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Architecture 2016 BA(Hons) Architecture & Master of Architecture Projects Review

Architecture 2016

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West Tower

on otel Hilton Hotel Liverpool One

Adagio Hotel Lewis’s

Master of Architecture Studio, Spring 2016

duates please send your up to o for consideration for a position.

3 The Parsonage - Manchester M3 2HW E manchester@ahr-global.com

sponsors


Architecture 2016 BA(Hons) Architecture & Master of Architecture Projects Review


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Liverpool John Moores University


contents welcome

workshops abroad symposium public lectures film orks urban design exhibition northern soul community engagement research

bachelor of architecture first year second year third year

master of architecture oint ro ect specialist studies housing index of CDPs

architecture society awards

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10 12 14 16

18 38 50

76 80 82 101

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site visit, Billerhuder Insel, looking west across Bille Lake to Hamburg city centre MArch Workshop Abroad October 2015 6

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welcome This review celebrates the outputs and activities of the Architecture studios here at the Liverpool School of Art & Design. It has been another busy year, starting in October with successful workshops abroad in Rome and Hamburg initiating studio projects. Our high profile public lecture series also got underway right at the beginning of the academic year. The school organised a Symposium: ‘film, space and architecture’ in January, with a day of presentations and debate being a primer to many of the undergraduate first year studio projects. Later in January we also launched the publication ‘re-inState - urban propositions for Birkenhead, Liverpool City Region and Veddel, City of Hamburg’ with a public exhibition of work from our MArch urban design studios. Outputs from last year’s ‘Housing Futures’ studio together with related staff research were recently published in the book ‘Housing the Future: Alternative Approaches for Tomorrow’. The school will host a second related international housing conference titled ‘Government and Housing in a Time of Crisis: Policy, Planning, Design and Delivery’, in September this year. In the spring we co-hosted the RIBA Northern Soul design charrette. RIBA North, the only national RIBA architecture centre outside London, will open at Liverpool’s Mann Island in June 2016. We welcome this as a great opportunity for our staff and students to facilitate and showcase their research, particularly into ‘City Futures’. To support this our school has appointed a member of staff to a new LJMU/RIBA collaborative post, adding to those we already have with Tate Liverpool, FACT and the Liverpool Biennial. It has been a successful year for many of our staff in terms of published research, and we have included a brief summary herein. For studio teaching our staff develop speculative work that addresses real world issues, informed by their own research but also

by our associations with cultural, professional and civic institutions in this city and beyond. Such collaborations nourish the thematically focussed activities of our students. Last year a Liverpool building, the Everyman Theatre, won the ‘Stirling Prize’. In December the architecture collective Assemble won the ‘Turner Prize’ for their work with Granby Four Streets Community Land Trust in Liverpool 8. In previous years we have collaborated with these local organisations, along with many others, to explore, speculate and assist in the fermentation of ideas about their spaces and buildings. Assemble are now working with LJMU in virtuoso posts as mentors to a number of our students. I would like to thank our student architecture society, ‘ArchSoc’, for continuing to organise such a rich variety of social events, guest lectures and film nights and to thank the guest speakers and critics that play such a vital role in enriching our studio culture. It is never possible to capture within so few pages the full vibrancy of the School but I hope the contents of this document provide a taste of its creative energy. Thank you to our catalogue sponsors, who make this document possible, we take pride in our links with them and their support. Finally congratulations to all our graduating students, whose work you will find within these pages, we wish them well for their own futures. Ian Wroot, Architecture & Urban Design Programmes Leader May 2016

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workshop abroad

bachelor of architecture

Each year the BA Workshop Abroad visits a European city, and this year took place in Rome; students from both Second Year and Third ear participated in the five day trip. Experiential learning from visiting and studying buildings and cities is a fundamental part of Architecture students’ education. Amongst the objectives of the Workshop were for the students to develop an understanding of: various historical developments of public spaces in the city of Rome, their role and links with their vicinity; the connection between interior and exterior spaces; the relationship between urban form, space and everyday use; the role of the street in the urban life of Rome as a socio-cultural phenomenon; and the design of the varying physical interventions from the making of the place to the detail of the particular. Rome proved to be a fascinating place to study, in particular because of the richness generated by a palimpsest of urban design taking place over many centuries. The trip took place early in the first term so that on return to Liverpool these multi-faceted studies of urban spaces directly informed the students’ studio project work, in which they were generating urban design proposals for a site in the city. Having conducted a detailed analysis of numerous urban squares in Rome, students were able to apply what they had learned to their project work thereby deepening their learning experiences. Highlights included: urban design interventions by Sixtus V, the Forum and the Colosseum, the Pantheon, St Peter’s Basilica, Michelangelo’s Campidoglio, Piazza del Popolo, Piazza Navona, Hadrian’s Villa, Tivoli Gardens and the MAXXI Gallery by Zaha Hadid.

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ROME Architecture 2016

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After a short period of research the MArch Workshop Abroad is the effective launch of design work in the academic year, as for both year groups of the Masters programme the city involved is a site for the semester’s work. Consequently the workshops, of about a weeks duration, have an intensity to them, as students seek to gather as much information as possible and immerse themselves in the nature of the place. Typically days are balanced between site research and visiting architectural projects of note. Hamburg was selected as a ‘second tier’ port city with similarities to Liverpool. Whilst not an established cultural destination, as with other recent workshops abroad Hamburg was found to be a city of hidden gems, surpassing expectations for many who had not previously experienced it. Architectural highlights included the Chile Haus, Elbphilharmonie, Hafen City, I A Energy Centre, and avid Chipperfield’s Empire Hotel. We were grateful to the Hamburg Planning Department for an excellent lecture they gave us and access to their city model, pictured.

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area(km ) Population unemployment rate GDP per capita

liverpool

liverpool federal city state of region hamburg 724 755 1,517,467 1,774,242 8.4% 4.6% £21,393 £39,645

hamburg


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26th January 2016 Ian Christie

Professor of Film and Media History, Birkbeck College, London

Robert Harbison Architecture critic & writer

Brian Hatton

Liverpool John Moores University

Phil Lo

Liverpool John Moores University

Richard Martin

Fellow in Culture, Media and Creative Industries, King's College, London

Robert Maxwell

Emeritus Dean of Architecture, Princeton University

Sarah Mills & Doreen Bernath Leeds Beckett University

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symposium

film s ace and architecture This symposium was organised by the Architecture Programme, primarily to extend our own students theoretical discourse, whilst also contributing to the vibrant dialogue around film which takes place in Liverpool. Why Architects Should Watch Movies Although the kinematograph is 120 years old, only recently has close attention been given to the capacity of moving pictures for spatial and architectural representation. At first this may not surprise; for, as movie images move and buildings stand still, some may suppose their relation to be limited to timelapse records of construction or shadows. ut that misses two factors that make film different from static renditions. The first is that the camera itself can move in space, and the second is that it can show the behaviour of people in time, interacting with each other and with their ambience. Moreover, fiction film can enscene actions that may expose qualities in their locations that were potential but unprojected by their designers and commissioners. We might even propose, like ernard Tschumi, that such films expose the

real significances of sites and situations. or need such exposure require dramatic shots or mise-en-scene. ‘Slow’ film can be just as revelatory. Just attending long at scenes, with but elliptic commentary, as do Patrick Keiller’s fictive documentaries, may draw awareness to significance in not just a scene but its originating background. How may architectural lessons in film be not merely noted but examined and studied? That is the question addressed in this symposium. Attention is directed not to stylish or spectacular studio-sets, nor to locations that are mere backdrops for actors, but to interactions of actors and cameras with spatial and psychological conditions offered by the set or location. Accordingly, the first part of the symposium will consider the spatial techniques of kinematography itself, in both documentary and fiction filming. In passing from documentary to fiction, attention extends to how subjectivity in the acted character, engaging with the objectivity of their site or location, may bring out in its architecture kinaesthetic qualities that only film can render.

The symposium’s latter part will pull back from close relations of camera, actor and scene to the broad and multisubjective ambit of the city. To variability of technique is added variety of topographic, architectural and social motif, seen and heard at every scale from intimate to public, from lyric to epic.

Film, Space & Architecture: Why architects should watch movies

Symposium

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Tuesday 26th January

| 2.00pm - 7.00pm

Ian Christie Professor of film and media history, Birkbeck College, London | Robert Harbison Architecture critic & writer | Brian Hatton, Liverpool John Moores University | Richard Martin Fellow in Culture, Media and Creative Industries, King’s College, London | Robert Maxwell Emeritus Dean of architecture, Princeton University | Sarah Mills & Doreen Bernath, Leeds Beckett University.

Johnson Foundation Auditorium

John Lennon Art and Design Building | 2 Duckinfield Street | Liverpool | L3 5RD

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public lectures

Daniel Libeskind Charity Lecture 2pm, Friday 23rd October 2015 John Lennon Art and Design Building Liverpool School of Art and Design

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The year started with a lecture from Daniel Libeskind, masterplan architect of the new World Trade Centre and the Jewish Museum in Berlin. This lecture was in support of the Talia Trust for Children and the Red Cross for Syrian Children. Later in the year architectural collective Assemble Studio, winners of the 2015 Turner Prize spoke, and during the year members of the collective are mentoring and teaching LJMU students in their capacity as visiting lecturers. Other highlights included author and journalist Douglas Murphy, who presented his new book ‘Last Futures: ature Technology and the End of Architecture’.


filmworks Each year the student’s Architecture Society work with staff to deliver the ‘FIlmworks’ series of screenings in our large auditorium, with each film selected for its spatial qualities. Highlights included Dziga Vertov’s ‘Man with a Movie Camera’, David Lynch’s ‘Blue Velvet’, Yasujiro Ozu’s ‘Late Spring’, Michelangelo Antonioni’s ‘Red Desert’ and Jean-Luc Godard’s ‘Le Mepris’. Culminating this series was a special screening of the new Ben Wheatley film ‘High Rise’ which was staged in partnership with Picturehouse at FACT cinema. An introductory lecture was given by Dr Christopher Duffy, whose doctoral thesis is titled ‘Heterotopic Space in Selected Works of J. G. Ballard’, and who is co-editor of the forthcoming collection of critical essays; J. G. Ballard: Landscapes of Tomorrow. His talk considered the complex synthesis of inner and outer space in High-Rise. It reflected on the way in which the technological built environment of Ballard’s ‘vertical city’ directly influences the psychology of its inhabitants by outwardly manifesting interior states of mind at individual and communal levels. Questions about the division between public/private space in the urban environment and the role of a ‘truly “free” psychopathology’ as a reaction to the conditions of contemporary existence were discussed.

