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PAPER MONEY Today’s newspaper investors are buying cheap and looking for ways to boost revenue beyond print. PAGE

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From the Editor

Andrew Oppmann

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he Spring 2013 issue of APME News might be described as our “Extreme Makeover” edition! In keeping with our mission to deliver ideas and inspiration from the media platforms of our members, I hope you will enjoy reading the firsthand accounts by editors involved in a variety of transformations, including the new print format of The Columbus Dispatch, the retooling of the website

of The Roanoke Times and an innovative digital storytelling approach by the Democrat and Chronicle of Rochester, N.Y. You can also read one editor’s account on Gannett’s digital “turbo charge” efforts. Thanks for the feedback we received on the last issue of APME News. We appreciate your ideas and suggestions.

inside Spring 2013

3 The President’s Corner/Brad Dennison: Happy birthday, NewsTrain

4 Michael Roberts: NewsTrain program chief receives APME President’s Award

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8 New course for Columbus: Size matters for The Dispatch and its readers 9 #GCIturbocharge: Gannett meeting looks to create a vision for 2013 11 Karen Magnuson: It’s mission critical to stay on top of technology trends 14 Carole Tarrant: A website redesign in Roanoke stresses content and feedback 16 See you in Indy: What to do, where to go and how to sign up for APME 2013 17 Great Ideas: APME features a collection of the industry’s best and brightest 21 Back in the game: New newspaper owners are betting against the trends 23 You are covered: AP’s coverage of health care rollout to focus on states 24 The votes are in: 10 memorable moments from the 2012 presidental campaign

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27 High water mark: How two reporters got the story on dangerous levees 28 Member Showcase: Photos of the Month winners are honored 30 Editors in the News: A roundup of promotions, appointments and recognition 34 AP Stylebook Moment: Clearing up the proper use of apostrophes

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ABOUT THE COVER The Columbus Dispatch’s redesign includes a new page size, as well as invigorated sections and other new features. The new approach debuted on Jan. 28.

EDITOR

Andrew Oppmann Adjunct Professor of Journalism Middle Tennessee State University Andrew.Oppmann@mtsu.edu DESIGNER

Steve Massie designmass@yahoo.com

APME News is the quarterly magazine of the Associated Press Media Editors, a professional, non-profit organization founded in 1933 in French Lick, Ind. Its members include senior editors and leaders from news operations in the United States and Canada that are affiliated with The Associated Press, including more than 1,400 newspapers and online sites and about 2,000 broadcast outlets. The group also includes college journalism educators and college student media editors. APME works with AP to support and recognize journalism excellence and the First Amendment. To learn more about APME’s programs and activities, visit apme.com.

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inside n Roberts to receive 2013 President’s Award y Page 4 y n NewsTrain’s Springfield session features a full agenda y Page 5 y

The President’s Corner

Brad Dennison

Michael Roberts: Keeping us on the rails takes more than money

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appy 10th birthday, NewsTrain. After a decade, APME’s now-signature program – the ever-popular, low-cost, traveling journalism workshop – is still on the rails. Or put another way, as one prospective funder rhetorically asked, “What program makes it

shortage of that. From board members to speakers to attendees to funders, when you talk to folks about NewsTrain, you can see the genuine affection they have for the program. Nowhere is it more evident than in a conversastion with NewsTrain Director Michael Roberts. Michael has been 10 years?” involved with the program as a speaker since its inception Indeed. in 2003. In 2011, he took over as director and we’re lucky to NewsTrain has survived 10 APME boards of have him. directors, all of which clearly and consistently He’s jealously protective of NewsTrain’s quality, agreed that the show must go on, then did all that fiercely committed to its evolution even as our was necessary to ensure it did. NewsTrain has surindustry evolves, and his results speak for themvived the massive evolution and expansion of how selves. content is delivered and consumed. And Every NewsTrain sold out in 2012, followed by NewsTrain has survived the worst economy of our glowing reviews from attendees. lifetimes – an economy that forced APME to go to Above all, Michael and the entire APME Board of far more funders to get fewer dollars from each, to Directors are committed to continuing to bring ROBERTS get the same dollars necessary for the survival of affordable, accessible journalism training to the the program. masses in 2013 and beyond. n And keeping NewsTrain chugging along requires serious cash every year. Truthfully, it’s a fund-raising cycle without Dennison is President of GateHouse Media’s Large Daily end. newspaper division and will serve as president of APME But in addition to funding, NewsTrain requires equal through the fall conference, to be held in Indianapolis Oct. parts passion. Fortunately for APME, there has never been a 28-30. First 2013 NewsTrain scheduled Springfield, Ill. April 29-30 $75 including food Register at www.apme.com

2013 NewsTrain funders

2013 individual donors

The Associated Press Ethics & Excellence in Journalism Scripps Howard Foundation Gannett Foundation APME Foundation GateHouse Media Inc. Medicare News Group Athlon Sports The World Company

Dennis Anderson Mark Baldwin Cate Barron J.B. Bittner Bill Church Chris Cobler Michael Days Brad Dennison Laura Sellers-Earl Alan English Kurt Franck Mindy Marques

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Gary Graham Carol Hanner Teri Hayt Bob Heisse Joe Hight Laura Kessel Jack Lail Alan Miller Martin Reynolds Jim Simon Debra Adams-Simmons Carole Tarrant Jan Touney

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briefs

Michael Roberts, NewsTrain program director since 2011 will be the recipient of the 2013 APME President’s Award. “It’s time to say ‘thank you’ in a public way,” said APME President Brad Dennison.

Roberts to receive 2013 APME President’s Award

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ewsTrain Program Director and veteran journalist Michael Roberts will be the recipient of the 2013 Associated Press Media Editors President’s Award. Roberts has been involved with APME’s signature program, NewsTrain, from its inception in 2003. After starting as a featured speaker for the low-cost, national traveling journalism workshop, he became a crowd favorite and remained a staple of the program. Roberts became the program’s director in 2011. “We are indebted to Michael for his service and dedication to NewsTrain,” said APME President Brad Dennison. “He’s passionate about the program and protective of its quality, and we’re fortunate to have him. It’s time to say ‘thank you’ in a public way.” The APME President’s Awards are given out each year at the discretion of the organization’s president, and this recognition comes just as NewsTrain celebrates its 10-year anniversary. Roberts will receive the award at the 80th APME conference, to be held Oct. 28-30 in Indianapolis. Roberts will oversee four NewsTrain workshops in 2013 – the host sites are yet to be named. Sponsors of NewsTrain 2013 include The Associated Press, the APME Foundation, the Ethics & Excellence in Journalism Foundation, the Gannett

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Foundation, the Scripps Howard Foundation, GateHouse Media Inc., Medicare News Group, Athlon Sports, and The World Company. Outside of his work with NewsTrain, Roberts is a newsroom trainer and consultant who works with news organizations in both the United States and Canada. He was deputy managing editor of staff development at The Arizona Republic from 2003 to 2010, where he was responsible for all newsroom training, served as writing coach and edited major projects. Previously, Roberts designed and taught the American Press Institute’s first online seminar for copy editors, and has presented programs for the Poynter Institute, American Press Institute, the Maynard Institute, Freedom Forum and various National Writers Workshops. Before the Republic, Roberts was a senior editor, including 10 years as training editor/writing coach at The Cincinnati Enquirer. He has also held both writing and editing positions at the Midland (Mich.) Daily News and the Detroit Free Press, and worked as an editor at two magazines. He is a graduate of the University of Michigan and holds a master’s degree in training and human resource development from Xavier University in Cincinnati. n

Become a lifetime member of APME For the first time and in recognition of its 80th anniversary in 2013, APME is offering lifetime memberships for a limited time. You can join this elite group of news industry leaders for just $800 — already, four members have made this commitment to APME. Renew your membership for a year or a lifetime by going to www.apme.com

Welcome NewsTrain to your area: Apply for a 2013 host site APME’s popular NewsTrain program is seeking host sites for 2013. Our national traveling workshop is celebrating its 10-year anniversary this year and needs enthusiastic hosts with venues that can hold 100+ attendees. More information and an application can be found at www.apme.com


APME NEWS

NewsTrain’s Springfield session features a full agenda - and Freedom Sings

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he agenda is packed for the first NewsTrain in this 10th anniversary year, to be held April 29Questions: Contact Michael Roberts, NewsTrain Project 30 in Springfield, Ill. Director, mroberts.newstrain@gmail.com. Bob Heisse, But added to the workshop agenda will be a State-Journal Register, bob.heisse@sj-r.com, 217-788-1505. special event free to NewsTrain attendees. After the first day's sessions, all will be invited to a perWORKSHOP AGENDA formance by Freedom Sings, the popular touring show of n Covering Government: Now, more than ever, the most the Freedom Forum that focuses on the First Amendment important thing journalism does is cover government. This through the performance of previously banned or censored especially true for state and local government in an era of music. crumbling infrastructure, political polarization, and scarcer It will be held at the Old State Capitol State Historic Site of resources. This session is an overview on how to sustain Illinois, just two blocks from the NewsTrain venue and strong government coverage AND connect with readers hotel. What better place for a Freedom Sings show and a when journalism itself is in crisis, with dwindling personnel NewsTrain 10th anniversary reception? and financial resources, and a bewildering array of new Ken Paulson of the Freedom Forum’s First multimedia tools. Amendment Center in Nashville will be joined by these Freedom Sings musicians: Lari White n Making the Significant Sexy & Relevant: (from Broadway and the Tom Hanks movie Viewers of Downton Abbey know the most “Cast Away”), Don Henry (Grammy Award-winimportant things in the world are money, ning songwriter, songs recorded by Miranda power, and people. Coverage of government Lambert and Ray Charles, among others), and and politics should be among the most sexy Bill Lloyd of the hit-making country duo Foster and relevant lines of coverage for your paper. and Lloyd. Strong local government coverage goes beyond NewsTrain offers the best training around meetings to focus on money, power and people, PAULSON and it only costs $75 for the two-day workshop and how they interact and impact each other. and food service. Register for NewsTrain Springfield and This session explores how to deliver much more than meetenjoy Freedom Sings free. ing reports, how to show how government works and affects Register at http://www.apme.com/?page=Springfield the community. The result can be fascinating and important The workshop will offer sessions on watchdog journalism, stories that enable a local zoning story to compete with the government coverage, social media skills, working with Kardashians for readers’ interest. data, covering diverse communities, and more. NewsTrain is sponsored by APME and this workshop is n Maximize Your Social Media: So you're a journalist on hosted by the State Journal-Register of Springfield; Rockford social media, but not so sure you're taking the right (Ill.) Register Star, Peoria (Ill.) Journal Star; Quad City Times approach? This session offers tactics and tips to improve (Iowa); Illinois Press Association; The Associated Press and your comfort on social media, establish your brand, encourthe AP editors board in Illinois. Other members of the planage audience engagement, and measure how well your ning committee include the AP editors boards in Indiana social media efforts are working over time. and Wisconsin; Belleville (Ill.) News Democrat, St. Louis Post Dispatch; Indianapolis Star; Chicago Tribune; and the Midn Crowdsourcing: Tap Into the Crowd: How reporters and American Press Institute. editors can use social media as a reporting tool when faced Discount hotel rates are available for workshop particiwith breaking news or enterprise projects. Includes how to pants at the President Abraham Lincoln Hotel. The rate is use social media and onsite tools to locate expert and “real $89 per night. For reservations, call 217 544-8800 or 1-866people” sources, for "crowdsourcing” using advanced 788-1860 and ask for the NewsTrain or APME rate.Come search features on major social media sites, and how to early and enjoy the presidential museum, the Lincoln home, curate social media content to augment your own content. and the capital city in the Land of Lincoln. >> Please see NEWSTRAIN, Page 33

