RVIVR is her favorite band. It could be yours, too. Brother Andy and No Hickeys round out what will be a bitchin’ show that you’ll be glad you went to next time your jerkwad boss has you all bummed out. RB.

Malvern-born troubadour and duct tape aficionado Blaze Foley finally gets his due in a documentary more than 20 years after he was shot to death by a friend over nothing more than a grudge. Although some of his great-

20 NOVEMBER 2, 2011 ARKANSAS TIMES

lawyer Brad Hendricks, whose firm is sponsoring the screening at Stickyz, was one of those acquaintances; they were good friends and even shared a place one time. Multi-instrumentalist Gurf Morlix, who has collaborated with everyone from Robert Earl Keen to Lucinda Williams (whose “Drunken Angel” is a tribute to Foley), performs after the documentary screening with Triplett. BR.

FRIDAY 11/4

‘THE QUALITY OF LIFE’

7:30 p.m. The Weekend Theater. $12-$16.

It’s hard these days to avoid the ideological conflicts of our political and cultural landscape; there’s too much yelling and not enough insight, and it seems nobody can get along because nobody really wants to. TV and the Internet, for all their hopeful modernity, have turned into the stomping ground of the stupid, so perhaps it’s worth it to examine our world in a more oldfashioned way, from the stage. The Weekend Theater presents this drama about a conservative couple whose faith in God helps them cope with the death of their adult daughter, and their weekend visit to liberal, hippy-dippy cousins who live in Berkeley and smoke medical marijuana. By now these are two worldviews whose clash we are not unfamiliar with, but the stage is generally a quiet place, and it possesses a realism that might remind us that we’re all human, no matter what we believe in. The drama continues Nov. 5, 11, 12, 18 and 19. BR

BYRON TAYLOR

9 p.m. White Water Tavern. $6.

est songs are best known from the interpretations of other artists, such as Merle Haggard (“If Only I Could Fly”) and John Prine (“Clay Pigeons”), Foley’s music maintains an impressive legion of followers. He lived all over the country, from Georgia to Chicago to Austin, and his vast number of acquaintances made the film project a logistically difficult one for Texan director Kevin Triplett. Little Rock

GOD DRAMA: Alan Douglas, Fran Jameson, Stephanie Gunderman and Scott Minor star in ‘Quality of Life.’


BYRON TAYLOR

IN BRIEF

THURSDAY 11/3

SATURDAY 11/5

CORNBREAD FESTIVAL

11 a.m. Bernice Garden. $3-$5.

Cornbread is to Southern cuisine kind of like Faulkner is to Southern literature, or the word “y’all” is to our regional dialect: the standout you can’t avoid twining into any sensible conversation on the subject, so ubiquitous and obvious and essential that it almost

need not be mentioned at all. Cornbread is, after all, bread, a benchmark in not only culinary but also cultural achievement (see our Native’s Guide to cornbread in Arkansas on page 58). The Bernice Garden hosts this inaugural South Main celebration of castiron connoisseurs, professionals and amateurs who can do a thing or two with maize and butter, all while tap-

ping their feet to blues and bluegrass. Besides a cornbread competition and music there’ll be vendors, a variety of family activities and “Cornbread Gospels” author Crescent Dragonwagon (who will also give a talk at noon at the Historic Arkansas Museum). Put down “The Sound and the Fury” and grab some comfort food that Faulkner would be proud of. BR.

SUNDAY 11/6

DEAD CONFEDERATE

8:30 p.m. Stickyz. $10.

SMART PSYCH: Dead Meadow comes to Juanita’s.

SUNDAY 11/6

DEAD MEADOW 8 p.m. Juanita’s. $10 adv., $12 d.o.s.

It’s time for a live show of music that’s made for lying in bed watching the ceiling fan spin, tuning in and dropping out to slumberous skyward guitars. For a band that’s so potently neo-psychedelic and stoner rock, Dead Meadow seems to be made up of fairly smart guys — their drummer stepped out temporarily to

After touring with the Meat Puppets and Dinosaur Jr. (who it opened for the band last time it was in Little Rock), Dead Confederate ought to be ready to make it on its own. Listeners still eat up Nirvana, of course, who always take the number one slot when the “sounds like” comparison is made for the Athens-based altrockers. Front man Hardy Morris doesn’t quite hit the right level of Cobain melancholia, although his hair is stringy enough to play the part, and there’s a uniquely unSeattle drawl — both in Morris’ vocals and in the steely, swerving notes of the guitar. Maybe this country-grunge fusion is too safe or too neurotic a path to take, but in a world where the rock ’n’ roll charts have been hijacked by the likes of Nickelback, Dead Confederate can take whatever path it wants. BR.

go to law school, and they have lyrics indebted to Tolkien and Lovecraft (considered reasonably intellectual reading). But critics are polarized over whether or not the band has made any significant evolution after 10 years and five albums. It’s up to you to decide — are they pushing boundaries with janglier riffs and more harmonic restraint than ever, or just languishing in the cavernous reverb of a long-running acid-trip? BR.

BACK TO HEADLINE: After touring with Dinosaur Jr., Dead Confederate plays Stickyz.

pendulum hips that ticked scandalously. Coming to Arkansas is Eddie Miles, Grade A Elvis impersonator, to touch a few more lives and keep the music alive in all of our hearts. Critics, including Elvis’ drummer, a couple of his guitarists, and lifelong friends, say Miles is one of the best. He’s billed as

one of the classier tribute acts, and also plays songs from country legends in his solo performance. If the King really is still alive out there somewhere, he’s either awfully pleased with his reputation, or seriously creeped out. Miles returns for another concert on Wednesday, too. BR.

6 p.m. Murry’s Dinner Playhouse. $23-$33.

According to Wikipedia, 84 percent of Americans say their lives have in some way been touched by Elvis. I, for one, used to have an Elvis clock with

FRIDAY 11/4 Downtown Music Hall’s massive lineup of Christian post-hardcore bands is a real mouthful, with A Bullet For Pretty Boy, The Great Commission, The Plot in You, The Air I Breathe and The Front Line, 6 p.m., $11. Glossary and Austin Lucas are no doubt two of the most beloved Americana acts that frequent Arkansas, and Maxine’s has both of them, 8 p.m., $5 adv., $7 door. For some Red Dirt country rockin’, Revolution has Jason Boland & The Stragglers and American Aquarium at an 18-and-older show, 9 p.m., $12 adv., $15 d.o.s. For some late-night rowdiness, check out Joecephus & The George Jonestown Massacre at Midtown, 12:30 a.m., $5. Fans of bratty Millennial pop-punk and post-Bieber boy-bands will have their hands full at Juanita’s with All Time Low, The Ready Set and He Is We, 9 p.m., $22.50 adv., $25 d.o.s. The FOCAL book sale starts at 10 a.m. at Main Library.

SATURDAY 11/5

TUESDAY 11/8

EDDIE MILES

Do you seek an evening of heavymetal-psych-rock-riff-o-rama? Look no further than White Water Tavern, which hosts Iron Tongue, Black-Eyed Vermillion and Whiskey Dick, 9 p.m., $5. Up in Fayetteville, UARK Bowl has John Oates, one half of legendarily smooth blue-eyed soul duo Hall & Oates. It starts at 8 p.m., $20 adv., $22 door. Cajun’s Wharf has The Gettys as the headlining act and Ben & Doug playing during happy hour, 5 p.m. and 9 p.m., $5 after 8:30 p.m. Author David Cortight will discuss “Ending Obama’s War,” his book about U.S. and NATO military policy in Afghanistan and Pakistan, Clinton School of Public Service, 6 p.m., free.

Ed Bowman & The Rock City Players bring rockin’ R&B to Shooter’s Sports Bar & Grill, 9 p.m., $5. The Toneadoes tear it up and put it all back together at Cregeen’s Irish Pub, 8 p.m., $5. Get out your wallets, comic book geeks, because it’s time once more for the River City Comic Expo at Sherwood Forest. It’s $3 to get in, doors open at 10 a.m. and the cosplay costume contest starts at 11 a.m. Arkansas TheatreWorks’ production of the Fats Waller-inspired musical “Ain’t Misbehavin’” opens at Central Theatre, 8 p.m., $20-$30. This is your last chance to catch “That ’80s Show” at Wildwood Park for the Arts, 7 p.m., $15-$25. www.arktimes.com NOVEMBER 2, 2011 21


AFTER DARK All events are in the Greater Little Rock area unless otherwise noted. To place an event in the Arkansas Times calendar, please e-mail the listing and all pertinent information, including date, time, location, price and contact information, to calendar@arktimes.com.

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 2

MUSIC

Alternative Wednesdays. Features alternative bands from Central Arkansas and the surrounding areas. Mediums Art Lounge, 6:30 p.m., $5. 521 Center St. 501-374-4495. Archeology. For ages 18 and older. Stickyz Rock ‘n’ Roll Chicken Shack, 8:30 p.m., $6. 107 Commerce St. 501-372-7707. www.stickyfingerz.com. Bolly Open Mic Hype Night with Osyrus Bolly and DJ Messiah. All American Wings, 9 p.m. 215 W. Capitol Ave. 501-376-4000. allamericanwings.com. Brian & Nick. Cajun’s Wharf, 5 and 9 p.m., $5 after 8:30 p.m. 2400 Cantrell Road. 501-3755351. www.cajunswharf.com. Chris Robinson & The Brotherhood. George’s Majestic Lounge, 9 p.m., $22. 519 W. Dickson St., Fayetteville. 479-442-4226. Gil Franklin & Friends. Holiday Inn, North Little Rock, first Tuesday, Wednesday of every month. 120 W. Pershing Blvd., NLR. Grim Muzik presents Way Back Wednesdays. Cornerstone Pub & Grill, 8:30 p.m. 314 Main St., NLR. 501-374-1782. cstonepub.com. Heidi Newfield, Bridgette Tatum, Lindsay Kate Band. For ages 18 and up. Revolution, 7:30 p.m., $10 adv., $15 d.o.s. 300 President Clinton Ave. 501-823-0090. revroom.com. Jim Dickerson. Sonny Williams’ Steak Room, 7 p.m. 500 President Clinton Ave. 501-324-2999. www.sonnywilliamssteakroom.com. RVIVR, Brother Andy and His Big Damn Mouth, No Hickeys. For ages 18 and older. White Water Tavern, 9 p.m., $6. 2500 W. 7th. 501-375-8400. www.whitewatertavern.com. Ted Ludwig Trio. Capital Bar and Grill, 5 p.m., free. 111 Markham St. 501-374-7474. www.capitalhotel.com/CBG.

COMEDY

Tommy Blaze, Kurt Green, Tommy Nolan. The Loony Bin, 8 p.m.; Nov. 4, 10:30 p.m.; Nov. 5, 7, 9 and 11 p.m., $7-$10. 10301 N. Rodney Parham Road. 501-228-5555. www.loonybincomedy.com.

EVENTS

Jewish Learning Event. Rabbi Euguene Levy of Temple B’nai Israel will discuss the history of Reform Judaism and the creation of Conservative Judaism. Hendrix College, 7:30 p.m. 1600 Washington Ave., Conway. 501-4504597. www.hendrix.edu. “Pinta” and “Nina” docking. Replicas of Christopher Columbus’ ships will dock at Riverfront Park for visitors to explore. Riverfront Park, through Nov. 6, 9 a.m. p.m., $6-$8.

LECTURES

“The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict, American Policy and the Arab Uprisings.” Ethan Bronner, Jerusalem bureau chief for The New York Times, will discuss the current state of U.S. and Middle East relations. Clinton Presidential Center, 6 p.m. 1200 President Clinton Ave. 370-8000.

22 NOVEMBER 2, 2011 ARKANSAS TIMES

SUPER-SPAZZ: Atlanta’s Family Force 5 mixes the over-the-top theatricality of André 3000 with pop, pop-punk, techno, auto-tuned vocals and a heaping helping of ADD and puts it all in a big Gen-Y blender and hits “puree.” The result? One of the most bewilderingly, mind-blowingly bizarre musical concoctions ever. If that sounds like your cup of crazy, don’t miss this show, at Revolution, 9 p.m., $15. www.clintonpresidentialcenter.org. Remembering LBJ and Ladybird. Christy Carpenter is the guest speaker. Lunch will be served. Reservations required. Governor’s Mansion, 11:30 a.m., $20. 1800 Center St. “The Thousand-Year Flood: The OhioMississippi Disaster of 1937.” David Welky, associate professor of history at the University of Central Arkansas, discusses one of the biggest natural disasters in American history. Main Library, 12 p.m. 100 S. Rock St. www.cals.lib.ar.us.

THURSDAY, NOV. 3

MUSIC

“BLISS.” Music by DJ Greyhound. Deep Ultra Lounge, 10 p.m. 322 President Clinton Ave. Fire & Brimstone. Faulkner County Library, 7 p.m. 1900 Tyler St., Conway. 501-327-7482. www.fcl.org. The Gettys (headliner), Ben & Doug (happy hour). Cajun’s Wharf, 5 and 9 p.m., $5 after 8:30 p.m. 2400 Cantrell Road. 501-375-5351. www. cajunswharf.com. Grandchildren, Brian Martin. Maxine’s, 8 p.m., $5. 700 Central Ave., Hot Springs. maxinespub. com. “Inferno.” DJs play pop, electro, house and more, plus drink specials and $1 cover before 11 p.m. Sway, 9 p.m. 412 Louisiana. 501-907-2582. Iron Tongue. White Water Tavern, 9 p.m., $5.

UnioN UnioN

2500 W. 7th. 501-375-8400. www.whitewatertavern.com. Jim Dickerson. Sonny Williams’ Steak Room, 7 p.m. 500 President Clinton Ave. 501-324-2999. www.sonnywilliamssteakroom.com. John Oates. UARK Bowl, 8 p.m., $20 adv., $22 door. 644 W. Dickson St., Fayetteville. 479-3012030. www.uarkballroom.com/. Ol’ Puddin’haid. Thirst n’ Howl, 7:30 p.m., free. 14710 Cantrell Road. 501-379-8189. www.thirstn-howl.com. Port Arthur Band. Parrot Beach Cafe, 9 p.m. 9611 MacArthur Drive, NLR. 771-2994. Ted Ludwig Trio. Capital Bar and Grill, 5 p.m., free. 111 Markham St. 501-374-7474. www.capitalhotel.com/CBG.

COMEDY

Tommy Blaze, Kurt Green, Tommy Nolan. The Loony Bin, through Nov. 4, 8 p.m.; Nov. 4, 10:30 p.m.; Nov. 5, 7, 9 and 11 p.m., $7-$10. 10301 N. Rodney Parham Road. 501-228-5555. www. loonybincomedy.com.

EVENTS

64th Annual Original Ozark Folk Festival. Includes arts and crafts demonstrations, a parade and performances from Split Lip Rayfield, Big Smith, 3 Penny Acre, Still on the Hill and others. Basin Spring Park, 10 a.m., $10$15. Downtown Eureka Springs, Eureka Springs.

479-253-7333. Arkansas Workforce Services 2011 Career Expo. Information about job vacancies, meetings with employers, and workshops on interviewing, networking, resume tips and more. Verizon Arena, 10 a.m., free. 1 Alltel Arena Way, NLR. 855-225-4440. www.ARJobLink.com. “Columbo and Crime Television.” Amelie Hastie, associate professor of English and chair of Film and Media Studies at Amherst College, will present this lecture about the popular crime series in relation to crime television past and present. Hendrix College, 7:30 p.m. 1600 Washington Ave., Conway. 501-450-4597. www. hendrix.edu. Hillcrest Shop & Sip. Shops and restaurants offer discounts, later hours, and live music. Hillcrest, first Thursday of every month, 5-10 p.m. P.O.Box 251522. 501-666-3600. www.hillcrestmerchants.com. “Pinta” and “Nina” docking. See Nov. 2. Quapaw Quarter Association Annual Membership Meeting and Greater Little Rock Preservation Awards. Kirk Huffaker, Executive Director of the Utah Heritage Foundation, will join us to speak about successful neighborhood revitalization programs. Historic Arkansas Museum, 5:30 p.m., Free. 200 E. Third St. 501-324-9351. www.quapaw.com.

LECTURES

David Cortight. The author of “Ending Obama’s War” will discuss his book about U.S. and NATO military policy in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Clinton School of Public Service, 6 p.m. 1200 President Clinton Ave. 501-683-5239. www.clintonschool.uasys.edu.

CLASSES

“Your Story” workshop. Free autobiographical writing and performance workshop led by Pulaski Technical College instructors April Gentry-Sutterfield and Paula Morell. Limited to 20; to register, contact Mary Gall at 501-8122751 or mgall@pulaskitech.edu. Laman Library, 6 p.m. 2801 Orange St., NLR. 501-758-1720. www.lamanlibrary.org.

FRIDAY, NOV. 4

MUSIC

All Time Low, The Ready Set, He Is We. Juanita’s, 9 p.m., $22.50 adv., $25 d.o.s. 614 President Clinton Ave. 501-372-1228. www. juanitas.com. Brandon White. Cregeen’s Irish Pub, 8 p.m. 301 Main St., NLR. 501-376-7468. www.cre3421 Old Cantrell Rd • 501-353-0360 geens.com. 3421 Old Cantrell Rd. • 501-353-0360 (One block from Loca Luna) Brian & Nick. Flying Saucer, 9 p.m., $3. 323 (One block from Loca Luna) President Clinton Ave. 501-372-7468. www. www.unionbistrolittlerock.com Lunch • Tuesday - Friday 11 am - 2 pm beerknurd.com/stores/littlerock. Dinner • Tuesday Saturday 5 pm 12 am Lunch • Tuesday-Friday 11am-2pm A Bullet For Pretty Boy, The Great Commission, Brunch • Sunday 10 am - 2 pm Dinner • Tuesday-Friday 5pm-12am The Plot in You, The Air I Breathe, The Front Brunch • Sunday 10am-2pm Line. Downtown Music Hall, 6 p.m., $11. 211 W. Capitol. 501-376-1819. downtownshows. 3421 Old Cantrell Rd • 501-353-0360 homestead.com. (One block from Loca Luna) Tuesday - Thursday • Never aDJ cover Silky Slim. Top 40 and dance music. Sway, 9 Live Local Music Lunch • Tuesday - Friday 11 am - 2 pm p.m., $5. 412 Louisiana. 501-907-2582. Dinner • Tuesday - Saturday 5 pm - 12 am Thursday & Saturday nights Ed Burks. Sonny Williams’ Steak Room, Nov. 4-5, Brunch • Sunday 10 am - 2 pm Never a cover 7 p.m. 500 President Clinton Ave. 501-324-2999. Starting a 9:30 • $5.00 cover www.sonnywilliamssteakroom.com. Live local music “The Flow Fridays.” Twelve Modern Lounge, 8 Salsa Night on Fridays Tuesday - Thursday • Never a cover p.m. 1900 W. Third St. Starting at 9:30 • $5.00 cover FreeVerse. 18 and up show. Stickyz Rock ‘n’ Roll Salas Night on Fridays Chicken Shack, 10 p.m., $5. 107 Commerce St. Starting a 9:30 • $5.00 cover Daily Lunch and Dinner Specials 501-372-7707. www.stickyfingerz.com.

BISTRO

BISTRO

UnioN BISTRO

Live local music

Salas Night on Fridays

Daily lunch and dinner specials

Daily Drink Specials Daily lunch and dinner Daily Drink Specials specials

Daily Drink Specials


Glossary, Austin Lucas. Maxine’s, 8 p.m., $5 adv., $7 door. 700 Central Ave., Hot Springs. maxinespub.com. Gravel Road. White Water Tavern, 9 p.m., $5. 2500 W. 7th. 501-375-8400. www.whitewatertavern.com. Jason Boland & The Stragglers, American Aquarium. 18+ show. Revolution, 9 p.m., $12 adv., $15 d.o.s. 300 President Clinton Ave. 501823-0090. revroom.com. Jerry Don O’Neal. Cornerstone Pub & Grill, 9 p.m. Cornerstone Pub & Grill, 9 p.m. 314 Main St., NLR. 501-374-1782. www.jerrydononeal.com. Jodi James (headliner), Richie Johnson (happy hour). Cajun’s Wharf, 5 and 9 p.m., $5 after 8:30 p.m. 2400 Cantrell Road. 501-375-5351. www. cajunswharf.com. Joecephus & The George Jonestown Massacre. Midtown Billiards, 12:30 a.m., $5. 1316 Main St. 501-372-9990. midtownar.com. Michael Ward, Ed Perkins. Porter’s Jazz Cafe, 9 p.m., $20. 315 Main St. 501-324-1900. www. portersjazzcafe.com. Minerva, Scott Diffee & His Six String, Threshold. Vino’s, 9 p.m., $8. 923 W. 7th St. 501-375-8466. www.vinosbrewpub.com. Nine Lives Spent. Shooter’s Sports Bar & Grill, 9 p.m., $5. 9500 I-30. 501-565-4003. www.shooterslittlerock.com/. OTR. Denton’s Trotline, 9 p.m. 2150 Congo Road, Benton. 501-315-1717. Runaway Planet. The Afterthought, 9 p.m., $7. 2721 Kavanaugh Blvd. 663-1196. www.afterthoughtbar.com. Ted Ludwig Trio. Capital Bar and Grill, 9 p.m., free. 111 Markham St. 501-374-7474. www.capitalhotel.com/CBG.

COMEDY

Tommy Blaze, Kurt Green, Tommy Nolan. The Loony Bin, through Nov. 4, 8 p.m.; Nov. 4, 10:30 p.m.; Nov. 5, 7, 9 and 11 p.m., $7-$10. 10301 N. Rodney Parham Road. 501-228-5555. www. loonybincomedy.com.

DANCE

Dancing into Dreamland. Benefit for Dreamland Ballroom restoration with performance by Lawrence Hamilton, competitive dancing with text voting, silent auction, appetizers, refreshments. After party at Porter’s Jazz Cafe, 315 Main St., from 9 to 12. Governor’s Mansion, 6 p.m., $100. 1800 Center St. 501-607-0954. www. dreamlandballroom.org.

EVENTS

Arkansas AIDS Walk Wine & Cheese Kickoff. Silent auction and entertainment. Historic Rogers House, 7 p.m., $20. 400 W. 18th St. 501-376-6299. Arkansas Genealogical Society seminar and book fair. Saturday registration includes lunch. Includes special lecture sessions with genealogist Mark Lowe Friday and Saturday. Wyndham Riverfront Hotel, Nov. 4, 5 p.m.; Nov. 5, 8 a.m., $30 Friday only; $35 Saturday only; $50 both days. 2 Riverfront Place, NLR. 501-888-6981. www.agsgenealogy.org. “Cornbread: Food, Shelter, Story.” Talk by Crescent Dragonwagon, author of “Cornbread Gospels.” Kicks off the Arkansas Cornbread Festival at the Bernice Garden, 1401 S. Main Street. RSVP to 324-9351. Historic Arkansas Museum, 12 p.m. 200 E. Third St. 501-324-9351. www.ARCornbreadFestival.com.

Hot Springs Jaguar Invitational car rally. This rally takes place at various locations in Hot Springs. Downtown Hot Springs, 11 a.m. Central Avenue, Hot Springs. 501-366-4110. LGBTQ/SGL Youth and Young Adult Group. Diverse Youth for Social Change is a group for LGBTQ/SGL and straight ally youth and young adults age 14 to 23. For more information, call 244-9690 or search “DYSC” on Facebook. 800 Scott St., 6:30 p.m. 800 Scott St. “Pinta” and “Nina” docking. See Nov. 2.

Come join us for happy hour drink and appetizer speCials! 5:00-6:30 pm

LECTURES

Dennis Henigan. Thee acting president of the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence will discuss American gun policy. Clinton School of Public Service, 12 p.m. 1200 President Clinton Ave. 501-683-5239. www.clintonschool.uasys. edu.

POETRY

Haiku Hot Springs. National Park Community College Library, Hot Springs, 9 a.m., free.

best st eak 2005- 2011 f r e e va l e t pa r k ing • p ia no b a r tu es -s at 3 3 5 w i n e s e l e Cti o n s • fine s p ir its fr o m a r o u nd th e wo r ld i n q u i r e a b o u t ou r p r ivate Co r p o r ate lu nC h es

BOOKS

FOCAL book sale. FOCAL members are allowed to shop the basement starting at 9am on Friday and Saturday. Main Library, Nov. 4, 10 a.m.; Nov. 5, 10 a.m.; Nov. 6, 1 p.m. 100 S. Rock St. 501-918-3086. www.cals.org.

SATURDAY, NOV. 5

MUSIC

Arkansas Trainwreck feat. Mare Borgelt. Cornerstone Pub & Grill, 9 p.m. 314 Main St., NLR. 501-374-1782. cstonepub.com. Banks & Shane. Woodlands Auditorium, 7:30 p.m., $18. 1101 De Soto Blvd., Hot Springs Village. 501-922-4321. www.hsvwoodlands. com. Ben Miller Band. Maxine’s, 8 p.m., $5. 700 Central Ave., Hot Springs. maxinespub.com. Crash Meadows (headliner), Andy Tanas (happy hour). White Water Tavern, 5 and 9 p.m., $5 after 8:30 p.m. 2500 W. 7th. 501-3758400. www.whitewatertavern.com. DJs Ramon, Joel Allenbaugh, A.M.P. and Hollywood. Performers include Dominique, Skye Ohara Paige and Whitney Paige. Discovery Nightclub, 9 p.m., $12. 1021 Jessie Road. 501-664-4784. www.latenightdisco.com. Ed Bowman & The Rock City Players. Shooter’s Sports Bar & Grill, 9 p.m., $5. 9500 I-30. 501565-4003. www.shooterslittlerock.com/. Ed Burks. Sonny Williams’ Steak Room, 7 p.m. 500 President Clinton Ave. 501-324-2999. www. sonnywilliamssteakroom.com. Family Force 5. All ages show. Revolution, 9 p.m., $15. 300 President Clinton Ave. 501-8230090. revroom.com. Four on the Floor. Stickyz Rock ‘n’ Roll Chicken Shack, 9 p.m. 107 Commerce St. 501-372-7707. www.stickyfingerz.com. Ghost Town Blues Band. Midtown Billiards, 12:30 a.m., $5. 1316 Main St. 501-372-9990. midtownar.com. The Kavanaugh Band. The Afterthought, 9 p.m., $7. 2721 Kavanaugh Blvd. 501-663-1196. www. afterthoughtbar.com. Kent Burnside & The New Generation. 18 and up show. Stickyz Rock ‘n’ Roll Chicken Shack, 9 p.m. 107 Commerce St. 501-372-7707. www. stickyfingerz.com. “KISS Saturdays” with DJs Deja Blu,

500 p re si de n t Cl i n t on av e n u e ( in t h e ri v e r m a r k e t d i s t r i Ct ) Cal l f or r e se rvat i on s 501.3 2 4 . 2 9 9 9 • www. s o n n y wi l l i a ms s t e a k r o o m. Co m

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www.arktimes.com NOVEMBER 2, 2011 23


THE TELEVISIONIST

Beavis and Butt-head return BY DAVID KOON

BEAVIS AND BUTT-HEAD: NEW EPISODES Thursdays at 9 p.m. MTV

It’s time to dig your Nirvana t-shirt out of the closet and get that case of OK Soda you’ve had aging behind the water heater, because “Beavis and Butt-head” is back. Created by Mike Judge, the seminal bonehead cartoon series broke a lot of ground when it first debuted in March 1993, earning legions of fans and howls of protest from parents’ groups, who clearly didn’t see the humor in the two low-forehead heroes’ penchant for lechery, setting stuff on fire and getting stoned on paint thinner fumes. Judge — seeking to focus more time on his more family-friendly series “King of the Hill” — had the dumbass duo ride off into the sunset at the height of the popularity in Nov. 1997 (a feature film, “Beavis and Butt-head Do America,” had done big biz at the box office the previous year),

but with the cancellation of “King of the Hill” in May 2010, it looks like Judge saw the wisdom of cashing in on Generation X’s 1990s nostalgia while the getting was good. I caught the first new 2011 episode last week, and, while the show paved the way for naughty, envelope-shredding fare like “Family Guy,” “South Park” and “Adult Swim,” it seems positively tame now. That ain’t to say it’s not still funny as hell though, especially given that the new episodes feature Beavis and Butt-head not only doing their shtick of providing color-commentary for music videos (for everybody under the age of 20: a “music video” is a kind of minimovie set to a popular song. Look it up on Wikipedia), but also ripping into scenes from the reality-show dreck that has replaced music on MTV in the years since the first incarnation of “Beavis and Butt-head” went off the air, including “Jersey Shore.” (Sample: “You’re the best grandma ever, Grandma Jwoww... tell us again about the time you got syphilis.”)