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urban design exhibition The first months of the Masters programme are focussed upon urban issues, investigating the socio-economic and consequent spatial nature of places at a strategic level and as a setting for specific architectural projects. Stemming from the ‘Second Tier Cities in Europe: Why invest beyond capitals’ research published by L MU’s European Institute for Urban Affairs, our programme has in recent years looked at series of cities around Europe which share similar concerns to Liverpool. Porto, Marseille, Rotterdam and Hamburg have all been visited and Genoa is the next destination in this sequence of port cities. In this academic year we looked at edge of centre conditions in Hamburg, and equivalent conditions on Merseyside, in Birkenhead. The comparisons between the Free City of Hamburg and the emerging Liverpool City Region were particularly fruitful, and we were fortunate to receive detailed briefings from the city planning o ce and tours of the Hafen City development whilst in Hamburg. For both locations studio projects are undertaken culminating in spatial propositions for each place. These proposals are presented in a variety of media; drawing, model and film.

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The culmination of this work is a public exhibition of the student’s proposals and a lecture, which brings our work to a wider audience. In January this year we were delighted to welcome David Rudlin, of Urbed, to give a talk entitled ‘Garden Cities in the North of England?’. This was not only specifically topical to the issues of the country’s current housing crisis, but connected to much of our design studio work looking at green spaces within cities.

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northern soul

riba design charrette Our programme was instrumental in staging this year’s RIBA Northern Soul event, an annual design workshop gathering together architecture students from She eld, reston, Manchester, Huddersfield, orthumbria and Liverpool. This day-long event used Constellations in the Baltic Triangle as a studio having visited the project site, Anfield Cemetery, early in the morning. By the middle of the nineteenth century the burial grounds in town centres had become dangerously overcrowded. In 1854 Liverpool Corporation prohibited any further burials in the city centre graveyards. In 1860 a competition was held to design a cemetery in Anfield. Although this was won by Thomas . Barry, the commission was awarded to William Gay. However after he resigned the following year, the layout of the cemetery was designed by famous Victorian Landscape Architect, Edward Kemp. Building started in 1861. The layout of the cemetery is based on a system of interlocking circular and curved paths arranged around an east/west axial path running close to the centre of the site. The focus of the cemetery is a sunken

rectangular area, formerly overlooked by the three cemetery chapels, of which only one now remains. The buildings in the cemetery, including the three chapels, and the entrances and entrance lodges were designed by the Liverpool architects Lucy and Littler. Two of the original chapels and one of the lodges have been demolished the one remaining chapel, originally served the Nonconformists and formed the focal point of the brief. Within the 142 acres of the cemetery are a number of notable graves, war memorials by Lutyens and lomfield and the derelict catacombs. In recent years the cemetery structures have suffered from neglect resulting in the demolition of two of the chapels and the ruinous state of the two catacomb buildings. The ‘Friends of Anfield’ have now started, with the support of English Heritage and Liverpool City Council, a campaign to rescue the one remaining chapel and stabilize the catacombs. It was into this context of decay, stabilization and the re-interpretation of urban cemeteries that the students were asked to make their propositions. Architecture 2016

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granby workshop Granby Workshop is a new social enterprise making handmade products for homes. The workshop has grown out of the community-led rebuilding of this historic neighbourhood following years of dereliction. The workshop sells a range of products that are made in Granby. The project has been set up by the architecture collective Assemble Studio as part of their ongoing work in the area and for their contribution to the Turner Prize 2015. Throughout autumn 2015 Assemble Studio worked with the local community, including some students from our Architecture Programme and others from the LJMU School of Art & Design, to establish the workshop. For the Turner Prize Exhibition they built a showroom displaying the products of the Workshop, and Assemble Studio won the prize in December 2016. In a separate project Assemble Studio are now working with L MU in ‘virtuoso’ posts as mentors to a number of our students.

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community engagement homebaked

Homebaked, incorporated in 2012 by a group of local residents, is a co-operatively run bakery and community land trust on the boundary of Anfield and Everton, just opposite the Liverpool Football Club ground. Homebaked saved their neighbourhood bakery from demolition and now offer jobs at the living wage and training and fresh food to local people. All profits are re-invested into the neighbourhood. Their latest venture, working with the architectural practice Architectural Emporium, is to develop further parts of their high street in community ownership, offering long-term affordable housing and shops for local business and social enterprise. As part of this venture Homebaked invited Liverpool John Moores University students and local young people to a workshop entitled ‘Ingredients for a good place to live’ to generate ideas around affordable urban living, communal living with a focus on community and ‘good’ design. The lively and insightful workshop began with a walking tour led by local residents, and was followed by a site visit above the bakery, collaborative mapping exercises, animated discussion and the formulation of numerous design ideas. The evening ended with the eating of delicious Homebaked pies. This workshop and other similar projects give our students excellent experience of real project engagement, alongside contributing genuinely useful design guidance to local communities.

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Several staff in the Architecture programmes are research active, and the programmes sit within the recently established Design Research Lab – part of the ARTS Labs research centre in the School. Staff outputs in the fields of architecture and urban design inform our teaching, and are integrated into many of our studio projects. Some notable publications and highlights from the last 12 months are listed here. Dr. Stephen Bowe

invariably linked to and reciprocally folded back into design studio teaching. Recent interests (and outputs) have been related to ‘balanced asymmetry’ emerging from research into Japanese aesthetics and ‘edge phenomena’ initially influenced by Snohetta’s Opera House relating to Liverpool’s urban disposition ‘on the edge’ with all its inference geographic and political. Over the past academic year two papers for conference have been produced both related to Liverpool’s edge condition using philosophical concepts to explain this edge condition and the relevant specifics of the cities strategies and development through these concepts.

The main focus of Dr. Stephen Bowe’s research is centred on Material Culture. Over the last twenty years the two main outcomes of his research work have been produced by Liverpool University Press in 2007 (Shaker Design) and in 2015 (Mulberry Trees). At the present time, he is undertaking work on the Quakers and looking at urban dairy development with the move from Yorkshire to Liverpool at the end of the nineteenth century. This will hopefully result in Dr. Joanne Hudson an article being produced for Quaker Studies (Liverpool University Press). Concurrent work is also analysing handwriting in the context of the development of the writing pen in the twenty first century with specific reference to Alfred Dunhill. The outcome of this research will be a limited edition book. Dr. Joanne Hudson’s research is located at the intersection of Architecture, Planning and Gary Brown Geography. Her research focuses principally on the relationship between spatial planning practices and the production, (re)production and use of wastelands and derelict spaces - what she terms ‘informal spaces,’ and affordable housing design. Her current work questions how we can utilise the potential of Key research interests centre around our inter- informal spaces through the development of relationship with the urban environment, how coordinated systems of land use planning, we perceive it and reciprocally design and creative design and community capital. intervene in it. These research interests are Furthermore, her research that engages with LIBIDINAL

CIRCUITS Scenes of Urban Innovation 8-10 July 2015 Liverpool www.libidinalcircuits.com

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affordable housing seeks to investigate the relationship between community groups and designers and the potential of incremental housing as a sustainable design strategy to alleviate the growing ‘housing crisis.’ Joanne has produced publications including a journal article and book chapter. Her most recent article explored various temporalities of informal spaces and how these influenced their (re)production and use. Her book chapter explored the specific uses of these sites and structures as areas for creative activity and endeavour. Throughout summer 2016, Joanne will be exhibiting photographic work that focus on informal spaces, as part of the ‘Loitering With Intent’ exhibition at The Peoples History Museum Manchester. Dr. Robert MacDonald The publication of this book will revolutionise design for people living with dementia by using the systems suggested and working closely with those who are currently ’living well with dementia’ in its many forms and stages, this needs to be done to fully understand the intricacies of the condition.

DESIGN

for DEMENTIA

Some of the issues around living well with dementia are around the attitude of others who think we will be satisfied with a room and board and no thought of stimulation in our environment. We need a safe place with clear signage (having agreed colour and design). Remember, we are people with the needs of other people, stimulation and discussion, not just a TV or radio, although they also have a place at times. Speak to us. Ask us what we want, what we need. Please do not exclude us, you might be surprised. For example, I was a member of a design team at a large children’s hospital before my diagnosis and I have retained many of those skills. We are very lucky in this generation to be given the support and medication to ’living well with dementia’. It is not yet available to all and is a start on the road, so take advantage of listening to us and learning from us because we can help you to have a better future by designing suitable buildings, communities and care so that your futures are safer and more fun. If there is one thing that bonds us all together, whatever our condition, it is that we can still have fun. Whether its singing songs, old and new, dressing up in our finery for a trip out, or working together to develop new technology, the fun factor is essential. I attended a ‘Sandtray’ session, unsure of what to expect and had a wonderful time. I could have stayed all day. It’s important to remember that sometimes the simplest pleasures are the best and can be the most creative. Regina Shaw Co-Chair of the Service Users Reference Forum (SURF)

Dr. Robert MacDonald’s research concerns architecture and mental well-being, including the design of The Dementia Home and Neighbourhood with The HL Partnership and Building Research Establishment (BRE). He has published books, including Design for Dementia (two volumes) and The Environment in Dementia Care, and wrote the Foreword to Design for a Complex World. His essay The City as a Laboratory of Shadows was published

in Architecture, Media, Politics and Society (AMPS) and Libidinal Circuits Scenes of Urban Innovation was presented at IASCC including an online web cast via FACT. Rob’s current research includes the design of The Dementia Home and Neighbourhood with The HL Partnership and BRE. He has had papers accepted for “Voices of Madness” University of Huddersfield Humanities Conference, The Jungian Sand Tray at Birmingham City University, Well-Being Conference 2016 and will chair The International NHS Exposition about Design for Dementia at Manchester Central; Rob is also organising the “Autism, Art and Architecture Symposium”. In 2015 Rob was very honoured to bring Professor Daniel Libeskind to Liverpool to deliver a major Charity Lecture in aid of children in Syria and Israel. Rob generates substantial research income, and is a Design Champion for The NHS Trust, Ambassador For Conferences. He was presented with “The Roscoe Citizenship Award” by Lord David Alton and Professor Nigel Weatherill, VC, LJMU. Dr. Aliki-Myrto Perysinaki évolution du paysage urbain parisien au prisme des risques climatiques École Nationale Supérieure d’Architecture de Paris-La Villette 144, avenue de Flandre 75019 Paris _ amphithéâtre 11 4 et 5 février 2016 _ 8:30-18:30

PARIS SMART CITY 2050 par VINCENT CALLEBAUT ARCHITECTURES

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CADASTRE SOLAIRE DE PARIS, MAIRIE DE PARIS, CAP GEO, 2015

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CAMPAGNE «VIVRE MIEUX À PARIS» DE CHRISTOPHE NAJDOVSKI, 2014

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PARIS SOUS LES EAUX : LA GRANDE CRUE DE 1910, LE QUAI DE GRENELLE, 1910

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Dr. Aliki-Myrto Perysinaki’s research deals with the influence of sustainable development on the architectural design process. Focusing on


research exemplar practices, building regulations and policies, she develops a critical understanding of architecture - as process and profession - through what she defines as ‘Complexity’. Her current work examines the transformation of urbanscapes due to climatic change, the impact of devolution in spatial planning (Northern Powerhouse) and the potential of alternative housing typologies (incremental housing) to provide affordable design. By dealing with different scales, Aliki’s research aspires to observe the evolving character of the architectural profession in leading intradisciplinary conception and negotiation through a project’s process. During the last academic year, Aliki has coorganised a conference in Paris which following on from the 21st Climate Conference (COP21) was focusing on the impact of environmental risks on the mutation of cities. Working with the research laboratory AMP UMR LAVUE CNRS, she is co-directing the publication “Urban landscapes and climatic risks” with Dr. Yann Nussaume and Dr. Olivier Jeudy. Aliki is member of the Scientific Committee of the Architectural Science Association working for the 2015 Conference conducted at the University of Melbourne and the 2016 Conference which will be held at the University of Adelaide in December 2016. Aliki was recently awarded with the Prize for Research and PhD in Architecture (Prix de la Recherche et de la Thèse de Doctorat en architecture), awarded by the Academy of Architecture (Académie d’Architecture) in France.

