Page 1


Holding fast the faithful Word ...

• • •

In

the Church

Rev. & Mrs. S. G. Norris came to St. Paul in 1934 to pastor Midway Tabernacle located at 464 Pierce Street. In 1950 the Church moved to Hague and Victoria, still known as Midway Tabernacle. Finally in 1967 the Church was relocated at 6944 Hudson Blvd. N. and renamed the Apostolic Bible Church. After 37 years as pastor, Rev. Norris resigned to hecome pastor emeritus in 1971 whiit' Rev. Robert A. Sabin assumed the pastorate, continuing to hold fast the faithful Word . . . in thE Church.


Holding fast the faithful Word ...

• • •

In

the School

Apostolic Bible Institute opened its doors in 1937 at 464 Pierce Street, the result of the move of God in he hearts of Rev. & Mrs. S. G. orris. A. B.T. was relocated a 745 Grand Avenue in 1951. Fi.nally in 1967 the School moved to its present 40 acre campus at 6944 Hudson I3lvd. N. Here, Rev. & Mrs. Norris, on the 38th anniversary of the founding of Apostolic i3ible Institute, continu to hold fast the faithful Word . . . in the School.


TABLE of

CONTENTS Within/Wet out/About

5

Administration

8

Classes

24

ActOvities

52

Catalog

81

Sponsors

103


WITHIN

5


WITHOUT

6


ABOUT

7


A D M

N I S T

R A

o


Rev. S. G. Norris, founder and president, qUickens the hearts and minds of Pentecostal youth with imperishable ruths. He loves 0 teach "The Mighty God in Christ," Since 1937 he has championed the cause for Bible School education. He believes that a diploma from A. B.I. is a spiritual treasure. The Apostolic Bible Institute has rown from a one building church-school to a scenic rty-acre campus. Lives an; enriched by his ministry and to him nothing is more valuable than the presence of God. He is an honorary board member of the U.P.C. Students drink deeply from God's Word when he teaches the Old Testament, Doctrine, Revelation and Epistles. He loves life, is generous and has exceptional ability to discover good qualities in people and encourage them to use their abilities for the Kingdom of G d.

A WORD FOR SENIORS . . . . . EZRA!

One of the greatest stories in the Bible has the least drama wrapped up in its happenings. ~o lion's den escape, no fiery furnace deliverance, no Red Sea crossing are recorded. You won't sit on the edge of your chair while reading Ezra's record, but his approach and method brought a revival. This man was not used in miracles - as great and wonderful as they are - but his

results brought a move of God in Jerusalem that had not been experienced for many years. There is a lot of good old-fashioned Godly common sens in F:zra's life. ';'his produced results. The first six chapters of his book are really the story of Zerubabbel and the return of the captives from Babylon to Jerusalem in 536 B.C. His personal story starts ith chapter even.

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EZRA THE SCRIBE

EZRA'S CAREFULNESS Thi.' scribe's request to go was ranted. His upplies wer more than enough, but Ezra would not start out until there were ministers, ons of Levi,in the caravan. He wanted to be sure that th r were those returning with him who vould minister in the house of the Lord. Ei hteen d dicated men joined the band. Now verything was ready. As 'zra looked out over that barren stretch of desert from Babylon to Jerusalem, knowing it would take four n1' nths to accomplish the journey, his heart almost sank. The volunteers were ready to go. They were trusted with gold 8nd silver, but th 1'e were also robbers and dang r8 ahead. He knew if he ask d the king for soldi rs and horsemen to protect them, th y woul I be granted. (F:7ra 8: 2) Howev r, he n'membered he had testified to the king that "the hand of our God i upon aU them for good that seck him," so inst d of as ing for for ign protection h -, fasted and besoup;ht the La d for this journey, "and ad was intr ated for us."

Like a senior just graduating nd desiring to have a part in saving souls, Ezra longed for a revival in Jerusalem. On the. urface, like most challenges, the task se med impossibl . He was a Jew in the foreign land of ~ aby on. The Medes and Pers ians had complete control of his people. Babylon was a long way from Jerusalem and Ezra had never been there. Where could he get the n c ssary money? How could he get dedicated Jews too go with him? Was there any way to obtain permissioll from the King for such an undertaking? Would th Jews listen to him if h did go back? Th futur was bleak but Ezra had something on his side that always overcom s great ob stacles - fie knew the Word of Cod' THE REWARD OF TYING THE W RD OF G D Ezra was a student of the Scriptures. His heart was fill d with God's Word. H was unselfish. This man of God was not satisfied just to be personally bl ssed with the knowledge of eternal truth, but longed to share it with others. (Ezra 7: 10) "Ezra had prepared his heart to se k the Ie W of the Lord and to do i , and teach in Israel tatutes and judgments." What a wonderful ambition! Ezra was like a senior who has been faithful in studying God's Word and by graduating tim his heart is filled with a 1 nging to share the Word with others. The goal may seem mountains and d "s rts away. The finance perhaps is mea Tcr to say th' lea t, but as God made a way for Fzra, so will H help every seni r.

, SCRIBE (ST DENT OF ,OD'S WOR PL S CO AGE EQUALS REVIV L! Ezra's name is not eulogized in the Bible as ome others, but very few performed any greater s rvice for Israel than this ood level-headed, God -loving man. He ill d no bear; he lew no lions; h . carried away no gates of Gaza, nor pronounc d blindness on a Syrian army, hut his pr aching and t aching hrought a resurrection of faith to Jerusalem. t lis mess ge of holiness caus dod's favor to hine again in th cho. en ci y. Zerubabbel, Joshua, th high pri st, Ilaggai and Z chariah were instru mental in bu' ding the little tempi of Zerubabb 1. That was sam ye r5 efore Ezra's r tu l ehemiah, a little later, ui t th walls and strcets of Jeru alem, but it was aa \ ho brought the revival! This unhe al ed crib opened th B ok of od's Word (Neh. 8:5) and caus cl th people to understand the law. (Nch. 8:7) It was Ezra that "read the hook distinctly and gav sens and caus d Israel to understand the reading." This destroyed something greater than physical enemies. It crushed false doctrines and idolatry. It brought the people back in fellowship with the tru God.

RTAXERXt:: There i ~ nothing that wi Ll brin~ la ing results and pen th winda s of he' ven mar sur ly than a d dicatecl study and an ap li cati.on of th \V ord of God. ,zra pr yed and fasted. God moved upon the heart f this great king to grant permission for the r turn to Jerusalem. H also opened his treasu cs to provid financial aid . More also, he ave Ezra letters of approval to preach in Jerusalem with decrees of warning to anyone that might molest him. This God-fearing king commanded that whatever was needed forth house of God that it should b diligently provided. The very same God that moved upon Artaxerxes to assist Ezra has people waiting to h Ip every s nior who puts his hand to the plow of God's Gospel!

Go forth, seniors, with the written Word of God. It will h lp you cross deserts and bring men back to the faith which was once delivered unto the sa ints.

11


Mrs. S. G. Norris improves the quality of life around her. She teaches her pupils that their lives belong to God. Lessons beginning with encouragement in consistent prayer life, lead to discovering one's capabilities and then finding the perfect plan of God. Carefree students are molded into responsible, dedicated Christian workers. Distinction marks her duties as faculty member and president's wife. Besides teaching, she writes; is sought by advisory boards for counseling; children ar und the globe listen to her story records and the Junior Sunday School class has a lifetime to practice Christian habits cleverly taught by her. Wherever sh~ goes, she is surrounded with books and administrative work, but she takes time to chat with a child, or pick up her binoculars to follow a bird. She loves nature and the Creator. Tn any association with her, you, too, will capture the beauty around you and love the Christ she loves. Perhaps no income is available; perhaps tithes can be paid on other "increases" other than money. Let us repeat: state your objective, consider the conditions under which the objective can be reached and be sure that the pupils can -perform the objective, Let us proceed to three simple methods of teaching. First, let us explain ROTE learning. Rote learning is simple drill or "telling" and is not teaching, although we make students aware of basic facts with this method. Rote learning and its ensuing recitation has been a "no-no" for years. However, we cannot rule out basic drill when it is foundational. Sometimes teachers gloat over how many in their classes can recite the Books of the Bible, the ten commandments, or the twelve sons of Jacob, These drill-fashion recitations can be made meaningful by explanations, but let us be aware that we settle for facts alone without giving understanding. perform.

"Holding fast the faithful Word." Titus 1:9 These few words form the theme of the 1975 year book- "Holding fast the faithful Word." The marginal reference continues, "in TEACHING." Although these words are directed to a bishop, I would like to dedicate this article to the seniors who have studied Educational Psychology in my classes. The composite of three years of the study of God's Word, plus related subjects, should allow a graduate to "hold fast the faithful VVord in teaching." My objective is to remind you again of the fundamental aspects of teaching, and to help you to evaluate your teach:ing. You already know that meaningful teaching and relevant teaching will be lasting teaching. First of all, you, too, will state your objective, beinp; sur that it is a valid objective. You will see that it is stated clearly and simply. Next, you will outline the conditions by which the objective can be learned. For instance: if you are teaching pupils to pay tithes, you will explain the objective and the word "tithes:' Next, you will describe the conditions under which tithing is to be paid. "Ten per cent" must be explained to the children by the use of arithmetical examples on the blackbo!1rd. "Increas " is to be considered in the ight of an allowance, a gift, or a find. Time is a consideration, also, for some children only receive an allowance when their father is paid, which may be once a week, once a month, or sporadically. If a reward for bringing in of tithes is given, the time clement may eliminate some of the non-tithers and cause disappointment. Next, in stating your objective consider the pupils' ability to

COMPREHENSIVE learning comes with understanding when the teacher enlightens the pupil as to what the drill or rote learning means. Imagine the nine or ten year old perhaps even adults - reciting the Minor Prophets, and receiving applause or a prize for doino- so, but haVing no idea what the books contain (One pupil insisted that the Minor Prophets had to do with mining coal, and "something about profit and loss!") Every drill must be accompanied with explanations. "But they KNOW themr" you say. No, they do not KNOW them; they only know how to pronounce them, unless you have taught the meanings of the books,

t

APPLICATION learning, the best of the three, offers the student ways to use basic learning

12


meant much research and the making of plaster gods. That Sunday morning our class members were diggers, sifters, news reporters, artists, and photographers. A trumpet-bearer blew a flourish whenever an article was dug out. One boy made posters directing students to the area. We even had lunch there l Then when the last trophy was brushed and placed in a large basket we went, dusty and tired to our classroom where a teacher drew a time line and the students identified the trophies with the time line. Did we learn? Yes! What a difference from communication of content by a teacher-given monologue during classtime!

and apply it to everyday problems. This savors of wisdom, and even a child can be wise. For example: Applying rate learning one Sunday, I followed my usual \Nay of rewarding with silver dollars for the reading that past week of Psalm 119 in its beautiful octets. One little girl, holding her Bible asked, "Are you giving money today?" When I answered that I was, she said, "I won't accept it!" with a great degree of certainty. When I asked for an explanation, she pointed to verse 72, "That's why!" Then I read " The law of thy mouth is better unto me' than thousands of gold and silver." I rejoiced over and over for she had been able to APPLY the lesson. If we teach, trying to develop comprehension in the student, he soon learns that the Bible has ten identifiable divisions. He learns, too, that the Epistles were written to already established churches, while the book of Acts, alone contains the establishment of the first Church with its plan of salvation applicable today.

Many other CREATIVE activities which involved the whole class \Nere the building and setting up of the tabernacle. We made the floor of our classroom into an area exemplifying the Dead Sea Scroll area with the Essenes - the students arranging from construction paper cutouts, the mountains, the Jordan River, the caves and the scrolls in clay pots. Abraham's journeys were acted out (some pupils did not care to be Terah because they said he died); a whole drama of Joseph's life (they learned Jacob's sons - and not by rate); even the "Ites" surrounding Judah and Israel were painted ugly faces on hard-boiled eggs placed in their proper geographical position on a sand table map; the four soils; marching about the Jericho walls - all thiS, and many more were taught creatively.

CENTER OF INTEREST teaching too, has many assets in that the Word is taught in the area of the child's interests; A two and one-half hour session, divided into various activities, all contingent on one Biblical theme, allows for concentrated learning with variety; the child listens to the Word; the child is active in his project center; singing, quizzing, story hour time keep interest; adaptibility of Center of Interest to the particular needs of any Sunday School all work together to make it a delightful way to teach. The children enjoy it so, that it is a S.S. builder! A common remark from visitors to our Center of Interest is, "I wish we had had that when I went to Sunday School - I hated it!"

Not all teachers are able to use CREATIVE TEACHING, but perhaps with a little instruction from an assistant or a superintendent, progress could be made. Our education books tell us that the teacher's mental set may so firmly fix routine ways of doing and perceiVing things that the habitual set interferes with creativity. Inability to see other ways of uses for a story might cause the teacher to have little or no ability to get interaction or response from a student. High purpose obtained from the study of the Word of God, knowledge of its faithfulness, a happy expectation that the students may find the same thrill from the Word, may cause a teacher who otherwise will not try to break through the old traditional ways of teaching, to delve into a puzzling Biblical subject.

And now, CREATIVE TEACHING! We have been employing it for years in our teaching, but we usually received a negative response when we tried to introduce it to others in our fellowship. And NOW, the denominational world has picked it up and researched it and explored it. The beauty of it is that we get interaction, research, response and involvement from our students and they LEARN! For instance, after teaching our ten and eleven year old Juniors the basic doctrine of the MIGHTY GOD IN CHRIST, we taught a CREA TIVE lesson which we called THE ARCHAELOGICAL DIG, which had for its theme, THE ONE GOD! Fortunately we had a six foot bank of dirt, about forty feet long on our groundS, and there we dug in Sumerian, Babylonian, Greek, Roman and present day artifacts such as cuneiform tablets, the threeheaded god of Babylonia, a shield, a scroll, coins and other pertinent representations of those nations. Students made many of these articles which were from the ages past. This

C an your boys find out about David's mighties? How many Benaiahs were there? What did they accomplish? How many miles did Hiram bring the cedars and firs from Lebanon to the temple site? Meaningful teaching causes the pupil to be able to relate relevant concepts to the ones we are learning or have already learned. Research shows that such learning is more apt to be lasting than other methods. Let us try teaching which is CREATIVE! 13


ISAIAH 55 10 For as the rain cometh down, and the snow from heaven, and returneth not thither, but watereth the earth, and maketh it bring forth and bud, that it may give seed to the sower, and bread to the eater: 11 So shall my word be that goeth forth out of my mouth: it shall not return unto me void, but it shall accomplish that which I please, fu""1d it shall prosper in the thing whereto I sent it.

Rev. Sabin is another fine d dicated faculty m mber at A.B.l. lIe ha taught here enthusiastically and carefully for twelve years. Students in his classes los their fear of puzzling qu stion in Religio Analysis. They ar also grounded in English, Public peaking and Apologetics. In a dition t this he also directs the orchestra and blesses all of us with his trumpet solos. Rev. Sabin is also p star of the Apostolic Bible Church. His sermons arc deep and anoint d. He formerly taught at Winona State College but his heart was in Bibl School education. He has a dedicated an talented family.

1


Please meet "Mister Music." This fil ' Christian man has a gift of God in helping people to sing. He simply bubbles with melody. If you have ever heard his choirs, ensembles, quartets or vocal groups sing, then your heart has been thrilled. If not, your coming to A.B.I. will be enriched by enrolling in his classes. He has taught Minor Prophets, Life of Christ and Acts for over twenty years. These books live again in his lectures. Rev. Gleason is a living example of Christian faithfulness. He has a lovely family. They are among the happiest in Pentecost. Melody is in the air at A.B.I. with "Mister Music."

ACTS 20

24 But none of these things move me, neither count I my life dear unto myself, so that I might finish my course with joy, and the ministry, which I have received of the Lord Jesus, to testify the gospel of the grace of God.

PHILIPPIANS 4 13 1 can do all things through dlrlsl which strengtheneth me.

Rev. Grant is an exampl of thl' ted wn to earth" cours s taugh at A. D.l. This school has been in operation long nough to gi e the student courses that ar "field tested." This very practic 1 faculty mcmb r tcaches Church llistory in such a way that the student enjoys what he learns. H also offers co rses that arc unique in Building Construction and Business Law. Legal matters in church work are mOTe important every da,. Practical building knowlellge is almost a must. These courses build great courage in the student. His blackboard drawings and illustrations make his lectures inspiring. He has taught at A.B.I. for seventeen years. His wife and daughter complete this Christian family. They all love the Lord.

15


Rev. Griffin comes to A.B.I. with a great deal of experience. He pastored nine years, assisted for three years, and more recently evangelized for three years. He also served as Wisconsin Youth President for two years. He is well qualified to teach Current Events, Library Science, and English. He has attended Northland College and the University of Wisconsin studying History and Library Science. This year he h8S diligently catalogued the Paul regory Memorial Library for student use. Those who know Brother Griffin appreciate his devotion and enthusiasm.

GALATIANS 2 20 I am crucified with Christ: nevertheless I live; yet not I, but Christ liveth in me: and the life hich I now live in the flesh I live by the faith of the Son of God,

MATTHEW 6 33 But seek ye first the kingdom at God, and his righteousness; and all these things shall be addild unto you.

When you first meet Rev. Dale Hodges you will feel like you have known him before someplace as a friend. He is a consecrated teacher and a consistent Christian. His example is more outstanding because his work demands much detail and natience. He has taught Bible Geography and Mission classes for eight years. These subjects are dear to his heart and this dedication is transferred to the students. He also fills a very important place in the accounting department and is the faculty sponsor for yearbooks. He is a great Sunday School worker and has lectured in Camp Meetings and conferences. His wife and daughter complete his contented home.

16


This talented young man is the son of a Pentecostal minister. He studied two years at the University of Minnesota but gave up that opportunity for the Lord's w0rk. He is president of the class of '75 and God has blessed him as a dedicated Christian example. He has the respect of the entire student body. He will be teaching English, and have full charge of the office. He is capablE' of assisting in other courses at this school. The Lord definitely called him to work with uS and we all are thankful to have him on our side.

ROMANS 1 20 For the invisible things of him from the creation of the world are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made, e,'en his eternal power and Godhead; so that they are without excuse:

Psalm 19 14 Let the words of my mouth, and the m ditation of my heart, be acceptable in thy sight, 0 LORD, my strength. and my redeemer.

This fine young man is graduating in the class of '75 with top honors. He has trav(~led with (he A.B.T. quartet in the past, and was second highest top quizzer in the nation for the . r.c. at the Miami national conference. He is gifted in you nf people's work and has been assistant minister of a large group of young people in the church here. God has called him to preach and teach and his Jife is ded.icatcd to this Pentecostal. truth. He will be teaching: Religious Education and assisting in other subjects. The students will enjoy his teaching. We are glad to hav him join the faculty.

17


Mrs. Foster is a graduate of A. B.t She understands school life. She teaches A. B.l. girls to design and make their own dress's. They also learn economic methods of sewing and planning modest wardrobes. Her classroom is equipped with very modern machines. Girls 1 arn even more from h r because of the erene Christian spirit she radiates. Her classes are not only instruc 路ve but a ble sing.