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Alan D. Miller

Charting a new course in

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Size matters: The Dispatch offers its readers a smaller canvas, but adds more content, sections and better story packaging

he day the compact, new broadsheet debuted in Columbus, a few of us arrived in the newsroom extra early. From past experience, we know that when subscribers have something to say about The Columbus Dispatch, they don’t hesitate to call the newsroom, and we expected we might get a lot of calls about its new size. The main newsroom phone rang twice in two hours, and one caller wanted to say how much she liked the new paper. The other – my wife, trying feebly to disguise her voice – said the rain on that Jan. 28 morning had shrunk her newspaper. In short, central Ohioans love their new Dispatch. It’s easier to handle, has more content (yes, we added pages and content), more

sections, and news is packaged better. The new page size is 10.5 inches by 14.5 inches. When folded, it’s the size of an iPad. Unfurled, it’s about the width of your body. That means you won’t smack your neighbors in the face when you read it on an airplane. And the top half of the page won’t flop over into your spouse’s cream-cheesecovered bagel when you’re reading it at breakfast. And despite all of those pluses, you’re probably still wondering: Why would they give up the bigger canvas for one a little wider than a legal pad? The Dispatch is now able to finish the daily press run in a third less time because the TKS presses have been retooled to handle three pages per press drum (aka “three-around”) rather than two. That means extra press capacity, which will be used to print The Cincinnati Enquirer and The Kentucky Enquirer starting in March. The papers will be trucked 100 miles south, and Gannett will shut down its Cincinnati presses. And readers really do like the size. Voluntary subscription starts, which are defined as those having no connection to special subscription deal, are up 142 percent in the first two weeks. And less than 0.01 percent dropped subscriptions specifi>> Please see DISPATCH, next page

The new Dispatch is the size of an iPad when folded in half. It is 10.5 inches by 14.5 inches.

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Brighter section flags and fronts and better labeling are key to The Dispatch's new design approach. >> Continued from previous page

cally because of the new format. We didn’t want to believe it possible, but we saw the love for the new format more than 18 months ago when four focus groups looked over a series of non-descript prototypes of a newspaper that our focus-group leader said might be coming to the Columbus market. The City Paper, as we called it for the test, contained typical content for a metro daily, but it was shorter – fully a third shorter – than The Columbus Dispatch at the time. One by one, each person at the table praised the new format. They loved its easy-to-handle size. They loved that it had the convenience of a tabloid but the sections of a broadsheet. They were smiling. Some said they wished the local newspaper was this size. On the other side of the glass, Dispatch executives were

Dispatch executives used a variety of platforms to tell readers about the changes to their print edition.

vacillating between delight and disbelief. Surely, it couldn’t be this well-received. At the risk of revealing what was really going on, Editor Benjamin J. Marrison jumped out of his seat and took them a mockup of the new Dispatch. They were jubilant. It was as if Bono had walked in. With that response, we refined the prototype. We went into that process armed with three key pieces of information: the page was shrinking by about a third; extensive market research told us what we could improve upon and what we should leave alone; and we knew we had to provide advertisers with new positions to retain some and attract others. We printed the refined Dispatch prototype on a borrowed press and sent it to more than 300 subscribers with a detailed questionnaire, probing their likes and dislikes. The results were as positive as the first focus groups. But they made clear that their love for the new format hinged on content: They would not tolerate a reduction. A research consultant echoed that point by saying the new format would quickly fail if readers even sniffed that they were getting less content for their money. The editorial process began in November 2011 with the appointment of cross-disciplinary teams for every section of the paper. The examination continued for months as we set about creating something that our readers and advertisers would find irresistible. Groups of editors, artists, photographers and reporters worked collaboratively to pick apart The Dispatch, section by section, with the goal of making it better based on market research and our journalistic training and experience. We debated which features should be dropped or added– not necessarily because of the size change, but because it was a good opportunity to question everything we do. About half of the 160-member newsroom was involved in >> Please see DISPATCH, Page 8

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the content analysis and re-imagining of The Dispatch. Our goal: Build a paper that readers would create if we gave them the keyboard and mouse and asked them to start from scratch. At the same time, our art department continued to refine the prototype created for focus groups and the company launched an unprecedented effort to communicate and engage readers. Editor Marrison wrote regular columns explaining what was going on, describing how the changes might affect their newspaper, and what items might be dropped so that new content could be added. The Dispatch production department spent a significant sum to retool the presses and bought new folders. And the marketing department hired top-shelf advertising consultants to help create TV commercials that were the best the company has ever aired. And a lot of money was spent to get the word out: This was something special. The promotion and communication paid huge dividends. We invited 100 readers to attend a preview party, but more than 300 signed up before we stopped taking names. At the parties, top executives sat at every table, listening as the new format was previewed and readers paged through their new newspaper. They said that content is better labeled, making it easier to navigate the thicker paper, that stories are packaged better, and the section headers — Metro, Sports, Life, etc. — are bolder and colorful. Other improvements they noticed: subsections to better organize stories. An example is our Sunday Home & Garden section, in which we present stories about gardening, home repair and real estate in three subsections. Our research shows how valuable this content is, and that both readers and advertisers appreciate that it is package better. Research told us that readers in our market were keenly interested in world and national news. They didn’t view this as commodity news that should be left out in deference to micro-local news. So we added a daily Nation & World section. Readers had been upset with us for folding our Business news into the “A” section. The new format allowed us to create a stand-alone business section. We created a number of new ad positions that advertisers are excited about, and that’s not hype. They really like them and the results they are seeing and hearing. (Focus-group participants repeatedly said “the ads are easier to see.”) We designed ads in modular form so they can work in an L shape around editorial content on the coveted right-hand pages. We offer more color positions for advertisers. We sought to keep left-hand pages open for clean, eye-pleasing

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editorial content. And some of those pages have banner-ad positions built in. We have banner-ad positions on most covers. And we created “destination pages” on page 2 of most sections that include banner-ad positions. Another effort we made in the redesign was to better brand our staff. TV does a fantastic job at that, but newspapers rarely have. We also sought to better brand the content we deliver daily because some of it is being overlooked by readers, according to the data. We’re doing that by labeling stories with overlines such as “Your money,” “Ongoing investigation,” and “Health update.” To see the new Dispatch and a detailed look at the redesigned pages and the philosophy behind them, go online to http://www.dispatch.com/content/topic/dispatch/whole-new-experience.html n Alan D. Miller is managing editor / news at The Columbus Dispatch and a member of the APME board. amiller@dispatch.com @amiller78

Cincinnati Enquirer follows Dispatch in format change

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Enquirer Media, publisher of The Cincinnati Enquirer and The Kentucky Enquirer, changed its print editions to the compact format on March 11. The Enquirer’s print dimensions will mirror that of The Columbus Dispatch. Gannett Co. Inc, owners of Enquirer Media, recently reached an agreement with The Dispatch to print the Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky newspapers. Enquirer Media closed its Cincinnati printing plant after print operations moved to Columbus. In its Feb. 27 announcement, The Enquirer says its new format “will feature a more convenient size, bolder colors and graphics with the same indepth news, unique local features and content produced by its team of 150 journalists.” “The transition to the new Enquirer has been years in the making and incorporates feedback from readers and advertisers throughout Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky,” the announcement read.