Dr. Charlie Smith

The principal areas of Dr. Charlie Smith’s research are: pedagogy in creative disciplines, the architecture of libraries in a digital age, and housing design. His current work is also pioneering approaches in which teaching drives research and which have student project work at the core of their methodology. He argues that such approaches can explore deeper meanings signified by the body of work within wider contexts of real-world problems.

Dr. Simon Tucker

Dr. Simon Tucker’s research interests focus around modelling the environmental and sustainable performance of buildings and the formulation of user-oriented design methods. Recent work includes the application of design patterns and pattern language to low energy buildings, user experience and building simulation software, low environmental impact housing design, building design and climate change, properties of ecological building materials, and virtual learning environments for Over the last twelve months he has produced a environmental design. number of publications, including proceedings, papers and book chapters. In the field of His current research explores aspects of learning and teaching he has published Human-Computer Interaction and User two papers, one discussing self-directed Experience in relation to Building Simulation. learning pedagogies, and one focusing on the During 2015-2016 he has authored / coaforementioned teaching-informed research authored five journal papers on the topics methods. He has published a paper and a of simulation software design and on book chapter on libraries, which discuss how environmental building materials. One of these digitisation and new programmatic challenges was awarded ‘Best Scientific Paper’ of 2014are affecting these civic and cultural landmarks. 2015 by the Journal of Building Performance Another book chapter explored the apparently Simulation. The work examines how the use conflicting priorities of space, affordability and of environmental simulation software can be sustainability in new housing design, arguing made more suitable for integration into design that by thinking creatively it is possible to make processes, and makes use of Christopher advances in each separate area to mutual Alexander’s design patterns. The aim is that advantage. He was awarded ‘Outstanding simulation software (lighting and thermal) can Paper’ in the 2015 Emerald Literati Network be made far easier to use and therefore can Awards for Excellence. assist better in creating low energy buildings.

Dominic Wilkinson

Dominic Wilkinson’s research has included the study Eighteen English Towns Revisited: a review of the impact of 30 years of development upon Alec Clifton-Taylor’s series of English market towns. Between 1977 and 1984 the architectural historian, Alec CliftonTaylor, produced three television series for the BBC about the architecture of English market towns. The subsequent series of books covered the same towns in three volumes; Six English Towns, Another Six English Towns and Six More English Towns. The research paper presented at the 2nd International Changing Cities conference in Greece (June 2015) explored the impact of the thirty years of development upon the spatial and physical form of these towns. The market towns were originally selected for the historical interest of their, generally modest, architectural and urban form, a form which had been subject to only limited intervention by modern development. Examining changes in the urban morphology of each town, the paper illustrated how, despite planning policies protecting the historic cores and significant buildings, in a large number of examples, the fundamental nature of the place has been radically altered.

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The BA(Hons) programme is thoughtfully balanced to address the creative and technical demands of the profession. Taught principally through a studio environment that is seamlessly underpinned and informed by lectures and workshops, addressing architectural design theory, practice issues, and structural and environmental building technologies. The over-arching ambition of the programme is to create graduates with artistic flair, and who are technically skilled and grounded in the demands of the professional role of the architect. The learning and teaching environment is progressively informed by pedagogic research in the creative field. While teaching the curriculum, the programme also develops less tangible skills in students, such as communication, presentation and self-motivation. A key ambition is to create independent thinkers, adept at resolving problems with creativity and originality. A broad educational experience is offered within which students can develop diverse, rigorous and creative approaches to design issues that explore and test appropriate resolutions in relation to contemporary and anticipated contexts. Design projects form the backbone of the core teaching strategy. These projects are seen as primers to a divergent creative and critical thought process. They are characterised by individual interpretation and interest of the subjects that encourage imaginative solutions through discursive studio forums. As students progress through the Degree, the design projects gradually become larger in scale, more complex and ambitious in their intentions and integrative in their nature. At Degree level, predominantly, the city of Liverpool is used as a contextual laboratory to test concepts that have a local flavour with global implications. A Staff Gary Brown Ed Butler Mark Doyle Joanne Hudson Caspar Jones Philip Lo Robert MacDonald Anthony Malone Gladys Masey Athanassios Migos Mike Ollis Aliki-Myrto Perysinaki Charlie Smith Simon Tucker 18

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first year

The First Year Programme endeavours to introduce to the student the fundamental skills necessary to engage in their architectural education whilst simultaneously exploring the year’s thematic objectives: Light, Space and Form. This ambition is explored in the first semester through the Anatomy of Buildings, a project that examines seminal architectural paradigms, and Archifilm, an exploration through model-making that provokes students to creatively think, make and record spatial and architectural settings. The second semester focuses on the investigation of a craft and its translation from programme to poetic interpretation in the Place for Crafting project. In order to nurture haptic representational and exploratory capabilities, students are encouraged to learn, practise and conduct hand-drawing and physical model-making as a necessary means to immerse themselves in the design process. A number of dedicated Studio Workshops run in parallel to studio tutorials to instil this ambition. Architecture 2016

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semester one

the anatomy of a building

archifilm

In The Anatomy of a Building, students conduct their studies in small groups and conclude with work that demonstrates their research, analysis and understanding of their building. There is an expectation that compositional and theoretical stances derived from their studies are presented as part of their enquiry. In Archifilm, students are asked to generate models to devise three spatial settings: Landscape, Abstract and Architectural. The interpretation of these various themes motivated students to explore space as an inhabited (space making) domain with the aid of photography and filmmaking techniques.

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1. Amber Whetter 2. Ellie Cox 3, 4. Stephanie Ralph 5. Leah Ainsworth 6. Kim Astin 7. Matthew Quinlan 7

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5 1. Jacob Walker 2. Emily Karras 3. Stephanie Ralph 4, 5. Brad Chick 6. Harry Jones 6

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1, 4. Vidal Jackson 2. Almagul Inkarova 3. Matthew Quinlan 5. Harry Jones 6. John Bell 7. Stephanie Ralph

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1. Koay Wen Jian 2. Matthew Quinlan 3. Jamie Boardman 4, 5. Vidal Jackson 5

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semester two a place for crafting

The single project of the second semester draws from the experiences and skills learnt from the first semester with design objectives being recapitulated more comprehensively and ambitiously. In this respect, A Place for Crafting, introduces the students to urbanity, or more precisely, the street as a typological element of the city: the interface between the public and the private, along with contextual studies. This complements the student’s research, understanding and interpretation of their own subject towards the provision for a crafting facility with a dwelling unit. The project embraces the programmatic challenges in tandem with their own poetic interpretations. It is also at this stage that students are asked to consider the act of building as an activity integral to design. Therefore, technology, construction, materiality and lighting studies are conducted with the aim to enrich space making as a conscious phenomenological enquiry.

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6 1, 2. Amber Whetter 3. Matthew Quinlan 4. Almagul Inkarova 5. Ellie Cox 6. Daniel King 7. Bartosz Durda 4 Architecture 2016

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8 1. Thomas Chong 2, 4, 5. Ellie Cox 3. Michaili Kavilli 6. Stephanie Ralph 7. Charlotte Wittingham 8. Zubair Hoque 7

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1, 4, 6, 7. Almagul Inkarova 2. Bartosz Durda 3. Max Bohl 5. Emily Karras

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second year The year is a vital stage in the transition from fundamental understandings of the subject towards a personal critical position, achieved with completion of the Degree. To enable this there is more freedom in Second Year to explore radical conceptions and challenging contexts. There are opportunities for students to be experimental and explorative in architectural design thinking, production and representation. The complexities of the city become the setting for the investigation of design ideas. The acts of researching, understanding and applying, as techniques within a design process continuum are demonstrated and practiced. Architecture 2016

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2 1. Kyle Knight, Lewis MacDonald and Anith Marzuki 2. Adam Hardman 3, 4. Anith Marzuki 5, 6. Ben Scragg

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semester one

contextual studies

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In the first semester of Second ear the city becomes a setting for the investigation of ideas in urban design. Students are introduced to principles of design at this scale through lectures, studio workshops and a study of an urban space. A site in Liverpool was given although the specific boundaries of students’ explorations were fluid and could be delineated as project work developed. Initially the students worked in small groups, which reinforces the importance of working collaboratively, firstly to research and analyse the area of investigation and then to design a masterplan for urban regeneration. Emphasis was placed on thoughtful consideration and articulation of movement through the proposed urban fabric, as mediated by streets and squares (routes and nodes). These masterplans each evolved from a conceptual idea, which was derived from the group’s interrogation of fabric and space within the city, aligned with consideration of sustainability and an understanding of permeability and relationships between public and private realms. Each group sought to present a coherent vision for a revitalised fabric of streets and squares, and the massing of the built form that defines them, based on a clear thematic principle. These masterplans provided the framework and context for the second stage of the design work, in which each student chose an urban space within the masterplan to develop at a larger scale. These designs considered ways in which such an urban space can become a place of activity and intervention. Students were encouraged to consider how their design proposals would be experienced by those who might occupy them through eye-level studies and proposals for how people will meaningfully occupy that place over time. Architecture 2016

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semester two

experimentations

The second semester of Second Year is a period in which students are encouraged to make experimental architectural investigations. They are given the opportunity to be more explorative in their design thinking, process, production and representation. The studio tutors each offered a different project brief, and the students could choose their preferred options. These briefs are seen very much as starting points, and students are actively encouraged to creatively interpret them when defining their project’s trajectory, potentially transgressing the boundaries of architecture and venturing into other disciplines and fields. Each studio project group devised and established their challenges and objectives for research, interpretation, developmental studies and potential design responses. There were six units in total: Repetition and ifference, Flow-Investigations, Earth Interpretations, Architecture in Flux, Turing’s Library, and Migration and Design.