HEBREWS 3 14 For we are made partakers of christ, If we hold the beginning of our confidence stedfast unto the end:

ISAIAH 12 2 Behold, God is my salvation; I wiU trust, and not be afraid: for the LORD JEHOVAH is my strength and my song; he also is become my salvation.

Her father, Rev. Gleason, is "Mister Music" and Pam is "Miss Sunshine." This talent d young woman teaches piano and organ to A.B.!. students. She radiates happiness. She is a gifted arranger of music, organizer and vocalist. erhaps you have met h r on one of the Choir tours. Try to enroll in one of her classes if possible.

18


A.B.1. has been an important part of Mrs. Gerald Grant's life since her youth. Her classes include such areas as Teacher Training and Sunday School Organization. In recent years, the "Center of Interest" program has also been a part of her instruction. Mrs. Grant has always been a friend to the s~udents as well as a teacher. Her advice and understanding have been appreciated by many.

PSALM 145 2 Every day will I bless thee; and I will praise thy name for ever and ever.

I CORINTmANS 15 58 Therefore, my beloved brethren, be ye stedfast, unmoveable. always abounding in the work of the Lord, forasmuch as ye know that your labour is not in vain in the Lord.

Sister Lundquist lives and breathes missions. She is still a guest lecturer in the missions class. She taught at A. B. 1. for many years and has been a friend to missionaries in many foreign fields. Her love for the name of Jesus will refresh your heart.

19


Sister Griffin faithfully helps her husband in the library. Books surround her at all times and she checks books in and out constantly. In addition to her work. she attended several cla se:; to increase her knowl dge of the Word of God.

PROVERBS 3

6 In all thy ways acknowledge him and he shall direct thy paths. '

A Bible school or anization must not only have a qualified faculty but also an efficient office staff. Mary Alice Gregg graduated from A.B.l. with high honors in 1973. She has excellent business knowledge combined with a cheerful Christian character. Mary Alice understands studentmanagement r e 1a t ion s hip which is so very valuable. We thank the Lord she is a part of our A. B.1. team.

PROVERBS 1

5 A wise man w'U hear, and will incre se learning; and a man of under..tanding shall attain unto wise counsels:

ISAIAH 26 Tho~ wil.t keep him in perfect peace, lO\e .nd IS stayed on thee: becau e he Husteth 1D thee.

Pat Norris graduated with the A.B.1. class of 1974 and was the scholastic honor student of that year. She is a tireless. effi.cient worker in the office and capab eofparttimeteachin in Religious Education. She has a burden for th "teens" and has directed their choir in the hurch. Sh coached the Quiz team to sec0nd high'st national honors and also has traveled with the •. B. 1. quartet for two years. IIer Christian walk with God is refreshing.

22


DORM

SU ERVISORS

A.B.r.

STAFF

KITCHEN

STAFF

23


C L A S

S E


Holding fast the faithful Word ...

. . . in the Third Year Class 26


J A ELLF ABSHIRE Calumet Park. Ill.

DEBORA BENNETT

Columbus, Ohio

RO E.R BUCKLAND

Indianapolis, Ind.

DONALD BAILEY JR. State College, Penn.

EDW ARD BLAIR

Grand Junction, Colo.

DEN S B RNS Portsmouth, Ohio

KAREN BEE Red Wing, Minn.

CATHY BROWN

Columbus, Ohio

DE 1\115 CASE Sr. Louis, Mo.


DAVID CAYLOR Knoxville, Iowa

NORA COOK Royal Oaks, Mich.

ROLAND CROUCHER Seymour, Ind.

JEFF DAWSON Akron, Ohio

BETTY DUNLAP Plymouth, Ind.

PAT DURHAM Toledo, Ohio

SHARON CRANE St. Louis, Mo.

LOIS DEHMLOW St. Paul, Minn.

JOSEPH ECK Indianapolis, Ind.


KATHY ECK Indianapolis, Ind.

DEBBIE FOSTER Panama City, Fla.

ALBERT FRIEND Hamilton, Ohio

GARY ERICKSON Shreveport, La.

LAVIE FOSTER Panama City, Fla.

REUBEN GARCIA Richton Park, Ill.

HARRY EVANS III Andover, N.B., Can.

TREADUS FRENCH West Memphis, Ark.

DAVID GEE Andover, N. B., Can.


BER IE GILLESPIE Fairmont, W. Va.

CRISE GILLESPIE Fairmont, W. Va.

DAVID GUZZETTA Burlington, Wise.

BERNARD GILLESPIE Fairmont, W. Va.

MIKE GILLIAM Madison, Wise.

TERESA HALL Flatwoods, Ky.

BRIDGET GILLESPIE Fairmont, W. Va.

LEE GOHDES St. Paul, Minn.

GARY HARRIS No. Canton, Ohio


BECKY HILDERBRAND

Elmburst, Ill.

WILLIAM KIDW ELL

Columbus, Ohio

KEITH LEAMAN

Detroit, Mich.

KENNETH HIMEBAUCH

Burlington. Wise.

GRACE KIRKENDALL

Athens, Ohio

CHARLES LEHTO

Ocala, Fla.

VICKIE KADER

Elyria. Ohio

ROGER KOREN

St. Paul, Minn.

FRANK MALLOY

Kirkland, Ill.


DANIEL MEITZLER Allentown, Penn.

DONALD MEYERSON Bloomington, Minn.

DEAN MONTGOMERY Atlanta, Georgia

NEVA MORANN Plainville, Conn.

DA VID NE VINS Camden, Dela.

DA VID NORRIS St. Paul, Minn.

JAMES MOLBERG Red Wing, Minn.

J AMES MURDOCK McHenry, Ill.

JEFF PATTON Akron, Ohio


JOE PATTON Akron, Ohio

RICHARD PIERCE Cornelius, Oregon

WILLIAM ROBERTS Milwaukee, Wise.

JACK PEVELER Akron, Ohio

DA VID PORTER Columbus, Ohio

RA YMOND ROBINSON Chicago, Ill.

EDWARD PHILLIPS Columbus, Ohio

JAMES POWELL Bristol, Conn.

WILLIAM ROOS Long Beach, Calif.


FRANK SA Herrin, Ill.

MARK SMITH Mogadore, Ohio

A JETTE SUAREZ Bogota, olumbia, S.A.

FRED S ITH Cin innati" Ohio

GARY STICKLER Miami, Fla.

RAFAEL SUAREZ Bogota, Columbia, S.A.

JAMES SMITH Oskaloo a. 10.va

SCOTT STOOKSBURY Lansing, 111.

HARRY TALLMAI Ravenswood, W. Va.


DOUGLAS T AYLOR Mattoon, Ill.

RICHARD TYSON Milwaukee, Wise.

GLENDA WATSO '

T allahass ee, Fla.

MARSHA TRACEY Bethel, Delaware

DIANE WARFIELD Lancaster, Ohio

BOI E WATTS Albany, Oregon

RICHARD TRACEY Bethel, Delaware

LARRY WARR N West Helena, Ark.

JERRY WEDLUND Eau laire, Wise,


THOMAS WEISSER

St. Paul, Minn.

GARVI

WHATLEY

Zachary, Louisiana

DEBORAH ZEEK

orthumberland, Penn.

36

DEBORAH WILLIAMS

Livonia, Mich.


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. . .in th

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Holding fast the faithful Word...

. . .in the "B" Class 48


THIRD YEAR Eric

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50


A

V I T

E S

52


Glee

Club

PSALM 47 6 Sing praises to God, sing praises: sing praises unto our King, sing praises. 7 For God is the King of all the earth: sing ye praises with understanding.

54


A.B.I. Quartets on Tour

55


ORCHESTRA PSALM 150 RAISE ye the LORD. Praise God in his sanctuary: praise him in the firmament of his power. 2 Praise him for his mighty acts: praise him according to his excellent greatness. 3 Praise him with the sound of the trumpet: praise him with the psaltery and harp. 4 Praise him with the timbrel and dance: praise him with stringed instruments and organs. 5 Praise him upon the loud cymbals: praise him upon the high sounding cymbals. 6 Let every thing that hath breath praise the LORD. Praise ye the LORD.

P

56


TALENT NIGHT

57


Rev. Dale Brown ('53) & family Peru

Rc\'. Jam,,;, Dallas ('66) 8rlrl sh l~les

Rev. Denzil Bolton ('56) & family Liberia

Rev. James Wood ('58) & family Iran

MISSIONARIES Rev. Vernon Johnsor Swed(~n

ACTS 1

8 But ye shall receive power, after that the Holy Ghost is come upon you: and ~e shall be witnesses unto me both in Jerusalem, and in all Judea, and in Sli-ma'ri-a, and unto the uttermost part of the earth.

Rev, Alan Demos ('72) & family Greece

Rev. John Turkington ('67) & family Australia

Barbara Flannery ('64) Columbia, Sourh America

Rev. Bobby ('61) & Mrs. Dykes France


Rev. & Mrs. Jerry Burns ('70) Venezuela

Rev. FrCll ('47) & Mrs. SCOtt Uruguay Rev. John Brian (' 52) & family Australia

FROM A.B.1.

Rev. Boshra ('58) & Mrs. SedI Egypt

Rev. Robert ('45) & Mrs. Norris Brazil

Rev. Jamcs Burton ('60) & family Venczuela

Rev. John Harris ('63) & familv Ethiopia .

Rev. Bennie ('62) & Mrs. DeMerchanr ('62) Brazil

Rev. Harold Shoemaker (' 64) & fam ily Madagascar

Rev. Mack Carpenter & family South Africa


IFOUNDER'S ~

60


Guest speakers (opposite page) Rev. Floyd Henson, Warsaw, Indiana (left) and Louisiana District Superintendent Rev. C. G. 'vVecks (right). Alumni President, Rev. William Connell (top left) and Apostolic Bible Church ladies preparing meals (top right). Rev. R. G. Cook, Lancaster, Ohio (lower left), and 2nd year choral readers (right).

61


VISITORS Clockwise - opposite page Rev. Eddie Guinn Rev. W. M. Parker Rev. S. W. Chambers Rev. M. D. Padfield and Rev. M. H. lansford Rev. M. D. Padfield

Clockwise Rev. and Mrs. C.L. Rigdon Rev. C.A. Nelson Rev. and Mrs. 8.8. Chelette Rev. T. Hammond and Rev. K.E. Minniear

