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Mark Hryncyszn | Oliver Seddon LJMU 2013/14

The City Neighbourhood as a Net Producer

7006MARCH Urban Design Project


Mark Hryncyszn | Oliver Seddon LJMU 2013/14

7006MARCH Urban Design Project

Contents 1.0 Introduction 2.0 Site (research + analysis)

5. Strategy > 5.1 Energy / utility

> 2.1 Location

> 5.2 Adjacencies

> 2.2 Planning policy / context

> 5.3 Connections

a. Local & Regional

> 5.4 Proposed use

c. Earmarked developments

> 5.5 Phasing

> 2.4 History

6. Proposal

> 2.5 Topography

> 6.1 Schematics

> 2.6 Existing use / condition

> 6.2 Visuals

> 2.7 Connections 3.0 Case studies > 3.1 Public realm / movement

a. Park (linear)

b. Street (shared)

c. Square (civic) > 3.2 Food prodution / urban agriculture

a. Market gardens

b. City farm

4. Concept > 4.1 Redefining community

> 4.2 Renewed investment > 4.3 Projected market


Mark Hryncyszn | Oliver Seddon LJMU 2013/14

7006MARCH Urban Design Project

1.0 Introduction - The City Neighbourhood ‘Located just beyond the edge of the city centre, the Parliament Street strip is an area in transition. The steady regeneration of the Baltic Triangle to the north creates a focus for the creative industries whilst the ex local authority housing estates to the south form a stable mono-functional block. The zone in-between incorporates the landmarks of the Cains Brewery and St James church, the former tax office on the waterfront and a disparate mix of housing and industry. The potential for a new Merseyrail station opposite St James church adds a strategic infrastructure impetus. This classic piece of urban periphery offers lots of alternative functional diverse possibilities with the added opportunity for creating an engagement with the waterfront.’ (Ref: 7006MARCH Urban Design Project Brief - Site D. Liverpool)

> Satelite photograph with focus area highlighted


Mark Hryncyszn | Oliver Seddon LJMU 2013/14

7006MARCH Urban Design Project

2.0 Site St James 2

> Site location plan (nts)

Š Crown copyright/database right 2013. Ordnance Survey/EDINA supplied service. FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY.

Sep 09, 2013 15:19

Scale 1:5000 0

.> Site aerial photograph

> Site birdseye photograph

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500 m

Jamie Scott Liverpool John Moores


Mark Hryncyszn | Oliver Seddon LJMU 2013/14

7006MARCH Urban Design Project

2.1 Planning policy / context

The following information has been extracted from the most recent local City Centre waterfront area and other locations now of increasing significance for international tourism such as Hope Street, Ropewalks, and planning policy documentation available (as referenced) and the relthe St George’s Quarter; evance with respect to a potential urban design strategy on the estabSome suggestions for future projects include: Gastronomic Market/Food Hall, lished site highlighted: Establishing the boundary character independents zones, major family leisure development, and large scale creative industries centre. The boundary for the Framework has been set to take account of all those Waterfront areas considered to have the potential to make a real contribution to the • 5 star hotel health, wealth and growth of the City Centre. • Backpacker/youth group accommodation * More active waterspaces around Liverpool Marina and Albert Dock • City Centre townhouse accommodation * Re-use of empty HMRC building at Queens Dock The Eastern boundary has extended to the full extent of the Knowledge • More animated water spaces hh * New international migration museum at Pier Head Quarter (marked by the Liverpool Women’s Hospital) and as a whole will • More high-end restaurant *Begin Liverpool Waters, Peel Group’s ambitious plan for north docks, have significant impact on the economic future of Liverpool City Centre. starting with King Edward Triangle and Princes Dock The Southern boundary is predominantly defined by the A562. At the There is still investor interest in leisure tourism. * Extend Arena & Convention Centre Liverpool waterfront the boundary has been drawn to include Cains brewery, the * Increase connections across Strand and enliven street scene Marina and the residential waterfront development of South Ferry Quay. Industrial opportunities The Western boundary of the City Centre is defined by the River Mersey. Liverpool Bench Marking: • Green Infrastructure - imaginative use makes a world class city Green infrastructure forms an integral part of any successful city and its imaginative use is demonstrated by the examples shown in New York, Chicago, Hong Kong, Paris and Munich. Some of the most interesting examples exist within cities where the built urban form is combined with imaginative green design.

The Core Strategy makes provision for 40,950 additional dwellings, citywide between 2011-2028.

• Green Expo- demonstrating that further opportunities exist to benefit from International business tourism and sustainable development.

The proposed Bio-Innovation Centre.

Culture and Tourism - We have highlighted the use of iconic architecture allied to use and place making, notably in Oslo, and also how the capital of culture designation proved useful in delivering legacy projects- Porto is a great example with many similarities to Liverpool. Residential - The City Centre residential offer does we believe need greater definition and identification - there could be a number of defined neighbourhoods across the City Centre where we add depth and quality of the offer - to illustrate the point we have looked at both contemporary offerings (NYC’s meat packing district) but also just quality - with a particular eye on the Canning/Hope Street area, where we use Barcelona’s Eixample district to define the art of the possible. Infra-structure

Housing- The City Centre and Urban Core areas of Liverpool will be the focus for housing investment. The City Centre is high density but meanwhile protecting family housing.