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i ion n i n edges, thresholds and folds of folds; Repetition and difference have been termed the basis for all experiential phenomena. The landscape could be viewed through a similar approach as labyrinthine experiential repetitive rhythms identified through differentials. Our landscape as city is a reflection of our ontology consisting of fluxes and flows that are continually folded into each other. This project anticipated an exploration of the nth potential of spatial permutations, meaning that all things are possible. It anticipated an emphasis on processes as the production of serial things. It anticipated an emphasis on processes as an exploration of folding (that develops edges and thresholds) perceptually and conceptually through models that are both real and virtual. There was a series of abstract explorations to initiate the project which constituted creative processes as formal play. Methodologies of testing the potential usefulness of particular selected spatial formats were researched and developed. The selected spatial formulations were developed into tectonic forms through these methodologies. Processes were considered as multiplicities i.e. interrelated assemblage’s within which the diverse strategies of their components were respected. Tutor: Gary Brown

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1, 2. Alice Jones 3. Anith Marzuki 4. Myfyr Jones-Evans 5. Rachel English

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turing’s library Are libraries needed when a world of information can be held in the palm of a hand?

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1. Ed Stangoe 2. Marta Weglarowicz 3. Yusuf-Samet Aydin 4. Sasha Nakiende

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Just as debate over print versus digital is not about content but the significance of books and what they symbolise, debate over libraries is about their role and significance within our civic fabric: as both cultural landmarks and an internal extension of the streets, squares, parks and playgrounds that constitute urban environments. Turing’s Library questions the idea of a library in the 21st century, exploring the theoretical boundaries of a building type straddled between digital and civic space. Tutor: Charlie Smith

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earth interpretations This project explored design opportunities latent in the geological collection held at the Liverpool Picton Museum. By observing, analysing and interpreting origins of form, function and structure; solid and void relations and hidden geometries; unexplored juxtapositions can be unravelled. y these influences and in a process of interpretation and layering, the project used active dialogue to initiate an approach to designing space in architecture. Tutor: Gladys Masey

1. Ben Scragg 2. Faisal Alhaek Naji 3. Aamir Patel 4. Adam Williams 5. Andrew Lai

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migration and design 2

Migration is a phenomenon occurring in both the natural world and in human societies. Migration and Design considered selected aspects of migration including permanence and transience, place and dwelling, and migration as journey. Students explored examples, processes and patterns of migration in order to discover connections and symbiotic relationships between design and the natural world and to inform ‘design for future migrations’. Tutor: Simon Tucker

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1, 2. Kyle Knight 3. Sam Potter 4. Luke Chan 5. Joshua Adejumo

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In the flow of contemporary spatial design – the environment is a forcefield of transformations. This project explored a few approaches to recognising this and describing flows of change as partnerships between human processes of movement, dwelling and built space. The work included an application of Integral Method, a consideration of varying modes of space generation and first hand anthropological techni ues including moving image capture.

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1. Luke Greenhaigh 2, 3. Eva Szelast 4. Cameron Cockbain 5. Olivia Marshall

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“For the nomad, “home” cannot be understood except in terms of journey, just as space is defined by movement”. Prussin Labelle, African Nomadic Architecture: Space, Place and Gender, Washington, 1995: 40.

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This exercise proposed to generate a network of ephemeral projects that in turn create an ephemeral set of forces in the city. The aim was to challenge static, permanent and solitary ways of thinking about architecture and try instead to invent ways allowing anticipation of the increasingly mobile nature of contemporary life. Imagining the relationship that people have to their built environment when these are inhabited by ephemeral structures, students were encouraged to think of these small-scale projects as radicant organisms that grow up in the forgotten / unnoticed parts of the city. 2

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Tutor: Aliki-Myrto Perysinaki

1. Emma Fitzpatrick 2. Harry Williams 3. Adam Hardman 4. s fia Fridrih

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third year Architecture is conceived of as emerging from and responding to a context of contemporary cultural and environmental programmatic issues. The generic aim of the year is the synthesis of these diverse programmatic elements into a holistic experiential matrix. The year is split by two projects in which this integrated, holistic aim is emphasised. The initial project is a small but reasonably complex project undertaken over a ten week period as preparation for the major Comprehensive Design Project project which takes up the remainder of the academic year.

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The introductory project briefing primer was generic to the year. Students were expected to develop critical positions and conceptual propositions in relation to this in assigned tutor groups. This year’s project adopted the TRADA (Timber Research and Development Association) 2016 competition brief on a local site. The competition was for a flagship building for the Sylva Foundation referred to as the Arboreal Building. The Sylva Foundation are a charity who care for our forests as natural habitats and home grown natural resourses. Sylva wish to promote resilient and productive forest resource ‘omics’ and a thriving bio-economy and wish to commission a flagship building (Arboreal) promoting these aims. The building design was to be conceived as an exemplar of timber construction, sustainable sourcing and long term sustainability.

project site

project site

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The year also has the obvious vocational aim of equipping students with the skills and knowledge to practice architecture in a creative manner. Direct knowledge and influence from the context is seen as an educational advantage, consequently the site was in Formby within the National Trust coastal site. The competition was supported by lectures and workshops by L MU staff and further enabled by case studies on the TRADA website and lectures from invited TRADA experts.


semester one formby trada

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1 Facade made out of an injection moulded plastic call Krion. it is white and translucent in aperance and will reveal the wooden structure underneath

the structure is made from Glue Laminated Syprus trees, a comon and pletiful timbir used in engenired timbir construction

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1-4. Asher Bourne 5-7. Jake Chesworth 8, 9. Abbie Gilman

the light towers are made from glulam beams, with aluminium fins acing as light shelves or blineds to bring in or rflect more light.

the wooden structure is clad in pine wood slats to be enceeping with the trees of the surounding area.

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Section A-A 1:100 Abbie Gilman

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The final project is termed the Comprehensive Design Project (CDP). This aptly describes its objectives ‘to pursue a design project proposal that is comprehensively researched, developed and resolved in a holistic manner through the presentation drawings and models.’ The is an option project and briefing primers are presented by design tutors as directional aids. Students select one of these to pursue whilst developing their own ‘uni ue design character’. esign drives the project and supporting studies such as history and theory, technology and practice and materiality and detailing integrate and synthesise with, and have outcomes from, the design process. Studio work with one to one tutorials and regular reviews underpin the project. The four primers and examples of project work are presented in the following pages. 58

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comprehensive design project

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spaces of spectacle The aim of the project was to develop gravitational centre’s or fields that amend our experience of particular popular culture aspects through the design of spaces of spectacle to support the consumption and dissemination of events and exhibitions. This was based on the premise that real and reproduction have tended to fold themselves into each other such that what is unique disappears through the process of reproduction. The aim of the project was to utilise designed spaces to realign real and reproductive processes in a mutually beneficial strategy where there is an enhancing of one by the other in a cyclical manner generating unique experiences from both to generate a dense architectural experience capable of adapting to rapidly changing social conditions. Areas of interest related to popular cultural events were initially proposed as sport, film, fashion, music, literature, art, which were to be utilised singularly or in any combination to produce a revised experiential urban typology as cityscape. Tutor: Gary Brown

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Megan Adamczyk The Core of Creativity and Life

Elizabeth Anderson The Fashion Playhouse

Joe Barlow Flux-Auditorium

George Coleman The Void

Ollie ri ths The Flux

Dan Hales The Blues Quarter

Mabon Jones The Landing Stage

Jack Manners San Per Aquam

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James Taylor Proliferation

INTERIOR VISUALISATION

Music Listening Library


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1. Jack Manners 2. Megan Adamczyk 3. George Coleman 4, 5, 6. Mabon Jones 7, 8, 9. Ollie Griffiths 10, 11. James Taylor 42

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impermanent active urban landscapes Architecture is commonly viewed as permanent, aspiring to the status of ‘monument.’ For much of the opening decades of the 2000s, architecture was about statement building - it’s raison d’être to make a lasting impression, create an icon and contribute to the impression of a cities status as ‘global.’ Architecture has always been synonymous with permanence, but should it be? Cities evolve constantly, mutating as a consequence of cycles of accumulation and dissemination, inextricably linked to changing economic, social and cultural processes. The spatial manifestations of these factors are made visible as cities’ constituent parts physically outgrow imposed boundaries, or conversely shrink back from these as fragments decline. As a discipline architecture falls short of addressing these notions, shouldn’t we be better at responding to the innate potency of the impermanent? Architecture could be reusable, recyclable and sustainable, implementing current technologies faster, whilst still succeeding in creating a sense of place. Rethought in this way, architecture could better address numerous recurrent problems, including those of urban dereliction and abandonment which continue to perplex planners, architects, communities, academics and those urban elites responsible for managing and selling the city to a global audience. Tutor: Joanne Hudson 64

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Dan Dalby A Space for Expression

Robert Gibson Tempus Framian

April Gundry The Weave

Jacob Martin Evolve Creatively

Oliver Moran The Frameworks

Ben Pond The Beach: A Musical World

Chris Rooney The Edge

Bracken Roots Dancing with the Edge

James Soeno Tabula Rasa

Lewys Taylor People Feed the People

Dylan Thompson Gridiron Gym and Endurance Centre Landscapes


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project X the last resort Between the land, the river and the sea. The Last Resort is a location, a book and photographic collection, a seaside locality down on its heels and a shadow of its former self. Students were invited to design a new photographic and media gallery on a pier with a tower. The context; A Camera Obscura, Latin for dark room, is an optical device that led to photography and the photographic camera. The pier is a spacial promenade that enables people to extend their reach over the sea or river. A gallery is an exhibition space designed to exhibit photographs or visual information. The tower is a vertical part of the programme and function. You are an Eye; id iga ertov anticipate the ‘selfie’ in 1923? Tutor: Robert MacDonald

image; Raymond Farley, 2016

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Halim Rahman The Avant-Garde Pier

Jake Chesworth The Landscape of Choice

Aimee Cornelius New Brighton Nirvana

Dave Cross Educational Centre for Wild Flowers

Abbie Gilman Connect • Create • Care

Ben Jackson Between the Heavens and the Deep Blue Sea

Niall Jones The Crying Earth, The Weeping Shores

Harry Sutch The Urban Sports Centre

Akeem Taylor Destination: Safe Space

Nicole Wiggins Equi-Day

“I’m an eye. A mechanical eye. I, the machine, show you a world only I can see it. I free myself for today and forever from human immobility. I’m in constant movement. I approach and pull away from objects. I creep under them. I move alongside a running horse’s mouth. I fall and rise with the failing and rising body. This is I, the machine, manoeuvring in the chaotic movements, recording one movement after another in the most complex combinations.” Dziga Vertov


1 1, 2, 3. Jake Chesworth 4. Abbie Gilman

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pattern and place making We live in a universe of patterns… However, traditionally the pattern maker, is the craftperson who makes the design. Pattern is the culmination of design, it is the object from which the mould is made. All castings in an engine would have been made from a pattern. In this project the intention was to experiment and explore with an architecture that investigates pattern in all its translations and transpositions. In either sense of the word. Looking at materials and ultra materials, effected by the creative possibilities of pattern in forming, casting, Ureprocessing R E and recycling.