While it’s questionable whether the show will manage to catch the attention of the youngsters once again, especially in this world that’s full of much edgier cartoon fare, it’ll be must-see TV every week for this old fart, and may well win some new converts.

HELL ON WHEELS: SERIES PREMIERE 9 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 6 AMC

If you’re old enough to remember the dim days of ten years ago, you know that AMC was once the Old Lady of basic cable, running mothballed flicks from the vaults and hovering only a step or two above Turner Classic Movies in the coolness department (“Welcome back to TCM! Here’s another 26-hour marathon of movies starring Fred Murray to help you kill a few more hours until your inevitable death!”). In recent years though, AMC has morphed into a dramatic powerhouse, rolling the dice on some of the edgiest, most genre-busting television around and winning big with fans and critics. As you know well by now if you’ve watched this space for awhile, I’ve come to trust AMC almost absolutely when it comes to their dramatic series development. Viewers have as well, with groundbreaking show

after show taking off like rockets and scooping up the Emmy Awards — “Mad Men,” “Breaking Bad” and “The Walking Dead.” That’s not to say they can’t lose (their flopped espionage thriller “Rubicon” comes to mind), but the network’s definitely got a hell of a lot better batting average than NBC. Now comes their new foray into the Western genre, “Hell on Wheels.” The show features Anson Mount as Cullen Bohannon, a former Confederate Army soldier and all-around Dangerous Sumbitch, who is out for blood after his wife was murdered by a band of Union raiders during the darkest days of the Civil War. With Reconstruction in full swing, Bohannon heads west to Hell on Wheels, the massive tent city of workers, whores, swindlers, cutthroats, robber barons and preachers that moved along with the construction of the Transcontinental Railroad as the rails inched west to the Pacific. Helping out Mount is an ensemble cast, including the rapper Common as freed slave Elam Ferguson. While I haven’t snagged a copy of the pilot yet, the trailer (available at AMC.com) looks damn fine, with sprawling vistas, tons of period filth, and Bohannon shooting a priest in the face through the screen of a confessional. If that’s what’s in the trailer, I can’t wait to see what the show comes up with week to week. Definitely one to watch.

THE TELEVISIONIST Greyhound and Silky Slim. Sway, 10 p.m. 412 Louisiana. 501-907-2582. Mobley. Vino’s, 9 p.m. 923 W. 7th St. 501-3758466. www.vinosbrewpub.com. Nordic Lights. Featuring piano soloist Neil Rutman. Reynolds Performance Hall, UCA, 7:30 p.m., $6 for students, $20-$30 for adults. 350 S. Donaghey, Conway. 450-5506. conwaysymphony.org. Shannon McClung. Flying Saucer, 9 p.m., $3. 323 President Clinton Ave. 501-372-7468. www. beerknurd.com/stores/littlerock. Ted Ludwig Trio. Capital Bar and Grill, 9 p.m., free. 111 Markham St. 501-374-7474. www. capitalhotel.com/CBG. The Toneadoes. Cregeen’s Irish Pub, 8 p.m., $5. 301 Main St., NLR. 501-376-7468. www. cregeens.com.

COMEDY

Tommy Blaze, Kurt Green, Tommy Nolan. The Loony Bin, 7, 9 and 11 p.m., $7-$10. 10301 N. Rodney Parham Road. 501-228-5555. www. loonybincomedy.com.

EVENTS

Arkansas AIDS Walk. Registration begins at 10:30 a.m. River Market Pavilions, 12:15 p.m., $25; $15 for students. Registration begins at 10:30 a.m. River Market Pavilions, 12:15 p.m., $25; $15 for students. 400 President Clinton Ave. 376-6299. www.rivermarket.info. Arkansas Genealogical Society seminar and book fair. See Nov. 4. Arkansas Farmers Market. Locally grown produce. Certified Farmers Market, 7 a.m.-12 p.m.

6th and Main, NLR. Cornbread Festival. Includes a cornbread competition, games, live music and more. The Bernice Garden, 11 a.m., $3-$5. 1401 S. Main St. www.thebernicegarden.org. Eureka Springs 64th Annual Folk Festival. Artists will demonstrate a variety of crafts, including broom-making, weaving, wood carving, blacksmithing and more. Basin Spring Park, 10 a.m. Downtown Eureka Springs, Eureka Springs. 479-253-7333. Fall Craft Show and Used Book Sale. Artisans and vendors will sell unique items ranging from jewelry to soup mix to home decor. Breakfast and lunch available. Grace Lutheran Church, 9 a.m., free. 5124 Hillcrest Ave. 501-663-3631. Falun Gong meditation. Allsopp Park, 9 a.m., free. Cantrell & Cedar Hill Roads.

24 NOVEMBER 2, 2011 ARKANSAS TIMES

Red Door Ad (April 2011) 1/4 stretch (9.25 x 2.8125)

Hillcrest Farmers Market. Pulaski Heights Baptist Church, 7 a.m. 2200 Kavanaugh Blvd. “Pinta” and “Nina” docking. See Nov. 2.

LECTURES

“The Teddy Bear and the Spanish-American War.” MacArthur Museum of Arkansas Military History, 9 a.m., Free. 503 E. 9th St. 501-376-4602. www.arkmilitaryheritage.com.

SPORTS

Team NUSA 2012 5K Race to Indianapolis. This is the first annual 5K race to raise money for Little Rock’s Team Neighborhoods USA to attend the upcoming NUSA conference. Hindman Park, 8 a.m. 60 Brookview Drive. www. meadowcliffbrookwood.org. CONTINUED ON PAGE 30


ARTISAN BREAD OF THE WEEK

Healthgrain Bread

Let Bleu Monkey Grill

cater your holiday party this year! bleu monkey shrimp

maui salad

flax, wheat germ, millet, cracked rye poppy, sesame, sunflower seeds wheat, whole wheat, rye fours

Citizen Diplomacy Summit

Changing American Foreign Policy One Handshake at a Time

Healthy & Hearty!

River Market, Little Rock, AR November 6 – 7, 2011

Downtown 1200 Main (I-630 & Main) • 375-6418 west LittLe Rock 270 S. Shackleford • 224-1656

(501) 520-4800 4263 Central ave. Hot SpringS bleumonkeygrill.com

BEST NEW

Summit AgenDA Sunday, November 6 High School Student exchange Seminar

River Market, 3rd Floor (enter in back), 2:00 – 3:30 PM

FREE Admission

Celebrate our 7th Anniversary at the Clinton Center November 12 – 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Parade of nations

Start at overpass on President Clinton Avenue, 4:00 – 4:30 PM

Reception at the Clinton Presidential Center great Hall 5:00 – 6:00 PM

Free concert

New Clinton Bridge, 5:00 – 6:00 PM

Monday, November 7 international Companies Seminar

Darragh Center, Central Arkansas Library, 9:45 – 10:45 AM

Coffee Break with international Coffees

Darragh Center, 10:45 – 11:15 AM

Local Businesses engaged internationally Seminar

Darragh Center, 11:15 – 12:15 PM

Lunch - Albert Porter Citizen Diplomacy Award Darragh Center, 12:15 – 1:25 PM

international Students in Higher education Seminar Room 110, Ark. Studies Center, 1:30 – 3:30 PM

nonprofits in the international Sector Seminar Room 124, Ark. Studies Center, 1:30 – 3:30 PM

High tea and networking

Darragh Center, 3:30 – 4:30 PM

See what’s NEW at the Clinton Center! Audio Tours Audio tours narrated by President Clinton are FREE. New features added to the audio tour!

See amazing sculptures out of LEGO® bricks.

SEPT. 24, 2011 - FEb. 12, 2012 PRESENTED bY

1200 President Clinton Avenue • Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 • 501-374-4242 • clintonpresidentialcenter.org

CPC_LEGO_Kids.indd 1

10/31/11 3:26 PM

Nathan Sawaya’s The Art of the Brick Open until February 12, 2012 Dubbed the Picasso of LEGO® bricks, lawyer-turned-artist Nathan Sawaya creates artistic masterpieces from the beloved toy. LEGO® Robotics Demonstrations 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The Clinton Center, in partnership with the Science and Technology Group and FIRST® LEGO® League, will showcase LEGO® MINDSTORMS Robotics. Arkansas FIRST® LEGO® League (FLL®) teams will present their robotic designs and showcase their problem-solving skills, creative thinking and teamwork to school groups. Demonstrations will be held every hour.

1200 President Clinton Avenue • Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 • 501.374.4242 • clintonpresidentialcenter.org

no charge due to the generosity of the Summit Planning Committee.

All are welcome to bring the flag of their birth or citizenship & come join the fun and a free concert afterward. An opportunity to show Arkansas the nations represented by our residents. Parade begins on Pres. Clinton Avenue underneath the I-30 bridge at 4 PM on Sunday Nov. 6, 2011. Sponsored by:

Walter Nunn Executive Director, 501-370-9400 Lafayette Square 523 Louisiana, Suite 450, arkciv.org


THEATER REVIEW

AnnuAl HolidAy open House

7

COME BE DAZZLED

Fri. Nov 11th & Sat. Nov 12th 10 a.m. till 6 p.m.

10-50% oFF Sale

door prizeS, Free giFt wrappiNg, Spiced tea & homemade cookieS, holidaY trapp caNdleS

Oliver’s Antiques

Best little antique store in central Arkansas! 501.982.0064 1101 Burman Dr. • Jacksonville Take Main St. Exit, East on Main, Right on S. Hospital & First Left to Burman

Christmas Open House November 11 & 12

Florist & Gift Shoppe 918 W. Main St Jacksonville 501-982-3125 M-F 8-5 • Sat 9-4

MonDay-SaTuRDay 10-5

We’re Telling Tales! Lunch: Tuesday-Saturday 11am-3pm Dinner: Friday-Saturday 5pm-9pm Dinner And A Show: Tuesday’s 5pm-8pm

‘Shrek’ Mae by V.L. Cox

411 Main St. • In The Heart Of The Argenta Arts District Downtown North Little Rock www.TalesFromTheSouth.com • 501.372.7976

Paws in the Vineyard Benefiting CARE for Animals

wine tasting w hors d’oeuvres w drawings Thursday, November 3 w 5:30 - 8:00pm $40 per guest

Unitarian Universalist Church of Little Rock, 1818 Reservoir Road

501.603.2273 to purchase tickets Wine Master: Bruce Cochran

Thank You to Our Sponsors!

Boulevard Bread Company Bruce Cochran Catering to You Clark Trim & Henrik Thostrup Owners of Colonial Wine & Spirits Tom Crow Owner of Sherwood Beverage

Framed print by Amy Reges to be raffled. CARE for Animals 5516 Kavanaugh Blvd. Little Rock, AR 72207 501.603.2273 www.careforanimals.org 26 NOVEMBER 2, 2011 ARKANSAS TIMES

Oct. 28, Robinson Center Music Hall BY WERNER TRIESCHMANN

N

ew York critics weren’t wild about the 2008 stage incarnation of “Shrek the Musical.” But, outside of “The Lion King,” theater critics have pretty much walled off their hearts to popular film cartoons being made into high-priced, Great White Way entertainment. Then again, it’s a tricky business to turn the intricately animated into singing and dancing flesh-and-blood. Now “Shrek the Musical” arrives at Robinson Center Music Hall thanks to a non-equity tour diverted to Little Rock by Celebrity Attractions. Directed on Broadway by Arkansas native Jason Moore, “Shrek” has undergone changes and songs have been added and cut (book and lyrics are by David LindsayAbaire and music is by Jeanine Tesori), but it’s still a musical that very much resembles the 2001 Dreamworks movie. On stage, “Shrek” is funny and involving — like the movie, it’s aimed at tickling adults and children. The cracked fairy tale story of an ogre and a princess with a secret doesn’t take itself too seriously or smother the audience in winks. There are sections that simply don’t translate on stage but they pass pretty quickly. That’s good because “Shrek” lasts two and half hours, which is something to know if you are taking kids. As a story, “Shrek” is a busy and pop-

ulated tale beginning with fairy tale creatures that are relocated to Shrek’s swamp by the vertically-challenged Lord Farquaad (played with great relish and on his knees in a special short legs costume by Merritt David James). The group is lead by a particularly pessimistic Pinocchio (Chase Todd) and there’s even Gingy (voiced by Schuyler Midgett), the sassy gingerbread cookie. Of course Donkey, the part that was voiced by Eddie Murphy in the movie and who Andre Jordan sounds a lot like here, is along for the journey to be both pain and friend to Shrek. Overall, the performances in this “Shrek” are energetic and comic without crossing over into the camp territory. As Shrek, Lukas Poost’s accent gets the better of him at times but he plays off well with Liz Shivener’s sharp, “bi-polar” Princess Fiona. Tesori’s music has a modern edge to it and is more serviceable than memorable. The songs are spiced by Lindsay-Abaire’s witty lyrics. The parts that don’t work in this “Shrek” are the parts that really could only be pulled off on film — the dragon is an impressive large puppet but does it really need to have a song? And the spectacle of Princess Fiona’s final transformation is pretty but doesn’t make sense. Still, “Shrek” is light and bright entertainment. The show isn’t trying to be the Great American Musical, thank goodness, and just because Hollywood got to it first doesn’t make it bad. The story holds up and the ogre and his cartoon pals are good-hearted and warped just enough to be worth the time. 


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HELP WANTED ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS Friday, November 4 - Thursday, November 10

CELEBRATING OUR 11th YEAR!

The Way PG13 1:45 4:00 7:00 9:15 Emilio Estevez, Martin Sheen, Deobrah Kara Linger SainT nR 2:15 4:15 6:45 9:00 Egbert-Jan Weeber, Caro Lenssen, Bert Luppes BlackThoRn R 1:45 4:00 6:45 9:00 Sam Shepard, Eduardo Noriega, Stephen Rea The GuaRd R 2:00 4:20 7:00 9:15 Brendan Gleeson, Don Cheadle, Mark Strong Sundance & Berlin Film Fest TuckeR and dale vS. evil R 2:00 7:15 Tyler Labine, Alan Tudyk, Katrina Bowden SXSW Film Fest hiGheR GRound R 4:20 9:15 Vera Farmiga, Joshua Leonard Sundance Film Fest

ScREEn youR FEaTuRE, ShoRT, docuMEnTaRy oR MuSIc VIdEo! EMaIL cInEMa8@cSWnET.coM FoR dETaILS

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Share the Road

Share the road For Cyclists

Tips for SAFE cycling on the road.

• Bicycles are vehicles on the road, just like cars and motorcycles. Cyclists must obey all traffic laws. Arkansas Uniform Vehicle Code #27-49-111 • Cyclists must signal, ride on the right side of the road and yield to traffic normally. Code #27-51-301/403 • Bicycles must have a white headlight and a red tail light visible from 500 feet and have a bell or warning device for pedestrians. Code #27-36-220 • Make eye contact with motorists. Be visible. Be predictable. Head up, think ahead. • On the Big Dam Bridge... go slow. Represent! • As you pass, say “On your left... thank you.” • On the River Trail... use a safe speed, don’t intimidate or scare others. Watch for dogs and leashes.

Tips for prEVENTiNG iNjury or dEaTh.

For more information... Bicycles are vehicles on Bicycle Advocacy of Arkansas

www.bacar.org the road, just like cars and League of American Bicyclists motorcycles. Cyclist should www.bikeleague.org/programs/education Share the Road obey all traffic laws. Arkansas For Cyclists Tips forVehicle SAFE cycling on the road. Uniform Code #27-49-111

• Bicycles are vehicles on the road, just like cars and motorcycles. Cyclists must Cyclists should signal, rideobey on all traffic laws. Arkansas Uniform Vehicle Code the right side of the road, and #27-49-111 •yield traffic likeside Cycliststo must signal,normally ride on the right of the road and yield to traffic normally. any other road vehicle. Code Code #27-51-301/403 •#27-51-301/403 Bicycles must have a white headlight and a red tail light visible from 500 feet and have a bell device for pedestrians. Giveor 3warning feet of clear space when Code #27-36-220 passing (up to a $1000 fine!) • Make eye contact with motorists. Be visCode #27-51-311 ible. Be predictable. Head up, think ahead. • On the Big Dam Bridge... go slow. Cyclist by law can not ride on Represent! •the As you pass, say “On left... thank you.” sidewalk in your some areas, • On the River Trail... use a safe speed, don’t some bikes canothers. onlyRoad handle Share the intimidate or scare Watch for dogs and leashes.roads For Cyclists smooth (no cracks, For morecycling information... Tips for SAFE on the road. potholes, trolley tracks).

Advocacyonofthe Arkansas • BicyclesBicycle are vehicles road, just like www.bacar.org LR Ord.#32-494 cars andLeague motorcycles. Cyclists must obey of American Bicyclists allwww.bikeleague.org/programs/education traffic laws. Arkansas Uniform Vehicle Code Make eye contact with cyclists. #27-49-111 • Cyclists must signal, ride on the right side Drive predictably. of the road and yield to traffic normally. Code #27-51-301/403 prevent bikes. and a •Please Bicycles must have aghost white headlight red tail light visible from 500 feet and have a www.ghostbikes.org bell or warning device for pedestrians. Code #27-36-220 • Makefor information: eye more contact with motorists. Be visible. Be predictable. Head up, think ahead. Bicycle advocacy of arkansas • On the Big Dam Bridge... go slow. Represent!www.bacar.org • As you pass, say “On your left... thank you.” • On the River Trail... use a safe speed, don’t intimidate others. Watch for dogs Leagueorofscare American Bicyclists and leashes.

www.bikeleague.org/ For more information... Bicycle Advocacy of Arkansas programs/education

www.bacar.org League of American Bicyclists www.bikeleague.org/programs/education

28 NOVEMBER 2, 2011 ARKANSAS TIMES

NEW MOVIES Anonymous (PG-13) – What if Shakespeare didn’t really write all those plays and his works were actually created by time-travelling robots? Sadly, this period piece doesn’t explore that tantalizing, entirely plausible angle. From the director of “Stargate.” Rave: 10:30 a.m, 1:30, 4:30, 7:35, 10:35. Saint (NR) – An evil Saint Nick brings bloody Christmas carnage to Amsterdam. Can a renegade ex-cop stop this jolly, murderous madman? Market Street: 2:15, 4:15, 6:45, 9:00. The Way (PG-13) – Martin Sheen plays a father who learns some unexpected lessons after traveling to France to pick up the remains of his adult son, who was killed while hiking in the Pyrenees. Written and directed by Emilio Estevez. Market Street: 1:45, 4:00, 7:00, 9:15. Tower Heist (PG-13) – A Bernie Madoff type steals millions from his clients as well as the retirement funds of the staffers at his luxury condo. Breckenridge: 1:05, 4:05, 7:10, 10:00. Rave: 12:01 a.m., 10:30 a.m., 11:00 a.m., 11:45 a.m., 1:30, 2:30, 3:45, 4:15, 5:15, 7:00, 8:00, 8:45, 9:45, 10:45. Riverdale: 11:45 a.m., 2:15, 4:35, 7:10, 9:40. A Very Harold & Kumar Christmas (R) – Remember how the first Indiana Jones movie was awesome, and the second one was kinda meh, but then the third was awesome again? (3D Stoner Christmas comedy). Breckenridge: 1:35, 4:35, 7:40, 10:15. Rave: 12:01 a.m., 11:55 a.m., 12:55, 2:40, 3:35, 5:00, 5:55, 7:30, 8:30, 10:00, 11:10. Riverdale: 11:25 a.m., 1:30, 3:40, 5:50, 8:00, 10:15. RETURNING THIS WEEK 50/50 (R) – Seth Rogen and Joseph GordonLevitt star in this story of love, friendship and finding humor in the face of serious illness. Riverdale: 11:40 a.m., 2:05, 4:20, 6:45, 9:10. Apollo 18 (PG-13) – Turns out the Department of Defense sent a secret mission to the moon in 1974, and this is their footage. We remain unconvinced. Movies 10: 12:30, 5:20, 9:55. Blackthorn (R) – A historical re-imagining of what might have happened if Butch Cassidy hadn’t been killed in a Bolivian showdown following his adventures with the Sundance Kid. Market Street: 1:45, 4:00, 6:45, 9:00. Bucky Larson: Born to Be a Star (R) – Quite possibly the worst movie ever made with the distinction of a 0 percent rating on Rotten Tomatoes. Movies 10: 12:15, 2:35, 4:50, 7:20, 9:50. Cars 2 (G) – A group of animated talking cars travel abroad for the inaugural World Grand Prix in this Pixar sequel. Movies 10: 1:15, 4:00, 7:00, 9:30. Colombiana: Latina badass hunts down her parents’ murderers. Movies 10: 12:10, 2:40, 5:10, 7:45, 10:20. Courageous (PG) – This is a wholesome family movie about courage and God and police officers and things like that. Breckenridge: 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 10:00. Rave: 1:50, 5:00, 8:25, 11:25. Crazy, Stupid, Love (PG-13) – Steve Carell plays Steve Carell in this movie about Ryan Gosling taking on a less serious role to avoid being stereotyped in his rise to fame. Movie 10: 12:50, 4:15, 7:05, 9:45.

‘TOWER HEIST’: Eddie Murphy, Matthew Broderick, Alan Alda and Ben Stiller star in this tale of a Wall Street huckster who bilks not only his clients, but also screws over the staff of his luxury condo. The Debt (R) – Two retired Mossad secret agents learn a dark secret about their former colleague and the mission they undertook back in the 1960s. With Helen Mirren. Movies 10: noon, 2:30, 5:00, 7:30, 10:00. Dolphin Tale (PG) – This story about an injured dolphin overcoming adversity and learning to use a prosthetic tale will jerk the tears out of your face so hard you might catch whiplash. Breckenridge: 4:15, 9:50 (2D), 1:15, 7:15 (3D). Footloose (PG) – This remake of the 1984 classic will probably make you side with the humorless minister who doesn’t want the small-town kids to have any fun ever. Breckenridge: 1:30, 4:30, 7:30, 10:05. Rave: 10:35 a.m., 1:25, 4:35, 7:25, 10:30. The Guard (R) – Brendan Gleeson plays an Irish policeman who must team up with an FBI agent, played by Don Cheadle, in this comedy. Market Street: 2:00, 4:20, 7:00, 9:15. The Help (PG-13) — Emma Stone and Viola Davis star in this adaptation of Kathryn Stockett’s novel about the African-American maids who work in white households in 1960s Mississippi. Riverdale: 11:05 a.m., 1:45, 4:30, 7:25, 10:15. Higher Ground (R) – Vera Farmiga directs and stars in this drama about a Jesus freak waiting on the Rapture, until family matters cause her to question her faith. Market Street: 4:20, 9:15. Ides of March (R) ��� Clooney directs Clooney in this political thriller starring Ryan Gosling, who seems poised to become the next Clooney. Breckenridge: 1:20, 4:20, 7:20, 10:05. Riverdale: 11:00 a.m., 1:25, 3:55, 6:20, 8:40. In Time (PG-13) – Justin Timberlake stars in this movie that takes us to a future where aging has been halted at 25 and time has become currency. Breckenridge: 1:25 (open-captioned), 4:10, 7:15, 10:05. Rave: 11:30 a.m., 12:30, 2:10, 3:10, 4:50, 7:40, 11:00, 11:30. Riverdale: 11:35 a.m., 2:10, 4:45, 7:35, 10:05. The Last Ride (NR) – Shot in Arkansas, this film chronicles the last hours of country music legend and tortured genius Hank Williams. Rave: 1:35, 6:30. The Lion King 3D (G) – It’s “The Lion King” and it’s in 3D. Movies 10: 12:45, 2:55, 5:05, 7:15, 9:25. Moneyball (PG-13) – Baseball can seem pretty boring, but this movie makes it look funny, but also people learn things about life and themselves. Breckenridge: 1:00, 4:05, 6:55, 9:45. Riverdale: 11:20 a.m., 1:50, 4:40, 7:20, 10:00. Paranormal Activity 3 (R) – The franchise continues with more found footage of people who conveniently videotape their lives. This one takes us back to the genesis of the demon from the first two. Breckenridge: 1:45, 4:47, 7:45, 9:50. Rave: 12:01 a.m., 11:50 a.m., 2:05, 4:25, 5:55, 7:05, 8:30, 9:30, 11:05. Riverdale: 11:30 a.m., 1:40, 3:50, 5:55, 8:05, 10:10.