Government’s new Green Investment Bank in Liverpool. Green Infra-structure Key findings include: 62% of the city is green infrastructure; The City Centre and Inner Areas have low levels of green infrastructure; and the most Reasons for improving the green infrastructure include: sustainability,health, biodiversity, reduce urban heat island and drainage issues. The strategy does not cover the economic benefits.

Baltic Triangle Planning Framework Definition of the vision and development opportunities within the Baltic Triangle The vision for the Baltic is that over time it will become an important employment area for the city. A mix of general office employment will complement creative industries employment, providing for a diverse range from architects offices to artist’s studios and new employment space. Limited development has occurred in the past 5 years in this area. The CUC is also due for closure in Dec 2011. Are fragmented ownerships and existing uses preventing development? Is the vision for this area deliverable? Should residential development be encouraged? The Baltic Triangle has a number of opportunity development sites Baltic Triangle Marketing Recommendations

Positioning Liverpool Internationally Each sector of Liverpool City Centre’s economy has the potential to reach the international stage. This has to be International opportunities in: trade and enterprise; internationally competitive sectors (Creative & Digital, Life Sciences); targeting international tourism; international students; international events and international place marketing.

Advice on target markets and positioning for the Baltic Triangle to attract investment and development Recognising culture and creativity as an economic driver; there is demand for contemporary workspace; The Baltic Triangle is Liverpool’s most central development opportunity; investors are currently cautious. The Baltic Triangle is being marketed as a ‘cool and edgy’ place for creatives to live, work and play. How will the closure of the CUC impact confidence for investors in the area? Engage with the Baltic Triangle Strategic Steering Group representative during the ‘City Conversations’

• Transport; • Utilities, e.g. energy and water; • Waste management; • Flood prevention; • Digital infrastructure, e.g. broadband provision; • Social infrastructure, e.g. schools, health provision and community facilities, such as libraries; and • Green infrastructure.

Equality Diversity

Baltic Triangle Manifesto

Liverpool is historically a diverse city and its population of 445,200 is becoming increasingly diverse. Liverpool is also the most deprived local authority area in England with some of the most deprived communities in the UK and large areas of the city suffer high levels of deprivation in terms of education, employment, income, healthy and living environment.. Commitment to Equality and Diversity is explicit in wider Council policies.

Investment in cultural, tourism and leisure uses will be directed to the

Tourism Leisure

Details the strategic direction for the Baltic triangle The direction of travel for the area is most appropriately illustrated by the following terms: Flexible, curious, industry, art, free-thinking, How to encourage private sector-led creative development? How does residential development fit in? Links to Kings Dock and other Are urban realm improvements and public spaces required to achieve this vision? A brief but visionary document which details the preferred direction of travel for the area.creative, pop-up, independent retail, urban leisure.


Mark Hryncyszn | Oliver Seddon LJMU 2013/14

7006MARCH Urban Design Project

2.1 Planning policy / context neighbouring communities. Transformational projects The review of the baseline documents has identified a number of emerging projects that will have an impact on the City Centre in the next ten years. Several of these projects have been highlighted as having a transformational quality in terms of their collective impact on the city’s profile. These projects have the potential to become real catalysts for regeneration and investment and raise Liverpool’s status to a worldwide stage. These projects include; Culture and Tourism • A City Park in the centre of Liverpool would have the potential to be transformational, attracting people to the city and raising the city’s status as a key leisure destination for the region. Renewable Energy Range of plants primarily for benefit of user University and Royal Liverpool University Hospital operate combined heat and power (CHP) plants. Limited potential in City Centre for wind energy generation but Arena is a notable exception. Work being carried out to assess the potential for the retrofit of housing stock. Limited potential for major plants in the City Centre. The Smart Cities project has identified a set of challenging targets for carbon reduction, which have great resonance with the development of renewable energy. The Eldonians’ Combined Heat and Power project is spearheading a new approach to energy generation and usage. The Eldonians are working with Peel to develop follow-on plans. There is the potential for tidal energy generation however this is currently not economically viable. Support measures are required to reduce demand, encourage CHP on major schemes and support local small scale generation initiatives. Potential for off shore wind energy generation Sport and Leisure There are a number of private gyms in Liverpool City Centre. However, there are no specific sports and leisure municipal facilities within the Liverpool SIF study area. The private gyms within Liverpool City Centre include brand name, as well as independently owned gyms. Discussions are underway with a private leisure provider to deliver a new ‘extreme sports’ centre on the waterfront. Green Infrastructure Green infrastructure provision is set out in the Liverpool Green Infrastructure study. The evidence base for this study includes the Liverpool Open Space study, the Sports and