APME NEWS

Beryl Love

#GCIturbocharge: Gannett meeting looks to create a vision for 2013

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rom the get-go, it was clear this wasn’t going to be a typical Gannett editors meeting. First, the demographic profile of the attendees at the Dec. 6-7, 2012, meeting was noticeably different. Social media editors – many new to their jobs as a result of recent newsroom reorganizations – took their seats among those of us who remember life before it was fashionable for a journalist to place an “@” in front of his or her name. The second hint: We were not alone. Added to the mix were carefully chosen provocateurs from outside the company. (Gasp! What if some of our corporate secrets leak out?) The stage in the Frank E. Gannett auditorium provided the next glimpse of what was to come. Its signature starkness was replaced by a cozy array of overstuffed couches and pillows. I heard an editor wonder if someone had stolen the set from The View. Finally, this meeting had an official hashtag that at first seemed a bit random: #GCIturbocharge. But people were using it. I remember pausing for a moment to take it all in. “Wow,” I thought. “This actually might be fun.” Realizing that a recession is a terrible thing to waste, the leadership of Gannett’s newspaper division two years ago wisely determined that smaller newsrooms needed to be smarter about how resources are used. Kate Marymont, Gannett’s senior vice president for news, often would remind editors that cranking out a lot of mediocre stories wasn’t going to cut it; we needed to pick our spots and create

Love: ‘Turbo’ sessions were built around concepts, discussions and establishing a sense of urgency.

meaningful, authoritative content on the topics that matter most to the readers in our communities. We rededicated ourselves to watchdog reporting and public service. And we got serious about our digital audience and the notion of platform-perfect content. Anxious editors arrived in McLean wondering if we were on the right track. Marymont opened the meeting with five simple words: “Don’t change course. Change pace.” Suddenly, the #GCIturbocharge hashtag didn’t seem so random. And the collective realization that we were moving forward electrified the room. “Game on! Already inspired by opportunities,” tweeted Kathy Spurlock, the editor of the News-Star in Monroe, La. Editors expecting a step-by-step plan to execute in 2013 quickly realized this meeting would instead be about creating a vision. Sessions were built around concepts, discussions and establishing a sense of urgency. Research conducted by Gannett’s innovation team opened our eyes to the effects of social media on news consumption. Are we on a user’s social roster? Do we understand the power of buzz when it crosses paths with someone’s interests? The takeaway: Our social media efforts need to be turbocharged. Jaime Spencer, an invited provocateur from Magid Media Labs, introduced editors to the newest generation of Americans. Whether you call them the Pluralists (Magid’s attempt at a moniker), Gen Z, the iGen or Gen Tech doesn’t matter. The important thing to know is that their worldview will be shaped by increased fragmentation and the erosion of dominant media brands. Spencer also shared research that shows we’re adapting to new technology at increasingly faster rates. Another engine to turbo charge. “We need >> Please see TURBO, Page 10

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You could feel the optimism seeping into the auditorium. And for a group bruised by the hammer of layoffs, furloughs and paralyzing uncertainty, that was no small achievement.

to have gravitas, bravado and a kickin’ mobile strategy,” tweeted Liz Kelly Nelson, a social media editor at the Desert Sun in Palm Springs, Calif. In a panel discussion called “If I Were an Editor,” Mark Katches from the Center for Investigative Reporting wondered what would happen if we challenged news staffers to come up with one crazy idea a year. Sean Blanda, co-founder of the website Technically Philly, reminded us that even the most sophisticated start-ups would kill for the content, resources and connection to the community we members of the established media too often take for granted. You could feel the optimism seeping into the auditorium. And for a group bruised by the hammer of layoffs, furloughs and paralyzing uncertainty, that was no small achievement. Marymont left editors with a final challenge: Be bold. Be

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courageous. Be quick. She then showed a video that highlighted the amazing journalism produced by the Asbury Park Press as they pushed digital-first reporting, video and social media engagement to new heights during their coverage of Superstorm Sandy. Narrated by editor Hollis Towns, the video received a standing ovation. Veteran Gannett editor Terry Eberle of the News-Press in Fort Myers, Fla., captured the Zen of the moment in his parting #GCIturbocharge tweet. “Just left incredible uplifting 3 days with great people, ideas. And I noticed everyone had a little swagger.” A little swagger can go a long way. n Beryl Love is executive editor of the Reno (Nev.) Gazette-Journal. In a shameless bid to have more followers than his fellow Gannett editors, he’d like you to follow him at @beryllove.

‘Turbocharge’ tweets ... @katemarymont announces #hashtag #gciturbocharge so I am betting this is an editors meeting like no other. #gannett - Nancy Andrews Just learned the hashtag for the Gannett editors meeting: The word “Gannetty” was coined within the first hour. - Amy Bartner

Great stage setup at Gannett editors meeting. - Joel Christopher

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Kate Marymont: Don't change course, change pace. - Cindy McCurry-Ross

It’s not in our DNA to tell our own stories,” said Kate Marymont at #GCIturbocharge. True, but that's changing. - Josh Awtry Game on! Already inspired by opportunities. - Kathy Spurlock

“The message is not that content evolution is over. Content evolution accelerates. - David Plazas

APME NEWS Kate Marymont: Don't change course, change pace.


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Karen Magnuson

It’s mission critical to stay on top of technology trends

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ewspapers are producing a lot more digital content – and at faster rates around the clock – and digital first is no longer a mantra. In newsrooms such as the Democrat and Chronicle, the focus is on Digital best – our best exclusive content on topics that matter most to readers, delivered at the best times on the best platform for the target audience. We know much more about the ways consumers are using mobile phones and tablets, and we plan and package our content to serve evolving needs. We looked at national studies on media consumption behavior and conducted extensive local research, including visiting the homes of readers and non-readers in Rochester, N.Y., to learn about what’s most important to them. We’re building on what we heard by working with advisory groups, conducting online surveys and studying digital traffic.

We learned about many things that prompt people to pick up a newspaper or a digital device – the time of day, where they are, what they want to accomplish and the amount of time they have available. Consumers are adopting technology at an accelerating rate, especially since Santa delivered more tablets this Christmas, so it’s even more critical to stay on top of technology usage trends. A recent study by the Online Publishers Association showed that the majority of tablet owners are on their tablets several times per day, averaging 14 hours per week. However, the tablet is a “lean-back” platform, meaning readers are content to settle in with in-depth content delivered to them – and more often after dinner at night, while watching television. Reader behaviors on tablets are similar to those of newspaper readers, unlike the way people tend to use desktop computers or mobile phones. By studying national and local trends, editors can be more strategic about the type of content, the packaging of the information and the timing of sharing it on specific platforms and social networks. At the Democrat and Chronicle, we developed a content planning chart to guide our efforts. It displays the days of the week, platforms with different colors, and suggested times for “spotlighting” or promoting our journalism. For example, since we know that tablet owners tend to kick back with their tablets after dinner, we offer what we call an evening read – a longer narrative with strong visuals, often including video. We’re hoping this strategy of storytelling will increase frequency between 5 and 11 p.m. on our tablet site. We also offer bonus content through a tablet app developed for one of our niche products, Rochester Magazine. The app is free along with bonus content but readers must pay a subscrip-

Research shows that reader habits with tablets are similar to those of newspaper readers.

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tion to get the monthly magazine. Much of this content focuses on positive news about the topics such as the arts, and food and drink – content that readers might enjoy when they are relaxing at night or on weekends – but we plan on experimenting with edgier stories this year. Mobile users, on the other An example of how the Rochester Information Center plans its digital engagement each day. hand, tend to read in short spurts on the go, especially 3. If your market has a significant minority population, when it comes to breaking news, the weather, sports and be sure to include people of color. According to a report by entertainment. We emphasize entertainment and things to the Pew Internet & American Life Project, blacks and do on the weekends, when there’s less breaking news and English-speaking Latinos are more than likely than the genpeople are away from their computers. We promote our real eral population to access the web by cellular phones. Social estate database on Saturdays, when home seekers are apt to media is the main driver, connecting users instantly with be searching for new places to live. family and friends, with an ongoing sharing of information We’re also closely watching an emerging trend of growing including links to news. smart phone users who are reading in-depth articles on their devices so we don’t exclude longer narrative from our 4. When you have a good handle on local needs and mobile menu. media consumption behaviors, compare your research with Research by the Pew Research Center shows that half of the most recent national trends. We were surprised to learn U.S. adults now connect to the Internet through a smart that tablet users in Rochester tended to go to the Democrat phone, with 61 percent saying they read in-depth articles on and Chronicle first thing in the morning, much like a print their devices. reader would, and identified from national trends as a big “The smart phone audience presents an opportunity for opportunity to increase audience at night. We also spotted newspaper companies to fill frequency gaps, bringing peoan opportunity to grow our audience with social networking ple to their content during hours when they are not at their during the afternoons when we saw that our Rochester desktop, “ says Traci Bauer, vice president for digital strategy experience differed from national studies. and development at the Democrat and Chronicle. Where do you start? 5. Develop a savvy social media strategy for sharing con1. To get the process started, it’s best to focus on the tent and interacting with users. Research from Pew shows needs of the consumer rather than the platform. Try beginthat nine percent of news site traffic comes from social ning with this: What is the job to be done in your market for media sites – up by more than half since 2009 – while the your print readers and digital users? If the answer is providpercentage coming from search engines has dropped two ing local news and information, how do your readers define points to 21 percent. All journalists must be committed to local? What kind of local information do they need or want building relationships through social media for sourcing as most, and how would they like to receive that information? well as general engagement. It’s important to note that while mobile and tablet usage 2. Work with your Marketing Department to find out as is growing rapidly, the desktop site is still the most popular much as possible about local consumer behaviors and platform in our market. Readers are looking for constant interests. Then visit readers and non-readers in their homes news, utility, multimedia and a public forum. We get most to glean clues from their surroundings and media habits. of our desktop traffic during the workday with peak times in In Rochester, we determined from our research that we the morning so we offer morning roundups with quick hits should focus most of our multimedia resources on three on what to expect for the day. On Mondays, we display a content areas – local watchdog journalism, information module titled “In Case You Missed It” with four entry points about local food and drink, and coverage of local innovation from weekend coverage. and entrepreneurship – in addition to covering the news of the day. >> Please see TRENDS, next page

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The print edition remains important, of course, but its strength is reliant on our success to reach the growing number of digital users. We introduced new sections last year, with more coverage of food and drink, and innovation and small business, and we’ll continue to develop new features for print. The newspaper also benefits from the depth of our reporting staff, our deep well of sources and our ability to deliver more sophisticated context and analysis to news developments. Watchdog journalism remains our most important job to be done and we are producing more video, interactive graphics and databases to showcase our investigative work on digital platforms. It’s too early to gauge the impact of our new content pro-

gramming strategy because it was just launched in midDecember. Although we lost page views when we introduced a new paid subscription model last spring, we’ve been growing unique visitors and digital-only subscribers and our goals for 2013 are extremely ambitious. The chart accompanying this article is only the first iteration and we expect some of our assumptions may not pan out. We’ll figure that out quickly and try something else. The research we have today will likely change tomorrow. Our world is shifting and we must shift with it. n Magnuson, a former APME board president, is editor and vice president of the Democrat and Chronicle. Follow her on Twitter at @kmagnuson.