62


63


G

R A

o U A

1974

~~~

T

I

o N

64


dramas banquet diplomas choral reading caps and gown~


A.B.1. WIVES & HUSBANDS

66


Job Opportunities

NORTHWF:Sn~R[

Student:

REFL INC co. Cary Erickson

SUPER AMERICA Student: Curtis Whittle

AVIS CAR RF:i\"i,'AL Students: Dave Guzzetta Dave MacDonald Bill Decker Dick Tyson Frank Sandy Don Bailey Mike Bachmeyer Don Hargate Marty Chapman

COOK Student: Jim Smith 68


NA TIONAL CAR RENT AL

Students:

Joe Hutchinson Kevin Olson Leonard Hodges

/

.I

~

~ "7

Studem:

3-M Mark Cottrill

AMERICAN I fOIST

Student;

Doug: Taylor

BUS - DRIVER Student: Bonnie Gee

SECURITY GUARD Student: Dathan Jones

69


PREACH THE WO

o

I

/'

1 1


SHUT THE DOOR ST. MATTHEW 6

6 But thou, when thou prayest, enter into thy closet, and when thou hast shut thy door, pray to thy Father which is in secret; and thy Father which seeth in secret shall reward thee openly.


Now a reality, we see the New Girls' Dorm from its be inning in prayer to J. finL hed room. We drove that first stake into the ground by faith. We thank God for those who have contributed in finance and labor to make rhis facility possible.

73


Paul Gregory Memorial Library

74


YEA BOOK STAFF F ACUL TY ADVISOR: Rev. Dale Hodges

EDITORIAL DIRECTOR: Mrs. S.G. Norris

PRINTER: Rev. Gerald Grant

LAYOUT EDITORS: Church and Commercial AdsGary Erickson

SALES: Friends, Church and Commercial AdsMike Gilliam

CIassesDebbie Bennett leva Morann

PHOTOGRAPHY: Marty Chapman Art Hodges Roger Koren

FacuItv and ActivitiesLois D hml w Be ky Hilderbrand Debbi Zeek

ASSIST A~TS: Dennis Burns Itarr E ans Bonnie G e David Ge Berni Gillespi Charles Lehto Jim Molberg

FOLDING A D COLLATING: Ke Him baueh Frank andy Scott Staok bury

75


76


77


Winter

Fall

78


S ri g

Summer


...holding f st the f ithful word

as he h th been taught,

that he may be able by sound doctrine both to ex

rt and to convince

the gainsayers.

titus 1:9


C A

A G


APPROVAL

BOARD OF EDUCATION, STATE OF MINNESOTA VET RA 's ADMINISTRA nON Title 38; U. S. CodeChapt. 31 Voc. Rehab. Chapt. 34 G. I. Veterans Chapt. 35 Widows and dependents IMMIGRA nOl DEP' \ TMENT Washington, D. C. NATIONAL SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM Washington, D. C. BOARD OF CHRISTIAN EDUCATION of the United Pentecostal Church, ~t. Louis, Mo.

LOCATION

The Apostolic Bible Institute, Inc., is located in St. Paul, Minnesota, the capital city of the State. It is equally accessible to the business areas of Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minnesota, via Interstate 94 and 494. St. Paul has a population of 350,000. It is an educational center, the home of many colleges, universities, and schools. Its temperate climate is conducive to study. The school is also in the heart of a great metropolis which offers numerous opportunities for employment. An international airport brings us students from many parts (If United States and the world.

82


o

FICIAL BOARD

Rev. S. G Norris . . . . • . • . • • • . . • • • • . . • . . . . . President Rev. Wm. Connell . . • . . • . . • . . . • . . . . . . " Vice President R v. W. C. Gleason . . • . . • . . . • • . • . • • . . • • • . • Treasurer Rv.G.F.Grant . • . . . • • • . • . . . • . . . • • • . • • • • Secretary EXECUTIVE BOARD R v. Rev. Rev. Mrs.

. G. o r r i s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . President R. Sabin • • . . • . • • . • • • • . . . • • • • . . • . • . . Member W. C. Gleason . . . . . • . . • . . . • xecutive Vice President Jessie A. Norris . . . • • . • • . • . . . • • . . . • . • Secretary

TRUSTEE BO RD Rev. S. G. Norris •.••...••.••.••.• St. Paul, Minnesota Mrs. Jessie A.. orris •••••.•..•••... St. Paul, Minnesota Rev. Geo. Chambers. • . • . . . . • . • . • • • • . Columbus, Ohio Rev. L. J. Roshon . . • . . . . •. . • . . . Portsmouth, Ohio Rev. James H. imison . . . . . . • . • . . . .. Indianapolis, Indiana Rev. vV m. Connell • . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . • . . Ocala, Florida R v. W. C. Gleason . • . . . . . . • • . . . .. St. Paul, Minnesota Rev. G. F. Grant . • • • . • . . • . . . . •. St. Paul, Minnesota Rev. R. Sabin .•.•••••••• . . . . . . .. St. Paul, Minnesota ADVISORY BOARD Rev. Rev. Rev. Rev. Rev. Rev. Rev. Rev. Rev. Rev. Rev. Rev. Rev. Rev. Rev.

R. Bowe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . • . . • St, Paul, Minnesota Francis Ellis. . . . . . • . • . • . . • .. Milwaukee, Wisconsin Eddie Guinn .•••.•••••..•.••. St. Louis, Missouri Robert Hayes . . . . • • . . . • . • . . • . Mattoon, Illinois Fred Kinzie . • . . . • . • . • . . • • . • • • . • Toledo, Ohio Paul Leaman . . . . . . . . • • • • . • . . . • . Detroit, Michigan Robert McFarland • • . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fortville, Indiana Wayne Mitchell . . . . . . . . • • • . . • . • . •• Moline, Illinois C. A. Nelson • . • . • . . . . . . • • . . . Claremore, Oklahoma Calvin Rigdon • . . . • . • . . • • . • . . . . St, Louis, Missouri Wayne Rooks . • • . • . . . . . • . . • .• Miami, Florida Oliver Spencer . • . • • . . . • . . . . • • . • Princeton, Illinois Wayne Trout. . . . . • . . . . . . • . . . . . •. Dover, Delaware D. L. Welch. . . • • . . • . • . • . . • • • .• Pensacola, Florida Robert Whalen . . . . . • . . • • . . Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

ALUMNI OF A.B.I. Rev. Wm. Connell Rev. Gerald Grant Members receive voting priVileges (A.B.I. by -laws)

. . • . . . .. President Secretary - Treasurer after paying

$ 5.00 dues.

ALUMNI COMMITTEE OF 100 Rev. Wm. Connell . • • • • • . . . . . • . • . . . . • . • • • • President Rev. Gerald Grant . • • • . • . . . . . . . . . . Secretary - Treasurer A donation of $ 25.00 toward Committee of 100 gives membership and benefits of a free soft-back edition of the annual (THE WAY), a free banquet ticket and a year's subscription to "The Pentecostal Way." Endorsed by United Pentecostal Church, Inc., Hazelwood, Mo.

83

ADMINISTRATIVE PERSONNEL


HISTORY

Rev. S. G. Norris possessed a d ep conviction early in 1937 concerning the need for trained Pentecostal workers. This callto -teach grew into a responsibility, not only to Rev. Norris' own heart, but to members of :M..idway Pentecostal Tabernacle, where he pastored. So much so that united impetus was recorded in the minutes of the Tabernacle on May 21, 1937: "The congregation met and decided to have a Bible School beginning October 4, 1937. The school, to be supported by tuition and pledg from members:' - A. G. Newstrand, Sec. After much pray r and many sacrifices the doors of the Tabernacle pencd to fourteen students - the pit neers of the Institute. Dedicated faculty m mbers, full of the Spirit of Cod, joined in the effort a rain young men and women for Gospel work. w re

On April 21, 1943, Apostolic Bible Institute was incorporated under the laws of the State of Minnesota as a non-profit ins itute for religi us education and for t "aining of ministers of th Gospel and missionar"" s, and to continue the work which was founded in October, 1937. Several y~ars later, Midway Pentecostal Tabernacl purchased a church building at Hague and Vi toria Aves. in St. Paul. postolic Bible Institute occupied the former Tabernacle for several years. Growtll of the school necessitated the purchasing of a school building at 745 Grand ve. The 464 Pi rce St. building was then remodel d into an eleven-apartment huilding for married students. Dormitori s at 721, 736, and 713 Lincoln Ave., and 449 Beacon St., provided living space for single students. The purchase of a forty-acre campus in the Fall of 1966 and the erection of nn admi.nistration building plus an auditorium seating over five hundred, three dormitories plus the purchase of an additional dormitory at 2510 Hudson Rd., comprise the Institute's efforts thus tar. [n humil1ty we bow with thankfulness to the One who gave the inspiration in 1937. In thankfulness we acknowledge the loyal cooperation of the members of Midway Pentecostal Tabernacle (now Apostolic Bible Church) and the faculty and staff. Al these, and more, have transformed Rev. Norris' vision into a tangible reality, Cod has given Apostolic Bible Institute twelve full time faculty members, representing one hundred and seventy-eight years of Bible school teaching experience, three full time dormitory superVisors plus twelve staff members. What a modern-day Pentecostal miracle!

OBJECTIVES

From October, 1937, until the present date, Apostolic Bible Institute emphasizes training of ministers of the Gospel, evangelists, missionaries, Sunday School teachers and workers and efficient lay workers. The final objective is the Christian worker, in whatever field his calling lies, efficiently trained for the promulgation of the Gospel. The Institute strives for extensive knowledge of the Bible, with special emphasis on knowledge of the Pentecostal doctrines. All courses are field tested and proven to "work" in the Pentecostal church. They are vocationally slanted. Some students, not called or fitted for the field of religion in a leadership capacity, have gone on to become teachers. Others attend the Bible Institute to obtain a firm background in a general Bible education as a foundation for life. However, the majority of students go into active work for the Lord and therefore are trained with that in mind.

84


To train the young student in a disciplined Christian life, leading him into deeper spiritual understanding of the things of God. To lead the student to a degree of maturity and seriousness necessary for a minister.

SECONDARY OBJECTIVES

To cultivate in the enrollee a love for study and research in Bible subjects. To fit the student for life correlated to the ministry. To develop in him a concern for others, to be useful in his community especially in his role as a Christian.

We believe the Bible to be inspired of God - the infallible Word of God. The basic and fundamental doctrine of Apostolic Bible Institute is the Bible standard of full salvation - repentance, baptism in water by immersion in the Name of the Lord Jesus Christ, and the baptism of the Holy Ghost with the initial sign of speaking with other tongues as the ~pirit gives utterance. We believe in the one everliving eternal God, infinite in power, holy in nature, attributes and purpose and possessing absolute indivisible deity. This one true God has revealed Himself as Father, through His Son, in redemption and as the Holy Spirit, by emanation. (I Cor. 8:6, Eph. 4:6, II COL 5: 19, Joel 2:28.) The Son of God. The one true God, the Jehovah of the Old Testament, took upon Himself the form of man, and as the Son of man, was born of the virgin Mary. As Paul says, "and without controversy great is the mystery of godliness: God was manifest in the flesh, justified in the Spirit, seen of angels, preached unto the Gentiles, believed on in the world, received up into glory." I Tim. 3: 16. The Name ••• "His name shall be called Wonderful, Counsellor, the Mighty God, the Everlasting Father, the Prince of Peace." "And she shall bring forth a son, and thou shalt call His name Jesus: for He shall save His people from their sins." Matt. 1:21. Healing. We believe that the vicarious suffering of the Lord Jesus Christ paid for the healing of our bodies, as for the salvation of our souls. "Himself took our infirmities and bare our sicknesses." Matt. 8: 17. Jesus said of believers ••• "they shall lay hands on the sick, and they shall recover." "Is any sick among you? Let him call for the elders of the church and let them pray over him, anointing him with oil in the name of the Lord and the prayer of faith will save the sick, and the Lord shall raise him up." James 5:14-16. Holiness. We approve of every activity which will promote the interest of spiritual progress and the soon coming of the Lord for His Church. However, evidences of worldliness which are not conducive to Christianity and godly liVing and which will prohibit being taken in the rapture, we firmly disallow. Rapture. We believe that the time is drawing near when our Lord shall appear; then the" .•. the dead in Christ shall rise first: Then we which are alive and remain shall be caught up together with them in the clouds, to meetthe Lord in the air. .. " I Thess. 4: 13-17.

85

DOCTRINAL STATEMENT


FACULTY

REV. S. G. NORRIS, President

od

Testament, Doctrine I and n, Epistles, Advan d pistles, Church Government. Busines sLaw, Advanced Church Gov rnment. Ohio State University; Forty years pastoral experience. Thirtyeight years teaching at Apostolic Bible Institute.

MRS. HERSCHEL FOSTER Designing Apostolic Bible Ins itute, Macalester College; t aching experience at Apostolic Bible Institute.

Sixteen years

MISS PAMELA GLEASON Fundamentals of MuSiC, Beginner's Piano, Music Talent Development, Piano, Organ (private lessons). postol'ic Bible Institute; Five years teaching experience.

REV. WENDELL GLEASON Life of Christ, Acts, Minor Prophets, Inter-testamental History, Applied Music, Choir Leading, Glee Club, Speech, Drama. Veteran, .5. Army, Apostolic Bible Institute, MacPhail Music College, University of Minnesota; Twenty - fi\'e years Ass't. Minister - Apostolic Bible Church, Twenty - six years teaching experience at Apostolic Bible Institute.

REV. GERALD GRANT Church History, Business Law, Building Construction I and 11. Apostolic Bible Institute, Macalester College, University of Minnesota, .S.B.; Ass't. Minister - Apostolic Bible Church, Fighteen years teaching experience at Apostolic Bible Institute.

MRS. GERALD GRANT Religious Education. Apostolic Bible Institute, Macalester College; Twenty years teaching experience at Apostolic Bible Institute.

REV. KELSEY GRIFFIN Library SCience, English, Current Events, Speech. Northland College, University of Wisconsin;Threeyears teaching experience at Apostolic Bible Institute.

MRS. C. E. LUNDQUIST Missions. (guest teacher) Apostolic Bible Institute teacher for thirty - three years.

MR. JAMES MOLBERG r':nglish. University of Minnesota, Apostolic Bible Institute.

86


REV. DAVID NORRIS Religious Education, Youth Evangelism. Apostolic Bible Institute.

MRS. JESSIE A. NORRIS, Child Psychology, Educational Psychology, Applied Psychology Religious Education, Storytelling, Choral Reading. Ohio State University, B.A., Macalester College plus extra credits, Apostolic Bible Institute; Thirty-seven years teaching experience at Apostolic Bible Institute.

REV. ROBERT SABIN English (Reading Vocabulary, Growth and Development), Religion Analysis, Church History Analysis, Public Speaking, Apologetics, Homiletics, Orchestra. Apostolic Bible Institute, Winona State Teachers College, B.A., University of Minnesota; Pastor of Apostolic Bible Church, twelve years teaching experience at Apostolic Bible Institute.

CALE DAR FIRST SEMESTER Faculty Seminar . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . August 25 - 29, Minnesota - Manitoba District (Labor Day) Camp Meeting Grey Cloud Island .•........ August 30, 31, September 1, Cafeteria opens. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. September 2, Freshman and transfer students registration and orientation. . .... . • •. September 2 - 5, Upper classmen registration and schedules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. September 8, September 8, All classes begin Welcome Night and reception September 14, Thanksgiving vacation November 27, 28, Christmas cantata. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . December 18, A.B.I. Christmas skits. . . . . . . . . . . . . . December 19, Christmas vacation begins 1:00 P.M December 19, classes resume 8:00 A.M. . . . . . . . . . . .. January 6, Church Christmas program December 21, End of First Semester January 30,

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SCHOOLING

* * *

Apostolic Bihle Institute, Inc., offers graduates of a three year Theology course and fourth -year graduates of the Advanced Theology course a diploma. This entitles graduates to a General License with the United Pentecostal Church, Inc.

ASSOCIATION Apostolic Bible Institute, Inc., is associated with the United Pentecostal Church, Inc., tlazelwood, Mo" 63042. It cooperates with the beliefs of this organization and its doctrinal position has been lifted from the manual of that organization.

NON - DISCRIMINATION Apostolic Bible Institute maintains no racial discrimination.

PRICE Apostolic Dible Institute, Inc •• offers, as it always has, Christian education at the lowest cost which we can possibly charge. We are offering well-qualified, full time teachers, who work for the scbool all year.

*

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS THE LOGY COURSE. Three Year Cours . Born again experience: repentance, baptism in water in the Name of Jesus Christ, reception of the Holy Ghost (or seeking) according to Acts 2:4. A life of holiness. A teachable spirit. A wilUngness to obey Apostolic Bible Institute HIles. A sincere desire to study God's Word. 1. At least seventeen (17) years of age. 2. A high school graduate. (non-graduates admitted by special examination.) 3. Three satisfactory character references, one from his present pastor. 4. A satisfactory health certificate and chest x-ray report from his physician. Must be sound mentally, also. 5. A transcript of credits from his last school. 6. Payment f $ 15.00 matriculation fee - non refundable. (* Veterans - please s 'e stUd nt expense page)

ADVANCED THEOLOGY COURSE. Fourth Year Course. Born Again experience: repent nc , baptism in water in the Name of Jesus ,hrist, F' eption of the Holy Ghost (or seeking) according to Acts 2:4. A lift:' of hollness. A teachable spirit. A \ illingness to Obl'y Apostolic ~ible Institute rules. A sincer d'sire to study God's ,Vord. M"ntal ability to grasp fourth year subjects.

*

1. At least twenty (20) years of age. 2. A hi~h school graduate and a graduate of an approved three year course in Theology either from Apostolic Bible Institut ' or another approved I ible College. . • Thre satisfactury charact r ref r ,nces. one from his present pastor. 4. sati factory health certificate and chest x-ray report [rom l1's ph sician. Must be sound mentally, also. 5. transcript of credits from his last school. 6. Payment of $ 15.00 matriculation fee - non refundable. (* Vet"'rans - please see student expense page)

REGISTRATION Students are required to regi ster before the beginning of each semester. The final date for enrollment is three weeks after the beginning of each semester.

88


LATE REGISTRATION Late registrations are accepted only with the approval of the President. lt is understood that all work in all classes that is missed by late registration will be made up within three weeks. In case of delay in registration beyond the registration date indicated in the Bible Institute's calendar, a fine of five dollars will be imposed for the first day and fifty cents for each day thereafter. No waiver of fee or portion of tuition will be granted for the late registration.

CHANGE IN SUBJECT Changes in subjects will be p rmitted only within two weeks after registration. Changes later than two weeks will producE; a failure in the course.

INCOMPLETE WORK

*

*

*

Incomplete work must be finished within three weeks after the issuance of report cards. Otherwise, credit will not be given for the course.

ABSENCES AND LEAVES

*

School days begin with 8:00 A.M. classes. At eight (8) minutes after the time that a class begins, students are marked absent even though they arrive after that time. Class attendance is recorded and grade points are lowered with absences. Students will be granted leave by the President and that only in case of emergency.

CLASS OFFIC ERS

*

Presidents, vice-presidents and secretaries from each class (elected by the class members) cooperate with the faculty to form a counselling group.

STANDARDS OF PROGRESS

*

Report cards are issued once a semester. A student may obtain progress reports at any time from an instructor. Grades depend upon class discussion, homework, tests, final examinations as well as attitude, ability and effort. Each instructor adheres to the standard grading policy: Excellent Good Average Passing Failure

A

B C D F

94-100 87-93 80-86 75-79 Below 75

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS The three year Theology course reqUires one hundred and twenty (120) hours credits. (The usual load for a student is twenty (20) hours per semester.) Also, each graduating student must attain one hundred and twenty honor points for graduation. (AS each C grade hour is equal to one honor point. graduating students must obtain at least a C average, unless the student, because of a debility, obtains a modified diploma or is a special student, receiving a special diploma.) Also, no diploma will be given to a student who has not met all of his financial obligations to the school. He also must have completed all required subjects. 89

*


*

HONOR POINT SYSTEM One hundr d and twenty (120) honor points are necessary for gr duation. A student ho earns fifty (50) honor points per sem ster is on the Presid nt's honor roll and obtains a certification of honor point a knowledgm nt. The President's aduation honor roll cons ists of those who have obtained thr hundred (300) honor points. Example of bonor points for a three (3) credit course: A B C D F

*

(3 honor points) ••••••• 9 (2 honor points) .•••.•• 6 (1 honor point) .••••••• 3 (0 honor points) ••••.•• 0 (minus 3 honor points) •• -3

ho or honor honor honor honor

points POintB points points points

STUDENT EXPENSES Tuition per 20 hour semester. . •• • • . • • • . • • • • • • • •. $250.00 Tuition is P' yab1e twice yearly - at the beginning of each semest r. 6 semesters of 20 hour credits qualifies for a diploma. Additional classes available: Tuition - additional credits per redit hour (ex ept Glee Club and Designing), ••...•...•••.••.• 10.00 Tuition - pan time per credit hour ••••..••..•.•••.• 15.00 Tuition - auditing fee per credit hour •..•.•..•••••••• 15.00 Tuition - electives, non -r fundabl (except for veterans * ) Matriculation fee per semester, non-refundable (except for veterans *) • • • • • • • • • • • • 15.00 Room deposit ~ . 25.00 refundable at end of semester •••..•.••••••••••• 10.00 Late registration fee, first day •.••••.••••.•••.•••.•••..•••.•••• 5.00 each day after first day • • . . • • • • • • • . • • . • • . . . • • •• .50 Piano ·lessons per semester • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• 40.00 Organ lessons per semester. • • • • • . • • • • . • • • • . . . •• 50.00 withdrawal fee (piano or organ) •..••••...•••.••• 8.00 Girl's and Boy's room - weekly ••••.•.•.•.••.••.•. 8.00 Girl's board - weekly • . . . . . • • • • . • . . . • . • . . • . • • • 23.00 Boy's board - weekly ...•.•.••••••.••••.•.•••• 26.00 Time payment on past due accounts

•.••

one percent per month

NO STUDENT ADMITTED TO A.B.T. DORMITORIES WITHOUT A.B.I. CASH REGISTER RECEIPT FOR TUlTION.

*

REFUND SCHEDULE Non -veterans: In case the student withdraws from school or drops individual classes, a refund will be made as follows: During first week • . • . • . • • • • . • • . • . . • • • • . • . . . • • 100% During second week ..••••••••.•••.•••••••••••. 80% During third week ..•••••••••.•.•••••••••••••. 60% During fourth week •...•••••••••....•..•••••••• 40% During fifth week ..••••••.••..•.•..•••••.••••. 20% During sixth week and thereafter ••••••••••••••••... 0% '" Veterans: Not more than $10.00 of the registration fee shall be deemed non-refundable. All other charges and tuition will be based on a daily pro rata basis.

90


DORMITORY ROOMS Dormitory rooms are comfortable and clean. All rooms are outside rooms and equipped with ampl furniture. All s udents maintain their own rooms and are res ol1sible for cleanliness and tidiness. o cookinll; is permitted in dormitory rooms. No electrical appliances are allowed. Lunches and "snacks" are provided by the dormitory supervi or occasionally at her or his discretion.

GENERAL INFORMATION

All single students are required to reside in the dormitory except thos l' siding with par nts locally. Each stud nt is given a STUDE T RULE BOOK which is his guide for conduct while at Apostolic Bibl Institute.

HOUSING MARRIED STUDENTS

*

Housing for married students is available within easy driving distance from the nst.itute. El en apartments are available in our own housing. All other apartments must be rented.