Recreation Strategy and the Liverpool Space for Nature study. In the urban core, there are moderate to low levels of green infrastructure provision, most of which is private gardens, parklands and general amenity space. The areas of Liverpool which are set to see the greatest levels of housing and economic growth, which includes the City Centre – are also those areas where green infrastructure is limited. • Schools – there is an opportunity to encourage genuine family living in the under-populated City Centre and with this new educational provision may be required. • Animating our Streets and Spaces creating exciting and dynamic city centre streets and spaces, by working together with communities in each City Centre neighbourhood, including businesses, property owners, universities and residents to create a programme of activity. Such a programme can help to develop stronger communities, create a more attractive and cared for area, and provide experiences and memories for visitors. Examples could include growing projects, markets and fairs, performances etc

> Liverpool district zoning adjacencies

The below text has been extracted from the most national planning policy framework documentation and has been selected with respect to a potential urban design strategy on the established site highlighted: Economic growth; - Local councils should have a clear economic strategy for their area, based on understanding business needs to support sustainable growth. Local plans, health and well being: - Local councils should work closely with the community and business to identify and plan for the needs of the area. - Local councils should work with public health bodies to understand the health of the local community, including how the community might change in the future. Local councils and health bodies should understand anything that stops gains in health and well-being.

Sustainable communities: - The aim is strong , vibrant and healthy communities. - Good quality buildings in their area. - Good local services - Local councils should plan to provide community facilities, such as local shops, meeting places, public houses and places of worship. Green space designation: - Green space land must be protected because is important to local life Sustainable transport - good public transport links, with priority given to cyclists and people on foot.

Reference documents:

> Liverpool City Centre Strategic Investment Framework 2012, Liverpool Vision > Liverpool City Centre Strategic Investment Framework Baseline Report, March 2012, Drivers Jonas Deloitte > Baltic Triangle Planning Framework January 2008, Liverpool Vision > Baltic Triangle Vision Manifesto > Liverpool South Docks Waterspace June 2012 > Liverpool Green Infrastructure Strategy


Mark Hryncyszn | Oliver Seddon LJMU 2013/14

7006MARCH Urban Design Project

9.0 DEsIGn pRoposAL 9.2 Planning mAstER pLAn 2.1 policy / context - c. Earmarked developments

9.0 DEsIGn pRoposAL Cains Brewery Village, Stanhope Street 9.2 mAstER pLAn

Block 2

Block 2

Block 3

Block 3 Block 1

Block 1

Block 4

Block 4

Existing site plan

9.0 DEsIGn pRoposAL 9.1.4 DEsIGn consIDERAtIons_ActIVE fRontAGEs > Brewery Village site location plan > Historic photographs - Projected brand identity site Boundary

Existing site plan

proposed site plan

site Boundary

Block 1

the above os map shows cain’s Brewery as existing. the red indicates the original historic building and the grey indicate the later additions to the brewery.

Block 2

Existing Brewery

supermarket / fitness and Beauty centre with residential above

Block 3

multi storey carpark

Block 4 / 5 / 6

Retail with Residential above

The Cains Brewery site covers an area of approximately 2.5 hectares and is

the above os map shows cain’s Brewery as existing. the red indicates the original historic building and the grey indicate the later additions to the brewery.

proposed site plan Block 1

Existing Brewery

Block 2

supermarket / fitness and Beauty centre with residential above

Block 3

multi storey carpark

Block 4 / 5 / 6

Retail with Residential above

the proposals will see the site transformed to provide a range of employment, leisure and residential uses. the existing brewery will be redeveloped for employment and leisure uses, including a hotel, cinema, craft brewery and foodhall. two other sites within the complex will provide residential, retail and leisure facilities, along with car parking.

the proposals will see the site transformed to provide a range of employment, leisure and residential uses.

the existing brewery will be redeveloped for employment and leisure uses, including a hotel, cinema, craft the diagrams Street highlight theto areas of proposed active bound by Parliament the north, Beaufort Street to the east, existing brewery and foodhall. two other sites within the complex will provide residential, retail and leisure facilities, frontages within the Brewery Village scheme. these

> Brewery Village proposal

along with car parking.

frontages will include a mix of food and other retail and a supermarket. they will also provide access to the health and fitness centre on the lower ground floor.

industrial buildings on Hill Street to the south and Grafton Street to the west.

The site is nothaving currently in operational use as brewing activities ceased in May active frontages along the two predominant routes to the site; parliament street and Grafton street,

passers by will bethis, able to see intrigue 2013. Notwithstanding theactivity, useproducing of the site as a brewery complex remains and increasing the chances of enticing visitors to the

site. its lawful planning use.

the prominent active frontage to the Brewery Village will

be off stanhopeon street into the courtyard of the Existingwarehousing buildings, canning The brewery complex the site comprises cains Brewery. this entrance will provide access to all uses within the Brewery Village and will become a key

facilities and the original Cains Brewery building and the Brewery Tap public pedestrian route within the scheme. house. The original brewery building and public house were constructed from red brick and terracotta between 1896 and 1902. Both buildings are Grade II listed for their architectural and historic importance. proposed site plan

Active frontages, 3D massing

Retail

supermarket

Retail

(Ref: Cains Brewery Villlage planning application documents)

KEY: proposed scheme Existing Buildings Listed Building Active frontages


Mark Hryncyszn | Oliver Seddon LJMU 2013/14

7006MARCH Urban Design Project

2.1 Planning policy / context - c. Earmarked developments N

6

N

Completed Completed schemesschemes

6

Ref.