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Carole Tarrant

A web redesign in Roanoke stresses content, feedback

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n February, The Roanoke Times finished a yearlong project redesigning its website, roanoke.com, and installing a new content management system – all with the parallel goals of more deeply engaging readers while serving up news online first. In early 2012, we began this process with a blog, RefreshRT, where we told our readers what we were planning for the site and how we wanted their feedback from the very beginning. Our goal was to make this a transparent process, so the new website wouldn’t arrive on their doorstep with a shocking overnight “thud.” This was a long beta process of asking and incorporating feedback long before we delivered a finished product. The results: n We designed the homepage and top index pages (News, Sports, Living) with a hierarchy that cued readers into the most important stories. n This is critical if you are pushing out ALL of your content online first and need to distinguish between a homi-

cide arrest and brief about a minor street closing. n Launched “Times Square,” a blog that acts as an information concierge for busy readers. We tell them what’s interesting on the site or clue them into what people are talking about in our social media channels. n On our home page, we showcased our popular blogs -25 and counting, written by staffers and freelancers, covering everything from Virginia Tech football and Blue Ridge politics to Zone 7 gardening and Roanoke street fashion. Blogs now account for 17 percent of our traffic and were an awkward, almost hidden add-on in the old site. n We vastly improved our photo display with the design motto of, “Can’t run them large enough.” n We enriched our story pages with related content and graphics so “side door” readers who came in through search might stick around longer. n Carole Tarrant, editor of The Roanoke Times, is a former board member of APME. She can be reached at carole.tarrant@roanoke.com.

The Roanoke Web redesign puts a greater emphasis on larger photo display on key pages.

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APME NEWS

See you in Indy 80th annual APME conference set for Oct. 28-30

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While in Indianapolis ... Courtesy: Indianapolis Convention and Visitors Bureau n A New Art Hotel: The Alexander opened in January with 22,500 square feet of event space, innovative restaurants, and an emphasis on art and design. The Indianapolis Museum of Art is curating 40 works of art totaling $2 million. Plat 99 and Cerulean Restaurant make up the hotel’s unique, local dining options. This hotel is Indy-centric from the artwork featuring Indianapolis legends to the meeting space being named after Indianapolis historic neighborhoods. In fact, the name, The Alexander, derives from the name of our city architect, Alexander Ralston, who not only platted Indianapolis, but Washington D.C. as well. n Indianapolis Cultural Trail: Celebrating its grand opening in May 2013, this $63 million, 8-mile urban bike trail will now connect all six of Indy’s cultural districts. Flanked with incredible public art, the Trail leads visitors and residents to the front door of many of Indy’s greatest restaurants and attractions. In fact, Project for Public Spaces declared this project the “biggest and boldest step by any American city.” n Racing Capital of the World Indianapolis is home to the world’s largest single day sporting, the Indianapolis 500 and the world’s second largest single day sporting event,

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the Brickyard 400. As racing capitol of the world, over 400,000 visitors combined flock to Indianapolis each summer to capture the greatest spectacle in racing. n Tourism development In the past three years, Indy has invested more than $3 billion in new tourism products from an expansion of the Indiana Convention Center to the opening of the world’s largest J.W. Marriott. The forward growth hasn’t stopped there with additional NCAA National Headquarters projects recently completed like the state-of-the-art NCAA National Headquarters meeting space expansion or a new permanent pedestrian and gathering area that makes up a 4-block stretch of Georgia Street. Not to mention, Indy will see over an additional $68 million in new hotel product and renovations in 2013.

J.W. Marriott

oin us for the Associated Press Media Editors 80th annual conference in Indianapolis, Oct. 2830, 2013. Sign up before May 1 for the early bird discount. The event will have two host hotels at two price points in the same complex, including the J.W. Marriott, $169, and the SpringHill Suites, $139. The conference will be held just across the street at the Indiana State History Museum. In addition, the first night's reception and APME Foundation auction will be held at the Indiana Roof Ballroom, and the second night will feature a reception at the NCAA Hall of Champions. APME is offering an early bird registration discount to members through May 1 for $195. After May 1, the registration cost will revert to the standard $250 for members. "Indianapolis is a phenomenal city with easy access, and it's a town built around hosting events," said APME President Brad Dennison. "This will be a very compact conference, but attendees will get the full Indy experience." This year's conference theme, "Content is King," is a nod to the increased focus and premium newspaper companies have placed on content in recent years. Guest speakers will be announced throughout 2013 as they are secured.

Lodging n J.W. Marriott Indianapolis King or Queen $169 per night Special rates available until Sept. 26, 2013 n SpringHill Suites Indianapolis Downtown King w/Sleeper Sofa $139 per night; Queen w/Sleeper Sofa $139 per night Special rates available until Sept. 26, 2013


APME NEWS

2012 APME NASHVILLE CONFERENCE

great ideas T

he Associated Press Media Editors features each year a collection of the best and brightest ideas from around the industry in our Great Ideas book. The 2013 edition, which debuted at the 2012 APME Nashville conference, is available online as a PDF document at APME.com and has sections on Audience Engagement, Enterprise Storytelling, Multimedia, Niche Product/Section/Site, Social Media, Streaming Live/Broadcast, Video and more.

As a special feature of APME News, here’s a sampling of what you can find in the full book. Also remember: If you've launched a great idea, you can submit it now through an easy-to-use form found on APME.com and we'll consider it for our monthly recognition and our annual book. If you have questions, contact David Arkin, executive director of the News & Interactive Division for GateHouse Media at darkin@gatehousemedia.com.

FRINGE FESTIVAL REVIEWS Winnipeg Free Press Winnipeg, Manitoba Julie Carl Deputy editor Julie.Carl@freepress.mb.ca Every year, the paper rushes to review all of the shows in the Fringe Festival. This year, 88 reviews had to be turned around within the first days of the festival. We run the reviews in special pull-out sections. This year, we added mobile access through QR codes we placed on the venues, with the help of Wendy Sawatzky, who is responsible for QR codes and mobiles at festivals. Readers could use the QR codes to access reviews of shows playing that locale, five-star and four-star reviews or readers’ reviews. Hundreds of readers used the new system. READ THE REVIEWS ONLINE

wfp.to/fringe, wfp.to/fringereviews, wfp.to/mobilereviews, wfp.to/5stars, wfp.to/reader4, wfp.to/venue#

MOST INTERESTING PEOPLE The State Journal-Register Springfield, Ill. Bob Heisse Editor bob.heisse@sj-r.com We announced, through a popular column, that we were searching for Springfield’s Most Interesting People and asked for nominations. Within a month about 40 people were nominated. A group of community judges rated the submissions, and we named 14 people. We did a profile of each for a special section and we invited them o a reception at the newspaper. MORE ONLINE

www.sj-r.com/mostinteresting


GREAT IDEAS

RESCUING ROCHESTER’S CHILDREN

IMAGES FROM THE ILLINOIS STATE JOURNAL GLASS PLATE NEGATIVES. 1929-35 The State Journal-Register Springfield, Ill. Rich Saal Photo editor rsaal@sj-r.com Saal spent two years reviewing 1,340 glass plate negatives from the first photographers of the paper. He restored many and put together about three dozen in an outstanding exhibit that went on display in the summer of 2012 at the Lincoln Library. He raised

grant money to create museum quality display panels for the library. He also created a special website with all of the restored photos and giving readers the ability to comment on them and order them for purchase. FIND THE GALLERY

www.springfieldphotographs.com/ FIND THE STORY

www.sj-r.com/features/ x1700672887/Glass-platenegatives-show-citys-past

OURTOWN WEBSITES The Blade Toledo, Ohio Greg Braknis Web editor gbraknis@theblade.com The Blade launched two hyperlocal websites, each focused on two of the most populated suburbs. Each has an assigned reporter who writes hard news and feature stories, as well as a blog. The sites encourage reader-submitted stories and photos, as well as events in a prominently displayed calendar. The sites, patterned after The Blade’s main website, were

Democrat and Chronicle Rochester, N.Y. Dick Moss Director of Local Content/Days rlmoss@democratandchronicle.com Rochester City School District has had a long run of problems typical of a big-city school district: low graduation rate, poor grades, etc. These recurring problems have been the focus of talk but little effective action during a period of many years. We set out on this project to try to effect positive change in a moribund system. While we are only partway through the project, it has resulted in some changes to the district’s tutoring program. FIND IT ONLINE

http://www.democratandchronicle. com/section/rrc started to try to address a need for hyperlocal content and a venue for such advertising. The Sylvania site was launched within months of that community's local weekly newspaper going out of business. Each site provides content that does not appear in the newspaper or on toledoblade. com. The sites are promoted constantly from toledoblade.com as well as from The Blade’s Facebook pages. FIND MORE ONLINE

ourtownperrysburg.com ourtownsylvania.com toledoblade.com


GREAT IDEAS NEWSPAPER PROM DRESSES Detroit Free Press Detroit Nancy Andrews Managing editor for Digital Media nandrews@freepress.com It was a simple idea that used nearly every tool we have: social media such as Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, the print edition, the online edition, interactive voting, video, photos and — probably most important — face-toface engagement with our younger audience. Krista Jahnke and Alexandra Bahou asked our high school audience to make a prom dress out of news-papers. This callout became a mega-assignment for some teens as they put days of work into their dresses. In the end more than 3,200 votes were cast (after teens lobbied for their dresses on Facebook) and a winner was selected. The idea exceeded our fondest expectations. A local expo of interior and fashion design requested our winner to participate and display the dress. It was so successful that we’re already planning for next year — and we’ve attracted interest from a popular shopping mall to participate. VIEW THE GALLERY AND VIDEO:

http://freep.com/promdress/

THE RISING The Citizens’ Voice Wilkes-Barre, Pa. Larry Holeva Managing editor lholeva@citizensvoice.com One month after the Susque-hanna River surged to a record level and devastated communities in Northeastern Pennsylvania, The Citizens’ Voice produced a full-color special section to aid flood victims. Our news and photo staffs teamed to produce a 32-page section that consisted of a moment-by-moment narrative and images of the record flooding. Our advertising staff secured sponsors for each of the 32 pages and proceeds went directly to the Red Cross Flood relief effort. We then joined forces with WNEP-TV, the local ABC affiliate, and other TimesShamrock Newspapers throughout Pennsylvania and raised more than $325,000 for the disaster relief effort. This effort allowed the newspaper to showcase some of its award-winning work for a good cause.