NOV. 4-5

Puss in Boots (PG) – A Shrek spin-off following the adventures of Puss in Boots, voiced by Antonio Banderas. Breckenridge: 1:50, 4:40, 7:35, 9:55 (2D), 1:10, 4:10, 7:05, 9:25 (3D). Rave: 11:40 a.m., 1:45, 2:15, 4:45, 7:15, 7:50, 9:50 (2D), 10:40 a.m., 11:05 a.m., 1:10, 3:40, 5:20, 6:35, 9:05, 10:20 (3D). Riverdale: 11:10 a.m., 1:20, 3:30, 5:40, 7:50. Ra.One (PG-13) – Who ever heard of a Hindi scifi action film? This one, evidently, is the most special-effects laden extravaganza Bollywood has ever produced. Rave: 10:50 a.m. (2D), 2:00, 5:05, 8:15, 11:20 (3D). Real Steel (PG-13) – You know they’re turning Battleship into a movie, too. (Boxing robots). Breckenridge: Rave: 10:45 a.m., 1:40, 5:10, 8:05, 11:20. Rise of the Planet of the Apes (PG-13) — The resurrected ’70s sci-fi franchise continues in this origin story of just how those primates got to be so smart. Movies 10: 12:35, 3:00, 5:25, 7:50, 10:15. The Rum Diary (R) – Based on Hunter S. Thompson’s long-lost first novel, and starring Thompson’s Hollywood persona, Johnny Depp, based on the author’s early career as a reporter in Puerto Rico. Breckenridge: 1:40, 4:25, 7:25, 10:10. Rave: 10:55 a.m., 1:55, 5:05, 8:15. Shark Night: (PG-13) – Oversexed college students get terrorized by a shark at a lakeside cabin. Movies 10: 12:05, 2:25, 4:40, 7:10, 9:40. The Smurfs (PG) — The venerable Dr. Doogie Howser must aid a cadre of tiny blue communists as they flee from an evil plutocrat who seeks to control their means of production. Movies 10: 12:25, 2:50, 5:15, 7:40, 10:05. Straw Dogs (R) – One of those movies that makes Southerners look like violent, angry hillbillies; remake of the 1971 original starring Dustin Hoffman. Movies 10: 2:45, 7:25. Take Shelter (R) – Critically acclaimed and directed by Little Rock native Jeff Nichols, in which a husband must protect his family from his apocalyptic nightmares. Rave: 10:30 a.m., 1:15, 4:10, 7:10, 10:10. The Thing (R) – OK, so supposedly this is not just another in an endless litany of pointless remakes, but rather a prequel to the 1982 version of “The Thing,” which was a remake of the 1951 original. Riverdale: 11:15 a.m., 1:55, 4:20, 6:50, 9:15. The Three Musketeers (PG-13) – Orlando Bloom stars in the steampunk adaptation of the adventures of d’Artagnon and his friends, with more explosions than Dumas could ever have intended. Breckenridge: (2D), (3D). Rave: 11:10 a.m. Tucker and Dale vs. Evil (R) – “Deliverance” x “Shaun of the Dead” = this comedy of errors, which looks like it could be pretty funny, actually. Market Street: 2:00, 7:15. Chenal 9 IMAX Theatre: 17825 Chenal Parkway, 821-2616, www.dtmovies.com. Cinemark Movies 10: 4188 E. McCain Blvd., 945-7400, www.cinemark.com. Cinematown Riverdale 10: Riverdale Shopping Center, 296-9955, www.riverdale10.com. Lakewood 8: 2939 Lakewood Village Drive, 7585354, www.fandango.com. Market Street Cinema: 1521 Merrill Drive, 312-8900, www.marketstreetcinema.net. Rave Colonel Glenn 18: 18 Colonel Glenn Plaza, 687-0499, www.ravemotionpictures.com. Regal Breckenridge Village 12: 1-430 and Rodney Parham, 224-0990, www.fandango.com.


MOVIE REVIEW

Thanks for Helping! ‘PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 3’: Chloe Csengery and Jessica Tyler Brown star.

Frightening formula ‘Paranormal Activity 3’ keeps the scares coming. BY SAM EIFLING

B

y this, the third installment, there’s a familiar normalcy to the happenings in “Paranormal Activity 3.” But say this for its unrepentant, unadorned approach to the bumpin-the-night haunt flick: You know exactly what’s coming. It tells you what’s coming. Eerie noises. Ominous, shadowy bursts. Furniture moving … on its own! Remarkably, it all still works. This is the grilled cheese sandwich of horror movies, straightforward but quite satisfying, if it’s what you’re in the mood for. Like the previous “Paranormal” movies — the first of which was shot for $15,000 and went on to gross nearly $200 million; the second, shot for $3 million, raked in $177 million — the third is filmed by the characters therein. Most of it takes place in 1988, when the sisters from the earlier movies, Katie and Kristi, are little girls first making the acquaintance of the haunts that will follow them later; Kristi, the younger, has what everyone assumes is an imaginary friend named Toby. Their mother, Julie, played to an underconcerned T by Lauren Bittner, reluctantly consents to a request by her videographer boyfriend, Dennis (Christopher Nicholas Smith), to put cameras around their home in a bit of DIY ghostbusting. He starts noticing some low-grade thuds and thumps that can’t be explained merely by an errant Teddy Ruxpin doll. Real-life documentarians Ariel Schulman and Henry Joost (who teamed up for “Catfish”) direct. Fans of the previous movies will appreciate that the prequel addresses some of the story points raised in the 2007 and 2010 “Paranormal” flicks, though it’s clear by glancing at online discussion boards for this movie that dedicated viewers could drive a dump truck through the plot holes. Care at

your own risk. Also, the trailers would have you believe that all hell proceeds to break loose, but whether those are being saved for the DVD extras or what, the result on the screen is as patient as any 81-minute movie you’ve seen, with each scene’s reveal turning the screw another notch. “Paranormal Activity 3” doesn’t overexplain the whys or hows beyond Dennis’ buddy Randy (Dustin Ingram) flipping through some library books on the occult (in California, of course, the local branch carries titles like “Demonology”). There are a couple of scary symbols placed on walls and a couple of pretty aggressive acts by whatever’s haunting the home. Mostly the low, wooden sighs and random rattlings are attributed to something that stays out of view, and rightly so. For as campy as the “Paranormal” franchise is (and it’s sure to keep expanding, given that these movies print money) there’s an endearing quaintness to the films. Audiences absolutely scream at these things, so long as they can suspend their disbelief long enough not to giggle. A swinging door, a shuddering mirror — in the age of profligate digitized explosions, aliens, monsters, magic, space travel, on and on, ad nauseam, ad mortem, how can it be that a little girl standing still for an hour to stare at someone else sleeping is still so utterly creeptastic? The minimalist approach forces even yappy teen-agers to shut up and stare if they’re gonna get anything out of it. The scariest things, the funniest things, the sexiest things, the most engrossing things, are those which remain just out of view. When you find yourself wondering how a stationary bedsheet can seem so frightening, you’ll stop wondering how these low-budget gotcha flicks keep raking in the dough.

When you volunteer, South End shines! We challenged you to shine by helping keep Arkansas clean and green – and you did! Your time and effort are much appreciated. Please continue your efforts to keep Arkansas beautiful year-round! KeepArkansasBeautiful.com

www.arktimes.com NOVEMBER 2, 2011 29 GAC 1011 003 SouthEnd_TY_4.5x12_gs.indd 1

11/1/11 11:30 AM


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BOOKS

Bill Jones. Jones will be signing copies of his book “Classics Illustrated: A Cultural History.” WordsWorth Books & Co., 3 p.m. 5920 R St. 501-663-9198. www.wordsworthbooks.org. FOCAL book sale. See Nov. 4. River City Comic Expo. Vendors will sell comics, manga, toys, games, artwork, memorabilia and more. A costume contest starts at 11 a.m. Sherwood Forest, 10 a.m. p.m., $3. 1111 W. Maryland Ave., Sherwood. 501-492-9007.

MUSIC

rs!

Thanks To All Of Our Sponso

y • Riverside Bank US PIZZA • River Rock Realt ick Sabin • Arkansas Times The Committee to Elect Warw st and Bank Box Turtle • Kroger • Delta Tru Inc. • Golden Eagle Distributors, Burt Taggart/Max Recordings n ion • Shoppes on Woodlaw Hillcrest Residents Associat TECON Associates Martinsen Management • HIS Al White/AIMCO Equip Co. ues Church • Kahler-Payne Antiq Pulaski Heights Presbyterian op • Hillcrest Liquor & Wine Sh Victoria Gross/Spinning Plates 26 ry lle Ga • Ciao Baci • Konarski Chiropractic Clinic y & ea Edwards Family Dentistr JAD Properties LLC • Reid, Rh Junk Co. • Rhea Drug Cafe Bossa Nova • Hillcrest Pulaski Heights Realty Edward Jones Investments • Woodlawn WOW Factor at Shoppes on Simmons First National Bank dical Spa DRB Enterprises-Hillcrest Me

30 NOVEMBER 2, 2011 ARKANSAS TIMES

Out Of The Darkness Community Walk For Suicide Prevention. Help raise money and awareness to prevent suicide. You can register as an individual or a team online. Clinton Presidential Center, 9 a.m. 1200 President Clinton Ave. 370-8000. www.outofthedarkness.org. “Reining Cats and Dogs.” 19th annual fundraiser for the Humane Society of Pulaski County includes auction of artwork, pet items, jewelry and dining and music by Paradox, in the Great Hall. Tickets at www.warmhearts.org, 227-6166, in person at the HSPC shelter, Just Dogs Gourmet!, E Bistro and Green Counter Store. Clinton Presidential Center, 7 p.m., $50, $60 at door. 1200 President Clinton Ave. 3708000. www.clintonpresidentialcenter.org.

SUNDAY, NOV. 6

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BENEFITS

Corey Smith. All ages show. Revolution, 8 p.m., $18 adv., $20 d.o.s. 300 President Clinton Ave. 501-823-0090. revroom.com. Dead Confederate. 18 and up show. Stickyz Rock ‘n’ Roll Chicken Shack, 8:30 p.m., $10. 107 Commerce St. 501-372-7707. www.stickyfingerz.com. “Jazz on a Sunday Afternoon.” Benefit for the Ozark Foothills FilmFest featuring performance by Rodney Block & The Real Music Lovers. Elizabeth’s Restaurant & Catering, 3 p.m., $25. 231 E. Main St., Batesville. 870-698-0903. Karaoke. Shorty Small’s, 6-9 p.m. 1475 Hogan Lane, Conway. 501-764-0604. www.shortysmalls.com. Music for the Saints. Featuring Molly Williams on the cello and Bob Bidewell on the organ. St. Paul United Methodist Church, 4 p.m., Free. 2223 Durwood Road. 666-9429. Sunday Jazz Brunch with Ted Ludwig and Joe Cripps. Vieux Carre, 11 a.m. 2721 Kavanaugh Blvd. 501-663-1196. www.vieuxcarrecafe.com. Times Remembered. Patrick Henry Hays Center, 3 p.m., Free. 401 W. Pershing, NLR. 501-7582576. www.northlittlerockband.com. Traditional Irish Music Session. Hibernia Irish Tavern, through Dec. 18: first Sunday of every month, 2:30 p.m.; third Sunday of every month, 2:30 p.m. 9700 N Rodney Parham Road. 501246-4340. www.hiberniairishtavern.com.

EVENTS

“Pinta” and “Nina” docking. See Nov. 2. Wagner’s “Siegfried.” Part of the Captured Live from the Met Performance Series. Reynolds Performance Hall, UCA, 2 p.m., free. 350 S. Donaghey, Conway. 501-450-3293. www.uca. edu/cfac.

BENEFITS

NAPVI golf tournament. Lunch catered by Whole Hog Cafe at 11am during registration. 12:30 p.m. www.arnapvi.org. The Walk for CommUNITY. Sponsored by Just Communities of Arkansas, Walkers and Walk Teams raise funds to support JCA’s youth and community leadership programs. River Market

Pavilions, 3 p.m. 400 President Clinton Ave. 501372-5129. www.arkansasjustcommunities.org.

BOOKS

FOCAL book sale. See Nov. 4.

MONDAY, NOV. 7

MUSIC

Tony Caramia, “An American Journey.” Harding University, 7 p.m., $3. 900 E. Center Ave., Searcy. 501-279-4343. Touch, Grateful Dead Tribute. Stickyz Rock ‘n’ Roll Chicken Shack, 8 p.m., $5. 107 Commerce St. 501-372-7707. www.stickyfingerz.com.

TUESDAY, NOV. 8

MUSIC

Brian Martin. Maxine’s, 8 p.m., free. 700 Central Ave., Hot Springs. maxinespub.com. Dr. Dog. George’s Majestic Lounge, 8:30 p.m., $21. 519 W. Dickson St., Fayetteville. 479-4424226. Eddie Miles. Miles performs a “Salute to Elvis.” Dinner before show at 6 p.m. Murry’s Dinner Playhouse, Nov. 8-9, 7:45 p.m., $31. 6323 Col. Glenn Road. 501-562-3131. murrysdinnerplayhouse.com. Jeff Long. Khalil’s Pub, 6 p.m. 110 S. Shackleford Road. 501-224-0224. www.khalilspub.com. Jim Dickerson. Sonny Williams’ Steak Room, 7 p.m. 500 President Clinton Ave. 501-324-2999. www.sonnywilliamssteakroom.com. Jucifer. 8 p.m., $7. Liszt: A Faust Symphony. Performed by Norman Boehm and Annalisa Crosmer, pianos, featuring the Hendrix College Choir. Hendrix College, 7:30 p.m. 1600 Washington Ave., Conway. 501-450-1247. www.hendrix.edu. Lucious Spiller Band. Copeland’s, 6-9 p.m. 2602 S. Shackleford Road. 501-312-1616. www.copelandsofneworleans.com. Ringworm, The Greenery. Downtown Music Hall, 7 p.m., $10. 211 W. Capitol. 501-376-1819. downtownshows.homestead.com. Tsar Bomba, Echo Canyon, Michael Whitman. White Water Tavern, 9 p.m. 2500 W. 7th. 501375-8400. www.whitewatertavern.com. Tuesday Jam Session with Carl Mouton. The Afterthought, 8 p.m., free. 2721 Kavanaugh Blvd. 501-663-1196. www.afterthoughtbar.com.

DANCE

“Latin Night.” Revolution, 7 p.m., $5 regular, $7 under 21. 300 President Clinton Ave. 501-8230090. www.revroom.com.

EVENTS

Tales from the South. Authors tell true stories; get schedule at www.talesfromthesouth. com. Dinner served 5-6:30 p.m., show at 7 p.m. Reserve at 501-372-7976. Starving Artist Cafe. 411 N. Main St., NLR. 501-372-7976. www. starvingartistcafe.net.

FILM

“The Hustler.” An up-and-coming pool player plays a long-time champion in a single highstakes match. With Paul Newman (1961). Market Street Cinema, 7 p.m., $5. 1521 Merrill Drive. 501-312-8900. www.marketstreetcinema.net.

LECTURES

Brian Fagan. The author of “Elixir: A History of Water and Humankind” will discuss the history of water and how ancient societies viewed the resource. Clinton School of Public Service, 12 p.m. 1200 President Clinton Ave. 501-683-5239. www.clintonschool.uasys.edu. CONTINUED ON PAGE 33


ARKANSAS TIMES MUSICIANS SHOWCASE

THE SEARCH IS ON!

Check out arktimes.com/showcase12 for details on how to enter online and upload your files. Deadline for entry Dec. 24, 2011 For More Info E-mail robertbell@arktimes.com

¡REVOLUTION!

Arkansas Times Musicians Showcase Entry Form NAME OF BAND HOMETOWN DATE BAND WAS FORMED AGE RANGE OF MEMBERS (ALL AGES WELCOME) CONTACT PERSON ADDRESS

“A Crowd pleaser... his rhapsodic melodies coupled with considerable stage charm have made him a phenomenon!”

CITY, STATE, ZIP PHONE E-MAIL SEND ENTRIES AND DEMO CD TO: Arkansas Times Musicians Showcase, PO BOX 34010, Little Rock, AR 72203

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LegaL Notice Copyright Notice: All rights reserved re common-law copyright of trade-name/trade-mark, GERALD DUKES©- as well as any and all derivatives and variations in the spelling of said trade-name/trade-markCommon Law Copyright© 1984 by Gerald Dukes©. Said common-law trade-name/trade-mark, GERALD DUKES©, may neither be used, nor reproduced, neither in whole nor in part, nor in any manner whatsoever, without the prior, express, written consent and acknowledgement of Gerald Dukes© as signified by the red-ink signature of Gerald Dukes© , hereinafter “Secured Party.” With the intent of being contractually bound, any juristic person, as well as the agent of said juristic person, consents and agrees by this Copyright Notice that neither said juristic person, nor the agent of said juristic person, shall display, nor otherwise use in any manner, the common-law trade-name/trade-mark GERALD DUKES© , nor the common-law copyright described herein, nor any derivative of, nor any variation in the spelling of, GERALD DUKES© without the prior, express, written consent and acknowledgement of Secured Party, as signified by Secured Party’s signature in red ink. Secured Party neither grants, nor implies, nor otherwise gives consent for any unauthorized use of GERALD DUKES© , and all such unauthorized use is strictly prohibited. Secured Party is not now, nor has Secured Party ever been, an accommodation party, nor a surety, for the purported debtor, i.e.”GERALD DUKES,” nor for any derivative of, nor for any variation in the spelling of, said name, nor for any other juristic person, and is so-indemnified and held harmless by Debtor, i.e. “GERALD DUKES,” in Hold-harmless and Indemnity Agreement No. GD-010484-HHIA dated the Fourth Day of the First Month in the Year of Our Lord One Thousand Nine Hundred Eighty-four against any and all claims, legal actions, orders, warrants, judgments, demands, liabilities, losses, depositions, summonses, lawsuits, costs, fines, liens, levies, penalties, damages, interests, and expenses whatsoever, both absolute and contingent, as are due and as might become due, now existing and as might hereafter arise, and as might be suffered by, imposed on, and incurred by Debtor for any and every reason, purpose, and cause whatsoever. Self-executing Contract/Security Agreement in Event of Unauthorized Use. By this Copyright Notice, both the juristic person and the agent of said juristic person, hereinafter jointly and severally “User,” consent and agree that any use of GERALD DUKES© other than authorized use as set forth above constitutes unauthorized use, counterfeiting, of Secured Party’s common-law copyrighted property, contractually binds User, renders this Copyright Notice a Security Agreement wherein User is debtor and Gerald Dukes© is Secured Party, and signifies that User: (1) grants Secured Party a security interest in all of User’s assets, land, and personal property, and all of User’s interests in assets, land, and personal property, in the sum certain amount of $500,000.00 per each occurrence of use of the common-law-copyrighted trade-name/trade-mark GERALD DUKES©, as well as for each and every occurrence of use of any and all derivatives of, and variations in the spelling of, GERALD DUKES©, plus cost, plus triple damages; (2) authenticates this Security Agreement wherein User is debtor and Gerald Dukes© is Secured Party, and wherein User pledges all of User’s assets, land, consumer goods, farm products, inventory, equipment, money, investment property, commercial tort claims, letters of credit, letter-of-credit rights, chattel paper, instruments, deposit accounts, accounts, documents, and general intangibles, and all User’s interest in all such foregoing property, now owned and hereafter acquired, now existing and hereafter arising, and wherever located, as collateral for securing User’s contractual obligation in favor of Secured Party for User’s unauthorized use of Secured Party’s common-law-copyrighted property; (3) consents and agrees with Secured Party’s filing of a UCC Financing Statement in the UCC filing office, as well as in any county recorder’s office, wherein User is debtor and Gerald Dukes© is Secured Party; (4) consents and agrees that said UCC Financing Statement described above in paragraph”(3)” is a continuing financing statement, and further consents and agrees with Secured Party’s filing of any continuation statement necessary for maintaining Secured Party’s perfected security interest in all of User’s property and interest in property, pledged as collateral in this Security Agreement and described above in paragraph “(2),” until User’s contractual obligation theretofore incurred has been fully satisfied; (5) consents and agrees with Secured Party’s filing of any UCC Financing Statement, as described above in paragraphs “(3)” and “(4),” as well as the filing of any Security Agreement, as described above in paragraph “(2),” in the UCC filing office, as well as in any county recorder’s office; (6) consents and agrees that any and all such filings described in paragraphs “(4)” and “(5)” above are not, and may not be considered, bogus, and that User will not claim that any filing is bogus; (7) waives all defenses; and (8) appoints Secured Party as Authorized Representative for User, effective upon User’s default re User’s contractual obligations in favor of Secured Party as set forth below under “Payment Terms” and “Default Terms,” granting Secured Party full authorization and power for engaging in any and all actions on behalf of User including, but not limited by, authentication of a record on behalf of User, as Secured Party, in Secured Party’s sole discretion, deems appropriate, and User further consents and agrees that this appointment of Secured Party as Authorized Representative for User, effective upon User’s default, is irrevocable and coupled with a security interest. User further consents and agrees with all of the following additional terms of Self-executing Contract/Security Agreement in Event of Unauthorized Use: Payment Terms: In accordance with fees for unauthorized use of GERALD DUKES© as set forth above, User hereby consents and agrees that User shall pay Secured Party all unauthorized-use fees in full within (10) days of the date User is sent Secured Party’s “invoice,” itemizing said fees. Default Terms: In event of non-payment in full of all unauthorized-use fees by User within (10) days of date invoice is sent, User shall be deemed in default and; (a) all of User’s property and property pledged as collateral by User, as set forth in above in paragraph “(2),” immediately becomes, i.e. is, property of Secured Party; (b) Secured Party is appointed User’s Authorized Representative as set forth above in paragraph “(8)”; and (c) User consents and agrees that Secured Party may take possession of, as well as otherwise dispose of in any manner that Secured Party, in Secured Party’s sole discretion, deems appropriate, including, but not limited by, sale at auction, at any time following User’s default, and without further notice, any and all of User’s property and interest, described above in paragraph “(2), “ formerly pledged as collateral by User, now property of Secured Party, in respect of this “Self-executing Contract/Security Agreement in Event of Unauthorized Use,” that Secured Party, again in Secured Party’s sole discretion, deems appropriate. Terms for Curing Default: Upon event of default, as set forth above under “Default Terms,” irrespective of any and all of User’s former property and interest in property, described above in paragraph “(2),” in the possession of, as well as disposed of by, Secured Party, as authorized above under “Default Terms,” User may cure User’s default only re the remainder of User’s said former property and interest property, formerly pledged as collateral that is neither in the possession of, nor otherwise disposed of by, Secured Party within twenty(20) days of date of User’s default only by payment in full. Terms of Strict Foreclosure: User’s non-payment in full of all unauthorized-use fees itemized in invoice within said twenty-(20) day period for curing default as set forth above under “Terms for Curing Default” authorizes Secured Party’s immediate non-judicial strict foreclosure on any and all remaining former property and interest in property, formerly pledged as collateral by User, now property of Secured Party, which is not in the possession of, nor otherwise disposed of by, Secured Party upon expiration of said twenty-(20) day default-curing period. Ownership subject to common-law copyright and UCC Financing Statement and Security Agreement filed with the UCC filing office. Record Owner: Gerald Dukes©, Autograph Common Law Copyright © 1984. Unauthorized use of “Gerald Dukes” incurs same unauthorizeduse fees as those associated with GERALD DUKES©, as set forth above in paragraph “(1)” under “Selfexecuting Contract/Security Agreement in Event of Unauthorized Use.” 32 NOVEMBER 2, 2011 ARKANSAS TIMES

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AFTER DARK, CONT. Heather Sellers. Lecture will be held in the College of Business building, room 107. University of Central Arkansas, 7:30 p.m., Free. 201 Donaghey Ave., Conway. 501-450-3653. www.uca.edu. Michelle Alexander. The Ohio State University law professor and author of “The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness” will discuss her work. Philander Smith College, 7 p.m. 900 W. Daisy L. Gatson Bates Drive.

POETRY

Corrie Williamson, Kaj Anderson-Bauer. The writers will discuss their work. Pulaski Technical College, 6:30 p.m., free. 3000 W. Scenic Drive, NLR.

THIS WEEK IN THEATER

THEATER

“Ain’t Misbehavin’.” Arkansas TheatreWorks presents the rollicking musical ode to the life of the legendary Fats Waller. Central Theatre, through Nov. 17: Fri., Sat., 8 p.m.; Sun., 2 p.m.; Mon.-Thu., 7:30 p.m., $20-$30. 1008 Central Ave., Hot Springs. “Alice in Wonderland,” Théâtre Tout à Trac. This French-Canadian troupe’s unique presentation of the classic tale implements masks and puppets and is kid-friendly. Walton Arts Center, Sat., Nov. 5, 10 a.m., $8-$16. 495 W. Dickson St., Fayetteville. 479-443-5600. “Cinderella: A Rockin’ New Musical.” Children’s Theatre production of the fairy tale set to music. 7 p.m. Fridays, 3 p.m. Saturdays, 2 p.m. Sundays. Arkansas Arts Center, through Nov. 6: Fri.-Sun.. 501 E. 9th St. 501-372-4000. www.arkarts.com. “The Diary of Black Men.” Thomas Meloncon’s play examines issues inherent in the relationships between black men and black women. Robinson Center Music Hall, Nov. 4-5, 7:30 p.m., $28-$40. Markham and Broadway. www. littlerockmeetings.com/conv-centers/robinson. Gladys in Wonderland. Shepherd of Peace Lutheran Church, Fri., Nov. 4, 7 p.m.; Sat., Nov. 5, 7 p.m.; Sun., Nov. 6, 2 p.m.; Fri., Nov. 11, 7 p.m.; Sat., Nov. 12, 7 p.m.; Sun., Nov. 13, 2 p.m., $12 for adults, $10 for students and seniors. 449 Millwood Circle, Maumelle. 501-352-4239. www.maumelleplayers.org. “The Importance of Being Earnest.” Aquila Theatre presents this take on Oscar Wilde’s comedic masterpiece that sends up the upper classes of Victorian London. Walton Arts Center, Sat., Nov. 5, 8 p.m., $10-$25. 495 W. Dickson St., Fayetteville. 479-443-5600. “Knuffle Bunny: A Cautionary Musical.” The Kennedy Center Theater for Young Audiences presents this story about family, friends and memories, told through costumes, dancing and song. Walton Arts Center, Sun., Nov. 6, 2 p.m., $8-$16. 495 W. Dickson St., Fayetteville. 479-443-5600. “The Mousetrap.” A snowstorm strands a group of strangers and a murderer in an isolated boarding house, in one of Agatha Christie’s most popular works. Murry’s Dinner Playhouse, through Nov. 6: Tue.-Sat., 6 p.m.; Wed., Sun., 11 a.m.; Sun., 5:30 p.m., $23-$33. 6323 Col. Glenn Road. 501-562-3131. murrysdinnerplayhouse.com. “Mr. Marmalade.” Dark comedy explores the way children absorb adult issues and what it takes for them to grow up in troubled times. Recommended for mature audiences only. University of Central Arkansas, Nov. 3-4, 7:30 p.m.; Nov. 9-11, 7:30 p.m., $10. 201 Donaghey Ave., Conway. www.uca.edu. “The Odditorium.” Paul Prater presents a fact-paced one-man stage show featuring

sideshow stunts, mind-reading, mystery and storytelling. The Public Theatre, Nov. 4-5, 8:30 p.m., $12. 616 Center St. 501-374-7529. www. thepublictheatre.com. That ‘80s Show. Wildwood Park for the Performing Arts, Wed., Nov. 2; Thu., Nov. 3; Fri., Nov. 4; Sat., Nov. 5, $15-$25. 20919 Denny Road. 501-378-0405.