14

14

2 17

2 7

17

Location Ref. Location

1

Completed Completed schemes 1 schemes

The Block, 1 The KeelBlock, WharfKeel Wharf

5

Schemes Schemes oncurrently site on site 5 currently

2

St Vincent 2 St DeVincent Paul Primary De Paul School Primary School

7

Proposed Proposed schemes 7 schemes

3

Women’s 3 Organisation Women’s Organisation

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Baltic4Creative Baltic Creative

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Arena 5 andArena Conference and Conference Centre Centre

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Liverpool 6 One Liverpool One

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Cosmopolitan 7 Cosmopolitan Liverpool Liverpool

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Camp 8 Furness Camp Furness

1

Ref.

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15

26

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19 21 19 20 22 320 3 23 23 24 26

24 25 25 16

4 13

Proposed Liverpool Proposed City Liverpool Enterprise City Enterprise Zone Zone Main retail area Main(UDP) retail area (UDP) Baltic Triangle Baltic Triangle City Centre City boundary Centre boundary

Location Ref. Location

We note the Cains Brewery Villlage planning application (hybrid) has recently been gained permission from Liverpool Council.

Sefton 9 Street Sefton Quarter Street Quarter

Proposed Proposed schemesschemes

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BALTIC BALTIC TRIANGLE TRIANGLE 21

5

Application site Application (Brewery site Village) (Brewery Village)

SchemesSchemes currentlycurrently on site on site

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9

5

Key

1

Ref.

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Key

16

4

13 27 8 12

12 9

28 27

8

28 10

10

9 11

30 29

29

30

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Location Ref. Location

10

St James 10 Merseyrail St James Merseyrail Station Station

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St James 11 Heritage St JamesQuarter Heritage Quarter

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Land Bounded Landby Bounded The Dolby by The Hotel Dolby and Hotel and 12 Sefton Street Sefton Street

13

Liverpool Arena Liverpool andArena Convention and Convention Centre Centre 13 extension extension

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Land adjacent Landtoadjacent Argyle Court, to Argyle Argyle Court, Argyle 14 Street Street

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Tribeca 15

16

Former 16 Shell Former Petrol Shell Station Petrol Station

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Hurst 17Street Hurst (former Street “L1ve�) (former “L1ve�)

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King’s 18Dock King’s Mill (Phase Dock Mill 2 &(Phase 3) 2 & 3)

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40-50 19St James 40-50 Street St James Street

20

3 Bridgewater 20 3 Bridgewater Street Street

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3a Bridgewater 21 3a Bridgewater Street Street

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5, 7 22 & 9 Bridgewater 5, 7 & 9 Bridgewater Street Street

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Jamaica 23 Street/Watkinson Jamaica Street/Watkinson Street Street

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Greenway 24 Greenway Global, Brick Global, Street Brick Street

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12 Jordan 25 12 Street Jordan Street

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Stanley 26 Auto Stanley Engineers, Auto Engineers, Norfolk Street Norfolk Street

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41-51 27Greenland 41-51 Greenland Street Street

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35-39 28Greenland 35-39 Greenland Street Street

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James 29 Troop James Buildings Troop Buildings

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Darby 30Macy, Darby Hill Street Macy, Hill Street

It will be our intention to further analyse the merits of the proposal and additional schemes in place (see fig left) with respect to the cohesive urban renewal strategy we will strive to formulate.

Tribeca

Plans reproduced by Plans permission reproduced of Ordnance by permission Surveyof on Ordnance behalf ofSurvey The on behalf of The                        Â?Â? Â?Â?    Â?­   €  Â?Â? Â?Â?    Â?­   €  ‚‚ƒÂ? „ Â?    ‚‚ƒÂ? „ Â?       €  Â…  †     €  Â…  †  €  €  €  €  

Project: Brewery Project: Village Brewery Village Client: Robert Client: CainRobert Brewery Cain Brewery Title:

Title:andGrowth Growth Future and Future Development Development in the Balticin the Baltic Triangle andTriangle Surroundings and Surroundings Status: FinalStatus: Final Job No: Date:

* Refer to* attached Refer to attached schedule schedule for furtherfor further details details

Scale:

Job No: ROBM2001 Dwg No: 2700 Dwg No: 2700 ROBM2001 Revision: July Date: 2013 July 2013 1_0 Revision: 1_0 Author: NTS Scale: NTS RD Author: RD

(Ref: Cains Brewery Villlage planning application documents)


Mark Hryncyszn | Oliver Seddon LJMU 2013/14

7006MARCH Urban Design Project

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2.2 History

Coburg Dock is a dock, on the River Mersey and part of the Port of Liverpool. It is situated in the southern dock system, connected to Queens Dock to the north, Brunswick Dock to the south. The dock was opened in 1840 and provided direct river access. This passage fell into disuse and was subsequently sealed up. 3

90000m

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> 1890 Survey

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Mark Hryncyszn | Oliver Seddon LJMU 2013/14