MY FAVORITE WALLEYE The Blade Toledo, Ohio Kurt Franck Executive editor kfranck@theblade.com The Blade invited fans of the Toledo Walleye, Toledo’s AA hockey team, to select their favorite Walleye player for the 2011-2012 season. The two-weeklong “My FavoriteWalleye” poll was cast online at toledoblade.com. Nearly 10,000 votes were cast from across the United States and Canada. Using SurveyGizmo as the poll tool, readers selected their choice from a list of nine players. They also could add a write-in candidate, and we asked them to leave comments about their favorite player for a story we published about the contest. Winner Riley Emmerson was presented with a framed commemorative page by The Blade’s executive editor and sports editor prior to the start of the final home game. FIND MORE ONLINE:

http://tinyurl.com/9nft2hq


GREAT IDEAS

POSTCARDS FROM CANTON, OHIO The Repository Canton, Ohio Don Detore Editor don.detore@cantonrep.com From Clinton to Navarre to Canton, The Repository reporter Gary Brown shared with readers the treasures of these Ohio communities in his postcard series. Brown highlights people, businesses and traditions in the communities surrounding Canton. The postcard series offers a hometown feel to everyday life, whether it’s the homemade root beer at Woody’s drive-in stand in Canton or the conversion of the Roxy Theatre into a community center in Minerva. The postcard segments are great examples of enterprise storytelling. They provide readers a slice of life and an opportunity to explore the surrounding communities.

SECRET PLACES Wisconsin State Journal Madison,Wis. Phil Brinkman City editor pbrinkman@madison.com Summers and holiday weekends can be brutal on story budgets. When the Wisconsin State Journal hits a dry patch, a popular fallback has been “Secret Places,” our occasional series in which we take readers on a virtual tour of a place most would never get to see. Reporters and editors brainstormed the most unlikely places to explore and, surprisingly, were able to gain access in most cases. Thus, we’ve taken readers on a terrifying ride to the top of a 1,310-foot radio tower, along the path your luggage takes after you check in at the airport, and inside a top-secret control room where workers manage the electrical grid that powers the Upper Midwest. Always interesting reads, these simple explanatory stories also lend themselves to dramatic photography and graphics. FIND MORE ONLINE:

http://go.madison.com/secretplaces

PUBLIC AFFAIRS INTERNSHIP PROGRAM The Columbus Dispatch Columbus, Ohio Alan Miller Managing editor amiller@dispatch.com To increase interest in public affairs reporting and providemore experience to young journalists, The Dispatch partnered with Ohio University to create a Statehouse News Bureau programfor college journalists. The program places students with a host news organization in the state capital of Columbus, where they work with editors and other mentors to cover everything from city council meetings to campaign visits by the U.S. president. They also cover courts at all levels, the state legislature and various state, county and local agencies. The students meet with an OU professor, a former Statehouse reporter, several times a month for additional coaching and mentoring. The students also are required to produce a capstone project, which in each case has led them to high-impact stories that land on A1.


APME NEWS

By Ryan Nakashima AP Business Writer

New newspaper owners are betting against trends

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OS ANGELES (AP) — Harkening back to a bygone era, some wealthy investors are rediscovering the benefits of newspaper ownership. Whether they're seeking political influence or trying to preserve a local institution, today’s newspaper investors are buying at rock-bottom prices and looking for ways to boost revenue beyond the printed page. They often have a deep interest in the civic good, and considering recent trends, they tend to be a little eccentric. Among the recent buyers are a couple of billionaires: Famed investor Warren Buffett bought 63 newspapers from Media General for $142 million last summer. Denver-based billionaire Philip Anschutz, head of the energy, sports and real estate conglomerate The Aschutz Co., scooped up The Gazette in Colorado Springs in November for an undisclosed sum. What’s driving the buyers, experts say, is a belief that newsgathering companies can succeed in a world where smartphones, tablet computers, digital advertising and paid subscriptions reign supreme. Investors “are people who have a degree of optimism about the future of the industry,” says Rick Edmonds, a media business analyst with The Poynter Institute, a journalism school in St. Petersburg, Fla. “There are enough relatively promising revenue streams that that's attractive to some people.” It’s no secret that newspapers are struggling. A near decade of falling advertising revenue has rattled these former bedrocks of urban life. Newspapers, once as integral to each morning as toast and coffee, are trying hard to remain relevant. The industry’s year-end figures won’t be available until March, but it's likely that the $22.9 billion in advertising revenue that Google generated in the last six months of 2012 will be larger than the full-year ad revenue of all the nation’s newspapers combined. The newspaper industry’s 2011 ad revenue of $23.9 billion is less than half of what it was in 2005, and there are no signs that the harrowing decline has ended. Many publishers have been forced to respond with layoffs and closures. Others have entered bankruptcy. Even so, a number of well-heeled investors are beginning to see value where others saw only decline. Today’s newspaper barons are swooping in like real estate tycoons at the end of the housing bubble, and buying companies at low, low prices. The buying rationale centers around a few core convic-

tions: For local news, there are few - if any - outlets that deliver the in-depth reporting of newspapers. There are signs that people are willing to pay for coverage of communities they care about. And the worst of the layoffs and debt restructurings have passed. “There’s a belief that newspapers are far from being over,” says John Lynch, chief executive of U-T San Diego, Warren Buffett the rebranded daily that he and local hotel magnate Douglas Manchester bought for $110 million from Platinum Equity in 2011. After the purchase, the duo invested $5 million more in a new TV studio and plopped it right in the middle of the newsroom, expanding the reach of its reporters to the Internet, mobile devices and TV networks. According to Lynch, these changes and others have expanded the realm in which the U-T competes for ads, from a $250 million local print advertising market to one that is $2.5 billion a year. “There’s no reason for a marketer to go anywhere else than the U-T,” Lynch says. He expects profits to rise by about a third this year. Advertising revenue is up - though management won’t disclose by how much - while circulation has risen modestly at The Orange County Register, where new owner Aaron Kushner is on track to add 100 journalists - a 50 percent staffing increase - since buying the paper in the upscale Los Angeles suburban area for an undisclosed sum in July. Kushner has added pages, tripled the number of colors, and introduced daily color cartoons. He’s gone on a hiring spree that ranges from seasoned investigative reporters to a brigade of low-paid interns tasked with covering 200 high school sports games every week. That’s a swath of local coverage not provided anywhere else. By the end of March, the newspaper plans to charge for online access. It’s all part of a strategy to boost quality, give paying customers what they want and stop chasing low-revenue online ads. Kushner’s hope is to reverse a downward spiral caused by having fewer journalists _ something Editor Ken Brusic equates to watering down coffee and charging the same >> Continued on Page 22

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>> Continued from Page 21

“The publishers get a second bite at the apple and the opportunity to correct the original mistake.” Barry Lucas, newspaper analyst

price. Eventually customers will stop coming, he argues. Instead Kushner wants to invest heavily, create a better product in the hope that readers and advertisers come along for the ride. “It’s a question of, ‘How quickly can we grow revenue to surpass costs?’” Kushner says. “When you give your customers more, they return in kind.” Bolstering Kushner’s case for investment - and hiring more journalists - is a study last year by Press+, a technology company that helps newspapers erect systems that encourage online readers to pay for access after reading a set number of free articles each month. It found that newspapers that put more stories online had dramatically better success selling online subscriptions. In Press+’s study, a newspaper with four times as many new stories on their website as another publication of the same size and market characteristics sold 10 times as many online subscriptions. “If you want to sell journalism, you’ve got to do journalism,” says co-founder Steven Brill. Although the study didn’t analyze story content, he says exclusive local stories are what give newspapers an edge. “Our strong suspicion is they have to be stories that you typically can’t get anywhere else.” To be sure, not all new owners are opening up the checkbooks. For certain newspapers, a change in ownership hasn’t reduced the focus on cutting costs. Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway shuttered the News & Messenger in Manassas, Va., shortly after buying it and 62 other newspapers from Media General. Berkshire said the 10,000-circulation daily had trouble maintaining a sense of community and lacked a clear path to profitability. The new owners of the Tampa Tribune, Los Angeles-based Revolution Capital Group, cut pay and offered buyouts for staffers in October shortly after buying the underdog newspaper in the city from Media General for $9.5 million. And a local group of civic-minded investors is locked in labor negotiations after buying The Philadelphia Inquirer, Daily News and Philly.com last year for $55 million, a tenth of what the assets sold for seven years earlier. Threatened with liquidation, the journalists’ union agreed to open up talks on a new contract several months early as the company seeks millions of dollars in concessions. The new owners in Philadelphia, which include parking lot magnate and former New Jersey Nets owner Lewis Katz, are attempting to cut costs while preserving a product for which they hope to charge online subscription fees this year. “If this is all about layoffs, then this will be a failure,” Katz said in April. One of the first items on the new owners’ to-do list is charging for digital access. While the fees aren't all that

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inviting to new readers, making devoted news consumers pay for content reverses the rush to put up free websites years ago. The Register’s Kushner likens the move to closing the back door of a club, which people had been using for a long time to avoid paying the cover charge. Analysts agree. “We’ve got this incredible deployment of smartphones and tablets ... People appear to be much more inclined to pay,” says Barry Lucas, a newspaper company analyst with Gabelli& Co. “The publishers get a second bite at the apple and the opportunity to correct the original mistake.” There is quite a lot of experimenting in the industry, too. The popularity of deals sites like Groupon has inspired copycat services such as those now offered by the U-T. The newspaper is also becoming an email marketer to those who sign up for contests and coupons, expanding the boundaries of what a newspaper business once was. While such steps won’t immediately offset the advertising revenue decline, they offer some hope. n Associated Press writers Elliot Spagat in San Diego, Kathy Matheson in Philadelphia and Josh Funk in Omaha, Neb., contributed to this report.