HOOL OF ART AND DESIGN

Asher Bourne The Genesis of the Third Culture

Sam Buckley Inducing The Cure

Luke Chandler Anthropocene Architecture

Callum Cherry A Posse Ad Esse

Jessica Hughes The Sequential Extinction

Farah Mior Abu Tahrin Cicatrizing Wounded Buildings

Rory Moss Orbis Aedes

Sharon Sarpong The Plastic Age: State of Inceptum

Aadil Khan Sharoni

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Tutor: Gladys Masey

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‘The insistence that every individual holds the promise of a new beginning, that to act means to be able to seize an initiative and do the unanticipated’ Jürgen Habermas on Hanna Arendt’s Theory of Action

image; Bedrich Grunzweig

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PATTERN


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The MArch programme focuses on sustained scholarly activity underpinned by the research interests of staff engaged in the strategic theme of Urbanism and concerned with identifying the value of design thinking and practice in new urban contexts. It addresses questions around dwelling, health and well-being and public space, in a range of contexts, driven by an ambition to produce visionary strategies for sustainable urban futures. To this end the first year of the programme introduces the students to contemporary urban design theories and practice. Locating project work within Merseyside and abroad, students are encouraged to engage with cultural organisations, regional stakeholders and statutory authorities with the aim of producing creative, socio-economically engaged architectural proposals. Students then follow strands of enquiry around theme of dwelling in the city. Alongside this each student undertakes a yearlong Specialist Study as the basis for individual research proposals that aim to nourish their endeavours in the final year. The final year of the MArch offers opportunities for more in depth explorations emanating from group urban studies. Programmatic ambitions for comprehensive building design projects evolve from a thorough analytical and intuitive response to place. Our students address realistic scenarios and engage with a range of collaborators in their project work. At times they work with students in related disciplines from the School of the Built Environment and a wide range of external advisors and guest critics from professional practice. We host symposia and conferences to inspire and nourish their studies. At Masters level project work is often located outside of the UK, addressing global issues with reference to international best practice. MArch Staff Stephen Bowe Mark Doyle Brian Hatton Phil Lo Aliki-Myrto Perysinaki Jamie Scott Dominic Wilkinson Ian Wroot

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master of architecture

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joint project

Ocean Gateway – more than 50 projects over 50 years with £50 billion of investment – is The Peel Group’s vision for the renaissance of the strategic corridor encompassing Manchester, Liverpool and adjacent areas within Cheshire and Warrington. The focus is on the regeneration of land and assets fronting the Manchester Ship Canal and the River Mersey.

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Ocean Gateway projects embrace ports; logistics; retail and leisure; residential; commercial development; media infrastructure and renewable energy. Signature schemes include Liverpool Waters; Liverpool2; Wirral Waters; MediaCityUK, Manchester; Port Salford; Liverpool John Lennon Airport and the planned expansion of Scout Moor wind farm in Lancashire.

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Ocean Gateway – more than 50 projects over 50 years with £50 billion of investment – is Other benefits Ocean Gatewayvision include the creation The PeelofGroup’s for the renaissance of environmental assets such as Speke Garston and wind turbines at the Portencompassing of ofCoastal theReserve strategic corridor Liverpool. Manchester, Liverpool and adjacent areas An independent review of the first five years of Ocean Gateway reveals that it has delivered £2 billion of within Cheshire andover Warrington. The focus We were pleased to work with the Peel Group on this project which private investment and thousands of new jobs.* isTheon the regeneration of land and assets exposes our students to the strains of a multidisciplinary, ‘live’ report concludes that more than £1 billion Projects of investment by The Peel Group since 2008 has fronting Manchester Ship Canal56and the project scenario. Working in teams of students from other LJMUthe leveraged an additional £1 billion of other private sector investment. River Mersey. programmes including Quantity Surveying, Real Estate Management

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Agricultural Land Holdings Arndale Centre Arpley Meadows Barton Renewable Energy Bridgewater Way 1.2M, Ellesmere Port Cammell Laird City Airport Manchester Cornbrook & Pomona Eastbank Residential Scheme Eastham Biofuels Ellesmere Quays EventCity

*Source: AMION Consulting

Ocean Gateway is Peel’s contribution to the wider and Construction Management amongst others, our Masters students Atlantic Gateway public-private partnership. A total of 16 Ocean Gateway projects are part of the Atlantic presented proposals for development at Wirral Waters FourOcean Bridges, Gateway Gateway growth plan. projects embrace ports; logistics; around the new Wirral Met College. Richard Mawdsley, Director retail andof leisure; residential; commercial development; Development for Wirral Waters and Ian Parkinson, Urban Designer for www.oceangateway.co.uk media infrastructure and renewable energy. Signature schemes Peel, briefed our students and were members of the review panel, andinclude Liverpool Waters; Liverpool2; Wirral Waters; MediaCityUK, Manchester; Port Salford; we are grateful to them for their support.

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Frodsham Wind Farm 23 Garrett Hall Haydock Park Hulton Estate Ince Biomass Energy Plant Ince Resource Recovery 53 Park Liverpool2 Liverpool International 54 Business Park Birkenhead Liverpool John Lennon Airport7 Liverpool Waters Ship Canal Container Shuttle MediaCityUK Mersey Tidal Power Mersey Wind Farms

Liverpool 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42.

Partington Village Pemberton Mixed Use Pioneer Business Park Port Cheshire Liverpool World Cargo Port Salford Port Warrington Port Wirral Rossfield Park Runcorn Waterfront Saica Paper Mill Salford City Stadium Salford Quays Salford West Residential Scout Moor Wind Farm Expansion

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Liverpool John Lennon Airport and the planned expansion of Scout Moor wind farm in Lancashire.

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South of Hindley Garston Coastal Reserve St. George’s and Castlefield City Stadium Retail & Leisure Switch Island Trafford Centre and Barton Square Trafford Quays Trafford Rectangle & Sports Village Warrington Quays Western Gateway Infrastructure Scheme Wirral Waters Woodside Woolston Deposit Ground Worsley New Hall

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Other benefits of Ocean Gateway include the creation of environmental assets such as Speke Garston Coastal Reserve and wind turbines at the Port of Liverpool.

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An independent review of the first five years of Ocean Gateway reveals that it has delivered over £2 billion of private investment and thousands of new jobs.* The report concludes that more than £1 billion of investment by The Peel Group since 2008 has leveraged an additional £1 billion of other private sector investment.

Liverpool John Moores University

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Ocean Gateway is Peel’s contribution to the wider Atlantic Gateway public-private partnership. A total of 16 Ocean Gateway projects are part of the Atlantic Gateway growth plan.

56 Projects 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

Agricultural Land Holdings Arndale Centre Arpley Meadows Barton Renewable Energy Bridgewater Way 1.2M, Ellesmere Port Cammell Laird City Airport Manchester Cornbrook & Pomona Eastbank Residential Scheme Eastham Biofuels Ellesmere Quays

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Frodsham Wind Farm Garrett Hall Haydock Park Hulton Estate Ince Biomass Energy Plant Ince Resource Recovery Park Liverpool2 Liverpool International Business Park Liverpool John Lennon Airport Liverpool Waters Ship Canal Container Shuttle MediaCityUK Mersey Tidal Power

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Central Hydraulic Tower, Four Bridges, centre of the project proposals


specialist study Emily Green The Everyman Today The Specialist Study this year provided a number of interesting and well - constructed pieces of illustrated work. A particular aspect of the study which is highlighted in the summary text is the wide variety of topics and different approaches. This ranged from the Everyman Theatre, Church Architecture to Sustainable Design. A further feature of the work was the balance achieved between primary and secondary material which included exhibitions, site visits, interviews and archival work.

‘The new Everyman is built on the very best of what’s gone before. Its reincarnation now makes it possible for us to create more opportunities, nurture new talent and ideas, and keep our eyes firmly on the future.’ (Everyman & Playhouse, 2014). Winning the RIBA Stirling Prize in 2014, the Everyman Theatre stands proudly on Hope Street in Liverpool. Haworth Tompkins designed the new build theatre erected in 2013 and this was their first ‘new build’ theatre. Over all, the cost of construction was approximately £13.4 million and took 3 years to rebuild. This study looked at the life of the Everyman Theatre and the Everyman Theatre Company. It explored the aims and values of the Company and how it tried to deliever these with the architecture of their new building.

Andrew Jarman A Critical Analysis of Exemplary Selfbuild Projects: Propositions for More Sustainable Housing Self-building was once the most prominent method of housing globally, and still remains so in certain parts of the world. Despite this it has been a marginal method of housing in the UK for most of the last century, with control of the British housing market lying firmly in the hands of developers. In recent years however, following the success of do-it-yourself programs such as Grand Designs, there has been a steady revival of self-building. Whilst this has been occurring, housing has had to try and deal with the added universal problem of tackling climate change. The construction industry is one of the biggest contributors to carbon emissions and also produces vast amounts of waste. As climate change has come to the forefront of international policy the world over, it is no surprise that sustainability is now on the agenda for every building commissioned. With the need to house growing populations ever present, it is now more important than ever for the housing market to take significant steps to reduce its impact on the environment and to lead the way in sustainable construction. One way it might do this is by learning from exemplary selfbuilds that are often shown to be more sustainable homes. The purpose of this study, through a critical analysis of techniques and methods used in three award winning Case Studies, is to explore the advancement of sustainable housing design as it is presented in self-building. The Case Studies discussed are all examples of individual selfbuild, whereby individuals have played a significant part in the design and construction of the project. After comparing and contrasting the Case Studies in the context of contemporary issues, the study concludes with a set of propositions for more sustainable housing. The propositions have been derived from the techniques and methods that have been examined in the Case Studies, and are suggestive of ways by which massproduced housing can not only be more sustainable, but can also provide better homes for the masses.

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3 William Morris photograph taken circa 1870

12 INTRODUCTION

Matt Kerrod Examining the Modern Church - Roman Catholic Architecture in the North West

Scott Stamper A Study of the Japanese Tearoom and Associated Garden

Jonathan Tinsley William Morris & The Folly of The Wretched System

Over the last century or so, Roman Catholic Church architecture has undergone a period of transformation and modernisation not usually associated with such a traditionalist body. This came about through the acceptance of the Modernist Movement and through radical calls for liturgical development. This period of aggiornamento (bring up to date) culminated in the Second Vatican Council, where this liturgical reform was codified into Papal law.

The essence of tea culture in Japan breaks the boundaries between internal and external space. It is this notion which encouraged an analysis of the practice of the Japanese tea ceremony. The rituals and activities associated with the ceremony have great impact upon the design of the space where it is practiced, along with the garden spaces associated with it. With the process of events directly influencing the design of the internal space, a highly considered external journey aims to create separation and prepare a person’s mentality, in order for a more immersive experience. This innovative approach to spatial design can openly translate into an architectural stimulus, where both the internal events and approach to a space, can inform and enhance an individual’s experience of the space. Essentially the transition between external and internal space becomes a focus of attention, rather than being overlooked.

The aim of this study was to develop an understanding of the vital role that William Morris played in the formation of both the Garden City and Arts and Crafts movements, and to plot those influences through people, places, architecture and urban design, with Morris as the constant.