7006MARCH Urban Design Project

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> 1920 Survey

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Mark Hryncyszn | Oliver Seddon LJMU 2013/14

7006MARCH Urban Design Project

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Mark Hryncyszn | Oliver Seddon LJMU 2013/14

7006MARCH Urban Design Project

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2.2 History

In 1986, the large grain silo near the dock basin was demolished.[1] This and the other docks in the southern system are owned by British Waterways. Part of the dock is set aside for moorings. South Ferry Basin or ‘The Cockle Hole’, a small open basin to the south, was little known under its own name and often confused as being part of Coburg Dock The Royal Navy Headquarters (RNHQ) Merseyside is 90 on Brunswick Dock, which includes the HMS Eaglet establishment of the Royal Naval Reserve. As of 2011, the Archer class patrol vessels HMS Biter and HMS Charger are based in the dock. Due to tidal restrictions at Brunswick however, the two ships spend most of their time at Langton Dock in the North dock system in order to enable them to carry out their University Royal Naval Unit training programs more effectively. This and the other docks in the southern system are owned by British Waterways, with part of the dock is set aside for moorings. 3

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HM Revenue and Customs office Opened 1993-closed 2012 due to issues with efficiency of running building

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> 1990 Survey

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Mark Hryncyszn | Oliver Seddon LJMU 2013/14

2.3 Topography

> Figure ground / terrain study

7006MARCH Urban Design Project


Mark Hryncyszn | Oliver Seddon LJMU 2013/14

2.3 Topography

> Existing site section

7006MARCH Urban Design Project


Mark Hryncyszn | Oliver Seddon LJMU 2013/14

2.4 Existing use / condition

> Land use / open space study

7006MARCH Urban Design Project


Mark Hryncyszn | Oliver Seddon LJMU 2013/14

2.4 Existing use / condition

> Building use

7006MARCH Urban Design Project


Mark Hryncyszn | Oliver Seddon LJMU 2013/14

7006MARCH Urban Design Project

2.5 Connections

Lime Street Station

reet ent St Parliam Upper

St Margaret of Antioch CofE Primary School

eet Str

et ick Stre Warw Upper

Ha rlo w

et tre nS fto Se

et tre nS fto Gra

Brunswick Business Park

Dingle

The Florrie

St Cleopas C of E Primary School

Pa rk Ro ad

Matthew Arnold Primary School

Riv er sid eD riv e

The Belvedere School

Mo ssle yH ill Dr i

Aviary Cafe

ee Gr

To Allerton St Finbars RC Primary School

ny me t lm DaStree

Va le

Shorefields Technology College

The Britannia Pub

KEY

Princes Park

M ill St re et

Co ck bu rn St re et

Din gle

2 miles from Town

Croxteth Road

Bellerive FCJ Catholic College

ve

Brunswick Station

Park Road Sports Centre

St Silas CofE Primary School

oad re R ide Belv

Queens Parade Gates

Beaufort Park Primary School

St re et

reet Park St

Our Lady of Mount Carmel RC Primary School

La rk La ne

reet Mill St

Brunswick Lock Bridge

d Roa Park

St Malachys RC Primary School

Toxteth

Pr inc es Av en ue

ad Ro

et Hill Stre

1 mile from Town

(open 7am - 7pm or sunset whichever is earliest)

Windsor Primary School

Bu ckla nd

Str ee t

Palm House

T Aigburth Library Aig bu rth

St Charles St Michael St Michaels in the Hamlet RC Primary school Station School Riv Liverpool Hope ers ide University Halls Dr ive of Residence

Sefton Park Vic tor ia R o

r dso Win

St Patricks RC Primary School

wn do ith Sm

Cains Brewery

Ro ad

Ash field Roa d

T

ve Dri th ur gb Ai

Anglican Cathederal

Novas Contemporary Arts Centre

Abercrombie Nursery School

Toxteth Library

Liverpool Watersports Centre

Liverpool

Myrtle St

Cath arine Street

et Stre aica Jam

Arena

Gt George Street

Pa rk La ne

Hardm an St

Ul let Ro ad

Duk eS tree t

Bus Station

Ro ad

Oxford Stre et

Berry St

T

De vo ns hir eR oa d

Central Station

t tree wS sha Ren

eet Str ver no Ha

Liverpool One

Albert Dock

Wa ver tre e

Brownlow Hill

So ut Rohwo ad od St Mic ha els Ro ad

Station

Di ng le La ne

T

t ee Str James ter Wa Street

No rth Hi ll S tre et

Pier Head

(Liver Buildings, Ferry Terminal)

ne Edge La

London Road

le S Da

nb an kD rive

Moorfields Station treet

Aigburth Jer ich oL an e

City Centre - Otterspool National Cycle Route 56 Schools Shopping Areas Landmarks Rail Station

Otterspool Promenade

Cycle Parking Toucan Crossing

T

* Additional cycle parking is available throughout the city centre - for locations and information on connecting cycle routes across the city please see the Liverpool Cycle Map