An excerpt to Warren Buffett's most recent report to Berkshire Hathaway stockholders: “Newspapers continue to reign supreme, however, in the delivery of local news. If you want to know what’s going on in your town – whether the news is about the mayor or taxes or high school football – there is no substitute for a local newspaper that is doing its job. A reader’s eyes may glaze over after they take in a couple of paragraphs about Canadian tariffs or political developments in Pakistan; a story about the reader himself or his neighbors will be read to the end. Wherever there is a pervasive sense of community, a paper that serves the special informational needs of that community will remain indispensable to a significant portion of its residents. “Even a valuable product, however, can self-destruct from a faulty business strategy. And that process has been underway during the past decade at almost all papers of size. Publishers – including Berkshire in Buffalo – have offered their paper free on the Internet while charging meaningful sums for the physical specimen. How could this lead to anything other than a sharp and steady drop in sales of the printed product? Falling circulation, moreover, makes a paper less essential to advertisers. Under these conditions, the “virtuous circle” of the past reverses. “The Wall Street Journal went to a pay model early. But the main exemplar for local newspapers is the Arkansas DemocratGazette, published by Walter Hussman, Jr. Walter also adopted a pay format early, and over the past decade his paper has retained its circulation far better than any other large paper in the country. Despite Walter’s powerful example, it’s only been in the last year or so that other papers, including Berkshire’s, have explored pay arrangements. Whatever works best – and the answer is not yet clear – will be copied widely.”


In this March 23, 2010, photo, President Barack Obama signs the Affordable Care Act in the East Room of the White House in Washington.

AP PHOTO/J. SCOTT APPLEWHITE, FILE

APME NEWS

AP coverage of health care rollout to focus on states

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resident Barack Obama’s national health care reform is the biggest addition to the nation’s social safety net since the advent of Medicare nearly 50 years ago. The Affordable Care Act is estimated to cover at least 30 million of the nearly 50 million people now uninsured at a cost of $1.7 trillion from 2013 to 2022 – perhaps more in later decades as greater numbers of people sign up and medical costs keep rising. The Associated Press, which has reporters in all 50 states – a footprint unmatched by any other news organization – will provide comprehensive coverage and support for member news organizations in localizing stories as implementation of the wide-ranging law shifts to the states. Signups for the expanded health care coverage start Oct. 1; the expansion of coverage goes into full effect on Jan. 1, 2014. A package of AP stories were scheduled for Jan. 28-29, and included a primer on buying health care coverage at the state level in insurance markets called exchanges. Other offerings in that package will decipher the terminology spawned by the legislation, answer key consumer questions, and examine the challenge facing the states, which must decide whether to expand the Medicaid safety net health insurance program to cover millions of low-income people left out until now. “Though the Affordable Care Act was devised in Washington, it’s in the states that we’ll find out if it works, so no one else is positioned to give this story the breadth, detail and how-to consumer information that AP will provide its member news organizations and other customers,” said

Kristin Gazlay, AP managing editor for state news, financial news and global training. “As implementation shifts to the states and they try to figure out how to comply with the law, this big story is set up to draw on AP’s unique strengths.” In the forefront of AP’s plans, team leaders have been designated in each region to work with the news editors and reporters in the individual states who are assigned to cover how the Affordable Care Act will go into effect. Sacramento correspondent Tom Verdin, who helped drive AP’s national “Broken Budgets” initiative examining the fiscal crises in the states, will be the overall project leader. Washington-based reporter Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, who’s covered federal health care policy for the past decade, including tracking the passage and implementation of the Affordable Care Act, will continue to cover the rollout and advise reporting efforts in the AP’s state bureaus. Throughout the year, the AP’s text stories, videos and interactives will aim to offer a lifeline for readers as they struggle to grasp the complexities of the act and will place an emphasis on addressing their most pressing question: “What does it mean for me?” “Rarely does a story of this sweep and long-term significance come along,” Gazlay said. “The AP plans to seize the opportunity and dominate coverage of the story in the coming year, so we might also meet the expectations of our member papers and other customers that rely on us for vital state news coverage.” n

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By Douglass K. Daniel Associated Press

10

Mitt Romney

Barack Obama

memorable moments from the 2012 presidential campaign The twists, turns and flubs (in chronological order)

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hen a news story unfolds over the course of a year or more, there are bound to be scores of memorable moments. If there weren’t, then it wouldn’t be news. Amid the twists and turns of Democrat Barack Obama and Republican Mitt Romney’s race for the White House, here are 10 top moments we’re unlikely to forget (in chronological order):

1. Rick Perry’s bid goes ‘oops’: In a televised debate, the Texas governor, expected to offer the strongest challenge to Romney, couldn’t remember the third of three government agencies he’d shut down if elected president. “Oops,” he said. His bid to take the nomination never recovered.

2. ‘Obamacare’ ruled constitutional: The president’s singular achievement hung in the balance. When the Supreme Court ruled in Obama’s favor, the decision dampened a key Republican argument against re-election.

3. The ‘America the Beautiful’ spot: Obama and his allies spent the spring and early summer pouring money

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into TV ads defining Romney. Hard to get out of your head was the one featuring Romney singing off-key. The spot mocked him as a millionaire with foreign bank accounts and whose company had shipped jobs overseas.

4. Obama declares ‘You didn’t build that’: The president got twisted up in his own words while trying to argue that business owners owed some of their success to teachers, government-initiated infrastructure and the like. Romney and his supporters picked those four words to claim that Obama looked down on success and hard work.

5. Romney’s foreign flubs: It was supposed to be his big moment on the world stage. But knocking the Olympics in London and criticizing Palestinian culture in Israel brought Romney the kinds of headlines he didn’t want. Paul Ryan >> Continued on next page


APME NEWS Clint Eastwood brought an empty chair and bizarre banter to the GOP. >> Continued from previous page

6. Romney picks Paul Ryan: Respected in both parties, the Wisconsin congressman added youth, congressional experience and policy chops to the Republican ticket. Most important, his strong standing among conservatives bolstered Romney with a lukewarm GOP base. 7. Clint Eastwood pulls up a chair: A party convention is supposed to be about the nominee’s acceptance speech. Sparking far more next-day chatter was the “Dirty Harry” star’s bizarre banter with an empty chair.

8. Romney and the ‘47 percent’: The Republican candidate’s derisive comments at a private fundraiser about “47 percent” of Americans not paying federal income tax and seeing themselves as “victims” play to Obama’s worst caricature of his opponent. 9. Obama's lackluster debate: The incumbent who had been running a campaign almost free of serious missteps practically fell on his face in the first debate _ and in front of 58 million TV viewers. Romney’s dominant performance re-energized his campaign. In the understatement of the race, Obama remarked, “I had a bad night.” 10. Superstorm Sandy rains on the challenger: One of the most damaging storms to strike the Northeast, Sandy naturally drew attention away from the campaign. Obama took the opportunity to look presidential by dealing with the crisis while Romney could only stand by, at the loss of precious momentum. n

APME

sounding board survey on election coverage Many newsrooms devoted lots of resources to fact-checking during the 2012 election. Editors say those efforts seemed popular with voters, but remain uncertain about whether fact-checking really impacted the behavior of candidates.

By Gary Graham and Jim Simon Many news organizations devoted significant resources to fact-checking candidate’s statements and advertising during the recent election season and generally drew praise from readers for the effort, according to a recent APME survey. Editors were more uncertain about the impacts of fact-checking on the campaigns. When the accuracy of ads and accuracy of political statements were challenged, nearly three-quarters said the candidates didn’t modify claims. And in no cases, did any candidate pull a challenged ad, according to the editors surveyed. Still, even when campaigns ignored the fact-checking, several editors felt that it was a worthwhile service for voters. “While it didn’t seem to affect candidates and their messages, voters noted in interviews that that they were paying attention to factchecking and that it had some affect in their decisions,” said one editor. About 50 editors responded to the

November Sounding Boards survey about coverage of this year’s elections. More than half – nearly 58 percent – said they devoted significant resources to fact checking in their campaign coverage. At some organizations, reporters simply wedged the factchecking into other reporting duties. A few editors said they assigned reporters and, sometimes an editor, to fact-checking nearly full time. Another editor said they partnered a member of their watchdog team with a political reporter to produce fact checks. Most of the respondents, about 62 percent, incorporated the fact checks into their spot news reporting. About 10 percent of those surveyed used a “Truth Needle” or similar gauge that focused on single issues; while 24 percent wrote columns or editorials based on the fact checks. The fact checks didn’t prompt any changes in the behavior of candidates, according to 72 percent of the editors. About 17 percent said candidates modified their claims after inaccuracies were cited, but no one cited any cases of candidates pulling challenged ads. Slightly more than half of those surveyed published some of AP’s fact checks in print or online; 14 percent published nearly all or most of AP’s fact checks. Another 15 percent said they used PoliFact or some other fact-checking product. >> Continued on Page 26

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On Oct. 31, 2012, President Barack Obama is greeted by New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie upon his arrival in Atlantic City, N.J. Obama traveled to the region to take an aerial tour of the damage caused by superstorm Sandy.

AP PHOTO/PABLO MARTINEZ MONSIVAIS, FILE >> Continued from Page 25

In other findings, a third of editors who responded said the intensity of the presidential race was the biggest surprise in their coverage of the election. "As an Ohio newspaper,” wrote one editor,” "we expected to see the candidates and their surrogates, but the number and frequency of visits was beyond our expectations. It started much earlier than in 2004 and continued unabated.” An editor in the South said the intensity of negative campaigning in the presidential race kept his staff busy trying to produce issues-focused coverage. Twelve percent of the editors said the U.S. economy and unemployment dominated their coverage.