WHA T TO BRING

*

Since lin n ar not provided by the school, students should bring them. Sheets, pillow-cases, blankets, bedspreads, 1 pillow, and towels are listed as linens. The Oxford - King James version of the Bible is suggested for class use. The Apostolic Bible Institute orchestra will welcome new students who bring their musical instruments.

CAFETERIA

*

All single students are required to eat their meals in the school cafeteria. Board is payable in advance. No money will be refunded for meals that are missed in the school cafeteria, except in cases where advance notification of leave of absence has been given.

PRAYER

*

Students are taught the privilege of prayer, but they are also required to pray at least fifteen minutes a day. However, there are many opportunities for prayer. Each class has its assigned periods of prayer. Each class period opens with prayer. On Thursdays and Sundays a one hour prayer period is available for students besides prayer time and altar work at our regular services. Devotional s rvices in the curriculum also gives the advantage of prayer.

CHURCH SERVICES

*

Church services at the Apostolic Bible Church are not only compulsory but a joyful duty. There the students see in action many of the lessons learned during classes. Sunday School, Sunday Morning Worship, Sunday ~vening Evangelistic services, Thursday night prayer and worship services and revival services must be attended by the students. Permission must be granted to be excused.

VISITING MINISTERS Students are privileged to hear the finest preachers, missionaries and ministers in our organization as they minister to Apostolic Bible Church.

91

*


*

ENGAGEMENTS AND MARRIAGE Students must obtain special permission from the President to be engaged or married while in school. This permission will not be granted first year students. This ruling also applies to engagements or marriage during the summer vacation period.

*

CLOTHING Students are asked to observe rules of decency and modesty in the choice of wearing apparel. Classroom attire establishes the wellgroomed ministerial effect and trains the young student in correct appearance. No casual clothes are allowed in the classroom. Ties are a "must." Both young ladies and young men dress as Christians.

*

LAUNDRY Dormitories are equipped with washers and dryers. Dry cleaning must be taken to a nearby cleaner.

*

PART TIME EMPLOYMENT Students have no difficulty in obtaining part time work. Almost every student who attends Apostolic Bible Institute works on such an arrangement. The afternoons - after 2 P.M. are available for such work. We run bus routes to take and pick up students at their employment.

*

*

CARS Students must obtain permission from the office before bringing a car to Apostolic Bible Institute. All students who have cars must also carry Public Liability coverage, Property Damage coverage, regardless of the state registration. Each owner of a car registers his insurance policy number and license number when registering for classes. He also must have a valid driver's license. The owner of a car is not to loan his car to others without permission of the office. He is also not to use his car for transporting those of the opposite sex without permission. There is ample parking room for cars on our forty acre campus.

MAIL Mail is received once a day at the Institute and is distributed to the students in private mail slots. A U.S. mail box for the collection of mail stands in our entrance hall and the mail is collected every day but Sunday.

*

SCHOOL PAPER TIlE PENTECOSTAL WAY. This paper is printed on a monthly basis and contains news from alumni as well as articles written by faculty members and students.

*

SCHOOL YEARBOOK THE WAY. This annual has been published for many years and forms a collector's item to supplement previous copies. We are complimented when we see these annuals in a long row in our friends' bookshelves.

92


APOSTOLIC BIBLE INSTITUTE

I

3M

I

~

I

8

E~ers Lake

Hudson Rd.

..

\Ba~ti'e

St. Paul

APOSTOLIC BIBLE Blvd.INSTITUTE N.

69 44 Hudson ota St. Pau 1 , Minnes -7686 Phone: 739

93

55119

8 II


DOCTRINE, 121

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES

One Semester, Two Hours a Week, Two Credits

* BIBLE OLD TEST AMENT, 140 One Semester, Three Hours a Week, Three Credits A study of the Pentateuch (first five books). The Days of Creation. The patriarchs from Adam to Moses. The beginning of the Hebrew race. The call of Abraham. The migration from Canaan to Egypt. A thorough study of the Law given to Moses. The Tabernacle Plan. The Levitical Priesthood. OLD TEST AMENT, [41 One Semester, Thr

~Hours a

Week, Thr 'cCredits

The conquest of Canaan - Joshua. The heights and depths of the uncertain time of the Judges. The Book of Ruth - a ten year oasis during the period of the Judges. 1st and 2nd Samuel - a great judge's formula for victory through prayer instead of warfare. The great Kings (assisted by prophets) - Saul, David and Solomon. The division of the kingdom - Israel from Jeroboam through Hoshea, 721 B.C., and their captivity to Assyria. Judah and its fall to Baby Ion in two captivities 606 and 588 â&#x20AC;˘C. Daniel's book - the backbone of prophecy. Gentile empires - Babylon, MediaPersia, Greece and Rome. A Bible-packed course - it opens the Rcholar's mind to a host of thrilling experiences. l)OCTRINI~,

120

One Semester

The difference between John the Baptist's experience and that of Apostle Paul. Holy, Righteous and Wicked. The difference between the Rapture of the Church and the White Throne Judgment. Where are the Dead? Demonstrations, charts, blackboard drawings, question bees and recitations make for interesting learning of a difficult subject. DOCTRINE, 220 One Semester, Two Hours a Week, Two Credits The churches of Asia - their depiction of Church Ages. The Rapture. God's plan for the Jews. The three sets of judgments - seals, trumpets and vials. The martyrdom of those who stand for Christ In the tribulation. The rise of the harlot church. The coming of the man of sin - 666 the Ami-Christ. The Battle of Armageddon. Students are thrilled as many of the events prophesied of in this course come to pass in this generation. DOCTRINE, 221 One Semest r, Two Hours a Week, Two Credits The thousand years of peace - the Millenium. The last resurrection and the destination of the righteous and the wicked. Wilful versus ignorant sin. Marriage and divorce. Eternal Security and other false doctrines. Puzzling phases of doctrine are examined in thiS study with special reference to the above subjects.

Two Hours a Week, Two Credits EPISTLES, 340

Aim: to train students to be able to understand and explain the great doctrines of the Bible. The Mighty God in Christ, "Let us make man." Water baptism in the Name of Jesus Christ. The evidence of the reception of the Holy Ghost.

One Semester, Three Hours a Week, Three Credits First Thessalonians: The coming of the Lord for His Church. The details of proper Christian behavior. Detailed explanation of the rapture (or translation) of the Church from earth to heaven. Second Thessalonians: The clearest account of progress of Anti-Christ (other than Revelation). Anti-Christ's final declaration that He is God. First Corinthians 1 - 8: "The Tabernacle Plan of the New Testament." Marriage problems separation, divorce. EPISTLES, 341 One Semester, Three Hours a 'Neek, Three Credits The Lord's Supper. Operations of the nine gifts of the Holy Spirit. Great lessons on charity. The resurrection. Romans: Chapter by chapter analysis. continued

94


EPISTLES, 341 (continued) Reconciliation by death of Clu.. ist. Salvation through life of Christ. God's plan for the Jews - past, present and future. This study is "bread and butter" for the prospective pastor as well as those who wish to understand church structureo EPISTLES, 440 One

Semestl~.i.-_ Thi(;~'

Hours a Week, Three Credits

This Advanced Theology course covers the Book of Hebrews. The Son - the express Image of God. His incarnation. The "rest" that remains for the children of God. Christ our High Priest. The Christian who falls away. Christ - after the order of Melchizedek.. Various types of personalities in chapter on faith. Brotherly love. EPISTLES, 441 One Semester, Three Hours a Week, Three Credits

MINOR PROPHETS, 240

Colossians: The mystery of the ages. A highlight - Gentiles saved! Capital and labor and their consideration one of the other. James: Joy in suffering. 路I路:arthly Wisdom vs worldly wisdom.

One Semester, Two Hours a Week, Two Credits Miscellaneous and post-exilic prophets. Unique ministry. Background of each prophet. Appraisal of writing of each prophet. Present day application.

INTERTESTAMI:NTAL HISTORY, 241 One

Semester,

MAJOR PROPHETS, 422

One Hour a Week, One Credit

One Semester, Three Hours a Week, Three Credits

Formulation of Jewish institutions. Investigating outstanding political leaders of intertestamental period.

Isaiah, his rank, character and times. Structure of his book. Messianic views. Outstanding texts.

ACTS, 322 MAJOR PROPHETS, 423 One Semester, Two Hours a Week, Two Credits One Semester, Three Hours a Week, Three Credits Jeremiah. His rank, character and times. His message. Structure and content of his book. Symbols. Ministry to nations. Ezekiel. His times, call, mission, method and character. Jerusalem's doom and hope. Preaching values contained in his book. Practical lessons of permanent value.

Saul's conversion journey. Philip's ministry in Samaria. Peter's ministry to the Gentiles. ACTS, 323 One Semester, Two Hours a Week, Two Credits Missionary journeys of Paul. Events - city by city.

* BIBLE

MINOR PROPHETS, 239

BIBLE GEOGRAPHY, 122

One Semester, Two Hours a Week, Two Credits

One Semester, Two Hours a Week, Two Credits

8th century and 7th century prophets. Unique ministry compared to priesthood. Background of each prophet. Appraisal of writing of each prophet. Present day application.

Prominent countries, bodies of water, rivers and mountains of Biblical import. Development of relationship between geographical locations and Biblical events. Use of geography in sermons and teaching. Palestine - the "bridge."

95

RELATED


BIBLE GEOGRAPHY,

123

MAPS and CHARTS, 424,425

One Semester, Two Hours a Week, Two Credits

Two Semesters, Three Hours a Week, Six Credits

Realistic perspective of nature and role of children of Israel. Chronology of Bible from Adam to Christ. Wilderness wanderings, Conquest of Canaan land.

Paul's missionary journeys. Maps painted on canvass 60" x 35" - useful tools for ministry. Further self-selected charts and maps.

LIFE OF JESUS, 222

* ENGLISH

One Semester, Two Hours a Week, Two Credits

ENGLISH, 134

Provinces of Palestine. Herod Family. Political situation during Jesus' day. Emphasis on Galilean ministry.

One Semester, Three Hours a Week, Three Credits

LIFE OF JESUS, 223 One Semester, Two Hours a Week, Two Credits Emphasis on Judean ministry. Study of each Gospel writer's approach to the life of Christ. APOLOGETICS, 410 One Semester, Two Hours a Week, Two Credits Critique of evolutionary theory. "Proofs" from embryology, geological records and dating techniques. Theistic evolution. Bible creation - great gap theory, long day theory. Reading in a multitude of books written on the above subjects aids the student in his final Biblical decision. APOLOGETICS, 411

SPEECH

This first year course is designed to develop the Christian worker's most-used tool- his ability to express his ideas effectively in speaking and writing. Simple Sentence. Complex Sentence. Achieving sentence variety. Agreement of subject and verb. Use of adverbs and adjectives. Solving pronoun problems. Skill with graphics. ENGLISH, 135 One Semester, Three Hours a Week, Three Credits The second semester's work makes use of a programed course and in its flexibility meets the needs of every student. Common English errors. The Smooth-running sentence. Devices of subordination. Recognizing the sentence unit. SolVing verb problems. Patterns of sentence structure. Remedial classes are given to slow learners. ENGLISH, 234

One Semester, Two Hours a Week, Two Credits One Semester, Three Hours a Week, Three Credits Biblical inspiration. Philosophical assault upon religion. Ingersoll. Bertrand Russell. William James. Psychological assault upon religion. Nature and 'neaning of a saving faith. Neew defensive answers to higher criticism form the basis for a "working faith" for the student.

History of English language. Evolving of the languages. English, cognate of German. Vocabulary. Technique in developing "word hoards." Students will take a test at the beginning of the year to determine meaning of words from context clues. ENGLISH, 235 One Semester, Three Hours a Week, Three Credits A parallel test to the first semester test will be given after completion of text. Debate - the proposition building a case, the rebuttal, counter-rebuttal. Library science. Composition. Vocabulary evaluation.

JOURNALISM, 144 One

96

Semester,

One Hour a Week, One Credit continued


JOUR ALISM, 144 (continued) Actual editin of a pictorial freshman booklet photography, lay-out design, paste up, folding and distribution. The church bulletin - its design and contents. The school paper. News and article writing. Submitting manuscripts. JOURNALISM, 145 One Semester,

One Hour a Week, One Credit

The short story - main character, the villain, dialogue, characterization. Writing for primary, junior, young and adult pupils. Stories - missionary, character, personal. Christian fiction. Writer's market. Submitting manuscripts. PUBLIC SPEAKING, 226 (continued) Fundamentals of any speech. The use of "for instances." Demanding action. Students write speeches each week and speak in lively sessions.

JOUR, ALISM, 244, 245 Two Semesters, One Hour a Week, Two Credits Instruction in planning, writing and publishing a school paper.

PUBLIC SPEAKING, 227 JOURNALISM, 344,345

One Semester,

Two Semesters, Three Hours a Week, Six Credits

Proper introduction of a speaker. Correct acceptance of introduction. Sincerity in speaking. The pastor's remarks at end of speaker's message. Students are trained in the above and are given opportunity to practise.

Laboratory course for production of yearbook. Creative composition. Type-setting. Photography. Financial arrangements for sale of ads and yearbook. Printing methods.

One Hour a Week, One Credit

PUBLIC SPEAKING, 326 PUBLIC SPEAKING, 126 One Semester, Two Hours a Week, Two Credits One Semester,

One Hour a Week, One Credit Building a sermon around a main idea. Use of definition. Specific illustrations. Current Events. Illustrations from science, literature, personal experience. Summary.

Comparison with public preaching. Historical importance. A fine art. Primary divisions of sermon. Preparation of sermon. Each student will prepare a speech and present it (without notes) before the class.

PUBLIC SPEAKING, 327 PUBLIC SPEAKING, 127

One Semester, Two Hours a Week, Two Credits

One Semester,

Speech gestures. Voice. The title. The outline. Sermon note filing. Sermon evaluation and criticism.

One Hour a Week, One Credit

Seven principles of debate. Requirements and purposes of good debating. Building a case. The rebuttal. Evidence doctrine defended against many arguments such as - glossolalia for linguistic ability, glossolalia related to "m ir acle of hearing" argument, glossolalia and the gift of tongues. Time permitting, several debates will be organized with student participation.

HOMILETICS, 430 One Semester,

One Hour a Week, One Credit

Radio techniques. Students will be given opportunity for presentation of a recorded radio sermon.

PUBLIC SPEAKING, 226

HOMILE TICS, 431

One Semester,

One Semester,

One Hour a Week, One Credit continued

97

One Hour a Week, One Credit continued


HOMILETICS, 431 (cpntinued) Expository preaching, a practicum. LIBRARY SCIENCE, 142 One S mester, Two Hours a Week, Two Credits Use of the card catalog, the Library of Congress classification system and basic library skills in finding nel using reference materials. A research paper i,' required to gain practical experience in using the library. LIBRARY scm ICE, 143 One Semester, w flours a Week, Two Credits The minister's library. The most valuable Bibl s and books and their LIse. A reseJ.rch paper is required on a school-relat d subject to acquaint the student with availab! ' material

* HISTORY

leading to Reformation. Morals of clergy. Early attempts to reform. Political and economi.ca conditions in Europe at beginning of 16th century. Reformation in Germany. Reformation in Switzerland. John Ca vin. Michael Servetus. Reformation in England.

CH RCH HISTORY, 130 One Semester, Three Hours a Week, Three Credits Background [or study of first through fourth century Christianity. Grecian and Roman history and culture. Jewish history and government. Bible - inspiration, canonization, various translations. Apocrypha.

RELIGION ANALYSIS, 310 One Semester, Two Hours a Week, Two Credits Religion in American life. Sketch of historical background. Puritanism in New England. Rise of Deism and Unitarianism. Evangelical fervor on frontier. Methodists, Baptists, Disciples of Christ. Great Revival 1800 - 1830. Varieties of religious experience. (Extensive refutation of Mormonism.)

CHURCH HISTORY, 131 One Semester, Three Hours a Week, ThreeCredits Rapid growth of early Church. Paul and missionary journeys. Post Apostolic era. Church fathers. Ante-Nicean era. Constantine. Nicean Council.

RELIGION ANALYSIS, 311 One Semester, Two Hours a Week, Two Credits

CHURCH HISTORY ANALYSIS, 230

Religious picture in modern America. Naturalistic assaults on orthodoxy and refutation of "higher criticism," Liberalism in America - a l' treat from the Bible as God's Word. Social Gospel. Humanists. Empiricists. Main stream Liberalists. Neo-Orthodoxy. Existentialism - radical theology due to disregard for Word of God. The students learn that Apostolic Christianity is the answer to the above!

One Semester, Three Hours a Week, Three Credits Historical introduction to persons and writings such as - Apostolic Fath rs, Church Fathers, Writings of Apologists. Th - persecutions as an outline of civil government. The Petrine doctrine and development of Church organization - Scripture refutation. Rise of papacy. Controversies regarding the Godhead and divinity of Christ - Modalistic controversy - was Jesus God in the flesh? AntiNicene Fathers. Homoousian controversy regarding "substance" of Jesus. Arianism. Writings of Athanasius. Christological Councils - Nicea, Constantinople, Ephesus, Chalccdon.

* PASTORAL

AND TEACHER TRAINING

CHURCH HISTORY ANALYSIS, 231

HOBBY CLUB TRAINING 153,154,253,254,353,354,453,454

One Semester, Three Hours a Week, Three Credits

Two Semesters, One Session a Week, Two Credits

Final collapse of Roman Empire. Milestones to the Reformation. Rise of Mohammedianism. Holy Roman Empire. Crusades. Renaissance. Conditions continued

Course taken under supervision of Hobby Club leader. Actual practise in leading in devotional program, storytelling, assisting teachers, and making of crafts.

98


RELIGIOUS EDUCA TIO , 132

EDUCA TIONAL PSYCHOLOGY, 333

One Semester, Three Hours a Week, Three Credits

One Semester, Three Hours a Week, Three Credits

Value of Sunday School. Crime and the Sunday School. Comparison between public school and Sunday School. History of Sunday School. Teaching Books of Bible. Pattern of a Sunday School lesson. Teaching Christian habits. Center of Interest teaching. Hobby Club. Actual classroom teaching. Weekly lessons handed in on current Sunday School lessons.

Motivation. Creativity. Character. Intelligence. Significance of individual differences. How to teach.

RELIGIOUS EDUCATION, 133

APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY, 432 One Semester, Three Hours a Week, Three Credits Adjustment concepts. Adjustment by positive substitute activities. Adjustment by negative substitute activities. Adjustment by functional ailments. Ministerial counselling.

One Semester, Three Hours a Week, Three Credits Sunday School administration. Characteristics of various age groups and how to teach them. D. V. B.S. How to carryon a Sunday School census. Salvation for children - how to effect it. Study of Sunday School literature and how to write literature. Center of Interest projects.

APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY, 433 One Semester, Three Hours a Week, Three Credits Conflict. Methods and perusal of maladjusted. Counselling interviews in churches. Developing our own personalities.

CHILD PSYCHOLOGY, 232 STORYTELLING, 349 One Semester, Three Hours a Week, ThreeCredits The value of life. D.N.A. Heredity. Behavior of organism in early infancy. Intelligence - its growth and functioning. Retardation.

One Semester, Two Hours a Week, Two Credits Purposes. How to select stories. Story plan. Selection according to need and age group. Sample stories. The voice.

CHILD PSYCHOLOGY, 233 One Semester, Three Hours a Week, Three Credits Characteristics of age groups from infancy to adulthood. Personality - its various definitions and theories. Concept of self. Group functioning interaction, structure, roles and goals.

STORYTELLING, 350 One Semester, Two Hours a Week, Two Credits Use of word pictures. Active verbs. Facial animation. Jesus' use of stories. Activeparticipation in storytelling.

EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY, 332

BUSINESS LAW, 155

One Semester, Three Hours a Week, Three Credits

One

Science of learning. Principles of teaching. Methods. Practise. Transfer of Training. Permanence of learning. "Apt to teach."

Evolvement of law. Selection of a lawyer. Banking in its various forms. Borrowing money - kinds of loans. Interest rates. Credit.

-...-o:T..--:-:-.-.....

Semester,

One Hour a Week, One Credit

BUSINESS LAW, 156 One Semester,

One Hour a Week, One Credit

Life insurance - various kinds. Other insurance. Sales contracts. Real estate - deeds, mortgages and abstracts. CHURCH GOVERNMENT and BUSINESS LAW, 212 One Semester, One Hour a Week, One Credit Students learn this course through charts, demonstration and lectures. continued 99


CHURCH GOVERNMI:NT and BUSINESS LAW, 2J2 (continued) "Why the pastor failed." State laws concerning incorporation. Sole proprietorship. Proper way to fill offices in a church. Election of trustees for corporations.

CHURCH GOVERNMENT and BUSINESS LAW, 412 One

semester,

One Hour a Week, One Credit

Taxes - real estate, sales. Tax exemptions. Income tax - federal and state. Court procedure. Jury duty.

CHURCH GOVERNMENT and BUSINESS LAW, 213

CHURCH GOVERNMENT and BUSINESS LAW, 413

One

One Semester,

Semester,

One Hour a Week, One Credit

Duties of pastor, trustees and other church officials. Payment of construction materials. Church by-laws. How to handle church trouble according to the Bible. Fundamentals of leading services.

One Hour a Week, One Credit

Wills and inheritances. Criminal Laws. Agents and brokers. Church construction. Lien Waivers. Church organization, incorporation. Affiliation.

* MISSIO

SAND EVANGELISM

PERSONAL EVANGELISM, 112,113 Two Semesters, Two Hours a Week, Four Credits The need of the church today - return to the New Testament form of evangelism. Instruction in conducting street meetings, hospital evangelism, reaching senior citizens, campus ministries, witnessing to people on the street, on the job and in their homes. How to set up a personal evangelism program in any church and become an effective soul-winning church. MISSIONS, 330, 331 Two Semesters, Two Hours a Week, Four Credits History of foreign and home missionary work. Problems of field in various countries. CHURCH GOVERNMENT and BUSINESS LAW, 312 PERSONAL EVANGELISM, 416,417 One

Semester,

One Hour a Week, One Credit Two Semesters, One Hour a Week, Two Credits

Great difference between simple and regular interest. Borrowing from small loan companies. Rights involved in rental and leased properties. How to establish credit. Insurance - ordinary life, endowment, term. How to buy a home or a church. Establishing worth of church.

The church usher's part in evangelism. Use of flip-top projector. Selection of tracts. Campus Crusade. Evangelization of the community.

CHURCH GOVERNMENT and BUSINESS LAW, 313 One

Semester,

One Hour a Week, One Credit