During this period, Church architecture began to reflect the liturgical developments of the time, affecting the design of new churches and modification of existing ones. This study seeks to examine how the design of Roman Catholic architecture changed throughout the 20th Century. The study moves on to discuss what the future of Church Architecture might be and, more importantly, what role does this future architecture hold in the modern, and increasingly secularised, society? The scope has been limited to the North West of England with particular focus on Birkenhead and Liverpool. Case Studies have been chosen that reflect important events of both Liverpool and the wider Catholic religion. St Werburgh, Birkenhead is the oldest Catholic building on the Wirral and was built at a time when Catholics still feared persecution; Velarde’s St Monica, Bootle was built in the inter-war period and reflects an attempt at building on tradition; the Metropolitan Cathedral, Liverpool, originally designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens, being decidedly Romanesque, is a stark contrast to Sir Frederick Gibberd’s modern form that was built in the 1960s; and finally, St Marys, Leyland, built just after the announcement of Sir Frederick Gibberd’s winning proposal for the Cathedral, is a study of modern church design using modern building techniques.

The study was carried out referencing the significant body of existing literary material, and with the recent Anarchy & Beauty Exhibition at London’s National Portrait Gallery acting as the foundation on which the study was built. Other sources of primary research included visits to existing settlements inspired by garden city ideologies and having ‘Garden City’ status. The ideals of Morris, inspired by those of John Ruskin, were forged through an innate understanding of his surroundings and have influenced a great number of people in society, most notably Ebenezer Howard – the father of the Garden City movement. The influence of Morris’ thinking casts an intricate web of connections right up to the present day. They are now so ingrained in the modern mind that few people actually realise where they originated. They form not only a part of our culture, which in turn forms our conscience and our political and social agendas, but our ability to comprehend and condition ourselves to other cultures and schools of thought. If the evolution of man’s thinking could be plotted as in The Origin of the Species, then William Morris would be the missing link between the ignorant and the enlightened.

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housing

building design The Master of Architecture programme has established a long-term engagement with the architecture of housing, through both research and project work. It has long since been identified that there is a crippling housing crisis in the UK. However, despite widespread recognition of the problem, solutions to this complex web of issues – which include affordability, shortage, supply, design and sustainability – remain scarce. The alignment of student research and projects to highly contentious, real-world challenges is deliberate, as shortly these students will be practicing within that context. When environmental concerns are added to the crisis of availability and affordability of homes in the UK, it can be argued that the current models of new housing delivery (including design) are not fit for purpose. These issues in contemporary housing form the basis for the principal building design project of the second semester for the MArch. The political context of this critical aspect of the built environment forms the backdrop for consideration of how to address the interwoven pressures and demands in providing for the residential needs of future generations. The cohort was divided into four groups, which then explored these issues across a diverse range of scales, densities, contexts, typologies and narratives. Common themes wove through the projects, however, such as sustainability and the principal design issues faced by the profession in meeting the challenges posed by Britain’s chronic housing shortage. The six week design project is supplemented with carbon studies, interior design and technology components, culminating in the production of a detailed physical model. Architecture 2016

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site and brief Everton Park has borne the brunt of much of the City of Liverpool’s twentieth century housing policy. In the 1960s large amounts of terraced housing were cleared, creating the park from previously dense townscape. Occupants were relocated to New Towns outside the city, or in towers and slab blocks built in the local vicinity. With few exceptions most of these local projects failed and were demolished, leaving large tracks of green space in and around the new, rather poorly defined, park.

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The design project took a range of defined sites at the southern end of the park and asked for large scale housing proposals. The homes created were to be a mixture of two-, three- and four-bedroom.

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desirable and dense socia(b)l(e) housing

definition

Compared to their continental equivalents English cities have seldom succeeded in developing popular dense urban housing typologies, and consequently rarely exhibit the urbane qualities of the typical European city. England’s previous engagement with social housing – the main form of housing in England to ever be built at high density – primarily occurred between 1945 and 1980. For numerous reasons this period of development created many failed projects, of short lifespan, and widely disliked by society.

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However there are exceptions that disprove the idea that dense housing never succeeds in England, with notable and popular developments from each decade of the last century working effectively at many different scales and contexts around the country. Critical evaluation of these successful precedents was the point of departure for this project; one commonality between all these successful housing developments is the quality of their architectural design, with their concern to create good places for people to live. Tutor: Jamie Scott

1. Shao Qian Chan 2. Ryan Blair 3, 4. Amirah Tengku Johari

4 Architecture 2016

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The Panoramic Fringe: Reinstating Everton’s Community Harry Foster

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Behind the Façade Lauren O’Donnell

Architecture 2016

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1 site and brief The site was in Toxteth, opposite the park in St James Place and close to Upper Parliament Street. The selection of this site was based on the current land ownership, location and development potential. The scenario considered that residents were part of a cooperative able to coordinate the integration of different phases of land and housing production. The first phase centred on the basic housing nucleus, single story units. The second phase included the design of preapproved, rationalised housing prototypes, together with instructions for execution (in order to support self-builders during incremental development). Schemes were sought that illustrated linking the concept of incremental housing to contemporary debate on urban development. The aim was to develop housing delivery that provides maximum flexibility at household and plot level.

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incremental housing definition Incremental housing refers to flexible prototypes which grow over time, depending on the income and/or the growing number or age of the household. The core units contain the most basic features which are being upgraded based on the finances of the families. The originality of this typology lies not in the outcome but in the process, which is divided in different phases: access to land, construction of the core units, and the incremental improvement. It has been adopted as a mechanism to deal with increasing poverty: low-income housing schemes are initiated by local governments in order to enable the “urban poor� to improve their living conditions, acquire construction skills, and to help them own their houses. Far from being a regional phenomenon, incremental construction of low-income housing transcends political boundaries and involves different cultures and societies, as well as economic and political systems. Tutor: Aliki-Myrto Perysinaki

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1, 2, 3, 4. Pinky Tan 5. Zhor Boukerou 6, 7, 8. Oliver Jones 9, 10. Sami Boner

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Z House Nick Kelly Mod House Domnica Chisca

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Cosmopolis.+Homing the Homeless Adam Dwyer

Architecture 2016

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site and brief

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This project explored the notion of creating an energy hub in Toxteth reusing an abandoned reservoir as an energy store and utilising its elevated position as the ideal position for the location of solar panels and wind turbines. The land adjacent to the reservoir was developed as an estate of exemplar zero carbon homes.

1, 2, 3, 4. David Moynihan 5, 6, 7, 8. Kathlyn Atienza 9, 10, 11. Liam Marsden

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toxteth energy hub low carbon housing definition

It could be argued that a large proportion of the most cost-effective measures for increasing the sustainability of new housing in the UK have already been implemented through incrementally more onerous Building Regulations, thus leaving only more expensive options for further improvements. Can the environmental impact of new dwellings be reduced further without significantly increasing cost? Or does the law of diminishing returns dictate that zero carbon homes are destined remain an indulgence for the wealthy minority?

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With references such as the IBA Energy Bunker (Hamburg) with nearby housing benefiting from the related district heating, or LILAC (Leeds) which has developed low-impact, low-cost housing communities that explore progressive models of cohabitation, funding and procurement, this project commenced with a comparative analysis of exemplar low carbon dwellings from temperate climates around the world. It then appraised both the energy producing potential of the site and surrounding district, and the energy storage potential of the reservoir, before moving on to produce an ecological strategy for the site which formed the briefing document for the housing project itself. Tutor: Ian Wroot

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A Place for Craftsmen - Built by Craftsmen Rob Simcox

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Welsh Streets - Retrofitting Ringo’s Residence Joseph Kelly

Architecture 2016

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site and brief Fairfield is an area of Kensington that has steadily lost its identity. Since it was first developed as a residential suburb of grand villas and terraces, it has been slowly eroded through the development of small factories and infill housing. This project asked students to reimagine this fragmented suburb as the focus of a new higher density place to live.

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The project sought an understanding of the history and character of Fairfield, the positive and negative aspects of suburbs, and the potential for increasing density. It then challenged: how many dwellings can be created and where can they go? What happens if semi-detached houses are replaced with apartment villas? What are the new typologies? How to maintain suburb character whilst increasing density? 1. Christopher Shaw 2. Feridson Han Wei Hong 3, 4. Konstantina Voroklinioti 5, 6. Chloe Purcell 7. Samah Anjum

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infill housing densifying suburbia definition

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Since 2000 minimum density regulations have resulted in the average speculative housing estate rising from 15 houses/hectare to 35. However if the number of houses is to meet an annual demand of 250,000, the capacity of existing cities must be increased. The Urban Task Force Report directed new developments to brownfield land as a first option, and recent planning policy loosened restrictions upon ‘greenbelt’. However there is a third, and until recently under-explored, measure: densification of suburbia. Densifying suburbia will most likely be achieved through a range of interventions, including high-density development of infill sites, redundant commercial premises and re-use of existing buildings. The ‘suburb’ – Ebenezer Howard’s fusion of town and country – must change, replacing low-density sprawl with compact urban space. This project explored options for retrofitting suburbia: examining what typologies may be applicable, how to find ‘lost’ spaces, and how to increase density without destroying the positive aspects of suburbs. Tutor: Dominic Wilkinson

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5A-5B Laurel Road, Fairfield Harrison Smith

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Three Architectural Jewels Ross Whittle

Architecture 2016

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index of MArch comprehensive design projects The Comprehensive Design Project (CDP) forms the core of the Masters final year and provides the opportunity for students to explore proposals in depth. Derived from the Group Urban Design undertaken at the start of the year, each student develops a project brief which they then take from concept to detailed resolution. All aspects of the Final Year programme (history and theory, practice management and law, technology and environment) become linked to and based around the CDP which becomes the vehicle for individual exploration. The type of project is determined by the nature of the group urban designs and hamburg city centre

project area project area veddel bille

veddel & bille, hamburg

by the personal agendas of each student. Students are encouraged to engage with real issues raised during the group work whilst simultaneously challenging established norms and preconceptions. A critical re-appraisal of established building types and inventive approaches to the generation of new forms is encouraged, with the CDP becoming the opportunity to explore ideas through the medium of design. This year, contininuing our work looking at ‘Second Tier’ European cities, comparable out of centre locations in Hamburg and Liverpool City Region were chosen for the projects, shown below, with students selecting their preference. project area birkenhead

liverpool city centre

birkenhead, liverpool city region Architecture 2016

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Amir Izzat Adnan Integrated Healthy Food Hub

Bayu Aditya Hamburg Gastronomy Quarter

A market is an ancient means of exchange, exchange of goods, food stuffs but also of differences. 80% of the residents of Veddel are considered as immigrants, and the market celebrates this mixed culture. The market accommodates an urban farm, fresh daily produce stalls, restaurant, co working space and also a food waste recycling facility. . 102

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Awall Fiqri Awalludin The Laird Academy

The Laird Academy aims to be an iconic design on the Mersey waterfront comprising of the Cammell Laird shipbuilding headquarters and a Maritime Engineering College. This project is inspired by the history of the site itself, The project is based on the historical importance of ship-building and innovation to Cammell Laird and Birkenhead, and employs complex engineering to achieve its flowing physical form

The project aims to invent a new healthy food system for the people of Birkenhead by providing information to the public about food nutrition and healthy lifestyle. The Integrated Food Hub Project is a development providing progressive healthcare and consists of two primary programmes which include food hub and healthcare area. The project introduced means for visitors to experience food preparation from healthy sources, including produce sourced from the central winter garden.