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Eighty-four percent of editors said they did not commission any polling this year. Of those who commissioned polling, most said collaborating with other news organizations made the polling possible. More than 60 percent of the newspapers published voter guides in 2012 with 53 percent of them providing both print and online versions. More than a third offered online-only guides while 10 percent produced print sections. One newspaper's online-only section received more than one million page views. During the campaign season, AP’s interactives were used by 12 percent of those surveyed, while 26 percent only used the election night map. n


APME NEWS

Dangerous levees: How two reporters got the story

I

n a memo to AP staff, Managing Editor for State News Kristin Gazlay recounts how one reporter in Traverse City, Mich., and another based in New Orleans used freedom of information law and their own interviewing skills over many weeks to document how 326 levees covering more than 2,000 miles in 37 states need urgent repair. For months, John Flesher and Cain Burdeau examined the condition of the nation’s levees, setting a goal of conducting the first analysis into the state of the system that keeps thousands of communities safe and dry. Flesher, the Traverse City, Mich., correspondent, and Burdeau, a New Orleans newsman, filed a FOIA seeking raw levee inspection data from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, but their request was rejected on national security grounds. Their next avenue was an online inventory the Corps was planning to post to the public, which included the inspection reports. But that database had not yet been fully populated. Undeterred, the two reporters interviewed local levee operators across the country and obtained inspection documents and reports that shed light on problems with the system. Then, when that reporting was nearly complete, the Corps’ website put up enough data to round out the duo’s weeks upon weeks of reporting. The result? An AP Impact story that detailed how hundreds of flood control systems were at risk of failing, endangering people and property in 37 states. The story revealed that 326 levees covering more than 2,000 miles were deemed in urgent need of repair. The most common levee deficiencies: earthen walls weakened by trees and animal burrows, design or construction flaws, and decayed pipes and pumping stations. Houses and other structures also were built on or dangerously close to levees in violation of the Corps’ own rules. The story was accompanied by a video piece shot by Haven Daley and an interactive by Dan Kempton that included a searchable database by state and county, so members could see the condition of levees in their own areas. n

In this May 19, 2011 file photo, a row of flooded farm homes are pictured near Yazoo City, Miss. AP PHOTO/DAVE MARTIN, FILE

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member

showcase

APME recognizes contributions to the AP photo report through the Showcase Photo of the Month Award. The competition is judged by AP and member photo editors. The monthly winners are displayed at the annual conference and a Showcase Photo of the Year Award is presented.

SEPTEMBER AP Photo/ The Post-Standard

Dennis Nett In this Sunday, Sept. 30, 2012 photo, Syracuse police subdue Fatima Darby, 24, at the corner of E. Beard and and Beard Place, in Syracuse, N.Y., after she threw a pot of flaming grease at firefighters responding to a fire in her apartment.

OCTOBER AP Photo/ Evansville Courier & Press

Erin McCracken Hayley Betz, front center, jumps with the rest of her Harrison teammates as they practice their routine at Prime Cheer on October 31, 2012 in Evansville, Ind., in preparation for the state competition. The squad, who as gone to the state meet the last two years, will compete in Indianapolis for a chance at the state title.

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member showcase

NOVEMBER AP Photo/ The Indianapolis Star

Matt Kryger Firefighters work the scene where an explosion has killed two people and damaged more than a dozen homes in the Richmond Hill subdivision on Nov. 10, 2012, in Indianapolis.

DECEMBER AP Photo/ The Journal-Star

Adam Wolffbrandt Emily Dresbach, left, 12, and Kelsey Blum, 11, sled down the hill on Thursday, Dec. 20, 2012 at Holmes Lake in Lincoln, Neb.

JANUARY AP Photo/ York Daily Record

Jason Plotkin Linda Phiel places a Whopper Jr. sandwich from Burger King on the casket to be buried with her father David Kime, Jr. at Prospect Hill Cemetery in York, Pa. on Jan. 26, 2013. Phiel and other mourners went through the drive-through at Burger King and each got the hamburger to honor Kime, Jr. who loved fast food.

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editors in the news

Industry’s promotions, appointments, awards and recognition AP’s Sedensky receives fellowship Matt Sedensky, an award-winning correspondent for the Associated Press whose national beat includes issues of aging, has been named the first recipient of The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research Fellowship on the Economics of Aging and Work. The 12-month residential AP-NORC Fellowship will enable Sedensky to spend the next year in Chicago working with world-class research scientists, economists and others to develop the economic and analytical skills needed to produce research-based enterprise journalism focused on a rapidly aging American workforce. Sedensky, who has been an AP reporter for the past 10 years, was awarded the fellowship after a national competition open to mid-career journalists currently employed by the AP or by any Associated Press Media Editors (APME) news organization. More information about the AP-NORC center and the fellowship can be found at http://bit.ly/12qHeo5.

who has moved to Florida as executive editor of the Herald Tribune in Sarasota. The paper reported that Davis was executive editor of the Lafayette Journal & Courier for the past two years. Before that he was an editor at the Chicago Sun-Times, Baltimore Sun and TV Guide. He also wrote the 2009 book “Street Gang: The Complete History of Sesame Street.”

Pace named Associated Press White House correspondent

Delania Trigg has been named managing editor of the Gainesville (Texas) Daily Register. Jim Perry, publisher of the newspaper, said the change was effective Feb. 16. Trigg has been the assistant editor at the Register since 2010 and has also served as the Living section editor writing feature and news stories for the newspaper. “I am pleased to have Delania heading up the coverage of our local news and events. She is very talented editor, focused and motivated to provide our readers with the very best local news product possible. She has many contacts throughout Cooke County and is familiar with what our readers want. This is definitely a win-win for our newspaper and the community,” Perry said

Julie Pace, who covered Barack Obama’s 2008 presidential campaign and has reported on his presidency ever since, has been appointed head of The Associated Press’ staff at the White House. The promotion to White House correspondent, effective immediately, was announced by Sally Buzbee, AP’s bureau chief in Washington. Pace succeeds Ben Feller, who is moving to New York after 10 years with AP, six of them at the White House and the last two as correspondent. Pace, 30, joined AP’s video operations in Washington in Julie Pace 2007 and a year later moved over to the campaign as a video and print reporter. She is a 2004 graduate of Northwestern University's Medill School of Journalism. She worked at e.tv, a South African television station, and as a freelancer in South Africa and Zambia in 2003 and 2004. From 2005 to 2007, she worked as a reporter at The Tampa (Fla.) Tribune.

Davis to lead Statesman newsroom

AP names Schneider as Michigan editor

Michael Davis, an editor from Indiana, has been named to lead the newsroom at the Salem (Ore.) Statesman Journal. Publisher Steve Silberman said Davis would be executive editor of Statesman Journal Media, succeeding Bill Church,

Roger Schneider, a veteran editor in Wisconsin who has led The Associated Press’ news operations there for the past seven years, is moving across Lake Michigan to become the cooperative’s news editor in Michigan.

Trigg named M.E. in Gainesville

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APME NEWS

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The appointment was announced by David Scott, the AP’s regional editor for the central U.S. In Wisconsin, Schneider has directed the AP’s coverage of news as varied as Gov. Scott Walker’s push to curb the union rights of state workers to this past summer's deadly shooting at a Sikh temple in suburban Milwaukee. Schneider is a 1979 graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, where he earned a bachelor of science degree in journalism and political science. He worked as an editor at Beloit Daily News and the Green Bay PressGazette in Wisconsin, and the Asbury Park Press in New Jersey, before joining the AP as Wisconsin News Editor in 2005. Schneider, 55, will be based in Detroit and begin work as Michigan News Editor on Feb. 1.

Nebraska editor adds publisher title The editor in Columbus, Neb., has added publisher to his title. James Dean has become editor and publisher of The Columbus Telegram. His promotion was announced by Julie Bechtel, who is regional publisher for Lee Enterprises. Lee is based in Davenport, Iowa. Dean also will be responsible for two nearby Lee properties, the David City Banner-Press and Schuyler Sun. Dean took over as interim publisher in Columbus after Publisher Bill Vobejda left last summer to become a vice president for Fremont Area Medical Center. Bechtel says the accomplishments of Dean’s team in the past four months “have earned this opportunity for him.” Dean is a native of Wood River and a University of Nebraska-Lincoln graduate. He joined the newspaper in April 2005. The Telegram's daily circulation is around 8,000.

Simon named editor of The Daily Record David B. Simon, a journalist who has worked for several Maryland newspapers, is the new editor of The Daily Record in Baltimore. Publisher Suzanne E. Fischer-Huettner announced the appointment. Simon succeeds Tom Linthicum, who retired last month as vice president and executive editor. The 36-year-old Simon begins his duties Jan. 14. He was a senior writer in medicine and biological sciences for the fund-raising arm of the University of Chicago. He was formerly managing editor for news and opinion at The Gazette in Gaithersburg. Simon also was assistant city editor at The Frederick News-Post, and worked as assistant city editor for the Carroll County Times in Westminster.

editors in the news The Daily Record, which covers business and legal affairs in Maryland, is owned by The Dolan Co., based in Minneapolis.

Brown named East Oregonian publisher Kathryn Brown has been appointed publisher of the East Oregonian and the Hermiston Herald. Brown replaces Tom Brown, who is retiring but will remain on the board of directors of the East Oregonian Publishing Co. (now EO Media Group), one of a dwindling number of family-owned newspaper chains in the United States. Kathryn Brown and Tom Brown are not related. The East Oregonian reports that Kathryn Brown is currently the associate publisher of the newspaper, which has been owned by her family for four generations. She had a previous career in nursing and served in the Peace Corps in Africa. General manager Bob Carruth will add the title associate publisher.

Herald-Tribune gets new editor The executive editor of the Statesman Journal in Salem, Ore., has been named executive editor of the Sarasota Herald-Tribune. The Florida newspaper announced on its website recently that 54-year-old Bill Church, who is a member of the APME board, will begin work at the Herald-Tribune on Jan. 24. He replaces Mike Connelly, who left in October to lead the newsroom at The Buffalo (N.Y.) News. Church has more than 20 years of experience with Gannett Co. Inc. and has been the executive editor at the Statesman Journal since June 2006. In 2010, the Statesman Journal was an Associated Press Media Editors Innovator of the Year finalist for its use of social networking in reporting. The Herald-Tribune is owned by the Halifax Media Group.