> Otterspool to the city centre (pdf) -

> Jon Egan, Archetype Studio, Liverpool. flyover-liverpoolLiverpool City Council


Mark Hryncyszn | Oliver Seddon LJMU 2013/14

7006MARCH Urban Design Project

2.5 Connections

> Road traffic analysis


Mark Hryncyszn | Oliver Seddon LJMU 2013/14

7006MARCH Urban Design Project

2.5 Connections N

Key

Central Station

James Street Station

Application site (Brewery Village) Proposed Liverpool City Enterprise Zone Bus stops Bus Station Railway station Railway line Main retail area (UDP) Baltic Triangle City Centre boundary

BALTIC TRIANGLE > Citylink route (Merseytravel)

N

Central Station

James Street Station

Key Plans reproduced by permission of Ordnance Survey on behalf of The             Application site (Brewery Village)  Â?Â? Â?Â?    Â?­   €  ‚‚ƒÂ? „ Â?   Proposed Liverpool City Enterprise     €  Â…  † Zone  €  € 

Bus stops Bus Station Project: Brewery Village Client: Robert Cain Railway station Brewery Title:

Accessibility in the Baltic Railway line Triangle and Surroundings

Status: Final Job No: Date: Scale:

Brunswick Station

> Public transport nodes

BALTIC TRIANGLE

Main retail area (UDP) Dwg No: 2600 ROBM2001 July 2013 BalticRevision: Triangle1_0 Author: NTS RD City Centre boundary


Mark Hryncyszn | Oliver Seddon LJMU 2013/14

7006MARCH Urban Design Project

2.5 Connections The Governor Bank of England recently suggested with particular respect to 2nd tier cities ‘strategic infrastructure, particularly transportation can have a major spill over benefits for broader economy.. more efficient supply chains and unlocking tourism. Advice from TOC Merseytravel is that a business case must be built. (Ref - Liverpool Echo)

> St. James Station historic survey

> Merseyrail Network map CITY businesses have launched a campaign for a new Merseyrail station to serve Liverpool’s growing creative district around the Baltic Triangle. The move – described as a potential “game-changer” for the area – would see the former St James’s station, which sits on Merseyrail’s Northern Line between Brunswick and Liverpool Central, reopened. It has not been used since 1917.

Liverpool’s Strategic Investment Framework (SIF), mentions the importance of reopening St James’s Station to boost the Baltic Triangle and the creative sector. Now local people have pledged to work together with Liverpool Vision and Merseytravel to see if the station can be brought back to life. Any reopening would be several years away and finding funding will be a challenge. But Vision pledged to work with local organisations to build a business case to win that cash. CITY businesses have launched a campaign for a new Merseyrail station to serve Liverpool’s growing creative district around the Baltic Triangle.

> Aerial photograph St. James Station

> Site photograph St. James Station

cutting existing site

cutting existing site


Mark Hryncyszn | Oliver Seddon LJMU 2013/14

7006MARCH Urban Design Project

3.0 Case studies > 3.1 Public realm / movement - a. Park (linear) The success of New York’s high line park has become as synonymous as a contemporary best practice example of public green space intervention in an urban environment. The result of a design competition the scheme makes use of disused overhead tram infrastructure resulting in an elevated oasis of vegetation and escape from the bustling street below. Provided with high quality public furniture wild planting and urban lighting. We cite the linear park as a exemplar to making new connections, desirable civic realm green spaces and improving biodiversity and social wellbeing as emphasised in planning policy documentation (see prev. Ref.).

> High line public park, New Yor k from below (nocturnal) / above


Mark Hryncyszn | Oliver Seddon LJMU 2013/14

7006MARCH Urban Design Project

3.0 Case studies > 3.1 Public realm / movement- b. Street (shared) Exhibition Road London exists as a successful UK progression of a Dutch ideal. The Woonerf (or shared|) street is a notion to providing a more pedestrian orientated (kerbless) trafficked street / road which retains regular vehicular traffic and cycling movement and parking. We cite this approach / treatment as a means to improving the quality of public realm within our intended proposal and foresee market stall lined shared streets suggested by the brewery village proposal benefitting from this level of consideration.

3.0 Case studies > 3.1 Public realm / movement- c. Square (civic) > Exhibition Road, South Kensington, London

The area of King’s Cross London recently underwent (is in the process of) large scale redevelopment . Following landmark development of passenger rail station the re-adaptation of an abundance of redundant historic industrial building stock to mixed use commercial / residential use has established a new district within the city. The treatment of granary square at the heart of the scheme as a contemporary civic square provides a platform for numerous activity such as a regular food market, outdoor venue and generally a meeting place / focal point.

> Granary Square, Kings Cross redevelopment, London


Mark Hryncyszn | Oliver Seddon LJMU 2013/14

7006MARCH Urban Design Project

3.0 Case studies > 3.1 Public realm / movement- b. Street (shared) The Prinzessinnengarten is a social and ecological urban agriculture. Our goal is to create a place of exchange and learning on issues of local and organic cultivation of food, biodiversity, sustainable Kosums, the responsible use of resources and sustainable neighborhood and urban development. For the conversion of brownfields into thriving gardens and our nonprofit social activity in the form of garden work days, workshops and collaboration with schools, kindergartens and universities.