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B Tom Barlow Future Urban Car Factory

Concluding the ‘Automobile Route’ of the masterplan strategy the proposal presents the state-of-theart in manufacturing innovative personal transport. Progressions in manufacturing techniques and advancements in automotive technology have informed the design of this urban facility to revolutionise, produce and maintain driverless vehicles for the City of Hamburg, which is already at the forefront of the green urban agenda.

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Adam Brindley Hamburg: A Gridded Intensity

The project is a development from the group master plan Questionable Hamburg: (Alternative Notion of Context). The project represents a method of creating intensity in an area with a series of three grids which are organised with the same orientation but at different scales. As the grids are overlaid, it allows for an intensity to build up depending upon how many grids are overlapped in one area. Each of these three grids has rules to its spread and height. High Intensity - A 3m x 3m ‘L’ shaped grid created from the footprint of the proposed outline of the master plan. Medium Intensity - A four-fingered grid of 9m x 9m squares created from the footprint of an existing building on the site that will be demolished.

Low Intensity - 20m x 20m created as an overall base, landscape grid. Following these grids a scaffolding device will be created which will set the boundaries for the building footprint, massing, and circulation. The most intense part of the building is the centre where all three grids overlap, the area around this being of medium density where two of the grids cross with finally a low intensity beyond that with one grid. The three different intensities allow the building to ‘fizzle’ out from its core into the Hamburg landscape, where visitors will slowly start to interact with the grids long before actually arriving at the building.


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Architecture 2016

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B Rhydian Eldridge The New Epicurean Garden

Overview of Scheme from East

Alex Brooke Coalescence

The Coalescence scheme creates a series of different facilities on Bille basin including a Spa, a restaurant and a water sports facility. These buildings are linked together via a series of floating pontoons joining them back to the promenade of the masterplan. The restaurant will source local fish as well as utilising views out across the basin across Hamburg. Germany treats bathing as an important daily ritual and a communal activity where bonding and formation of new relationships can occur in facilities like those at the Spa. The provision of water sports means that the water will be reactivated and used by the public throughout the year for boating, sailing and swimming. 106

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Thomas Choong Veddel Gateway

The proposal is based on a tributary of the Elbe River in Veddel, Hamburg. The project creates a gateway from the waterfront development into the historically isolated surrounding community. The scheme encompasses a range of waterfront activities; Residential Units, Kayaking Club and Community Centre and Retail Units, which will allow greater opportunity for the people of Veddel to experience a range of interactions with water.

The project creates a residential community and schoolhouse, based around the philosophical teachings of Epicurus. The project is situated around the ruins of a Benedictine Monastery and an 18th Century Neo-Gothic church, at the site of Birkenhead Priory. The architectural ambition is to juxtapose the ruins with modern forms and a new materiality.


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BUILDING SECTIONAL AXONOMETRIC 1:150

ATRIUM SPACE

Aliya Farjo KULTUR - A Centre for Dance & Cinema

The Centre for Dance and Cinema derives from The Veddel Gateway Masterplan which addressed the migrant crisis in Germany. The urban design strategy looked to extend the existing neighbourhood to accommodate the refugees coming into the country. The Centre for Dance and Cinema provides a facility for the community where they can learn from each other. The building comprises of dance studios, cinemas and a theatre.

INCUBATOR STARTUP FLOOR SPACE

Michael Eze Incubator

The vision of the wider masterplan is to create a thriving mixed-use development of civic scale, yet bringing various local ethnic minorities together in the process. A start-up business incubator, the building design provides state of the art IT facilities and innovative energy solutions integrating a major IT server below ground. This Google Cube contains a range of public exhibition spaces, presentation suites, flexible offices and studios, and a public roof terrace. Architecture 2016

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F John Finlayson Anthroposophy Sanctuary

Rothenburgsort’s Recreational, Educational and Healing Centre: The proposal creates a new building design through the methods proposed by the German academic Rudolf Steiner’s spiritual science philosophy Anthroposophy. The proposal consists of spa facilities, workshop facilities, a dance studio, a natural medical laboratory, temporary accommodation units, a public atrium, a cafe and bar, exhibition space, a comedy club and concert hall. The architecture is informed by an organic approach to materials and form, with a flowing sequence of spaces in brick and timber avoiding orthogonal geometries.

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G Rhys Gethin proxyHOTEL

The Hotel at Birkenhead waterfront is part of a wider project to inject social and economic structure into the area by using Liverpool as a parent city. The aim is to have the Birkenhead waterfront as an “auxiliary city� to Liverpool. As Liverpool attracts more tourists into its city every year the demand on hotels and leisure facilities increase. The goal of the hotel is to provide a wide variety of leisure, business and accommodation facilities in one place. To be in direct vicinity of amenities and to create a new attractive skyine for Birkenhead.

Emily Green Entkommen

Experience the Fairytale: The project aims to create an imaginative sense of place and memory through spaces to story-tell, write, read or retreat. Routes and spatial experiences are created within a controlled picturesque landscape containing a series of buildings embedded into the landscape. Collectively creating a place to enjoy discovering architecture hidden in the park. A place of reflection and a home for writers, the main building within the scheme is a Writers Retreat.

Architecture 2016

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Daniel Haigh Sustainable Community Living

The proposal makes places to live for people who would participate in activities generated within the masterplan area. Other objectives of the proposal are to; Include a mixture of leisure and recreational facilities to enrich the lives of residents: provide public gardens, allotments, promenades and open spaces to encourage community cohesion: have an on-site energy centre, for recycling and supplying heat.

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Hugh Haran The Boats of Bille

The Elbe and Hamburg’s canals provide underutilised opportunities for people to withdraw from their daily lives in the busy city. The scheme is inspired by a film ‘Herr Schultz Sets Sail’, the story of Kurt Schultz who chases a dream to build a sailing boat whilst living in temporary accommodation, in 1957, on Billerhuder Insel in East Hamburg. A boat building facility is proposed to train enthusiasts and novices to build traditional timber clinker boats for use on the Bille and Elbe rivers. The focal practice of boatbuilding will become a new basis for social encounter amongst the local community.

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Architecture 2016

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H Andrew Harris Craft on Bille

A craft lands on a Rothenburgsort canal between allotment gardens and portal frame grids. The building facilitates a community of craft dwellings where people begin making and selling their wares. Hamburg’s baroque merchant houses, the dielenhauser, inform a building that reconnects an underused canal network and re-establishes adjacent schrebergartens as important civic property. The ‘diele’ or hall was where cargo was hauled, meals were taken, and business was done and is revisited in the form of halls of refection, residence, and the guildhall. Sitting between logistic and industrial companies and the revered gardens, a new craft community will bring live/work back to East Hamburg. 112

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H Kevin Hiew End of the Line

The project title could describe a potential near future considering Birkenhead’s current predicament, but here it signifies a new beginning of large scale regeneration integrated with a rejuvenated tram system. In some ways the project is returning to the propositions of the World Exhibitions, with buildings demonstrating optimistic visions of a futuristic architecture. A programme of energy production, employment and education are proposed within a campus of buildings dealing with the science of algae. Space frame structures provide ‘universal space’ within, creating a flexible platform for a multitude of activities. Architecture 2016

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Gethin Hughes The Priory Theatre

The project aims to forge a strong bond within the community through the medium of art and performance. In doing this, two areas were explored, one being a space for performing where people could come and see live performances, whilst the other would be a facility for people to express themselves creatively. What this project aims to do is regenerate a site which is not being used to its full potential and make it into a place of enjoyment and relaxation. It will provide Birkenhead with a building and institution that offers a unique opportunity to develop the town’s sense of community through creativity.

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Architecture 2016

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J Andrew Jarman The Old Timber Yard

A community hub anchored by workshops and studios for material reclamation and re-appropriation on the site of on old timber yard in Birkenhead. ‘The Yard’ is sited on the disused Birkenhead Dock Branch railway line and is a series of buildings connected by a large winter garden which marks the start of the regeneration of the disused line. ‘The Yard’ is an inclusive social space that aims to educate, to liberate and make a significant, long lasting contribution to the regeneration of Birkenhead in tandem with the long term plans of the proposed Birkenhead Arts Collective.

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K Zackry Johanni Market Street Extension

The existing Market Street is expanded from a narrow secondary route to a new public space, containing different kinds of activity focused upon the sale and preparation of food. Food festivals, and other related activities occupy the space with pavilions and kiosks adding permanent points of focus. The project includes a food market, with a large cold storage building containing fresh local produce serving market stalls with a conveyor system. The architecture is of an appropriately bold form celebrating the technology of its construction.

Matt Kerrod The Illusionarium

This project is an examination of how people interact with the spaces they occupy on an emotional and psychological level. Can the design of spaces heighten our experience as we move through them? Using the typology of a Theatre for Magicians the project will explore how a series of spaces can affect the mood or perception of an observer as they move through them before entering a ‘final’ space for the end performance. As masters of illusionary techniques that manipulate our senses and expectations, who better to inhabit such a space than magicians.

Architecture 2016

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Wei Ren Lee Tree of Life

A residential block specially tailored to the needs of senior citizens where everything they need to enhance their particular circumstances is within the building. The project incorporates full accessibility, retail, sports, social and cultural activities and an elevated public park, creating a safe and secure environment protected from flooding. The scale and ambition of the building reflect both the numbers of senior citizens needing accommodation and an optimistic view of a bold problem solving future.

Architecture 2016

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M Brandon McKeown The Egalitarian Nation

Form : Order : Power : Authority : Vision : Growth The Town Hall, a realm for the public to inhabit. Providing facilities from which to govern, discuss, debate and create. Library, Civic Offices, Archive Storage Tower, Galleries, Halls & Debating Chamber are all housed within these traditional forms. Form and geometry instil a sense of place, belonging and authority from each individual building.

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Nur Amiera Mohammad Padeli Urban Agriculture

A logistics hub that acts as a collection point for the produce of a network of Wirral farms. The project will be a catalyst for the future transformation of Birkenhead as the heart of a well calibrated local Agriculture strategy. The hub is complemented with a series of educational spaces, to support the further development of the Wirral food network through training.


M Rhiannon Morgan Urban Retreat

Offering an opportunity for its inhabitants, as well as visitors to improve their mental wellbeing, with the architectural qualities of the surrounding built environment adding to the positive experience. The logic of an urban retreat grew from the desire to utilise an urban environment in an unexpected way, just as the Priory site has become to be an almost surprising element within this area of Birkenhead, hidden between Cammell Laird’s shipyard and a tangled web of industrial sheds.