Fresno names new publisher, president Tom Cullinan has been named president and publisher of The Fresno Bee. The newspaper reports (http://bit.ly/U2Gei6) the McClatchy Company made the announcement. Cullinan had been serving as interim publisher of the paper since November, when former publisher William H. Fleet left. Cullinan is a 28-year employee of the newspaper and has served as its vice president of circulation since 2000. He is a native of Detroit and a second-generation newspaper executive. Sixty-one-year-old Cullinan got his start in the newspaper industry at the Detroit Free Press in 1969, working in the >> Continued Page 32

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>> Continued from Page 31

production department and later in circulation. He joined the Fresno newspaper in 1984 as circulation manager. This year, he led the effort to introduce the Bee’s digital subscription program. The newspaper also recently named a new executive editor, former editorial page editor Jim Boren.

McGrory named Boston Globe editor The Boston Globe has named its deputy managing editor for local news, Brian McGrory, as its new editor. McGrory, 51, succeeds Martin Baron, who became editor of the Washington Post, the Globe said. “Brian has distinguished himself throughout his career,” the Globe’s publisher, Christopher Mayer, said. “He will continue to emphasize the accountability reporting that has been the Globe’s trademark, combined with narrative storytelling that gives readers a strong sense of our unique community.” McGrory oversaw an investigation of Brian McGrory

state government that led to resignations and indictments of officials including a former House speaker convicted of corruption charges last year. He said his goal is “to inject even more urgency” into the newspaper.

Boren accepts new role at Fresno Bee The executive editor of the Fresno (Calif.) Bee, Betsy Lumbye, is retiring and will be replaced by Jim Boren, the newspaper’s editorial page editor. The Bee reported that the changes were announced. Lumbye, 57, joined the newspaper in 1997 as the assistant managing editor and became managing editor the following year. She took over the reins as executive editor in 2006, seeing the newspaper through turbulent times that included staffing cuts during the economic downturn. Boren, 63, said he will maintain the Bee’s coverage of local news across the San Joaquin Valley and will continue to transform the newspaper into a 24-hour-a-day, seven-daya-week online source of breaking news. Boren has previously served as the newspaper’s political reporter. n

Join us for the first NewsTrain in this 10th anniversary year, to be held April 29-30 in Springfield, Ill. Along with an exciting workshop agenda will be a special event free to NewsTrain attendees. After the first day's sessions, all will be invited to a performance by Freedom Sings, the popular touring show of the Freedom Forum. It will be held at the Old State Capitol State Historic Site of Illinois, just two blocks from the NewsTrain venue and hotel. What better place for a Freedom Sings show and a NewsTrain 10th anniversary reception? For more information, contact Michael Roberts, NewsTrain Project Director, mroberts.newstrain@gmail.com.

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n The Data Mindset: How to see data and treat it as a source to be interviewed, like people. When to create data, to adapt someone else’s or to analyze existing public data. Tips to make data the inspiration and foundation of great news and enterprise stories. n Revealing Government With Data: Data and documents help reporters covering local government shift the balance of power. How? Consider: Data and documents enable a reporter to test government's claims and contest its priorities; reshape the focus of an issue with a paragraph of key statistical background; and provide facts that stand outside local debates and allow comparisons to the broader world. Good use of data also shows readers the reporter can think and act independently and will do so on their behalf. This session explains how to grow a data-and-document mindset in government coverage. Included is a starter kit: five story clusters every local newsroom can use. Each cluster will include sources for data and documents on that topic; samples; schedules; and story examples. n Uncovering Diversity: How to improve coverage of diverse segments of your community. Combining traditional reporting and research approaches, with new digital tools, can significantly expand the lens through which your newsroom views and covers your community. n Enterprise off a Beat: A program aimed at reporters and editors on how to spot and develop enterprise stories off a busy beat. This session offers different ways to measure the accountability of public and private institutions, and a variety of story forms that can be used to quickly develop a series of short to mid-range enterprise pieces. The goal is to build a sustained body of enterprise coverage while juggling the many demands of beat work. n Getting Things Done: At all levels of the newsroom, reduced resources, new technology, and changing expectations have made getting everything done harder than ever. This session offers a variety of tactics – for managers and staff – that can help reduce wasted effort, set priorities, and improve communication and use of resources to achieve better results.

WORKSHOP SPEAKERS n Evelyn Hsu is senior director of programs and operations for the Robert C. Maynard Institute for Journalism Education. She began her journalism career at the San Francisco Chronicle, where she was a city hall reporter and a member of the investigative team. She spent eight years at

The Washington Post as a metropolitan reporter covering politics and government and as an assistant editor for the paper's weeklies. From the Post, she joined the American Press Institute as an associate director responsible for designing and leading seminars on editing, management and writing. Evelyn is a past national president of the Asian American Journalists Association and was a key organizer of the first UNITY conference. n Mandy Jenkins is Digital Projects Editor with Digital First Media. Her duties involve work with papers on special projects, digital strategy and breaking news strategies. She conducts training on digital media around the country and was recently elected as a board member of the Online News Association. Mandy also writes the Zombie Journalism blog on digital media. n Jack Lessenberry is interim head of the journalism faculty at Wayne State University, Detroit, and Michigan Radio WUOM-FM’s senior political analyst, providing daily interviews and commentary on important Michigan issues. He also hosts the weekly public television show, “Deadline Now,” on WGTE-TV, Toledo. He is a contributing editor and columnist for the Metro Times (Detroit), the Traverse-City Record Eagle, Dome Magazine, and the Toledo Blade, and serves as The Blade’s writing coach and ombudsman. n Paul Overberg is a database editor at USA TODAY and a member of its data team. He helps to shape its demographic trend coverage, but also analyzes data on subjects from war casualties to highway traffic. He also helps to produce data maps, graphics and interactive applications. He had earlier been a science and environmental reporter and editor at Gannett News Service in Washington and a reporter and editor at The Courier-News in Bridgewater, N.J. n Michael Roberts is a newsroom trainer and consultant and Project Director for NewsTrain. Previously, Michael was Deputy Managing Editor Staff Development at The Arizona Republic (2003-2010), responsible for all newsroom training, served as writing coach, and edited major projects. Outside his own newsrooms, Roberts helped create and launch NewsTrain, designed and taught the American Press Institute’s first online seminar for copy editors, and has presented programs for the Poynter Institute, American Press Institute, the Maynard Institute, Freedom Forum, and various National Writers Workshops. Michael has also worked as a writer and editor at the Midland (MI) Daily News, the Detroit Free Press, and as a senior editor at two magazines. He is a graduate of the University of Michigan and holds a masters degree from Xavier University, Cincinnati. n

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By David Minthorn

AP Stylebook Moment Industry’s promotions, appointments, awards and recognition

A

member asked why AP uses “boys soccer and girls soccer” - no apostrophes for the descriptive forms - but “men’s soccer and women’s soccer” - spelled with apostrophes - for the adult sports? The explanation comes from the DESCRIPTIVE PHRASES section of the AP Stylebook’s “possessives” entry. The ’s is required when a term involves a plural word that doesn’t end in s, such as children’s hospital or people’s republic. By that guidance, both men (the plural of man) and women (the plural of woman) get apostrophe s in sports and other descriptive references. But plural descriptives for boy and girl are formed by adding s without apostrophe - boys soccer, girls soccer.

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Other examples: men’s golf, women’s tennis, boys basketball and girls gymnastics. Along the same lines, the Stylebook says don’t add an apostrophe to a word ending in s when it is used primarily in a descriptive sense: citizens band radio, a Cincinnati Reds infielder, a teachers college, a Teamsters request, a writers guide. Memory Aid: The apostrophe usually isn't used if “for” or “by” rather than “of” would be appropriate in the longer form: a radio band for citizens, a college for teachers, a guide for writers, a request by the Teamsters. The ’s is required, however, when a term involves a plural word that does not end in s: Young Men’s Christian Association. n


APME NEWS

2013

APME BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Officers

Directors

n President: Brad Dennison, GateHouse Media, Fairport, N.Y. n Vice President: Debra Adams Simmons, The Plain Dealer, Cleveland n Secretary: Teri Hayt, The (Canton, Ohio) Repository n Journalism Studies Chair: Alan D. Miller, The Columbus (Ohio) Dispatch n Treasurer: Jan Touney, Quad City Times, Davenport, Iowa

(Terms expiring in 2013) n J.B. Bittner n Carol L. Hanner, Winston-Salem (N.C.) Journal n Jack Lail, Knoxville (Tenn.) News Sentinel n Jan Touney, Quad City Times, Davenport, Iowa

Executive Committee (officers above plus) n Past President: Bob Heisse, State Journal-Register, Springfield, Ill. n AP Senior Vice President/Executive Editor: Kathleen Carroll, New York n AP Vice President/Senior Managing Editor: Mike Oreskes, New York n Conference Program: Mark Baldwin, Rockford (Ill.) Register Star and Bill Church, Sarasota (Fla.) HeraldTribune

Our communications vehicles n apme.com Officers n http://www.facebook.com/APMEnews n https://twitter.com/APME n http://apmeblog.blogspot.com/ n http://www.facebook.com/NewsTrain n https://twitter.com/NewsTrain and, APME Update: n http://www.apme.com/?page=Newsletters

(Terms expiring in 2014) n Bill Church, Sarasota (Fla.) Herald-Tribune n Michael Days, Philadelphia Daily News n Alan English, The Log Cabin Democrat, Conway, Ark. n Kurt Franck, The Blade, Toledo, Ohio n Gary Graham, The Spokesman-Review, Spokane, Wash. n Joe Hight, The Oklahoman, Oklahoma City n Laura Kessel, The News-Herald, Whilloughby, Ohio n Eric Ludgood, WGCL/CBS, Atlanta News n Aminda Marques Gonzalez, Miami Herald n Martin G. Reynolds, The Oakland Tribune n Monica R. Richardson, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution (Terms expiring in 2015) n Dennis Anderson, Peoria (Ill.) Journal Star n Mark Baldwin, Rockford (Ill.) Register Star n Chris Cobler, Victoria (Texas) Advocate n Angie Muhs, Portland (Maine) Press Herald n Laura Sellers-Earl, East Oregonian Publishing Co., Astoria, Ore. n Jim Simon, The Seattle Times n Elbert Tucker, WBNS-10TV, Columbus, Ohio

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APME News: Spring 2013  

The Spring 2013 issue of the Associated Press Media Editors' APME News might be described as our Extreme Makeover edition! In keeping with o...

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