Sales aiYreement. Contract for deed. Warranty deed. Value of abstract. A broker and an agent the differences. The pastor - his relationship with the congregation. Special services - when? How to advertise. The marriage - investigation, preparation, ceremony. Thefuneral-visitation, order of the service, burial. 100


ORGAN, 106, 107, 206, 207, 306, 307, 406, 407 One Semester, One Hour a Week, One Credit Students enroll to take individual lessons. Three church-model Console Hammond organs of practise use.

CHORAL CLINIC, 228 One Semester, One Hour a Week, One Credit

HOM!::. MISSIONS TRAINING, 355, 356, 455, 456 Two Semesters, W ekly Services, Two ':":redits Attendance, participation and nearby Home Missions works.

Choral directing. The choir 1 ader - his qualifications and responsibilities. The student prepares a Gospel song for use in practise directing.

observation in

* MLSIC

MUSIC THEORY, 124 On

Semester, One Hour a Week, One Credit

Introduction to general musical vocabulary. Formation of scales. Time signatures. Key sig~ natures. Introduction to harmony. MUSIC THEORY, 125 One Semester, One Hour a Week, One Credit Songleading - its ten commandments. Creating atmosphere. Holding attention. An accompanist duties. Congregational singing. Music in evangelism.

CHORAL CLINIC, 229 One

APPLIED MUSIC, 128,224 One Semester, One Hour a Week, One Credit Physiological make-up of voice production. Exercises for proper breathing useful in singing or speaking. Vocal exercises. Students work for public performance.

Semester,

One Hour a Week, One Credit.

Choral directing. Screening voices. Choir seating for best results. Communication between director and choir, also between choir and congregation. Developing of individual voices. GLEE CLUB, 100, 101, 200, 201,300,301,400,401 One Semester, Two Hours a Week, One Credit

APPLIED MUSIC, 129,225 One Semester,

One Hour a Week, One Credit

Vocalises. Special groups created to encourage ensembles, quartettes, trios and duets.

Ensemble of all classes. Practise and public performance twice each week. ORCHESTRA, 118, 119, 218,219,318,319,418,419 One Semester, Two Hours a Week, One Credit

PIANO, 104, 105, 204, 205, 304, 305, 404, 405 One Semester,

One Hour a Week, One Credit

Students enroll as beginners or advanced pianists. May study accompanying, classical or "Pentecostal style" music. 101

The Bible Institute orchestra practices two periods each week and performs during church serVices, participates in annual musical programs and during graduation services. Open to those who read music and play a band or orchestral instrument.


1-~

DSSIG lNG, 146,147,246,247

PRACTICAL ARTS

Tw

BLDG. C

[I

TR

cno "

Semest'rs, One Hour a Week, Two Credits

Colors. Patt Tn . Sty1 s. Fabri s. M chanics s Wing. Restrict d to coeds.

f

151,1';2,251,252,' 51,:152 Dl:: IGI lNG, 346,347,446,447

T

110

em sters, On

Hou

a Week, Two Credits Two Semesters,

Physical and material problem for the prospecti builder. ading 0 plans. Plumbing, I ctrical wi!'ing, block laying an permits.

ek, Two Credits

ne Hour a

Advanced class off r tips to insure the student professional finish to h r garment.

PRESCRIBED COURSE OF STUDY FOR THEOLOGICAL

TUDENTS CIli-< II!

CIl

Firsl Y car 113 [21 123 131 133 135 141 143

6 ~

S(~COlld

.- il>

"Of-< il> i-< ~ ill

Required: 112 120 122 130 132 134 140 14:l

~

goo -II!

4 4 4 6 6 4

2 2 2

6

3 3 2 3

4

2

212 220 222 226 230 232 234 239

Elective 100 104 106 118 124 126 128 144 146 151 153 155

101 105 107 119 125 127 129 145 147 152 154 156

Glee Club Piano Organ Orchestra Music Theory Public Speaking Applied Music Journalism Designing BuUding Construction Hobby Club Training Business Law

2 2 2

2 2

2

2 2 2 2 2

2

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Third Y (ar 311 313 323 327 331 333 341 350

213 221 223 227 231 233 235 240 241

~

Church Gov't. and Business Law Daetrin Lif of Jesus Public Speaking Church History Analysis Child Psychology nglish Minor Prophets Intertestamental History

2 4 4 2 6 6 4 4 2

Glee Club Piano Organ Orchestra Applied Music Choral Clinic Journalism Designing Building Construction Hobby Club Training

2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

1

2 2 1 :1 3 2

2 1

Electives: 200 204 206 218 224 228 244 246 251 253

201 205 207 219 225 229 245 247 252 254

1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1

ReqUired: Reli iOll nalysis Church Gov't. and Business Law Acts Public Speaking 1issions Educati nal Psychology Epistles Storytelling

4 2 4 4 3 6 6 4

2 1 2 2 2 3 3 2

lee Club iano Organ Orchestra Journal sm Designing Building Construction Hobby Club Training Home Missions Training

2 2 2 2 6 2 2 2 2

1 1

410 412 414 416 422 430 432 440

411 413 415 417 423 431 433 441

Apologetics C urch Gov't. and Business Law Drama Personal Evangelism Major Prophets Homiletics Applied sychology Epistles

4 2 2 2 6 2 6 6

Glee Club Piano Organ Orchestra Maps and Charts Designing Hobby Club Training Home Missions Training

2 2

2 1

3 1

3 3

Electives: Electives: 300 304 306 318 344 346 351 353 355

301 305 307 319 345 347 352 354 356

1

1 3 1 1 1 1

400 404 406 418 424 446 453 455

401 405 407 419 425 447 454 456

il>

uo..

Fourth Year

ReqUired: 310 312 322 326 330 332 340 349

'-' ill

~U) II! ~

R qUiTed:

uo.. Personal evangelism Doctrine Bible Geography Church History Religious Education English Old Testament Librarv S ience

":"E

Year

2 2

6

2 2

2

1 1 1 1 3 1 1 1


s p

o N

S

o


FRIENDS OF A.B.!. David R. Abshire Riv rdale, lllinois

Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Bozeman Flint, Michigan

Rev. and Mrs. Wm. C. Cook Detroit, Michigan

Di 'k & Alice Adam,; & Chris P .oria, llIinois

Mr. and Mrs. Don Brigley

St,

lvlr. and Mrs. R. W. Cottrill Westerville, Ohio

Mr. and Mrs. William H. Adams Peoria, lllinois

Mr. and Mrs. Cecil J. Brown !vlidland, Michigan

1\¡lr. and Mrs. Wayne Cottrill Columbus, Ohio

Friend St. raul, Minnesota

Mr. and Mrs. Claude Brown Columbus, Ohio

Rita Cox Omaha, 'ebraska

Rev. and Mrs. Ray Agnaw Bridgeton, Maryland

James D. Brown Midland, Michigan

Creative Ligbting St. Paul, Minnesota

Dawn Amundson IVlinneapolis, Minnesota

Mr. and Mrs. Leo J. Brown Midland, Mic.higan

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Crow Monclova, Ohio

Miss gnes Anderson St. Paul, Minnesota

Dave Bryan Flint, Michigan

Morris Crutchfield Florissant, Missouri

Rev. Carl E. Anil'le, D.D. 1I1adison, Tenness c

Connie Burns Orient, Ohio

Cumpton's Printing and Publishing Co. Raceland, Kentucky

Mrs. Ruth Antonson St. Paul, Minnesota

Mr. and Mrs. Grover Burns Eau Claire, Wisconsin

Mrs. Naomi Daniel Oregon, Ohio

"ancy Areng Indianapolis, Indiana

John P. Burns Eau Claire, Wisconsin

Mr. and Mrs. James Davis Rochester, Minnesota

Rev. and Mrs. L. M. Arrowood Seymour, Indiana

Mason R. Burns Eau Claire, Wisconsin

Mrs. Martha DaVIS Columbus, Ollio

Palmer Ayers olumbus, Ohio

Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Burns Portsmouth, Ohio

Mr. and Mrs. Vernon Dehmlow Worthington, Minnesuta

Mr. and Mrs. Lowell rd. Baker II zcl Park. Michigan

Rev. and Mrs. George Bye St. Paul, Minnesota

1r. and Mrs. Harold Dehne & Rebecca Pinckneyville, Illinois

Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Barcus St. Paul, Minnesota

Mr. and Mrs. Ed Caldie St. Paul, Minnesota

Mrs. Beatrice DeMerchant Perth, New Brunswick Canada

Mr. and Mrs. John Barcus St. Paul, Minnesota

Jeff Carell Flint, Michigan

Mr. and Mrs. Milton Demos RoseVille, Minnesota

Clarence G. Barrett Columbus, Ohio

Mr. and Mrs. Donald Carringer Columbus, Ohio

Mr. and Mrs. Keith B. Barrett Brandon, Manitoba Canada

Raymond E. Casebolt Edge ater, Florida

Mr. and Mrs. Jack J. Duhe Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Brend Baver St. Paul, Minnesota

MertOn Christgau St. Paul. Minnesota

Mr. nd Mrs. Robert J. Duhe Gonzales, Louisiana

Rev. and Mrs. J. R. Beaver St. Paul, Minnesota

Rosie M. Church Ashland, Kentucky

Mr. and Mrs. George Dummitt Oroanoko, Virginia

Mr. and Mrs. Ken Beckett St. Paul, 'Ii nnesot

My. and Mrs. elson I I. Churchfield N. Versailles, Pennsylvania

Mr. and 1r6. Marlin Dummitt Marysville. hio

Rev. Victor A. Bentley aumee, Ohio

Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Churchill St. Paul, Minnesota

Rev. and Mrs. Wedsol Dummitt Napoleon, Ohio

Frank and Sadie B .ming Cincinna ,Ohio

Mr. (lnd Mrs. Harold Claxton Mishawaka, Indiana

Mr. and Mrs. Wentiford C. Durham Seymour, Indiana

Rev. and Mrs. . J. Bibbs nderson, Indiana

Robert and Carnl Clodfelder Mattoon, Illinois

Rev. and Mrs. Rog r I.d\\ ar s Bloomington, Indiana

Bart ingham Elwood, Indiana

Mr. and Mrs. Dale Coffin Hampden Highlands. Maine

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond S. St. Paul, ~1innesota

Mr. and Mr . Thomas Buhlsen St. Paul Par , Minn l;ma

Mr. and Mrs. ROZier Collins Panama City. Flo ida

Bre t Embry Louisv ille, Kentucky

~1'1T.

and Mrs. David Booker Richfield, Minnesota

Mrs. Mabel Condon Rochester, Minnesota

Rev. nd Mrs. R. F. Rowe Sr. Paul, Minnesota

Rev. and Mrs. R.G. Cook Ashville. Ohio

J ':"\ul,

Minnesota

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Dixon Inver Grove Heights, Minnesota

â&#x20AC;˘ Bide

Mr. and Mrs. Odin and Ann St. Pau I, ivlinnesota Vert and Eva Marie Enis Mattoon. Illinois

Eng'Mth


FRIENDS OF A.B.1. Mr. and Mrs. Michael Sr. Paul, Minnesota

Mr. and Mrs. LeRoy Erickson COLtage Grove, Minnesota

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Gilliam Madison, Wisconsin

Mr. :lnd Mrs. Gordon Jensen Cottage Grove, Minnesota

1\1r. and Mrs. Earl Evans Fort Smith, Arkansas

Rev. W.C. Gleason Sr. Paul, Minnesota

Mr. and Mrs. James O. Miami, Florida

Rev. Ken Evig Hastings, Minnesota

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Glenna Eau Claire, Wisconsin

John O. Johnson San Diep:o, California

Lillian Felclick o. St. Paul, Minnesota

Thomas M. Golden, Jr. Tallahassee, Floricla

Mr. and J\1rs. Michael jones Percy, Illinois

Mi s Ann Grant Sr. Paul, Minnesota

Mr. ::LnJ

Rev. Kelsey Griffin Sr. Paul, l'vlinnesota

Norma Kelly ]J nsacola, Florida

Mr. and Mrs. T.D. Griffin Atlanta, Georgia

Mrs. Ida. B. K ndall Burlington, Wi<;consin

Rev. and Mrs. G. T. Gri nder Cedar Lake, [ndiana

Marilyn Kerr arion, nlinois

Joseph J. Guzzetta, Sr. Burlington, Wisconsin

Mrs. Lillian Ketchum Cottage Grove, Minnesota

John R. Hancock Biloxi, Mississippi

Mrs. Paul W. Kiner Columbus, Ohio

Ramona A. Felstead Sr. Charles, innosota Rev. James S. Lucas Louisville, Kentucky Rev. George O. Cumpt n Ashland, Kentucky Rev. and Mrs. Donald W. Fisher Bridgeton, Missouri Mr. and IvIrs. Wesley Fisher Midland, Michigan Rev. Charles W. Fitch Columbus, Ohio

il1iam

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Jarrett Akron, Ohio

Jimmy Fpley Hot Springs, Arkansas

Miss Arlene Flater Inver Grove Heights, Minnesota

Mr. and Mrs. Basil Hanscom Perth, N. B. Canada

Cynthia Fleetwood Columbus, Indiana

Mr. and Mrs. Greg Hanson N. St. Paul, Minnesota

Debra and Daniel Flemming St. Paul, Minnesota

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Harrington Mattoon, 111inois

La June Fogle Broadway, Ohio

Mrs. and Mrs. Lewis F. Harris Blacklick, Ohio

Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd E. Forrey Sr. Sr. Paul, 1\'!innosota

William L. Hayhurst Salem, Oregon

Mr. and Mrs. S.C. Fosdick Tiskilwa,minois

Rev. and Mrs. Floyd B. Henson Warsaw, Indiana

Miss Heather Foster St. Paul, Minnesota

Sgt. George Ilernandez Apo. S. F" California

Mr. and Mrs. Herschel Foster St. Paul, Minnesota

Allen and Beverley Hicks Gottage Crove, Minnesota

Arthur Friend SteUbenville, Ohio

Rev. Derrald Hilderbrand J-Iazelcrest, 111inois

John and Brenda Froese Belleville, Illinois

Mr. aod Mrs. Charles Hirnebauch Burlington, Wisconsin

Rev. and Mrs. Paul Froese Pinckneyville, 111inois

James and Lois Hobson Atlanta, Indiana

Debby Garrett Fairfax, Virginia

David Hodges St. Paul, Minnesota

Mr, and Mrs. Paul Gee Andover, New Brunswick Canada

Rev. and Mrs. L. E. Hodges St. Paul, Minnesota

Mrs. Phyllis Gibson Heath, Ohio

Mr. and Mrs. James Hogg St. Paul, Minnesota

George K. Gillespie Fairmont, West Virginia

Olga Hyde Indianapolis, Indiana

Icy D. Gillespie Fairmont, West Virginia

Robert Imes South Point, Ohio

John~

~rs. Gerard E.. Kaye Alburqul'rque, ,lew Mexico

Mr. and Mrs. Lar:ry Kinney Lakeland, Minnesota Barbara Kirkland St. Paul, Minnesota Dr. and Mrs. Walter R. Kirschbaum Chicago, Illinois Mr. and Mrs. Ira R. Kline Milton, Pennsylvania Dr and Mrs. R. P. Kloepper 11 ShÂŁeveport. Louisiana Mr "nd Mrs. Edward Kretsch Mundelein, Illinois William I':. Kratz St. Louis, .\1issouri John W. Kyle Brookpark, Ohio Chuck Laible Omaha, Nebraska Mr. and Mrs. Frederick LaLonde Grand Ledge, Michigan Mr. Ulyssess Langford Sharonville, Ohio Bill Larson Newark, Ohio Mr. and Mrs. EdwIn Larson St. Paul, Minnesota Mrs. Genevieve Larson St. Paul, Minnesota Mr. and Mrs. John A. Larson, Sr. Stockton, California Kathy Larson St. Paul, Minnesota


FRIENDS OF A.B.1. Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Lawrence !lawkins, Wisconsin

Ron McDuff Mangum, Oklahoma

Joe Paslay Vandalia, Illinois

Mrs. Anna C. Leaman Columbus, Ohio

Mr. and Mrs. Bill McElhaney Nashville, Tennessee

Judy Penrod St. Paul, Minnesota

Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Lehto Randolph, Massachusetts

Mr. and Mrs. Edward McEwin Markham, Illinois

Andrew Keith Perry Niles, Michigan

Nlr. and Mrs. Donald Lerche Sr. Paul. Minnesota

Robby McGee Flint, Michigan

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Perry Vandalia, llIinois

Mr. and Mrs. A.C. Linstrom Des Moines, Iowa

Norman McNea I St. Paul, Minnesota

Mr. and Mrs. John Piho East Berlin, Pennsylvania

Loretta Lipk,' St. Paul, Minnl'~ota

Roy A. Meitzler Mertztown. Pennsylvania

Ken Poole New Brighton, Minnesota

Mn:. Junior Liston St. l':lul, Minnesota

Jerry Mercurio Toledo, Ohio

Me. and Mrs. P. E. Porter, Jr. Columbus, Ohio

Linda D. London Columbus, Indiana

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Mersereau Hoyt, N. B. Canada

Kathryn Possehn Lake Odessa, Michigan

Me. and Mrs. Oren Laos Pinckneyville, lllinois

Me. and Mrs. Lyle Mincer Carson, [ow a

Chris Post Newark, Ohio

Rev. and Mrs. Richard Lucas St. Paul Park, Minnesota

Rev. and Mrs. Kyle E. Minniear Elwood, Indiana

Mr. and Mrs. Nick Predovich Eveleth, Minnesota

]'\llr. and Mrs. Ralph Lumbard Columbus, Ohio

Catherine S. Missal Harvey, Illinois

Me. and Mrs. Eugene Pulke Pinckneyville, llIinois

Mrs. C.E. Lundquist St. Paul, Minnesota

Rev. Robert Molberg Red Wing, Minnesota

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Rahn St. Charles, Minnesota

Mr. and Mrs. Fayne Lundquist St. Paul, Minnesota

J. D. Moore Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Me. and Mrs. Donald Raschke Sr. Paul, Minnesota

Mr. and Mrs. Angus MacLeod Gulf Breeze, Florida

Mrs. Elmer Morann Plainville, COllnecticut

Evalee Reed Sullivan, lllinois

Spec. 4 Kenneth S. Maki APO New York, ew York

Eunice Mrenca Sr. Paul, Minnesota

Rev. and Mrs. Kenneth Reed Champaign, Illinois

Miss Kirsten Maki New Brighton, Minnesota

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Nevins Camden, Delaware

Rev. and Mrs. Ralph E. Reed, Je. Westminster, Maryland

Me. and Mrs. Tauno J. Maki Duluth, Minnesota

Fern Newstrand St. Paul, Minnesota

H len B. Ressler Maywood, California

Rev. and Mrs. Larry Malarz Brain rd, Minnesota

Mrs. Katherine Newton Lexington, Kentucky

/)avid Renberg Fon Frances, Ontario Canada

Mr. a d Mrs. 8.B. Marker Elyria. Ohio

Mr. ami Mrs. Charles Lak Elmo, Minnesora

Charles I .1arshall Kn xvii Ie, Iowa

t\lr. an rs. David 'orris St. Paul, Minnesota

Mr. and ~rs. M. C. Richards Pensacola, Florida

Betty Marrin Omaha, ebraska

MiSS Linda N nis Sr. Paul, }.til1n"sot~

Florence M. Richrer Unionto m, Ohio

Mrs. Frances anin Port. mouth, Ohio

I'atricia 1. Nnrrib Sr. Paul, Ivlinnesota

Mr. and Mrs. Harold S. Richard, Jr. Toledo, Ohio

MJ". and Mrs. Hom r Manin Rensselaer, Indiana

Re\'. and Mrs. S. G. Sr. Paul, Mjnnesota

Mr. and Mrs. I:ldon Ma e St. Paul, 1innesota

Mr. and Mrs. James Lakeland, Minnesota

Heather MacMullen St. PaLlI, Minnesota

Rev. James Osborn Pc'ncy, Arkansas

Rev. and Mrs. Larrv McCuan Ponca City, Oklahoma

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Oswald St. Paul, Minnesota

Mr. and Mrs. Harold McDonald Tamaroa, Illinois

Me. and Mrs. Rodney Pamer Barberton, Ohio

rr Norris

'orris orris

Diane Renberg St. Paul, Min';-esota

Mr. and 1rs. Russell Ricldlebarger Columbus,Ohi Mr. and 1"1r8. Charles Ritzer Stillwater, Minnesota Gus Robertson Barling, Arkansas Nancy Robinson Pinckneyvilk. Illinois Lucille Roh Madison, Wisconsin


FRIENDS OF A.B./. Mr. and Mrs. Joe Roos Cottage Grove, Minnesota

Mr. and Mrs. Lester Sna ely S . Paul, Minnesota

Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Walker St. Paul, Minnesota

Nancy Rose • 'ewporc, Minnesota

Mr. Vernon Snavely St. Paul, Minnesota

Mr. and Mrs. Le tel' ard Minneapolis, Minnesota

Virginia A. Rugger Scurtevant, Wisconsin

Doris J. Solomon Downey, California

David Warren Westminster, Maryland

Mr. and Mr .. Rohert Sabin, Sr. Eagan. Minn sota

Mr. and Mrs. lIarry Souter Soutl1fleld, Michi.gan

Clara Page Watc.rs Cincinnati, Ohio

My. and !vlrs. Tom Sabin St. Paul, Minnesota

Connie Spengl r Oakhwn, Illinois

tkv. Fnlnlc R. Waters Crocker, MIssouri

Tim Sabin Mil1nt:apolis, l\.linnesota

Peggy A. Steeley Milton, Pennsylvania

Mr. and Mrs. Norman Weber Columbus, Ohio

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Sabia St. Paul, Minnesota

Rev. and 1\'lrs. D. R. Stephens Grand Ledge, Michigan

l\lr. and Mrs. David Wedlund I::au Claire, Wisconsin

Willi;J11l A. Sanderlin, Jr. Norfork, Vi ginia

Mr. and Mrs. James Min(?rva, Ohio

Mr. nd Mrs. Dan Weisbrod St. Paul, Minnesota

Me and Mrs. Frank Sanders. Jr. Stillwater, Minn sota

Rev. and Mrs. James K. Stewart Worthington, Ohio

Mr. n Mrs. Gary Weisbrod Sr. Paul, Minnesota

M • and Mrs. Glenn E. Saunders Ironton, Ohio

Mr. and Mrs D. A. Stickler Miami, Florida

Mrs. Marvel Weisbrod Mahtomedi, Minnesota

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Sawyer St. Paul, Minnesota

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Stirnemann Madison Heights, Michigan

Mr. and Mrs. Neil Welsh St. Paul, Minnesota

Cynthia Sawyer Seabrook, Texas

Esther 'vV. Stolpa South Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Rev. Martin J. Whalen Columbus, Ohio

Mr. and Mrs. Roy D. Sawyer Seabrook, Texas

Mr. and Mrs. Roy Stooksbury Lansing, Illinois

Rev. and Mrs. Jerry D. Wheat Lexington, Kentucky

Mrs. Gladys Schenk Hamilton, Ohio

Sturgell's Home Shopper Service Ashland, Kentucky

Dr. and Mrs. James H. Whittem Washington, D. C.

Mrs. Edna Schneider Lebanon, Illinois

Jerry and Teloa Tackett Charleston, West Virginia

Mr. and Mrs Lloyd D. Wick Bloomington, Minnesota

Mr. and Mrs. D. H. Schnur Tucson, Arizona

Mr. and Mrs. Doug Taylor Mattoon, IIlnois

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond J. Wiggins Midland, Michigan

Arnold Schofield Midland, Michigan

Mrs. Mary Testa St. Paul, Minnesota

Mr. and Mrs. James R. Woodhull Greenwood, Arkansas

Mr. and Mr • Marvin G. Shilling Clin on, Maryland

Carol Thompson Lomita, Caltfornia

Mr. and Mrs. John L. Woodhull, Jr. South El Monte, California

Rev. and Mrs. Lloyd Shirley Leeward Islands

My. and Mrs. Donald Thrush

Miss Kathy S. Shurcer apillion, Nebraska

W. W. Tiller Papillion, Nebraska

Rev. and Mrs. Larry Sims Cantonment, Florida

Stan Townsend Elwood, Indiana

Catherine Sleeva Indianapolis, Indiana

Karen Tracy Crawfordsville, Indiana

Stan and Mary Sleeva Indianapolis, Indiana

Mr. and Mrs. Milton L. Trac,=,y B thel, Delaware

Tom David Sleeva Brooklyn, New York

Anne Marie Troller Villa Park, Illinois

Mr. and Mrs. Dale L. Smith Mogadore, Ohio

Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Tyson Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Mr. and Mrs Leonard Smith, Sr. Belleville, Illinois

Mr. and Mrs. Robert O. Vernon Fairmont, West Virginia

Ruth L. Smith Des Moines, Iowa

Walgreen Company St. Paul, Minnesota

St~wart

Walbridge. Ohio

Misses Lenore and LOrene Wolff Bellev We, Iill noi Mr. and Mrs. George Wratren Indianapolis, Indiana Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Wrip;h Pinckneyville, minois Rev. and Mrs. Richard Wright Toledo. Ohio Thelma Wright Ashland, Kentucky Miss Olgamarie Yokum COlumbus, Ohio Mr. and Mrs. V. H. Zeek Northumberland, Pennsylvania Mr. and Mrs. Roland Zehendner Dallas, Texas Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Zimmer Vandalia, Illinois


PASTOR: R. A. SABIN PASTOR EM ~RITUS: S. G. ORRIS TRUSTEES: R. F. Bowe S. G. Norris R. A. Sabin Frank Sanders Arthur Sawyer PLANNI G COMMITTEE: R. F. Bowe Don Brigley S. G. Norris Joe Roos R. A. Sabin Frank Sanders Arthur Sawyer

6944 HUDSON BLVD. N. ST. PAUL, MINNESOTA

MINISTERIAL ASSISTANTS: R. F. Bowe G. K. Bye W. C. Gleason Gerald Grant Kelsey Griffin Dale Hodges


APOSTOLIC FAITH TABERNACLE Rev. W. M. Parker, Pastor West 52nd and Vallejo Denver, Colorado 80221

UNITED PENTECOSTAL CHURCH MOREHEAD, HAYS CROSSING AND FLEMINGSB RG,KENTUCKY

REV. & MRS. LLOYD DEAN

ECOS1AL CHURCH Rev. & Mrs. Kenneth Reed Graduates of 1962

Champaign, Ill.

FORTVILLE UNITED PENTECOSTAL CHURCH 1900 E. Broadway, Fortville, Indiana Pastor Gerrald Truman invites you to visit any or all of the following services:

CONGRATULATIONS SENIORS

"Study to shew thyself approved unto God."

Sunday School Evangelistic Tuesday Youth Service Thursday Bible Study

9:45 7:30 7:30 7:30

A.M. P.M. P.M. P.M.

Home of the Indiana Campground


FIRST APOSTOLIC CHURCH Fred E. K "nzie, J. Mark Jordan, Victor Bentley, Clarence Condon, Brenda Hunt, Sandy Jordan, Vera Kinzie,

Pastor Ass't. Ass't. Elder Sec'y Sec'y Music

James Ward, Rod Farnsworth, Warren Hunt, Charles Hurst, Herman Bentley, David Sawyer, Stanley Crow, Dana Crow,

CONGRATULATIONS

class of 1975

Deacon

Trustee

TOLEDO, OHIO CALVARY APOSTOLIC TABERNACLE Corcyra Rd., Island Park Sunbury, Pa.

Congratu ations

To The Senior Rev. T. J. Miller,

Pastor

Class


PENTECOSTAL TEMPLE 5303 N. JEFFERSON MIDLAND, MICHIGAN

PASTOR

Rev, & Mrs. Roger Barcus Jonathan & Stephanie Class of '68

CONCRATULATIO S TO

RI~V,

& MRS, S.C. NORRIS,

REV. & MRS. ROBERT SABIN AND THE

ENTIRE

ST AFF FOR ANOTHER CREAT Y 'AR IN CHRISTIAN EDUCATION.

CONGRATULATIONS TO

APOSTOLIC BIB E I S ITUTE • m II

III/JI, I~' S(,'/J(J(JI,S /.I; IIJ TIll' II II •

lJNITED PENTEe~STAL

eHlJReH

-

.....................-r_._

Inlernal ional

. ~

,J./

-

"

"'H"'~

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r

WORLD EVANGELISM CENTER HAZELWOOD, MISSOURI

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"

..... Em'IU'sll" ('(JIIlnul tOI' Ilu' /,(1;111 OIU'() "f'I;I'()I'NI 10 lIu} ,'UI;III,,,. " (JIIII,' :/1


FIRST

PENTECOSTAL

CHURCH

DE RIDDER, LOUISIANA

SALUTES ASI SUNDAY Radio KOLA Sunday School M,wning Worship Harvcstimâ&#x201A;Ź' KOLA Evangeiistic Service WCD0JSSDAY Mid - W'2Ck Service FRlDa,y You th Praye:c SATURDAY Bus Ministry

Rev. & Mrs. George Glass Pastor

8:30 10:00 11:00 4:30 7:00

A.M. A.M. A.M" P.M. P.M.

7:3() P.M. 7:30 P.M, 9:30 A.M.

Rev. & Mrs. Ron Liles Assistant Pastor

(( The Church Where Exciting Things Are Happening"


Best wishes to the Seniors:

5000 South 60th Street One minute off By-pass

894

on S. 60th

and!~=:!!!!!!!!!I!illiill~

reaching out for the lost, for Contending for The Faith 21 years in this bustling metTopoHs. to

A

-

refr hing place

visit!

Pastor: F.J. llis Asst.: D. D. Witkus

UNITED

Jim Powell

PENTECOSTAL CHURCH

48 Lewis street Bristol, Connecticut

Neva Morann

Rev. William V. Thompson, Pastor

David MacDonald

Susan Powell

Bert Cote


FIRST PENTECOSTAL CHURCH 1009 west Gallatin street Vandalia, illinois Pastor Edward L. Lucas

The church that is

bi~

enough to serve you !

Small enough to know you ! Strong enough to help you!

Pastor & Mrs. Lucas CONGRATULATIONS TO ABI AND 1975 GRADUATES

& Jonathan Edwards

UNITED PENTECOSTAL CHURCH

Pastor WAYNE ROOKS

Sunday School Sunday Worship Sunday Youth Service Evangelistic Wednesday Bible Study

10:00 11:00 6:00 7:30 7:30

A.M. A.M. P.M. P.M. P.M.

MIAMI, FLORIDA

Residence 821-8048 Office 691-1335 Secretary and Treasuuer Barbara Herring Choir Director George Johns Sunday School Superintendent Tommy Herring Sunday School General Secretary Hans Reimers