> Pop up urban agriculture (environment) / serving kiosks


Mark Hryncyszn | Oliver Seddon LJMU 2013/14

4.0 Concept 4.1 Redefining community - Return to the commons

7006MARCH Urban Design Project

Liverpool as many modern cities today is a mass consumer of resources (we need only observe the operational nature of the cities most recent (pre-2008 crash) investment / delivery of a large scale urban renewal project in the form of the L1 retail destination / Chavasse park). With respects to a recovering economy however unfortunately the only export that’s appears to be leaving the docks in bulk currently is a tonnage of empty cardboard boxes on their way back to the Chinese Republic to be recycled.

It’s Liverpool’s neighbourhoods which appear to be suffering the most evidently. Many the of the 1960s planning haphazard estates are in further decline with loss of local shops / amenities and stagnant employment levels as anaemic economic the climate continues to take it’s toll.

The proximity of one such neighbourhood has become readily apparent in our strategic approach. We cite the Dingle (residential area established to the South of our focus area) as an atypical and symptomatic urban waste of space! In explanation our urban design analysis (land use survey highlighted (see Prev. Ref)) we distinguished an abundance of open green space which we feel is undervalued and under used. To substantiate this claim Liverpool Council have themselves suggested that the

> The Levellers Declaration and Standard

constant upkeep (grass cutting) of these spaces as onerous and costly.

The term ‘leveller’ had been used in 17th-century England as a term of abuse for rural rebels. In the Midland Revolt of 1607, the name was used to refer to those who ‘levelled’ hedges in enclosure riots.

We believe these spaces need to be put to better use and we care about the health of this neighbourhood. We subsequently propose these pockets of land be taken off the hands of the council and used for the benefit of the local community residents and in turn the city and eve the planet and here’s why...

> Plan of medieval manor

> Grazing pigs


Mark Hryncyszn | Oliver Seddon LJMU 2013/14

7006MARCH Urban Design Project

4.2 Renewed investment - City Neighbourhood as a net provider Commons refers to the cultural and natural resources accessible to all members of a society, including natural materials such as air, water, and a habitable earth. These resources are held in common, not owned privately. When commonly held property is transformed into private property this process alternatively is termed “enclosure” or more commonly, “privatization.”

Imagine a future where every available space in big cities is used to let new green spaces bloom. Green spaces that local residents create themselves and use to produce fresh and healthy food. The result would be increased biological diversity, less CO2 and a better microclimate. The spaces would promote a sense of community and the exchange of a wide variety of competencies and forms of knowledge, and would help people lead more sustainable lives. They would be a

> IBC planters

kind of miniature utopia, a place where a new style of urban living can emerge, where people can work together, relax, communicate and enjoy locally produced vegetables.

In future ever more people will be living in cities rather than in rural areas. The city will therefore become the decisive place for the development of more sustainable ways of eating, living and moving. The city of the future should be a climate-friendly, pleasant place to live, where every care is taken to conserve our natural resources.

(Ref: prinzessinnengarten)

> Potential green infrastructure / urban farm areas highlighted on site birdseye photo

We are proposing the return to the commons within our urban neighbourhoods. Rentable allotment space, access to tools and education, no space wasted and ultimately a new economy influencing further urban renewal stimulation / investment incentives.

> Stacked urban allotments (security / point of sales kiosks)


Mark Hryncyszn | Oliver Seddon LJMU 2013/14

7006MARCH Urban Design Project

4.2 Renewed investment - City Neighbourhood as a net provider We believe a decisive urban agricultural incentive such as that which has been suggested will be most profitable when paired with a related district energy strategy.

In this case producing sustainable energy and heat from recycled abundance of green waste might seem like common sense but investment in energy infrastructure will tie back into agricultural cycle and bring wider benefits to exiting and proposed district.

> Bio-digestion process / cycle

> Anaerobic digestion tank diagram


Mark Hryncyszn | Oliver Seddon LJMU 2013/14

7006MARCH Urban Design Project

4.3 Projections (market) - Sustained growth of Baltic Triangle Facilitate sustained growth of the creative district influx mixed scale digital businesses and commercial premises Encourage small enterprise Temporary - Pop-up - lightweight Earmark larger sites for commercial office space (mixed use) New residential community infrastructure Improvements to existing residential area Encourage Urban homestead (agriculture / produce) Promote community integration with new amenities Transformation of existing landmark building (see brewery village) Improved connections / public realm – Civic platform / forum

> Baltic Triangle birdseye photo

Connect with waterfront provide leisure recreation facilities Landmark waterfront buildings Hotel Reinstatement of St. James railway station

> Camp & Furnace


Mark Hryncyszn | Oliver Seddon LJMU 2013/14

5.0 Strategy > 5.1 Energy / utility

7006MARCH Urban Design Project

FAQs: Bunhill energy centre and heat network Why are we setting up an energy centre and heat network in Bunhill? We are setting up a heat network in Bunhill ward to provide cheaper, greener, locally-produced heat. The heat network will be fed by a local energy centre, which will produce electricity and heat. In the same way that we use heat from a car engine to keep us warm when driving, the energy centre will use the heat created from producing electricity to help heat buildings and provide hot water. The central power stations that produce most of our electricity waste up to two thirds of their energy, mostly through wasted heat. The energy centre will produce electricity on a much smaller scale and the otherwise wasted heat will be captured and piped around the heat network. This makes the energy centre much more efficient, cheaper and greener - providing residents with affordable warmth and helping us reduce our carbon emissions.