Bud Whetstone Is Being Recognized As One Of The Best Lawyers In Arkansas

GALLERIES, MUSEUMS

NEW EVENTS, EXHIBITS

CLINTON PRESIDENTIAL CENTER: “Reigning Cats and Dogs,” auction of artwork and other items to benefit the Humane Society of Pulaski County, 7-10 p.m. Nov. 5, live music, hors d’oeuvres, $50. 227-6166, warmhearts.org. CANTRELL GALLERY, 8206 Cantrell Road: “Night Owls,” paintings by John Deering, opens with reception 6-8 p.m. Nov. 4, runs through Dec. 24. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Sat. 224-1335. M2GALLERY, 11525 Cantrell: New work by Chris Hall, Taylor Shepherd, Lisa Krannichfeld, Robin Tucker, Jason Twiggy Lott, Sam Jones IV, Richard Sutton. 2256257. ARKADELPHIA ARKADELPHIA ARTS CENTER, 625 Main St.: Hanging party for donated ceramic mobile “Suspended Boogie Woogie” by HSU students and other ceramics by Peake Elementary students, 2-4 p.m. Nov. 5. 501-802-1003. BENTON HERZFELD LIBRARY: Lainie Deerman, photographs and artwork, through November. Reception 6:30 p.m. Nov. 17. 501-778-4766. FAYETTEVILLE FAYETTEVILLE UNDERGROUND, One E. Center St.: “Progressive Hemofiction,” paintings by Luciano Trigos; “Gravity,” photographs by Dana Idlet; “Tea Time,” ceramics by Gailen Hudson; drawings and ceramics by Chad Sims, reception 5-8 p.m. Nov. 3, First Thursday. fayettevilleunderground.blogspot. org. HOT SPRINGS Most galleries are open 5-9 p.m. Friday, Nov. 4, for Gallery Walk ALISON PARSONS GALLERY, 802 Central Ave.: Paintings by Alison Parsons. 501-625-3001. AMERICAN ART GALLERY, 724 Central Ave.: Paintings by Jimmy Leach, Jamie Carter, Ersele Hiemstra, Margaret Kipp, Kim Thornton, Sue Coon, Virgil Barksdale and others. 501-624-055. BLUE MOON GALLERY, 718 Central Ave.: “Vision Re-visited: Ten Years After,” photographs by David Rackley, continuing through November. 501-318-2787. GALLERY 726, 726 Central Ave.: Shirley Anderson, Barbara Seibel, Caryl Joy Young, Sue Shields, Becky Barnett, Janet Donnangelo, Marlene Gremillion, Ken Vonk and others. 501-915-8912. GALLERY CENTRAL, 800 Central Ave.: Michael Ethridge, paintings. 501-318-4278. JUSTUS FINE ART, 827 A Central Ave.: “Near and Far,” photography by Don House and Cindy Momchilov; also work by Steve Griffith, Donnie Copeland, Rene Hein, Robyn Horn and Dolores Justus. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Wed.-Sat. 501-321-2335. TAYLOR’S CONTEMPORANEA, 204 Exchange St.: Winfred Rembert, images of the segregated South in leather, through November. Gallery Walk reception 5-9 p.m. Nov. 4. 501624-0516.

In an instant their world has been torn apart… we help them put it back together. Awards Won Include: • Distinguished Citizen Award – Community Service Awards • FBI Community Leadership Award • “One Of America’s Premier Lawyers” – Fortune Magazine • Listed In Best Lawyers In America - Personal Injury • Mid-South Super Lawyer • 11 Times “Best Lawyers” – Arkansas Times • “One Of The Best Trial Lawyers In Arkansas” – Arkansas Democrat-Gazette • “Outstanding Lawyer And Humanitarian” – Arkansas Bar Association • “Outstanding Trial Lawyer” – Trial Lawyers Association

501.376.3564 • Little Rock whetstoneandodum.com www.arktimes.com NOVEMBER 2, 2011 33


WILLIAM H. BOWEN ILLIAM BOWEN SW CHOOL OFH. LAW

SCHOOL OF LAW

54 NOVEMBER 2, 2011 ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES


Arkansas Times is proud to publish the Best Lawyers® in Arkansas list for 2012. Produced by the Best Lawyers® in America, the oldest lawyer-rating publication in the U.S., this list is the gold standard for accuracy and integrity. Listings are organized by specialty and broken down by city and are in alphabetical order.

Best Lawyers in Arkansas 2012

®

Administrative / Regulatory Law Little Rock

Frederick K. Campbell

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard, P.L.L.C. 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Doak Foster Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Allan W. Horne Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor 425 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-375-9151

T. Ark Monroe III Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Charles L. Schlumberger Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

William H. L. Woodyard III Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Antitrust Law Little Rock

Philip S. Anderson

Williams & Anderson PLC Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

Peter G. Kumpe Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

Robert Shults Shults, Brown & Perkins 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1600 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3637 501-375-2301

Appellate Practice Fayetteville

Constance G. Clark

Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor, PLC 19 East Mountain Street P.O. Box 1688

Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702-1688 479-521-7600

R. Christopher Lawson Friday, Eldredge & Clark 3425 North Futrall Drive, Suite 103 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72703-6252 479-695-2011

Little Rock

Philip S. Anderson

Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

Jess L. Askew III Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

E. B. Chiles IV Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

Patrick J. Goss Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

Philip E. Kaplan Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

Troy A. Price Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Roger D. Rowe Lax, Vaughan, Fortson, McKenzie & Rowe Cantrell West Building, Suite 201 11300 Cantrell Road Little Rock, Arkansas 72212 501-376-6565

Robert S. Shafer Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Arbitration Fort Smith

Robert E. Hornberger

ADR, Inc. 404 North Seventh Street P.O. Box 8064 Fort Smith, Arkansas 72902 479-783-1776

Little Rock

Sidney H. McCollum

ADR, Inc. 1501 North University Avenue, Suite 420 Little Rock, Arkansas 72207 501-376-2121

Banking and Finance Law Jonesboro

Ralph W. Waddell

Barrett & Deacon, P.A. 300 South Church Street, Third Floor Jonesboro, Arkansas 72403 870-931-1700

Rogers

Leigh Anne Yeargan

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 5414 Pinnacle Point Drive, Suite 500 Rogers, Arkansas 72758-8131 479-464-5650

Little Rock

Garland W. Binns, Jr.

Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor 425 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-375-9151

Patrick A. Burrow Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

Randal B. Frazier Kutak Rock 124 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3706 501-975-3000

Jeb H. Joyce Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

John Kooistra III Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

David F. Menz Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

David B. Vandergriff Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES

NOVEMBER 2, 2011 35


Bankruptcy and Creditor Debtor Rights / Insolvency and Reorganization Law Crossett

THOMAS S. STREETMAN Streetman, Meeks & Gibson 302 Main Street P.O. Drawer A Crossett, Arkansas 71635 870-364-2213

Fayetteville

JASON N. BRAMLETT Friday, Eldredge & Clark 3425 North Futrall Drive, Suite 103 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72703-6252 479-695-2011

JILL R. JACOWAY Jacoway Law Firm 223 Southeast Avenue P.O. Box 3456 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702 479-521-2621

Bet-the-Company Litigation Batesville

H. DAVID BLAIR Blair & Stroud 500 East Main Street, Suite 201 P.O. Box 2135 Batesville, Arkansas 72501 870-793-8350

CHARLES W. BAKER Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

CHARLES T. COLEMAN Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

STEVEN T. SHULTS

CHRISTOPHER J. HELLER

JOHN E. TULL III

FLOYD M. THOMAS, JR.

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

Thomas, Hickey & Shepherd 423 North Washington Avenue El Dorado, Arkansas 71730-5615 870-862-3478

Fayetteville Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor 19 East Mountain Street P.O. Box 1688 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702-1688 479-521-7600

JOHN C. EVERETT Everett & Wales 1944 East Joyce Boulevard P.O. Box 8370 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72703-8370 479-443-0292

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 3425 North Futrall Drive, Suite 103 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72703-6252 479-695-2011

HARRY A. LIGHT

RICHARD L. RAMSAY

STAN D. SMITH Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

GEOFFREY B. TREECE Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

North Little Rock

DAVID A. GRACE Hardin & Grace 500 Main Street, Suite A P.O. Box 5851 North Little Rock, Arkansas 72119 501-378-7900

Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins 400 West Capital Avenue, Suite 2470 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-1887

MICHAEL N. SHANNON Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

Shults, Brown & Perkins 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1600 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3637 501-375-2301

CLIFFORD W. PLUNKETT

Eichenbaum, Liles & Heister Union National Bank Building, Suite 1900 124 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3717 501-376-4531

SIDNEY P. DAVIS, JR.

PATRICK J. GOSS Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

WILLIAM M. GRIFFIN III

JUDY SIMMONS HENRY

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

James F. Dowden 212 Center Street, 10th Floor Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-324-4700

LANCE R. MILLER

R. T. BEARD III

Constance G. Clark Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor 19 East Mountain Street P.O. Box 1688 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702-1688 479-521-7600

DENNIS L. SHACKLEFORD

Conner & Winters 4375 N. Vantage Drive Suite 405 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72703 479-582-5711

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Fayetteville

Shackleford, Phillips & Ratcliff 100 East Church Street P.O. Box 1718 El Dorado, Arkansas 71731-1718 870-862-5523

ROBERT L. JONES III JAMES F. DOWDEN

CHARLES L. SCHLUMBERGER Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

El Dorado

SIDNEY P. DAVIS, JR. Little Rock

TIMOTHY O. DUDLEY Timothy O. Dudley 114 South Pulaski Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-1924 501-372-0080

Helena

DAVID SOLOMON David Solomon 427 Cherry Street P.O. Box 490 Helena, Arkansas 72342-3301 870-338-7427

D. MICHAEL HUCKABAY, SR.

WILLIAM A. WADDELL, JR.

Huckabay Law Firm Metropolitan Tower 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1575 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-375-5600

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

M. SAMUEL JONES III

JIM L. JULIAN Chisenhall, Nestrud & Julian 400 West Capitol Avenue Suite 2840 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-5800

PETER G. KUMPE Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

JOHN G. LILE Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Little Rock

H. WILLIAM ALLEN

ELIZABETH ROBBEN MURRAY

Allen Law Firm Centre Place, Ninth Floor 212 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2416 501-374-7100

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

PHILIP S. ANDERSON

Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

DAVID M. POWELL Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

STEVEN W. QUATTLEBAUM JESS L. ASKEW III Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

E. B. CHILES IV Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

KEVIN A. CRASS Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

GORDON S. RATHER, JR. Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Lax, Vaughan, Fortson, McKenzie & Rowe Cantrell West Building, Suite 201 11300 Cantrell Road Little Rock, Arkansas 72212 501-376-6565

JOHN TERRY LEE

RICHARD T. DONOVAN

John Terry Lee 106 South Broadway Street P.O. Box 1348 Siloam Springs, Arkansas 72761-1348 479-524-2337

Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

36 NOVEMBER 2, 2011 ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES

JOHN R. ELROD Conner & Winters 4375 N. Vantage Drive Suite 405 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72703 479-582-5711

JOHN C. EVERETT Everett & Wales 1944 East Joyce Boulevard P.O. Box 8370 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72703-8370 479-443-0292

Conner & Winters 4375 N. Vantage Drive Suite 405 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72703 479-582-5711

CLIFFORD W. PLUNKETT Pine Bluff

STEPHEN A. MATTHEWS Bridges Law Firm 315 Eighth Avenue P.O. Box 7808 Pine Bluff, Arkansas 71611 870-534-5532

Civil Rights Law Little Rock

DAVID M. FUQUA Fuqua Campbell, P.A. 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 400 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-374-0200

PHILIP E. KAPLAN Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 3425 North Futrall Drive, Suite 103 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72703-6252 479-695-2011

Fort Smith

DAVID SOLOMON David Solomon 427 Cherry Street P.O. Box 490 Helena, Arkansas 72342-3301 870-338-7427

JOSEPH BARRETT DEACON

Porter Law Firm Tower Building, 323 Center Street, Suite 1300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-244-8200

Barrett & Deacon 300 South Church Street, Third Floor Jonesboro, Arkansas 72403 870-931-1700

Batesville

H. DAVID BLAIR Blair & Stroud 500 East Main Street, Suite 201 P.O. Box 2135 Batesville, Arkansas 72501 870-793-8350

El Dorado

BRIAN H. RATCLIFF Shackleford, Phillips & Ratcliff 100 East Church Street P.O. Box 1718 El Dorado, Arkansas 71731-1718 870-862-5523

Shackleford, Phillips & Ratcliff 100 East Church Street P.O. Box 1718 El Dorado, Arkansas 71731-1718 870-862-5523

GARY D. CORUM Wilson, Engstrom, Corum & Coulter 200 South Commerce, Suite 600 P.O. Box 71 Little Rock, Arkansas 72203 501-375-6453

D. NATHAN COULTER Wilson, Engstrom, Corum & Coulter 200 South Commerce, Suite 600 P.O. Box 71 Little Rock, Arkansas 72203 501-375-6453

KEVIN A. CRASS Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

RICHARD T. DONOVAN Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

TIMOTHY O. DUDLEY Timothy O. Dudley 114 South Pulaski Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-1924 501-372-0080

PATRICK J. GOSS Helena

Jonesboro

Commercial Litigation

E. B. CHILES IV Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

DON A. SMITH Smith Cohen Horan 1206 Garrison Avenue P.O. Box 10205 Fort Smith, Arkansas 72917 479-782-1001

AUSTIN PORTER, JR.

DENNIS L. SHACKLEFORD ROGER D. ROWE

Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

WILLIAM M. GRIFFIN III Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

CHRISTOPHER J. HELLER Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Little Rock

D. MICHAEL HUCKABAY, SR.

H. WILLIAM ALLEN

Huckabay Law Firm Metropolitan Tower 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1575 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-375-5600

Allen Law Firm Centre Place, Ninth Floor 212 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2416 501-374-7100

M. SAMUEL JONES III PHILIP S. ANDERSON Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

JIM L. JULIAN JESS L. ASKEW III Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

Chisenhall, Nestrud & Julian 400 West Capitol Avenue Suite 2840 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-5800

PHILIP E. KAPLAN KRISTINE G. BAKER Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

FLOYD M. THOMAS, JR. BEVERLY A. ROWLETT

Siloam Springs

Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

PHILIP E. KAPLAN Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor 19 East Mountain Street P.O. Box 1688 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702-1688 479-521-7600

ROBERT L. JONES III TERESA M. WINELAND

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

JASON J. CAMPBELL

Munson, Rowlett, Moore & Boone 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-374-6535

Thomas, Hickey & Shepherd 423 North Washington Avenue El Dorado, Arkansas 71730-5615 870-862-3478

JOHN K. BAKER

PETER G. KUMPE

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800


Stephen R. Lancaster Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

John G. Lile Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Rogers

James G. Lingle

Lingle Law Firm 110 South Dixieland Road Rogers, Arkansas 72758 479-636-7899

Marshall S. Ney

Bruce E. Munson

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 5414 Pinnacle Point Drive, Suite 500 Rogers, Arkansas 72758-8131 479-464-5650

Munson, Rowlett, Moore & Boone 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-374-6535

Communications Law

Elizabeth Robben Murray Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

David M. Powell Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

Steven W. Quattlebaum Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

Gordon S. Rather, Jr.

Fort Smith

Douglas O. Smith, Jr.

Warner, Smith & Harris PLC 400 Rogers Avenue P.O. Box 1626 Fort Smith, Arkansas 72901 479-782-6041

Construction Law Fayetteville

John M. Scott

Conner & Winters, LLP 4375 N. Vantage Drive Suite 405 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72703 479-582-5711

Little Rock

Jack East III

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Jack East III 2725 Cantrell Road, Suite 202 Little Rock, Arkansas 72202 501-372-3278

Roger D. Rowe

Cyril Hollingsworth

Lax, Vaughan, Fortson, McKenzie & Rowe Cantrell West Building, Suite 201 11300 Cantrell Road Little Rock, Arkansas 72212 501-376-6565

Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor 425 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-375-9151

Beverly A. Rowlett

Jeffrey H. Moore

Munson, Rowlett, Moore & Boone 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-374-6535

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Corporate Law Jonesboro

Ralph W. Waddell

Barrett & Deacon, P.A. 300 South Church Street, Third Floor Jonesboro, Arkansas 72403 870-931-1700

Little Rock

Philip S. Anderson

Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

Paul B. Benham III Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Garland W. Binns, Jr. Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor 425 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-375-9151

C. Douglas Buford, Jr. Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Walter M. Ebel III Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Price C. Gardner Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Donald T. Jack, Jr.

David M. Powell Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

Jack, Nelson & Jones One Cantrell Center 2800 Cantrell Road, Suite 500 Little Rock, Arkansas 72202 501-375-1122

North Little Rock

Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

Steven T. Shults Shults, Brown & Perkins 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1600 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3637 501-375-2301

John E. Tull III Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

William A. Waddell, Jr. Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Teresa M. Wineland Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

David A. Grace

Hardin & Grace 500 Main Street, Suite A P.O. Box 5851 North Little Rock, Arkansas 72119 501-378-7900

Copyright Law Little Rock

J. Charles Dougherty

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings LLP 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Harold J. Evans Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

Hermann Ivester Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Pine Bluff

Stephen A. Matthews

Bridges Law Firm 315 Eighth Avenue P.O. Box 7808 Pine Bluff, Arkansas 71611 870-534-5532

Corporate Governance Law

James Carter Coulter

P.L.C.

Attorneys at Law

501-372-1414 • www.jamescartercoulterlaw.com 500 Broadway • Suite 400 • Arvest Bank Building • Little Rock

Congratulations to Judson Kidd

D. Nicole Lovell

Walter E. May Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

T. Ark Monroe III Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

We congratulate Mr. Kidd on his dedicated service and being named one of Arkansas's Best Lawyers.

John S. Selig Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Robert Shults Shults, Brown & Perkins 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1600 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3637 501-375-2301

H. Watt Gregory III

Criminal Defense: Non-White-Collar

Kutak Rock LLP 124 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3706 501-975-3000

Buckley, McLemore & Hudson, P.A. 123 North Block Avenue

Little Rock

For Being Selected By His Peers As One Of The Best Lawyers In Arkansas Employment Law – Individuals Employment Law – Management Litigation – Labor & Employment

H. Watt Gregory III

Charles L. Schlumberger

Michael N. Shannon

John Coulter

Kutak Rock 124 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3706 501-975-3000

Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

Congratulations to

Fayetteville

Timothy M. Buckley

Dodds, Kidd and Ryan 501.375.9901 313 West Second St. Little Rock, AR 72201

DKRFirm.com ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES

NOVEMBER 2, 2011 37


The Law Firm Of

BARRETT & DEACON A PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATION

is honored to recognize our colleagues for being included among the Best Lawyers in Arkansas

BARRY DEACON

RALPH W. WADDELL

ROBERT S. JONES PAUL D. WADDELL ALFRED F. ANGULO, JR.

P.O. Box 4700 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702-4700 866-722-7694

JOHN C. EVERETT Everett & Wales 1944 East Joyce Boulevard P.O. Box 8370 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72703-8370 479-443-0292

WARNER H. TAYLOR Taylor Law Partners 303 East Millsap Road P.O. Box 8310 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72703 479-443-5222

Fort Smith

BARRETT & DEACON A Professional Association

Jonesboro | Fayetteville (870) 931-1700 | (479) 582-5353 | barrettdeacon.com

Congratulations To Our Best Lawyer! Real Estate Law

EDDIE N. CHRISTIAN, SR. Christian, Byars and Hickey 502 Garrison Avenue Fort Smith, Arkansas 72901 479-782-9147

Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

DAVID M. GRAF Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Jonesboro

BILL W. BRISTOW

GREGORY B. GRAHAM

Bristow & Richardson 216 East Washington Avenue Jonesboro, Arkansas 72401-3102 870-935-9000

Overbey, Graham, Strigel & Wesbrook 10809 Executive Center Drive, Suite 310 Little Rock, Arkansas 72211-6022 501-664-8105

BOBBY R. MCDANIEL

JOSEPH B. HURST, JR.

McDaniel & Wells 400 South Main Street Jonesboro, Arkansas 72401 870-932-5950

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Little Rock

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

EDDIE N. CHRISTIAN, SR. Christian, Byars and Hickey 502 Garrison Avenue Fort Smith, Arkansas 72901 479-782-9147

Jonesboro

For 80 years the lawyers of Barrett & Deacon have added value to a broad base of clients operating in nearly every industry. We’re proud that our attorneys continue to demonstrate an exceptional commitment to our clients and our community.

Fort Smith

BILL W. BRISTOW Bristow & Richardson 216 East Washington Avenue Jonesboro, Arkansas 72401-3102 870-935-9000

BOBBY R. MCDANIEL McDaniel & Wells 400 South Main Street Jonesboro, Arkansas 72401 870-932-5950

ALEXANDRA A. IFRAH GARY D. CORUM Wilson, Engstrom, Corum & Coulter 200 South Commerce, Suite 600 P.O. Box 71 Little Rock, Arkansas 72203 501-375-6453

TIMOTHY O. DUDLEY Timothy O. Dudley 114 South Pulaski Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-1924 501-372-0080

JOHN WESLEY HALL John Wesley Hall 1202 Main Street, Suite 210 Little Rock, Arkansas 72202 501-859-0013

Little Rock

TIMOTHY O. DUDLEY

JACK T. LASSITER

Timothy O. Dudley 114 South Pulaski Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-1924 501-372-0080

Lassiter & Cassinelli 813 West Third Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-370-9300

A. WYCKLIFF NISBET, JR. Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

THOMAS L. OVERBEY Overbey, Graham, Strigel & Wesbrook 10809 Executive Center Drive, Suite 310 Little Rock, Arkansas 72211-6022 501-664-8105

CRAIG H. WESTBROOK Overbey, Graham, Strigel & Wesbrook 10809 Executive Center Drive, Suite 310 Little Rock, Arkansas 72211-6022 501-664-8105

Employment Law Individuals

JOHN WESLEY HALL

JEFF ROSENZWEIG

Jonesboro

John Wesley Hall 1202 Main Street, Suite 210 Little Rock, Arkansas 72202 501-859-0013

Jeff Rosenzweig Third and Spring Street 300 Spring Building, Suite 310 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-859-0328

Barrett & Deacon, P.A. 300 South Church Street, Third Floor Jonesboro, Arkansas 72403 870-931-1700

DUI/DWI Defense

Little Rock

PAUL D. WADDELL

J. BLAKE HENDRIX Blake Hendrix 813 West Third Street, Suite 200 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-376-0679

JACK T. LASSITER Lassiter & Cassinelli 813 West Third Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-370-9300

JEFF ROSENZWEIG Jeff Rosenzweig Third and Spring Street 300 Spring Building, Suite 310 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-859-0328

Criminal Defense: White-Collar El Dorado

FLOYD M. THOMAS, JR. Thomas, Hickey & Shepherd, L.L.P. 423 North Washington Avenue El Dorado, Arkansas 71730-5615 870-862-3478

Fayetteville

Fayetteville

KRISTINE G. BAKER

CHRISTINA D. COMSTOCK

Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

Everett & Wales 1944 East Joyce Boulevard P.O. Box 8370 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72703-8370 479-443-0292

Little Rock

DAVID H. WILLIAMS The Law Office of David H. Williams 212 Center Street Suite 200 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0038

Education Law Little Rock

JOHN L. BURNETT Lavey and Burnett 904 West Second Street P.O. Box 2657 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-376-2269

JOHN D. COULTER James, Carter & Coulter, PLC Arvest Bank Building, Suite 400 500 Broadway P.O. Box 907 Little Rock, Arkansas 72203 866-716-3242

CLAYTON R. BLACKSTOCK Mitchell, Blackstock, Barnes, Ivers & Sneddon PLLC 1010 West Third Street P.O. Box 1510 Little Rock, Arkansas 72203-1510 501-378-7870

JOHN T. LAVEY Lavey and Burnett 904 West Second Street P.O. Box 2657 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-376-2269

TIMOTHY M. BUCKLEY

J. Mark Spradley We are so proud of you! Love, Laura, Ples, Ty and Victoria 501-537-4290 8114 Cantrell, Suite 240, Little Rock, Arkansas 72227 www.spradleylaw.com 38 NOVEMBER 2, 2011 ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES

Buckley, McLemore & Hudson 123 North Block Avenue P.O. Box 4700 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702-4700 866-722-7694

DAN F. BUFFORD

ELIZABETH ROBBEN MURRAY

Laser Law Firm 101 South Spring Street, Suite 300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2488 501-376-2981

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

JOHN C. EVERETT

CHRISTOPHER J. HELLER

JANET PULLIAM

Everett & Wales 1944 East Joyce Boulevard P.O. Box 8370 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72703-8370 479-443-0292

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

WARNER H. TAYLOR

Employee Benefits (ERISA) Law

Taylor Law Partners 303 East Millsap Road P.O. Box 8310 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72703 479-443-5222

Little Rock

Employment Law Management

BRYANT CRANFORD

Jonesboro

Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street

Barrett & Deacon, P.A.

PAUL D. WADDELL


300 South Church Street, Third Floor Jonesboro, Arkansas 72403 870-931-1700

Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

Little Rock

MICHAEL S. MOORE

KRISTINE G. BAKER

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

ELIZABETH ROBBEN MURRAY TIM BOE Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

James, Carter & Coulter Arvest Bank Building, Suite 400 500 Broadway P.O. Box 907 Little Rock, Arkansas 72203 866-716-3242

J. BRUCE CROSS Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon, & Galchus 500 President Clinton Avenue, Suite 200 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-371-9999

Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor 425 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-375-9151

JOHN D. DAVIS

ALLEN C. DOBSON Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon, & Galchus 500 President Clinton Avenue, Suite 200 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-371-9999

Little Rock Dover Dixon Horne PLLC Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor 425 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-375-9151

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

SAMUEL E. LEDBETTER Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon, & Galchus 500 President Clinton Avenue, Suite 200 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-371-9999

McMath Woods 711 West Third Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-396-5400

CHARLES R. NESTRUD SCOTTY M. SHIVELY

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Environmental Law

SHERRY P. BARTLEY CHARLES REYNOLDS

RICHARD A. RODERICK OSCAR E. DAVIS, JR.