~~~

0@

~

rf5

~

OF MINNES TA-MA IYODA DISTRICT

~

"EACH DAY WE'RE GAINING, NEW HEIGHTS ATTAINING. WE ARE THE PENTECOSTAL CONQUERORS."

CONQUERORS' PRESIDENT Rev. Robert Stroup

CONQUERORS' SECRETARY Rev. Larry Malarz

APOSTOLIC BIBLE CHURCH, ST. PAUL, MINN.

SUNDAY SCHOOL CONG RA TULATIONS SENIORS

S.S. SUPERINTE 'DE T Franklyn Sanders S.S. SECR TARY Warren Walker

MRS. S.G. NORRIS and CENT R OF INT REST

ROGER AND CHERYL KOREN BUS M1NISTRY HOBBY CLUB


United Pentecostal Church Rev. C. A. Nelson, Pastor

204 West 11th Street Claremore, Oklahoma

Phone 763-2712

Congratulations and best wishes to the Seniors UNITED PENTECOSTAL ClfURCH Winnsboro. Louisana Sunday Morning Evening

10:00 A.M. 6:00 P.M.

Wednesday 7:00 P.M. ( Bible Study) Friday 7:00 P.M. ( Youth Service ) Rev. J. A. Hawthorne. Pastor "

Come thou with us and we will do thee good "

MI WAY TABERNACLE EIGHTH AT GAINES STREET

DAVENPORT, IOWA

REV. GEORGE L. THARP, PASTOR

PHONE - 323-1785 391-2616

CONGRATULATIONS TO THE GRADUATING CLASS


.

,·/:r ,

:., .' . <. /

./

I

(

-

"Give her of the fruit of her hands; and let her works praise her in the gates.:'

1

Mrs. James Merrick, President

P

Mrs. W. Eikamp, Secretary-Treasurer

IE

I

©~I1Wi ~~w @®~rP~I1 ©OOWJ~~OO 3511 MILW AUKEE ST., MADISON, WISCONSI

John W. Grant, Pastor

CENTRAL NEW ENGLAND DISTRICT

REV. H. M HO\ E, DISTRTCT SUPT.


OAK HILL ROAD eRA WFORDSVILLE, INDIANA Rev.

ester McGruder, Pastor

S DAY unday School Morning Worship Evangelistic Service TUESDAY Bibl Study THURSDAY Youth Service

10:00 A.M. 11:30 A.M. 7:30 P.M. 7::\0 P.M. 7:30 P.M.

CO GRATULATIONS TO THE SENIOR CLASS

Rev. and Mrs. Lester McGruder

APOSTOLIC

FAITH

ASSEMBLY

1111 So. Meridian, Street

Lebanon, Indiana

Rev. Doyle M. Jenkins, Pastor

Apostolic luitlt fltl/fclt '"'"

-

P. 0. ~B<).", 23 ~"d, P~ 3-'12-3012 :J.<fe PecuJ. ~ & ~J :D~ H...un" P~<l.I"W 3-'12-2905 J1«M1 f~<U1. 0~ -'1376-'1 JC :R<.~QIld 'Y~. Paa.ian


Midlothian, Illinois 148th Place & Hamlin Ave. Pastor & Mrs. James F Abshire o

Sunday Morning Evang listie Wednesday Bible Study

10:00 A.M. 7:30 P.M. 7:30 P.M.

CONGRATULATIONS CLASS OF '75

UNITED PENTECOSTAL CHURCH KENTUCKY DISTRICT The District Superintendent and wife send congratula ions to faculty and students of Apostolic Bible Institute, and thanks for your continued contribution to the fast and solid growth of the kingdom of God in Kentucky. Let us be alive in 1975'

Rev. & Mrs. Manuel J. Tharp LiVing on the beautiful District Camp Grounds P.O. Box 7 Summerville, Ky. 42782 Ph. 502-932-4993


UNITED PENTECOSTAL CHURCH 164th and Lat_ rop Harvey, Illinois Phone: 312-339-5800

Rev. VVarren Hilderbrand, Pastor Graduat 1963 Rev. and M â&#x20AC;˘ Derra1d Hilderbrand, Assistant Minister Graduate 1972

CALVARY PENTECOSTAL CHURCH W. Kemper Rd. & Walnut St. Cincinnati (Springdale) Ohio 45246 Exit 41 off 1-275 P.S.F.I. Chapter Now On U.C. Campus Forerunners Club-High School Campus SUNDAY: Sunday School Morning Worship Prayer Prayer Evangelistic TUESDAY: Youth and Children WEDNESDAY Prayer THURSDAY: Bible Study SATURDAY: Actsion Class SUNDAY: Harvestime Broadcast W.H.K.K.-100.9 F.M.

9:45 10:45 2:30 6:30 7:00

A.M. A.M. P.M. P.M. P.M.

8:00 P.M. 8:00 P.M.

8:00 P.M. 12:00 P.M. 4:00 P.M.

Rev. Harold C. Swango, Assistant Pastor

Pastor & Mrs. Norman R. Paslay & Norman II


LOUISIA A STUDENTS JACKIE DUHE GARVIN WHATLEY Baton Rouge

L

'''\.,1

o 0 Monroe Shreveport

odd Rl er

0

LEONARD HODGES De Ridder

GARY ERICKSON Shreveport

Baton Rouge

MIKE MAYO Monroe

CANE'U

LA

o

A ERICA

A. B. I. From Other Areas NEBRASKA Howie Tiller Tim Tiller Stanford Tiller Linda Tiller Mark Gefroh Kathy Shurter

CONNECTICUT Solveig Bergersen Debbie Dibble James Powell Neva Morann Bert Cote David Mc Donald

COLORADO Ed Blair

MONTANA Rud Knudsen

VIRGINIA Diana Hileman Carolyn Shilling

SOUTH CAROLINA John Fischer

ARIZONA Clarence Cagle HAWAII John Jeffrey Bill Pestana

MARYLAND Keith Masters TENNESSEE Debbie Warren

NEW MEXICO Walter Kaye

NEW JERSEY Nancy Sitko Diane Whittle Curtis Whittle

SOUTH DAKOTA Marcia Orris

MISSOURI Dennis Case Sharon Crane

ARKANSAS Larry Warren Teresa Ezell Talmadge French Treadus French WEST VIRIGINA Harry Tallman IOWA David Caylor Jim Smith Robert Jadrnicek Dean Card YUGOSLAVIA A-na Ferko NEW BRUNSWICK, CANADA David Gee Harry Evans Faye Means Kathy Mersereau COLUMBIA, S.A. Annette and Raphael Suarez


WISCONSINI Ashland

MARLYS HARDT

JERRY WEDLUND

Eau Claire

Ellsworth

"

• BOB STELTENPOHL

•Arpin

G L NN SEIFFERT

Madison

BILL ROBERTS • DICK TYSON Milwaukee

\

. .

Burlington

)

Sturtevant WARREN RUGGER

DAVE GUZZETTA

KEN HIMEBAUCH

LAND OF MILK AND HONEY


LAKE BREEZE APOSTOLIC CHURCH, u.p.C. 1530 LAKE BREEZE ROAD LORAIN, OHIO 44054 PHONE 949-5110 949-5165

REV. R. TERRY LITZ, PASTOR

MINISTERIAL ASSIST ANTS: John Canter Roy Mc ugritch Paul Rl unds

A Going Church for

A Coming Christ

UNITED PENTECOSTAL CHURCH 501 West College

Albert Lea, Minnesota 56007

Pastor Rev. Daniel Stirnemann

PHONES;

Church 737-1140

Pastor's Home 433-4194


THE UNITED APOSTOLIC CHURCH CON JRATl LATION GRADUATES

2590 Morse Ro::td Columbus, Ohio 43229

Sunday School Worship Evening Worship Wed. Bible Study Friday Youth

PASTOR: Rev. & Mrs.

10:00 11:45 7:30 7::\0 7:3Cl

A.M. A.M. P.M. P.M. P.M.

rank Campb 11

UA FRIENLLY CHURCH WITH AN ETERNAL MESSAGE"

CORNER BOURBON AND NORTH STREETS

ROURBON, INDIANA 46504

S NDAY SerIO L EVENrNG WORSHIP TUESDAY Y UTI-! TH R. BlBLE STUDY

10:00 7:00 7:30 7:30

A.M. P.M. P.M. P.M.

Edward Kozar, Pastor

BEST WISHES TO THE CLASS OF (75

" J\crs 2:42


APOSTOLIC GOSPEL CHURCH Sunday: Worship & Sunday School Evangelistic

9:45 A.M. 7:30 P.M.

Tuesday: Youth Servic e

7:30 P.M.

Thursday: Bible study and Prayer

7:30 P.M.

James D. Merrick, Pastor

LITTLE ROCK UNITED PENTECOSTAL CHURCH

DULUTH, INNES TA F"rst Pentecostal Church

2623 SO. LEWIS

1116 So. Pennsylvania Ave. LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS

M. L. Clifford, Pastor

FIRST PE TEC STAL CHURCH 529 Illinois Street, South Beloit, Illinois Pastor: Rev. J. To Brooks Assistant: L. W. Brooks Sunday School 9:30 A.M. Sunday Worship 11:00 A.M. Conquerors 6:00 P.M. Evangelistic 7:00 P.M. Wednesday Bible Study 7:30 P.M. Evelyn Griffin, Sunday School Superintendent

Marion, Indiana Sunday School Morning Worship Evangelistic Tuesday Young People Thursday Bible Study

9:45 11:00 7:00 7:30 7:30

A.M. A.M. P.M. P.M. P.M.