James Mullen The Elbe Centre

The Elbe Centre follows on from the Veddel Gateway masterplan which looked at dealing with the current migrant crisis in Europe. The urban design strategy aimed to accommodate the incoming refugees, by expanding the existing housing stock and improving community interaction. Located at the north site of the site, next to the River Elbe, the building addresses the edge of the water, an area which was under developed. The Elbe Centre comprises a watersport centre, boat museum, boat build and repair workshop and a water taxi terminal point.

Architecture 2016

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M Khusri Musa ActiveVue

This project is about proposing a place where the community is able to gather among themselves, to communicate and live a healthy lifestyle with an element of “urban agriculture activity�. Winter gardens are introduced on ground and top floor, whilst there are a number of indoor community rooms, retail units, indoor sport court, indoor community cinema and a jogging track linking continuously from one block to another block. A public plaza has been introduced next to Priory such that it may animate and rejuvenate the Priory over time.

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Craig Neal Birkenhead Pier

Growing out of the proposed masterplan, following the principles of an urban park typology the project will transform a once prominent industrial site into a cultural hub. This will accentuate the history of the area and establish an identity to the waterfront, with a new hub of activity. This project combines transport through the ferry terminal with the amenities of the museum, restaurants etc. to bring life to an idle area of the waterfront. The pier will act as a primary attraction creating a space for a multitude of functions which creates a direct link between the park and the water.

Lee Newell Headbangers Ballroom

This scheme will be a music institution that hosts musicians and music enthusiasts with a particular passion for the Rock and Heavy Metal Genres. It will provide people with a desire to perform with the opportunity to develop their skills, express themselves through performance, and interact with other like-minded people and re-engage Hamburg’s love for Heavy Metal.


N Rebecca Nutbrown German Poetry Centre

The Centre seeks to create quiet spaces of reading writing and narrating in an otherwise noisy industrial area. It has to compete in size, scale and impact with the surrounding buildings and infrastructure. It is not an iconic building in an ostentatious manner but designed through integrating into the surrounding context and with a more humane, memorable and approachable ambition. The project creates an inhabited wall along the side of the main road as protection from the external elements whilst expressing the length of the site. Existing mature trees are kept and used to dictate the position of lighter communal elements which face into the surrounding canal. Architecture 2016

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P Maria Pitsillou Mersey Tate

The design of the new Tate Gallery building in Birkenhead. The current TATE in Liverpool in Albert Dock will be relocated on to the waterfront of Birkenhead. The gallery follows some of the principles of the current Liverpool TATE, however with, better ways for visitors to view the art work and a better experience for both visitors and staff.. The building is situated right on the waterfront, and is cantilevered beyond the dock wall above the Mersey River.

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Jacob Robertson Volk-Wagen-Hamburg

The scheme aims to provide classic Volkswagen enthusiasts and car restoration devotees with the opportunity to enjoy their hobby on a larger scale. The building’s function is primarily to source abandoned and neglected Volkswagen Beetle’s and to a take them through the restoration process whilst exposing the process throughout, however equally important is the social aspect of allowing fellow enthusiasts to liaise with one another and to allow the public to engage with both the process and the enthusiasts.


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Omar Shariff Monks Ferry – Pool & Spa

Located in the area encompassing the historic Monks Ferry slipway, and within sight of the Birkenhead Priory, this project aims to reinvent the relationship between the people of Birkenhead with the river Mersey. The introduction of a new landmark pool and spa set within the waterfront landscape will aim to create a sensory experience that will reconnect people to the water.

Scott Stamper Verschmelzen

Aiming to stimulate a further artistic revival of Entenwerder Park, Verschmelzen creates an environment for creative expression & artistic retreat and of artist engagement with the community, Verschmeltzen provokes the phenomenology of escaping the urban context & integrating with the landscape through considered thresholds & facades. Architecture 2016

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T Liam Thomas The New Rothburgsort Art Museum

Operation Gomorrah, the code name given to the event in which the RAF delivered the systematic destruction of the city of Hamburg, through a use of fire and high explosive, and caused the large-scale loss of human life over a mere nine days. One way in which people have recorded various acts of war is through the use of art, in this project a collection of thirty art works has been assembled. Their placement within the building forms a narrative route through it and the project develops a new elegant public gallery, with a simplicity of form and material to create a place for contemplation.

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Jonathan Tinsley AD2077

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The project is set 27 years after the collapse of the west Antarctic ice sheet. Initially global water levels rose by 6 meters in a matter of months. Over time the increase in temperature due to the increase in C02 levels meant the water levels continued to rise. Most people moved inland to higher ground but as is human nature - some resisted the change and chose instead to adapt their cites as a means to a purer way of life and to prepare themselves early for the inevitable, approaching apocalypse. As most of the fishing industry is centred around coastal towns (which are now underwater) the fish population exploded providing the vast majority of sustenance year-round. The condemned, flooded coastal regions were abandoned by the general populous and left to evolve independently and as such, became completely detached from mainstream society. The people that remained became citizens of nowhere, here reclaiming an empty tower utilising found materials to provide habitability.

Architecture 2016

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Christopher Wells Mini Hamburg

The project derived from the roll of the dice. Mini Hamburg became about a tower of congestion a ‘social condenser’ filled with nine given functions. The project created a rich set of programs that can exchange and extend throughout the tower creating cultural congestion and hence stimulate intense social interaction, while providing potential space for ever changing and unprecedented activities to be carried out. To explore each function the project set out to develop architecture as a piece of fantasy and fiction, which acted as a device for formal experimentation, creative release and a stimulus for new possibilities in a playful way.

Iman Zulkifly Inhabitant Theatre

Living the golden age with a sense of drama! As part of a wider masterplan of facilities for an aging population this theatre provides residential apartments to allow members and guests to immerse themselves within a cultural and creative community in a stimulating way. The juxtaposition of the technical requirements of a theatre with apartment/hotel suite accommodation generates a range of interesting spatial conditions.

Architecture 2016

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arch soc

The school has a very active student architectural society, ArchSoc. Each year the society organises their own themed guest lecture series. This year a highlight was Eva Jiricna, who spoke with great clarity about her design process, not just her finished projects. The society organises various social events throughout the year that bring the whole student body together. This year there was a series of well attended ’Socials’, enabling students from different years, and those new to Liverpool to meet up. The more-or-less end of year Architecture Ball, held early in May, was a highlight of the year and its popularity is a measure of the society’s central role within the architecture programmes, pictured.

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awards congratulations to

Adam Dwyer, MArch, for winning this year’s Susan Cotton European Travel Award and to Adam Hardman, BA(Hons), for winning the Faculty International Bursary, for a two week educational exchange with the Korean National University of Arts, Seoul.

our RIBA President’s medal nominations for 2016: Silver Medal (RIBA Part 2) Hugh Haran, The Boats of Bille Christopher Wells, Mini Hamburg

Bronze Medal (RIBA Part 1)

Asher Bourne, The Genesis of the Third Culture Callum Cherry, A Posse Ad Esse

Dissertation Medal

Harry Foster, A Study of the Connection between Architecture & Neuroscience and

The Clare Wrigley Lighting Prize Aadil Khan

Architecture 2016

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Liverpool John Moores University


www.bdp.com manchester@bdp.com


w w w. c a l d e r p e e l . c o m cpp@calderpeel.com CHE SHIRE | S URREY


Welsh National Sailing Academy & Events Centre, Pwllheli

Ellis Williams is an experienced international architectural practice specialising in strategic and creative solutions in the Regeneration, Masterplanning, Education, Commercial, Leisure and Arts sectors. Employing over 60 staff with offices in Warrington, London, Liverpool and Berlin we have developed a reputation for design excellence and attention to detail.

ewa.co.uk


Top 100 practice

Falconer Chester Hall is an award winning architectural and interiors practice with an international reputation. Our committed team is based in Liverpool and London, servicing schemes across the UK, and we have recently opened our first overseas office in Kuala Lumpur. We are looking for experienced architects and talented assistants to work on some exciting projects. If that sounds like you then get in touch. CV and examples of work to f.winter@fcharchitects.com

Liverpool T. +44 (0)151 243 5800 Liverpool

London

London T. +44 (0)203 137 7393 Kuala Lumpur

Kuala Lumpur T. +(0)60 3 2858 6401

www.fcharchitects.com


Beetham Tower West One

Old Hall Street SAS Radisson Hotel & Apartments Adagio Hotel Lewis’s

Part 1 and Part 2 Graduates please send your up to1date CV and portfolio please for consideration Part and Part 2 Graduates send your up to for a CV position. date and portfolio for consideration for a position. Parsonage Chambers - 3 The Parsonage - Manchester M3 2HW T +44 (0)161 828 7900 E manchester@ahr-global.com ahr-global.com

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Hilton Hotel Liverpool One


www.grimshaw-architects.com

ARCHITECTURE | URBAN PLANNING | INDUSTRIAL DESIGN


Architecture 2016

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shedkm LIVERPOOL

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INNOVATION

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LONDON

ARCHITECTURE

PLACEMAKING


QUEEN ELI SA B E TH H A LL, A NTWERP

T WO ST PETER’S SQUARE, MANCHESTER

BAT TERSEA POW ER STATI ON, LON D ON

SimpsonHaugh and Partners is an award winning, design led architectural practice with offices in Manchester and London We are currently recruiting for Part I and Part II graduates to join our studios and help to deliver a series of exciting projects, which include major masterplanning proposals, cultural buildings, residential and commercial developments, hotels and infrastructure projects. Candidates should be passionate about design with good communication, CAD (ideally MicroStation) and hand drawing skills. Please send a cover letter, CV, and a concise sample of your most relevant work by email to careers@simpsonhaugh.com

ONE SPI N N I NGF I E LDS, MA NC H EST E R

D OL LAR BAY, LONDON

MANCHESTER Riverside, 4 Commercial Street Manchester M15 4RQ T +44 (0)161 835 2345 F +44 (0)161 839 4808 www.simpsonhaugh.com

LONDON 5-8 Roberts Place London EC1R 0BB T +44 (0)20 7549 4000 F +44 (0)20 7490 5331 mail@simpsonhaugh.com

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architecture-ljmu.tumblr.com urbandesignljmu.com catalogue production team Jamie Scott, Phil Lo, Anthony Malone, Aliki-Myrto Perysinaki, Charlie Smith. June 2016 v2

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Up, up and away. Congratulations to all students graduating in Summer 2016. Keep in touch with the LJMU Architecture Programmes via; www.architecture-ljmu.tumblr.com


This catalogue celebrates the work of our Bachelor of Architecture, BA(Hons), and Master of Architecture, MArch, programmes over the 2015-2016 academic year.

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Architecture Programmes, Liverpool School of Art & Design, John Lennon Art and Design Building, Duckinfield Street, Liverpool, L3 5RD

Architecture Programmes Review 2016  

Liverpool John Moores University Architecture programmes annual projects review catalogue

Architecture Programmes Review 2016  

Liverpool John Moores University Architecture programmes annual projects review catalogue

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