SCOTT C. TROTTER Perkins & Trotter 101 Morgan Keegan Drive, Suite A P.O. Box 251618 Little Rock, Arkansas 72225-1618 501-603-9000

MARK H. ALLISON JANET PULLIAM

JOHN D. COULTER

N. M. NORTON Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon, & Galchus 500 President Clinton Avenue, Suite 200 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-371-9999

Chisenhall, Nestrud & Julian 400 West Capitol Avenue Suite 2840 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-5800

FREDERICK S. URSERY

G. ALAN PERKINS

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Perkins & Trotter 101 Morgan Keegan Drive, Suite A P.O. Box 251618 Little Rock, Arkansas 72225-1618 501-603-9000

BRIAN A. VANDIVER BYRON L. FREELAND Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

KATHLYN GRAVES Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

CAROLYN B. WITHERSPOON

MARCELLA J. TAYLOR Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Mountainburg

WALTER G. WRIGHT, JR.

MICHAEL R. JONES

Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon, & Galchus 500 President Clinton Avenue, Suite 200 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-371-9999

Gilker and Jones 9222 North Highway 71 Mountainburg, Arkansas 72946 479-783-3109

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

DANIEL L. HERRINGTON Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Pine Bluff

SPENCER F. ROBINSON

Equipment Finance Law

Ramsay, Bridgforth, Robinson and Raley Simmons Banking Building, 11th Floor 501 Main Street P.O. Box 8509 Pine Bluff, Arkansas 71611 870-535-9000

Little Rock

GARLAND J. GARRETT Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

Rogers

Family Law

DENISE REID HOGGARD

LEIGH ANNE YEARGAN

Hot Springs National Park

Chisenhall, Nestrud & Julian 400 West Capitol Avenue Suite 2840 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-5800

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 5414 Pinnacle Point Drive, Suite 500 Rogers, Arkansas 72758-8131 479-464-5650

BRYAN J. REIS

PHILIP E. KAPLAN Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

DAVID P. MARTIN Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

JOANN C. MAXEY Williams & Anderson

At Cearley Law Firm, we seek justice for our clients. And because we have been successful, we have been named one of the best lawyers in Arkansas every year since 1998. We enjoy being part of the legal system, and we’ve got the plaques on our walls and the smiles of our clients to prove it.

Cearley Law Firm Bob Cearley, Attorney 212 Center Street • Little Rock • 372-5600 (Toll Free) 1-877-934-5600 • www.CearleyLawFirm.com

BRIAN ROSENTHAL

Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon, & Galchus 500 President Clinton Avenue, Suite 200 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-371-9999

CHRISTOPHER J. HELLER

We like what we do.

Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

RUSSELL A. GUNTER

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Justice for our clients. Awards from our peers.

The Farrar Firm 135 Section Line Road, 3rd Floor Hot Springs National Park, Arkansas 71913 501-525-3130

Congratulations to

BOBBY McDANIEL Criminal Defense: Non-White-Collar Criminal Defense: White-Collar Medical Malpractice Law-Plantis Personal Injury-Plaintis

and

PHILLIP WELLS Personal Injury-Plaintis Workers’ Compensation Law-Claimants

Recognized as two of the best lawyers in the state of Arkansas, we applaud them on this honor. We would also like to thank our peers in the legal community and the Arkansas Times readers for their continued support.

Energy Law Little Rock

Little Rock

LAWRENCE CHISENHALL, JR.

MARCIA BARNES

Chisenhall, Nestrud & Julian, P.A. 400 West Capitol Avenue Suite 2840 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-5800

Mitchell, Blackstock, Barnes, Ivers & Sneddon 1010 West Third Street P.O. Box 1510 Little Rock, Arkansas 72203-1510 501-378-7870

STEPHEN N. JOINER Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

BARRY E. COPLIN Coplin, Hardy, & Stotts One Union Plaza, Suite 1650 124 West Capitol Avenue

Attorneys at Law 400 South Main, Jonesboro, AR 72401  t   www.mcdanielandwells.com ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES

NOVEMBER 2, 2011 39


Congratulations

tO Our PArtnerS On being nAMed beSt lAwyerS in AMericA®

Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-707-0300

Stephen C. Engstrom

John T. Lavey

Lee J. Muldrow

Lavey and Burnett 904 West Second Street P.O. Box 2657 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-376-2269

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Henry Hodges

Judson C. Kidd Dodds, Kidd & Ryan 313 West Second Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-375-9901

W. Michael Reif Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor 425 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-375-9151

Gary B. Rogers Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor 425 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-375-9151

Jack Wagoner III Wagoner Law Firm 1320 Brookwood, Suites D & E Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-663-5225

North Little Rock

Carrol Ann Hicks

Hicks & Associates 5321 John F. Kennedy Boulevard, Suite A North Little Rock, Arkansas 72116 501-771-1817

Sam Hilburn Hilburn, Calhoon, Harper, Pruniski & Calhoun One Riverfront Place US Banking Building, 8th Floor P.O. Box 5551 North Little Rock, Arkansas 72119 501-372-0110

400 weSt cAPitOl Avenue, Suite 2400 | little rOck, Ar 72201-4851 telePhOne: 501-372-1887 | fAcSiMile: 501-372-7706 webSite: www.AnderSOnMurPhyhOPkinS.cOM

North Little Rock

Morgan E. Welch, Jr.

Welch, Brewer and Hudson One Riverfront Place, Suite 413 North Little Rock, Arkansas 72114 501-978-3030

Williams & Anderson PLC Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

David M. Powell

Roger D. Rowe Lax, Vaughan, Fortson, McKenzie & Rowe Cantrell West Building, Suite 201 11300 Cantrell Road Little Rock, Arkansas 72212 501-376-6565

William A. Waddell, Jr. Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Government Relations Practice Little Rock

T. Ark Monroe III

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard, P.L.L.C. 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Health Care Law Fayetteville

Bryan G. Looney

Goodwin Moore 511 South Fourth Street P.O. Box 726 Paragould, Arkansas 72450 870-239-2225

Kutak Rock 234 East Millsap Road, Suite 400 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72703-4099 479-973-4200

Debby Thetford Nye

Rogers

Little Rock

Matthews, Campbell, Rhoads, McClure, Thompson & Fryauf 119 South Second Street Rogers, Arkansas 72756 479-636-0875

Hardin, Jesson & Terry 1401 W. Capitol Avenue Suite 190 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2939 501-850-0015

Financial Services Regulation Law

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Elizabeth Andreoli

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Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard, P.L.L.C. 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

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40 NOVEMBER 2, 2011 ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES

First Amendment Law Little Rock

Philip S. Anderson

Williams & Anderson PLC Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

Jess L. Askew III Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street

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Little Rock

Franchise Law

Paragould

David R. Matthews

Scotty M. Shively Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon, & Galchus 500 President Clinton Avenue, Suite 200 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-371-9999

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Standing Left to Right: david A. littleton, Scott d. Provencher, Mariam t. hopkins, Michael P. vanderford Seated Left to Right: Jason J. campbell, randy P. Murphy

Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

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Lonoke

Kathy W. Goss

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Information Technology Law Little Rock

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Raising the bar is more than something we do. It’s part of who we are. Wright, Lindsey & Jennings LLP has promoted a culture of professional integrity for more than 110 years. And that dedication continues today, with these and other members of our team. Thank you for reaching higher. WWW.WLJ.com

All of the attorneys and staff of Jack Nelson Jones & Bryant congratulate our senior partner, Don Jack, on this well deserved recognition.

LittLe Rock 200 W. capitol Ave., Ste. 2300 Little Rock, AR 72201 Edwin L. Lowther, Jr., Managing Partner NoRthWeSt ARkANSAS 3333 Pinnacle hills Pkwy., Ste. 510 Rogers, AR 72758

501-375-1122 • One Cantrell Center • 2800 Cantrell Road, Suite 500 • Little Rock www.jacknelsonjones.com

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NOVEMBER 2, 2011 41


425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Labor Law Management Little Rock

KRISTINE G. BAKER Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow PLLC 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

TIM BOE Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

J. BRUCE CROSS Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon, & Galchus 500 President Clinton Avenue, Suite 200 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-371-9999

Land Use & Zoning Law

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Little Rock

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CHARLES REYNOLDS Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor 425 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-375-9151

Legal Malpractice Law Little Rock

Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon, & Galchus 500 President Clinton Avenue, Suite 200 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-371-9999

CAROLYN B. WITHERSPOON Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon, & Galchus 500 President Clinton Avenue, Suite 200 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-371-9999

Mountainburg

JOHN D. DAVIS

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KATHLYN GRAVES Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

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Legal Malpractice Law - Defendants DONALD H. BACON Friday, Eldredge & Clark, LLP 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Pine Bluff

SPENCER F. ROBINSON Ramsay, Bridgforth, Robinson and Raley Simmons Banking Building, 11th Floor 501 Main Street P.O. Box 8509 Pine Bluff, Arkansas 71611 870-535-9000

Labor Law - Union Little Rock

Leveraged Buyouts and Private Equity Law Little Rock

Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon, & Galchus 500 President Clinton Avenue, Suite 200 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-371-9999

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DANIEL L. HERRINGTON

MELVA HARMON

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

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DAVID P. MARTIN Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

JOANN C. MAXEY Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

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Williams & Anderson PLC Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

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JAMES M. SIMPSON Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Litigation - Banking & Finance Little Rock

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Kutak Rock LLP 124 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3706 501-975-3000

Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

Little Rock

JOHN K. BAKER Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard, P.L.L.C. 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

PRICE C. GARDNER Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

CRAIG S. LAIR Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

KIMBERLY WOOD TUCKER

STAN D. SMITH

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

JOHN E. TULL III Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

GEOFFREY B. TREECE Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

DAVID B. VANDERGRIFF Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

WILLIAM A. WADDELL, JR. Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Rogers Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 5414 Pinnacle Point Drive, Suite 500 Rogers, Arkansas 72758-8131 479-464-5650

Litigation Bankruptcy

North Little Rock

DAVID A. GRACE Hardin & Grace 500 Main Street, Suite A P.O. Box 5851 North Little Rock, Arkansas 72119 501-378-7900

KEVIN KEECH Keech Law Firm 4800 West Commercial Drive North Little Rock, Arkansas 72116 501-221-3200

Rogers

MARSHALL S. NEY Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 5414 Pinnacle Point Drive, Suite 500 Rogers, Arkansas 72758-8131 479-464-5650

Fayetteville

CONSTANCE G. CLARK PHILIP S. ANDERSON

Litigation & Controversy - Tax

111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

MARSHALL S. NEY

H. WATT GREGORY III

JOHN L. BURNETT RUSSELL A. GUNTER

PHILIP S. ANDERSON

Little Rock

BYRON L. FREELAND Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Litigation Antitrust Little Rock

RICHARD A. RODERICK

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

MICHAEL O. PARKER Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor 425 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-375-9151

RICHARD T. DONOVAN Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor, PLC 19 East Mountain Street P.O. Box 1688 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702-1688 479-521-7600

WILLIAM M. CLARK, JR. Cypert, Crouch, Clark & Harwell 111 Holcomb Street P.O. Box 1400 Springdale, Arkansas 72765-1400 479-751-5222

Little Rock

CHARLES T. COLEMAN Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

RANDAL B. FRAZIER Kutak Rock 124 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3706 501-975-3000

Springdale

JAMES F. DOWDEN James F. Dowden 212 Center Street, 10th Floor Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-324-4700

Litigation Construction Batesville

H. DAVID BLAIR Blair & Stroud 500 East Main Street, Suite 201 P.O. Box 2135 Batesville, Arkansas 72501 870-793-8350

DONALD H. HENRY Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

HARRY A. LIGHT Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

PHILIP E. KAPLAN

LANCE R. MILLER

Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard

Fayetteville

JASON WALES Everett & Wales 1944 East Joyce Boulevard P.O. Box 8370 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72703-8370 479-443-0292

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Little Rock

JOSEPH HENRY BATES III

KRISTINE G. BAKER

JASON J. CAMPBELL

Carney Williams Bates Bozeman & Pulliam 11311 Arcade Drive, Suite 200 P.O. Box 25438 Little Rock, Arkansas 72212 501-312-8500

Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins 400 West Capital Avenue, Suite 2470 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-1887

JUNIUS BRACY CROSS, JR. RAY F. COX, JR.

Junius Bracy Cross, Jr. 308 East Eighth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72202 501-374-2512

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

ALLEN C. DOBSON

5414 Pinnacle Point Drive, Suite 500 Rogers, Arkansas 72758-8131 479-464-5650

Litigation - Labor & Employment

PHILIP E. KAPLAN

Fayetteville

Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

ALFRED F. ANGULO, JR. Barrett & Deacon, P.A. 100 West Center Street, Suite 200 P.O. Box 1506 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702 479-582-5353

TROY A. PRICE

Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon, & Galchus 500 President Clinton Avenue, Suite 200 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-371-9999

JACK EAST III Jack East III 2725 Cantrell Road, Suite 202 Little Rock, Arkansas 72202 501-372-3278

ALLAN GATES Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

SAMUEL E. LEDBETTER

CYRIL HOLLINGSWORTH Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor 425 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-375-9151

McMath Woods 711 West Third Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-396-5400

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

SIDNEY P. DAVIS, JR. Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor 19 East Mountain Street P.O. Box 1688 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702-1688 479-521-7600

JOHN E. TULL III Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

EVA C. MADISON Littler Mendelson, P.C. One Steele Plaza, Suite 300 3739 Steele Boulevard Fayetteville, Arkansas 72703 479-582-6100

North Little Rock

MORGAN E. WELCH, JR. KELLY M. MCQUEEN Gill Elrod Ragon Owen & Sherman 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 3801 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-376-3800

Welch, Brewer and Hudson One Riverfront Place, Suite 413 North Little Rock, Arkansas 72114 501-978-3030

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

JOHN DEWEY WATSON ADR, Inc. 1501 North University Avenue, Suite 420 Little Rock, Arkansas 72207 501-376-2121

North Little Rock

DAVID A. GRACE Hardin & Grace 500 Main Street, Suite A P.O. Box 5851 North Little Rock, Arkansas 72119 501-378-7900

MARCELLA J. TAYLOR

Rogers

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

JAMES G. LINGLE

Rogers

JAMES G. LINGLE Lingle Law Firm 110 South Dixieland Road Rogers, Arkansas 72758 479-636-7899

Litigation - ERISA Little Rock

PAUL D. WADDELL

Rogers

JAMES G. LINGLE Lingle Law Firm 110 South Dixieland Road Rogers, Arkansas 72758 479-636-7899

Litigation - First Amendment Litigation Environmental

Little Rock

Little Rock

Williams & Anderson PLC Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

PHILIP S. ANDERSON

SHERRY P. BARTLEY Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard, P.L.L.C. 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Litigation Intellectual Property

PHILIP E. KAPLAN

H. WILLIAM ALLEN Allen Law Firm, P.C. Centre Place, Ninth Floor 212 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2416 501-374-7100

HERMANN IVESTER Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

N. M. NORTON Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Ross Noland

Pine Bluff

SPENCER F. ROBINSON Ramsay, Bridgforth, Robinson and Raley Simmons Banking Building, 11th Floor 501 Main Street P.O. Box 8509 Pine Bluff, Arkansas 71611 870-535-9000

Rogers Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 5414 Pinnacle Point Drive, Suite 500 Rogers, Arkansas 72758-8131 479-464-5650

E. B. CHILES IV

DAVID P. MARTIN

LEIGH ANNE YEARGAN

Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 5414 Pinnacle Point Drive, Suite 500 Rogers, Arkansas 72758-8131 479-464-5650

JOHN D. COULTER

JOANN C. MAXEY

James, Carter & Coulter, PLC Arvest Bank Building, Suite 400 500 Broadway P.O. Box 907 Little Rock, Arkansas 72203 866-716-3242

Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

J. BRUCE CROSS

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon, & Galchus 500 President Clinton Avenue, Suite 200 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-371-9999

MARSHALL S. NEY

FREDERICK S. URSERY Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

MARSHALL S. NEY JOHN G. LILE

MICHAEL S. MOORE Rogers

SCOTTY M. SHIVELY Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon, & Galchus 500 President Clinton Avenue, Suite 200 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-371-9999

DENISE REID HOGGARD Chisenhall, Nestrud & Julian 400 West Capitol Avenue Suite 2840 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-5800

Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

JOHN L. BURNETT

CHARLES REYNOLDS Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor 425 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-375-9151

CHRISTOPHER J. HELLER Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

KRISTINE G. BAKER

Lavey and Burnett 904 West Second Street P.O. Box 2657 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-376-2269

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard

Sam Ledbetter

KATHLYN GRAVES Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

Little Rock

n i m e ’ ! Kick s t e l b the Gi

Carter C. Stein

JANET PULLIAM Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

Little Rock

E. B. CHILES IV Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow PLLC 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

ALLEN C. DOBSON Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon, & Galchus 500 President Clinton Avenue, Suite 200 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-371-9999

DANIEL L. HERRINGTON

Barrett & Deacon 300 South Church Street, Third Floor Jonesboro, Arkansas 72403 870-931-1700

Lingle Law Firm 110 South Dixieland Road Rogers, Arkansas 72758 479-636-7899

ELIZABETH ROBBEN MURRAY Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Jonesboro

STEPHEN R. LANCASTER

JOHN D. DAVIS Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Litigation - Patent Little Rock

RAY F. COX, JR. Wright, Lindsey & Jennings LLP 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

you your plate than on e or m ve s. If you ha cMath Wood over, call on M e ac gr y e, sa ic n st ca for ju es to fighting When it com B e th est. we’re some of

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NOVEMBER 2, 2011 43


Litigation - Real Estate Fayetteville

425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor, PLC 19 East Mountain Street P.O. Box 1688 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702-1688 479-521-7600

Glenn E. Borkowski

M. Samuel Jones III

Kutak Rock 124 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3706 501-975-3000

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Constance G. Clark

Joseph R. Falasco Fort Smith

Thomas A. Daily

Daily & Woods 58 South Sixth Street P.O. Box 1446 Fort Smith, Arkansas 72902 479-782-0361

Little Rock

John K. Baker

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard

Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

Garland J. Garrett Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

Timothy W. Grooms

111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

Stephen R. Lancaster Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Charles L. Schlumberger Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow

Rogers

L. Kyle Heffley

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 5414 Pinnacle Point Drive, Suite 500 Rogers, Arkansas 72758-8131 479-464-5650

Litigation Securities Little Rock

H. William Allen

Allen Law Firm, P.C. Centre Place, Ninth Floor 212 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2416 501-374-7100

Kevin A. Crass Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Richard T. Donovan Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

M. Samuel Jones III Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Litigation - Trusts & Estates Fayetteville

William Jackson Butt II

Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor, PLC 19 East Mountain Street P.O. Box 1688 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702-1688 479-521-7600

The lawyers and staff at Watts, Donovan & Tilley congratulate

RichaRD Watts, DaviD Donovan & Jim tilley for their selection in The Best Lawyers in America for personal injury. Watts, Donovan & Tilley provides a tradition of legal excellence, serving the citizens of Arkansas.

Jonesboro

Robert S. Jones

Barrett & Deacon 300 South Church Street, Third Floor Jonesboro, Arkansas 72403 870-931-1700

Little Rock

Allison J. Cornwell

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Sarah M. Cotton Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Richard F. Hatfield Hatfield & Sayre 401 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 502

Find Us On Facebook www.facebook.com/arkansastimes

Watts, Donovan & tilley, P.a. Arkansas Capital Commerce Center 200 River Market Avenue, Suite 200 Little Rock, AR 72201 (501) 372-1406

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44 NOVEMBER 2, 2011 ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES


Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3437 501-374-9010

Little Rock

501-375-5600

DONALD H. BACON

M. SAMUEL JONES III

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Rogers

SCOTT D. PROVENCHER

STEPHEN R. LANCASTER

L. KYLE HEFFLEY

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 5414 Pinnacle Point Drive, Suite 500 Rogers, Arkansas 72758-8131 479-464-5650

Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins 400 West Capital Avenue, Suite 2470 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-1887

CRAIG S. LAIR Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

GEORGE N. PLASTIRAS Plastiras Law Firm 101 South Spring Street, Suite 300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-859-0986

Medical Malpractice Law - Defendants Fayetteville

KELLY CARITHERS

Mass Tort Litigation Little Rock

SHERRY P. BARTLEY Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard, P.L.L.C. 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

GORDON S. RATHER, JR. Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Mass Tort Litigation / Class Actions Defendants Little Rock

Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor, PLC 19 East Mountain Street P.O. Box 1688 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702-1688 479-521-7600

WALTER B. COX Cox, Cox & Estes Arvest Square, Suite 400 75 North East Street P.O. Box 878 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702 479-251-7900

SIDNEY P. DAVIS, JR. Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor 19 East Mountain Street P.O. Box 1688 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702-1688 479-521-7600

STEVEN W. QUATTLEBAUM

JAMES R. ESTES

Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow PLLC 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

Cox, Cox & Estes Arvest Square, Suite 400 75 North East Street P.O. Box 878 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702 479-251-7900

Media Law

WALKER DALE GARRETT

Little Rock

Bassett Law Firm 221 North College Avenue P.O. Box 3618 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702-3618 479-521-9996

JOHN E. TULL III Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow PLLC 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

Jonesboro

PAUL D. MCNEILL

Mediation Fort Smith

ROBERT E. HORNBERGER ADR, Inc. 404 North Seventh Street P.O. Box 8064 Fort Smith, Arkansas 72902 479-783-1776

Little Rock

JOHN A. DAVIS III ADR, Inc. 1501 North University Avenue, Suite 420 Little Rock, Arkansas 72207 501-376-2121

FRANK S. HAMLIN Hamlin Dispute Resolution 823 W. Markham Street, Suite 100 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-850-8888

Medical Malpractice Law

Womack, Landis, Phelps & McNeill Century Center 301 West Washington P.O. Box 3077 Jonesboro, Arkansas 72403 870-932-0900

PAUL D. WADDELL Barrett & Deacon 300 South Church Street, Third Floor Jonesboro, Arkansas 72403 870-931-1700

Fayetteville

JAMES W. SMITH Friday, Eldredge & Clark, LLP 3425 North Futrall Drive, Suite 103 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72703-6252 479-695-2011

Little Rock

PAUL B. BENHAM III Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

C. DOUGLAS BUFORD, JR. Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

KEVIN R. BURNS Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

BRUCE E. MUNSON Commercial Litigation Personal Injury Litigation – Defendants Product Liability Litigation – Defendants

BEVERLY A. ROWLETT Bet-the-Company Litigation Commercial Litigation Personal Injury Litigation – Defendants

JOHN E. MOORE Personal Injury Litigation – Defendants

WALTER M. EBEL III Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

H. WATT GREGORY III Kutak Rock 124 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3706 501-975-3000

Little Rock

TIMOTHY L. BOONE Medical Malpractice Law – Defendants Personal Injury Litigation – Defendants

ROBERT M. WILSON, JR. Associates Closing & Title, PLLC 1521 Merrill Drive, Suite D-220 Little Rock, Arkansas 72211 501-219-9388

TIMOTHY L. BOONE Munson, Rowlett, Moore & Boone 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-374-6535

KEN COOK

BOBBY R. MCDANIEL

Mergers & Acquisitions Law

T. MICHELLE ATOR Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

McDaniel & Wells 400 South Main Street Jonesboro, Arkansas 72401 870-932-5950

ROBERT J. LAMBERT Roy, Lambert & Lovelace 2706 South Dividend Drive P.O. Drawer 7030 Springdale, Arkansas 72766-7030 479-756-8510

Mortgage Banking Foreclosure Law

H. DAVID BLAIR

Jonesboro

Springdale

Little Rock

Batesville Blair & Stroud 500 East Main Street, Suite 201 P.O. Box 2135 Batesville, Arkansas 72501 870-793-8350

LAURA HENSLEY SMITH Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR MEMBERS NAMED AS BEST LAWYERS IN AMERICA

MARIAM T. HOPKINS Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins 400 West Capital Avenue, Suite 2470 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-1887

D. MICHAEL HUCKABAY, SR. Huckabay Law Firm Metropolitan Tower 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1575 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201

JENNIFER WILSON-HARVEY Wilson & Associates 1521 Merrill Drive Suite A-150 Little Rock, Arkansas 72211 501-223-0949

Municipal Law Little Rock

W. CHRISTOPHER BARRIER Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard, P.L.L.C. 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

C. TAD BOHANNON Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Regions Center {ääÊ7iÃÌÊ >«ˆÌœ]Ê-ՈÌiÊ£™ääÊUʈÌ̏iÊ,œVŽ]Ê,ÊÇÓÓä£ ­x䣮ÊÎÇ{‡ÈxÎxÊUÊ>ÝÊ­x䣮ÊÎÇ{‡x™äÈ www.mrmblaw.com

A civil litigation firm serving all of Arkansas

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NOVEMBER 2, 2011 45


M. JANE DICKEY

Oil & Gas Law

JASON WALES

Springdale

Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

Fort Smith

Everett & Wales 1944 East Joyce Boulevard P.O. Box 8370 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72703-8370 479-443-0292

JERRY LOVELACE

HAL JOSEPH KEMP Hal Joseph Kemp 111 Center Street, Suite 1300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-7243

DAVID F. MENZ Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

THOMAS A. DAILY Daily & Woods 58 South Sixth Street P.O. Box 1446 Fort Smith, Arkansas 72902 479-782-0361

Little Rock

ROBERT M. HONEA

MICHELLE ATOR

Hardin, Jesson & Terry Arvest Bank Building, Suite 500 5000 Rogers Avenue P.O. Box 10127 Fort Smith, Arkansas 72917-0127 479-452-2200

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Little Rock

J. SHEPHERD RUSSELL III

G. ALAN PERKINS

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Perkins & Trotter 101 Morgan Keegan Drive, Suite A P.O. Box 251618 Little Rock, Arkansas 72225-1618 501-603-9000

JOHN WILLIAM SPIVEY III Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

GORDON M. WILBOURN Kutak Rock 124 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3706 501-975-3000

Non-Profit/ Charities Law Little Rock

SARAH M. COTTON Friday, Eldredge & Clark, LLP 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

DONALD H. BACON Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

JAMES C. BAKER, JR. Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Magnolia

G. SPENCE FRICKE

CAROLYN J. CLEGG

Barber, McCaskill, Jones & Hale 400 West Capitol 2700 Regions Center Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-6175

Keith & Clegg McAlester Building, Suite 205 124 South Jackson P.O. Drawer 1029 Magnolia, Arkansas 71754-1029 870-234-3550

WILLIAM M. GRIFFIN III Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Patent Law Little Rock

STEPHEN D. CARVER Carver Patent Law Pleasant Valley Corporate Center, Suite 800 2024 Arkansas Valley Drive Little Rock, Arkansas 72212 501-224-1500

JEFFREY HATFIELD Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

BYRON M. EISEMAN, JR.