Rev. & Mrs. L. William Schmidt

CONGRATULATIONS TO THE SENIORS


THE FIRST APOSTOLIC CHURCH 1313 S. 9th Street Mattoon, Illinois SUNDAY Sunday School Choir Practice Evangelistic Service

9:45 A.M. 6:30 P.M. 7:30 P.M.

WEDNESDAY

CONGRATULA TIONS

Conquerors' Service Bible Study Junior Church Children's Church

7:30 8:30 7:30 7:30

P.M. P.M. P.M. P.M.

FRIDAY To Rev. and Mrs. S. G. Norris and the entire staff and students of A.B.!. for another fine year in Christian education.

Youth and Teen Fellowship

7:00 P.M.

SATURDAY R. L. Hays-Pastor

Prayer

7:00 P.M.

Congratulations Seniors, from the

APOSTOLIC

PENTECOSTAL

TABERNACLE

3rd St. and Indianapolis Ave.

Rev. Larry Arrowood Asst. Pastor

Rev. Dennis Croucher Pastor

SEYMOUR, INDIANA A CHRIST-CENTERED CHURCH IN THE CENTER OF THE CITY


NORTHSIDE PENTECOSTAL CHURCH 1351 Shepley Drive

st.

Louis, Missouri

Rev. Walter S. Guinn Founder Sunday School Sunday Worship Sunday Evening Tuesday Evening (Bible Study) Thursday Evening (Youth Service)

9:45 11:00 7:00 7:15

A.M. A.M. P.M. P.M.

7:30 P.M.

Rev. Eddie GUinn, Pastor Rev. Timothy W. Bollmann, Ass't. Pastor

Central and Hawthorne

Red Wing, Minnesota

CHURCH: 388-5217

HOME: 388-5088

ROBERT J. MOLBERG, Pastor 1137 MAPLE STREET

SUNDAY Sunday School 10:00 A.M. Morning Worship 11:00 A.M. Youth Service 6:30 P.M. Evangelistic Service 7:45 P.M. Harvestime - KCUE (FM) 9:30 P.M. WEDNESDAY Bible StUdy and Prayer 8:00 P.M.

THE WHOLE GOSPEL TO THE WHOLE WORLD


SOUTHEAST UNITED PENTECOSTAL CHURCH

700 S. E. Binkley Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Pastor & Mrs. R. D. Whalen Graduates of 1951

Sunday School Worship Evangelistic Wednesday Bible Study Friday Youth Service

10:00 11:00 7:00 7:30 7:30

A.M. A.M. P.M. P.M. P.M.

Assistant Pastor, William Riedel

CONGRATULA nONS TO SENIOR

Youth Minister, Duane Kramer Pastor J. S. Leaman

Diane Warfield


CONGRATULATIONS A.B.1. ~1]J[P~J1®

©OOilJ1@~~~~~

M~~~[t®~

REV. & MRS. B. BRIAN CHELETTE

" A PENTECOSTA L HOME FOR THE HOMELESS AND NEEDY CHILDREN"

Box 167 TUP ELO, MISSISSIPPI

38801

Phone: (601)-842-6982


irst Apostolic Church ROUTE 50 WEST ATHENS. OHIO

Congratulations Senior Grace Kirkendall !

Sunday School Evangelistic Tuesday Youth Thursday Bible Study Saturday Prayer

7:30 7:30 7:30 7:30 10:00

P.M. P.M. P.M. P.M. A.M.

Pastor James W. Hinkle Asst. Pastor Roger Boyd

FIRST CALVARY CH RCH GRANVILLE, WEST VIRGINIA

Pastor: Rev. Bernard Gillespie

SUNDAY Sunday School Evangelistic Service

10:00 A.M. 8:00 P.M.

SATURDAY Evangelistic Service

8:00 P.M.

CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR GRADUATING SENIORS! BERNARD; BRIDGET; CRISE; BERNIE


Elim Tabernac e 155 16th St. Cor. Princess Ave.

Leonard H. Wurch, Pastor Brandon, Manitoba, Canada 728-6068

Keith Barrett, Assistant Pastor Sunday School Sunday Worship Evangelistic Tuesday Bible Study Friday Family Night

lO:UO A.M.

11:00 7:00 8:00 8:00

A.M. P.M. P.M. P.M.

Exodus 15:27 "And they came to Elim where were twelve wells of water." Revelation 21:6 "I will give unto bim that is athirst of the fountain of the water of life freely."

YOU ARE INVITED TO ATTEND THE SERVICES AT ...

THE BIBLE CHURCH

Sunday School 9:45 A.M. Sunday Evangelistic 7:45 P.M. Tuesday, Bible Study 7:45 P.M. Friday, Youth Service 7:45 P.M,

3745 E. Pleasant Run Pkwy, So. Dr. Indianapolis, Indiana

P astor James H. Simison


Aposto ic Faith Assemblv Sunday School Sunday Evangelistic Wednesday Bible Srudy Friday Youth Service

9:45 7:30 7:45 7:45

A.M. P.M. P.M. P.M.

1717 W. Turkey Foot Lake Road

Barberton, Ohio

Pastor: Rev. Nelson F. Pamer

FIRST APOSTOLIC CHURCH---4828 Vine st. Cincinnati, Ohio 45217 Services SUNDAY Sunday School M\)rniI1E Worship Evangelistic TUESDAY Youth & Children THURSDAY Bible Study

10:00 A.M. 11:00 A.M. 7:30 P.M. 8:00 P.M. 8:00 P.M.

Congratulations to the Graduating Class!

Rev. Leroy Buller Pastor 1953 -- 1957 A.B.!. Student


CHRISTIA APOSTOLI

CH RC 22 NORTH 23RD STREET

Nwark, Ohio ~cruicc.s

Rev. R. A. News 'rand, Pastor

WESTERN 3329 Boomer Rd. Cincinnati, Ohio 45239 (Monfort Hts.)

Sunday School Morning Worship Evangelistic Wednesday Bible Study Friday Youth

10:00 11:15 7:30 7:30 8:00

A. . A.M. P.M. P.M. P.M.

ILLS APOSTOLIC CHUR H Rev. Eugene V. Price - Pastor Phone 481-1294

"The Church Teaching the Apostles' Doctrine, and Receiving the Pentecostal Blessing." Sunday 10:00 A.M. Worship and Christian Education 7:30 P.M. Evangelistic Wednesday 7:30 P.M. Prayer and Bible Study Saturday 7:30 P.M. Youth Worship "YOU ARE CORDIALLY INVITED TO ATTEND" CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR GRADUATING STUDENT Bro. Fred Smith and the Graduating Class of 1975


APOSTO Ie PEN COSTA CHURCH 13th & GRAVOIS ST. LOUIS/MISSOU I ~ ~

Harry W. Branding Founder

'(THE FREEWAYS MAKE THIS YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD CHURCH"

IDl1t QIaluaru Apostolic QIl1urcb 31 We.t Oreenwood Ayenue

Columbu., Ohio 43201

Phone (bI4) 299-4254

G. C. Chambers Pastor J. K. Stewart Co-Pastor D. L. Ball Pastor ; Assistant

~~i1l!-:dr7~~~~~m~'

~ ~YUJ

AFFILIATED WITH THE UNITED PENTECOSTAL CHURCH

....J.-_--..,


119 SOUTH GRA T STREET Jli FFERSON CITY, M1SS0 RI

"The church with a heart, in the heart of Missouri."

Rev. Richard Ward, Pastor

FIRST UNITED PENTECOSTAL CHURCH Sunday School Morning Worship Evangelistic Wednesday Bible Study

10:00 A.M. 11:00 A.M. 7:30 P.M. 7:30 P.M.

Rev. Donald L. Brooks, Pastor 429 N. 7th St. Dekalb, Ill. 60115 Phone (815) 756-1372

FIRST UNITED PENTECOSTAL CHURCH 711 5th Avenue South

VIRGINIA, MINNESOTA 55792 PASTOR:

ROBERT L.

snoup

SERVICE SCH EDU L : 10:00

SUNDAY

'1:1 S

MORNING

SCHOOL WORSHIP

7:30

EVANGELISTIC

7:30

WEDNESDAY - FRAYER !l BI BlE STU DY

6:30

FRIDAY -

YOUTH

ast 16th Street

Special blessing on all students and faculty at the Apostolic Bible Institute. Rev. and Mrs. Kirby C. Tiller Bloomington, Indiana


INN A N I

DISTRICT

SOTA

OF THE

CHURCH,

UNITED PENTECOSTAt INTERNATIONAL

SUPERINTENDENT J. D. Merrick 2340 Nanticoke StreN Duluth, Minn. 55811

BOARD OF PRESBYTERS R. A. Sabin J. A. Tanner Irvin Wurch

SECRETARY W. C. Gleason 2220 Dellridge Ave. St. Paul, Minn. 55119

T

o B

Leonard WUTch Home Missions Director

Ken Shirley Sunday School Director

Robert Stroup Conqueror's President

Mrs. Lester Lear essenger Editor

Camp Galilee 11975 Grey Cloud Trail Cottage Grove, Minn. 55016

A EMMANUEL UNITED PENTECOSTAL CHURCH Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada SUNDAY

9:30 10:30 7:30 8:00 8:00

TUESDAY S T RDAY

Sunday School Mnrning Worship Evangelistic Bible Study Prayer Meeting WE One One One

astor: Rev. H.C. Heaslip

U ITED PENTECOSTAL CH Jl CH Commerce and Lee Allen. Oklahoma

Sunday School MJrning Worship Evangelistic Wednesday Bible Study Saturday Youth Service

A.M. A.M. P.M. P.M. P.M.

PREACH: Lord, Faith, Baptism.

FIRST UNITED PENTECOSTAL CHURCH

924 Merchant Street

10:00 11:00 7:00 7;:W 7:30

Rev. Richard Harrod. Pastor

A.M. A.M. P.M. P.M. P.M.

Effingham, Illinois

Rev. Harold Grigsby, Pastor CONGRATULATIONS SENIORS!


aIuluar!;! ~postolic aI~ttr(~ "UNITED PENTECOSTAL CHURCH"

C.L. VITTITOW, Pastor CHURCH 4936 HAZELWOOD

RES. LOUISVILLE,

366--4308

KYv

7718 CRESTLINE RD,

40214

Sunday School Morning Worship Evangelistic Tue. Youth Thur. Bible Study

366-8026

10:00 A.M. 11:00 A.M. 7:00 P.M. 7:30 P.M. 7:30 P.M.

QIrlltX J\pllStllJ it 209 South lrd. Street BAYPORT, MINNESOTA 55003

Rev. S.C. Tiller, Pastor Phone: 612-439-8374

THE LADIES A XlLlARY OF THE V.P.C. KE JTUCKY DISTRICT

UNITED PEi TECOSTAL CHURCH 1117 Bell Avenue, Paducah, Kentucky Rev. E.D. Puckett

Congratulations and many prayers to Bro. and Sis. Jorris, faculty, and students. God's best to you in 1975 ! Marlene Puckett, Director Margaret Tharp, Secy. & Treas.

Sunday School Evangelistic Tuesday Bible Study Thursday Youth

10:00 7:30 7:30 7:30

A.M. P.M. P.M. P.M.

Congratulations A.B.l. Students

Ch~ij.tian .1}ife Chu~ah 444 Whittaker Ave. Trenton, New Jersey 08611 SUNDAY SCHOOl

10:00 A.M

MORNING WORSHIP SUNDAY

EVENI~~G

WEDNESDAY

7:00 P.M.

BIBLE STUDY

PASTOR: DAVID S路 SiTKO

THE UNITED PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF TRENTON

11:00 A.M.

7'30 P.M. PHONE 298-0286

THE CHURCH THAT CARES


MINNESOTA

Land of 1 ,000 Lakes

MINNESOT A STUDENT BODY

*

CONGRATULA nONS SENIORS!!!

STUDENTS are Proud be a part of A-8-1 !

NOlANA

to

Mary Castle

Lllli Castle Sue Henson Paula Fishback Rita ray Kathy Allen Mary Gill ila Moore Rt.:ne Baumann Carol Welcher Neal Welcher Tina Bryant arry Martin Jon Gill Jim Buckland Roland Croucher Mike Gill J ff Gill Fred Stout INDIANA STUDENT BODY


0110'

DE

,

.1. â&#x20AC;˘

UTE

SENIORS - CLOCKWISE FROM TOP Debbie Foster Dennis Burns Jeff Patton David Porter Fred Smith Albert Friend Vicki Kader Joe Patton Jeff Dawson Debbie Bennett Edward Phillips Mark Smith Pat Durham Jack Peveler Cathy Brown Gary Harris Bill Kidwell Diane Warfield Grace Kirkendall

,


FLORIDA IS A.B.1. COUNTRY W ILLlAM CONNELL Florida District Superintendent A. . 1. Alumni Pr sidellt

FIRST YEAR Rocky Essex Janice Golden Louise Golden Joseph Howell Jeff Jones Mike Richards Christopher Rossetti Gilberto Salinas Jackie Salinas

SECOND Y2AR Tracy Collins Charles McCartney Derek MacLeod Sue Richards L3rry Sims Sonja Thorgerson

THIRD YEAR Lavie Foster Gary HarriS Charles Lehto Gary Stickler Glenda Watson

B'S Christine Gray Debbie Jones Dale S路::>rrells


MICHIGAN STUDENTS TERRY LL JEFF JSZIERSKI KEITI I LEAMA ' JAY STIR EM NN DANIEL TROUSE J N BROWN NORA COOK DE IE ~lLLIAMS DEBORA POSSEHN JOYCE P WERS KAREN BAKER ANCY JEH ZEN

-are a part of A. B. I.

PENNSYLVANIA STUDENTS BRING THE WAYNE SAVIDGE SHARO KLINE ERIC COLWELL BO PYL BETSY PIHO DON BAILEY D 8BIE ZEEK DAN MEITZLER

81-CE TENNIAL STATE TO A. B. I.


Kentuckv "The Bluegrass State"

K REN EMBRY VTCKI SCOTT TA YA GULLETT Dt::L NOA HOLT TAMARA GULLETT KAY GRUBBS TF:RESA HALL JANET C MPTON OA VlD F Al BURN (not pictured)

C ONGRA TULA TrONS TO TERESA


~~t~tsC0~~()~

~tlDro~eD06D&

0

Bill Roos Arthur Hodges Laura Bray Ruth Cupoli Richard P. Lucas Richard L. Lucas

Long Beach San Diego Orange San Diego Westminster Westminster


C ONGRATULATIONS Bro. and Sister Norris!

(( 38 GREAT YEARS" A s Founder and President of A.B.lo

Louisiana District United Pentecostal Church Tabernacle

YOUTH CAMPS '75 IN LOUISIANA June 9th - 20th

CAMP MEETING J at the

E 29th - JULY 5th District Campground

P.O. Box 248 Tioga, La. 71477 Phone (318) 640-9657

640-3051

C G Weeks - District Superintendent J. Roy WeidlJl'r - District Secretary DISTRICT BOARD

The District Board of Louisiana congratulates Bro. and Sis. Norris on their 38th Anniversary as Founder and President of A.B.T. and wishes God's blessings on them and A.B.!. in the years head. We thank you, Bro. Norris, for the great blessing you have been to the Louisiana District and to the entire fellowship. God Bless You!

LOUISIANA DISTRICT UNITED PENTECOSTAL CHURCH


ROCHESTER PENTECOSTAL CHURCH Rochester,Mn. 55901 420 11th Ave. N. E.

Pastor Rev. Dennis Condon

CARPET CITY Discount Carpet

Cel~ter

" BETTER CARPETING AT LOWER PRICES"

. .V3.11 to wall Carpeting Specialists

Open Every Night Till 9100

Dennis Condon 55901

General Manger

Phone 282-1052


MO DA'S RESTAURANT

CENTURY AVENUE TEXACO

1047 Hudson Road

Hillcrest Gold Eagle Wash

t. Paul, Minn.

I terstate 94 and Century Avenue e t Door to Howard Johnson's

Phone: 739-9986 or 739-1509

1645 Whit Bear Avenue St. Paul, Minn sota Phone: 776-3485 Complete Dry Cl aning and L undry Cent r

AMERICA 3 86 Alabama Minneapolis, Minnesota

PROVISION MEAT

CURRELL REALTY, INC. 1296 Hudson Road St. Paul, Minn. 771-8836

BROOKS' SUPERETTE

CO GRA TULA nONS S' laRS!

WOODBURY BARBERS 3000 Hudson Road St. Paul, Minnesota 55119

CENTURY FEED & FARM STORE FIELD AND LAWN FERTILIZER FARM AND LAWN SEEDS

3025 Frontage Road Hours 7:00 A.M. - 11:00 P.M.

LIVESTOCK REMEDIES Phone 739-5044

7 Days per week 3474 Hudson Road Lake Elmo, Minn. 55042


ec• •ec ng Imu ce

I

with Ready Reserve at The Easy Bank

I~('ady Reserve is your own personal ,hccking account hack d by a $100 to 'ii5000 ready (a~1l re erve that allows you to III et enwrg neil', or take acJvantage of bMgains. Vou usr your p rsonal ch ck, so no one know you Me using credit. l3orrowed r serve funds Me paid

back by a predetermined monthly raynwnl (including interest) automatically deducted from your checking account. For full inlorrn,ltioll on Ready Reserve Checking, stol) in or lise this hilndy coupon.

r----------------------------------------, MAil TO: Northwestern N,llional Bank of Saint Paul I I

55 E sl Fifth Street t. Paul, Minnesota 55101 AlIn: Personal Banking Department

I I

Type of ~cc-ount preferred.

D Joint D Si 19lC' D I ,t1re~dy I ,]Ve ~ checking account ~t 'orthwp'!C'rn Saint Paul. D I am interp,!,'d Free Checkin' and would like to know if I qu,llil\ iar Re~dy Re~erve.

:

I I

111

NJme uj

\NII

or hu"bJrJd

Stille'

Ity

Zir A

The Easy Bank... NORTHWESTERN

SA

I I

, I I

PAUL

An AHiliate of Northwest Bancorporntion

No need to even corne in, just send

LIS

this coupon.

CO

~----------------------------------------~


7 "",,., ,

ROY MO

Cars

RM N

2085 EAST CALIF. ST. PAUL, MINN.55I1Q

771- 6bOCf

• Boats • Motors Sno\Nmobi s. ame Brand Tires Service

••• Bank Financing •••


SCOTCHLAND

We Feature the Following

Car Starting Specialize in Tune-up Brake Work

Texaco Batteries Mufflers & Pipes Free Pick-up & Delivery

735-2 63 373 Rut at Hiway 12 (1-94) ST. PAUL,

INESOTA 55119

@

Trust your car to the man who wears the star \.~.J


-.

SON

& \

.,

"'\

.

SHE ET Mf IA l~ W0RKS

120 BUTlER AVE E. WSTP 224 - 5113


u o STERV

I

DA

~ Oars Upholstery

UPHOLSTERING &

REFINISHING

MERLIN 8:: DAL THOMPSON 9976 ORLEANS LN. OSSEO,

MINN.