What exactly is a local heat network? A local heat network is a series of underground pipes carrying hot water between the local energy centre (where the heat is generated) and the buildings connected to the network. The heat network consists of two parallel pipes, one carrying hot water to buildings in the network and the other returning the cooler water to the energy centre. The heat is transported through these pipes to the boiler houses in each building. From the boiler house, the heat that is transferred to the existing central heating system will carry the heat to each building.

What are the benefits for those connected to the heat network?

Bunhill Power Station, Islington

Reduced energy costs Most power stations waste heat when generating electricity - up to two thirds of the energy can be wasted. Local heat networks capture and use the heat - this is more efficient and the savings can be passed on to residents. Greater energy reliability and security Local heat networks use a tried and tested technology called Combined Heat and Power (CHP). CHP is a type of engine that turns an electricity generator and captures the heat in the same way that we use heat from a car engine to keep us warm when we are driving. The heat from the CHP engine will be used to provide heating and hot water in buildings. The existing boilers in the buildings will also be retained to provide additional sources of heat and back-up. Having the energy centre and heat network means the heat supply will be more secure and reliable. Heat networks also have built-in flexibility to be supplied by a range of fuels (including bio-fuels) in the future to take advantage of cheaper alternatives as they become available. Reduced carbon footprint CHP is the most efficient way to get the most out the fuel that we use and so can result in 30 per cent less carbon dioxide emissions than traditional heat and power supplies.


Mark Hryncyszn | Oliver Seddon LJMU 2013/14

7006MARCH Urban Design Project

5.2 Adjacencies

COMMERCIAL

INDUSTRIAL

(CREATIVE INDUSTRY)

(INVESTMENT)

SUPPLY

- DISTRICT)

RESIDENTIAL

(ECO COMMUNAL ISM)

- ECONOMY (EXCHANGE)

DEMAND TRANSPORT NODE

MARKET

PUBLIC

(LEISURE)

FOOD PROCESSING/ STORE

FOOD PRODUCTION

STREET

RECYCLED ORGANIC WASTE

- PROCESS

ENERGY WATER SITE > Proposed scheme adjacencies diagram


Mark Hryncyszn | Oliver Seddon LJMU 2013/14

5.3 Connections

> Proposed building use

7006MARCH Urban Design Project


Mark Hryncyszn | Oliver Seddon LJMU 2013/14

5.4 Land use

> Proposed building use

7006MARCH Urban Design Project


Mark Hryncyszn | Oliver Seddon LJMU 2013/14

5.5 Phasing

7006MARCH Urban Design Project

> Proposed development phasing


Mark Hryncyszn | Oliver Seddon LJMU 2013/14

6.0 Proposal A main focal point to the scheme is a central axis formed by the intersection of Stanhope Street and Grafton Street. As existing, Stanhope Street severely lacks any sense of identity. The road is lined with an eclectic mix of commercial, industrial and residential buildings, with the middle of the street currently blocked off by the Cain’s Brewery entrance. Our intention is to entirely open up Stanhope Street and create one continuous flow from east to west, leading through core spaces of the overall masterplan. Starting at the end of the street, we propose to reopen St. James’ station and create a transport hub for the site, being the destination where people will predominantly arrive. With Cain’s Brewery already situated on a prominent corner, the idea is to transform this section of Stanhope Street into more of an eating and drinking strip, including cafes, restaurants and food markets, but more importantly these eating establishments would be encouraged and have the incentive to use produce that has been farmed in the adjacent green areas; the Urban City Farm. The central axis is a key space within the overall site, being at the core of the masterplan. We are there fore proposing to create a main square, which would become a meeting point as well as a multi use area, offering flexible spaces for markets, outdoor cafes, pop-up bars and general social activities. Food production is a main driver behind our scheme, with proposed allotments, wild meadows and grazing fields for animals occupying the existing green spaces. The creation of a more established green infrastructure would be the driving force behind the city neighbourhood becoming a ‘net producer’. Food produce would be grown and harvested before reaching its processing and production stage, with finished products and fresh produce being sold at markets and to local businesses.

7006MARCH Urban Design Project


Mark Hryncyszn | Oliver Seddon LJMU 2013/14

6.1 Schematics

> Masterplan proposal

7006MARCH Urban Design Project


Mark Hryncyszn | Oliver Seddon LJMU 2013/14

6.2 Visuals

> Proposed 3D massing

7006MARCH Urban Design Project


Mark Hryncyszn | Oliver Seddon LJMU 2013/14

6.2 Visuals

> Proposed Square

7006MARCH Urban Design Project


Liverpool 3 os,mh