RAY F. COX, JR.

DAVID A. LITTLETON

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins 400 West Capital Avenue, Suite 2470 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-1887

JAMES E. HARRIS

J. CHARLES DOUGHERTY

GUY ALTON WADE

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Roy, Lambert & Lovelace 2706 South Dividend Drive P.O. Drawer 7030 Springdale, Arkansas 72766-7030 479-756-8510

Personal Injury Litigation Defendants Arkadelphia

RODNEY P. MOORE Wright, Berry, Hughes & Moore 303 Professional Park Drive P.O. Box 947 Arkadelphia, Arkansas 71923 870-246-6796

Bryant

CLARK S. BREWSTER The Boswell Law Firm 408 North Reynolds Road P.O. Box 798 Bryant, Arkansas 72089-0798 501-847-3031

El Dorado

BRIAN H. RATCLIFF Shackleford, Phillips & Ratcliff 100 East Church Street P.O. Box 1718 El Dorado, Arkansas 71731-1718 870-862-5523

DENNIS L. SHACKLEFORD Shackleford, Phillips & Ratcliff 100 East Church Street P.O. Box 1718 El Dorado, Arkansas 71731-1718 870-862-5523

FLOYD M. THOMAS, JR. Thomas, Hickey & Shepherd 423 North Washington Avenue El Dorado, Arkansas 71730-5615 870-862-3478

Fayetteville

KELLY CARITHERS Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor 19 East Mountain Street P.O. Box 1688 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702-1688 479-521-7600

W. WILSON JONES

K. COLEMAN WESTBROOK, JR. Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Personal Injury Litigation Fayetteville

CLIFFORD W. PLUNKETT Friday, Eldredge & Clark, LLP 3425 North Futrall Drive, Suite 103 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72703-6252 479-695-2011

DAVID WILSON Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Cox, Cox & Estes Arvest Square, Suite 400 75 North East Street P.O. Box 878 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702 479-251-7900

TODD WOOTEN Laser Law Firm 101 South Spring Street, Suite 300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2488 501-376-2981

JAMES R. ESTES Cox, Cox & Estes Arvest Square, Suite 400 75 North East Street P.O. Box 878 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702 479-251-7900

WALKER DALE GARRETT Bassett Law Firm 221 North College Avenue P.O. Box 3618 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702-3618 479-521-9996

ROBERT L. JONES III Conner & Winters 4375 N. Vantage Drive Suite 405 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72703 479-582-5711

CURTIS NEBBEN Bassett Law Firm 221 North College Avenue P.O. Box 3618 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702-3618 479-521-9996

DON A. TAYLOR Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor 19 East Mountain Street P.O. Box 1688 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702-1688 479-521-7600

Fort Smith

DOUGLAS O. SMITH, JR. Warner, Smith & Harris 400 Rogers Avenue P.O. Box 1626 Fort Smith, Arkansas 72901 479-782-6041

G. ALAN WOOTEN Warner, Smith & Harris 400 Rogers Avenue P.O. Box 1626 Fort Smith, Arkansas 72901 479-782-6041

SIDNEY P. DAVIS, JR. Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor 19 East Mountain Street P.O. Box 1688

JOHN V. PHELPS Womack, Landis, Phelps & McNeill Century Center 301 West Washington P.O. Box 3077 Jonesboro, Arkansas 72403 870-932-0900

PHILLIP J. WELLS McDaniel & Wells 400 South Main Street Jonesboro, Arkansas 72401 870-932-5950

Little Rock

MICHAEL D. BARNES Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

SHERRY P. BARTLEY Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

R. T. BEARD III Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

TIMOTHY L. BOONE Munson, Rowlett, Moore & Boone 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-374-6535

DAN F. BUFFORD Laser Law Firm 101 South Spring Street, Suite 300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2488 501-376-2981

MICHELLE H. CAULEY Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

KEVIN A. CRASS Jonesboro

BILL W. BRISTOW WALTER B. COX

Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702-1688 479-521-7600

Bristow & Richardson 216 East Washington Avenue Jonesboro, Arkansas 72401-3102 870-935-9000

PAUL D. MCNEILL Womack, Landis, Phelps & McNeill Century Center 301 West Washington P.O. Box 3077 Jonesboro, Arkansas 72403 870-932-0900

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

DAVID M. DONOVAN Watts, Donovan & Tilley Arkansas Capital Commerce Center 200 River Market Avenue, Suite 200 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-1769 501-372-1406

ROGER A. GLASGOW Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300

Selected: Best Lawyer 2012 Eva Madison FNBEJTPO!MJUUMFSDPNt

-JUUMFS.FOEFMTPO 1$tXXXMJUUMFSDPNt0OF4UFFMF1MB[B 4UFFMF#PVMFWBSE 4VJUFt'BZFUUFWJMMF "3t

ABOUT LITTLER —8JUINPSFUIBOBUUPSOFZTBOEPGGJDFT -JUUMFS.FOEFMTPOJTUIFMBSHFTU64CBTFEMBXGJSNFYDMVTJWFMZEFWPUFEUPSFQSFTFOUJOHNBOBHFNFOUJOFNQMPZNFOUBOEMBCPSMBXNBUUFST 46 NOVEMBER 2, 2011 ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES


Congratulations to

&

BoB lamBert Jerry lovelace The attorneys and staff of Laser Law Firm, P.A. congratulate Frank B. Newell, Dan F. Bufford and ForTodd Being Selected By Their As Wooten on being selectedColleagues by The Best Lawyers in America 2012Lawyers Best Lawyers in Arkansas; they Two Of TheasBest In Arkansas also wish to pay tribute to founder Sam Laser for being named among The Best Lawyers in America every year since its first publication in 1983.

Roy, LambeRt, LoveLace & bingaman, LLP Attorneys at Law

The Legacy Continues. The attorneys and staff of Laser Law Firm, P.A. congratulate our colleagues Dan F. Bufford Frank B. Newell Todd Wooten As being selected by The Best Lawyers in America as 2011 Best Lawyers in Arkansas.

Little Rock: 101 South Spring Street, Suite 300 • Little Rock, AR 72201 • (501) 376-2981 Northwest Arkansas Office: 5100 S. Thompson, Suite 201 • Springdale, AR • 72765

479-756-8510 2706 South Dividend Drive • P.O. Drawer 7030 • Springdale, AR

Texarkana Office: 210 N. Stateline Ave. • Suite 503 • Texarkana, AR • 71854

“Over 60 Years of Excellence in Litigation”

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NOVEMBER 2, 2011 47


Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

ROBERT L. HENRY III Barber, McCaskill, Jones & Hale 400 West Capitol 2700 Regions Center Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-6175

MARIAM T. HOPKINS Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins 400 West Capital Avenue, Suite 2470 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-1887

D. MICHAEL HUCKABAY, SR. Huckabay Law Firm Metropolitan Tower 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1575 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-375-5600

JOHN E. MOORE Munson, Rowlett, Moore & Boone 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-374-6535

BRUCE E. MUNSON Munson, Rowlett, Moore & Boone 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-374-6535

RANDY P. MURPHY Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins 400 West Capital Avenue, Suite 2470 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-1887

Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins 400 West Capital Avenue, Suite 2470 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-1887

LYN P. PRUITT Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

JIM L. JULIAN Chisenhall, Nestrud & Julian 400 West Capitol Avenue Suite 2840 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-5800

The Centre at Ten Building 12921 Cantrell Road, Suite 204 Little Rock, Arkansas 72223-1799 501-376-3564

JAMES M. SIMPSON Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

JEFF SINGLETON Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

LAURA HENSLEY SMITH SCOTT D. PROVENCHER

DON MICHAEL HUCKABAY, JR. Huckabay Law Firm Metropolitan Tower 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1575 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-375-5600

111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

TERESA M. WINELAND Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

EDWIN L. LOWTHER, JR.

BEVERLY A. ROWLETT

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Munson, Rowlett, Moore & Boone 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-374-6535

ELTON A. RIEVES III Elton A. Rieves III & Associates 213 East Washington, Suite Two P.O. Box 450 Mountain View, Arkansas 72560 870-269-5757

Pine Bluff

JAMES W. TILLEY

STEPHEN A. MATTHEWS

Watts, Donovan & Tilley Arkansas Capital Commerce Center 200 River Market Avenue, Suite 200 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-1769 501-372-1406

Bridges Law Firm 315 Eighth Avenue P.O. Box 7808 Pine Bluff, Arkansas 71611 870-534-5532

STUART P. MILLER

JERRY J. SALLINGS

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Personal Injury Litigation Plaintiffs

MICHAEL P. VANDERFORD

Wright, Berry, Hughes & Moore 303 Professional Park Drive P.O. Box 947 Arkadelphia, Arkansas 71923 870-246-6796

McMath Woods 711 West Third Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-396-5400

Arkadelphia

RICHARD N. WATTS

MICHAEL N. SHANNON

BUD B. WHETSTONE

Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow

Whetstone & Odum

BRUCE E. MUNSON Munson, Rowlett, Moore & Boone 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-374-6535

SCOTT D. PROVENCHER Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins 400 West Capital Avenue, Suite 2470 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-1887

MICHAEL N. SHANNON Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

JAMES F. SWINDOLL Law Offices of James F. Swindoll 212 Center Street, Suite 300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-374-1290

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

RODNEY P. MOORE

Watts, Donovan & Tilley Arkansas Capital Commerce Center 200 River Market Avenue, Suite 200 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-1769 501-372-1406

MICHAEL D. BARNES Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

ROBERT M. MCHENRY McHenry & McHenry 8210 Henderson Road Little Rock, Arkansas 72210 501-372-3425

FREDERICK S. URSERY

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins 400 West Capital Avenue, Suite 2470 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-1887

Little Rock

JAMES BRUCE MCMATH Mountain View

FREDERICK S. URSERY GORDON S. RATHER, JR.

TIMOTHY O. DUDLEY Timothy O. Dudley 114 South Pulaski Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-1924 501-372-0080

LYN P. PRUITT Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

GORDON S. RATHER, JR. Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

MICHAEL P. VANDERFORD Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins 400 West Capital Avenue, Suite 2470 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-1887

Mountain Home

FRANK H. BAILEY

RICHARD N. WATTS

Bailey & Oliver 506 Hospital Drive Mountain Home, Arkansas 72653 870-425-6041

Watts, Donovan & Tilley Arkansas Capital Commerce Center 200 River Market Avenue, Suite 200 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-1769 501-372-1406

Batesville

H. DAVID BLAIR Blair & Stroud 500 East Main Street, Suite 201 P.O. Box 2135 Batesville, Arkansas 72501 870-793-8350

North Little Rock

CLYDE TAB TURNER Turner & Associates 4705 Somers Avenue, Suite 100 North Little Rock, Arkansas 72116 501-791-2277

North Little Rock

CLYDE TAB TURNER Turner & Associates 4705 Somers Avenue, Suite 100 North Little Rock, Arkansas 72116 501-791-2277

Bryant

TED BOSWELL The Boswell Law Firm 408 North Reynolds Road P.O. Box 798 Bryant, Arkansas 72089-0798 501-847-3031

El Dorado

Product Liability Litigation Batesville

H. DAVID BLAIR Blair & Stroud 500 East Main Street, Suite 201 P.O. Box 2135 Batesville, Arkansas 72501 870-793-8350

FLOYD M. THOMAS, JR. Thomas, Hickey & Shepherd 423 North Washington Avenue El Dorado, Arkansas 71730-5615 870-862-3478

Forrest City

B. MICHAEL EASLEY Easley & Houseal 510 East Cross Street P.O. Box 1115 Forrest City, Arkansas 72336 870-633-1447

Product Liability Litigation Plaintiffs Little Rock

ROBERT M. CEARLEY, JR. Cearley Law Firm, P.A. Centre Place 2nd Floor 212 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-5600

Little Rock

G. SPENCE FRICKE Barber, McCaskill, Jones & Hale 400 West Capitol 2700 Regions Center Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-6175

North Little Rock

CLYDE TAB TURNER Turner & Associates 4705 Somers Avenue, Suite 100 North Little Rock, Arkansas 72116 501-791-2277

EDWIN L. LOWTHER, JR. Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Jonesboro

Professional Malpractice Law Batesville

H. DAVID BLAIR

BILL W. BRISTOW

THOMAS G. WILLIAMS

Bristow & Richardson 216 East Washington Avenue Jonesboro, Arkansas 72401-3102 870-935-9000

Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

Blair & Stroud 500 East Main Street, Suite 201 P.O. Box 2135 Batesville, Arkansas 72501 870-793-8350

BOBBY R. MCDANIEL McDaniel & Wells 400 South Main Street Jonesboro, Arkansas 72401 870-932-5950

PHILLIP J. WELLS McDaniel & Wells 400 South Main Street Jonesboro, Arkansas 72401 870-932-5950

Little Rock

501.664.3062 5675((7‡/,77/(52&. 48 NOVEMBER 2, 2011 ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES

Springdale

JERRY LOVELACE Roy, Lambert & Lovelace 2706 South Dividend Drive P.O. Drawer 7030 Springdale, Arkansas 72766-7030 479-756-8510

Product Liability Litigation Defendants Jonesboro

ROBERT M. CEARLEY, JR.

JOSEPH BARRETT DEACON

Cearley Law Firm Centre Place 2nd Floor 212 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-5600

Barrett & Deacon, P.A. 300 South Church Street, Third Floor Jonesboro, Arkansas 72403 870-931-1700

Professional Malpractice Law Defendants Little Rock

DAVID M. POWELL Williams & Anderson PLC Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

SCOTT D. PROVENCHER Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins 400 West Capital Avenue, Suite 2470 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-1887

MICHAEL P. VANDERFORD Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins


400 West Capital Avenue, Suite 2470 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-1887

Professional Malpractice Law Plaintiffs Little Rock

Timothy O. Dudley

Timothy O. Dudley 114 South Pulaski Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-1924 501-372-0080

Project Finance Law Little Rock

W. Jackson Williams

James M. Saxton

Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Railroad Law Jonesboro

Joseph Barrett Deacon

Barrett & Deacon, P.A. 300 South Church Street, Third Floor Jonesboro, Arkansas 72403 870-931-1700

Harold W. Hamlin

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard, P.L.L.C. 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

David F. Menz Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

J. Shepherd Russell III Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

W. Jackson Williams Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

Little Rock

John Alan Lewis

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 5414 Pinnacle Point Drive, Suite 500 Rogers, Arkansas 72758-8131 479-464-5650

Public Finance Law Little Rock

Robert B. Beach, Jr.

Friday, Eldredge & Clark, LLP 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

James A. Buttry Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

M. Jane Dickey Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

James E. Hathaway III Kutak Rock 124 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3706 501-975-3000

Thomas P. Leggett Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

David F. Menz Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

J. Shepherd Russell III Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

John William Spivey III Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Gordon M. Wilbourn Kutak Rock 124 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3706 501-975-3000

J. Mark Spradley J. Mark Spradley 8114 Cantrell, Suite 240 Little Rock, Arkansas 72227 501-537-4290

Scott H. Tucker

Jay T. Taylor

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Frederick S. Ursery Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Real Estate Law

North Little Rock

Stuart W. Hankins

Hankins Law Firm 800 West Fourth Street North Little Rock, Arkansas 72114 501-371-9226

Fayetteville

Rogers

University of Arkansas School of Law 1045 West Maple Street Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 479-575-5601

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 5414 Pinnacle Point Drive, Suite 500 Rogers, Arkansas 72758-8131 479-464-5650

Carl J. Circo

Little Rock

W. Christopher Barrier

Rogers

John William Spivey III Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

James P. Beachboard Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor 425 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-375-9151

C. Tad Bohannon Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Glenn E. Borkowski Kutak Rock 124 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3706 501-975-3000

Randal B. Frazier Kutak Rock 124 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3706 501-975-3000

Price C. Gardner Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Timothy W. Grooms Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

Harold W. Hamlin Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Jeb H. Joyce Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

Hal Joseph Kemp Hal Joseph Kemp 111 Center Street, Suite 1300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-7243

John Alan Lewis

Securities / Capital Markets Law

Congratulations to our members named among the Best Lawyers® in Arkansas: Allan W. Horne Administrative/Regulatory Law Insurance Law Garland W. Binns, Jr. Banking & Finance Law Corporate Law Securities/Capital Markets Law Cyril Hollingsworth Construction Law Litigation – Construction Gary B. Rogers Family Law

Charles W. Reynolds Employment Law – Management Labor Law – Management Litigation – Labor & Employment Mark H. Allison Environmental Law W. Michael Reif Family Law

Michael O. Parker Litigation & Controversy – Tax Tax Law Trusts & Estates James Paul Beachboard Real Estate Law John B. Peace Tax Law Trusts & Estates Joseph H. Purvis Workers’ Compensation Law – Employers

Little Rock

Paul B. Benham III

Friday, Eldredge & Clark, LLP 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Garland W. Binns, Jr.

(501) 375-9151 425 W. Capitol, Suite 3700 Little Rock, AR 72201

Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor 425 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-375-9151

C. Douglas Buford, Jr. Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

5

Patrick A. Burrow Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

Walter M. Ebel III Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

M. Sean Hatch Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

John S. Selig Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Securities Regulation Little Rock

Paul B. Benham III

Friday, Eldredge & Clark, LLP 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Rogers 600 South 52nd Street, Suite 200

C. Douglas Buford, Jr. Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800 ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES

NOVEMBER 2, 2011 49


H. WATT GREGORY III Kutak Rock 124 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3706 501-975-3000

WALTER M. EBEL III

Technology Law

Little Rock

DAN C. YOUNG

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Little Rock

STEVE BAUMAN

Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

BYRON M. EISEMAN, JR. JOHN S. SELIG Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Securitization and Structured Finance Law

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

PRICE C. GARDNER Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Little Rock

GREGORY B. GRAHAM

J. SHEPHERD RUSSELL III

Overbey, Graham, Strigel & Wesbrook 10809 Executive Center Drive, Suite 310 Little Rock, Arkansas 72211-6022 501-664-8105

Friday, Eldredge & Clark, LLP 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

W. JACKSON WILLIAMS Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

Tax Law El Dorado

CRAIG S. LAIR Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

JOHN C. LESSEL John C. Lessel 11601 Pleasant Ridge Road, Suite 301 Little Rock, Arkansas 72212 501-954-9000

MICHAEL O. PARKER Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor 425 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-375-9151

JOHN B. PEACE ROBERT S. JONES Barrett & Deacon 300 South Church Street, Third Floor Jonesboro, Arkansas 72403 870-931-1700

TOM D. WOMACK Womack, Landis, Phelps & McNeill Century Center 301 West Washington P.O. Box 3077 Jonesboro, Arkansas 72403 870-932-0900

Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor 425 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-375-9151

Kutak Rock 124 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3706 501-975-3000

JOHN R. TISDALE Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

SAMUEL R. BAXTER

THOMAS C. VAUGHAN, JR.

Baxter & Jewell One Information Way, Suite 210 Little Rock, Arkansas 72202-2290 501-664-9555

Lax, Vaughan, Fortson, McKenzie & Rowe Cantrell West Building, Suite 201 11300 Cantrell Road Little Rock, Arkansas 72212 501-376-6565

J. LEE BROWN CRAIG H. WESTBROOK Overbey, Graham, Strigel & Wesbrook 10809 Executive Center Drive, Suite 310 Little Rock, Arkansas 72211-6022 501-664-8105

C. BRANTLY BUCK Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

BRYANT CRANFORD Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

BRYAN DUKE Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Trademark Law

J. CHARLES DOUGHERTY Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

HAROLD J. EVANS Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

HERMANN IVESTER Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

Trusts and Estates El Dorado Thomas, Hickey & Shepherd, L.L.P. 423 North Washington Avenue El Dorado, Arkansas 71730-5615 870-862-3478

Fayetteville

WILLIAM JACKSON BUTT II Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor 19 East Mountain Street P.O. Box 1688 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702-1688 479-521-7600

JAMES LEE MOORE III Reece, Moore, Pendergraft 75 North East Avenue, Suite 500 P.O. Box 1788 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702 479-443-2705

JAMES W. SMITH Friday, Eldredge & Clark 3425 North Futrall Drive, Suite 103 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72703-6252 479-695-2011

Pine Bluff

TED N. DRAKE

Jonesboro

Bridges Law Firm 315 Eighth Avenue P.O. Box 7808 Pine Bluff, Arkansas 71611 870-534-5532

ROBERT S. JONES Barrett & Deacon 300 South Church Street, Third Floor Jonesboro, Arkansas 72403 870-931-1700

ANTHONY A. HILLIARD

TOM D. WOMACK

Ramsay, Bridgforth, Robinson and Raley Simmons Banking Building, 11th Floor 501 Main Street P.O. Box 8509 Pine Bluff, Arkansas 71611 870-535-9000

Womack, Landis, Phelps & McNeill Century Center 301 West Washington P.O. Box 3077 Jonesboro, Arkansas 72403 870-932-0900

50 NOVEMBER 2, 2011 ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

PHILLIP J. WELLS McDaniel & Wells 400 South Main Street Jonesboro, Arkansas 72401 870-932-5950

Pine Bluff

WILLIAM THOMAS BAXTER

TED N. DRAKE

Texarkana

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Bridges Law Firm 315 Eighth Avenue P.O. Box 7808 Pine Bluff, Arkansas 71611 870-534-5532

Moore & Giles 1206 State Line Avenue Texarkana, Arkansas 71854 870-774-5191

J. LEE BROWN Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

C. BRANTLY BUCK Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

ALLISON J. CORNWELL Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

SARAH M. COTTON Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

BYRON M. EISEMAN, JR. Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

JAMES E. HARRIS Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

WILLIAM DIXON HAUGHT Haught & Wade 111 Center Street, Suite 1320 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-375-5257

W. WILSON JONES KATHRYN BENNETT PERKINS

JOSEPH HICKEY DAVID A. SMITH

Little Rock

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

STEPHEN D. CARVER

THOMAS L. OVERBEY

Jonesboro

HAROLD J. EVANS

Carver Patent Law Pleasant Valley Corporate Center, Suite 800 2024 Arkansas Valley Drive Little Rock, Arkansas 72212 501-224-1500

Overbey, Graham, Strigel & Wesbrook 10809 Executive Center Drive, Suite 310 Little Rock, Arkansas 72211-6022 501-664-8105

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 3425 North Futrall Drive, Suite 103 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72703-6252 479-695-2011

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

JAMES LEE MOORE III

JAMES W. SMITH

J. CHARLES DOUGHERTY

Little Rock

Fayetteville Reece, Moore, Pendergraft 75 North East Avenue, Suite 500 P.O. Box 1788 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702 479-443-2705

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings LLP 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

W. WILSON JONES

JOSEPH HICKEY Thomas, Hickey & Shepherd, L.L.P. 423 North Washington Avenue El Dorado, Arkansas 71730-5615 870-862-3478

RAY F. COX, JR.

Jonesboro

Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

CRAIG S. LAIR Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

JOHN C. LESSEL John C. Lessel 11601 Pleasant Ridge Road, Suite 301 Little Rock, Arkansas 72212 501-954-9000

THOMAS L. OVERBEY Overbey, Graham, Strigel & Wesbrook 10809 Executive Center Drive, Suite 310 Little Rock, Arkansas 72211-6022 501-664-8105

ANTHONY A. HILLIARD Ramsay, Bridgforth, Robinson and Raley Simmons Banking Building, 11th Floor 501 Main Street P.O. Box 8509 Pine Bluff, Arkansas 71611 870-535-9000

JAMES C. MOSER, JR. Bridges Law Firm 315 Eighth Avenue P.O. Box 7808 Pine Bluff, Arkansas 71611 870-534-5532

Rogers

CHRISTOPHER T. ROGERS Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 5414 Pinnacle Point Drive, Suite 500 Rogers, Arkansas 72758-8131 479-464-5650

Venture Capital Law Little Rock

CONSTANCE G. CLARK Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor, PLC 19 East Mountain Street P.O. Box 1688 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702-1688 479-521-7600

CURTIS NEBBEN Bassett Law Firm 221 North College Avenue P.O. Box 3618 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702-3618 479-521-9996

Little Rock

JOHN D. DAVIS Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

BETTY J. HARDY Coplin, Hardy, & Stotts One Union Plaza, Suite 1650 124 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-707-0300

Water Law Little Rock

BRIAN ROSENTHAL Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

WALTER G. WRIGHT, JR. Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Workers’ Compensation Law El Dorado

BRIAN H. RATCLIFF Shackleford, Phillips & Ratcliff, P.A. 100 East Church Street P.O. Box 1718 El Dorado, Arkansas 71731-1718 870-862-5523

Fort Smith Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon, & Galchus 5401 Rogers Avenue, Suite 200 Fort Smith, Arkansas 72903 479-783-8200

JOHN B. PEACE

Little Rock

Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor 425 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-375-9151

Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins 400 West Capital Avenue, Suite 2470 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-1887

R. SCOTT ZUERKER

RANDY P. MURPHY

GEORGE N. PLASTIRAS

PHILIP M. WILSON

Plastiras Law Firm 101 South Spring Street, Suite 300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-859-0986

Philip M. Wilson 711 West Third Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-374-4000

JOHN COGAN WADE

Workers’ Compensation Law Claimants

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Fayetteville

H. WATT GREGORY III

MICHAEL O. PARKER

K. COLEMAN WESTBROOK, JR.

Workers’ Compensation Law Employers

Kutak Rock LLP 124 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3706 501-975-3000

Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor 425 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-375-9151

Haught & Wade 111 Center Street, Suite 1320 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-375-5257

GREGORY GILES

MICHAEL R. MAYTON Mayton, Newkirk & Jones The Lyon Building, Suite 200 401 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4823 501-376-0504

LEE J. MULDROW Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

FRANK B. NEWELL Laser Law Firm 101 South Spring Street, Suite 300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2488 501-376-2981

ERIC NEWKIRK Mayton, Newkirk & Jones The Lyon Building, Suite 200 401 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4823 501-376-0504

JOSEPH H. PURVIS Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor 425 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-375-9151

MIKE RYBURN Ryburn Law Firm 10825 Financial Center Parkway, Suite 136 Little Rock, Arkansas 72211-3555 501-228-8100

GUY ALTON WADE Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

CAROL WORLEY Worley Wood & Parrish One Financial Centre Parkway, Suite 411 650 South Shackleford Road Little Rock, Arkansas 72211 501-225-3535

Fort Smith

EDDIE H. WALKER, JR. Walker, Shock & Harp PLLC 400 North Sixth Street P.O. Box 998 Fort Smith, Arkansas 72902-0998 479-783-7600

Pine Bluff

MICHAEL J. DENNIS Bridges Law Firm 315 Eighth Avenue P.O. Box 7808 Pine Bluff, Arkansas 71611 870-534-5532


Congratulations thomas D. Conley, MD, FaCC, FsCai

For Being selected as one of the Best Doctors 2011 Arkansas Cardiology, P.A. Arkansas Cardiology West Dwight Chrisman, MD, FACC Gary J. Collins, MD, FACC, FACP Scott A. Davis, MD, FACC G. Stephen Greer, MD, FACC J. Douglas Holloway, MD, FACC David G. Jones, MD, FACC Randy Minton, MD, FACC Blake Norris, MD, FACC Alexander N. Orsini, MD, FACC B.K. Singh, MD, FACC 9501 Lile Drive Ste. 600 Little Rock, AR 72205 501-227-7596

For more than 30 years, Arkansas Cardiology has provided our patients with the most advanced cardiovascular services in the state. We’re honored to have Dr. Thomas Conley recognized among the Best Doctors in Arkansas! Like many of the highly trained physicians at Arkansas Cardiology, Dr. Conley introduced new innovative therapies to the patients of Arkansas. Dr Conley was the first cardiologist in Arkansas to perform coronary stenting from the wrist. This procedure allows patients to walk and stand almost immediately after receiving stents. Arkansas Cardiology appreciates the dedication he has to improving the heart health of the patients he serves every day.