65369

PHONE

425-4978

We have dependable trucks to move-it-yourself • Chevrolets. Olh..,rs • local or oneway • all SILC'S • h Ill! trucks. pads. tow- .1r<; • nall,nwld r03el service • InsUi arleE'

. . ' -.. r..,,. 11"01.,1

_ _

• - * .....-. ..... ">. w:"")

.&'\L IWOM"

~ I

'"'tw-"

I

~Jl1ilflrr; ~

. -_ ""~. ~ f' - ~-:ni n"" ..n..,. - g. - ~ .::._-::.

·~t KrWw~

To make your reservations

call

636-6900

SKY BLUE WATERS R STAURANT 1716 Hudson Road White Bear exit and I 94 Take out orders

776-9257


ST. PAU and SUBURBAN BUS COMPANY 6349 Stillwater Blvd. North

St. Paul, Minnesota 55119

Charter Bus Service School Bus Service Interstate & Intrastate Authority Modern Equipment For Every Size Group & Occasion Courteous & Experienced Drivers

Phone: (612) 777-2310 (612) 777-2319

Mr. Don Regan and Mr. Hugh Salisbury

CONGRATULA nONS TO THE CLASS OF 1975

Specialists In Transportation Of Students And Chartered Groups


WHITE BEAR

We Feature the Following Car starting Specialize in Tune-up Brake Work

Texaco Batteries Mufflers & Pipes

735-0011 358 White Bear Ave.

ST. PAUL, MINNESOTA 55119

@

Trust your car to the man who wears the star \.~)


NATIONAL CAR RENTAL SYSTEM. INC. i'v'PL5.

SoT. PAIJL INTeRNATIONAL

1

'路onT/S-. D"l:!. '路lINN. ~5111

Congratulations and continued success to all the graduates of the Apostolic Bible Institute. I especially want to thank the following seniors for the excellent example they have set while an employee of National Car Rental Inc.

Joe Hutchison, Kevin Olsen, Leonard Hodges

It has been a genuine pleasure knowing and working with you and if we can

be of any assistance in the future, please call on us.

Sincerely,

Thomas Moore City Manager Twin Cities


PAUL LARSON ---CONSTRUCTION CO. - - -

Compliments of FRUIT DISTRIBUTORS INC.

1535 COMO AVENUE ST. PAUL 13, MINNESOTA

SuB,645-8601

P

UL LARSON

R~5'

645-2001

293 Commercial street st. Paul, Minnesota 55106 Phone: 222-4411

CONGRATULATIONS TO GRADUATING

~odeI SUN RAY CLEANERS Coin-Op. Laundry Coin-Op. Dry Cleaning Professional Dry Cleaning 2209 I-judson Rd. Sr. Paul, Minn. 55119 Ph. 735-3535

RAMADKINN

SENIORS

DONALD E. LUNDEEN Regional Secretary 1632 NA1CHEZ AVE. SO S1 LOUIS PARK. I J 554 6 Ale 612 77 1<14'1

SINCE

1900

MINIST"ERS LIFE and casualty union

MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA 55416

Banquet Rooms Surf Club

154 Large Rooms Restaurant and Coffee Shop . 1870 Old Hudson Rd. We Smile More Phone 735-2330


Olds

ITS A GOOD FEELING TO HAVE AN OLDS AROUND YOU

~,~

LINDAHL OLDS 1900 WEST 78th STREET MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA 55423


W~Sizzlin,

Sf AX lOUSE

Loyd Sims, Inc. 10 S. NEW WARRINGTON ROAD PENSACOLA·456-9977

1405 W HIGHWAY 98 PANAMA CITY. 785-3011

10 SEAL PARKWAY NW. FORT WALTON. 243-8512

5331 N. PALAFOX PENSACOU-\ • 433-8200

Try our broiled sirloin steaks - $1. 59

MR. AND MRS. LOYD SIMS - OWNERS


YPEWR E S "BUY WHER.E YOU GET SER.VICE"

ST PAUL TYPEWRITER EXCHANGE

82

=0;;

SINe I 1902

486 North Robert St. St. Paul, Minnesota 55105 Phone 222-1716

SALES AND SERVICE FOR TYPEWRITERS AND CALCULA TING MACHINES RETAILERS OF REX ROTARY MIMEOGRAPH MlCHINES

ALL SUPPLIES FOR MIMEO

WAGERS ST.PAUL TYPEWRITER EXCHANGE

INCORPORATED


AUTO

For All Your Insurance Needs

LIFE

HOMEOWNERS

COMMERCIAL

RENTERS INS.

BOAT OFFICE 739-1891 Call Ceo. McDonald I lome 739-9710

Call Thomas cGuire Horne 488-3546

UAfl IAIl.

Grand Ave. Ford A

INSUAANCI

TIMOTHY P. DYRHAUG, Agent Auto路 Life路 Health路 Home and Business

<1>

Headquarters for Ford sales, service and parts. AUTO, LIFE, HEALTH, FIRE INSURANCE I -TOWN CONVENIENCE FRlIiNDLY, HELPFUL SALES PEOPLE

EXPERT SERVICE EASY TO DO BUSINESS

ALL YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT INSURANCE!

Grand Ave. Ford 850 Grand Ave. St. Paul, Minn. Ph. 225-7813 ; 225-2467

617 So. Cleveland Avenue St. Paul, Minnesota

55116

Phone: 690-1711


GREETINGS FROM:

MAPLEWOOD STANDARD

Jim's Shel

135 North Century Ave. st Paul, Minnesota

I

ervlce

246 South Snelling St. Pau , Minnesota

EXPERT

HAIR STYLING 4 BARBEllS PERSONALIZED -SERVICE· APPOINTMENU OR WAlK INS

Sunray Shopping Center

FEATURIIiG

II(

For All Your Automotive Needs, call: 699-7271

::;::::========::;:;:;=:E;::~:3

PRO 0 UCr,T::;:S

Dan Weisbrod - Mechanic Specialist

~~

PHONE 735-5330

OPEN WED.• THURS. - FRIDAYS TILL 9 P. M.

''WILD'' Bill

2720 Stillwater 739-9055

K1

l'

\V

SUPER MARKETS

Lex. at Co. Rd. B 488-3035

791 Grand 224-5913

1326 Randolph 698-0713

NORTHWESTERN BOOK STORE

No Order Too Large or Too Small

offers you, your family, and your church ...

DIXIE CREAM DONUTS PASTRIES Phone 225-6529 918 University Avenue

BOOKS AND BIBLES GIFTS Religious Pictures For all occasions WEDDINGS Planning Service Invitations Bridal Books, etc.

MUSIC Chorus books Hymnals Cantatas GREETING CARDS All occasions Scripture NAPKINS SUNDAY SCHOOL MATERIALS

CALL OR STOP IN TODAY 34 A Signal Hills Shopping Center West St. Paul Phone: 224-2687

St. Paul, Minnesota

Delivery Service

DINE INN 3160 LOWER AFTON RD. OR FREEWAY 494 AND AFTON EXIT. TAKE OUT ORDERS

OPEN DAILY


MILLWORK INSULATION PAINTS BUILDERS HDWE ROOFING MASON SUPPLIES LUMBER

ONE STOP

U LDI G CENTER We Deliver High

Quality Building Materials

45 路6474

/lOver 50 Years

Hwy 56 Inver Grove H!lls Two Miles

Service"

ANCHOR

Soulll Of South St Paul

N. Me.KNIGHT RD. & E HWY. 36

BLOCK

Dorothy An Sun Ray Bakery 2187 Hudson Road St. Paul, Minnesota 55119 Phone: 735-4811

co.

COUNTRY CLEANERS For all your laundry needs DRAPERIES

PILLOWS CLOTHING

CARPETING

FURNITURE Ph. 735-8269 423 Woodlane St. Paul, Minnesota 55119


UNITED ELECTRIC CORP. 1011 WASHINGTON AVE. SO. MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 55415 333-1111

c/o MR. G. BLAIR

CONGRATULATIONS TO GRADUATING SENIORS FROM UNITED ELECTRIC CORPORATION

ELECTRIC DISTRIBUTORS SINCE 1915 MINNEAPOLIS - ST. PAUL - ROCHESTER - AURORA

THE WORLD'S FINEST ENGINE LUBRICANTS

THE international

HOUSE of PANCAKES For go!>/diesel engines

2

cyefe "ngine!>, diflerenfia/s

transmissions [, hydraulics

Sun Ray Shopping Center

The Favorite ((After" Meeting Place for Faculty, Students, and Friends

AGNES ZASTROW 791 Raymond Ave. St. Paul, Minn. 55114 612-646-2701

of A.B.!. -

O•• lership, Avoiloble -


EMMA NORTON RESIDENCE 670 North Robert St. st. Paul, Minnesota The Emma Global

orton Residence, sponsored by the Board of

inistries,

nited Methodist Church, is a home for

young women ( 17 to 30 ) of all races and faiths who are working or attending school in th St. Paul area.

Jim S ith, ABI student Assistant Cook

Judy Elliott, Pam Yates AB1 graduates living at residence

S MMIT M NOR CONVALESC' T &

IURSI G H

E

80 Western Ave. No. Complete Professional Care 24-hr. Professional ursing Home I hysic 1 & Occupational Therapy Beauty & Barber Shop Color T.V. Air Conditioning Ph. 227-8988

(t

A PLACE LIKE HOME "

fo tlw 1974 CRADUA TES

cAde4elU FOOD SER VICE SPECIA.LISTS fry)" RESTACRANTS & INSTITUTIONS ~,,~~!!1neapOnS

1-94 and White Bear Ave. st. Paul, Minn.


CE TURY AVENUE DAIRY QUEE Inside seatings for sixty-four

Take out OrdersCall 739-7143

Dairy Queen Brazier 819 N, Century Ave. st, Paul, Minnesota 55119

. Dairll

m

Queen

Open all year long from 11:00 A.M. to 11:00 P.M,

brazier

All the old familiar Dairy Queen treats plus the all new Brazier Menu


CONGRATULATIONS

to the GRADUATES!

gourlllet food8, ;rre. 1020 RA YMOND AVENUE ST. PAUL, MINNESOTA 55114 PHONE 646-7817

SEEFERT'S NURSERY

APARTMENT LAUNDRY LEASERS Distributors of

C

MPLFTE LINE OF N RSERY STOCK

3622 HUDSON ROAD ST. PA L, MINt ESOTA

Sr\

•E. and Commercial equipment

ES, LEAS!.:::. AND SERVICE

:251 L. 5th ST.

55119

St. Paul, Minn. 55101

Phone 739-6310 Ph. 227-6331

Panama Drapery Shoppe COMPLETE HOME FUR1':ISHINGS

Owners: Mr. & Mrs. G.D. Robbins DRAPERIES - HOME FURNISHINGS - GIFTS 1209 Harrison Avenue Panama City, Florida Phone: 763-1491


Complete Graphic Art Services from • LAYOUT AND DESIGN CRAFTSMA

• PRINTING • BINDING

PRESS

Minneapolis, Minn.

DATA TYPE Minneapolis, Minn.

PHOTO PLATE Minneapolis, Minn.

IGC COpy CENTERS INC. Chicago, III.

MULTIPLE DATA SYSTEMS Minneapolis, Minn.

INTERNATIONAL GRAPHICS 2117 West River Rd. N., Minneapolis, Minn. (612) 529-9507


· MR. S

AI( · America's Favorite fi1MIlYRestaurants

after Churc

...

dine at The Family Place • HONEY-DIP FRIED CHICKEN • SEAFOOD DISHES • SANDWICHES .... r--"'--'='I L)-' • OUR FAMOUS USDA X 1/ / P<, CHOICE STEAKS.

~

~

-)¥\'~~" X"

7

~

OPEN DAILY 11 A. M. TO 9 P. M.

· MR. STEAK·

Robert D. Miller, Manager 287 Ruth street

st. Paul, Minnesota Phone: 735-2800


We That's

why

want

your

business!

we've gone to such lengths to provide the

best possible value for your insurance dollars. Low cost, plus

the kind

of service you buy insurance for in the

first place. Wherever you travel or move there's a State Farm agent nearby (more than 9,000 of them coast-tocoast) to provide for your insurance needs or solve your insurance problems.

Give me a call and I'll be happy

to help you join the family of folks who are getting more for their auto, life and fire insurance dollars. If you're a

good

student, I'll introduce you to possible greater

savings through the State Farm Good Student Discount.

â&#x20AC;˘

â&#x20AC;˘

E lund &

STATE FARM

on Agency

REPRESENTING STATE FARM SINCE 1929 2049 No. Snelling Ave.

INSURANCE

Phone 631-0505


Sa egas. Save . 0 e~, When you Bank-byMail at The First National Bank of Saint Paul, we pay the postage both ways on all personal savings and checking tra nsactions. And to make it easy, we're offering a special "Energy Saver" kit that contains everything you need to open a savings account. Or checking account. Deposit money. Or make a withdrawal. Purchase Investment or Growth Certificates. You can even apply for a loan. All by mail. To f';nt your free "Energy Saver" kit and start Banking-by-Mail call our Skywalk Banking Center 291-5231.

The taD metropOlitan bank. we bank on people.


PEOPLE YOU CAN BANK ON.

"'·'111 EASTERN 3 CllrnPANY

HEIGHTS STATE BANK

2100 WILSON AVENUE. SAINT PAUL, MINNESOTA 55119

Phone 735-5660

• NEW fAWS ' NEW 'mUCKS t.4 E I

'USEDQ\AS 'U5ED'mUQ6 _,,,..1 ·S~V'CE

CITY VIEW MOTEL KITCHENETTES -

·PAm GRANDENDALE PHARMACY

TUB AND SHOWERS

PHONES, AIR CONDITION. COLOR T.V.

Corner of Grand & Dale

HWY. 94 AND 12 5

MIN. EAST OF LOOP

WHITE BEAR Ave:.

EXIT

ST. PAUL, MINN. 55106

Phone 226-3425 Phone: (612) -772 -2561 Owners: Oskar and Mary Potyondy

St Paul, Minnesota 55102


Efficient as it is elegant... _ rugged as it 's rewarding.

35 W & HWY 36

*

~

IN ROSEVILLE

PH. 636-6060

SALES

* PARTS * BODY SHOP * FINANCING & INSURANCE

OPEN••. 9AM - 9PM. Fridays & Saturdays 9AM - 6PM


ANGIE'S

PIZZA

Pizzas Spaghetti -

HOLCOMB-HENRY 536 N. SNELLING

CORNER. OF CHARLES

Burgers Chicken

3058 Upper Afton Road Phone 739-5060 F NI:R.t\L IIOME

!)!Je)I1C

646-2844~ ~

SKY BLUE WA ERS MOTEL

~

I I,

3 1/4 Mi es Cast of Downtown Saint Paul on U.S. Hwy. 12 Phone: 771-551:-\ 171611UD ON ROAD ST. Pf\UL,11t t\ESUTA 55106

TARTAN A&W ROOT BEER 749 Century Avenue St. Paul, Minnesota 55119 739-7333 Op(On

11

am

to

11

pm

7 days a week

If You Don't Know Diamonds .. ,

Know Your Jeweler COMPLIMENTS

ROGERS JEWELERS 423 Wabasha Street St. Paul, Minnesota 55102

OF

lOO AliI! fH.RS r,\CUA'ICF. Btll] 01'1(; "IIN\F."-I'OLl~.

\11"'\' S':;W2 Offlr.f.: 3:\(, .路,RM,

H~:SIIH:'ljn ..

:,.17 '2124

DR. SEYMOUR F ALK, 0.0.

JAMES W. BJORGAN VICE PRESIDENT

CONGRATULATIONS SENIORS!!!!!!!!!! BUSINess &

peRSONA~

INSURANCE:

orll .')0 Til H.IR


RESTAURANT

At SAMBO'S coffee is just a dime a cup!

And you get good family food at family prices!

1484

WHITE

BEAR

AVE.,

ST PAUL,

MINN.

PAGE JEWELERS

Sun Ray Shopping Center next door to Applebaum's

Watch repair and other jewelry Since 1909 needs since 1935 ! Finest Quality

Phone 735-4400

Candies

-

~.,

PEARSON CANDY COMPANY st Paul, Minnesota

COMPLETE BODY,lnd FENDER \'(IORK Expeer Painting - Glass Installed GEO. C. HUBER, Owner

G50 Grand Avenue Saint Paul. Minn. 55105

Residence 484-5589 Office 224路4717


A GALLERY OF AWARD WINNING

PHOTOGRAPHY FROM MEMBER

dove lorson ----photography

1711 ST. MARY'S AVENUE ST, PAUL, MINNESOTA 55113

645-2001


s

UDEN

• Important to us

Town & Country

OUR NUMBER ONE PRIORITY IS YOU

STATE BANK OFNt'WPORT

N wpOrl ,....hnnpso ,7 Mf'nli ,FDIC

~}50:"'5

.r..,d)·,

'

JO Y'S MOTEL

* HOBBIES * CRAFTS * TOYS * GAMES

50 UNITS • ELEVATOR • FREE PARKING

REASONABLE FAMILY RA TES

ON UNIVERSITY

2091 Hudson Road Sun Ray Shopping Center St. Paul, Minnesota

JOE

Ch noweth

Floral

EAST OF STATE CAPITOL 563 Payne Avenue St. Paul, Minn. 55101 Phone: 774-0331 Reservations: Call 227-8801


THE SAINT PAUL HILTON ST. PAUL, MINNESOTA 55101

11 EAST KELLOGG BLVD.

Best Wishes to the Students and Faculty of the Apostolic Bible Insrtute 24 stories 500 Rooms - Most of which overlook the Mississippi Air Conditioned - Free Guest Parking - Five Fine Restaurants Say, " I love you," with flowers.

FLORISTS -and-

GREENHOUSES JOHN A. SCHNEIDER. P,op

1767 OLD HUDSON ROAD (Just Off White Bear Ave.) SAINT PAUL, MINNESOTA 55106

BARR'S FLORAL 494 Snelling Avenue N. st. Paul, Minnesota

MIDWAY AREA Twin City Deliveries 646-7941

FLOWERS FOR ALL OCCASIONS

Flowers Telegraphed


I CHRYSLER I Plymoulfi

URY MOTORS, INC.

740 NORTH

CONCORD

STREET

SOUTH

SAl NT

PAUL,

MINNESOTA 55075

TELEPHONE 451-1313

Tom Bosworth

Red Leonard

AllTl<ORIlED OEAUR

~~ CHRYSLER MOTORS CQRPOAAnON ~


GERBER JEWELERS 385 WABASHA

One Mag ificent Diamond Store

PHONE 222-8585

RENOWNED SINCE 1885 INQUIRE ABOUT OUR SPECIAL STUDENT ACCOUNT PRIVILEGES

NO INTEREST OR CARRYING CHARGES

_ _ _11,

Gerber Jewelers

_ Sixth St.

~

-

___~ I Fifth St.

Fourth St. - - - - - - , Q) , . - - - - - Q)

H

'-'

(/)

~!

I~

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

DIAMONDS WEDDING BANDS RELIGIOUS WEDDING BANDS WATCHES JEWELRY CHARMS


1975 ABI yearbook  

1975 ABI yearbook

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