Arkansas Cardiology North Thomas D. Conley, MD, FACC, FSCAI Jay D. Geoghagan, MD, FACC Robert A. Lambert, MD, FACC Jeffrey Neuhauser, DO, FACC 3343 Springhill Dr Ste. 1035 North Little Rock, AR 72117 501-975-7676 Heartline 1-800-482-1224 www.arcard.org “Our Mission is to provide state-of-the-art comprehensive cardiovascular care to the people of Arkansas in a caring and compassionate manner”

We We congratulate We congratulate our our partners our partners Larry Chisenhall, Larry Chisenhall, Chuck Chuck Nestrud*, Nestrud*, Jim Jim Julian**, Jim Julian**, and and Denise and Denise Hoggard Hoggard congratulate partners Larry Chisenhall, Chuck Nestrud*, Julian**, Denise Hoggard on their recognition their recognition by their bypeers their aspeers on on their recognition by their peers as as

Best Best Lawyers Lawyers ininin Arkansas Arkansas Best Lawyers Arkansas ® ® ®

Regions Regions Center Center - 400 West - 400 Capitol West Capitol Avenue Avenue Regions Center - 400 West Capitol Avenue Suite Suite 2840 2840 Suite 2840 Little Little Rock, Rock, Arkansas Arkansas 72201 72201 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 (501) (501) 372-5800 372-5800 (501) 372-5800 www.cnjlaw.com www.cnjlaw.com www.cnjlaw.com *Fellow *Fellow of the of the American College College of Environmental of Environmental Lawyers Lawyers *Fellow of American the American College of Environmental Lawyers **Fellow **Fellow of the of the American College College of Trial ofLawyers Trial Lawyers **Fellow of American the American College of Trial Lawyers ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES

NOVEMBER 2, 2011 51


BEST LAWYERS IN ARKANSAS 2012 ®

CONTACT INFO: These lists are excerpted from Best Lawyers in America 2012, which includes listings for more than 43,000 lawyers in 124 specialties, in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Best Lawyers in America is published by Woodward/White, Inc., Aiken, South Carolina and can be ordered directly from the publisher. For information call 803-648-0300; write 237 Park Ave., S.W., First Floor, Aiken, SC 29801; email info@bestlawyers.com; or visit www.bestlawyers.com. Online subscriptions to Best Lawyers databases are available at www.bestlawyers.com.

DISCLAIMER: Woodward/White Inc., has used its best efforts in assembling material for this list but does not warrant that the information contained herein is complete or accurate, and does not assume, and hereby disclaims, any liability to any person for any loss or damage caused by errors or omissions herein whether such errors or omissions result from negligence, accident, or any other cause. All listed attorneys have been verified as being members in good standing with their respective state bar associations as of July 1, 2011, where that information is publicly available. Consumers should contact their state bar for verification and additional information prior to securing legal services of any attorney.

COPYRIGHT: Copyright 2011 by Woodward/White, Inc., Aiken, SC. All rights reserved. This list, or parts thereof, must not be reproduced in any form without permission. No commercial use of this list may be made without permission of Woodward/White, Inc. No fees may be charged, directly or indirectly, for the use of this list without permission. “Best Lawyers in America” and “Best Lawyers” are registered trademarks of Woodward/White, Inc.

METHODOLOGY: This list is excerpted from the 2012 edition of Best Lawyers in America, the preeminent referral guide to the legal profession in the United States. Published since 1983, Best Lawyers lists attorneys in 124 specialties, representing all 50 states, who have been chosen through an exhaustive survey in which thousands of the nation’s top lawyers confidentially evaluate their professional peers. The 2012 edition of Best Lawyers is

based on more than 3.9 million evaluations of lawyers by other lawyers. The method used to compile Best Lawyers remains unchanged since the first edition was compiled more than 25 years ago. Lawyers are chosen for inclusion based solely on the vote of their peers. Listings cannot be bought, and no purchase is required to be included. In this regard, Best Lawyers remains the gold standard of reliability and integrity in lawyer ratings. The nomination pool for the 2012 edition consisted of all lawyers whose names appeared in the previous edition of Best Lawyers, lawyers who were nominated since the previous survey, and new nominees solicited from listed attorneys. In general, lawyers were asked to vote only on nominees in their own specialty in their own jurisdiction. Lawyers in closely related specialties were asked to vote across specialties, as were lawyers in smaller jurisdictions. Where specialties are national or international in nature, lawyers were asked to vote nationally as well as locally. Voting lawyers were also given an opportunity to offer more detailed comments on nominees. Each year, half of the voting pool receives fax or email ballots; the other half is polled by phone. Voting lawyers were provided this general guideline for determining if a nominee should be listed among “the best”: “If you had a close friend or relative who needed a real estate lawyer (for example), and you could not handle the case yourself, to whom would you refer them?” All votes and comments were solicited with a guarantee of confidentiality – a critical factor in the viability and validity of Best Lawyers surveys. To ensure the rigor of the selection process, lawyers were urged to use only their highest standards when voting, and to evaluate each nominee based only on his or her individual merits. The additional comments were used to make more accurate comparisons between voting patterns and weight votes accordingly. Best Lawyers uses various methodological tools to identify and correct for anomalies in both the nomination and voting process. Ultimately, of course, a lawyer’s inclusion is based on the subjective judgments of his or her fellow attorneys. While it is true that the lists may at times disproportionately reward visibility or popularity, the breadth of the survey, the candor of the respondents, and the sophistication of the polling methodology largely correct for any biases. For all these reasons, Best Lawyers lists continue to represent the most reliable, accurate and useful guide to the Best Lawyers in the United States available anywhere. Best Lawyers lists are available at www.bestlawyers.com. “Best Lawyers,” and “Best Lawyers in America” are registered trademarks of Woodward/White, Inc.

RECOGNIZED AGAIN

DAVID H. WILLIAMS BEST LAWYERS IN AMERICA SINCE 2001

Every now and then even a good lawyer needs the name of another good lawyer. That’s why aorneys partner with us. When your clients need help with a personal injury case, adding us to your legal team is a strong idea. We bring more than 30 years of experience in such challenging legal areas as complex products cases, plane crashes, tractor trailer crashes and pharmaceucal cases. For more informaon on how we can help you obtain the best results for your client, contact us today.

THE LAW OFFICE OF DAVID H. WILLIAMS OFFERS OVER 30 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE WINNING ON BEHALF OF CLIENTS. PRESERVE THE AMERICAN JURY 212 Center Street Center Place Bldg • 2nd Floor Lile Rock, AR 72201 501-372-0038 toll free 877-492-3030 www.dhwilliamslawfirm.com 52 NOVEMBER 2, 2011 ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO ARKANSAS TIMES


The 2nd Friday Of Each Month November 11, 5-8 pm

Opening Reception for

CHUKES

TesseracT Dancing

“Fired Rhythm”

Brett anderson and emily galusha

Ceramic Sculpture and Mixed Media Paintings

• Live music by Lark in the Morning

• Performances by

Arkansas Festival Ballet

A museum of the Department of Arkansas Heritage

200 E. 3rd St. • 501-324-9351• www.HistoricArkansas.org

“Peaceful” 22”x8”x11”

DRINK MOCHA/TALK ART November 12, 2011, 10 am

Gallery Hours: Monday-Friday 9am – 5pm • Saturday 10am – 6pm Sunday (By Appointment) 1001 Wright Ave. Suite C Little Rock, AR 501-372-6822 www.hearnefineart.com

Windows and Mirrors Reflections on the War in Afghanistan A traveling collection of 25 panels from International artists and children from Kabul, Afghanistan. Canvas Community Church 1111 W. 7th St., LR (close to Vino’s)

FREE PARKING at 3RD & CUMBERLAND FREE STREET PARKING ALL OVER DOWNTOWN AND BEHIND THE RIVER MARKET (Paid parking available for modest fee.)

ARTIST RECEPTION Meet the Artist November 11, 2011, 5pm – 8pm

• pARTy for Peg lighting

Dodophant, by Brett Anderson

These venues will be open late. There’s plenty of parking and a free trolley to each of the locations. Don’t miss it – lots of fun!

November 10, 2011 – January 6, 2012

• Blacksmithing Demonstrations

300 Third Tower • 501-375-3333 coppergrillandgrocery.com

Meet the Cast of Much Ado About Nothing at This Special Reception & Stay for the Theatrical Performance at 8 p.m.

Sponsored by Drivers Legal Plan Drivers Legal Plan

The Old State House Museum is a museum of the Department of Arkansas Heritage.

Gypsy Bistro 501.375.3500

200 S. Commerce, Ste. 150 River Market District (Old Vermillion Location)

Featuring works of art from ArtGroup Maumelle. 521 President Clinton Ave. River Market District (501) 975-9800


Dining

Information in our restaurant capsules reflects the opinions of the newspaper staff and its reviewers. The newspaper accepts no advertising or other considerations in exchange for reviews, which are conducted anonymously. We invite the opinions of readers who think we are in error.

B Breakfast L Lunch D Dinner $ Inexpensive (under $8/person) $$ Moderate ($8-$20/person) $$$ Expensive (over $20/person) CC Accepts credit cards

BELLY UP Check out the Times’ food blog, Eat Arkansas arktimes.com

BRIAN CHILSON

WHAT’S COOKIN’

DISAPPOINTING: Ozark Country Restaurant’s chicken fried steak.

Stick with breakfast Ozark shines in the a.m., but shadows fall over dinner.

W

e love the local joints, those little tucked-back places that only the townies know about. Finding one of those restaurants — full of work-a-day Joes rubbing elbows with judges, insurance agents and funeral home directors — is one of the great joys of visiting small town Arkansas. Even if the food isn’t to die for, it’s the only way to really feel like you’ve truly been to a place: by supping where the people who live there sup. There aren’t many of that breed to be had anymore in Little Rock — those places where everybody knows everybody and the frycook knows your name if you visit more than twice. Life moves fast in the big city; too fast for waitresses who call you “hun” and want to chat about last Friday night’s football game at the high school, anyway. There are still a handful of places like that in Little Rock, though, and Ozark Country Restaurant is one. Snuggled just a half-block off Cantrell (which might well qualify as the Main Drag of Little Rock these days), it’s still surprisingly unknown to many. Kind of a non-chain Cracker Barrel, Ozark’s breakfast is popular. Weekend mornings usually mean waiting for a table. On a recent Sunday morning visit, after the obligatory wait, the reviewer tried a short stack of their sweet potato pancakes ($5.59), while our companion sampled the Ozark Country Breakfast ($8.99), featuring a big biscuit, diced potatoes (which they inexplicably call hash browns), white gravy, two eggs and a choice of bacon, sausage or ham. Companion’s breakfast was hearty and stick-to the-ribs good,

Ozark Country Restaurant 201 Keightly Drive Little Rock 663-7319

Quick bite You can order breakfast all day at Ozark Country Restaurant, and everything we’ve tried off that menu so far has been good. Hours 6 a.m. to 2 p.m daily; 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Thursday through Saturday. Other info All credit cards accepted, dessert list available on request. No alcohol.

with a nice-sized helping of thick-cut bacon, but it’s admittedly hard to mess up breakfast food. Pancakes, though, are tougher to get right, and the ones we had at Ozark were a real treat. We’ve had the sweet potato variety elsewhere before and weren’t impressed. These, on the other hand, were excellent: sweet, light, with a fine flavor of yams and a little cinnamon. Slathered with some butter and maple syrup, they started the day off right. The restaurant now serves dinner on Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights from 5-9 p.m. The dinner menu (which is actually available for lunch, too, beginning at 10:30 a.m. every day) is fairly small, with just six meat-and-two entrees (all $9.59 each) and a spaghetti-and-Italian sausage offering ($8.59). From the dinner slate, we chose our tried-and-true choice whenever we see it on a menu anywhere: the chicken fried steak ($9.59), pairing it

with black-eyed peas and steak fries. Our companion, meanwhile, tried the bacon cheddar burger ($6.59) with fries. Our friend’s burger was fine: big, meaty, with a generous slice of sharp cheddar, all served on a buttery Kaiser roll. With a squirt of ketchup on the side, it and the fries were soon devoured. The chicken fried steak, however, was a sadder story. What we were served turned out to be the cardinal sin in this foodie’s book: the dreaded pre-formed patty, slathered in white gravy. If you’re thinking it sounds like Ozark managed to step on this reviewer’s personal pet-peeve landmine, it did. It’s more than just a quirk, though. The reason we always try the chicken fried steak when we see it on a menu is because that dish, by our way of thinking, is the canary in the coal mine of down-home restaurants. Everything you need to evaluate a restaurant (from care in preparation, to recipes, to the quality of ingredients, to how long since the grease in the fryer has been changed, to whether the service is fast enough to get it to you before it turns into a cold mess) is handily encapsulated in the humble chicken fried steak. Get a good one, and it’s heaven. Get a bad one — burnt, tough, under-seasoned or over-cooked to the point of being like shoe leather — and you probably have a pretty good snapshot of what’s going on behind the kitchen door. All that said, in our experience, any place that sells you a “chicken fried steak” but can’t even spend a couple of bucks on a cube steak to bread and fry just isn’t gastronomically trustworthy enough to rate a second look. As an added affront, the black-eyed peas — a lowly legume which can rise far above its station if done right — were so bland that we might as well have been eating waterlogged lumps of PlayDoh. Even the chunks of ham floating amongst the peas seemed as flavorless as chunks of rubber. The steak fries were better, but were also devoid of any seasoning: no salt, no pepper. A friend who sampled the mashed potatoes and gravy recently said they were bland and no better. In short: while the breakfast at Ozark Country Restaurant deserves a good bit of the praise it has received over the years, our advice is to stick with The Most Important Meal of the Day or their burgers if you visit. While our sample of their plate dinner offerings was admittedly limited, the coal mine canary croaked early, and a little of that particular bird’s swan song goes a long way.

THE CHAIN RESTAURANT CHEDDAR’S, which bills itself as a “casual

cafe,” has opened its first branch in Little Rock. It’s at 300 S. University, in the Park Avenue shopping center that also includes Target. Hours are 11 a.m. until 11 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and 11 a.m. until midnight Friday and Saturday. The phone number is 614-7578 and the website is cheddars. com. HILLCREST ARTISAN MEATS (H.A.M.), the locally-sourced, organic meat shop coming to 2807 Kavanaugh, pushed its opening target back from Nov. 1 to Nov. 7. We’ll keep you posted.

DINING CAPSULES

AMERICAN

65TH STREET DINER Meat-and-two-veg lunch spot with cheap desserts and a breakfast buffet. 3201 West 65th St. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-562-7800. BL Mon.-Fri. ACADIA Unbelievable fixed-price, threecourse dinners on Mondays and Tuesday, but food is certainly worth full price. 3000 Kavanaugh Blvd. Full bar, CC. $$-$$$. 501-603-9630. D Mon.-Sat. BIG ORANGE: BURGERS SALADS SHAKES Gourmet burgers and properly fried Kennebec potatoes are the big draws. 17809 Chenal Parkway. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-821-1515. LD daily. BOBBY’S CAFE Delicious, humungo burgers and tasty homemade deserts at this Levy diner. 12230 MacArthur Drive. NLR. No alcohol, No CC. $. 501-851-7888. BL Tue.-Fri., D Thu.-Fri. BOSCOS Along with tried and true things like sandwiches, burgers, steaks and big salads, they have entrees like black bean and goat cheese tamales, open hearth pizza ovens and muffalettas. 500 President Clinton Ave. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-907-1881. LD daily. BOUDREAUX’S GRILL & BAR A homey, seat-yourself Cajun joint in Maumelle that serves up all sorts of variations of shrimp and catfish. 9811 Maumelle Blvd. NLR. Full bar, All CC. $$. 501-753-6860. L Sat., D Mon.-Sat. CAJUN’S WHARF The venerable seafood restaurant serves up great gumbo and oysters Bienville. 2400 Cantrell Road. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-375-5351. D Mon.-Sat. COPPER GRILL Comfort food, burgers and more sophisticated fare at this River Market-area hotspot. 300 E. Third St. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-375-3333. LD Mon.-Sat. DAVE’S PLACE Downtown’s premier soup-and-sandwich stop at lunch. Beef, chicken and fish are served with continental flair. 201 Center St. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-372-3283. L Mon.-Fri., D Fri. CONTINUED ON PAGE 56

www.arktimes.com NOVEMBER 2, 2011 55


CROSSWORD

DINING CAPSULES, CONT.

EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ Across 1 1960s “Bye!” 6 ___ de Boulogne (Paris park) 10 Web site with a “Buy It Now” option 14 Trip plannerʼs aid 15 Way back when 16 Miserʼs cry 17 Angle symbol, in trigonometry 18 Mark in a margin 19 Have ___ (lose it) 20 Iodine in a barberʼs first-aid kit? 23 Ultimate degree 24 Passbook abbr. 25 Vamp Negri 26 Doofus given a pink slip? 31 Root used as a soap substitute 34 Balancing pro

35 Philosopher Mo___ 36 Dim bulb, so to speak 39 Hobby kit with a colony 42 Sans affiliation: Abbr. 43 Muff 45 Caffeine-laden nuts 46 One modifying goals? 51 Texas ___ M 52 One with a 6-yr. term 53 Tokyo, to shoguns 56 Cronus and Rheaʼs barbecue remains? 60 Official proceedings 61 Municipal laws: Abbr. 62 Like some checking accounts

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE Z E B U I R A N G A R D E P U R R E M U S U P B E B A O P E F I R S S A N T O N E D R I C T S K S T S

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63 Title in an Uncle Remus story 64 Unlucky number for Caesar? 65 Influence … and a hint to 20-, 26, 46- and 56Across 66 Anti-snakebite supplies, e.g. 67 Superheroes of comics 68 Well-versed Down 1 Party spread 2 One of the Coens 3 Argus-eyed 4 Odds-and-ends category 5 Son of Isaac 6 Ordered (around) 7 Germane 8 Home of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano: Abbr. 9 Eighth-inning hurler, often 10 Many résumé submissions, these days 11 Like a New York/Los Angeles romance 12 In a bit 13 Bow wood 21 Results of most 100-yd. returns 22 You, to Yves 27 Serpentʼs home 28 Curative locale 29 Cornell of Cornell University 30 2012 Charlotte conventioneers: Abbr.

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Puzzle by Steve Salitan

31 Sarah McLachlan hit 32 Bond thatʼs often tax-free, for short 33 Rembrandt, notably 37 Player of a TV junkman 38 Hoopster Erving, to fans 40 End-of-fight letters

41 Predicted 44 “The Satanic Verses” novelist 47 Much of Libya 48 Mayo is part of it 49 Greets at the door 50 What might make molehills out of a mountain?

54 Willem of “Platoon” 55 Best 56 Spread unit 57 At oneʼs fighting weight, say 58 Machu Picchu builder 59 Paving stone 60 Gym ratʼs “sixpack”

For answers, call 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 a minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800-814-5554. Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. AT&T users: Text NYTX to 386 to download puzzles, or visit nytimes.com/mobilexword for more information. Online subscriptions: Todayʼs puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/wordplay. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords.

THIS MODERN WORLD

DAVID FAMILY KITCHEN Neckbones, ribs, sturdy cornbread, salmon croquettes, mustard greens and the like. Desserts are exceptionally good. 2301 Broadway. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-371-0141. BL Sun.-Fri. DELICIOUS TEMPTATIONS Decadent breakfast and light lunch items that can be ordered in full or half orders to please any appetite or palate, with a great variety of salads and soups as well. 11220 Rodney Parham Road. No alcohol, All CC. $$. 501-225-6893. BL daily. DIZZY’S GYPSY BISTRO Interesting bistro fare, served in massive portions at this River Market favorite. 200 River Market Ave. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-375-3500. LD Tue.-Sat. THE FADED ROSE The Cajun-inspired menu seldom disappoints. Steaks and soaked salads are legendary. 1615 Rebsamen Park Road. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-663-9734. LD daily. Full bar. $$-$$$. 501-224-3377. LD daily. FERNEAU Great seafood, among other things, is served at the Ice House Revival in Hillcrest. Thu.-Sat. 2601 Kavanaugh Blvd. Full bar, All CC. $$$-$$$$. 501-603-9208. D Tue.-Sat. FRANKE’S CAFETERIA Plate lunch spot strong on salads and vegetables, and perfect fried chicken on Sundays. 11121 N. Rodney Parham Road. No alcohol, All CC. $$. 501-225-4487. LD daily. 400 W. Capitol Ave. No alcohol, All CC. $$. 501-372-1919. L Mon.-Fri. FRONTIER DINER The half pound burger is a two-hander for the average working Joe. 10424 Interstate 30. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-565-6414. BL Mon.-Sat. FROSTOP A ‘50s-style drive-in has been resurrected, with big and juicy burgers and great irregularly cut fries. Superb service, too. 4131 JFK Blvd. NLR. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-758-4535. BLD daily. GADWALL’S GRILL & PIZZA Mouth-watering burgers and specialty sandwiches, plus zesty pizzas. 12 North Hills Shopping Center. NLR. Beer, Wine, All CC. $-$$. 501-834-1840. LD daily. HAYESTACK CAFE Southern cooking, po’boys and hearty breakfasts. 27024 Kanis Road. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-821-0070. BLD Tue.-Sun. KIERRE’S KOUNTRY KITCHEN Excellent home-cooking joint. 6 Collins Place. NLR. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-758-0923. BLD Tue.-Fri., BL Sat. RED DOOR Fresh seafood, steaks, chops and sandwiches. 3701 Old Cantrell Road. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-666-8482. BL Mon.-Fri. D daily. REDBONE’S Piquant Creole and Cajun food that’s among Little Rock’s best. The shrimp po-boy and duck and andouille gumbo are standouts. 300 President Clinton Ave. Full bar, All CC. $-$$. 501-372-2211. LD daily. RIVERFRONT STEAKHOUSE Steaks are the draw here, cooked quickly and accurately to your specifications. 2 Riverfront Place. NLR. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-375-7825. D Mon.-Sat. RUDY’S OYSTER BAR Good boiled shrimp and oysters on the half shell. 2695 Pike Ave. NLR. Full bar. 501-771-0808. LD Mon.-Sat. STARLITE DINER Breakfast and ice cream-loaded shakes star here. 250 E. Military Road. NLR. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-353-0465. BLD. TRIO’S Fresh, creative and satisfying lunches; even better at night. 8201 Cantrell Road. Full bar. $$-$$$. 501-221-3330. LD Mon.-Sat. VIEUX CARRE A pleasant spot in Hillcrest with specialty salads, steak and seafood. 2721 Kavanaugh Blvd. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-663-1196. LD Mon.-Fri., D Sat., BR Sun. ZACK’S PLACE Expertly prepared home cooking and huge, smoky burgers. 1400 S. University Ave. Full bar, All CC. $-$$. 501-664-6444. LD Mon.-Sat.

ASIAN

CHI’S CHINESE CUISINE Broad menu that spans the Chinese provinces and offers a few twists. 5110 W. Markham St. All CC. $-$$. 501-604-7777. FANTASTIC CHINA The food is delicious, the presentation beautiful, the menu distinctive, the service perfect, the decor bright. 1900 N. Grant St. Full bar, All CC. $$. 501-663-8999. LD daily. OSAKA JAPANESE RESTAURANT Fine-dining Japanese dishes and a well-stocked sushi bar. 5501 Ranch Drive, Suite 1. $$-$$$. 501-868-3688. LD. PAPA SUSHI Hibachi grill with large sushi menu and Korean specialties. 17200 Chenal Parkway. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-821-7272. SUSHI CAFE Impressive, upscale sushi menu. 5823 Kavanaugh Blvd. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-663-9888. L Mon.-Sat. D daily.

BARBECUE

CHATZ CAFE ‘Cue and catfish joint that does heavy catering business. 8801 Colonel Glenn Road. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-562-4949. LD Mon.-Sat. CORKY’S RIBS & BBQ The pulled pork is extremely tender and juicy, and the sauce is sweet and tangy 12005 Westhaven Drive. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-954-7427. LD daily. 2947 Lakewood Village Drive. NLR. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-753-3737. LD daily, B Sat.-Sun. WHITE PIG INN Go for the sliced rather than chopped meats at this working-class barbecue cafe. 5231 E. Broadway. NLR. Beer. $-$$. 501-9455551. LD Mon.-Fri., L Sat. WHOLE HOG CAFE The pulled pork shoulder is a classic, the back ribs are worthy of their many blue ribbons, and there’s a six-pack of sauces for all tastes. 516 Cantrell Road. Beer, Wine, All CC. $$. 501-664-5025. LD Mon.-Sat. 12111 W. Markham. Beer, Wine, All CC. $$. 501-907-6124. LD

56 NOVEMBER 2, 2011 ARKANSAS TIMES


m DINING CAPSULES, CONT. daily 150 E. Oak St. Conway. No alcohol, All CC. $$. 501-513-0600. LD Mon.-Sat., L Sun. 5107 Warden Road. NLR. Beer, Wine, All CC. $$. 501-753-9227.

EUROPEAN / ETHNIC

AMRUTH AUTHENTIC INDIAN CUISINE Numerous spicy, vegetarian dishes. 11121 N. Rodney Parham Road. Beer, Wine, All CC. $-$$. 501-224-4567. LD daily. CAFE BOSSA NOVA A South American approach to sandwiches, salads and desserts. 701 Kavanaugh Blvd. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-614-6682. LD Tue.-Sat., BR Sun. GEORGIA’S GYROS Good gyros, Greek salads and fragrant grilled pita bread. 2933 Lakewood Village Drive. NLR. Full bar, All CC. $-$$. 501-753-5090. LD Mon.-Sat. HIBERNIA IRISH TAVERN Irish and Southern food favorites. 9700 N Rodney Parham Road. Full bar, All CC. $$. 501-246-4340. LAYLA’S Delicious Mediterranean fare. 9501 N. Rodney Parham Road. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-227-7272. LD daily (close 5 p.m. on Sun.). 612 Office Park Drive. Bryant. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-847-5455. LD Mon.-Sat. TAJ MAHAL Upscale versions of traditional dishes and an extensive menu. 1520 Market Street. Beer, All CC. $$$. (501) 881-4796. LD daily. THE TERRACE MEDITERRANEAN KITCHEN A broad selection of Mediterranean delights. 2200 Rodney Parham Road. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-217-9393. L Mon.-Fri., D Mon.-Sat. YA YA’S EURO BISTRO Best bet is lunch, where you can explore the menu through soup, salad or half a sandwich. 17711 Chenal Parkway. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-821-1144. LD daily, BR Sun.

ITALIAN

GRAFFITI’S The casually chic and ever-popular Italian-flavored bistro avoids the rut with daily specials and careful menu tinkering. 7811 Cantrell Road. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-2249079. D Mon.-Sat. PIZZA D’ACTION Some of the best pizza in town, a marriage of thin, crispy crust with a hefty ingredient load. 2919 W. Markham St. Full bar, All CC. $-$$. 501-666-5403. LD daily. RISTORANTE CAPEO Familiar pasta dishes will comfort most diners, but let the chef, entertain you with some more exotic stuff, too, like crispy veal sweetbreads. They make their own mozzarella fresh daily. 425 Main St. NLR. Full bar. $$-$$$. 501-376-3463. D Mon.-Sat. ROCKY’S PUB Rocking sandwiches an Arkie used to have to head way northeast to find and a fine selection of homemade Italian entrees. 6909 JFK Blvd. NLR. Beer, Wine. $$. 501-833-1077. LD Mon.-Sat. ZAZA Here’s where you get wood-fired pizza with gorgeous blistered crusts and a light topping of choice and tempting ingredients. 5600 Kavanaugh Blvd. Beer, Wine, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-661-9292. LD daily. 1050 Ellis Ave. Conway. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-336-9292. BLD daily.

MEXICAN

JUANITA’S Menu includes a variety of combination entree choices. 614 President Clinton Ave. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-372-1228. L Mon.-Fri., D Thu.-Sat. ROSALINDA RESTAURANT HONDURENO A Honduran cafe that specializes in pollo con frito tajada. 3700 JFK Blvd. NLR. No alcohol, No CC. $-$$. 501-771-5559. LD daily. TACO MEXICO Some of the best and some of the cheapest tacos in Little Rock. 7101 Colonel Glenn Road. No alcohol, No CC. $. 501-4167002. LD Wed.-Sun.

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www.arktimes.com NOVEMBER 2, 2011 57


Natives Guide H

ave a hankering for fresh, hot cornbread? Whether your preference is for traditional Arkansas unsweetened cornbread or the more Northern-friendly sweet version, or even if you’re looking for jalapeno bread or johnnycakes, we have the best baker’s dozen places in the state to get your cornbread fix.

Ashley’s. Sweet. Pastry chef Tandra Watkins creates a sweet cracklin’ cornbread that goes perfectly with peas, greens or beans on any particular day. It’s made from War Eagle Mill grain and it’s delightful. Markham and Louisiana inside the Capital Hotel. 501-374-7474. www.capitalhotel.com/ashleyswebsite. 7 a.m.-11 p.m daily. Bean Palace. Traditional and nontraditional Italian. How fresh is your cornbread? You probably haven’t had it any fresher than what you can find at this restaurant, on the third floor of War Eagle Mill. Grain is grist-milled downstairs and brought up to be cooked up for lunch. Barely sweet, the traditional is great for sandwiches; if they’ve cooked up the Italian version instead treat yourself to that; it’s perfect for the Hickory Smoked Ham Sandwich. Inside War Eagle Mill (near Rogers). 479-789-5343. www.wareaglemill.com. 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. daily. Bobby’s Country Cookin’. Sweet. The lines start forming around 11 a.m. each day for folks hoping to get their meat-and-twoveg on over at the Shackleford cafeteria. The corn muffins are sweet and crumbly. Have yours with some Great Northern

Beans, some sweet tea and, if you’re lucky, some fried chicken. 301 N. Shackleford Road. 501-224-9900. www.bobbyscountrycookin.com. 10:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Mon.-Fri. Brown’s Country Store and Restaurant. Sweet. For 39 years the Benton landmark has been serving up a buffet featuring catfish, ribs, Southern cooking and fluffy sweet cornbread. Goes well with a little margarine, or if you’re feeding a sweet tooth try some honey on the table. Exit 118 on I-30 (Benton). 501-7785033. www.brownscountryrestaurant. 10 a.m.-9 p.m. daily. Cock of the Walk. Non-traditional. It would be enough for Cock of the Walk’s cornbread to be the moist, somewhat cakelike jalapeno-tinged cornbread that it is; when it’s served up by a waitress who flips it in the skillet, that’s even better. 7103 Cock of the Walk Drive, North Little Rock. 501758-7182. www.cockofthewalk.biz. 5-9 p.m. Mon.-Thu., 5-10 p.m. Fri.-Sat., 11:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Sun. Cotham’s Mercantile. Johnnycakes. If you’ve only ever tried the burger at Cotham’s, you’ve missed out on the full experience. Cotham’s serves up its cornbread selection like unsweetened flapjacks with margarine; they’re nicely crusty on the outside and crumbly in the middle. Get you a mess of collard greens with that. The original is at 5301 Hwy. 161, Scott. 501-961-9284. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Mon.-Thu., 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Fri.-Sat. The city version: 1401 W. Third, Little Rock. 501-370-9177. www.cothamsinthecity.com. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Mon.-Fri. Eunice’s Country Cookin’. Sweet.

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58 NOVEMBER 2, 2011 ARKANSAS TIMES

KAT ROBINSON

Cornbread

MAMA MAX’S: Moist, crumbly cornbread in Prescott.

Eunice’s serves up fabulous home-style beef over rice and chicken ’n’ dumplings, both of which are improved by the application of the restaurant’s sweet white cakelike cornbread. You can even order a pan to take home with you. 3325 S. 74th, Fort Smith. 479-484-1465. 10:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Mon.-Fri. Franke’s Cafeteria. Skillet traditional. Here’s a true Arkansas favorite: that great, crumbly skillet-fried cornbread from one the state’s oldest continually operating restaurant. It’s still soaking up all the butter next to your scalloped eggplant after all these years. Franke’s is now doing gluten-free jalapeno cornbread muffins, too. 11121 N. Rodney Parham, 501-225-4487, 10:45 a.m.-8 p.m. daily. 400 Broadway, Regions Center Building. 501-372-1919. www.frankescafeteria.com. 10:45 a.m.-2 p.m. Mon.-Fri. Fred’s Country Cooking. Traditional. A welcome haven for travelers in the western part of the state, this log cabin restaurant south of Waldron serves up fantastic catfish and burgers as well as some of the best traditional yellow cake cornbread you’ll find in the state. 16538 Highway

71, Boles. 479-577-2676. 6 a.m.-8:30 p.m. Tue.-Sat., 6 a.m.-2 p.m. Sun. Grandma’s Beans and Cornbread. Traditional. Can you build a business on nothing but beans and cornbread? Yes you can. Though this little Eureka Springs shop has changed hands numerous times, it’s still serving up barely sweet cornbread alongside that nearly famous pot of pinto and Great Northern beans. The combination is one of the cheapest and most filling dinners you’ll get in town. 200 Village Circle, Eureka Springs. 479-253-6561. www.grandmasbeansandcornbread.com. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Mon.-Sat. Homer’s. Traditional and non-traditional. This is sopping cornbread, the sort you want when you have a plate of candied yams and turnip greens. Homer’s serves up meat-and-three plates with your choice of a roll (also good), the traditional unsweet Arkansas cornbread or a non-traditional variation with jalapenos. Cornmeal never meets sugar here, not even in the hush puppies. 2001 E. Roosevelt. 501-374-1400. 7 a.m.-2 p.m. Mon.-Fri. Mama Max’s. Traditional. Beautiful, golden yellow and buttery, Mama Max’s thick cornbread is moist but crumbly and perfect with some lima beans or purple hull peas. 1102 W. Main Street, Prescott. 870-887-5005. 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Wed.-Sat., 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Sun. Shannon’s Restaurant. Sweet. Better known for doing breakfast any hour of the day, Shannon’s also serves up great plate lunches, almost always with a choice of roll or cornbread (except on Fridays, when it’s hush puppies). The sweetish cornbread is meant for sopping up bean juice and is great with turnip greens. 5511 Dollarway Road, Pine Bluff. 870-267-0000. 24 hours daily.


hearsay ➥ If you’ve been curious about the construction on the NLR side of the river across from Dillard’s headquarters (on Cantrell), wonder no more. It’s RIVERSIDE AT ROCKWATER, a new apartment development to be completed in phases with the first move-ins expected early 2012. ➥ Sadly, GREEN EARTH PHARMACY & WELLNESS CENTER, touted as the first LEED-certified pharmacy in the South when it opened in June 2010 in the River Market Tower on Rock St., Little Rock, closed earlier this month. The pharmacy, founded by Dr. Linda Bortell, offered health screenings, hormone consultations, lactation counseling and massage therapy. A great idea whose time may yet come. ➥ Nashville-based designer Margaret Ellis brings a spring 2012 jewelry trunk show to B. BARNETT Wednesday, November 9, 10 a.m., through November 10, 5:30 p.m. ➥ BARBARA JEAN has a full calendar for November, including a Kaufman Franco Trunk Show, November 3-4, and an Erno Lazlo event, November 8-9. ➥ On a recent stroll down Kavanaugh in the Heights, we noticed a new addition to the taxidermy menagerie in JERRY’S BARBER SHOP. Not to worry, the bandana-wearing, cup wielding raccoon is still there, but now he has a friend—a colossal moose head that looms over the shop.

NOVEMBER 2, 2011

Miami heat Arkansas artists to a wider audience BY KATHERINE WYRICK PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIAN CHILSON

A

s we reported last week, Boswell Mourot Fine Art inaugurates the opening of their new gallery in Miami with a fete on November 5. We caught up with Kyle Boswell just days before he left to talk about introducing his Arkansas artists into the hot Miami art scene. “As an artist myself, I understand the importance of getting in that market,” he opines. “It’s a larger population; it’s a huge art city, and, of course, Art Basel is there.” Continued on page 60 ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE ARKANSAS TIMES

NOVEMBER 2, 2011 59


H

istoric Arkansas Museum will be buzzing with activity on 2nd Friday Art Night—November 11, 5-8 p.m.—with the opening of “Tesseract Dancing: Brett Anderson and Emily Galusha,” a new exhibit in the Trinity Gallery for Arkansas Artists. We recently caught up with Galusha, who now resides in Austin, Texas, to discuss. She shares the following about her upcoming show, which is a perfect fit for this particular venue: “Continuing with the theme of ‘Southern Stash,’ I present mixed-media work and illustrations inspired by history and experience. The pistols, which have gained recognition, hang throughout the exhibit not as a means of violence, but as symbols, storytellers, vessels that hold rounds of experience and emotion of various calibers. Most of the collection contains an antiquity, taking an object that has gained a sense of wisdom through time and combining it with contemporary illustration. The combination of past with present, as well as with mechanical and organic, captures the concept of melding those things that make us who we are.” Sure, Galusha’s latest work is rich in meaning, but it also looks killer. The exhibit ends February 5, 2012.

“Apis Arma,” mixed media by Emily Galusha

See amazing sculptures out of LEGO® bricks.

BOSWELL

Continued from page 59

SEPT. 24, 2011 - FEb. 12, 2012 PRESENTED bY

1200 President Clinton Avenue • Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 • 501-374-4242 • clintonpresidentialcenter.org 60 NOVEMBER 2, 2011 ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE ARKANSAS TIMES

The gallery itself is in a tony area of Miami that was once the bohemian hub of the burgeoning arts community. Boswell invested in it years ago, but it now bears the Boswell Mourot name. He knew even then that he would someday like to have Arkansas artists represented there. “There’s so much untapped talent here,” he says. “Art is demographically influenced so Arkansas artists are different than those in Miami ... and the Miami market is savvy enough that they’ll be accepted.” With the Miami opening, Boswell’s own career has, in a sense, come full circle. “They were the ones who first supported me and showed my work and introduced me to other galleries,” he says. Brad Cushman of UALR, who has a show opening at the Little Rock gallery on November 12, will be one of the artists whose work will also show in Miami. Cushman says, “I’m excited. The more eyes that see it, the better.” Even as he prepares to take on Miami, the forward-thinking Boswell has his sights set on an even farther destination. He muses, “Someday, I think I’d like to have a presence in Berlin.” Achtung world!


Gifts Benefit

from around the world

that

BY KATHERINE WYRICK

the world

PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIAN CHILSON

O

n a recent visit to Shop@Heifer, a Heifer staffer wearing a kaki safari vest chatted with volunteers. He’d returned from a trip to Malawi and Zimbabwe the night before, and though jet-lagged, still managed to admire the many new additions to the store. More merchandise awaited unpacking in the back, boxes of ethically sourced, earth- and artisan-friendly products. Located inside Heifer Village, Shop@Heifer sells videos, books, educational toys, world handicrafts, accessories, greeting cards, honey, chocolate, coffee and Heifer merchandise (so you can wear your support proudly.) All products tie into Heifer Village’s educational mission, with every product having a story about where it

comes from and how it was made. A portion of the proceeds from the shop supports the entire mission of Heifer International—to end hunger and poverty while caring for the Earth. And remember, there’s really no better gift than a living one from the Heifer catalog. They recently sent out their 2011 Holiday Edition, full of options for any budget—from a flock of chicks for $20 to a goat for $120. You can even give the gift of bees—all the buzz this holiday season—to help families earn income through the sale of honey, beeswax and pollen. So what to get the person who has everything? A gift that helps children and families around the world to become self-reliant.

This beaded bracelet is ethnic with an edge. Luxurious, natural goat’s milk products make skin feel sublime.

Add sparkle to any ensemble with these pretty beaded earrings.

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Domesticated bliss! Incorporate livestock ornaments into home décor year-round.

support your community Small Town

A recycled paper pot from Vietnam looks modern and holds miscellany.

Shop@Heifer 1 World Avenue Hours: Monday-Saturday, 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.  www.heifer.org

ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE ARKANSAS TIMES

NOVEMBER 2, 2011 61


They’re a hoot

T

he hot topic among the Mississippi flyway birds coming south during the fall migration continues to be the rapture of several thousands of their brethren near Beebe last winter. The surviving birds, at least the migrants that I talked to, tend to think the raptured birds were “called home” by the great bird god Quetzalcoatl. They don’t disbelieve the official human report that the birds died of some “unexplained blunt-force trauma,” but they think that’s an obvious and negligible part of the story. The trauma was from the birds hitting the ground after falling from a great height, the birds agree, but it was only their mortal shells that fell — the Bird-God had already harvested their immortal souls and borne them away to Bird Heaven, where the streets are paved with sunflower seeds and the upper ranks of demons in faraway Bird Hell are filled with puddies that used up their nine tats. That’s the bird slant on the Great Beebe Croak, but you have to take bird forensics with several grains of Lot’s wife. Birdbrain didn’t come to mean what it does for nothing. Word-of-beak communication is about the only kind they have over long distances, and that combines badly with their tendency to gossip. Gossips always

embroider and festoon their news reports, and elide the subtleties, so that what started out as a mere bobBOB olink spiel evolves LANCASTER at last into a fullblown roadrunner windy, full of such preposterous notions as that creatures other than human beings might have an afterlife. In the Beebe aftermath, bird yarn-spinners outright stole the idea of a human Rapture and applied it to themselves. Deer have leapt to the same conclusion during hunting seasons with a heavy harvest, and possums since the heyday of the flivver have alleged that roadkill represents a rapture of sorts for their icky species. But it’s all hooey. Only humans have a Rapture. Other species can do special effects, but that’s only Pixar legerdemain, not the real deal. Birds do deserve some credit for not being sanctimonious in their bird-rapture delusions, and for not going around squawking or gabbling predicted dates and times. There’s no bird Harold Camping, or even a bird Tim LeHaye — and that speaks well for them. There’s no bird Geraldo, either. They

have no media except snatches of our blogs that they intercept unwittingly as they quietly wing down their predetermined longitudinal flypaths. They have to depend for punditry on the owls, appointed to put a reasonable spin on such prodigies as the Beebe Rapture and to enter authoritative interpretations of such events into the Avian Cosmology, an ancient stash of bird lore and bird fancy. These bird annals go back much farther than our own, but owls don’t know how to write, or how to compile written records, so they have to keep it all in their heads and disclose it only in hoots that all sound like the same hoot. There are only so many gigs of bird saga that you can get into a hoot. Multi-tasking is required of the owls too — if while they’re deep into archiving, for instance, they catch a glimpse of an incautious field mouse they have to beg pardon and go talon the rascal and take it home to stuff piecemeal into owlet maws. So owl wisdom is spotty, with gaps and lapses, sluggish with unpersuasive myth — and their knowledgeability is nothing to hoot home about either. They think bats are birds, for example. They think airplanes are birds. They think helicopters are just big dragonflies. They don’t know what to make of a kite. They can’t decipher roc or auk or any other of the ancient bird languages. You can hypnotize them with metronomes and make fools of them with post-hypnotic suggestions. You can sell

them schlock. Thousands of them are coowners of the Brooklyn Bridge. They’re better in matters of the spirit, but even there a fledgling aspirant to the ecclesiastical would be better served perching attentively in the rafters at a middling Vacation Bible School. There’s not a single owl that knows, or would guess, that the world is only 6,000 years old. Birds are utterly unaware of the great r.o.i.’s that derive from making burnt offerings. Neither raven nor dove has ever traced its ancestry to the ark. Birds have no Decalogue so they can only guess when they’ve sinned, and no blessed assurance is forthcoming for repenting guessed-at trespasses. When churlish jays or wiseacre magpies turn to the owls for priestly or rabbinic guidance, the owls can only shrug. They may add a hoot to the shrug. Birds see Sunnis fighting Shi’ites, Catholics and Protestants blowing each other up, Tutsis braining Wootsies and vice versa, evangelicals warring with the sane, etc. — and it all goes right over their heads. They lack the moral and physical courage to jump into the big middle of frays both great and small. We humans do however have the requisite grit, the dander, and our Maker rewards us with such gifts as the real-McCoy Rapture and dominion over the lesser, fainter-hearted, mindingtheir-own-business beasts, including the yellow-bellied sapsuckers.

ARKANSAS TIMES CLASSIFIEDS POLICE OFFICER

2012 STARTING SALARY: $38,000 Plus Holiday Premium Pay and Excellent Benefits Package (worth over $11,000) SALARY AFTER 2 YEARS: $43,125 The Nationally Accredited Little Rock Police Department, a professional and progressive law enforcement agency, is now recruiting. Apply On-Line at www.LRJOBS.net ONLY On-Line Applications Accepted. After application documents are submitted and processed, applicants will be contacted electronically (email) concerning testing. Applicants must complete the Application and Pre-Background Investigation process before participation in the Written Exam. REquIREmENtS tO BE HIRED AS LR POLIcE OffIcER: 21 but less than 46 years of age • Valid Driver’s License • U.S. Citizen • No Felony Convictions High School Graduate or GED • Acceptable Visual Acuity & Normal Hearing mINORItIES AND WOmEN ARE ENcOuRAgED tO APPLY. tHE LIttLE ROck POLIcE DEPARtmENt OffERS: Paid Health, Dental, and Life Insurance • Retirement • Shift Differential • Holiday Pay • Longevity Pay 15 Days Annual Vacation • 20 Days Paid Sick Leave • Workers’ Compensation Coverage Uniforms and Equipment Furnished • Education Incentive Pay after 2 years

For Information OR to Apply: LRPD Recruiting Hot Line – (501) 375-5773 (LRPD) Job Line – (501) 371-4505 Apply: www.LRJOBS.net 62 November 3, 2011 ARKANSAS TIMES 62 NOVEMBER 2, 2011 ARKANSAS TIMES

Employment

Education

Adoption & Services

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PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 (Void in Illinois)

Paid In Advance! Make $1,000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.homemailerprogram.net (AAN CAN)

Business Opportunities Interested in your own business? Want to work from home? Drs. Rodan & Fields, the creators of ProActiv, are seeking leaders to market & build executive teams in Ark & US. Ground floor direct selling company. Contact Jeanie tel:501-551-4703 .

Looking for pasture land for cattle.

200 mother cows, victims of the Texas drought. 325-396- 4675 OR CELL: 806- 317-2232

Sales & Marketing Reps wanted. $100 commission each free set-up to business. No selling. Any age/location. Paid Weekly. 501-246-7223 usanetwork@comcast.net

Community Art Education major Caitlin Murray opens her show with a public reception on Tuesday, November 15 from 2:00 to 4:00 at Henderson State University’ s Huie Library. (displayed through November 26) The show will display ceramics, paintings, and printmaking. This show is free of charge. For further information:cm168255@reddies. hsu.edu.

Call Challis FOR ADVERTISING INFO

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Legal Notices In the Circut Court of Pulaski County, Arkansas Probate Division 15th Division. In the matter of the adoption of Bladen Ellis Young, Case No. 06DR11-1664 NOTICE OF HEARING To: Gary Burchette Take Notice that a petition for Stepparent Adoption was filed by Thomas Zachary Young, so that your parental rights to your child can be legally terminated. NOW, unless you file an Answer or otherwise respond within the time required by law, the Petitions may be taken as confessed and an Order entered and granted by the Court. A hearing on this matter is scheduled for December 19, 2011 at 9:30 am at the Pulaski County Courthouse, 15th Division Circut Court, 401 W, Markham St,. Little Rock, AR.

Automotive CASHFORCARS:Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 http://www.cash4car.com


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This liTTle guy really is a “Champ”!

Six days after he was hit by a car, a kind-hearted neighbor contacted OOTW when Champ’s owner failed to take him to the vet. OOTW volunteers rushed to his aid, knowing that he must have suffered all that time.  Champ had been hit in the face, his skin torn off of his jawbone and the wound was very infected.  He couldn’t eat and had become very thin.  He was immediately taken to Pinnacle Valley Animal Hospital where he was given pain medication and lots of TLC! Dr. Cole Bierbaum surgically repaired his wound after I.V. antibiotics were given. As you can see, he is a very handsome boy and as good as new!  Champ is now in an OOTW foster home and doing great! He likes to play in water, go for walks and ride in the car.  He gets along great with other dogs and the cats in his foster home tolerate his natural inclination to herd them. Champ needs a home that understands what a Blue Heeler needs. He needs an active lifestyle and maybe even a job! Champ wants a home that will take care of him and love him forever, so that he will never have to face the uncertainties that he has dealt with in the past.  For information contact Kathy at gizmohouse@aristotle.net

Apricot Girls!

AppArel • HAndbAgs • Accessories

Out Of the WOOds Animal Rescue Of Arkansas  P.O. Box 7365 • Little Rock, AR 72217 • WWW.OOTWRESCUE.ORG 

boutique & party studio

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ARKANSAS NUMISMATIC SOCIETY, INC. presents its annual

Coin Show

JACKSONVILLE COMMUNITY CENTER Municipal Drive & W. Main St.

Dealers from all over the US on hand, buying and selling US and foreign coins, medals, tokens, currency, gold, silver, stamps, jewelry, & supplies

Nov.11, 12, & 13, 2011 Admission $2 ~ Friday - 2pm-6pm, More info: Saturday - 9am-5pm, Sunday - 10am-2 pm 501-985-1663

TU-FR 10am-6pm • SAT 10am-5pm

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375-6789 or 374-3331 100 E. Washington, NLR www.nationalpawn.com

Arkansas Times Flipside Advertise your business or event here

Find out how! Call Challis now at 375-2985

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ARKANSAS TIMES CLASSIFIEDS Nurse practitioNer

has an immediate opening for a psychiatric advanced practice nurse or nurse practitioner. Qualified applicant should be licensed as a registered nurse in arkansas and trained in the diagnosis and management of common as well as complex mental health conditions. Experience in mental health is required. Competitive compensation and excellent benefits. apply at: LrcMHc 4400 shuffield Dr. Little rock, ar 72205 or send resume: fax: 501-660-6838 email: human.resources@lrcmhc.com eoe

PSYCHIATRIST

Little Rock Community Mental Health Center,Inc. Is currently recruiting for a fulltime psychiatrist. The successful candidate performs assessment and treatment of persons with mental health disorders. Makes appropriate referrals for psychiatric evaluation and treatment; performs psychiatric evaluations; documents all consultations and progress notes; actively participates with the multidisciplinary treatment team; provides input for interpretation of psychosocial assessments; performs other duties as assigned. Qualified candidate must have an AR medical license. Competitive compensation and excellent benefits.

Apply at: LRCMHC 4400 Shuffield Dr. Little Rock, AR 72205 Or send resume: fax: 501-660-6838 email: human.resources@lrcmhc.com EOE

THERAPIST

Little Rock Community Mental Health Center Inc. is seeking a highly qualified licensed mental health professional to serve in the position of therapist in the Acute Day Treatment Program. This program serves adults with serious and persistent mental illness in a recovery-oriented model of care. The therapist will provide individual therapy, group therapy, oversee paraprofessional and other professionals, and manage the Acute Day Treatment client caseload. Experience with manualized treatment preferred. Management experience a plus. Qualified candidate should be licensed as a LPC, or LCSW in Arkansas. Competitive compensation and excellent benefits.

Apply at: LRCMHC 4400 Shuffield Dr. Little Rock, AR 72205 Or send resume: fax: 501-660-6838 email: human.resources@lrcmhc.com EOE www.arktimes.com NOvember 3, 2011 63


from Here

Retirement looks good

We take retirement living to new heights !

– Beth Ward

• Nightly Dining • “Happy Half-Hour” Nightly Before Dinner • 24 Hour Controlled Access • Large Apartments With Balconies • Scheduled Transportation Available • All Utilities Paid • Weekly Housekeeping & Linen Service

WOODLAND

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reathtaking views of the surrounding hills, deluxe modern amenities and more – the

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Arkansas Times